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Sample records for agaricus bisporus white

  1. Purification and Characterization of β-Glucosidase from Agaricus bisporus (White Button Mushroom).

    PubMed

    Ašić, Adna; Bešić, Larisa; Muhović, Imer; Dogan, Serkan; Turan, Yusuf

    2015-12-01

    β-Glucosidase (β-D-glucoside glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.21) is a catalytic enzyme present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes that selectively catalyzes either the linkage between two glycone residues or between glycone and aryl or alkyl aglycone residue. Growing edible mushrooms in the soil with increased cellulose content can lead to the production of glucose, which is a process dependent on β-glucosidase. In this study, β-glucosidase was isolated from Agaricus bisporus (white button mushroom) using ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, giving 10.12-fold purification. Biochemical properties of the enzyme were investigated and complete characterization was performed. The enzyme is a dimer with two subunits of approximately 46 and 62 kDa. Optimum pH for the enzyme is 4.0, while the optimum temperature is 55 °C. The enzyme was found to be exceptionally thermostable. The most suitable commercial substrate for this enzyme is p-NPGlu with Km and Vmax values of 1.751 mM and 833 U/mg, respectively. Enzyme was inhibited in a competitive manner by both glucose and δ-gluconolactone with IC50 values of 19.185 and 0.39 mM, respectively and Ki values of 9.402 mM and 7.2 µM, respectively. Heavy metal ions that were found to inhibit β-glucosidase activity are I(-), Zn(2+), Fe(3+), Ag(+), and Cu(2+). This is the first study giving complete biochemical characterization of A. bisporus β-glucosidase. PMID:26614504

  2. Agaricus bisporus and related Agaricus species on lignocellulose: production of manganese peroxidase and multicopper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Lankinen, Pauliina; Lundell, Taina

    2013-06-01

    Biotechnological, microbiological, and genetic studies of Agaricus species other than A. bisporus, the white button mushroom, have been limited so far. To expand the knowledge in the genus Agaricus, six novel wild-type isolates of Agaricus spp. were studied on their nutritional demands for enzyme production and mycelial growth. All the selected Agaricus species produced extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase activities in semi-solid rye bran cultures. Moderate MnP activities were measured for A. bisporus, A. bernardii and A. campestris. The highest laccase activities were obtained for A. bisporus and A. campestris. On soy medium, the highest mycelial tyrosinase activity was determined for A. bernardii. For A. bisporus, addition of copper caused no increase in laccase or tyrosinase activities on soy or malt extract media. Hyphal growth rate of the isolates was studied on lignocellulose amended agar plates. Fastest growth was obtained for A. bisporus on wheat bran and birch leaf litter agar. Except for A. bernardii, hyphal growth rates correlated well with MnP and laccase production levels between Agaricus species. Molecular taxonomy of the novel Agaricus spp. positioned them to distinct phylogenetic clusters with species-level identity. In conclusion, our data point to the importance of both MnP and multicopper enzymes in Agaricus spp. while growing on lignocelluloses. PMID:23454218

  3. RAPD discrimination of Agaricus bisporus mushroom cultivars.

    PubMed

    Moore, A J; Challen, M P; Warner, P J; Elliott, T J

    2001-06-01

    Cultivars of the white button mushroom Agaricus bisporus are difficult to differentiate, which has made strain protection problematic for this crop species. We have used RAPDs to discriminate between 26 strains of A. bisporus, 24 of which were commercial cultivars, and to characterise the genetic relatedness of these strains. Using 20 primers, 211 RAPD markers were identified and used in hierarchical cluster, patristic distance and parsimony analyses. All strains could be differentiated using the aggregated primer data. Although no one primer could differentiate all 26 strains, several individual primers yielded unique fingerprints for a variety of strains. The greatest differences (up to 28% variation) were observed in comparisons with or between two wild collections of A. bisporus. Quondam cultivars, commercial brown and off-white varieties proved more variable than the widely grown 'hybrid' types. Of the 15 hybrid varieties analysed, only one differed substantially (20% or more variable). The patristic and parsimony analyses both demonstrated the gross similarity of the hybrids, many of which appear to be essentially derived varieties from two original hybrid cultivars. RAPD analyses can assist mushroom strain identification and could play a role in the protection of novel cultivars. PMID:11525623

  4. Agaricus bisporus genome sequence: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Richard W; Challen, Michael P; Burton, Kerry S

    2013-06-01

    The genomes of two isolates of Agaricus bisporus have been sequenced recently. This soil-inhabiting fungus has a wide geographical distribution in nature and it is also cultivated in an industrialized indoor process ($4.7bn annual worldwide value) to produce edible mushrooms. Previously this lignocellulosic fungus has resisted precise econutritional classification, i.e. into white- or brown-rot decomposers. The generation of the genome sequence and transcriptomic analyses has revealed a new classification, 'humicolous', for species adapted to grow in humic-rich, partially decomposed leaf material. The Agaricus biporus genomes contain a collection of polysaccharide and lignin-degrading genes and more interestingly an expanded number of genes (relative to other lignocellulosic fungi) that enhance degradation of lignin derivatives, i.e. heme-thiolate peroxidases and β-etherases. A motif that is hypothesized to be a promoter element in the humicolous adaptation suite is present in a large number of genes specifically up-regulated when the mycelium is grown on humic-rich substrate. The genome sequence of A. bisporus offers a platform to explore fungal biology in carbon-rich soil environments and terrestrial cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. PMID:23558250

  5. Viral Agents Causing Brown Cap Mushroom Disease of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Daniel; Green, Julian; Grogan, Helen; Burton, Kerry

    2015-10-01

    The symptoms of viral infections of fungi range from cryptic to severe, but there is little knowledge of the factors involved in this transition of fungal/viral interactions. Brown cap mushroom disease of the cultivated Agaricus bisporus is economically important and represents a model system to describe this transition. Differentially expressed transcript fragments between mushrooms showing the symptoms of brown cap mushroom disease and control white noninfected mushrooms have been identified and sequenced. Ten of these RNA fragments have been found to be upregulated over 1,000-fold between diseased and nondiseased tissue but are absent from the Agaricus bisporus genome sequence and hybridize to double-stranded RNAs extracted from diseased tissue. We hypothesize that these transcript fragments are viral and represent components of the disease-causing agent, a bipartite virus with similarities to the family Partitiviridae. The virus fragments were found at two distinct levels within infected mushrooms, at raised levels in infected, nonsymptomatic, white mushrooms and at much greater levels (3,500 to 87,000 times greater) in infected mushrooms exhibiting brown coloration. In addition, differential screening revealed 9 upregulated and 32 downregulated host Agaricus bisporus transcripts. Chromametric analysis was able to distinguish color differences between noninfected white mushrooms and white infected mushrooms at an early stage of mushroom growth. This method may be the basis for an "on-farm" disease detection assay. PMID:26253676

  6. Viral Agents Causing Brown Cap Mushroom Disease of Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Daniel; Green, Julian; Grogan, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of viral infections of fungi range from cryptic to severe, but there is little knowledge of the factors involved in this transition of fungal/viral interactions. Brown cap mushroom disease of the cultivated Agaricus bisporus is economically important and represents a model system to describe this transition. Differentially expressed transcript fragments between mushrooms showing the symptoms of brown cap mushroom disease and control white noninfected mushrooms have been identified and sequenced. Ten of these RNA fragments have been found to be upregulated over 1,000-fold between diseased and nondiseased tissue but are absent from the Agaricus bisporus genome sequence and hybridize to double-stranded RNAs extracted from diseased tissue. We hypothesize that these transcript fragments are viral and represent components of the disease-causing agent, a bipartite virus with similarities to the family Partitiviridae. The virus fragments were found at two distinct levels within infected mushrooms, at raised levels in infected, nonsymptomatic, white mushrooms and at much greater levels (3,500 to 87,000 times greater) in infected mushrooms exhibiting brown coloration. In addition, differential screening revealed 9 upregulated and 32 downregulated host Agaricus bisporus transcripts. Chromametric analysis was able to distinguish color differences between noninfected white mushrooms and white infected mushrooms at an early stage of mushroom growth. This method may be the basis for an “on-farm” disease detection assay. PMID:26253676

  7. Protective Effects of White Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) against Hepatic Steatosis in Ovariectomized Mice as a Model of Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, Noriko; Kubo, Makoto; Liu, Zheng; Chu, Peiguo; Wang, Charles; Chen, Yate-Ching Yuan, Shiuan

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes various hepatic pathologies ranging from hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis and cirrhosis. Estrogen provides a protective effect on the development of NAFLD in women. Therefore, postmenopausal women have a higher risk of developing NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis is an early stage of fatty liver disease. Steatosis can develop to the aggressive stages (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis). Currently, there is no specific drug to prevent/treat these liver diseases. In this study, we found that white button mushroom (WBM), Agaricus Bisporus, has protective effects against liver steatosis in ovariectomized (OVX) mice (a model of postmenopausal women). OVX mice were fed a high fat diet supplemented with WBM powder. We found that dietary WBM intake significantly lowered liver weight and hepatic injury markers in OVX mice. Pathological examination of liver tissue showed less fat accumulation in the livers of mice on WBM diet; moreover, these animals had improved glucose clearance ability. Microarray analysis revealed that genes related to the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, particularly the genes for fatty acid synthetase (Fas) and fatty acid elongase 6 (Elovl6), were down-regulated in the liver of mushroom-fed mice. In vitro mechanistic studies using the HepG2 cell line showed that down-regulation of the expression of FAS and ELOVL6 by WBM extract was through inhibition of Liver X receptor (LXR) signaling and its downstream transcriptional factor SREBP1c. These results suggest that WBM is protective against hepatic steatosis and NAFLD in OVX mice as a model for postmenopausal women. PMID:22046322

  8. Development of algorithms for detection of mechanical injury on white mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowen, A. A.; O'Donnell, C. P.

    2009-05-01

    White mushrooms were subjected to mechanical injury by controlled shaking in a plastic box at 400 rpm for different times (0, 60, 120, 300 and 600 s). Immediately after shaking, hyperspectral images were obtained using two pushbroom line-scanning hyperspectral imaging instruments, one operating in the wavelength range of 400 - 1000 nm with spectroscopic resolution of 5 nm, the other operating in the wavelength range of 950 - 1700 nm with spectroscopic resolution of 7 nm. Different spectral and spatial pretreatments were investigated to reduce the effect of sample curvature on hyperspectral data. Algorithms based on Chemometric techniques (Principal Component Analysis and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis) and image processing methods (masking, thresholding, morphological operations) were developed for pixel classification in hyperspectral images. In addition, correlation analysis, spectral angle mapping and scaled difference of sample spectra were investigated and compared with the chemometric approaches.

  9. A detailed analysis of the recombination landscape of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus var. bisporus.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Anton S M; Gao, Wei; Lavrijssen, Brian; Hendrickx, Patrick; Sedaghat-Tellgerd, Narges; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Kong, Won-Sik; Schijlen, Elio G W M; Baars, Johan J P; Visser, Richard G F

    2016-08-01

    The button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) is one of the world's most cultivated mushroom species, but in spite of its economic importance generation of new cultivars by outbreeding is exceptional. Previous genetic analyses of the white bisporus variety, including all cultivars and most wild isolates revealed that crossing over frequencies are low, which might explain the lack of introducing novel traits into existing cultivars. By generating two high quality whole genome sequence assemblies (one de novo and the other by improving the existing reference genome) of the first commercial white hybrid Horst U1, a detailed study of the crossover (CO) landscape was initiated. Using a set of 626 SNPs in a haploid offspring of 139 single spore isolates and whole genome sequencing on a limited number of homo- and heterokaryotic single spore isolates, we precisely mapped all COs showing that they are almost exclusively restricted to regions of about 100kb at the chromosome ends. Most basidia of A. bisporus var. bisporus produce two spores and pair preferentially via non-sister nuclei. Combined with the COs restricted to the chromosome ends, these spores retain most of the heterozygosity of the parent thus explaining how present-day white cultivars are genetically so close to the first hybrid marketed in 1980. To our knowledge this is the first example of an organism which displays such specific CO landscape. PMID:27288752

  10. Effects of UV-C treatment and cold storage on ergosterol and vitamin D2 contents in different parts of white and brown mushroom (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenqiang; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Ruixiang; Shao, Suqin; Zhou, Ting; Lei, Jing; Wang, Zhidong

    2016-11-01

    Effects of ultraviolet-C (UV-C) treatment (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0kJ/m(2)) and cold storage on ergosterol and vitamin D2 content in different parts of white and brown button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) were investigated. UV-C treatment did not significantly affect ergosterol content in the caps and stems of the two mushrooms, but ergosterol content increased significantly during 14days cold storage. Vitamin D2 content in the caps and stems of two mushrooms significantly increased as UV-C dose increased, and 2.0kJ/m(2) UV-C showed the best result. During cold storage, vitamin D2 content in the caps of the two mushrooms decreased from day 1 to day 7, and then kept stable until day 14, but vitamin D2 content in the stems of brown mushrooms kept increasing for the whole 14days period. UV-C could increase vitamin D2 contents in both caps and stems of white and brown mushrooms without significantly affecting ergosterol content. PMID:27211630

  11. Biodegradation of lignin by Agaricus Bisporus

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, C.H.; Abbott, G.D.; Head, I.M.

    1996-12-31

    The lignolytic activity of Agaricus bisporus will be addressed in this paper. Sound and fungally degraded lignins were characterized by Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (Py-GC-MS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FnR) and elemental analysis. Fungally degraded lignins displayed increased wt%N, wt%H and wt%O content and decreased wt%C content The FTIR spectrum of decayed lignin showed an increase in the relative intensity of absorption bands assigned to carbonyl and carboxyl functional groups located on the aliphatic side chain and a decrease in absorption bands assigned to aromatic skeletal vibration modes. Semiquantitative Py-GC-MS revealed an 82% decrease in lignin derived pyrolysis products upon biodegradation. No significant increase in pyrolysis products with an oxygenated aliphatic side chain were detected in the fungally degraded lignin however shortening of the aliphatic side chain via cleavage at the {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} positions was observed.

  12. Combined vacuum impregnation and electron-beam irradiation treatment to extend the storage life of sliced white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Yurttas, Zeynep Sevimli; Moreira, Rosana G; Castell-Perez, Elena

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the application of an antibrowning solution using vacuum impregnation (VI) and then electron-beam irradiation as a means to extend the shelf life of sliced white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus). A preliminary study helped to determine the best antibrowning solution and VI process parameters. Mushroom slices were impregnated with 2 g/100 g ascorbic acid + 1 g/100 g calcium lactate; 2 g/100 g citric acid + 1 g/100 g calcium lactate; 1 g/100 g chitosan + 1 g/100 g calcium lactate; and 1 g/100 g calcium lactate at different vacuum pressures and times and atmospheric restoration times. Selection of the antibrowning solution and VI parameters was based on texture and color of the mushroom slices. Next, the slices were irradiated at 1 kGy using a 1.35-MeV e-beam accelerator. Physicochemical, sensory, and microbial quality of mushrooms was monitored for 15 d at 4 °C. The best impregnation process in this study was 2 g/100 g ascorbic acid and 1 g/100 g calcium lactate at 50 mm Hg for 5 min and an atmospheric restoration time of 5 min. The control (untreated) samples suffered structural losses throughout storage. Only the vacuum impregnated-irradiated samples had acceptable color by the end of storage. Sensory panelists consistently preferred the samples produced with VI and irradiation because exposure to ionizing radiation inhibited growth of spoilage microorganisms. PMID:24266620

  13. Characterization of the key odorants in pan-fried white mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus L.) by means of molecular sensory science: comparison with the raw mushroom tissue.

    PubMed

    Grosshauser, Sonja; Schieberle, Peter

    2013-04-24

    Application of aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) on the volatile fraction isolated from pan-fried white mushrooms ( Agaricus bisporus L.) revealed 40 odor-active compounds in the flavor dilution (FD) factor range of 8-8192, among which the caramel-like smelling 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one showed the highest FD factor of 8192, followed by 2-propionyl-1-pyrroline (popcorn-like) and 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylfuran-2(5H)-one (seasoning-like). A total of 36 compounds are reported for the first time in processed mushrooms, and 25 odorants showing the highest FD factors were then quantitated by stable isotope dilution assays and their odor activity values (OAVs) were calculated as ratio of their concentrations to their odor thresholds. Among them, 3-methylbutanal (malty), 3-(methylthio)propanal (cooked potato), and 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (popcorn-like) showed the highest OAVs (>100) in the pan-fried mushrooms, followed by 1-octen-3-one, 2-propionyl-1-pyrroline, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethylfuran-3(2H)-one, phenylacetaldehyde, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine, and 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethylfuran-2(5H)-one with OAVs >10. An aqueous aroma recombinate containing 13 odorants (OAV > 1) in their actual concentrations in the fried mushrooms showed a good similarity to the original aroma profile. The quantitation of the key odorants in raw mushrooms, identified with high FD factors during the AEDA, revealed that numerous odorants were quantitatively changed by the frying process, but in particular the concentrations of 2-phenylacetaldehyde and 3-methylbutanal were higher by factors of ∼40 and 6, respectively, compared to the amounts in the processed mushrooms. The data suggested an enzymatic formation of both Strecker aldehydes by the cut mushroom tissue. In total, 26 odorants were newly identified in raw mushrooms. PMID:23581517

  14. Formation of interspecies fusants of Agaricus bisporus and Agaricus bitorquis mushroom by protoplast fusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana Inder; Aarti, Kanojiya; Singh, Sandhu Sardul

    2007-12-01

    Interspecies fusants are formed between Agaricus bisporus and Agaricus bitorquis by protoplast fusion technique. Protoplasts were isolated and regenerated by using Novozyme 234 lytic enzyme. Twenty slow growing isolates were separated from the protoplast regenerated colonies, which were assumed as homokaryons (putative homokaryons). These twenty isolates were subjected to growth rate, colony morphology and spawn run studies for screening of true homokaryons. Antifungal markers were developed for selection of fusants. PMID:23100692

  15. Mitochondrial Haplotype Influences Mycelial Growth of Agaricus bisporus Heterokaryons

    PubMed Central

    De La Bastide, P. Y.; Sonnenberg, A.; Van Griensven, L.; Anderson, J. B.; Horgen, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of mitochondrial haplotype on growth of the common button mushroom Agaricus bisporus. Ten pairs of heterokaryon strains, each pair having the same nuclear genome but different mitochondrial genomes, were produced by controlled crosses among a group of homokaryons of both wild and commercial origins. Seven genetically distinct mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes were evaluated in different nuclear backgrounds. The growth of heterokaryon pairs differing only in their mtDNA haplotypes was compared by measuring mycelial radial growth rate on solid complete yeast medium (CYM) and compost extract medium and by measuring mycelial dry weight accumulation in liquid CYM. All A. bisporus strains were incubated at temperatures similar to those utilized in commercial production facilities (18, 22, and 26(deg)C). Statistically significant differences were detected in 8 of the 10 heterokaryon pairs evaluated for one or two of the three growth parameters measured. Some heterokaryon pairs showed differences in a single growth parameter at all three temperatures of incubation, suggesting a temperature-independent difference. Others showed differences at only a single temperature, suggesting a temperature-dependent difference. The influence of some mtDNA haplotypes on growth was dependent on the nuclear genetic background. Our results show that mtDNA haplotype can influence growth of A. bisporus heterokaryons in some nuclear backgrounds. These observations demonstrate the importance of including a number of mitochondrial genotypes and evaluating different nuclear-mitochondrial combinations of A. bisporus in strain improvement programs. PMID:16535683

  16. Carbohydrate utilization and metabolism is highly differentiated in Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Agaricus bisporus is commercially grown on compost, in which the available carbon sources consist mainly of plant-derived polysaccharides that are built out of various different constituent monosaccharides. The major constituent monosaccharides of these polysaccharides are glucose, xylose, and arabinose, while smaller amounts of galactose, glucuronic acid, rhamnose and mannose are also present. Results In this study, genes encoding putative enzymes from carbon metabolism were identified and their expression was studied in different growth stages of A. bisporus. We correlated the expression of genes encoding plant and fungal polysaccharide modifying enzymes identified in the A. bisporus genome to the soluble carbohydrates and the composition of mycelium grown compost, casing layer and fruiting bodies. Conclusions The compost grown vegetative mycelium of A. bisporus consumes a wide variety of monosaccharides. However, in fruiting bodies only hexose catabolism occurs, and no accumulation of other sugars was observed. This suggests that only hexoses or their conversion products are transported from the vegetative mycelium to the fruiting body, while the other sugars likely provide energy for growth and maintenance of the vegetative mycelium. Clear correlations were found between expression of the genes and composition of carbohydrates. Genes encoding plant cell wall polysaccharide degrading enzymes were mainly expressed in compost-grown mycelium, and largely absent in fruiting bodies. In contrast, genes encoding fungal cell wall polysaccharide modifying enzymes were expressed in both fruiting bodies and vegetative mycelium, but different gene sets were expressed in these samples. PMID:24074284

  17. DNA amplification polymorphisms of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Khush, R S; Becker, E; Wach, M

    1992-09-01

    Single 10-bp primers were used to generate random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers from commercial and wild strains of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus via the polymerase chain reaction. Of 20 primers tested, 19 amplified A. bisporus DNA, each producing 5 to 15 scorable markers ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 kbp. RAPD markers identified seven distinct genotypes among eight heterokaryotic strains; two of the commercial strains were shown to be related to each other through single-spore descent. Homokaryons recovered from protoplast regenerants of heterokaryotic strains carried a subset of the RAPD markers found in the heterokaryon, and both of the haploid nuclei from two heterokaryons were distinguishable. RAPD markers also served to verify the creation of a hybrid heterokaryon and to analyze meiotic progeny from this new strain: most of the basidiospores displayed RAPD fingerprints identical to that of the parental heterokaryon, although a few selected slow growers were homoallelic at a number of loci that were heteroallelic in the parent, suggesting that they represented rare homokaryotic basidiospores; crossover events between a RAPD marker locus and its respective centromere appeared to be infrequent. These results demonstrate that RAPD markers provide an efficient alternative for strain fingerprinting and a versatile tool for genetic studies and manipulations of A. bisporus. PMID:1444410

  18. Localization of the Mating Type Gene in Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianping; Kerrigan, Richard W.; Horgen, Paul A.; Anderson, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus is secondarily homothallic. Most basidia produce two basidiospores, each of which receives two of the four postmeiotic nuclei. Usually, the two packaged nuclei carry compatible mating types. Previous studies suggested that there may be only a single mating type locus in A. bisporus. In this study, we determined whether the mating type segregated as a single Mendelian determinant in a cross marked with 64 segregating molecular markers. To score mating types, each of the 52 homokaryotic offspring from this cross was paired with each of the two progenitor homokaryons. Compatible matings were identified by the formation of genetically stable heterokaryons which were verified by assay of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). Data for screening mycelial interactions on petri plates as well as fruit body formation were compared with the RFLP results. Mating types of 43 of the 52 homokaryotic offspring were determined on the basis of RFLP analysis. Our results indicate (i) there is a segregating mating type gene in A. bisporus, (ii) this mating type gene is on the largest linkage group (chromosome I), (iii) mycelial interactions on petri plates were associated with heterokaryon formation under selected conditions, (iv) fruit body formation was dependent upon the mating type gene, and (v) compatible mating types may not always be sufficient for fruiting. PMID:16349046

  19. DNA amplification polymorphisms of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed Central

    Khush, R S; Becker, E; Wach, M

    1992-01-01

    Single 10-bp primers were used to generate random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers from commercial and wild strains of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus via the polymerase chain reaction. Of 20 primers tested, 19 amplified A. bisporus DNA, each producing 5 to 15 scorable markers ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 kbp. RAPD markers identified seven distinct genotypes among eight heterokaryotic strains; two of the commercial strains were shown to be related to each other through single-spore descent. Homokaryons recovered from protoplast regenerants of heterokaryotic strains carried a subset of the RAPD markers found in the heterokaryon, and both of the haploid nuclei from two heterokaryons were distinguishable. RAPD markers also served to verify the creation of a hybrid heterokaryon and to analyze meiotic progeny from this new strain: most of the basidiospores displayed RAPD fingerprints identical to that of the parental heterokaryon, although a few selected slow growers were homoallelic at a number of loci that were heteroallelic in the parent, suggesting that they represented rare homokaryotic basidiospores; crossover events between a RAPD marker locus and its respective centromere appeared to be infrequent. These results demonstrate that RAPD markers provide an efficient alternative for strain fingerprinting and a versatile tool for genetic studies and manipulations of A. bisporus. Images PMID:1444410

  20. A meiotic DNA polymerase from a mushroom, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed Central

    Takami, K; Matsuda, S; Sono, A; Sakaguchi, K

    1994-01-01

    A meiotic DNA polymerase [DNA nucleotidyltransferase (DNA-directed), EC 2.7.7.7], which likely has a role in meiotic DNA repair, was isolated from a mushroom, Agaricus bisporus. The purified fraction displays three bands in SDS/PAGE, at molecular masses of 72 kDa, 65 kDa and 36 kDa. Optimal activity is at pH 7.0-8.0 in the presence of 5 mM Mg2+ and 50 mM KCl and at 28-30 degrees C, which is the temperature for meiosis. This enzyme is resistant to N-ethylmaleimide and sensitive to 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, suggesting that it is a beta-like DNA polymerase. These characteristics are similar to those of Coprinus DNA polymerase beta [Sakaguchi and Lu (1982) Mol. Cell. Biol. 2, 752-757]. In Western-blot analysis, the antiserum against the Coprinus polymerase reacts only with the 65 kDa band, which coincides with the molecular mass of the Coprinus polymerase. Western-blot analysis also showed that the antiserum could react with crude extracts not only from the Agaricales family, to which Agaricus and Coprinus belong, but also from different mushroom families and Saccharomyces. The Agaricus polymerase activity can be found only in the meiotic-cell-rich fraction, but the enzyme is also present in the somatic cells in an inactive state. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8172591

  1. Uniparental Mitochondrial Transmission in the Cultivated Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tianru; Horgen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    A uniparental mitochondrial (mt) transmission pattern has been previously observed in laboratory matings of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus on petri dishes. In this study, four sets of specific matings were further examined by taking mycelial plugs from the confluent zone of mated homokaryons and inoculating these plugs into rye grain for laboratory fruiting and for fruiting under industrial conditions. Examination of the mt genotype of each individual fruit body for mt-specific restriction fragment length polymorphisms further confirmed that the mt genome was inherited uniparentally. The vegetative radial growth and the fruiting activity of two pairs of intraspecific heterokaryons, each pair carrying the same combination of nuclear genomes but different mt genotypes, were compared. Our results suggested that the mt genotype did not appreciably affect radial growth or fruiting activity. The failure to recover both heterokaryons, each carrying either parental mt genotype in any given cross, therefore clearly indicated that in matings of A. bisporus, the mt genome from one of the parental homokaryons is either selectively excluded in the newly formed heterokaryon or selectively eliminated in the immediate heterokaryotic mitotic progeny of the newly formed heterokaryon. Images PMID:16349461

  2. Extraction optimization and bioactivity of exopolysaccharides from Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yong; Mao, Jian; Meng, Xiangyong

    2013-02-15

    Response surface methodology was used to optimize the extraction parameters of EPS produced by Agaricus bisporus MJ-0811 in submerged culture. The optimal levels for ethanol concentration (85%, v/v), pH (8) and precipitation time (22 h) were determined, and EPS production was estimated at 2.71 g/L. The actual yield of EPS under these conditions was 2.69 g/L. In addition, the antioxidant activity of EPS was investigated by measuring its scavenging ability on superoxide radicals and hydroxyl radicals in vitro. Furthermore, the hypoglycemic activity of EPS was investigated by measuring its effects on body weights and blood glucose of diabetic mice. The study suggests that EPS has beneficial antioxidant activities (hydroxyl radical-scavenging activities, superoxide radical-scavenging activities) in vitro, anti-diabetic effect on alloxan induced diabetic mice. The EPS from A. bisporus may be a novel resource of natural antioxidants and anti-diabetic agents for use in the functional food or medicine. PMID:23399195

  3. The transcriptional regulator c2h2 accelerates mushroom formation in Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Pelkmans, Jordi F; Vos, Aurin M; Scholtmeijer, Karin; Hendrix, Ed; Baars, Johan J P; Gehrmann, Thies; Reinders, Marcel J T; Lugones, Luis G; Wösten, Han A B

    2016-08-01

    The Cys2His2 zinc finger protein gene c2h2 of Schizophyllum commune is involved in mushroom formation. Its inactivation results in a strain that is arrested at the stage of aggregate formation. In this study, the c2h2 orthologue of Agaricus bisporus was over-expressed in this white button mushroom forming basidiomycete using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Morphology, cap expansion rate, and total number and biomass of mushrooms were not affected by over-expression of c2h2. However, yield per day of the c2h2 over-expression strains peaked 1 day earlier. These data and expression analysis indicate that C2H2 impacts timing of mushroom formation at an early stage of development, making its encoding gene a target for breeding of commercial mushroom strains. PMID:27207144

  4. The Genetic Linkage Map of the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Reveals Highly Conserved Macrosynteny with the Congeneric Species Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Cabannes, Delphine; Clément, Aurélien; Spataro, Cathy; Moinard, Magalie; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Callac, Philippe; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Comparative linkage mapping can rapidly facilitate the transfer of genetic information from model species to orphan species. This macrosynteny analysis approach has been extensively used in plant species, but few example are available in fungi, and even fewer in mushroom crop species. Among the latter, the Agaricus genus comprises the most cultivable or potentially cultivable species. Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom, is the model for edible and cultivable mushrooms. We have developed the first genetic linkage map for the basidiomycete A. subrufescens, an emerging mushroom crop known for its therapeutic properties and potential medicinal applications. The map includes 202 markers distributed over 16 linkage groups (LG), and covers a total length of 1701 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.2 cM. Using 96 homologous loci, we also demonstrated the high level of macrosynteny with the genome of A. bisporus The 13 main LG of A. subrufescens were syntenic to the 13 A. bisporus chromosomes. A disrupted synteny was observed for the three remaining A. subrufescens LG. Electronic mapping of a collection of A. subrufescens expressed sequence tags on A. bisporus genome showed that the homologous loci were evenly spread, with the exception of a few local hot or cold spots of homology. Our results were discussed in the light of Agaricus species evolution process. The map provides a framework for future genetic or genomic studies of the medicinal mushroom A. subrufescens. PMID:26921302

  5. The Genetic Linkage Map of the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Reveals Highly Conserved Macrosynteny with the Congeneric Species Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Cabannes, Delphine; Clément, Aurélien; Spataro, Cathy; Moinard, Magalie; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Callac, Philippe; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Comparative linkage mapping can rapidly facilitate the transfer of genetic information from model species to orphan species. This macrosynteny analysis approach has been extensively used in plant species, but few example are available in fungi, and even fewer in mushroom crop species. Among the latter, the Agaricus genus comprises the most cultivable or potentially cultivable species. Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom, is the model for edible and cultivable mushrooms. We have developed the first genetic linkage map for the basidiomycete A. subrufescens, an emerging mushroom crop known for its therapeutic properties and potential medicinal applications. The map includes 202 markers distributed over 16 linkage groups (LG), and covers a total length of 1701 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.2 cM. Using 96 homologous loci, we also demonstrated the high level of macrosynteny with the genome of A. bisporus. The 13 main LG of A. subrufescens were syntenic to the 13 A. bisporus chromosomes. A disrupted synteny was observed for the three remaining A. subrufescens LG. Electronic mapping of a collection of A. subrufescens expressed sequence tags on A. bisporus genome showed that the homologous loci were evenly spread, with the exception of a few local hot or cold spots of homology. Our results were discussed in the light of Agaricus species evolution process. The map provides a framework for future genetic or genomic studies of the medicinal mushroom A. subrufescens. PMID:26921302

  6. A Fruiting Body Tissue Method for Efficient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Stone, Michelle; Schlagnhaufer, Carl; Romaine, C. Peter

    2000-01-01

    We describe a modified Agrobacterium-mediated method for the efficient transformation of Agaricus bisporus. Salient features of this procedure include cocultivation of Agrobacterium and fruiting body gill tissue and use of a vector with a homologous promoter. This method offers new prospects for the genetic manipulation of this commercially important mushroom species. PMID:11010906

  7. Physiologic response of Agaricus subrufescens using different casing materials and practices applied in the cultivation of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Zied, Diego Cunha; Rinker, Danny Lee

    2013-01-01

    Casing materials and practices used in the cultivation of Agaricus bisporus were evaluated in the cultivation of Agaricus subrufescens, using the best techniques for optimization of production, including the possibility of re-casing of the compost for the production of a second crop of mushroom. Casing based on peat moss, loam soil or coir was compared to casing material mixed with or without spawn-run compost. Based on the results, we conclude that the casing layer used in the cultivation of A. subrufescens should not necessarily be the same as that used in the cultivation of A. bisporus. For the tested strain cultivated with loam soil as casing layer, the ruffling technique is highly superior to CACing and should be pursued in further research. The re-casing of compost in new cycles showed good results suggesting that the currently used compost could be improved. PMID:23931122

  8. Conservation of genetic linkage with map expansion in distantly related crosses of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Callac, P; Desmerger, C; Kerrigan, R W; Imbernon, M

    1997-01-15

    A previous map of the genome of a hybrid strain which had European parents belonging to the secondarily homothallic fungus Agaricus bisporus var. bisporus appeared to be unusually compact, with a particularly recombophobic segment in the central part of chromosome I. A new map of this segment was constructed based on allelic segregations among 103 homokaryotic offspring of an A. bisporus hybrid between a European parent of the var. bisporus and a Californian parent of the heterothallic var. burnettii. Markers completely linked on the previous map were distributed along 28 cM in the new map. These results suggest that the greater recombination rate could be correlated with the outbreeding behaviour of the var. burnettii. PMID:9011044

  9. From respiratory sensitization to food allergy: Anaphylactic reaction after ingestion of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus)

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Marta F.; González-Delgado, Purificación; Postigo, Idoia; Fernández, Javier; Soriano, Victor; Cueva, Begoña; Martínez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old mold-allergic patient who developed episodes of generalized urticaria and systemic anaphylactic shock immediately after ingesting button mushrooms. A manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and a NADP-dependent mannitol dehydrogenase (MtDH) from Agaricus bisporus mushroom were identified as patient-specific IgE-binding proteins. Cross-reactivity between A. bisporus MnSOD and mold aeroallergens was confirmed. We conclude that prior sensitization to mold aeroallergens might explain severe food reactions to cross-reacting homologs mushroom proteins. PMID:25750856

  10. Abr1, a Transposon-Like Element in the Genome of the Cultivated Mushroom Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Imbach

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, Anton S. M.; Baars, Johan J. P.; Mikosch, Thomas S. P.; Schaap, Peter J.; Van Griensven, Leo J. L. D.

    1999-01-01

    A 300-bp repetitive element was found in the genome of the white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, and designated Abr1. It is present in ∼15 copies per haploid genome in the commercial strain Horst U1. Analysis of seven copies showed 89 to 97% sequence identity. The repeat has features typical of class II transposons (i.e., terminal inverted repeats, subterminal repeats, and a target site duplication of 7 bp). The latter shows a consensus sequence. When used as probe on Southern blots, Abr1 identifies relatively little variation within traditional and present-day commercial strains, indicating that most strains are identical or have a common origin. In contrast to these cultivars, high variation is found among field-collected strains. Furthermore, a remarkable difference in copy numbers of Abr1 was found between A. bisporus isolates with a secondarily homothallic life cycle and those with a heterothallic life cycle. Abr1 is a type II transposon not previously reported in basidiomycetes and appears to be useful for the identification of strains within the species A. bisporus. PMID:10427018

  11. Volatile C8 compounds and pseudomonads influence primordium formation of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Noble, Ralph; Dobrovin-Pennington, Andreja; Hobbs, Philip J; Pederby, Jemma; Rodger, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Primordium formation of Agaricus bisporus depends on the presence of a casing layer containing stimulatory bacteria and on sufficient air exchange. The influence of specific pseudomonad populations and volatile organic compounds (VOC) on primordium formation of A. bisporus was studied in microcosm cultures. VOC produced by A. bisporus mycelium were predominantly C8 compounds, some of which could inhibit primordium formation, with 1-octen-3-ol being most inhibitory. A VOC produced by the rye grain substrate, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, on which A. bisporus was grown also inhibited primordium formation. 2-Ethyl-1-hexanol and 1-octen-3-ol were metabolized by pseudomonad populations and adsorbed by activated charcoal, with both modes of removal enabling primordium formation in the casing. Removal of VOC by ventilation also enabled primordium formation to occur under axenic conditions. The presence of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and 1-octen-3-ol in the microcosms resulted in higher total bacterial and pseudomonad populations in the casing. The stimulatory effects of the casing and its microbiota and air exchange on primordium formation of A. bisporus at least partly are due to the removal of inhibitory C8 compounds produced by the mycelium and its substrate. Monitoring and controlling the levels of these inhibitory VOC in mushroom culture should enable primordium formation of A. bisporus to be more efficiently and precisely controlled. PMID:19750937

  12. Dynamics of the chemical composition and productivity of composts for the cultivation of Agaricus bisporus strains

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Meire Cristina Nogueira; de Jesus, João Paulo Furlan; Vieira, Fabrício Rocha; Viana, Sthefany Rodrigues Fernandes; Spoto, Marta Helena Fillet; de Almeida Minhoni, Marli Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Two compost formulations based on oat straw (Avena sativa) and brachiaria (Brachiaria sp.) were tested for the cultivation of three Agaricus bisporus strains (ABI-07/06, ABI-05/03, and PB-1). The experimental design was a 2 × 3 factorial scheme (composts × strains) with 6 treatments and 8 repetitions (boxes containing 12 kg of compost). The chemical characterization of the compost (humidity, organic matter, carbon, nitrogen, pH, raw protein, ethereal extract, fibers, ash, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) before and after the cultivation of A. bisporus and the production (basidiomata mass, productivity, and biological efficiency) were evaluated. Data were submitted to variance analysis, and averages were compared by means of the Tukey’s test. According to the results obtained, the chemical and production characteristics showed that the best performances for the cultivation of A. bisporus were presented by the compost based on oat and the strain ABI-07/06. PMID:24688503

  13. Biocontrol Activity of Bacillus subtilis Isolated from Agaricus bisporus Mushroom Compost Against Pathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Can; Sheng, Jiping; Chen, Lin; Zheng, Yanyan; Lee, David Yue Wei; Yang, Yang; Xu, Mingshuang; Shen, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain B154, isolated from Agaricus bisporus mushroom compost infected by red bread mold, exhibited antagonistic activities against Neurospora sitophila. Antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi was also observed. The maximum antifungal activity was reached during the stationary phase. This antifungal activity was stable over a wide pH and temperature range and was not affected by proteases. Assay of antifungal activity in vitro indicated that a purified antifungal substance could strongly inhibit mycelia growth and spore germination of N. sitophila. In addition, treatment with strain B154 in A. bisporus mushroom compost infected with N. sitophila significantly increased the yield of bisporus mushrooms. Ultraviolet scan spectroscopy, tricine sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, matrix-associated laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed a molecular weight consistent with 1498.7633 Da. The antifungal compound might belong to a new type of lipopeptide fengycin. PMID:26050784

  14. Daily supplementation with mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) improves balance and working memory in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Miller, Marshall G; Gomes, Stacey M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Decline in brain function during normal aging is partly due to the long-term effects of oxidative stress and inflammation. Several fruits and vegetables have been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the effects of dietary mushroom intervention on mobility and memory in aged Fischer 344 rats. We hypothesized that daily supplementation of mushroom would have beneficial effects on behavioral outcomes in a dose-dependent manner. Rats were randomly assigned to receive a diet containing either 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, or 5% lyophilized white button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus); after 8 weeks on the diet, a battery of behavioral tasks was given to assess balance, coordination, and cognition. Rats on the 2% or 5% mushroom-supplemented diet consumed more food, without gaining weight, than rats in the other diet groups. Rats in the 0.5% and 1% group stayed on a narrow beam longer, indicating an improvement in balance. Only rats on the 0.5% mushroom diet showed improved performance in a working memory version of the Morris water maze. When taken together, the most effective mushroom dose that produced improvements in both balance and working memory was 0.5%, equivalent to about 1.5 ounces of fresh mushrooms for humans. Therefore, the results suggest that the inclusion of mushroom in the daily diet may have beneficial effects on age-related deficits in cognitive and motor function. PMID:26475179

  15. Dose-Response Effect of Sunlight on Vitamin D2 Production in Agaricus bisporus Mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Urbain, Paul; Jakobsen, Jette

    2015-09-23

    The dose response effect of UV-B irradiation from sunlight on vitamin D2 content of sliced Agaricus bisporus (white button mushroom) during the process of sun-drying was investigated.Real-time UV-B and UV-A data were obtained using a high-performance spectroradiometer. During the first hour of sunlight exposure, the vitamin D2 content of the mushrooms increased in a linear manner, with concentrations increasing from 0.1 μg/g up to 3.9 ± 0.8 μg/g dry weight (DW). At the subsequent two measurements one and 3 h later, respectively, a plateau was reached. Two hours of additional exposure triggered a significant decline in vitamin D2 content. After just 15 min of sun exposure and an UV-B dose of 0.13 J/cm(2), the vitamin D2 content increased significantly to 2.2 ± 0.5 μg/g DW (P < 0.0001), which is equivalent to 17.6 μg (704 IU) vitamin D2 per 100 g of fresh mushrooms and comparable to levels found in fatty fish like the Atlantic salmon. PMID:26314311

  16. Effect of microwave blanching on the quality of frozen Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Bernaś, Emilia; Jaworska, Grażyna

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the effect of microwave blanching on the levels of selected quality parameters in frozen Agaricus bisporus. Before freezing, mushrooms underwent one of the following treatments: blanching in water; blanching in a solution of sodium metabisulphite and citric acid; microwaving for 5 min; and combined blanching (first in water, then in a microwave oven). Products were freeze stored for 8 months at -25 ℃. Frozen storage resulted in decreased levels of vitamin B1, total polyphenols and antioxidant activity of 10-49%, as well as an increase in polyphenol oxidase activity compared with products immediately after freezing. The values for most colour parameters and whiteness intensity decreased, while cream, yellow, brown and grey saturation increased. There was a considerable deterioration in sensory quality, particularly colour. Microwave-blanched products had significantly higher dry matter, ash, vitamin B1 and B2 content than the remaining products as well as half the polyphenol oxidase activity. Total polyphenols and antioxidant activity were highest in the product blanched in the sodium metabisulphite solution, followed by the microwave-blanched product. Compared with the product blanched using sodium metabisulphite, microwave-blanched mushrooms showed slightly greater darkening but were superior in flavour and aroma. PMID:24831645

  17. A Retrospective Study in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome: Diabetic Risk Factor Response to Daily Consumption of Agaricus bisporus (White Button Mushrooms).

    PubMed

    Calvo, Mona S; Mehrotra, Anita; Beelman, Robert B; Nadkarni, Girish; Wang, Lingzhi; Cai, Weijing; Goh, Boon Cher; Kalaras, Michael D; Uribarri, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Adults with metabolic syndrome from different race/ethnicities are often predisposed to developing type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, growing evidence suggests that healthy diets and lifestyle choices can significantly slow or prevent progression to T2D. This poorly understood relationship to healthy dietary patterns and prevention of T2D motivated us to conduct a retrospective analysis to determine the potential impact of a minor dietary lifestyle change (daily mushroom consumption) on known T2D risk factors in racially diverse adults with confirmed features of the metabolic syndrome. Retrospectively, we studied 37 subjects who had participated in a dietary intervention focused on vitamin D bioavailability from white button mushrooms (WBM). All 37 had previously completed a 16-week study where they consumed 100 g of WBM daily and were then followed-up for one month during which no mushrooms were consumed. We analyzed differences in serum risk factors from baseline to 16-week, and from baseline to one-month follow-up. Measurement of serum diabetic risk factors included inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and the antioxidant component naturally rich in mushrooms, ergothioneine. Significant beneficial health effects were observed at 16-week with the doubling of ergothioneine from baseline, increases in the antioxidant marker ORAC (oxygen radical absorption capacity) and anti-inflammatory hormone, adiponectin and significant decreases in serum oxidative stress inducing factors, carboxymethyllysine (CML) and methylglyoxal (MG), but no change in the lipid oxidative stress marker 8-isoprostane, leptin or measures of insulin resistance or glucose metabolism. We conclude that WBM contain a variety of compounds with potential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant health benefits that can occur with frequent consumption over time in adults predisposed to T2D. Well-controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings and identify the specific mushroom components

  18. Comparison of the effect of two types of whole mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) powders on intestinal fermentation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Sakura; Araki, Takahiro; Ohba, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Keiko; Kamada, Takeo; Shimada, Ken-Ichiro; Han, Kyu-Ho; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-10-01

    The effects of two types of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus; white, WM; brown, BM) powders on intestinal fermentation in rats were investigated in terms of the physical characteristics of animals and by bacterial and HPLC analyses of cecal contents. Short-chain fatty acid levels were found to be significantly higher in the WM group than in the BM and the control (CN) groups; coliform bacteria levels in the BM group were significantly lower than those in the CN group, with the WM group inducing an apparent but insignificant decrease in coliforms. Anaerobe levels in the WM group were significantly higher than those in the CN group and, compared with the CN group, the BM and WM groups exhibited significantly increased feces weight and cecum weight, respectively. These results indicate that the mushroom powders, and in particular the WM powder, have beneficial effects on the intestinal environment in rats. PMID:27309965

  19. Effect of dose rate of gamma irradiation on biochemical quality and browning of mushrooms Agaricus bisporus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, M.; D'Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M.

    2002-03-01

    In order to enhance the shelf-life of edible mature mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, 2 kGy ionising treatments were applied at two different dose rates: 4.5 kGy/h ( I-) and 32 kGy/h ( I+). Both I+ and I- showed 2 and 4 days shelf-life enhancement compared to the control ( C). Before day 9, no significant difference ( p>0.05) in L* value was detected in irradiated mushrooms. However, after day 9, the highest observed L* value (whiteness) was obtained for the mushrooms irradiated in I-. Analyses of phenolic compounds revealed that mushrooms in I- contained more phenols than I+ and C, the latter containing the lower level of phenols. The polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities of irradiated mushrooms, analysed via catechol oxidase and dopa oxidase substrates, resulted in being significantly lowered ( p⩽0.05) compared to C, with a further decrease in I+. Analyses of the enzymes indicated that PPO activity was lower in I+, contrasting with its lower phenol concentration. Ionising treatments also increased significantly ( p⩽0.05) the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity. The observation of mushrooms cellular membranes, by electronic microscopy, revealed a better preserved integrity in I- than in I+. It is thus assumed that the browning effect observed in I+ was caused by both the decompartimentation of vacuolar phenol and by the entry of molecular oxygen into the cell cytoplasm. The synergetic effect of the residual active PPO and the molecular oxygen, in contact with the phenols, allowed an increased oxidation rate and, therefore, a more pronounced browning in I+ than in I-.

  20. A comparative genomic analysis of the oxidative enzymes potentially involved in lignin degradation by Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Fu, Bolei; Cullen, Dan

    2013-06-01

    The oxidative enzymatic machinery for degradation of organic substrates in Agaricus bisporus (Ab) is at the core of the carbon recycling mechanisms in this fungus. To date, 156 genes have been tentatively identified as part of this oxidative enzymatic machinery, which includes 26 peroxidase encoding genes, nine copper radical oxidase [including three putative glyoxal oxidase-encoding genes (GLXs)], 12 laccases sensu stricto and 109 cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. Comparative analyses of these enzymes in Ab with those of the white-rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, the brown-rot fungus, Postia placenta, the coprophilic litter fungus, Coprinopsis cinerea and the ectomychorizal fungus, Laccaria bicolor, revealed enzyme diversity consistent with adaptation to substrates rich in humic substances and partially degraded plant material. For instance, relative to wood decay fungi, Ab cytochrome P450 genes were less numerous (109 gene models), distributed among distinctive families, and lacked extensive duplication and clustering. Viewed together with P450 transcript accumulation patterns in three tested growth conditions, these observations were consistent with the unique Ab lifestyle. Based on tandem gene arrangements, a certain degree of gene duplication seems to have occurred in this fungus in the copper radical oxidase (CRO) and the laccase gene families. In Ab, high transcript levels and regulation of the heme-thiolate peroxidases, two manganese peroxidases and the three GLX-like genes are likely in response to complex natural substrates, including lignocellulose and its derivatives, thereby suggesting an important role in lignin degradation. On the other hand, the expression patterns of the related CROs suggest a developmental role in this fungus. Based on these observations, a brief comparative genomic overview of the Ab oxidative enzyme machinery is presented. PMID:23583597

  1. Genetic Variation and Combining Ability Analysis of Bruising Sensitivity in Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Baars, Johan J. P.; Dolstra, Oene; Visser, Richard G. F.; Sonnenberg, Anton S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced button mushroom cultivars that are less sensitive to mechanical bruising are required by the mushroom industry, where automated harvesting still cannot be used for the fresh mushroom market. The genetic variation in bruising sensitivity (BS) of Agaricus bisporus was studied through an incomplete set of diallel crosses to get insight in the heritability of BS and the combining ability of the parental lines used and, in this way, to estimate their breeding value. To this end nineteen homokaryotic lines recovered from wild strains and cultivars were inter-crossed in a diallel scheme. Fifty-one successful hybrids were grown under controlled conditions, and the BS of these hybrids was assessed. BS was shown to be a trait with a very high heritability. The results also showed that brown hybrids were generally less sensitive to bruising than white hybrids. The diallel scheme allowed to estimate the general combining ability (GCA) for each homokaryotic parental line and to estimate the specific combining ability (SCA) of each hybrid. The line with the lowest GCA is seen as the most attractive donor for improving resistance to bruising. The line gave rise to hybrids sensitive to bruising having the highest GCA value. The highest negative SCA possibly indicates heterosis effects for resistance to bruising. This study provides a foundation for estimating breeding value of parental lines to further study the genetic factors underlying bruising sensitivity and other quality-related traits, and to select potential parental lines for further heterosis breeding. The approach of studying combining ability in a diallel scheme was used for the first time in button mushroom breeding. PMID:24116171

  2. First report of Syzygites megalocarpus (Mucorales) web mold on the commercial portabella button mushroom Agaricus bisporus in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Imbach mushrooms are cultivated commercially under environmentally controlled conditions in several states within the US. They are the most important crop in Pennsylvania and an important high value crop in many other states. In August 2011 we first observed a mucoraceous m...

  3. Uncovering the abilities of Agaricus bisporus to degrade plant biomass throughout its life cycle.

    PubMed

    Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Post, Harm; Zhou, Miaomiao; Jurak, Edita; Heck, Albert J R; Hildén, Kristiina S; Kabel, Mirjam A; Mäkelä, Miia R; Altelaar, Maarten A F; de Vries, Ronald P

    2015-08-01

    The economically important edible basidiomycete mushroom Agaricus bisporus thrives on decaying plant material in forests and grasslands of North America and Europe. It degrades forest litter and contributes to global carbon recycling, depolymerizing (hemi-)cellulose and lignin in plant biomass. Relatively little is known about how A. bisporus grows in the controlled environment in commercial production facilities and utilizes its substrate. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we showed that changes in plant biomass degradation by A. bisporus occur throughout its life cycle. Ligninolytic genes were only highly expressed during the spawning stage day 16. In contrast, (hemi-)cellulolytic genes were highly expressed at the first flush, whereas low expression was observed at the second flush. The essential role for many highly expressed plant biomass degrading genes was supported by exo-proteome analysis. Our data also support a model of sequential lignocellulose degradation by wood-decaying fungi proposed in previous studies, concluding that lignin is degraded at the initial stage of growth in compost and is not modified after the spawning stage. The observed differences in gene expression involved in (hemi-)cellulose degradation between the first and second flushes could partially explain the reduction in the number of mushrooms during the second flush. PMID:26118398

  4. Effect of plasma activated water on the postharvest quality of button mushrooms, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingyin; Tian, Ying; Ma, Ruonan; Liu, Qinghong; Zhang, Jue

    2016-04-15

    Non-thermal plasma is a new approach to improving microbiological safety while maintaining the sensory attributes of the treated foods. Recent research has reported that plasma activated water (PAW) can also efficiently inactivate a wide variety of microorganisms. This study invested the effects of plasma-activated water soaking on the postharvest preservation of button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) over seven days of storage at 20°C. Plasma activated water reduced the microbial counts by 1.5 log and 0.5 log for bacteria and fungi during storage, respectively. Furthermore, the corresponding physicochemical and biological properties were assessed between plasma activated water soaking groups and control groups. The results for firmness, respiration rate and relative electrical conductivity suggested that plasma activated water soaking can delay mushroom softening. Meanwhile, no significant change was observed in the color, pH, or antioxidant properties of A. bisporus treated with plasma activated water. Thus, plasma activated water soaking is a promising method for postharvest fresh-keeping of A. bisporus. PMID:26616972

  5. Browning inhibition and quality preservation of button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) by essential oils fumigation treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mengsha; Feng, Lifang; Jiang, Tianjia

    2014-04-15

    The effect of essential oil fumigation treatment on browning and postharvest quality of button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) was evaluated upon 16 days cold storage. Button mushrooms were fumigated with essential oils, including clove, cinnamaldehyde, and thyme. Changes in the browning index (BI), weight loss, firmness, percentage of open caps, total phenolics, ascorbic acid, microbial activity and activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), and peroxidase (POD) were measured. The results indicated that all essential oils could inhibit the senescence of mushrooms, and the most effective compound was cinnamaldehyde. Fumigation treatment with 5 μl l⁻¹ cinnamaldehyde decreased BI, delayed cap opening, reduced microorganism counts, promoted the accumulation of phenolics and ascorbic acid. In addition, 5 μl l⁻¹ cinnamaldehyde fumigation treatment inhibited the activities of PPO and POD, and increased PAL activity during the storage period. Thus, postharvest essential oil fumigation treatment has positive effects on improving the quality of button mushrooms. PMID:24295683

  6. A novel immune-tolerable and permeable lectin-like protein from mushroom Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Ismaya, Wangsa T; Yunita; Efthyani, Alida; Lai, Xuelei; Retnoningrum, Debbie S; Rachmawati, Heni; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R

    2016-05-13

    A lectin like protein designated as LSMT is recently discovered in Agaricus bisporus. The protein adopts very similar structure to Ricin-B like lectin from Clitocybe nebularis (CNL) and HA-33 from Clostridium botulinum (HA-33), which both recognize sugar molecules that decorate the surface of the epithelial cells of the intestine. A preliminary study in silico pointed out potential capability of LSMT to perform such biological activity. Following that hypothesis, we demonstrated that LSMT is indeed capable of penetrating out from a dialysis tube of the mice intestine origin. Furthermore, the protein appeared not to evoke the immune response upon introduction into mice, unlike its structural homologs. This is the first report on the biological implication of LSMT that might lead to its application. PMID:27060548

  7. Carbohydrate composition of compost during composting and mycelium growth of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Edita; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2014-01-30

    Changes of plant cell wall carbohydrate structures occurring during the process to make suitable compost for growth of Agaricus bisporus are unknown. In this paper, composition and carbohydrate structures in compost samples collected during composting and mycelium growth were analyzed. Furthermore, different extracts of compost samples were prepared with water, 1M and 4M alkali and analyzed. At the beginning of composting, 34% and after 16 days of mycelium growth 27% of dry matter was carbohydrates. Carbohydrate composition analysis showed that mainly cellulose and poorly substituted xylan chains with similar amounts and ratios of xylan building blocks were present in all phases studied. Nevertheless, xylan solubility increased 20% over the period of mycelium growth indicating partial degradation of xylan backbone. Apparently, degradation of carbohydrates occurred over the process studied by both bacteria and fungi, mainly having an effect on xylan-chain length and solubility. PMID:24299775

  8. Isolation of developmentally regulated genes from the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    De Groot, P W; Schaap, P J; Van Griensven, L J; Visser, J

    1997-06-01

    From a cDNA library, constructed from mushroom primordia, nine cDNAs were isolated which were either induced or specifically expressed during fruit body development and maturation of the basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus. These cDNAs varied in size from 372 to 1019 bp and hybridized to transcripts of 400-1600 nt. Four of the cDNAs were only expressed in the generative phase of the life cycle while the other five cDNAs were strongly induced but had low steady-state mRNA levels in vegetatively grown mycelium of the hybrid strain Horst U1. An apparent full-length cDNA could be identified by sequence analysis and specified a putative protein homologous to the delta-subunit of the mitochondrial ATP synthase complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa. For one of the partial cDNAs, significant homology was found with a family of cell division control proteins, while another partial cDNA appeared to encode a cytochrome P450. All cDNAs, except the presumed cytochrome-P450-specifying cDNA (cypA), hybridized with single copy genes scattered over the Agaricus genome. For the cypA gene, the presence of several additional copies was shown by heterologous hybridizations. Based on changes in expression levels of the fruit-body-induced genes during development coinciding with alterations in morphological appearance of mushrooms, four stages of development were distinguished during growth and maturation of A. bisporus fruit bodies. PMID:9202475

  9. Proteomic response of Trichoderma aggressivum f. europaeum to Agaricus bisporus tissue and mushroom compost.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Matt; Grogan, Helen; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A cellular proteomic analysis was performed on Trichoderma aggressivum f. europaeum. Thirty-four individual protein spots were excised from 2-D electropherograms and analysed by ESI-Trap Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS). Searches of the NCBInr and SwissProt protein databases identified functions for 31 of these proteins based on sequence homology. A differential expression study was performed on the intracellular fraction of T. aggressivum f. europaeum grown in media containing Agaricus bisporus tissue and Phase 3 mushroom compost compared to a control medium. Differential expression was observed for seven proteins, three of which were upregulated in both treatments, two were down regulated in both treatments and two showed qualitatively different regulation under the two treatments. No proteins directly relating to fungal cell wall degradation or other mycoparasitic activity were observed. Functions of differentially produced intracellular proteins included oxidative stress tolerance, cytoskeletal structure, and cell longevity. Differential production of these proteins may contribute to the growth of T. aggressivum in mushroom compost and its virulence toward A. bisporus. PMID:25209637

  10. Agaricus bisporus compost improves the potential of Salix purpurea × viminalis hybrid for copper accumulation.

    PubMed

    Magdziak, Z; Mleczek, M; Gąsecka, M; Drzewiecka, K; Kaczmarek, Z; Siwulski, M; Goliński, P

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the ability of spent mushroom compost (SMC) from the production of Agaricus bisporus (A. bisporus) to stimulate the growth and efficiency of copper (Cu) accumulation by Salix purpurea × viminalis hybrid. Roots, shoots and leaves were analysed in terms of total Cu content and selected biometric parameters. Due to the absence of information regarding the physiological response of the studied plant, low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs), phenolic compounds and salicylic acid (SA) contents were investigated. The obtained results clearly demonstrate the effectiveness (usefulness) of SMC in promoting the growth and stimulation of Cu accumulation by the studied Salix taxon. The highest Cu content in roots and shoots was found at the 10% SMC addition (507±22 and 380±11 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively), while there was a reduction of the content in leaves and young shoots (109±8 and 124±7 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively). In terms of physiological response, lowered secretion of LMWOAs, biosynthesis of phenolic compounds and SA, as well as accumulation of soluble sugars in Salix leaves was observed with SMC addition. Simultaneously, an elevation of the total phenolic content in leaves of plants cultivated with SMC was observed, considered as antioxidant biomolecules. PMID:26709965

  11. Compost Grown Agaricus bisporus Lacks the Ability to Degrade and Consume Highly Substituted Xylan Fragments

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Ronald P.; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A.

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Agaricus bisporus is commercially grown for the production of edible mushrooms. This cultivation occurs on compost, but not all of this substrate is consumed by the fungus. To determine why certain fractions remain unused, carbohydrate degrading enzymes, water-extracted from mushroom-grown compost at different stages of mycelium growth and fruiting body formation, were analyzed for their ability to degrade a range of polysaccharides. Mainly endo-xylanase, endo-glucanase, β-xylosidase and β-glucanase activities were determined in the compost extracts obtained during mushroom growth. Interestingly, arabinofuranosidase activity able to remove arabinosyl residues from doubly substituted xylose residues and α-glucuronidase activity were not detected in the compost enzyme extracts. This correlates with the observed accumulation of arabinosyl and glucuronic acid substituents on the xylan backbone in the compost towards the end of the cultivation. Hence, it was concluded that compost grown A. bisporus lacks the ability to degrade and consume highly substituted xylan fragments. PMID:26237450

  12. Vitamin D2 Formation from Post-Harvest UV-B Treatment of Mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) and Retention during Storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this research were to study the effects of high intensity (0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 mW/cm2), dose (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 J/cm2), and post-harvest time (1 and 4 days) on the vitamin D2 formation in Portabella mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) as a result of UV-B exposure, as well as the vitamin D...

  13. Pangola grass colonized with Scytalidium thermophilum for production of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jose E; Mejia, Laura; Royse, Daniel J

    2008-02-01

    This work had the dual objective of selecting a substrate for rapid mycelial growth of Scytalidium thermophilum and then comparing the growth and production of a brown variety of Agaricus bisporus on substrate non-colonized and colonized with S. thermophilum. Mycelial growth of S. thermophilum at 45 degrees C was significantly greater on potato dextrose yeast extract agar (0.58 mm/h) as compared to malt extract glucose agar (0.24 mm/h) and yeast extract glucose agar (0.44 mm/h). On cereal grain, S. thermophilum grew significantly faster on rice (0.31 mm/h) compared to sorghum (0.22 mm/h) and millet (0.18 mm/h). It also grew faster on Pangola grass (0.49 mm/h) compared to corncobs (0.30 mm/h) and sawdust (0.18 mm/h). Colonization of Pangola grass with S. thermophilum was influenced by the addition of calcium salts in the form of gypsum, hydrated lime and ground limestone. For production of A. bisporus, biological efficiency (BE) on pasteurized Pangola grass pre-colonized by S. thermophilum for 4 days at 45 degrees C was more than twice (26.4%) that on grass non-colonized by S. thermophilum (11.0%). The addition of 2% hydrated lime to Pangola grass prior to colonization by S. thermophilum resulted in an additional doubling of BE of mushroom production (48.1%). These results show the possibility of developing a non-composted substrate method for producing A. bisporus without autoclaving the substrate. PMID:17331714

  14. Enhancement of Shelf Life of Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus (Higher Basidiomycetes) by Fumigant Application of Lippia alba Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Pratima; Pandey, Abhay K; Mishra, Priyanka; Singh, Pooja; Tripathi, N N

    2015-01-01

    Eleven essential oils isolated from higher plant species were assessed against the four isolates of Verticillium fungicola found on fruiting bodies of Agaricus bisporus. Eucalyptus citriodora and Lippia alba oils were more efficacious and completely inhibited the mycelial growth of fungal isolates. L. alba oil was fungistatic and fungicidal at 10- and 20-µL concentrations against all of the isolates, respectively, and was more potent than E. citriodora oil as well as some prevalent synthetic fungicides such as benomyl, ethylene dibromide, and phosphine. Eighty microliters of L. alba oil protected 500 g of fruiting bodies of A. bisporus for up to 7 d from infection of the fungus under in vivo conditions. The findings strengthen the possibility of L. alba oil as a plant-based protectant to enhance the shelf life of A. bisporus fruiting bodies. PMID:25746409

  15. Bioremediation of multi-polluted soil by spent mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) substrate: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and Pb availability.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, Carlos; Yunta, Felipe; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-12-30

    This study investigates the effect of three spent Agaricus bisporus substrate (SAS) application methods on bioremediation of soil multi-polluted with Pb and PAH from close to a shooting range with respect natural attenuation (SM). The remediation treatments involve (i) use of sterilized SAS to biostimulate the inherent soil microbiota (SSAS) and two bioaugmentation possibilities (ii) its use without previous treatment to inoculate A. bisporus and inherent microbiota (SAS) or (iii) SAS sterilization and further A. bisporus re-inoculation (Abisp). The efficiency of each bioremediation microcosm was evaluated by: fungal activity, heterotrophic and PAH-degrading bacterial population, PAH removal, Pb mobility and soil eco-toxicity. Biostimulation of the native soil microbiology (SSAS) achieved similar levels of PAH biodegradation as SM and poor soil detoxification. Bioaugmented microcosms produced higher PAH removal and eco-toxicity reduction via different routes. SAS increased the PAH-degrading bacterial population, but lowered fungal activity. Abisp was a good inoculum carrier for A. bisporus exhibiting high levels of ligninolytic activity, the total and PAH-degrading bacteria population increased with incubation time. The three SAS applications produced slight Pb mobilization (<0.3%). SAS sterilization and further A. bisporus re-inoculation (Abisp) proved the best application method to remove PAH, mainly BaP, and detoxify the multi-polluted soil. PMID:26188871

  16. Optimization of the Liquid Culture Medium Composition to Obtain the Mycelium of Agaricus bisporus Rich in Essential Minerals.

    PubMed

    Krakowska, Agata; Reczyński, Witold; Muszyńska, Bożena

    2016-09-01

    Agaricus bisporus species (J.E. Lange) Imbach one of the most popular Basidiomycota species was chosen for the research because of its dietary and medicinal value. The presented herein studies included determination of essential mineral accumulation level in the mycelium of A. bisporus, cultivated on liquid cultures in the medium supplemented with addition of the chosen metals' salts. Quantitative analyses of Zn, Cu, Mg, and Fe in liquid cultures made it possible to determine the relationship between accumulation of the selected mineral in A. bisporus mycelium and the culture conditions. Monitoring of the liquid cultures and determination of the elements' concentrations in mycelium of A. bisporus were performed using the flame technique of AAS method. Concentration of Zn in the mycelium, maintained in the medium with the addition of its salt, was in a very wide range from 95.9 to 4462.0 mg/g DW. In the analyzed A. bisporus mycelium, cultured in the medium enriched with copper salt, this metal concentration changed from 89.79 to 7491.50 mg/g DW; considering Mg in liquid cultured mycelium (medium with Mg addition), its concentration has changed from 0.32 to 10.55 mg/g DW. The medium enriched with iron salts has led to bioaccumulation of Fe in mycelia of A. bisporus. Determined Fe concentration was in the range from 0.62 to 161.28 mg/g DW. The proposed method of liquid A. bisporus culturing on medium enriched with the selected macro- and microelements in proper concentrations ratio have led to obtaining maximal growth of biomass, characterized by high efficiency of the mineral accumulation. As a result, a dietary component of increased nutritive value was obtained. PMID:26857993

  17. Isolation and characterization of a cellulose-growth-specific gene from Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Raguz, S; Yagüe, E; Wood, D A; Thurston, C F

    1992-10-01

    The edible basidiomycete, Agaricus bisporus, produces extracellular endoglucanase. Endoglucanase production is induced by cellulose and repressed by fructose in A. bisporus grown on minimal medium, and is regulated in activity during fruiting body development. An anti-endoglucanase antibody was used to isolate cellulase-related genes. Three main polypeptides of 38, 58, and 60 kDa were immunoprecipitated by the antibody from products of in vitro cell-free translation of mRNAs isolated from cellulose-grown mycelium. No cross-reaction was detected with the translated products from fructose-grown mycelium. This antibody was used to immunoscreen a lambda ZAPII-cDNA expression library made from mRNA isolated from cellulose-grown mycelium. Two cDNA cross-reacting clones, pSRc110 and pSRc200, were isolated. Clones pSRc110 and pSRc200 cross-hybridized and had the same restriction map. Clone pSRc200 hybrid selected an mRNA that on cell-free translation produced a 38-kDa polypeptide. The cDNA fragment from pSRc200 hybridized to a 1.3-kb mRNA from cellulose-grown mycelium. No hybridization was observed when using fructose-grown mycelium mRNA. Thus, the gene (cel1) expressing the 1.3-kb mRNA, is differentially regulated by the carbon source of the culture medium. The cell gene was isolated in a 8.9-kb EcoRI genomic fragment after hybridization to pSRc200. Sequences similar to those in the egl1 and cbh2 genes from Trichoderma reesi were found upstream from the ATG start codon in cel1. Nine short intervening sequences disrupt the cel1 coding sequence, and a strong bias against codons ending with G and A was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1398098

  18. Meiotic Behavior and Linkage Relationships in the Secondarily Homothallic Fungus Agaricus Bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Kerrigan, R. W.; Royer, J. C.; Baller, L. M.; Kohli, Y.; Horgen, P. A.; Anderson, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    This study followed the transmission of 64 segregating genetic markers to 52 haploid offspring, obtained from both homokaryotic and heterokaryotic meiospores, of a cross (AG 93b) of Agaricus bisporus, the commonly cultivated ``button mushroom.'' The electrophoretic karyotypes of the AG 93b component nuclei were determined concurrently (n = 13). Eleven distinct linkage groups were identified by two-point analysis. DNA-DNA hybridization showed that nine of these corresponded to unique chromosome-sized DNAs. Two other chromosomal DNAs were marked with nonsegregating markers, including the rDNA repeat. Two remaining chromosomes remained unmarked but hybridized to repeated-sequence probes. Cross 93b had an essentially conventional meiosis in which both independent assortment and joint segregation of markers occurred, but in which crossing over was infrequent over much of the mapped genome. The 48 homokaryotic spore-offspring had overall crossover frequencies that were similar to, but possibly slightly less than, those of three homokaryon constituents of heterokaryotic spore-offspring. These data provide support for our earlier cytogenetic model of sporogenesis in A. bisporus, that explains why heterokaryotic spore-offspring usually appear to exhibit no recombination. No evidence favoring an alternative, mitotic model of sporogenesis was found. The resulting genetic map appears to survey the genome extensively and for the first time permits localization of loci determining economically important traits in this fungal crop species. Large differences in the vigor of homokaryotic offspring were correlated with the inheritance of certain chromosome segments and were also often associated with significant departures from Mendelian segregation ratios. PMID:8094696

  19. Method Development for the Determination of Free and Esterified Sterols in Button Mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Ergosterol is the major sterol in button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) and can occur as free alcohol or esterified with fatty acids (ergosteryl esters). In this study, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode (GC/MS-SIM) was used to determine ergosterol and ergosteryl esters as well as other sterols and steryl esters in button mushrooms. Different quality control measures were established and sample preparation procedures were compared to prevent the formation of artifacts and the degradation of ergosteryl esters. The final method was then used for the determination of ergosterol (443 ± 44 mg/100 g dry matter (d.m.)) and esterified ergosterol (12 ± 6 mg/100 g d.m.) in button mushroom samples (n = 4). While the free sterol fraction was vastly dominated by ergosterol (∼90% of five sterols in total), the steryl ester fraction was more diversified (nine sterols in total, ergosterol ∼55%) and consisted primarily of linoleic acid esters. PMID:27064103

  20. Isolation of expressed sequence tags of Agaricus bisporus and their assignment to chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, A S; de Groot, P W; Schaap, P J; Baars, J J; Visser, J; Van Griensven, L J

    1996-01-01

    The genome of the cultivated basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus Horst U1 and of its homokaryotic parents has been characterized by using an optimized method of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Expressed sequence tags obtained as expressed cDNAs from a primordial tissue-derived cDNA library and a number of previously isolated genes were used to identify the individual chromosomes of the parental lines of Horst U1. The genome consists of 13 chromosomes, and its total size is 31 Mb. For those chromosomes that could not be resolved by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, the segregation of marker genes was studied in a set of 86 homokaryotic offspring of Horst U1. At least two markers were assigned to each individual chromosome. In this way all individual chromosomes were unequivocally identified. The large size difference observed between the homologous chromosomes IX, harboring the rDNA repeat, was shown to be largely due to a higher copy number of rDNA in parental strain H97 than in parental strain H39. PMID:8953726

  1. Bsn-t Alleles from French Field Strains of Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Callac, Philippe; Hocquart, Sophie; Imbernon, Micheline; Desmerger, Christophe; Olivier, Jean-Marc

    1998-01-01

    In the Agaricus bisporus desert population in California, the dominant Bsn-t allele determines the production of tetrasporic basidia and homokaryotic spores (n) that characterize a heterothallic life cycle. Strains belonging to a French population have the Bsn-b/b genotype that results in bisporic basidia that produce heterokaryotic spores (n + n) which characterize a pseudohomothallic life cycle. More recombination occurs in the tetrasporic population than in the bisporic population. In France, tetrasporic strains are rare. For two such isolates, Bs 261 and Bs 423, we determined the life cycle, the heritability of the tetrasporic trait, the amount of variation in the recombination rate, and the haploid fruiting ability. We found that (i) Bs 261 was heterothallic, (ii) Bs 423 was homokaryotic and homothallic, (iii) Bs 261 was Bsn-t/b, (iv) recombination on a segment of chromosome I depended on the genotype at BSN, (v) some of the homokaryotic offspring of Bs 261 and all of the progeny of Bs 423 were able to fruit, (vi) Bs 261 and Bs 423 were closely related, and (vii) Bs 423 was partially intersterile with other strains of the species. PMID:9603821

  2. Synthesis of double-stranded RNA in a virus-enriched fraction from Agaricus bisporus

    SciTech Connect

    Sriskantha, A.; Wach, P.; Schlagnhaufer, B.; Romaine, C.P.

    1986-03-01

    Partially purified virus preparations from sporophores of Agaricus bisporus affected with LaFrance disease had up to a 15-fold-higher RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity than did comparable preparations from health sporophores. Enzyme activity was dependent upon the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ and the four nucleoside triphosphates and was insensitive to actinomycin D, ..cap alpha..-amanitin, and rifampin. The /sup 3/H-labeled enzyme reaction products were double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as indicated by CF-11 cellulose column chromatography and by their ionic-strength-dependent sensitivity to hydrolysis by RNase A. The principal dsRNA products had estimated molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ and 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 6/. Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ equilibrium centrifugation of the virus preparation resolved a single peak of RNA polymerase activity that banded with a 35-nm spherical virus particle containing dsRNAs with molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ and 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 6/. The data suggest that the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with the 35-nm spherical virus is a replicase which catalyzes the synthesis of the genomic dsRNAs.

  3. In vivo immunomodulatory effect of the lectin from edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Ditamo, Yanina; Rupil, Lucia L; Sendra, Victor G; Nores, Gustavo A; Roth, German A; Irazoqui, Fernando J

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are glycan-binding proteins that are resistant to digestion in the gastrointestinal tract and enter intact to blood circulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus lectin (ABL) on innate and adaptive immune responses as well as its effect in two different experimental pathologies that involve the immune system. ABL inhibited in vitro nitric oxide (NO) production by mouse peritoneal macrophages in response to the pro-inflammatory stimuli lipopolysaccharides (LPS). However, it did not modify the activity of arginase, showing that while ABL downregulates M1 activation, it does not affect M2 activation. ABL also inhibited mononuclear cell proliferation in response to mitogen Con A, or in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. During the in vivo studies, oral administration of ABL to BALB/c mice induced a marked inhibition of NO production by peritoneal macrophages after LPS stimuli. The influence of ABL on tumor growth was studied in BALB/c mice receiving daily oral doses of ABL and implanted with CT26 tumor cells. ABL treatment induced significantly higher rate of tumor growth when compared with control mice. On the other hand, oral ABL administration in Wistar rats induced a marked diminution of the incidence of the disease and the severity of the clinical signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We can conclude that ABL has an in vivo immunomodulatory effect reducing the innate and adaptive responses. This food lectin shows potential therapeutic application on control of inflammatory autoimmune pathologies. PMID:26399519

  4. The crystallographic structure of the mannitol 2-dehydrogenase NADP+ binary complex from Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Hörer, S; Stoop, J; Mooibroek, H; Baumann, U; Sassoon, J

    2001-07-20

    Mannitol, an acyclic six-carbon polyol, is one of the most abundant sugar alcohols occurring in nature. In the button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, it is synthesized from fructose by the enzyme mannitol 2-dehydrogenase (MtDH; EC ) using NADPH as a cofactor. Mannitol serves as the main storage carbon (up to 50% of the fruit body dry weight) and plays a critical role in growth, fruit body development, osmoregulation, and salt tolerance. Furthermore, mannitol dehydrogenases are being evaluated for commercial mannitol production as alternatives to the less efficient chemical reduction of fructose. Given the importance of mannitol metabolism and mannitol dehydrogenases, MtDH was cloned into the pET28 expression system and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Kinetic and physicochemical properties of the recombinant enzyme are indistinguishable from the natural enzyme. The crystal structure of its binary complex with NADP was solved at 1.5-A resolution and refined to an R value of 19.3%. It shows MtDH to be a tetramer and a member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family of enzymes. The catalytic residues forming the so-called catalytic triad can be assigned to Ser(149), Tyr(169), and Lys(173). PMID:11335726

  5. Multi-trait QTL analysis for agronomic and quality characters of Agaricus bisporus (button mushrooms).

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Baars, Johan J P; Maliepaard, Chris; Visser, Richard G F; Zhang, Jinxia; Sonnenberg, Anton S M

    2016-12-01

    The demand for button mushrooms of high quality is increasing. Superior button mushroom varieties require the combination of multiple traits to maximize productivity and quality. Very often these traits are correlated and should, therefore, be evaluated together rather than as single traits. In order to unravel the genetic architecture of multiple traits of Agaricus bisporus and the genetic correlations among traits, we have investigated a total of six agronomic and quality traits through multi-trait QTL analyses in a mixed-model. Traits were evaluated in three heterokaryon sets. Significant phenotypic correlations were observed among traits. For instance, earliness (ER) correlated to firmness (FM), cap color, and compost colonization, and FM correlated to scales (SC). QTLs of different traits located on the same chromosomes genetically explains the phenotypic correlations. QTL detected on chromosome 10 mainly affects three traits, i.e., ER, FM and SC. It explained 31.4 % phenotypic variation of SC on mushroom cap (heterokaryon Set 1), 14.9 % that of the FM (heterokaryon Set 3), and 14.2 % that of ER (heterokaryon Set 3). High value alleles from the wild parental line showed beneficial effects for several traits, suggesting that the wild germplasm is a valuable donor in terms of those traits. Due to the limitations of recombination pattern, we only made a start at understanding the genetic base for several agronomic and quality traits in button mushrooms. PMID:27620731

  6. Inheritance of Strain Instability (Sectoring) in the Commercial Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aimin; Begin, Marc; Kokurewicz, Karl; Bowden, Christine; Horgen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    The button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, is a commercially important cultivated filamentous fungus. During the last decade, the button mushroom industry has depended mainly on two strains (or derivatives of these two strains). Using one of these highly successful strains (strain U1) we examined the phenomenon of strain instability, specifically, the production of irreversible sectors. Three “stromatal” and three “fluffy” sectors were compared with a healthy type U1 strain and with a wild-collected isolate. Compost colonization and fruit body morphology were examined. The main objective of this study, however, was to examine the meiotic stability of the sectored phenotype. Single basidiospores were isolated and subjected to a grain bioassay in which the ability to produce sectors was measured. Our results were as follows: (i) basidiospore cultures obtained from a wild-collected isolate showed no tendency to produce sectors; (ii) approximately 5% of the basidiospore cultures obtained from healthy type U1 strains produced irreversible sectors in the grain bioassay; (iii) the five primary sectors examined produced basidiospore cultures, half of which produced normal-looking growth in the grain bioassay and half of which produced some degree of sectoring; and (iv) the one sectored isolate that represented the F2 generation gave ratios similar to the 1:1 ratio observed for the F1 cultures. Images PMID:16349322

  7. Agaricus bisporus and its in vitro culture as a source of indole compounds released into artificial digestive juices.

    PubMed

    Muszyńska, Bożena; Kała, Katarzyna; Sułkowska-Ziaja, Katarzyna; Krakowska, Agata; Opoka, Włodzimierz

    2016-05-15

    The popularity of Agaricus bisporus results not only from the quality of the flavors, but also from the content of many substances of therapeutic properties. This paper presents a study on RP-HPLC determination of the content of indole compounds released from the lyophilized biomass from in vitro cultures of A. bisporus into artificial digestive juices at 37°C. A. bisporus in vitro cultures were grown on media enriched with zinc salts. The release of 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan and l-tryptophan was found in the greatest number of samples. The content of 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan in the investigated samples ranged from 86.62 to 531 mg/100g d.w. The amount of l-tryptophan was determined within the range of 1.63-4.68 mg/100g d.w. and for melatonin 0.43-0.64 mg/100g d.w. It was demonstrated for the first time that in vitro cultures of A. bisporus release indole compounds in conditions simulating the human digestive tract. PMID:26776002

  8. Evidence for Outcrossing via the Buller Phenomenon in a Substrate Simultaneously Inoculated with Spores and Mycelium of Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Callac, Philippe; Spataro, Cathy; Caille, Aurélie; Imbernon, Micheline

    2006-01-01

    In Agaricus bisporus, traditional cultivars and most of the wild populations belong to A. bisporus var. bisporus, which has a predominantly pseudohomothallic life cycle in which most meiospores are heterokaryons (n + n). A lower proportion of homokaryotic (n) meiospores, which typify the heterothallic life cycle, also are produced. In wild populations, pseudohomothallism was thought previously to play a major role, but recent analyses have found that significant outcrossing also may occur. We inoculated a standard substrate for A. bisporus cultivation simultaneously with homokaryotic mycelium from one parent and spores from a second parent. Culture trays produced numerous sporocarps that could theoretically have resulted from five different reproductive modes (pseudohomothallism, selfing or outcrossing via heterothallism, and selfing or outcrossing via the Buller phenomenon [i.e., between a homokaryon and a heterokaryon]). Most or all of the sporocarps resulted from outcrossing between the inoculated homokaryon and the inoculated heterokaryotic spores (or mycelia that grew from them). These data broaden our understanding of population dynamics under field conditions and provide an outcrossing method that could be used in commercial breeding programs. PMID:16597931

  9. Fate of Carbohydrates and Lignin during Composting and Mycelium Growth of Agaricus bisporus on Wheat Straw Based Compost.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Edita; Punt, Arjen M; Arts, Wim; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2015-01-01

    In wheat straw based composting, enabling growth of Agaricus bisporus mushrooms, it is unknown to which extent the carbohydrate-lignin matrix changes and how much is metabolized. In this paper we report yields and remaining structures of the major components. During the Phase II of composting 50% of both xylan and cellulose were metabolized by microbial activity, while lignin structures were unaltered. During A. bisporus' mycelium growth (Phase III) carbohydrates were only slightly consumed and xylan was found to be partially degraded. At the same time, lignin was metabolized for 45% based on pyrolysis GC/MS. Remaining lignin was found to be modified by an increase in the ratio of syringyl (S) to guaiacyl (G) units from 0.5 to 0.7 during mycelium growth, while fewer decorations on the phenolic skeleton of both S and G units remained. PMID:26436656

  10. Investigation of Mitochondrial Transmission in Selected Matings between Homokaryons from Commercial and Wild-Collected Isolates of Agaricus bisporus (= Agaricus brunnescens).

    PubMed

    Jin, T; Sonnenberg, A S; Van Griensven, L J; Horgen, P A

    1992-11-01

    Ten heterokaryons of Agaricus bisporus (= Agaricus brunnescens) were shown to carry four different mitochondrial (mt) genotypes by analysis of mt restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). Fifteen homokaryons derived from these strains were used to investigate mt inheritance in A. bisporus. One hundred eighty-nine pairings were performed in 25 different combinations. Pairings in 15 different combinations produced heterokaryons on the basis of nuclear RFLP analyses and/or fruiting trials. The mt genotype of each new intraspecies hybrid was examined by using mt RFLPs as genetic markers. Our results suggest the following. (i) Recombination between the mt genomes was not a common event. (ii) From most individual pairings, all heterokaryons carried the same mt genotype. (iii) Heterokaryons carrying either of the two possible mt genotypes were observed in certain crosses after modification of the pairing procedure. A biparental transmission pattern was demonstrated for some crosses, but there appears to be a preference for one of the mt genotypes to predominate in any specific pairing. PMID:16348802

  11. Investigation of Mitochondrial Transmission in Selected Matings between Homokaryons from Commercial and Wild-Collected Isolates of Agaricus bisporus (= Agaricus brunnescens)

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tianru; Sonnenberg, Anton S. M.; Van Griensven, L. J. L. D.; Horgen, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    Ten heterokaryons of Agaricus bisporus (= Agaricus brunnescens) were shown to carry four different mitochondrial (mt) genotypes by analysis of mt restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). Fifteen homokaryons derived from these strains were used to investigate mt inheritance in A. bisporus. One hundred eighty-nine pairings were performed in 25 different combinations. Pairings in 15 different combinations produced heterokaryons on the basis of nuclear RFLP analyses and/or fruiting trials. The mt genotype of each new intraspecies hybrid was examined by using mt RFLPs as genetic markers. Our results suggest the following. (i) Recombination between the mt genomes was not a common event. (ii) From most individual pairings, all heterokaryons carried the same mt genotype. (iii) Heterokaryons carrying either of the two possible mt genotypes were observed in certain crosses after modification of the pairing procedure. A biparental transmission pattern was demonstrated for some crosses, but there appears to be a preference for one of the mt genotypes to predominate in any specific pairing. Images PMID:16348802

  12. Polysaccharides from Agaricus bisporus and Agaricus brasiliensis show similarities in their structures and their immunomodulatory effects on human monocytic THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mushroom polysaccharides have traditionally been used for the prevention and treatment of a multitude of disorders like infectious illnesses, cancers and various autoimmune diseases. Crude mushroom extracts have been tested without detailed chemical analyses of its polysaccharide content. For the present study we decided to chemically determine the carbohydrate composition of semi-purified extracts from 2 closely related and well known basidiomycete species, i.e. Agaricus bisporus and A. brasiliensis and to study their effects on the innate immune system, in particular on the in vitro induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, using THP-1 cells. Methods Mushroom polysaccharide extracts were prepared by hot water extraction and precipitation with ethanol. Their composition was analyzed by GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy. PMA activated THP-1 cells were treated with the extracts under different conditions and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was evaluated by qPCR. Results Semi-purified polysaccharide extracts of A. bisporus and A. brasiliensis (= blazei) were found to contain (1→6),(1→4)-linked α-glucan, (1→6)-linked β-glucan, and mannogalactan. Their proportions were determined by integration of 1H-NMR signs, and were considerably different for the two species. A. brasiliensis showed a higher content of β-glucan, while A. bisporus presented mannogalactan as its main polysaccharide. The extracts induced a comparable increase of transcription of the pro-inflammatory cytokine genes IL-1β and TNF-α as well as of COX-2 in PMA differentiated THP-1 cells. Pro-inflammatory effects of bacterial LPS in this assay could be reduced significantly by the simultaneous addition of A. brasiliensis extract. Conclusions The polysaccharide preparations from the closely related species A. bisporus and A. brasiliensis show major differences in composition: A. bisporus shows high mannogalactan content whereas A. brasiliensis has mostly β-glucan. Semi

  13. In Vitro Antioxidant Activities and in Vivo Anti-Hypoxic Activity of the Edible Mushroom Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Sing. Chaidam.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Ji; Chen, Hai-Yan; Fan, Lin-Lin; Jiao, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Qi-He; Jiao, Ying-Chun

    2015-01-01

    With the rising awareness of a healthy lifestyle, natural functional foods have gained much interest as promising alternatives to synthetic functional drugs. Recently, wild Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Sing. Chaidam has been found and artificially cultivated for its thick fresh body and excellent taste, with its antioxidant and anti-hypoxic abilities unknown. In this work, the antioxidant potential of its methanolic, 55% ethanolic, aqueous extracts and crude polysaccharide was evaluated in different systems. The results showed that polysaccharide was the most effective in scavenging ability on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl radicals, metal chelating activity and reducing power, with EC50 values of 0.02, 2.79, 1.29, and 1.82 mg/mL, respectively. Therefore, we further studied the anti-hypoxic activity of crude polysaccharide. The results turned out that polysaccharide (300 mg/kg) prolonged the survival time, decreased the blood urea nitrogen and lactic acid content as well as increased the liver glycogen significantly, compared with the blank control and the commercialized product Hongjingtian (p < 0.05). With such excellent activities, we purified the polysaccharide and analyzed its molecular weight (120 kDa) as well as monosaccharide components (glucose, fructose and mannose). This study indicated that wild Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Sing. Chaidam had strong potential to be exploited as an effective natural functional food to relieve oxidative and hypoxia stresses. PMID:26404217

  14. Purification and properties of 4-aminobenzoate hydroxylase, a new monooxygenase from Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, H; Ogawa, T; Bando, N; Sasaoka, K

    1986-10-01

    A new FAD-dependent monooxygenase, 4-aminobenzoate hydroxylase that catalyzes the decarboxylative hydroxylation of 4-aminobenzoate and forms 4-hydroxyaniline in the presence of NAD(P)H and O2 has been purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation, affinity chromatography, chromatofocusing, and Sephadex G-100 chromatography from Agaricus bisporus, a common edible mushroom. The molecular weight of the enzyme, which consists of a single polypeptide, is 49,000. The enzyme contains 0.91 mol of FAD/mol of enzyme. Stoichiometric studies show that 1 mol of 4-aminobenzoate is converted to an equimolecular amount of 4-hydroxyaniline and CO2 with the consumption of 1 mol each of NADH and molecular oxygen. Results obtained isotopically with 18O2 show that one atom of molecular oxygen is incorporated into 4-hydroxyaniline formed from 4-aminobenzoate. The enzyme is most active between pH 6.5 and 8.0 in the oxidation of NADH and between pH 6.0 and 7.5 in the case of NADPH. The Km values for 4-aminobenzoate, NADH, and O2 are 20.4, 13.6, and 200 microM, respectively, and that for NADPH is 133 microM. Other substituted benzoates with free amino and carboxyl groups in the ortho or para position (e.g. 4-aminosalicylate and anthranilate) serve as substrates for hydroxylation, but, in these cases, H2O2 is formed simultaneously with the hydroxylation. The enzyme is insensitive to the chelators of iron and copper, sodium arsenite, and KCN. Heavy metal ions and p-chloromercuribenzoate severely inhibit the enzyme enzyme PMID:3489713

  15. Optimization of chemical sulfation, structural characterization and anticoagulant activity of Agaricus bisporus fucogalactan.

    PubMed

    Román, Yony; Iacomini, Marcello; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Cipriani, Thales R

    2016-08-01

    A fucogalactan (E) was isolated from aqueous extract of Agaricus bisporus. The monosaccharide composition, methylation, and NMR analyses showed it is constituted by a (1→6)-linked α-d-Galp main-chain, partially methylated at O-3, and partially substituted at O-2 by non-reducing end-units of α-l-Fucp or α-d-Galp. HPSEC analysis showed it had Mw of 1.28×10(4)gmol(-1). The polysaccharide was sulfated modifying reaction time, molar ratio of sulfation agent to hydroxyl group on the polysaccharide (ηClSO3H/OH ratio), and ratio of total reaction volume to weight of sample (VT/w ratio; μLmg(-1)). The degree of substitution (DS) was evaluated for all sulfated derivatives. The sulfated fucogalactan with the highest DS value (2.83) had the best anticoagulant activity on Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT) and Protrombin Time (PT) assays. This sulfated fucogalactan, named E100, was obtained with the optimal conditions of ηClSO3H/OH ratio of 18, VT/w ratio of 100, in 6h of reaction. The results showed that E100 produces a linear increment of APTT for concentrations of 15-45μgmL(-1), whereas PT was almost constant between 20 and 400μgmL(-1), suggesting an anticoagulant activity via inhibition of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. NMR and methylation analyses showed that α-d-Galp units of the main chain were greatly sulfated on 2-O-, 3-O-, and 4-O-positions. PMID:27112883

  16. Comparison of characterization and microbial communities in rice straw- and wheat straw-based compost for Agaricus bisporus production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Mao, Jiugeng; Zhao, Hejuan; Li, Min; Wei, Qishun; Zhou, Ying; Shao, Heping

    2016-09-01

    Rice straw (RS) is an important raw material for the preparation of Agaricus bisporus compost in China. In this study, the characterization of composting process from RS and wheat straw (WS) was compared for mushroom production. The results showed that the temperature in RS compost increased rapidly compared with WS compost, and the carbon (C)/nitrogen (N) ratio decreased quickly. The microbial changes during the Phase I and Phase II composting process were monitored using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Bacteria were the dominant species during the process of composting and the bacterial community structure dramatically changed during heap composting according to the DGGE results. The bacterial community diversity of RS compost was abundant compared with WS compost at stages 4-5, but no distinct difference was observed after the controlled tunnel Phase II process. The total amount of PLFAs of RS compost, as an indicator of microbial biomass, was higher than that of WS. Clustering by DGGE and principal component analysis of the PLFA compositions revealed that there were differences in both the microbial population and community structure between RS- and WS-based composts. Our data indicated that composting of RS resulted in improved degradation and assimilation of breakdown products by A. bisporus, and suggested that the RS compost was effective for sustaining A. bisporus mushroom growth as well as conventional WS compost. PMID:27337959

  17. The Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha Expresses Orthologs of the Fungal Agaricus bisporus Agglutinin Family1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Fouquaert, Elke; Jauneau, Alain; Rougé, Pierre; Lannoo, Nausicaä; Hamada, Hiroki; Alvarez, Richard; Devreese, Bart; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2007-01-01

    A lectin different from the previously described mannose-binding agglutinins has been isolated from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. Biochemical characterization of the purified lectin combined with the data from earlier transcriptome analyses demonstrated that the novel M. polymorpha agglutinin is not related to any of the known plant lectin families, but closely resembles the Agaricus bisporus-type lectins, which hitherto have been found exclusively in fungi. Immunolocalization studies confirmed that lectin is exclusively associated with plant cells, ruling out the possibility of a fungal origin. Extensive screening of publicly accessible databases confirmed that, apart from fungi, the occurrence of A. bisporus-type lectins is confined to M. polymorpha and the moss Tortula ruralis. Expression of a typical fungal protein in a liverwort and a moss raises the question of the origin of the corresponding genes. Regardless of the evolutionary origin, the presence of a functional A. bisporus lectin ortholog in M. polymorpha provides evidence for the expression of an additional carbohydrate-binding domain in Viridiplantae. PMID:17041032

  18. Accumulation of recalcitrant xylan in mushroom-compost is due to a lack of xylan substituent removing enzyme activities of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Edita; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitris; Xing, Lia; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; de Vries, Ronald P; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2015-11-01

    The ability of Agaricus bisporus to degrade xylan in wheat straw based compost during mushroom formation is unclear. In this paper, xylan was extracted from the compost with water, 1M and 4M alkali. Over the phases analyzed, the remaining xylan was increasingly substituted with (4-O-methyl-)glucuronic acid and arabinosyl residues, both one and two arabinosyl residues per xylosyl residue remained. In the 1M and 4M KOH soluble solids of spent compost, 33 and 49 out of 100 xylosyl residues, respectively, were substituted. The accumulation of glucuronic acid substituents matched with the analysis that the two A. bisporus genes encoding for α-glucuronidase activity (both GH115) were not expressed in the A. bisporus mycelium in the compost during fruiting. Also, in a maximum likelihood tree it was shown that it is not likely that A. bisporus possesses genes encoding for the activity to remove arabinose from xylosyl residues having two arabinosyl residues. PMID:26256360

  19. Genome sequence of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus reveals mechanisms governing adaptation to a humic-rich ecological niche.

    PubMed

    Morin, Emmanuelle; Kohler, Annegret; Baker, Adam R; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Lombard, Vincent; Nagy, Laszlo G; Ohm, Robin A; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Brun, Annick; Aerts, Andrea L; Bailey, Andrew M; Billette, Christophe; Coutinho, Pedro M; Deakin, Greg; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Floudas, Dimitrios; Grimwood, Jane; Hildén, Kristiina; Kües, Ursula; Labutti, Kurt M; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika A; Lucas, Susan M; Murat, Claude; Riley, Robert W; Salamov, Asaf A; Schmutz, Jeremy; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Wösten, Han A B; Xu, Jianping; Eastwood, Daniel C; Foster, Gary D; Sonnenberg, Anton S M; Cullen, Dan; de Vries, Ronald P; Lundell, Taina; Hibbett, David S; Henrissat, Bernard; Burton, Kerry S; Kerrigan, Richard W; Challen, Michael P; Grigoriev, Igor V; Martin, Francis

    2012-10-23

    Agaricus bisporus is the model fungus for the adaptation, persistence, and growth in the humic-rich leaf-litter environment. Aside from its ecological role, A. bisporus has been an important component of the human diet for over 200 y and worldwide cultivation of the "button mushroom" forms a multibillion dollar industry. We present two A. bisporus genomes, their gene repertoires and transcript profiles on compost and during mushroom formation. The genomes encode a full repertoire of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes similar to that of wood-decayers. Comparative transcriptomics of mycelium grown on defined medium, casing-soil, and compost revealed genes encoding enzymes involved in xylan, cellulose, pectin, and protein degradation are more highly expressed in compost. The striking expansion of heme-thiolate peroxidases and β-etherases is distinctive from Agaricomycotina wood-decayers and suggests a broad attack on decaying lignin and related metabolites found in humic acid-rich environment. Similarly, up-regulation of these genes together with a lignolytic manganese peroxidase, multiple copper radical oxidases, and cytochrome P450s is consistent with challenges posed by complex humic-rich substrates. The gene repertoire and expression of hydrolytic enzymes in A. bisporus is substantially different from the taxonomically related ectomycorrhizal symbiont Laccaria bicolor. A common promoter motif was also identified in genes very highly expressed in humic-rich substrates. These observations reveal genetic and enzymatic mechanisms governing adaptation to the humic-rich ecological niche formed during plant degradation, further defining the critical role such fungi contribute to soil structure and carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. Genome sequence will expedite mushroom breeding for improved agronomic characteristics. PMID:23045686

  20. Genome sequence of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus reveals mechanisms governing adaptation to a humic-rich ecological niche

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, Emmanuelle; Kohler, Annegret; Baker, Adam R.; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Lombard, Vincent; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Ohm, Robin A.; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Brun, Annick; Aerts, Andrea L.; Bailey, Andrew M.; Billette, Christophe; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Deakin, Greg; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Floudas, Dimitrios; Grimwood, Jane; Hilden, Kristiina; Kues, Ursula; LaButti, Kurt M.; Lapidus, Alla; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan M.; Murat, Claude; Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Wosten, Han A. B.; Xu, Jianping; Eastwood, Daniel C.; Foster, Gary D.; Sonnenberg, Anton S. M.; Cullen, Dan; de Vries, Ronald P.; Lundell, Taina; Hibbett, David S.; Henrissat, Bernard; Burton, Kerry S.; Kerrigan, Richard W.; Challen, Michael P.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Martin, Francis

    2012-04-27

    Agaricus bisporus is the model fungus for the adaptation, persistence, and growth in the humic-rich leaf-litter environment. Aside from its ecological role, A. bisporus has been an important component of the human diet for over 200 y and worldwide cultivation of the button mushroom forms a multibillion dollar industry. We present two A. bisporus genomes, their gene repertoires and transcript profiles on compost and during mushroom formation. The genomes encode a full repertoire of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes similar to that of wood-decayers. Comparative transcriptomics of mycelium grown on defined medium, casing-soil, and compost revealed genes encoding enzymes involved in xylan, cellulose, pectin, and protein degradation are more highly expressed in compost. The striking expansion of heme-thiolate peroxidases and etherases is distinctive from Agaricomycotina wood-decayers and suggests a broad attack on decaying lignin and related metabolites found in humic acid-rich environment. Similarly, up-regulation of these genes together with a lignolytic manganese peroxidase, multiple copper radical oxidases, and cytochrome P450s is consistent with challenges posed by complex humic-rich substrates. The gene repertoire and expression of hydrolytic enzymes in A. bisporus is substantially different from the taxonomically related ectomycorrhizal symbiont Laccaria bicolor. A common promoter motif was also identified in genes very highly expressed in humic-rich substrates. These observations reveal genetic and enzymatic mechanisms governing adaptation to the humic-rich ecological niche formed during plant degradation, further defining the critical role such fungi contribute to soil structure and carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. Genome sequence will expedite mushroom breeding for improved agronomic characteristics.

  1. Fate of Carbohydrates and Lignin during Composting and Mycelium Growth of Agaricus bisporus on Wheat Straw Based Compost

    PubMed Central

    Jurak, Edita; Punt, Arjen M.; Arts, Wim; Kabel, Mirjam A.; Gruppen, Harry

    2015-01-01

    In wheat straw based composting, enabling growth of Agaricus bisporus mushrooms, it is unknown to which extent the carbohydrate-lignin matrix changes and how much is metabolized. In this paper we report yields and remaining structures of the major components. During the Phase II of composting 50% of both xylan and cellulose were metabolized by microbial activity, while lignin structures were unaltered. During A. bisporus’ mycelium growth (Phase III) carbohydrates were only slightly consumed and xylan was found to be partially degraded. At the same time, lignin was metabolized for 45% based on pyrolysis GC/MS. Remaining lignin was found to be modified by an increase in the ratio of syringyl (S) to guaiacyl (G) units from 0.5 to 0.7 during mycelium growth, while fewer decorations on the phenolic skeleton of both S and G units remained. PMID:26436656

  2. In Silico Study to Develop a Lectin-Like Protein from Mushroom Agaricus bisporus for Pharmaceutical Application

    PubMed Central

    Ismaya, Wangsa Tirta; Yunita; Damayanti, Sophi; Wijaya, Caroline; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R.; Retnoningrum, Debbie Sofie; Rachmawati, Heni

    2016-01-01

    A lectin-like protein of unknown function designated as LSMT was recently discovered in the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The protein shares high structural similarity to HA-33 from Clostridium botulinum (HA33) and Ricin-B-like lectin from the mushroom Clitocybe nebularis (CNL), which have been developed as drug carrier and anti-cancer, respectively. These homologous proteins display the ability to penetrate the intestinal epithelial cell monolayer, and are beneficial for oral administration. As the characteristics of LSMT are unknown, a structural study in silico was performed to assess its potential pharmaceutical application. The study suggested potential binding to target ligands such as HA-33 and CNL although the nature, specificity, capacity, mode, and strength may differ. Further molecular docking experiments suggest that interactions between the LSMT and tested ligands may take place. This finding indicates the possible use of the LSMT protein, initiating new research on its use for pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:27110510

  3. In Silico Study to Develop a Lectin-Like Protein from Mushroom Agaricus bisporus for Pharmaceutical Application.

    PubMed

    Ismaya, Wangsa Tirta; Yunita; Damayanti, Sophi; Wijaya, Caroline; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R; Retnoningrum, Debbie Sofie; Rachmawati, Heni

    2016-01-01

    A lectin-like protein of unknown function designated as LSMT was recently discovered in the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The protein shares high structural similarity to HA-33 from Clostridium botulinum (HA33) and Ricin-B-like lectin from the mushroom Clitocybe nebularis (CNL), which have been developed as drug carrier and anti-cancer, respectively. These homologous proteins display the ability to penetrate the intestinal epithelial cell monolayer, and are beneficial for oral administration. As the characteristics of LSMT are unknown, a structural study in silico was performed to assess its potential pharmaceutical application. The study suggested potential binding to target ligands such as HA-33 and CNL although the nature, specificity, capacity, mode, and strength may differ. Further molecular docking experiments suggest that interactions between the LSMT and tested ligands may take place. This finding indicates the possible use of the LSMT protein, initiating new research on its use for pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:27110510

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of latent isoform PPO4 mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) tyrosinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard; Molitor, Christian; Al-Oweini, Rami; Kortz, Ulrich; Rompel, Annette

    2014-01-23

    Polyphenol oxidase 4 (PPO4) from the natural source A. bisporus was crystallized in its latent precursor form (pro-tyrosinase; Ser2–Thr565) using the 6-tungstotellurate(VI) salt Na{sub 6}[TeW{sub 6}O{sub 24}]·22H{sub 2}O as a crystallization additive. Tyrosinase exhibits catalytic activity for the ortho-hydroxylation of monophenols to diphenols as well as their subsequent oxidation to quinones. Owing to polymerization of these quinones, brown-coloured high-molecular-weight compounds called melanins are generated. The latent precursor form of polyphenol oxidase 4, one of the six tyrosinase isoforms from Agaricus bisporus, was purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The obtained crystals belonged to space group C121 (two molecules per asymmetric unit) and diffracted to 2.78 Å resolution. The protein only formed crystals under low-salt conditions using the 6-tungstotellurate(VI) salt Na{sub 6}[TeW{sub 6}O{sub 24}]·22H{sub 2}O as a co-crystallization agent.

  5. Transcription analysis of pyranose dehydrogenase from the basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus and characterization of the recombinantly expressed enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gonaus, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens

    2016-03-01

    Agaricus bisporus is a litter degrading basidiomycete commonly found in humic-rich environments. It is used as model organism and cultivated in large scale for food industry. Due to its ecological niche it produces a variety of enzymes for detoxification and degradation of humified plant litter. One of these, pyranose dehydrogenase, is thought to play a role in detoxification and lignocellulose degradation. It is a member of the glucose-methanol-choline family of flavin-dependent enzymes and oxidizes a wide range of sugars with concomitant reduction of electron acceptors like quinones. In this work, transcription of pdh in A. bisporus was investigated with real-time PCR revealing influence of the carbon source on pdh expression levels. The gene was isolated and heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. Characterization of the recombinant enzyme showed a higher affinity towards disaccharides compared to other tested pyranose dehydrogenases from related Agariceae. Homology modeling and sequence alignments indicated that two loops of high sequence variability at substrate access site could play an important role in modulating these substrate specificities. PMID:26616098

  6. The cel3 gene of Agaricus bisporus codes for a modular cellulase and is transcriptionally regulated by the carbon source.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, C M; Yagüe, E; Raguz, S; Wood, D A; Thurston, C F

    1994-01-01

    A 52-kDa protein, CEL3, has been separated from the culture filtrate of Agaricus bisporus during growth on cellulose. A PCR-derived probe was made, with a degenerate oligodeoxynucleotide derived from the amino acid sequence of a CEL3 CNBr cleavage product and was used to select cel3 cDNA clones from an A. bisporus cDNA library. Two allelic cDNAs were isolated. They showed 98.8% identity of their nucleotide sequences. The deduced amino acid sequence and domain architecture of CEL3 showed a high degree of similarity to those of cellobiohydrolase II of Trichoderma reesei. Functional expression of cel3 cDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was achieved by placing it under the control of a constitutive promoter and fusing it to the yeast invertase signal sequence. Recombinant CEL3 secreted by yeast showed enzymatic activity towards crystalline cellulose. At long reaction times, CEL3 was also able to degrade carboxymethyl cellulose. Northern (RNA) analysis showed that cel3 gene expression was induced by cellulose and repressed by glucose, fructose, 2-deoxyglucose, and lactose. Glycerol, mannitol, sorbitol, and maltose were neutral carbon sources. Nuclear run-on analysis showed that the rate of synthesis of cel3 mRNA in cellulose-grown cultures was 13 times higher than that in glucose-grown cultures. A low basal rate of cel3 mRNA synthesis was observed in the nuclei isolated from glucose-grown mycelia. Images PMID:8085821

  7. Induction of lcc2 expression and activity by Agaricus bisporus provides defence against Trichoderma aggressivum toxic extracts.

    PubMed

    Sjaarda, Calvin P; Abubaker, Kamal S; Castle, Alan J

    2015-11-01

    Laccases are used by fungi for several functions including defence responses to stresses associated with attack by other fungi. Laccase activity changes and the induction of two laccase genes, lcc1 and lcc2, in Agaricus bisporus were measured in response to toxic extracts of medium in which Trichoderma aggressivum, the cause of green mould disease, was grown. A strain of A. bisporus that shows resistance to the extracts showed higher basal levels and greater enzymatic activity after extract exposure than did a sensitive strain. Furthermore, pre-incubation of T. aggressivum extract with laccases reduced toxicity. Faster induction and greater numbers of lcc2 transcripts in response to the extract were noted in the resistant strain than in the sensitive strain. The timing and increase in lcc2 transcript abundance mirrored changes in total laccase activity. No correlation between resistance and lcc1 transcription was apparent. Transcript abundance in transformants with a siRNA construct homologous to both genes varied widely. A strong negative correlation between transcript abundance and sensitivity of the transformant to toxic extract was observed in plate assays. These results indicated that laccase activity and in particular that encoded by lcc2 contributes to toxin metabolism and by extension green mould disease resistance. PMID:25824278

  8. Hepatoprotective effects of polysaccharide isolated from Agaricus bisporus industrial wastewater against CCl₄-induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiafu; Ou, Yixin; Yew, Tai Wai David; Liu, Jingna; Leng, Bo; Lin, Zhichao; Su, Yi; Zhuang, Yuanhong; Lin, Jiaofen; Li, Xiumin; Xue, Yu; Pan, Yutian

    2016-01-01

    During the industrial production of canned mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), a large quantity of wastewater is produced. In this study, the wastewater generated during the canning of mushroom was analyzed. From this wastewater, four polysaccharide components (Abnp1001, Abnp1002, Abap1001, and Abap1002) with hepatic-protective activity were isolated by ultrafiltration, DEAE cellulose-52 chromatography and Sephadex G-200 size-exclusion chromatography. Results of ultraviolet spectra analysis and molecular weight determination showed that Abnp1001, Abnp1002, Abap1001 and Abap1002 were uniform with average molecular weights of 336, 12.8, 330 and 15.8kDa, respectively. The monosaccharide composition analysis using gas chromatography (GC) showed that the four fractions were heteropolysaccharides and mainly composed of glucose. Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) analysis showed that the isolated fractions were all composed of β-glycoside linkages. Additionally, the potential hepatoprotective activities of these polysaccharides against CCl4-induced hepatic injury in mice were studied. Notably, Abnp1002 and Abap1002 could lower the alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations in serum in a dose dependent manner and reduce the hepatocellular degeneration and necrosis, as well as inflammatory infiltration. These results indicate that these two polysaccharides had protective effects on acute hepatic injury induced by CCl4 in mice and suggest that the polysaccharides extracted from A. bisporus industrial wastewater might have potential in therapeutics of acute hepatic injury. PMID:26454111

  9. Induction of lcc2 expression and activity by Agaricus bisporus provides defence against Trichoderma aggressivum toxic extracts

    PubMed Central

    Sjaarda, Calvin P; Abubaker, Kamal S; Castle, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are used by fungi for several functions including defence responses to stresses associated with attack by other fungi. Laccase activity changes and the induction of two laccase genes, lcc1 and lcc2, in Agaricus bisporus were measured in response to toxic extracts of medium in which Trichoderma aggressivum, the cause of green mould disease, was grown. A strain of A. bisporus that shows resistance to the extracts showed higher basal levels and greater enzymatic activity after extract exposure than did a sensitive strain. Furthermore, pre-incubation of T. aggressivum extract with laccases reduced toxicity. Faster induction and greater numbers of lcc2 transcripts in response to the extract were noted in the resistant strain than in the sensitive strain. The timing and increase in lcc2 transcript abundance mirrored changes in total laccase activity. No correlation between resistance and lcc1 transcription was apparent. Transcript abundance in transformants with a siRNA construct homologous to both genes varied widely. A strong negative correlation between transcript abundance and sensitivity of the transformant to toxic extract was observed in plate assays. These results indicated that laccase activity and in particular that encoded by lcc2 contributes to toxin metabolism and by extension green mould disease resistance. PMID:25824278

  10. The effect of process parameters and microstructural changes on a new convenience food - quick-frozen paste-coated mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-Wen; Chang, Xue-Dong; Liu, Xiu-Feng; Jiang, Wen-Hong; Ma, Xiao-Feng

    2015-03-01

    The technology of quick-freezing paste-coated mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) was studied and optimized. The best microwave pretreatment condition for 1 cm slices, regarding color protection, was 5.4 W/g, for 55, 55-60 and 60 s for mushrooms with 3, 4 and 5 cm diameter caps respectively. For a batch of paste (668.2-1034.6 g), the process parameters considered were oil content (46.6-63.4 g), water content (381-562.6 g) and flour content (166-334 g) with a constant additional content of 30 g starch, 9 g baking powder, 2.6 g carrageenan, 30 g salt and 3 g pepper. These parameters were investigated using response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite design. The optimal levels of the major paste components were 300 g flour, 432.5 g water and 50 g oil. The freezing time and sensory acceptability for paste-coated Agaricus bisporus(PCAB) under the optimized conditions were 7.49 min and 6.2 respectively. The freezing curves of PCAB were established at different temperatures and the freezing rates were calculated to find the freezing characteristics. In addition, the cell structure of PCAB, frozen at -75 °C, the lowest freezing temperature, and studied using transmission electron microscopy, was similar in quality to that of fresh Agaricus bisporus. The results suggested that Agaricus bisporus can be quick-frozen with a paste coating to produce an acceptable and nutritious convenience food. PMID:25745199

  11. Long-Distance Translocation of Protein during Morphogenesis of the Fruiting Body in the Filamentous Fungus, Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Woolston, Benjamin M.; Schlagnhaufer, Carl; Wilkinson, Jack; Larsen, Jeffrey; Shi, Zhixin; Mayer, Kimberly M.; Walters, Donald S.; Curtis, Wayne R.; Romaine, C. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Commercial cultivation of the mushroom fungus, Agaricus bisporus, utilizes a substrate consisting of a lower layer of compost and upper layer of peat. Typically, the two layers are seeded with individual mycelial inoculants representing a single genotype of A. bisporus. Studies aimed at examining the potential of this fungal species as a heterologous protein expression system have revealed unexpected contributions of the mycelial inoculants in the morphogenesis of the fruiting body. These contributions were elucidated using a dual-inoculant method whereby the two layers were differientially inoculated with transgenic β-glucuronidase (GUS) and wild-type (WT) lines. Surprisingly, use of a transgenic GUS line in the lower substrate and a WT line in the upper substrate yielded fruiting bodies expressing GUS activity while lacking the GUS transgene. Results of PCR and RT-PCR analyses for the GUS transgene and RNA transcript, respectively, suggested translocation of the GUS protein from the transgenic mycelium colonizing the lower layer into the fruiting body that developed exclusively from WT mycelium colonizing the upper layer. Effective translocation of the GUS protein depended on the use of a transgenic line in the lower layer in which the GUS gene was controlled by a vegetative mycelium-active promoter (laccase 2 and β-actin), rather than a fruiting body-active promoter (hydrophobin A). GUS-expressing fruiting bodies lacking the GUS gene had a bonafide WT genotype, confirmed by the absence of stably inherited GUS and hygromycin phosphotransferase selectable marker activities in their derived basidiospores and mycelial tissue cultures. Differientially inoculating the two substrate layers with individual lines carrying the GUS gene controlled by different tissue-preferred promoters resulted in up to a ∼3.5-fold increase in GUS activity over that obtained with a single inoculant. Our findings support the existence of a previously undescribed phenomenon of long

  12. A novel homothallic variety of Agaricus bisporus comprises rare tetrasporic isolates from Europe.

    PubMed

    Callac, Philippe; Jacobé de Haut, Isabelle; Imbernon, Micheline; Guinberteau, Jacques; Desmerger, Christophe; Theochari, Ioanna

    2003-01-01

    Among 400 wild specimens of A. bisporus collected in Europe, only three were tetrasporic. In the case of two of them from France, a previous study showed that one was homokaryotic and hypothetically belonged to a homothallic entity while the other was heterokaryotic and possibly resulted from hybridization between a member of this entity and a classical bisporic strain. A third tetrasporic specimen recently was discovered in Greece. Morphological and genetic comparisons, using alloenzymatic markers, molecular markers and ITS polymorphisms, reveal that this third specimen is homokaryotic and belongs, with the homokaryotic specimen from France, to the same entity. Dissimilarity analysis confirms the hybrid origin of the heterokaryotic specimen. Varietal status is proposed for this homothallic, highly homogeneous entity, and A. bisporus var. eurotetrasporus is described. This novel variety clearly differs from var. bisporus by its tetrasporic basidia and from var. burnettii by its longer spores. It has a complex story because it can interbreed with var. bisporus and shares the same habitat; however, because of its homothallic life cycle and its partial intersterility, it is probably in the process of speciation. PMID:21156608

  13. Effect of ultrasound combined with malic acid on the activity and conformation of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) polyphenoloxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Liu, Wei; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Zou, Liqiang; Liu, Junping; Zhong, Junzhen; Chen, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Polyphenoloxidase (PPO) plays an important role in the browning of vegetables, fruits and edible fungi. The effects of ultrasound, malic acid, and their combination on the activity and conformation of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) PPO were studied. The activity of PPO decreased gradually with the increasing of malic acid concentrations (5-60mM). Neither medium concentrations (10, 20, 30mM) malic acid nor individual ultrasound (25kHz, 55.48W/cm(2)) treatment could remarkably inactivate PPO. However, the inactivation during their combination was more significant than the sum of ultrasound inactivation and malic acid inactivation. The inactivation kinetics of PPO followed a first-order kinetics under the combination of ultrasound and malic acid. The conformation of combination treated PPO was changed, which was reflected in the decrease of α-helix, increase of β-sheet contents and disruption of the tertiary structure. Results of molecular microstructure showed that ultrasound broke large molecular groups of PPO into small ones. Moreover, combined treatment disrupted the microstructure of PPO and molecules were connected together. PMID:27241293

  14. Scytalidium thermophilum-colonized grain, corncobs and chopped wheat straw substrates for the production of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jose E; Royse, Daniel J

    2009-02-01

    We examined the possibility of cultivating Agaricus bisporus (Ab) on various grains and agricultural by-products, with the objective of improving yield capacity of substrate pre-colonized by Scytalidium thermophilum (St). Radial growth rate (RGR) of St at 45 degrees C ranged from no growth on sterile wheat grain to 14.9 mm/d on whole oats. The linear extension rate (LER) of Ab, grown on St-colonized substrate (4 days at 45 degrees C), ranged from a low of 2.7 mm/d on 100% corncobs to 4.7 mm/d on a 50/50 mixture of ground corncobs/millet grain. Several other substrates containing wheat straw+ground corncobs+boiled millet and pre-colonized by St (4 days at 42+/-3 degrees C), were evaluated for production of Ab. The biological efficiency (BE) of production increased linearly with the addition of millet to the formula. However, substrates with millet levels 84% often were contaminated before mushroom harvest. Maximum BE (99%) and yield (21.6 kg/m(2)) were obtained on St-colonized wheat straw+2% hydrated lime supplemented with 9% commercial supplement added both at spawning and at casing. PMID:18954978

  15. Influence of sporophore development, damage, storage, and tissue specificity on the enzymic formation of volatiles in mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Combet, Emilie; Henderson, Janey; Eastwood, Daniel C; Burton, Kerry S

    2009-05-13

    The enzymic oxidation of the polyunsaturated fatty acid-linoleic acid leads, in fungi, to the formation of a unique class of nonconjugated hydroperoxides, which are cleaved to form eight-carbon volatiles characteristic of mushroom and fungal flavor. However, the enzymes involved in this biosynthetic pathway, the bioavailability of the fatty acid substrate, and the occurrence of the reaction products (hydroperoxides and eight-carbon volatiles) are not fully understood. This study investigated the lipids, fatty acids, and hydroperoxide levels, as well as eight-carbon volatile variations in the fungal model Agaricus bisporus, according to four parameters: sporophore development, postharvest storage, tissue type, and damage. Eight-carbon volatiles were measured using solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Tissue disruption had a major impact on the volatile profile, both qualitatively and quantitatively; 3-octanone was identified as the main eight-carbon volatile in whole and sliced sporophore, an observation overlooked in previous studies due to the use of tissue disruption and solvent extraction for analysis. Fatty acid oxidation and eight-carbon volatile emissions decreased with sporophore development and storage, and differed according to tissue type. The release of 1-octen-3-ol and 3-octanone by incubation of sporophore tissue homogenate with free linoleic acid was inhibited by acetylsalicylic acid, providing evidence for the involvement of a heme-dioxygenase in eight-carbon volatile production. PMID:19326947

  16. Effect of Selenium-Enriched Agaricus bisporus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Extracts, Obtained by Pressurized Water Extraction, on the Expression of Cholesterol Homeostasis Related Genes by Low-Density Array.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Soler-Rivas, Cristina; Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Reglero, Guillermo; Marín, Francisco Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Culinary-medicinal mushrooms are able to lower blood cholesterol levels in animal models by different mechanisms. They might impair the endogenous cholesterol synthesis and exogenous cholesterol absorption during digestion. Mushroom extracts, obtained using pressurized water extractions (PWE) from Agaricus bisporus basidiomes, supplemented or not supplemented with selenium, were applied to HepG2 cell cultures to study the expression of 19 genes related to cholesterol homeostasis by low-density arrays (LDA). Only the PWE fractions obtained at 25°C showed 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitory activity. Besides the enzymatic inhibition, PWE extracts may downregulate some of the key genes involved in the cholesterol homeostasis, such as the squalene synthase gene (FDFT1), since its mRNA expression falls by one third of its initial value. In summary, A. bisporus extracts may also modulate biological cholesterol levels by molecular mechanisms further than the enzymatic way previously reported. PMID:25746616

  17. Effect of polyvalencies of glycotopes on the binding of a lectin from the edible mushroom, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Albert M; Wu, June H; Herp, Anthony; Liu, Jia-Hau

    2003-01-01

    Agaricus bisporus agglutinin (ABA) isolated from edible mushroom has a potent anti-proliferative effect on malignant colon cells with considerable therapeutic potential as an anti-neoplastic agent. Since previous studies on the structural requirement for binding were limited to molecular or submolecular levels of Galbeta1-3GalNAc (T; Thomsen-Friedenreich disaccharide glycotope; where Gal represents D-galactopyranose and GalNAc represents 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactopyranose) and its derivatives, the binding properties of ABA were further investigated using our collection of glycans by enzyme-linked lectinosorbent assay and lectin-glycan inhibition assay. The results indicate that polyvalent Galbeta1-related glycotopes, GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr (Tn), and their cryptoforms, are the most potent factor for ABA binding. They were up to 5.5x10(5) and 4.7x10(6) times more active than monomeric T and GalNAc respectively. The affinity of ABA for ligands can be ranked as: multivalent T (alpha) (Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha1-), Tn and I / II (Galbeta1-3GlcNac/Galbeta1-4GlcNAc, where GlcNAc represents 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucopyranose)>>>>monomeric T (alpha) and Tn > I >>GalNAc>>> II, L (Galbeta1-4Glc, where Glc represents D-glucopyranose) and Gal (inactive). These specific binding features of ABA establish the importance of affinity enhancement by high-density polyvalent (versus multiantennary I / II) glycotopes and facilitate our understanding of the lectin receptor recognition events relevant to its biological activities. PMID:12467495

  18. Implications of polluted soil biostimulation and bioaugmentation with spent mushroom substrate (Agaricus bisporus) on the microbial community and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, Carlos; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Pesciaroli, Lorena; Yunta, Felipe; Crognale, Silvia; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    Different applications of spent Agaricus bisporus substrate (SAS), a widespread agro-industrial waste, were investigated with respect to the remediation of a historically polluted soil with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH). In one treatment, the waste was sterilized (SSAS) prior to its application in order to assess its ability to biostimulate, as an organic amendment, the resident soil microbiota and ensuing contaminant degradation. For the other treatments, two bioaugmentation approaches were investigated; the first involved the use of the waste itself and thus implied the application of A. bisporus and the inherent microbiota of the waste. In the second treatment, SAS was sterilized and inoculated again with the fungus to assess its ability to act as a fungal carrier. All these treatments were compared with natural attenuation in terms of their impact on soil heterotrophic and PAH-degrading bacteria, fungal growth, biodiversity of soil microbiota and ability to affect PAH bioavailability and ensuing degradation and detoxification. Results clearly showed that historically PAH contaminated soil was not amenable to natural attenuation. Conversely, the addition of sterilized spent A. bisporus substrate to the soil stimulated resident soil bacteria with ensuing high removals of 3-ring PAH. Both augmentation treatments were more effective in removing highly condensed PAH, some of which known to possess a significant carcinogenic activity. Regardless of the mode of application, the present results strongly support the adequacy of SAS for environmental remediation purposes and open the way to an attractive recycling option of this waste. PMID:25437949

  19. Evidence for PPC1, a determinant of the pilei-pellis color of Agaricus bisporus fruitbodies.

    PubMed

    Callac, P; Moquet, F; Imbernon, M; Guedes-Lafargue, M R; Mamoun, M; Olivier, J M

    1998-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the genetic basis of mushroom cap color. In first generation hybrids between a brown isolate and the white commercial hybrid U 1, the white trait was recessive. Color was determined using color meter technology in second generation hybrids obtained by crossing the homokaryotic progeny of a first generation hybrid with a homokaryon from U 1. Statistical analysis revealed a bimodal distribution describing two classes of white and not-white hybrids. We postulate that a recessive allele at a single locus (PPC1) encodes the white pilei-pellis color. Joint segregation analyses indicated that PPC1 was linked to the ADH (alcohol dehydrogenase) locus. Through the analysis of the heterokaryotic progeny of the first generation hybrid, a recombination model is proposed in which PPC1 is located between the centromere and the ADH locus. PMID:9578631

  20. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction to obtain mycosterols from Agaricus bisporus L. by response surface methodology and comparison with conventional Soxhlet extraction.

    PubMed

    Heleno, Sandrina A; Diz, Patrícia; Prieto, M A; Barros, Lillian; Rodrigues, Alírio; Barreiro, Maria Filomena; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-04-15

    Ergosterol, a molecule with high commercial value, is the most abundant mycosterol in Agaricus bisporus L. To replace common conventional extraction techniques (e.g. Soxhlet), the present study reports the optimal ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions for ergosterol. After preliminary tests, the results showed that solvents, time and ultrasound power altered the extraction efficiency. Using response surface methodology, models were developed to investigate the favourable experimental conditions that maximize the extraction efficiency. All statistical criteria demonstrated the validity of the proposed models. Overall, ultrasound-assisted extraction with ethanol at 375 W during 15 min proved to be as efficient as the Soxhlet extraction, yielding 671.5 ± 0.5mg ergosterol/100 g dw. However, with n-hexane extracts with higher purity (mg ergosterol/g extract) were obtained. Finally, it was proposed for the removal of the saponification step, which simplifies the extraction process and makes it more feasible for its industrial transference. PMID:26675841

  1. Novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides derived from edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus (J.E. Lange) Imbach identified by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ching Ching; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2014-04-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors derived from foods are valuable auxiliaries to agents such as captopril. Eight highly functional ACE inhibitory peptides from the mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, were identified by LC-MS/MS. Among these peptides, the most potent ACE inhibitory activity was exhibited by AHEPVK, RIGLF and PSSNK with IC₅₀ values of 63, 116 and 129 μM, respectively. These peptides exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity after gastrointestinal digestion. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggested that AHEPVK and RIGLF act as competitive inhibitors against ACE, whereas PSSNK acts as a non-competitive inhibitor. Mushrooms can be a good component of dietary supplement due to their readily available source and, in addition, they rarely cause food allergy. Compared to ACE inhibitory peptides isolated from other edible mushrooms, AHEPVK, RIGLF and PSSNK have lower IC₅₀ values. Therefore, these peptides may serve as an ideal ingredient in the production of antihypertensive supplements. PMID:24262574

  2. The Agaricus bisporus pruA gene encodes a cytosolic delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase which is expressed in fruit bodies but not in gill tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Schaap, P J; Müller, Y; Sonnenberg, A S; van Griensven, L J; Visser, J

    1997-01-01

    A fortuitously cloned 3'-truncated cDNA encoding the Agaricus bisporus delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase was used to characterize the complete gene. The gene would encode a cytosolic polypeptide of 546 amino acids, and the basidiomycetous gene was evenly expressed in various parts of the mushroom except for the gills. No expression was detected in compost-grown mycelium. The steady-state mRNA level of the gene in the vegetative phase was determined on simple synthetic media and was two- to threefold higher with ammonium or proline as the sole nitrogen source compared to glutamate as the sole nitrogen source. Moreover, the steady-state mRNA level was not markedly influenced by addition of ammonium phosphate to proline- or glutamate-utilizing cultures. The results suggest that ammonium and the amino acids proline and glutamate are equally preferred nitrogen sources in this organism and are consistent with previous observations of H. M Kalisz, D.A. Wood, and D. Moore (Trans. Br. Mycol. Soc. 88:221-227, 1987) that A. bisporus continues to degrade protein and secrete ammonium even if ammonium and glucose are present in the culture medium. PMID:8979339

  3. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus increases expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase-1 and expression of glutathione peroxidase-2 in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Howell, Kate; Dunshea, Frank R; Ng, Ken

    2014-03-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus on cytosolic gluthathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), gastrointestinal specific glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) and selenoprotein P (SeP) mRNA expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon was examined. Rats were fed for 5weeks with control diet (0.15μg Se/g feed) or Se-enriched diet fortified with selenised mushroom (1μg Se/g feed). The mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly (P<0.01) up-regulated by 1.65-fold and 2.3-fold for GPx-1 and GPx-2, respectively, but were not significantly different for TrxR-1 and SeP between the 2 diet treatments. The up-regulation of GPx-1 mRNA expression was consistent with GPX-1 activity level, which was significantly (P<0.05) increased by 1.77-fold in rats fed with the Se-enriched diet compared to the control diet. The results showed that selenised A. bisporus can positively increase GPx-1 and GPx-2 gene expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon. PMID:24176350

  4. Yield of four Agaricus bisporus strains in three compost formulations and chemical composition analyses of the mushrooms.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Meire Cristina Nogueira; Zied, Diego Cunha; de Almeida Minhoni, Marli Teixeira; Kopytowski Filho, João

    2008-07-01

    Three compost formulations, consisting of two varieties of Cynodom dactylon (L.) Pers. (Coast-cross and Tyfton) and oat (Avena sativa) straw were tested for the cultivation of A. bisporus strains ABI-01/01, ABI-04/02, ABI-05/03, and ABI-06/04. A completely randomized experimental design in a factorial scheme was adopted, with 12 treatments (4 A. bisporus strains × 3 types of compost) and 8 replicates. Each experimental unit corresponded to one box containing 12 - 12.5 kg fresh wet compost. The data were submitted to analysis of variance and the means were compared by Tukey test. According to the results, productivity of mushrooms was influenced by strain and/or compost type. It was also verified that crude protein, ash, and crude fiber contents in the mushroom varied with A. bisporus strain and straw used in the formulation of the compost. PMID:24031271

  5. Yield of four Agaricus bisporus strains in three compost formulations and chemical composition analyses of the mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Meire Cristina Nogueira; Zied, Diego Cunha; de Almeida Minhoni, Marli Teixeira; Kopytowski Filho, João

    2008-01-01

    Three compost formulations, consisting of two varieties of Cynodom dactylon (L.) Pers. (Coast-cross and Tyfton) and oat (Avena sativa) straw were tested for the cultivation of A. bisporus strains ABI-01/01, ABI-04/02, ABI-05/03, and ABI-06/04. A completely randomized experimental design in a factorial scheme was adopted, with 12 treatments (4 A. bisporus strains × 3 types of compost) and 8 replicates. Each experimental unit corresponded to one box containing 12 – 12.5 kg fresh wet compost. The data were submitted to analysis of variance and the means were compared by Tukey test. According to the results, productivity of mushrooms was influenced by strain and/or compost type. It was also verified that crude protein, ash, and crude fiber contents in the mushroom varied with A. bisporus strain and straw used in the formulation of the compost. PMID:24031271

  6. Enzyme activity of extracellular protein induced in Trichoderma asperellum and T. longibrachiatum by substrates based on Agaricus bisporus and Phymatotrichopsis omnivora.

    PubMed

    Guigón-López, Cesar; Guerrero-Prieto, Víctor; Lanzuise, Stefania; Lorito, Matteo

    2014-02-01

    Antagonistic Trichoderma spp. are used throughout the world for the biological control of soil-borne plant diseases. This approach has stimulated an on-going search for more efficient mycoparasitic strains with a high potential for producing extracellular lytic enzymes. This study compares the production of lytic enzymes by native strains of Trichoderma asperellum and Trichoderma longibrachiatum on substrates of differing complexity. The quantity of protein induced by Agaricus bisporus-based medium was higher than that induced by Phymatotrichopsis omnivora-based medium. In P. omnivora medium, T. asperellum exhibited higher chitinolytic and β-1,3-glucanolytic activities than T. longibrachiatum. The enzyme profile was related to the previously reported ability of these strains to inhibit the growth of several soil-borne plant pathogens. NAGase production was similar among the tested indigenous strains of T. longibrachiatum; T479 and T359 produced more endochitinase, T479 produced more glucanase, and T341 and T359 produced more β-1,3-glucanase. The detected variations in glucanase and β-1,3-glucanase activities suggest that the production of these enzymes is strongly influenced by the substrate. Strains T397 and T359 exhibited xylanase activity, which triggers defence mechanisms in plants. Thus, these strains may utilise an additional mechanism of biocontrol. PMID:24528642

  7. Synthesis of gamma-L-glutaminyl-[3,5-3H]4-hydroxybenzene and the study of reactions catalyzed by the tyrosinase of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Boekelheide, K; Graham, D G; Mize, P D; Anderson, C W; Jeffs, P W

    1979-12-10

    gamma-L-Glutaminyl-[3,5-3H]4-hydroxybenzene was synthesized in order to study the kinetics of its hydroxylation by tyrosinase purified from Agaricus bisporus and to explore its role in the induction of the dormant state in the spores of this species. It was found to be unique among the monophenolic substrates for tyrosinase in that the lag period for the hydroxylation reaction decreased with increasing substrate concentration. Unlike previously studied compounds, this phenol appeared to function as an electron donor, allowing it to act as its own co-substrate in the hydroxylation reaction. Its catechol product, gamma-L-glutaminyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzene, was found to be a superior co-substrate, yielding its electrons more readily (oxidation peak potential +0.18 V as compared with +0.65 V for the phenol). In situ periodate oxidation of gamma-L-glutaminyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzene to gamma-L-glutaminyl-3,4-benzoquinone confirmed the co-substrate role of the catechol in the hydroxylation reaction. The tyrosinase-mediated oxidation of gamma-L-glutaminyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzene to gamma-L-glutaminyl-3,4-benzoquinone occurred with an apparent Km = 1.54 mM and Vmax = 0.36 mmol/min/mg of enzyme. gamma-L-Glutaminyl-4-hydroxybenzene acted as an inhibitor of the oxidation reaction. PMID:115880

  8. Quantitative trait locus mapping of yield-related components and oligogenic control of the cap color of the button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rodier, Anne; Rousseau, Thierry; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2012-04-01

    As in other crops, yield is an important trait to be selected for in edible mushrooms, but its inheritance is poorly understood. Therefore, we have investigated the complex genetic architecture of yield-related traits in Agaricus bisporus through the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), using second-generation hybrid progeny derived from a cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar. Yield, average weight per mushroom, number of fruiting bodies per m(2), earliness, and cap color were evaluated in two independent experiments. A total of 23 QTL were detected for 7 yield-related traits. These QTL together explained between 21% (two-flushes yield) and 59% (earliness) of the phenotypic variation. Fifteen QTL (65%) were consistent between the two experiments. Four regions underlying significant QTL controlling yield, average weight, and number were detected on linkage groups II, III, IV, and X, suggesting a pleiotropic effect or tight linkage. Up to six QTL were identified for earliness. The PPC1 locus, together with two additional genomic regions, explained up to 90% of the phenotypic variation of the cap color. Alleles from the wild parent showed beneficial effects for some yield traits, suggesting that the wild germ plasm is a valuable source of variation for several agronomic traits. Our results constitute a key step toward marker-assisted selection and provide a solid foundation to go further into the biological mechanisms controlling productive traits in the button mushroom. PMID:22267676

  9. Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping of Yield-Related Components and Oligogenic Control of the Cap Color of the Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Anne; Rousseau, Thierry; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    As in other crops, yield is an important trait to be selected for in edible mushrooms, but its inheritance is poorly understood. Therefore, we have investigated the complex genetic architecture of yield-related traits in Agaricus bisporus through the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), using second-generation hybrid progeny derived from a cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar. Yield, average weight per mushroom, number of fruiting bodies per m2, earliness, and cap color were evaluated in two independent experiments. A total of 23 QTL were detected for 7 yield-related traits. These QTL together explained between 21% (two-flushes yield) and 59% (earliness) of the phenotypic variation. Fifteen QTL (65%) were consistent between the two experiments. Four regions underlying significant QTL controlling yield, average weight, and number were detected on linkage groups II, III, IV, and X, suggesting a pleiotropic effect or tight linkage. Up to six QTL were identified for earliness. The PPC1 locus, together with two additional genomic regions, explained up to 90% of the phenotypic variation of the cap color. Alleles from the wild parent showed beneficial effects for some yield traits, suggesting that the wild germ plasm is a valuable source of variation for several agronomic traits. Our results constitute a key step toward marker-assisted selection and provide a solid foundation to go further into the biological mechanisms controlling productive traits in the button mushroom. PMID:22267676

  10. Impact on Vitamin D2, Vitamin D4 and Agaritine in Agaricus bisporus Mushrooms after Artificial and Natural Solar UV Light Exposure.

    PubMed

    Urbain, Paul; Valverde, Juan; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-09-01

    Commercial mushroom production can expose mushrooms post-harvest to UV light for purposes of vitamin D2 enrichment by converting the naturally occurring provitamin D2 (ergosterol). The objectives of the present study were to artificially simulate solar UV-B doses occurring naturally in Central Europe and to investigate vitamin D2 and vitamin D4 production in sliced Agaricus bisporus (button mushrooms) and to analyse and compare the agaritine content of naturally and artificially UV-irradiated mushrooms. Agaritine was measured for safety aspects even though there is no rationale for a link between UV light exposure and agaritine content. The artificial UV-B dose of 0.53 J/cm(2) raised the vitamin D2 content to significantly (P < 0.001) higher levels of 67.1 ± 9.9 μg/g dry weight (DW) than sun exposure (3.9 ± 0.8 μg/g dry DW). We observed a positive correlation between vitamin D4 and vitamin D2 production (r(2) = 0.96, P < 0.001) after artificial UV irradiation, with vitamin D4 levels ranging from 0 to 20.9 μg/g DW. The agaritine content varied widely but remained within normal ranges in all samples. Irrespective of the irradiation source, agaritine dropped dramatically in conjunction with all UV-B doses both artificial and natural solar, probably due to its known instability. The biological action of vitamin D from UV-exposed mushrooms reflects the activity of these two major vitamin D analogues (D2, D4). Vitamin D4 should be analysed and agaritine disregarded in future studies of UV-exposed mushrooms. PMID:27323764

  11. gamma-L-Glutaminyl-4-hydroxybenzene, an inducer of cryptobiosis in Agaricus bisporus and a source of specific metabolic inhibitors for melanogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, F S; Kemper, L A; Jeffs, P W; Cass, M W; Graham, D G

    1977-04-01

    A stable phenol, gamma-L-glutaminyl-4-hydroxybenzene (GHB), is oxidized by tyrosinase in the gill tissues of the mushroom Agaricus bisporus to a quinone and a second oxidation product which together suppress mitochondrial energy production and the synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids in the zygote, thus establishing dormancy in the spores. Brief incubation of cultured murine L1210 leukemia and B-16 melanoma cells with muM concentrations of the purified quinone notably prolonged survival times or blocked tumor growth in histocompatible mice inoculated i.p. with high concentrations of the exposed cells. The instability of the quinone precluded in vivo administration. The short incubation of cultured B-16 melanoma cells with mM concentrations of GHB markedly prolonged survival times or abolished tumor growth in histocompatible C57BL/6J mice inoculated i.p. with 5 X 10(6) exposed cells. This response did not occur with L1210 leukemia cells, which lack the enzyme tyrosinase. The survival times of mice bearing B-16 melanoma, but not of those with L1210 leukemia, were slightly prolonged by a single injection and were significantly extended by daily i.p. injections of GHB. Normal C57BL/6J mice, given GHB i.p. as single or multiple 400-mg/kg doses, manifested no systemic toxicity but showed depigmentation of the hair after 2 to 3 weeks. These studies provide evidence that GHB exerts cytotoxicity specifically for cells that by their content of tyrosinase convert the phenol to the quinone. This targeted response minimizes systemic toxocity and underscores the potential therapeutic application of this agent to melanocarcinoma. PMID:403000

  12. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadruple time-of-flight with MS(E) technology used for qualitative analysis of non-volatile oxidation markers in sliced packed mushrooms (Agaricus Bisporus).

    PubMed

    Wrona, Magdalena; Pezo, Davinson; Canellas, Elena; Nerín, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    61 different non-volatile compounds were determined in Agaricus Bisporus sliced mushrooms using UHPLC/Q-TOF with MS(E) technology. Both positive and negative electrospray ionization were applied. Chemical profile of three parts of mushroom was created: cap, gills and stipe. The analysed mushrooms were oxidized to identify the non-volatile markers in their parts. MarkerLynx(®) was proposed as a powerful tool to distinguish mushrooms purchased in different countries (Spain and Portugal) by determining their non-volatile markers. Some metabolites were identified. Surprisingly a mix of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) was detected in cap and gills of mushrooms. Whole mushrooms were considered as vegetable resistant to migration from packaging compounds. Additionally migration tests were performed to determine the source of migrating compounds. PMID:26777782

  13. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus mushroom protects against increase in gut permeability ex vivo and up-regulates glutathione peroxidase 1 and 2 in hyperthermally-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Dunshea, Frank Rowland; Howell, Kate; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Rivera, Leni Rose; Furness, John Barton; Ng, Ken

    2014-06-01

    Dietary effects of organic Se supplementation in the form of Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus mushroom on ileal mucosal permeability and antioxidant selenoenzymes status in heat induced oxidative stress in rats were evaluated. Acute heat stress (40 °C, 21% relative humidity, 90 min exposure) increased ileum baseline short circuit current (Isc; 2.40-fold) and epithelial conductance (Ge; 2.74-fold). Dietary supplementation with Se-enriched A. bisporus (1 µg Se/g feed) reduced (p < 0.05) ileum Isc and Ge during heat stress to 1.74 and 1.91 fold, respectively, indicating protection from heat stress-induced mucosal permeability increase. The expression of ileum glutathione peroxidase (GPx-) 1 and 2 mRNAs were up-regulated (p < 0.05) by 1.90 and 1.87-fold, respectively, for non-heat stress rats on the Se-enriched diet relative to the control. The interplay between heat stress and dietary Se is complex. For rats on the control diet, heat stress alone increased ileum expression of GPx-1 (2.33-fold) and GPx-2 (2.23-fold) relative to thermoneutral conditions. For rats on the Se-enriched diet, heat stress increased (p < 0.05) GPx-1 expression only. Rats on Se-enriched + α-tocopherol diet exhibited increased expression of both genes (p < 0.05). Thus, dietary Se-enriched A. bisporus protected against increase in ileum permeability and up-regulated GPx-1 and GPx-2 expression, selenoenzymes relevant to mitigating oxidative stress. PMID:24962481

  14. White button mushroom enhances maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells and their antigen presenting function in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mushrooms have been shown to enhance immune response, which contributes to their anti-tumor property. White button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) (WBM) constitute 90 percent of the total mushrooms consumed in the United States; however, the health benefit of this strain in general is not well studied...

  15. In vitro supplementation with white button mushroom promotes maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mushrooms have been shown to enhance immune response, which contributes to their anti-tumor property. White button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) constitute 90 percent of the total mushroom market in the US; however, the health benefit of this strain in general is not well-studied. Furthermore, littl...

  16. Brown mushroom symptom expression following infection of an Agaricus bisporus crop with MVX associated dsRNAs.

    PubMed

    Fleming-Archibald, Caoimhe; Ruggiero, Angela; Grogan, Helen M

    2015-12-01

    Mushroom Virus X (MVX) is associated with a range of symptoms observed in mushroom crops. The most prominent symptom in Ireland is the occurrence of 'brown' or 'off-white' mushrooms in white strain crops. The browning symptoms are associated with the presence of four low molecular weight dsRNAs: MVX(0.6), MVX(0.8), MVX(1.8) and MVX(2.0), however viral dsRNAs also occur in non-symptomatic mushrooms. Three virus-infected mushroom cultures containing MVX(1.8) and MVX(2.0) were used to infect experimental crops at different rates and at different times in the crop cycle to test the effect on symptom expression. Mushroom colour was measured by chromometer, and the ΔE value calculated. RT-PCR was used to test for the presence of MVX(1.8) dsRNA in harvested mushrooms. Results indicate that following infection, browning symptom expression is variable both within and between crops. Control mushrooms from 1st and 2nd flush had ΔE values of 7-12, with most being <10. In contrast, 1st flush mushrooms from virus infected treatments had ΔE values of 6-25, with most being >10 while 2nd flush mushrooms had ΔE values similar to controls. Only mushrooms with ΔE > 15 appeared visibly brown or off colour. The transient and inconsistent nature of MVX-associated browning symptoms is discussed. PMID:26615746

  17. Determination of Zinc(II) Ions Released into Artificial Digestive Juices from Culinary-Medicinal Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus (Agaricomycetidae), Biomass of In Vitro Cultures Using an Anodic Stripping Voltammetry Method.

    PubMed

    Kala, Katarzyna; Muszynska, Bozena; Zajac, Magdalena; Krezalek, Remigiusz; Opoka, Wlodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is one of those microelements that are essential for the proper functioning of the human body and must be supplemented in our food at a daily dose of 15 mg. It is well known that mushrooms accumulate elements; thus, in order to determine the extent of accumulation and the level of zinc released from mushrooms, in vitro cultures of Agaricus bisporus were established. The cultures were run on a modified Oddoux medium (a control culture) as well as on the same medium with the addition of zinc hydroaspartate (100 and 200 mg/L) and zinc sulfate (87.23 and 174.47 mg/L). These compounds were chosen to help estimate which form, organic or inorganic, results in a better assimilation of zinc(II) ions by biomass. As the next step, the level of zinc(II) ions released from the lyophilized biomass of in vitro cultures to the digestive juices, under thermal conditions of the human body (37°C), was determined. For this purpose, artificial digestive juices, imitating the composition of human digestive juices, were used. For determination of zinc(II) ions in the digestive tract, an anodic stripping voltammetry method was employed. The amount of zinc released into artificial saliva over 1 minute varied from 0.15 mg/100 g d.w. in the control culture to 2.35 mg/100 g d.w. in the biomass in the medium to which 200 mg/L zinc hydroaspartate had been added. Values were higher in gastric juice and depended on incubation time (2.66 to 30.63 mg/100 g d.w.). In intestinal juice, the highest value of the released zinc grew to 24.20 mg/100 g d.w. (biomass of A. bisporus in vitro cultures in medium with the addition of 200 mg/L zinc hydroaspartate). Total average amount of zinc released into artificial digestive juices was the highest (56.26 mg/100 g d.w.) from A. bisporus biomass of in vitro cultures in the medium to which 200 mg/L zinc hydroaspartate had been added. PMID:27279537

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens LMG 5329, a White Line-Inducing Principle-Producing Bioindicator for the Mushroom Pathogen Pseudomonas tolaasii

    PubMed Central

    Rokni-Zadeh, Hassan; Zarrineh, Peyman

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas tolaasii, the causative agent of Agaricus bisporus brown blotch disease, can be identified by the white line reaction, occurring upon confrontation of the tolaasin-producing mushroom pathogen with “Pseudomonas reactans,” producing the lipopeptide white line-inducing principle (WLIP). The draft genome sequence of the WLIP-producing indicator Pseudomonas fluorescens strain LMG 5329 is reported here. PMID:23887909

  19. Pseudomonas putida Stimulates Primordia on Agaricus bitorquis.

    PubMed

    Colauto, Nelson B; Fermor, Terry R; Eira, Augusto F; Linde, Giani A

    2016-04-01

    Casing layer is one step of Agaricus bisporus cultivation where there is a competitive environment with a high number of microorganisms and diversity interacting with mycelia. It is suggested that a minimal community of these microorganisms would be necessary to stimulate fructification. However, A. bisporus is not able to produce primordia in sterile casing layers or Petri dishes. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize bacterial microbiota of casing layers from A. bisporus cultivation, isolate, identify and characterize the bacteria responsible for the stimulation of primordium and their action mechanism using Agaricus bitorquis as a primordium stimulation model. Bacterial and Pseudomonas spp. communities of different casing layers of A. bisporus cultivation were collected and quantified. It was concluded that Pseudomonas spp. corresponds to 75-85% of bacterial population of the casing layers in A. bisporus cultivation and among those 12% are Pseudomonas putida. Four biochemical assays were used to identify P. putida. In vitro primordium stimulation of living P. putida and non-living bacterial suspensions, after chemical or physical treatments, was tested using A. bitorquis as a primordium stimulation model. Primordium stimulation assay was registered by photographs, and micrographs of vertical cut of primordium were registered by scanning electron microscope. Interaction of living P. putida with A. bitorquis mycelia is capable of stimulating primordial instead of non-living bacterial suspensions. Stimulation of A. bitorquis primordia does not imply or is related to mycelial growth inhibition, but a hierarchical relation of primordium succession and development is suggested. PMID:26742772

  20. Comparative Study on the Efficacy of Bacteriophages, Sanitizers, and UV Light Treatments To Control Listeria monocytogenes on Sliced Mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Murray, Kayla; Wu, Fan; Aktar, Rafia; Namvar, Azadeh; Warriner, Keith

    2015-06-01

    The following reports on a comparative study on the efficacy of different decontamination technologies to decrease Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto white sliced mushrooms and assesses the fate of residual levels during posttreatment storage under aerobic conditions at 8 °C. The treatments were chemical (hydrogen peroxide, peroxyacetic acid, ozonated water, electrolyzed water, chitosan, lactic acid), biological (Listeria bacteriophages), and physical (UV-C, UV-hydrogen peroxide). None of the treatments achieved >1.2 log CFU reduction in L. monocytogenes levels; bacteriophages at a multiplicity of infection of 100 and 3% (vol/vol) hydrogen peroxide were the most effective of the treatments tested. However, growth of residual L. monocytogenes during posttreatment storage attained levels equal to or greater than levels in the nontreated controls. The growth of L. monocytogenes was inhibited on mushrooms treated with chitosan, electrolyzed water, peroxyacetic acid, or UV. Yet, L. monocytogenes inoculated onto mushrooms and treated with UV-hydrogen peroxide decreased during posttreatment storage, through a combination of sublethal injury and dehydration of the mushroom surface. Although mushrooms treated with UV-hydrogen peroxide became darker during storage, the samples were visually acceptable relative to controls. In conclusion, of the treatments evaluated, UV-hydrogen peroxide holds promise to control L. monocytogenes on mushroom surfaces. PMID:26038905

  1. A comparative study on edible Agaricus mushrooms as functional foods.

    PubMed

    Glamočlija, Jasmina; Stojković, Dejan; Nikolić, Miloš; Ćirić, Ana; Reis, Filipa S; Barros, Lillian; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Soković, Marina

    2015-06-01

    Agaricus bisporus is a cultivated mushroom; A. bitorquis, A. campestris and A. macrosporus are edible mushrooms growing wild in nature. A chemical characterization was carried out with samples that originated in Serbia. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-quorum sensing properties of their methanolic and ethanolic extracts were assessed. A. campestris had the lowest caloric value and total sugar content and showed the highest concentration in organic and phenolic acids, as also in tocopherols (mainly γ-tocopherol). In general, the methanolic extracts showed higher antioxidant, but lower antibacterial and antifungal potential than ethanolic ones. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ethanolic extracts demonstrated reduction of virulence factors, AQ inhibition zones, twitching and swimming motility. The biofilm forming capability of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner at sub-MIC values. The extracts of the tested Agaricus species are a promising source of antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiquorum sensing compounds. PMID:25954776

  2. Mass transfer characteristics of bisporus mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus) slices during convective hot air drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Davoud; Baraani Dastjerdi, Mojtaba; Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    An accurate understanding of moisture transfer parameters, including moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient, is essential for efficient mass transfer analysis and to design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments. The main objective of the present study was to carry out an experimental and theoretical investigation of mushroom slices drying and determine the mass transfer characteristics of the samples dried under different conditions. The mushroom slices with two thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm were dried at air temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C and air flow rates of 1 and 1.5 m s-1. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the moisture transfer parameters and predict the drying curves. It was observed that the entire drying process took place in the falling drying rate period. The obtained lag factor and Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the samples was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective moisture diffusivity and the moisture transfer coefficient increased with increasing air temperature, air flow rate and samples thickness and varied in the ranges of 6.5175 × 10-10 to 1.6726 × 10-9 m2 s-1 and 2.7715 × 10-7 to 3.5512 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively. The validation of the Dincer and Dost model indicated a good capability of the model to describe the drying curves of the mushroom slices.

  3. Bioconcentration factors (BCF) of silver in wild Agaricus campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Falandysz, J.; Danisiewicz, D.

    1995-07-01

    Silver is an element naturally occurring in small concentrations in different environmental sites. However, many anthropogenic sources of silver led to contamination of this element in soil surfaces, pastures, and coastal marine areas in different parts of the world. Estimates are that 40% of the 1.15x10{sup 4}t of silver produced annually worldwide, will escape into the environment. Due to municipal waste discharge and/or industrial effluents with high silver concentrations, 100 x above the background level have been reported in invertebrate species from polluted marine areas. The meta-stabile radioisotope, {sup 110m}Ag, is a main component of the liquid effluents from nuclear facilities under normal operating conditions. The presence of {sup 111}Ag and {sup 110m}Ag also has been widely found throughout Europe in the 1986 Chernobyl fallout. Silver ions are environmentally harmful. High toxic effects have been observed at low concentrations, especially in aquatic species. Species of lower fungi as well as the mushroom Agaricus bisporus are know to bioaccumulate high concentrations of silver when grown on an artificially enriched substrate. This study looks at the relationship between the silver content of soil and bioconcentration potential of wild Agaricus campestris from sites under different use and with different concentrations of heavy metals. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. GC-MS studies of the chemical composition of two inedible mushrooms of the genus Agaricus

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Assya; Alipieva, Kalina; Kostadinova, Emanuela; Antonova, Daniela; Lacheva, Maria; Gjosheva, Melania; Popov, Simeon; Bankova, Vassya

    2007-01-01

    Background Mushrooms in the genus Agaricus have worldwide distribution and include the economically important species A. bisporus. Some Agaricus species are inedible, including A. placomyces and A. pseudopratensis, which are similar in appearance to certain edible species, yet are known to possess unpleasant odours and induce gastrointestinal problems if consumed. We have studied the chemical composition of these mushrooms using GC-MS. Results Our GC-MS studies on the volatile fractions and butanol extracts resulted in the identification of 44 and 34 compounds for A. placomyces and A. pseudopratensis, respectively, including fatty acids and their esters, amino acids, and sugar alcohols. The most abundant constituent in the volatiles and butanol were phenol and urea respectively. We also identified the presence of ergosterol and two Δ7-sterols. In addition, 5α,8α-Epidioxi-24(ξ)-methylcholesta-6,22-diene-3β-ol was isolated for the first time from both mushrooms. Our study is therefore the first report on the chemical composition of these two species. Conclusion The results obtained contribute to the knowledge of the chemical composition of mushrooms belonging to the Agaricus genus, and provide some explanation for the reported mild toxicity of A. placomyces and A. pseudopratensis, a phenonomenon that can be explained by a high phenol content, similar to that found in other Xanthodermatei species. PMID:18096035

  5. Agaricus subrufescens: A review

    PubMed Central

    Wisitrassameewong, Komsit; Karunarathna, Samantha C.; Thongklang, Naritsada; Zhao, Ruilin; Callac, Philippe; Moukha, Serge; Férandon, Cyril; Chukeatirote, Ekachai; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have currently become a hot issue due to their various therapeutic properties. Of these, Agaricus subrufescens, also known as the “almond mushroom”, has long been valued by many societies (i.e., Brazil, China, France, and USA). Since its discovery in 1893, this mushroom has been cultivated throughout the world, especially in Brazil where several strains of A. subrufescens have been developed and used as health food and alternative medicine. This article presents up-to-date information on this mushroom including its taxonomy and health promoting benefits. Medicinal properties of A. subrufescens are emphasized in several studies which are reviewed here. In addition, safety issues concerning the use of this fungus will be discussed. PMID:23961172

  6. A Comprehensive Review of Tropical Milky White Mushroom (Calocybe indica P&C)

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Krishnamoorthy Akkanna

    2015-01-01

    A compressive description of tropical milky white mushroom (Calocybe indica P&C var. APK2) is provided in this review. This mushroom variety was first identified in the eastern Indian state of West Bengal and can be cultivated on a wide variety of substrates, at a high temperature range (30~38℃). However, no commercial cultivation was made until 1998. Krishnamoorthy 1997 rediscovered the fungus from Tamil Nadu, India and standardized the commercial production techniques for the first time in the world. This edible mushroom has a long shelf life (5~7 days) compared to other commercially available counterparts. A comprehensive and critical review on physiological and nutritional requirements viz., pH, temperature, carbon to nitrogen ratio, best carbon source, best nitrogen source, growth period, growth promoters for mycelia biomass production; substrate preparation; spawn inoculation; different supplementation and casing requirements to increase the yield of mushrooms has been outlined. Innovative and inexpensive methods developed to commercially cultivate milky white mushrooms on different lignocellulosic biomass is also described in this review. The composition profiles of milky white mushroom, its mineral contents and non-enzymatic antioxidants are provided in comparison with button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus). Antioxidant assay results using methanol extract of milky white mushroom has been provided along with the information about the compounds that are responsible for flavor profile both in fresh and dry mushrooms. Milky white mushroom extracts are known to have anti-hyperglycemic effect and anti-lipid peroxidation effect. The advantage of growing at elevated temperature creates newer avenues to explore milky white mushroom cultivation economically around the world, especially, in humid tropical and sub-tropical zones. Because of its incomparable productivity and shelf life to any other cultivated mushrooms in the

  7. A Comprehensive Review of Tropical Milky White Mushroom (Calocybe indica P&C).

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Krishnamoorthy Akkanna; Balan, Venkatesh

    2015-09-01

    A compressive description of tropical milky white mushroom (Calocybe indica P&C var. APK2) is provided in this review. This mushroom variety was first identified in the eastern Indian state of West Bengal and can be cultivated on a wide variety of substrates, at a high temperature range (30~38℃). However, no commercial cultivation was made until 1998. Krishnamoorthy 1997 rediscovered the fungus from Tamil Nadu, India and standardized the commercial production techniques for the first time in the world. This edible mushroom has a long shelf life (5~7 days) compared to other commercially available counterparts. A comprehensive and critical review on physiological and nutritional requirements viz., pH, temperature, carbon to nitrogen ratio, best carbon source, best nitrogen source, growth period, growth promoters for mycelia biomass production; substrate preparation; spawn inoculation; different supplementation and casing requirements to increase the yield of mushrooms has been outlined. Innovative and inexpensive methods developed to commercially cultivate milky white mushrooms on different lignocellulosic biomass is also described in this review. The composition profiles of milky white mushroom, its mineral contents and non-enzymatic antioxidants are provided in comparison with button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus). Antioxidant assay results using methanol extract of milky white mushroom has been provided along with the information about the compounds that are responsible for flavor profile both in fresh and dry mushrooms. Milky white mushroom extracts are known to have anti-hyperglycemic effect and anti-lipid peroxidation effect. The advantage of growing at elevated temperature creates newer avenues to explore milky white mushroom cultivation economically around the world, especially, in humid tropical and sub-tropical zones. Because of its incomparable productivity and shelf life to any other cultivated mushrooms in the

  8. Aggregation and conformational change of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) polyphenoloxidase subjected to thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Liu, Wei; Zou, Liqiang; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Hu, Xiuting; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated changes in the activity, conformation and microstructure of mushroom polyphenoloxidase (PPO) subjected to thermal treatment. The inactivation of PPO can be achieved by high temperature-short time or mild temperature-long time treatment. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra suggested that heating process induced the rearrangement of secondary structure and the disruption of tertiary structure. Red shifts of fluorescence spectra showed positive correlations with the inactivation rate of PPO. There were significant differences in the conformation and molecular microstructure among PPO samples with the same relative activity, which were obtained by treating PPO at 45, 55 and 65°C for different times. In summary, PPO molecules were deformed at mild temperature, while higher temperature induced the formation of large aggregates. PPO with the same relative activity might exist in different forms. PMID:27507494

  9. Daily supplementation with mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) improves balance and working memory in aged rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animals and humans show decrements in motor control, cognition, and brain function during normal aging, partly due to the long-term effects of oxidative stress and inflammation. Recent studies have identified a number of fruits and vegetables, whose phytochemical make-up contains potent antioxidant ...

  10. Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) polyphenoloxidase inhibited by apigenin: Multi-spectroscopic analyses and computational docking simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhiqiang; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Lei; Zou, Liqiang; Chen, Jun

    2016-07-15

    It has been revealed that some polyphenols can prevent enzymatic browning caused by polyphenoloxidase (PPO). Apigenin, widely distributed in many fruits and vegetables, is an important bioactive flavonoid compound. In this study, apigenin exhibited a strong inhibitory activity against PPO, and some reagents had synergistic effect with apigenin on inhibiting PPO. Apigenin inhibited PPO activity reversibly in a mixed-type manner. The fact that inactivation rate constant (k) of PPO increased while activation energy (Ea) and thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) decreased indicated that the thermosensitivity and stability of PPO decreased. The conformational changes of PPO were revealed by fluorescence emission spectra and circular dichroism. Atomic force microscopy observation suggested that the dimension of PPO molecules was larger after interacting with apigenin. Moreover, computational docking simulation indicated that apigenin bound to PPO and inserted into the hydrophobic cavity of PPO to interact with some amino acid residues. PMID:26948635

  11. Development and growth of fruit bodies and crops of the button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Straatsma, Gerben; Sonnenberg, Anton S M; van Griensven, Leo J L D

    2013-10-01

    We studied the appearance of fruit body primordia, the growth of individual fruit bodies and the development of the consecutive flushes of the crop. Relative growth, measured as cap expansion, was not constant. It started extremely rapidly, and slowed down to an exponential rate with diameter doubling of 1.7 d until fruit bodies showed maturation by veil breaking. Initially many outgrowing primordia were arrested, indicating nutritional competition. After reaching 10 mm diameter, no growth arrest occurred; all growing individuals, whether relatively large or small, showed an exponential increase of both cap diameter and biomass, until veil breaking. Biomass doubled in 0.8 d. Exponential growth indicates the absence of competition. Apparently there exist differential nutritional requirements for early growth and for later, continuing growth. Flushing was studied applying different picking sizes. An ordinary flushing pattern occurred at an immature picking size of 8 mm diameter (picking mushrooms once a day with a diameter above 8 mm). The smallest picking size yielded the highest number of mushrooms picked, confirming the competition and arrested growth of outgrowing primordia: competition seems less if outgrowing primordia are removed early. The flush duration (i.e. between the first and last picking moments) was not affected by picking size. At small picking size, the subsequent flushes were not fully separated in time but overlapped. Within 2 d after picking the first individuals of the first flush, primordia for the second flush started outgrowth. Our work supports the view that the acquisition of nutrients by the mycelium is demand rather than supply driven. For formation and early outgrowth of primordia, indications were found for an alternation of local and global control, at least in the casing layer. All these data combined, we postulate that flushing is the consequence of the depletion of some unknown specific nutrition required by outgrowing primordia. PMID:24119408

  12. Direct immobilization of tyrosinase enzyme from natural mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) on D-sorbitol cinnamic ester.

    PubMed

    Marín-Zamora, María Elisa; Rojas-Melgarejo, Francisco; García-Cánovas, Francisco; García-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio

    2006-11-10

    Mushroom tyrosinase was immobilized from an extract onto the totally cinnamoylated derivative of D-sorbitol by direct adsorption as a result of the intense hydrophobic interactions that took place. The immobilization pH value and mass of lyophilized mushrooms were important parameters that affected the immobilization efficiency, while the immobilization time and immobilization support concentration were not important in this respect. The extracted/immobilized enzyme could best be measured above pH 3.5 and the optimum measuring temperature was 55 degrees C. The apparent Michaelis constant using 4-tert-butylcatechol as substrate was 0.38+/-0.02 mM, which was lower than for the soluble enzyme from Sigma (1.41+/-0.20 mM). Immobilization stabilized the extracted enzyme against thermal inactivation and made it less susceptible to activity loss during storage. The operational stability was higher than in the case of the tyrosinase supplied by Sigma and immobilized on the same support. The results show that the use of p-nitrophenol as enzyme-inhibiting substrate during enzyme extraction and immobilization made the use of ascorbic acid unnecessary and is a suitable method for extracting and immobilizing the tyrosinase enzyme, providing good enzymatic activity and stability. PMID:16730834

  13. Application of edible coating and acidic washing for extending the storage life of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Naser; Zahedi, Younes

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocolloid-based materials have been extensively used to coat fruit and vegetables to prolong shelf-life. The effects of different concentrations of acidic washing (acetic, ascorbic, citric and malic acids) followed by coating with gum arabic (GA), carboxymethyl cellulose and emulsified gum arabic (EGA) were evaluated on the weight loss (WL), firmness and color of mushroom. The WL of the uncoated mushrooms was significantly (p < 0.05) greater than that of the coated ones, and the minimum WL was obtained with EGA coating. The mushrooms washed with malic and ascorbic acids showed minimum and maximum of WL, respectively. Loss in firmness of the EGA-coated mushrooms was by 21% (the minimum of loss), while loss value of the uncoated ones was by 39% (the maximum of loss). Firmness of mushrooms was not influenced by the acid type. Concentration of the acid significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the firmness of mushrooms, and at the lowest concentration of acid (1%), the mushrooms tissue was firmest. The L* value of the mushrooms coated with GA was higher than that of others. A significant (p < 0.05) decrease in L* value and a significant (p < 0.05) increase in a* and b* values occurred in the mushrooms washed with acetic acid. Overall, washing with 1% citric or malic acid followed by coating with EGA resulted in minimum decrease in WL and firmness of the mushrooms. PMID:23175781

  14. Spore behaviors reveal a category of mating-competent infertile heterokaryons in the offspring of the medicinal fungus Agaricus subrufescens.

    PubMed

    Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Moinard, Magalie; Souza Dias, Eustáquio; Savoie, Jean-Michel; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Strain breeding is much less advanced in the edible and medicinal species Agaricus subrufescens than in Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom. Both species have a unifactorial system of sexual incompatibility, a mating type locus tightly linked to a centromere, and basidia producing both homokaryotic (n) and heterokaryotic (n + n) spores. In A. bisporus, breeding is mainly based on direct selection among the heterokaryotic offspring and on hybridization between homokaryotic offspring. The parental heterozygosity is highly maintained in the heterokaryotic offspring due to suppression of recombination and preferential pairing in the spores of nuclei, each one per second meiotic divisions; such "non-sister nuclei" heterokaryons are fertile. In A. subrufescens, recent studies revealed that recombination is not suppressed and that nuclei from the same second meiotic division can also be paired in a spore that give rise to a "sister nuclei" heterokaryon in which the nuclei bear the same mating type allele. The objective of the present work was to investigate the potential function of the different categories of spores in A. subrufescens and their possible use in a genetic breeding program. Using eight co-dominant molecular markers, we found that half of the offspring of the A. subrufescens strain WC837 were heterokaryotic, one quarter of them being sister nuclei heterokaryons. These heterokaryons were infertile and behaved like homokaryons, being even able to cross between each other. In contrast, non-sister nuclei heterokaryons could fruit but inconsistently due to inbreeding depression. Potential roles of these two categories of heterokaryons in nature and consequences for strain breeding are discussed. PMID:26497018

  15. Laser inducement of Agricus bisporus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ning; Chen, Rong; Wang, Zesheng

    1996-09-01

    Using different power, different dosage's He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) and semiconductor laser (805 nm) to irradiated mycelia of four Agricus bisporus strains. And using no irradiate strain as contrast. Picking out some mycelium from irradiation position and then transfer them into Potato Dextrose Agar culture medium, culturing 12 - 15 days. We use the polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis to examine the esterase (EST) isozymes of mycelium. We could find from the result that laser irradiating could not change the Rf of main bands (F&s zones) of mycelium EST. However, 20 mw He- Ne, 10 minutes irradiation could not only raise the activity of EST distinctly, but also increase the numbers of enzyme zone of M zone, the difference between the semiconductor irradiation of 140 mv, 10 minutes and 20 mv, 10 minutes are not remarkable. And the irradiating effect of He-Ne laser is better than that of semiconductor laser.

  16. A new species of Agaricus section Minores from China

    PubMed Central

    Mao-Qiang, He; Rui-Lin, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Agaricus gemloides sp. nov. is characterised by its reddish brown fibrillose squamose on the pileus, relatively slender basidiome and broader basidiospores. In this article, it is introduced based on its distinguished morphological features and molecular phylogenetic position. PMID:26807303

  17. Nanofiltration of polysaccharides from Agaricus subrufescens.

    PubMed

    Camelini, C M; Rezzadori, K; Benedetti, S; Proner, M C; Fogaça, L; Azambuja, A A; Giachini, A J; Rossi, M J; Petrus, J C C

    2013-12-01

    A simplified submerged airlift cultivation was established for the production of biomass from Agaricus subrufescens. In this work, soluble polysaccharides extracted from fungal mycelium, fruiting bodies, and the residual culture media were concentrated by nanofiltration. Total and high molar mass polysaccharides and soluble solids were determined in the concentrate for the three extracts. Additionally, the permeate flow, the influences of temperature and pressure, and the resistance to the permeate flow during filtration were also evaluated. Ayield of 5.5 g/L of biomass with 35%glucose conversion was obtained when 0.5 g/L of initial inoculum was employed. Average specific speed of growth was 0.4/day, with biomass productivity of about 0.76 g/(L day). Nanofiltration has yielded polysaccharide increases of 85, 82, and 92% in the extracts from fruiting bodies, mycelium, and liquid media, respectively. A reduction in the permeate flow was observed during filtration, and it was compensated by higher pressures and temperatures. The higher resistance to the permeate flux was caused by polarization due to concentration (polarized gel layer), reaching values of 88% for the culture media. Maximal resistance caused by the membrane reached values of 40% for the extract from the fruiting bodies. On the other hand, resistance caused by fouling was responsible for less than 3.5%. In conclusion, nanofiltration is efficient to concentrate these functional compounds extracted from A. subrufescens and can, therefore, be applied in different biotechnological areas. PMID:24077725

  18. Genome and physiology of the ascomycete filamentous fungus Xeromyces bisporus, the most xerophilic organism isolated to date.

    PubMed

    Leong, Su-Lin L; Lantz, Henrik; Pettersson, Olga V; Frisvad, Jens C; Thrane, Ulf; Heipieper, Hermann J; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Grabherr, Manfred; Pettersson, Mats; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Schnürer, Johan

    2015-02-01

    Xeromyces bisporus can grow on sugary substrates down to 0.61, an extremely low water activity. Its genome size is approximately 22 Mb. Gene clusters encoding for secondary metabolites were conspicuously absent; secondary metabolites were not detected experimentally. Thus, in its 'dry' but nutrient-rich environment, X. bisporus appears to have relinquished abilities for combative interactions. Elements to sense/signal osmotic stress, e.g. HogA pathway, were present in X. bisporus. However, transcriptomes at optimal (∼ 0.89) versus low aw (0.68) revealed differential expression of only a few stress-related genes; among these, certain (not all) steps for glycerol synthesis were upregulated. Xeromyces bisporus increased glycerol production during hypo- and hyper-osmotic stress, and much of its wet weight comprised water and rinsable solutes; leaked solutes may form a protective slime. Xeromyces bisporus and other food-borne moulds increased membrane fatty acid saturation as water activity decreased. Such modifications did not appear to be transcriptionally regulated in X. bisporus; however, genes modulating sterols, phospholipids and the cell wall were differentially expressed. Xeromyces bisporus was previously proposed to be a 'chaophile', preferring solutes that disorder biomolecular structures. Both X. bisporus and the closely related xerophile, Xerochrysium xerophilum, with low membrane unsaturation indices, could represent a phylogenetic cluster of 'chaophiles'. PMID:25142400

  19. Antioxidant Effects of Medicinal Mushrooms Agaricus brasiliensis and Ganoderma lucidum (Higher Basidiomycetes): Evidence from Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Yurkiv, Borys; Wasser, Solomon P; Nevo, Eviatar; Sybirna, Nataliya O

    2015-01-01

    With diabetes mellitus and increased glucose concentrations, the mitochondria electron transport chain is disrupted, superoxide anions are overproduced, and oxidative stress develops in cells. Thus, preventing oxidative stress can produce a decrease in the antioxidant system activity and an increase in apoptosis in immune cells. The application of medicinal mushrooms is a new possible approach to diabetes mellitus treatment. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the influence of administration of the medicinal mushrooms Agaricus brasiliensis and Ganoderma lucidum on antioxidant enzyme activity in rat leukocytes. Wistar outbred white rats were used in the study. Streptozotocin was intraperitoneally injected once at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight. Mushroom preparations were orally administered at a dose of 1 g/kg/day for 2 weeks. This revealed that in diabetes mellitus, the level of antioxidant enzyme activity is significantly decreased compared with control values, whereas the levels of lipid peroxidation is increased; this manifested in an increase in the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The medicinal mushrooms' administration is accompanied by an increase in antioxidant enzyme activity to control values and is even higher in the case of A. brasiliensis administration when compared with the diabetic group. As for the indicators of lipid peroxidation under mushroom administration of A. brasiliensis and G. lucidum, we observed a significant decrease of TBARS levels compared with the diabetic group. Increased activity of antioxidant enzymes and reduction of TBARS level indicate pronounced antioxidant properties of studied mushrooms. PMID:26756186

  20. Modelling the effect of the physical and chemical characteristics of the materials used as casing layers on the production parameters of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Arturo; Emilio Pardo, J; de Juan, J Arturo; Zied, Diego Cunha

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this research was to show the mathematical data obtained through the correlations found between the physical and chemical characteristics of casing layers and the final mushrooms' properties. For this purpose, 8 casing layers were used: soil, soil + peat moss, soil + black peat, soil + composted pine bark, soil + coconut fibre pith, soil + wood fibre, soil + composted vine shoots and, finally, the casing of La Rioja subjected to the ruffling practice. The conclusion that interplays in the fructification process with only the physical and chemical characteristics of casing are complicated was drawn. The mathematical data obtained in earliness could be explained in non-ruffled cultivation. The variability observed for the mushroom weight and the mushroom diameter variables could be explained in both ruffled and non-ruffled cultivations. Finally, the properties of the final quality of mushrooms were established by regression analysis. PMID:20878147

  1. Vitamin D2-Enriched Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Improves Memory in Both Wild Type and APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Louise; Kersaitis, Cindy; Macaulay, Stuart Lance; Münch, Gerald; Niedermayer, Garry; Nigro, Julie; Payne, Matthew; Sheean, Paul; Vallotton, Pascal; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Bird, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread, affecting over 30% of adult Australians, and increasing up to 80% for at-risk groups including the elderly (age>65). The role for Vitamin D in development of the central nervous system is supported by the association between Vitamin D deficiency and incidence of neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A reported positive relationship between Vitamin D status and cognitive performance suggests that restoring Vitamin D status might provide a cognitive benefit to those with Vitamin D deficiency. Mushrooms are a rich source of ergosterol, which can be converted to Vitamin D2 by treatment with UV light, presenting a new and convenient dietary source of Vitamin D2. We hypothesised that Vitamin D2-enriched mushrooms (VDM) could prevent the cognitive and pathological abnormalities associated with dementia. Two month old wild type (B6C3) and AD transgenic (APPSwe/PS1dE9) mice were fed a diet either deficient in Vitamin D2 or a diet which was supplemented with VDM, containing 1±0.2 µg/kg (∼54 IU/kg) vitamin D2, for 7 months. Effects of the dietary intervention on memory were assessed pre- and post-feeding. Brain sections were evaluated for amyloid β (Aβ) plaque loads and inflammation biomarkers using immuno-histochemical methods. Plasma vitamin D metabolites, Aβ40, Aβ42, calcium, protein and cholesterol were measured using biochemical assays. Compared with mice on the control diet, VDM-fed wild type and AD transgenic mice displayed improved learning and memory, had significantly reduced amyloid plaque load and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and elevated interleukin-10 in the brain. The results suggest that VDM might provide a dietary source of Vitamin D2 and other bioactives for preventing memory-impairment in dementia. This study supports the need for a randomised clinical trial to determine whether or not VDM consumption can benefit cognitive performance in the wider population. PMID:24204618

  2. Vitamin D2-enriched button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) improves memory in both wild type and APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Louise; Kersaitis, Cindy; Macaulay, Stuart Lance; Münch, Gerald; Niedermayer, Garry; Nigro, Julie; Payne, Matthew; Sheean, Paul; Vallotton, Pascal; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Bird, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread, affecting over 30% of adult Australians, and increasing up to 80% for at-risk groups including the elderly (age>65). The role for Vitamin D in development of the central nervous system is supported by the association between Vitamin D deficiency and incidence of neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). A reported positive relationship between Vitamin D status and cognitive performance suggests that restoring Vitamin D status might provide a cognitive benefit to those with Vitamin D deficiency. Mushrooms are a rich source of ergosterol, which can be converted to Vitamin D2 by treatment with UV light, presenting a new and convenient dietary source of Vitamin D2. We hypothesised that Vitamin D2-enriched mushrooms (VDM) could prevent the cognitive and pathological abnormalities associated with dementia. Two month old wild type (B6C3) and AD transgenic (APPSwe/PS1dE9) mice were fed a diet either deficient in Vitamin D2 or a diet which was supplemented with VDM, containing 1±0.2 µg/kg (∼54 IU/kg) vitamin D2, for 7 months. Effects of the dietary intervention on memory were assessed pre- and post-feeding. Brain sections were evaluated for amyloid β (Aβ) plaque loads and inflammation biomarkers using immuno-histochemical methods. Plasma vitamin D metabolites, Aβ40, Aβ42, calcium, protein and cholesterol were measured using biochemical assays. Compared with mice on the control diet, VDM-fed wild type and AD transgenic mice displayed improved learning and memory, had significantly reduced amyloid plaque load and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and elevated interleukin-10 in the brain. The results suggest that VDM might provide a dietary source of Vitamin D2 and other bioactives for preventing memory-impairment in dementia. This study supports the need for a randomised clinical trial to determine whether or not VDM consumption can benefit cognitive performance in the wider population. PMID:24204618

  3. Changes in non-volatile taste components of button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) during different stages of freeze drying and freeze drying combined with microwave vacuum drying.

    PubMed

    Pei, Fei; Shi, Ying; Gao, Xingyang; Wu, Fangning; Mariga, Alfred Mugambi; Yang, Wenjian; Zhao, Liyan; An, Xinxin; Xin, Zhihong; Yang, Fangmei; Hu, Qiuhui

    2014-12-15

    Button mushroom slices were dehydrated using freeze drying (FD) or FD combined with microwave vacuum drying (FMVD), and the non-volatile component profiles were studied. The results showed that the level of non-volatile components in button mushroom firstly increased during sublimation of FD/FMVD process and then fell during desorption in FD process and MVD in FMVD process. Compared to FD products, the contents of soluble sugars and polyols in FMVD products were relatively low, whereas the contents of total free amino acids were significantly higher, close to the level of fresh mushroom. However, there was no significant difference in the contents of 5'-nucleotides and organic acids between FD and FMVD products. The equivalent umami concentration (EUC) values for FD and FMVD products did not differ from fresh, indicating that both drying methods could effectively preserve MSG (monosodium glutamate)-like components in button mushroom. PMID:25038710

  4. Relationship between Yield Components and Partial Resistance to Lecanicillium fungicola in the Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, Assessed by Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Anne; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Dry bubble, caused by Lecanicillium fungicola, is one of the most detrimental diseases affecting button mushroom cultivation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that breeding for resistance to this pathogen is quite challenging due to its quantitative inheritance. A second-generation hybrid progeny derived from an intervarietal cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar was characterized for L. fungicola resistance under artificial inoculation in three independent experiments. Analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTL) was used to determine the locations, numbers, and effects of genomic regions associated with dry-bubble resistance. Four traits related to resistance were analyzed. Two to four QTL were detected per trait, depending on the experiment. Two genomic regions, on linkage group X (LGX) and LGVIII, were consistently detected in the three experiments. The genomic region on LGX was detected for three of the four variables studied. The total phenotypic variance accounted for by all QTL ranged from 19.3% to 42.1% over all traits in all experiments. For most of the QTL, the favorable allele for resistance came from the wild parent, but for some QTL, the allele that contributed to a higher level of resistance was carried by the cultivar. Comparative mapping with QTL for yield-related traits revealed five colocations between resistance and yield component loci, suggesting that the resistance results from both genetic factors and fitness expression. The consequences for mushroom breeding programs are discussed. PMID:22247161

  5. Effect of packaging conditions on the growth of micro-organisms and the quality characteristics of fresh mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) stored at inadequate temperatures.

    PubMed

    González-Fandos, E; Giménez, M; Olarte, C; Sanz, S; Simón, A

    2000-10-01

    Mushrooms were packed in two polymeric films (perforated and non-perforated PVC) and stored at 17 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The carbon dioxide and oxygen content inside the packages, aerobic mesophiles, Pseudomonas spp., faecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, anaerobic spores and major sensory factors (colour, texture, development stage and presence of moulds) were determined. The non-perforated packages had the highest contents of CO2 (6-7%), the lowest contents of O2 (0.013-0.17%) and the most desirable quality parameters (texture, development stage and absence of moulds). Pseudomonas spp. counts were around 1 logarithmic unit lower in mushrooms packaged in non-perforated film as the O2 concentrations were lower than in perforated film. The mushrooms themselves were inoculated with an enterotoxin A-producing strain of Staphylococcus aureus, packaged in overwrapped trays and stored at 17 and 25 degrees C. Staphylococcus aureus did not grow in the samples stored at 17 degrees C. Only slight growth was observed in mushrooms packaged with non-perforated film after 1 day at 25 degrees C. No enterotoxin was detected in any package. Faecal coliform counts were <2 log cfu g(-1). Escherichia coli was not isolated in any of the samples. At 25 degrees C, counts of anaerobic spores of around 2 log cfu g(-1) were detected in those mushrooms packaged in non-perforated film. PMID:11054166

  6. Nutritional value of Agaricus sylvaticus: mushroom grown in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vinhal Costa Orsine, J; Carvalho Garbi Novaes, M R; Ramírez Asquieri, E

    2012-01-01

    The bromatological characterization of the Agaricus sylvaticus species (A. sylvaticus), known as the Sun Mushroom and cultivated in Brazil, is necessary to determine substances with pharmacological and nutritional potential, in view its safe use in food and in human medicine. The purpose of the present study was to determine the chemical composition of the A. sylvaticus mushroom grown in Brazil. Mushrooms were obtained in dehydrated form from a producer in Minas Gerais State. Through this study it was able to observe the fungus' rich chemical composition, highlighting the variety and quantity of minerals as well as its high protein content. There are many components of this mushroom that have medicinal properties, which are recognized as excellent antioxidants. Results also proved that the composition of A. sylvaticus presented differences when compared to the chemical composition of other Agaricaceae fungi. PMID:22732967

  7. Effects of catalysts on liquefaction of Agaricus versicolor (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, Halil

    2016-04-01

    Supercritical liquefaction process is used for producing energy from biomass. The common reaction conditions for supercritical liquefaction process are the 240-380 °C temperature range and 5-20 Mpa pressure values range. Agaricus versicolor (L.) was liquefied by acetone in an autoclave (75 mL) under high pressure with (aluminium oxide and calcium hydroxide) and without catalyst at 290 °C for producing bio-oil. The products of liquefaction (bio-oil) were analysed and characterized using various methods including elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. GC-MS identified 27 different compounds in the bio-oils obtained at 290 °C.

  8. Determination of Chemical Antioxidants and Phenolic Compounds in the Brazilian Mushroom Agaricus sylvaticus

    PubMed Central

    Orsine, JV Costa; Novaes, MRCG; Asquieri, E Ramirez; Cañete, R

    2014-01-01

    Agaricus sylvaticus mushroom has been widely studied because of its high nutritional value and medicinal properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant potential of both alcoholic and aqueous extracts of Agaricus sylvaticus and quantify their total polyphenol content. The antioxidant activity was performed by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity and total polyphenol content was assessed by colorimetric method. Observation also noted the great antioxidant potential of aqueous, alcoholic and ethereal extracts (14.6%, 75.6% and 14.6%, respectively) of the Agaricus sylvaticus mushroom, highlighting the alcoholic extract, which demonstrates the extraordinary benefits of this mushroom in the diet, since antioxidants prevent premature ageing and various types of cancer. PMID:25303248

  9. Determination of Chemical Antioxidants and Phenolic Compounds in the Brazilian Mushroom Agaricus sylvaticus.

    PubMed

    Costa Orsine, J V; Novaes, Mr Cg; Ramirez Asquieri, E; Cañete, R

    2014-03-01

    Agaricus sylvaticus mushroom has been widely studied because of its high nutritional value and medicinal properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant potential of both alcoholic and aqueous extracts of Agaricus sylvaticusand quantify their total polyphenol content. The antioxidant activity was performed by the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity and total polyphenol content was assessed by colorimetric method. Observation also noted the great antioxidant potential of aqueous, alcoholic and ethereal extracts (14.6%, 75.6% and 14.6%, respectively) of the Agaricus sylvaticus mushroom, highlighting the alcoholic extract, which demonstrates the extraordinary benefits of this mushroom in the diet, since antioxidants prevent premature ageing and various types of cancer. PMID:25303248

  10. Immunomodulating Activity of Agaricus brasiliensis KA21 in Mice and in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Fukuwatari, Yasushi; Okumura, Ko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Furukawa, Mai; Ohno, Naohito; Mori, Kazu; Gao, Ming; Motoi, Masuro

    2008-01-01

    We performed studies on murine models and human volunteers to examine the immunoenhancing effects of the naturally outdoor-cultivated fruit body of Agaricus brasiliensis KA21 (i.e. Agaricus blazei). Antitumor, leukocyte-enhancing, hepatopathy-alleviating and endotoxin shock-alleviating effects were found in mice. In the human study, percentage body fat, percentage visceral fat, blood cholesterol level and blood glucose level were decreased, and natural killer cell activity was increased. Taken together, the results strongly suggest that the A. brasiliensis fruit body is useful as a health-promoting food. PMID:18604247

  11. Therapeutic Effect of Agaricus brasiliensis on Phenylhydrazine-Induced Neonatal Jaundice in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lan; Yuan, Bo; Wang, HuiPing; Gao, Ya

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Agaricus brasiliensis extract (ABE) on phenylhydrazine-induced neonatal jaundice in rats. Administration of ABE dose-dependently reduced the elevated bilirubin level induced by phenylhydrazine. It can be somewhat supported from the results of in vitro bilirubin degradation experiment. ABE treatment also reduced the total antioxidant status (TAOS), cascade O2−/SOD, level of NF-κB protein, and adrenomedullin (AM). Overall, the results of this study demonstrated that Agaricus brasiliensis extract may be beneficial to reducing bilirubin level without causing hepatotoxicity in neonatal jaundice. PMID:25883968

  12. Therapeutic effect of Agaricus brasiliensis on phenylhydrazine-induced neonatal jaundice in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Yuan, Bo; Wang, HuiPing; Gao, Ya

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Agaricus brasiliensis extract (ABE) on phenylhydrazine-induced neonatal jaundice in rats. Administration of ABE dose-dependently reduced the elevated bilirubin level induced by phenylhydrazine. It can be somewhat supported from the results of in vitro bilirubin degradation experiment. ABE treatment also reduced the total antioxidant status (TAOS), cascade O2(-)/SOD, level of NF-κB protein, and adrenomedullin (AM). Overall, the results of this study demonstrated that Agaricus brasiliensis extract may be beneficial to reducing bilirubin level without causing hepatotoxicity in neonatal jaundice. PMID:25883968

  13. Photoprotective and Antimutagenic Activity of Agaricus subrufescens Basidiocarp Extracts.

    PubMed

    da Costa, M C D; Regina, M; Cilião Filho, M; Linde, G A; do Valle, J S; Paccola-Meirelles, L D; Colauto, N B

    2015-10-01

    The photoprotective and antimutagenic activity of opened and closed basidiocarps of Agaricus subrufescens (=A. blazei; =A. brasiliensis) obtained by different extraction methods were evaluated on Aspergillus nidulans conidia submitted to ultraviolet (UV) light. The aqueous extracts were obtained by three extraction methods: maceration, infusion, and decoction, at two different extraction times. The extracts of A. subrufescens did not present toxicity for A. nidulans conidia. A suspension of A. nidulans conidia was submitted to extracts before and after the exposure to UV light. All basidiocarp extracts, regardless of the extraction method or development stage, protected A. nidulans conidia against the damaging effects of the mutagenic agent. The antimutagenic and photoprotective activity was strengthened with extracts obtained by 168-h maceration, followed by 24-h maceration and 60-min infusion and, at last, by 30-min infusion. Although the extracts presented protector effect as well as recoverer effect to the action of UV light, the preventive effect was more evident. Differences in the biological activity in function of the different development stages were detected with greater antimutagenic and photoprotective activity for the opened basidiocarps. However, the extraction method is the most important factor to be considered when compared to the basidiocarp development stage to obtain better antimutagenic and photoprotective activity of A. subrufescens basidiocarps. PMID:26092419

  14. Production flush of Agaricus blazei on Brazilian casing layers

    PubMed Central

    Colauto, Nelson Barros; da Silveira, Adriano Reis; da Eira, Augusto Ferreira; Linde, Giani Andrea

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to verify the biological efficiency and production flushes of Agaricus blazei strains on different casing layers during 90 cultivation days. Four casing layers were used: mixture of subsoil and charcoal (VCS), lime schist (LSC), São Paulo peat (SPP) and Santa Catarina peat (SCP); and two genetically distant A. blazei strains. The fungus was grown in composted substratum and, after total colonization, a pasteurized casing layer was added over the substratum, and fructification was induced. Mushrooms were picked up daily when the basidiocarp veil was stretched, but before the lamella were exposed. The biological efficiency (BE) was determined by the fresh basidiocarp mass divided by the substratum dry mass, expressed in percentage. The production flushes were also determined over time production. The BE and production flushes during 90 days were affected by the strains as well as by the casing layers. The ABL26 and LSC produced the best BE of 60.4%. Although VCS is the most used casing layer in Brazil, it is inferior to other casing layers, for all strains, throughout cultivation time. The strain, not the casing layer, is responsible for eventual variations of the average mushroom mass. In average, circa 50% of the mushroom production occurs around the first month, 30% in the second month, and 20% in third month. The casing layer water management depends on the casing layer type and the strain. Production flush responds better to water reposition, mainly with ABL26, and better porosity to LSC and SCP casing layers. PMID:24031673

  15. Sexuality and Genetic Identity in the Agaricus Section Arvenses

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Bado, Leo; Noble, Ralph; Challen, Mike; Dobrovin-Pennington, Andreja; Elliott, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Twelve wild collections and one commercial strain were used to characterize breeding systems and to develop molecular identities in the Arvenses section of the genus Agaricus, which includes the “horse mushroom” A. arvensis. Two morphotypes were identified based on macro- and micromorphological features. However, not all collections could be delimited by conventional taxonomic characters. Sequencing of the small subunit intergenic spacer (ITS) region (368 to 370 bp) of the rRNA genes clearly resolved the 13 collections into two clusters consistent with the identified morphotypes. Single-spore progenies and mating type testers were established and used to test intra- and interstock compatibility. The two compatibility groups identified were consistent with ITS clusters. Compatibility group I stocks readily interbred within the constraints of a unifactorial heterothallic system with a multiallelic mating type factor. Compatibility group II had a more restricted breeding pattern, and interactions were difficult to predict on the basis of mating type. Morphological data, ITS sequences, and the ability to interbreed suggest that these collections are part of a complex of interrelated species. Single-spore, homokaryotic isolates from both compatibility groups were able to fruit in compost culture, and two of the collections may represent natural homokaryotic fruiting. We conclude that species from the section Arvenses have versatile unifactorial heterothallic life cycles that permit both interbreeding and homokaryotic fruiting. PMID:10653743

  16. Nuclear Migration and Mitochondrial Inheritance in the Mushroom Agaricus Bitorquis

    PubMed Central

    Hintz, WEA.; Anderson, J. B.; Horgen, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were used as genetic markers for following mitochondrial inheritance in the mushroom Agaricus bitorquis. In many basidiomycetes, bilateral nuclear migration between paired homokaryotic mycelia gives rise to two discrete dikaryons which have identical nuclei but different cytoplasms. Although nuclear migration is rare in A. bitorquis, unidirectional nuclear migration occurred when a nuclear donating strain (8-1), was paired with a nuclear recipient strain (34-2). The dikaryon recovered over the nuclear recipient mate (Dik D) contained nuclei from both parents but only mitochondria from the recipient mate; thus nuclei of 8-1, but not mitochondria, migrated through the resident hyphae of 34-2 following hyphal anastomosis. The two mitochondrial types present in a dikaryon recovered at the junction of the two cultures (Dik A) segregated during vegetative growth. Dikaryotic cells having the 34-2 mitochondrial type grew faster than cells with the 8-1 mitochondrial type. Fruitbodies, derived from a mixed population of cells having the same nuclear components but different cytoplasms, were chimeric for mitochondrial type. The transmission of mitochondria was biased in favor of the 8-1 type in the spore progeny of the chimeric fruitbody. Protoplasts of dikaryon (Dik D), which contained both nuclear types but only the 34-2 mitochondrial type, were regenerated and homokaryons containing the 8-1 nuclear type and the 34-2 mitochondrial type were recovered. PMID:17246425

  17. Effects of agaricus lilaceps fairy rings on soil aggregation and microbial community structure in relation to growth stimulation of western wheatgrass (pascopyrum smithii) in Eastern Montana rangeland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stimulation of plant productivity caused by Agaricus fairy rings has been reported, but nothing is known about soil aggregation and the microbial community structure of the stimulated zone, particularly the communities that can bind to soil particles. We studied three concentric zones of Agaricus li...

  18. The molecular genetics of cultivated mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Whiteford, J R; Thurston, C F

    2000-01-01

    The types, economic significance and methods of production of the principal cultivated mushrooms are described in outline. These organisms are all less than ideal for conventional genetic analysis and breeding, so molecular methods afford a particular opportunity to advance our understanding of their biology and potentially give the prospect of improvement by gene manipulation. The sequences described are limited to those found in GenBank by August 1999. The gene sequences isolated from the white button mushroom Agaricus bisporus, the shiitake Lentinula edodes, the oyster mushrooms Pleurotus spp., the paddy straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea and the enotake Flammulina velutipes are described. The largest group are genes from A. bisporus, which includes 29 for intracellular proteins and 12 for secreted proteins. In comparison, only a total of 26 sequences can be reported for the other cultivated species. A. bisporus is also the only cultivated species for which molecular karyotyping is already supported by reliable markers for all 13 of its chromosomes. PMID:10907549

  19. White House

    MedlinePlus

    ... Check out the most popular infographics and videos Photos View the photo of the day and other galleries Video Gallery ... your questions or your story with President Obama. Photo of the Day Explore the White House Photo ...

  20. Nutritional supplementation with the mushroom Agaricus sylvaticus reduces oxidative stress in children with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Marcela S; Sá, Luana A; Vasconcelos, Amanda S; Moreira, Danilo R; Laurindo, Paula SOC; Ribeiro, Danielle RG; Santos, Rogério S; Guzzo, Paulo; Dolabela, Maria F; Percario, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The involvement of free radicals and oxidative stress in HIV infection has been extensively studied, and the benefits of antioxidant supplementation in animal studies have been demonstrated. However, few studies have demonstrated a benefit in clinical studies. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effects of dietary supplementation with Agaricus sylvaticus, a mushroom rich in antioxidants, on the oxidative profile of children born with HIV undergoing antiretroviral therapy. DESIGN: The sample included 24 children (both boys and girls) between two and eight years of age, of whom 10 were HIV positive and received supplementation with Agaricus sylvaticus for a three-month period, and 14 were HIV negative and received no supplementation. At the beginning and conclusion of the study, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), nitrite and nitrate (NN), Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and the antioxidant capacity of inhibition of diphenyl-picrilhidrazil (DPPH) free radicals were analyzed. RESULTS: Before supplementation, significantly higher values of TBARS and NN, but decreased values of DPPH, were observed in infected subjects when compared with HIV-negative subjects. After supplementation, a reduction of TBARS and NN values and an increase in DPPH and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity values were observed in HIV-positive subjects. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study suggest the involvement of oxidative stress in HIV infection, with the participation of NN synthesis. Additionally, supplementation reversed oxidative alterations and improved antioxidant defense in infected individuals, and may become a complementary strategy in the treatment of these patients. PMID:25371688

  1. Characterization, feasibility and optimization of Agaricus subrufescens growth based on chemical elements on casing layer

    PubMed Central

    Cunha Zied, D.; Pardo-Giménez, A.; de Almeida Minhoni, M.T.; Villas Boas, R.L.; Alvarez-Orti, M.; Pardo-González, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze yields, biological efficiency, earliness (expressed as days to first harvest), and precociousness and establish models for the mushroom growing according to these parameters. The experiment followed a double factorial design with four sources of calcium (calcitic limestone, calcitic limestone + gypsum, dolomitic limestone and dolomitic limestone + gypsum) and 2 application times (25 days before casing and at the moment of casing), with 4 replicates for each treatment. Different calcium sources influenced differently Agaricus subrufescens production, especially as regards earliness, which showed significantly higher values when dolomitic limestone with gypsum was applied. Yield and biological efficiency were negatively correlated with H + AL, organic matter and Mg amount. Furthermore, earliness was positively correlated with H + Al, organic matter, and the amount of Mg and Fe. Finally, negative correlations were observed between precociousness and the amount of Ca, SB (sum of base), CEC (cation exchange capacity) and V% (percentage of base saturation). The models presented in this work are extremely important for predicting the agronomic performance of Agaricus subrufescens on the basis of chemical analysis provided by the casing soil. PMID:23961195

  2. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  3. White phosphorus

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    White phosphorus ; CASRN 7723 - 14 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  4. Influence of storage and household processing on the agaritine content of the cultivated Agaricus mushroom.

    PubMed

    Schulzová, V; Hajslová, J; Peroutka, R; Gry, J; Andersson, H C

    2002-09-01

    Agaritine (N-(gamma-L(+)-glutamyl)-4-hydroxymethyl-phenylhydrazine) was identified and quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography and used as a marker for the occurrence of phenylhydrazine derivatives in the cultivated Agaricus bitorquis and A. garicus hortensis mushrooms. Although relatively high levels of agaritine (around 700 mg kg(-1)) could be found in freshly harvested A. bitorquis from early flushes, samples from supermarkets contained less agaritine. The content of 28 samples varied between 165 and 457 mg kg(-1), on average being 272 +/- 69 mg kg(-1). The highest amounts of agaritine were found in the skin of the cap and in the gills, the lowest being in the stem. There was no significant difference in agaritine content of the two mushroom species in our study. Pronounced reduction in agaritine content was observed during storage of mushrooms in the refrigerator or freezer, as well as during drying of the mushrooms. The degree of reduction was dependent on the length and condition of storage and was usually in the region 20-75%. No reduction in agaritine content was observed during freeze-drying. Depending on the cooking procedure, household processing of cultivated Agaricus mushrooms reduced the agaritine content to various degrees. Boiling extracted around 50% of the agaritine content into the cooking broth within 5min and degraded 20-25% of the original agaritine content of the mushrooms. Prolonged boiling, as when preparing a sauce, reduced the content in the solid mushroom further (around 10% left after 2h). Dry baking of the cultivated mushroom, a process similar to pizza baking, reduced the agaritine content by approximately 25%, whereas frying in oil or butter or deep frying resulted in a more marked reduction (35-70%). Microwave processing of the cultivated mushrooms reduced the agaritine content to one-third of the original level. Thus, the exposure to agaritine was substantially less when consuming processed Agaricus mushrooms as compared

  5. Effect of cultivation practices on the β-glucan content of Agaricus subrufescens basidiocarps.

    PubMed

    Zied, Diego Cunha; Pardo Giménez, Arturo; Pardo González, Jose Emilio; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Carvalho, Maiara Andrade; Minhoni, Marli Teixeira de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    The present work aimed to assess the effect of the following treatments on the medicinal potential (β-glucan content) and agronomical performance (yield) of Agaricus subrufescens: five different fungal strains, three cultivation substrates (compost), four casing layers, and four cultivation environments. Two experiments were performed, and the results indicate that the greatest contribution to the variation in β-glucan content was the strain (35.8%), followed by the casing layer (34.5%), the cultivation environment (15.7%), and the type of compost (9.9%). On the other hand the variation in yield was affected most by the cultivation environment (82.1%), followed by the strain (81.3%), casing layer (49.1%), and compost type (15.2%). These findings underscore the importance of developing a production protocol that employs specific cultivation practices for improving mushroom yield as well as β-glucan content. PMID:24308309

  6. Characterization studies on cadmium-mycophosphatin from the mushroom Agaricus macrosporus

    SciTech Connect

    Meisch, H.U.; Schmitt, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    A low molecular weight Cd-binding phosphoglycoprotein, cadmium-mycophosphatin, has been isolated from the mushroom Agaricus macrosporus. This protein has a molecular weight of 12,000 dalton and contains no sulfur but a high amount of acid amino acids (Glu, Asp), and carbohydrates (glucose, galactose). Cadmium-mycophosphatin has an isoelectric point less than pH 2, binds cadmium with a dissociation constant of K/sub D/ = 1.59 x 10 M (pK/sub D/ = 6.8) and is saturated with 13.5 mole Cd/mole, all Cd-binding sites being equivalent. It is suggested that Cd is bound by phosphoserine groups, similar relations being known from calcium-binding proteins in animals. From A. macrosporus four other low-molecular weight glycoproteins have been isolated which contain sulfur and bind cadmium and copper. The biological significance of these Cd-binding proteins is discussed.

  7. Morphological and molecular characterization of two novel species of Agaricus section Xanthodermatei.

    PubMed

    Callac, Philippe; Guinberteau, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Agaricus specimens collected in France belong to two novel entities resembling small forms of A. moelleri and A. xanthodermus, two common species in section Xanthodermatei. Molecular (IT1+ITS2 DNA sequence) and morphological comparisons between eight presumed similar taxa of the section support the elevation of both entities to species rank. The new entities are described as A. parvitigrinus and A. xanthodermulus. They form a group with A. laskibarii, a rare species also recently described from France, and A. californicus, a North-American species. The well known A. moelleri and A. xanthodermus are the most related species among the studied sample. Like other species of the section, both new species have a phenolic odor and are probably toxic. PMID:16396349

  8. Performance and meat quality of broiler chickens that are fed diets supplemented with Agaricus brasiliensis mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, João Borges; Dos Santos, Eder Clementino; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Bertechini, Antônio Gilberto; da Silva Ávila, Carla Luiza; Dias, Francesca Silva

    2014-12-01

    This trial was performed to study the use of the mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis as an alternative additive to antimicrobial growth promoters in broiler chicken diets and to assess the quality of the broiler chicken breast meat of birds that are fed diets containing this fungus. Thus, 595 1-day-old chicks were reared in reused poultry litter without anticoccidial and antimicrobial additives. The results showed that a concentration of 1.6 g mushrooms/kg diet was ideal for these birds because it provided better bird performance. When the birds' immune system organs were analyzed, it was found that the addition of both mushrooms influenced the immune system organs of these broiler chickens. Adding A. brasiliensis to broiler chicken diets did not compromise breast meat quality. PMID:25169695

  9. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the famous 'White Rock' feature in Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. The light-toned rock is not really white, but its light tone caught the eye of Mars geologists as far back as 1972, when it was first spotted in images acquired by Mariner 9. The light-toned materials are probably the remains of a suite of layered sediments that once spread completely across the interior of Pollack Crater. Dark materials in this image include sand dunes and large ripples.

    Location near: 8.1oS, 335.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  10. Production of polysaccharide from Agaricus subrufescens Peck on solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Camelini, C M; Gomes, A; Cardozo, F T G S; Simões, C M O; Rossi, M J; Giachini, A J; Petrus, J C C; de Mendonça, M M

    2013-01-01

    The interest upon products obtained from fungi has increased during the recent years. Among the most noticeable, nutraceuticals, enzymes, and natural drugs occupy a privileged position. Fungal biomass for the obtainment of those products can be produced either by solid-state fermentation (SSF) or submersed fermentation. SSF has been employed for the production of spawn on pretreated wheat grains with the objective of increasing the fungal polysaccharide (glucomannans) contents. Among the important factors for the production of spawn, time of cooking, time of resting after grain cooking, consequently grain moisture, substrate pH, temperature of incubation, and initial inoculum amount are among the most significant. For wheat grains, cooking time of 21 min followed by a 24-min resting time has been shown as optimal for the production of glucomannans by the fungus Agaricus subrufescens (=Agaricus brasiliensis). Amendments of CaSO(4) (up to 3 %) and CaCO(3) (up to 1 %) had an important influence on the substrate pH. In general, better results for glucomannan production were obtained when no supplement was added or when up to 0.25 % CaCO(3) (pH 6.6) has been added to the mix. Our results demonstrate that the inoculum amount necessary for the best polysaccharide levels is around 10.3 %, while the best temperature is around 27.2 °C. Besides using the spawn for its main purpose, it could potentially and alternatively be used as nutraceutical due to the high levels of glucomannan observed (6.89 %), a compound technically proven to be a potent immunostimulatory and antitumoral agent. PMID:22820522

  11. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , White ...

  12. The Effect of Agaricus brasiliensis and Ganoderma lucidum Medicinal Mushroom Administration on the L-arginine/Nitric Oxide System and Rat Leukocyte Apoptosis in Experimental Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yurkiv, Borys; Wasser, Solomon P; Nevo, Eviatar; Sybirna, Nataliya O

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative-nitrative stress develops as a result of hyperglycemia under diabetes mellitus. Formation of excessive reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species leads to different cytotoxic effects and ultimately to increased cell death by apoptosis of immune-competent blood cells. This study showed the influence of medicinal mushroom (MM) administration on the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) system and rat leukocyte apoptosis under normal and experimental diabetic conditions. Animals were divided into 6 groups: (1) control, (2) control animals treated with Agaricus brasiliensis, (3) control animals treated with Ganoderma lucidum, (4) animals with experimental diabetes (EDM), (5) diabetic animals treated with A. brasiliensis, and (6) diabetic animals treated with G. lucidum. Control and diabetic animals were fed powdered mushrooms at a dose of 1 g/kg body weight. Administration of MMs to animals with diabetes caused a decrease in the activity of the NO synthase enzyme, as well as in the content of stable end products of NO metabolism-nitrates and nitrites-at the control level. The normalizing effect of mushrooms on the percentage of leukocytes that contain pro- (p53) and antiapoptotic (Bcl-2) proteins compared with the EDM group was shown by immunocytochemical analysis. Thus the administration of MMs under EDM showed a positive corrective action on the L-arginine/NO system and the ratio between p53 and Bcl-2 proteins in white blood cells, as well as on apoptotic index reduction. PMID:25954960

  13. Whites Trashing Whites: Multiculturalism's Liberal Guilt Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Presents the opinions of a white, male literature professor who attended a conference of college writing teachers and was distressed because the overwhelmingly white audience listened quietly as speakers used the platform to identify whites as oppressors of minorities and linguistic imperialists. The paper questions the view that Standard English…

  14. Simple and efficient expression of Agaricus meleagris pyranose dehydrogenase in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Sygmund, Christoph; Gutmann, Alexander; Krondorfer, Iris; Kujawa, Magdalena; Glieder, Anton; Pscheidt, Beate; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens; Kittl, Roman

    2012-05-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH) is a fungal flavin-dependent sugar oxidoreductase that is highly interesting for applications in organic synthesis or electrochemistry. The low expression levels of the filamentous fungus Agaricus meleagris as well as the demand for engineered PDH make heterologous expression necessary. Recently, Aspergillus species were described to efficiently secrete recombinant PDH. Here, we evaluate recombinant protein production with expression hosts more suitable for genetic engineering. Expression in Escherichia coli resulted in no soluble or active PDH. Heterologous expression in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris was investigated using two different signal sequences as well as a codon-optimized sequence. A 96-well plate activity screening for transformants of all constructs was established and the best expressing clone was used for large-scale production in 50-L scale, which gave a volumetric yield of 223 mg L(-1) PDH or 1,330 U L(-1) d(-1) in space-time yield. Purification yielded 13.4 g of pure enzyme representing 95.8% of the initial activity. The hyperglycosylated recombinant enzyme had a 20% lower specific activity than the native enzyme; however, the kinetic properties were essentially identical. This study demonstrates the successful expression of PDH in the eukaryotic host organism P. pastoris paving the way for protein engineering. Additionally, the feasibility of large-scale production of the enzyme with this expression system together with a simplified purification scheme for easy high-yield purification is shown. PMID:22080342

  15. Edible mushroom Agaricus sylvaticus can prevent the onset of atheroma plaques in hipercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Percario, S; Odorizzi, V F; Souza, D R S; Pinhel, M A S; Gennari, J L; Gennari, M S; Godoy, M F

    2008-01-01

    Since the involvement of free radicals in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis was proposed, antioxidant supplementation arose as a potential strategy for the management of this disease. Thus, we decided to investigate the potential benefit of a natural antioxidant--rich edible mushroom (Agaricus sylvaticus) on the prevention of atherosclerosis. New Zealand rabbits underwent atherosclerosis induction by feeding a cholesterol--enriched chow (Group A), while Group B simultaneously received edible mushroom A. sylvaticus water solution. Control group received standard rabbit chow only (Group C). At the end of 10 week treatment period serum samples were drawn for lipid profile, uric acid, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and total antioxidant status (TAS). The area of aorta arteries taken by atheroma plaques was evaluated. Groups A and B presented higher cholesterol levels (p< 0.01) and reduced TAS (p<0.01), when compared to the Group C. However, TBARS and uric acid levels for Group B animals' were reduced, in comparison to Group A (p<0.05), and equals to group C. Moreover, animals from group A developed extensive atherosclerotic areas (47.0+/-14.0%), and that was prevented by the supplementation of A. sylvaticus (6.6+/-2.9%, p<0.01). Data suggested that A. sylvaticus can prevent the development of atherosclerosis in spite of hipercholesterolemia. PMID:19116085

  16. Agarol, an ergosterol derivative from Agaricus blazei, induces caspase-independent apoptosis in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takamitsu; Kawai, Junya; Ouchi, Kenji; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Osima, Yoshiteru; Hidemi, Rikiishi

    2016-04-01

    Agaricus blazei (A. blazei) is a mushroom with many biological effects and active ingredients. We purified a tumoricidal substance from A. blazei, an ergosterol derivative, and named it 'Agarol'. Cytotoxic effects of Agarol were determined by the MTT assay using A549, MKN45, HSC-3, and HSC-4 human carcinoma cell lines treated with Agarol. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and mitochondria membrane potential (∆ψm) were also determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to quantify the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. Agarol predominantly induced apoptosis in two p53-wild cell lines (A549 and MKN45) compared to the other p53-mutant cell lines (HSC-3 and HSC-4). Further mechanistic studies revealed that induction of apoptosis is associated with increased generation of ROS, reduced ∆ψm, release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the cytosol, upregulation of Bax, and downregulation of Bcl-2. Caspase-3 activities did not increase, and z-VAD-fmk, a caspase inhibitor, did not inhibit the Agarol-induced apoptosis. These findings indicate that Agarol induces caspase-independent apoptosis in human carcinoma cells through a mitochondrial pathway. The in vivo anticancer activity of Agarol was confirmed in a xenograft murine model. This study suggests a molecular mechanism by which Agarol induces apoptosis in human carcinoma cells and indicates the potential use of Agarol as an anticancer agent. PMID:26893131

  17. Effect of different compounds on the induction of laccase production by Agaricus blazei.

    PubMed

    Valle, J S; Vandenberghe, L P S; Oliveira, A C C; Tavares, M F; Linde, G A; Colauto, N B; Soccol, C R

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are polyphenol oxidases produced by many fungi and have many applications in textile, food and beverage, and pulp and paper industries. Laccase production can be induced using aromatic or phenolic compounds that mostly affect the transcription of laccase-encoding genes. In this study, we analyzed laccase and biomass production by Agaricus blazei in the presence of different concentrations of nitrogen, copper, and inducers such as pyrogallol, veratryl alcohol, xylidine, vanillin, guaiacol, and ethanol. Laccase production by A. blazei U2-4 reached 43.8 U/mL in the presence of 2.8 g/L nitrogen and 150 μM copper. However, addition of copper to the cultivation medium decreased biomass production. Different compounds differentially induced laccase production by A. blazei. Moreover, different concentrations of these inducers exerted different effects on laccase activity. Ethanol (1.0 mM), guaiacol (0.5 mM), and vanillin (0.5 mM) were the best inducers and increased laccase activity by 120% (A. blazei U2-2), 30% (A. blazei U2-3), and 9% (A. blazei U2-4), respectively. In contrast, pyrogallol and xylidine decreased laccase activity but increased biomass production. PMID:26634556

  18. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of dried powder formulations of Agaricus blazei and Lentinus edodes.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Andreia A J; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Dueñas, Montserrat; Barros, Lillian; da Silva, Roberto; Gomes, Eleni; Santos-Buelga, Celestino

    2013-06-15

    Several mushroom species have been pointed out as sources of antioxidant compounds, in addition to their important nutritional value. Agaricus blazei and Lentinus edodes are among the most studied species all over the world, but those studies focused on their fruiting bodies instead of other presentations, such as powdered preparations, used as supplements. In the present work the chemical composition (nutrients and bioactive compounds) and antioxidant activity (free radical scavenging activity, reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition) of dried powder formulations of the mentioned mushroom species (APF and LPF, respectively) were evaluated. Powder formulations of both species revealed the presence of essential nutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates and unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, they present a low fat content (<2g/100g) and can be used in low-calorie diets, just like the mushrooms fruiting bodies. APF showed higher antioxidant activity and higher content of tocopherols and phenolic compounds (124 and 770 μg/100g, respectively) than LPF (32 and 690 μg/100g). Both formulations could be used as antioxidant sources to prevent diseases related to oxidative stress. PMID:23497872

  19. Microbial diversity in a bagasse-based compost prepared for the production of Agaricus brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Azevedo, Raquel Santos; Braga, Claudia; da Silva, Romildo; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2009-01-01

    Edible mushrooms are renowned for their nutritional and medicinal properties and are thus of considerable commercial importance. Mushroom production depends on the chemical composition of the basic substrates and additional supplements employed in the compost as well as on the method of composting. In order to minimise the cost of mushroom production, considerable interest has been shown in the use of agro-industrial residues in the preparation of alternative compost mixtures. However, the interaction of the natural microbiota present in agricultural residues during the composting process greatly influences the subsequent colonisation by the mushroom. The aim of the present study was to isolate and identify the microbiota present in a sugar cane bagasse and coast-cross straw compost prepared for the production of Agaricus brasilienses. Composting lasted for 14 days, during which time the substrates and additives were mixed every 2 days, and this was followed by a two-step steam pasteurisation (55 - 65°C; 15 h each step). Bacteria, (mainly Bacillus and Paenibacillus spp. and members of the Enterobacteriaceae) were the predominant micro-organisms present throughout the composting process with an average population density of 3 x 108 CFU/g. Actinomycetes, and especially members of the genus Streptomyces, were well represented with a population density of 2 - 3 x 108 CFU/g. The filamentous fungi, however, exhibited much lower population densities and were less diverse than the other micro-organisms, although Aspergillus fumigatus was present during the whole composting process and after pasteurisation. PMID:24031404

  20. Agaricus meleagris pyranose dehydrogenase: Influence of covalent FAD linkage on catalysis and stability

    PubMed Central

    Krondorfer, Iris; Brugger, Dagmar; Paukner, Regina; Scheiblbrandner, Stefan; Pirker, Katharina F.; Hofbauer, Stefan; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K.

    2014-01-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH) is a monomeric flavoprotein belonging to the glucose–methanol–choline (GMC) family of oxidoreductases. It catalyzes the oxidation of free, non-phosphorylated sugars to the corresponding keto sugars. The enzyme harbors an FAD cofactor that is covalently attached to histidine 103 via an 8α-N(3) histidyl linkage. Our previous work showed that variant H103Y was still able to bind FAD (non-covalently) and perform catalysis but steady-state kinetic parameters for several substrates were negatively affected. In order to investigate the impact of the covalent FAD attachment in Agaricus meleagris PDH in more detail, pre-steady-state kinetics, reduction potential and stability of the variant H103Y in comparison to the wild-type enzyme were probed. Stopped-flow analysis revealed that the mutation slowed down the reductive half-reaction by around three orders of magnitude whereas the oxidative half-reaction was affected only to a minor degree. This was reflected by a decrease in the standard reduction potential of variant H103Y compared to the wild-type protein. The existence of an anionic semiquinone radical in the resting state of both the wild-type and variant H103Y was demonstrated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and suggested a higher mobility of the cofactor in the variant H103Y. Unfolding studies showed significant negative effects of the disruption of the covalent bond on thermal and conformational stability. The results are discussed with respect to the role of covalently bound FAD in catalysis and stability. PMID:25043975

  1. Reaction of pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris with its carbohydrate substrates.

    PubMed

    Graf, Michael M H; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Bren, Urban; Chu, Dinh Binh; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Oostenbrink, Chris; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2015-11-01

    Monomeric Agaricus meleagris pyranose dehydrogenase (AmPDH) belongs to the glucose-methanol-choline family of oxidoreductases. An FAD cofactor is covalently tethered to His103 of the enzyme. AmPDH can double oxidize various mono- and oligosaccharides at different positions (C1 to C4). To study the structure/function relationship of selected active-site residues of AmPDH pertaining to substrate (carbohydrate) turnover in more detail, several active-site variants were generated, heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris, and characterized by biochemical, biophysical and computational means. The crystal structure of AmPDH shows two active-site histidines, both of which could take on the role as the catalytic base in the reductive half-reaction. Steady-state kinetics revealed that His512 is the only catalytic base because H512A showed a reduction in (kcat /KM )glucose by a factor of 10(5) , whereas this catalytic efficiency was reduced by two or three orders of magnitude for His556 variants (H556A, H556N). This was further corroborated by transient-state kinetics, where a comparable decrease in the reductive rate constant was observed for H556A, whereas the rate constant for the oxidative half-reaction (using benzoquinone as substrate) was increased for H556A compared to recombinant wild-type AmPDH. Steady-state kinetics furthermore indicated that Gln392, Tyr510, Val511 and His556 are important for the catalytic efficiency of PDH. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and free energy calculations were used to predict d-glucose oxidation sites, which were validated by GC-MS measurements. These simulations also suggest that van der Waals interactions are the main driving force for substrate recognition and binding. PMID:26284701

  2. Commonly consumed and specialty dietary mushrooms reduce cellular proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R; Brophy, Sara K

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, over one million women will be newly diagnosed with breast cancer in the next year. Moreover, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the USA. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that consumption of dietary mushrooms can protect against breast cancer. In this study, we tested and compared the ability of five commonly consumed or specialty mushrooms to modulate cell number balance in the cancer process using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Hot water extracts (80°C for 2 h) of maitake (MT, Grifola frondosa), crimini (CRIM, Agaricus bisporus), portabella (PORT, Agaricus bisporus), oyster (OYS, Pleurotus ostreatus) and white button (WB, Agaricus bisporus) mushrooms or water alone (5% v/v) were incubated for 24 h with MCF-7 cells. Cellular proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced up to 33% by all mushrooms, with MT and OYS being the most effective. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction, an often used mitochondrion-dependent marker of proliferation, was unchanged although decreased (P > 0.05) by 15% with OYS extract. Lactate dehydrogenase release, as a marker of necrosis, was significantly increased after incubation with MT but not with other test mushrooms. Furthermore, MT extract significantly increased apoptosis, or programmed cell death, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl end labeling method, whereas other test mushrooms displayed trends of ∼15%. The total numbers of cells per flask, determined by hemacytometry, were not different from control cultures. Overall, all test mushrooms significantly suppressed cellular proliferation, with MT further significantly inducing apoptosis and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. This suggests that both common and specialty mushrooms may be chemoprotective against breast cancer. PMID:20921274

  3. Confronting White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swalwell, Katy

    2012-01-01

    Even as the United States becomes more diverse, a new era of "white flight" is unfolding. Whether they live in urban, suburban or rural communities, white students are likely to attend schools that reinforce their perceptions of cultural dominance. The average white student attends a school where 77 percent of the student body is of their race.…

  4. Do spawn storage conditions influence the colonization capacity of a wheat-straw-based substrate by Agaricus subrufescens?

    PubMed

    Farnet, Anne-Marie; Qasemian, Leila; Peter-Valence, Frédérique; Ruaudel, Florence; Savoie, Jean-Michel; Roussos, Sevastianos; Gaime-Perraud, Isabelle; Ziarelli, Fabio; Ferré, Élisée

    2014-01-01

    Storage conditions of the spawn of edible fungi are of major importance to facilitate the production of mushrooms. Here, standard storage conditions at 10°C or 15°C were used and the potential of colonization of standard European compost by the tropical species Agaricus subrufescens was assessed during the spawn running phase. Two lignocellulolytic activities, laccase and CMC-cellulase, were enhanced after storage compared to control as well as substrate transformation, as described by the aromaticity ratio and a humification ratio calculated from NMR data. This result indicates that mycelium growth probably occurred during storage at 10 or 15°C, leading to a larger amount of biomass in the inoculum. Moreover, the microbial functional diversity of the substrate was favored, showing that the electivity of the substrate was maintained. Thus, these findings indicate that recommendations for the mushroom producers can be established for A. subrufescens cultivation under European standard conditions. PMID:25103829

  5. Whiteness in Social Work Education Authentic White Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is guided by the following questions: How do People of Color define and experience White people as "authentic" allies? What does a White ally look like to People of Color? How do White allies view themselves as "authentic" White allies? What experiences lead White people to anti-racism and anti-racist praxis?…

  6. White Teachers Talking Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Avner; Garrett, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the increasing racial diversity in American schools and the consistently homogenous teacher workforce in the United States, understanding the ways white teachers consider and attend to racial issues is of crucial importance to the educational landscape. This paper, based on a qualitative study, explores five white American…

  7. White Mold of Chickpea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White mold of chickpea can occur at either seedling stage or at flowering and pod filling stages. At seedling stage, the disease occurs at the base of the stem causing symptoms like collar rot. Often white mycelial growth around the stem on soil surface is visible. Affected plants wilt and die. ...

  8. The Hidden Curriculum of Whiteness: White Teachers, White Territory, and White Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ricky Lee

    This paper suggests that space and spatiality are major features of racial identity and the formation of student resistance. It brings together critical studies of "Whiteness," human territoriality, and theories of resistance in education. The problems between white teachers and students of color can be understood better through a combination of…

  9. Sailing to White Boat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a composite red-green-blue image of the rock called White Boat. It is the first rock target that Spirit drove to after finishing a series of investigations on the rock Adirondack. White Boat stood out to scientists due to its light color and more tabular shape compared to the dark, rounded rocks that surround it.

  10. Working decks for buoy maintenance. White Sage on left, White ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Working decks for buoy maintenance. White Sage on left, White Holly on right. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  11. Elevation from east. White Holly in foreground, with White Sage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation from east. White Holly in foreground, with White Sage behind. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  12. Measurement of fluorescent white effects and whiteness.

    PubMed

    Anders, G

    1975-01-01

    This report surveys the literature and describes various techniques of whiteness measurement and evaluation in current use. Measuring techniques are described for dealing separately with the effects obtained by bleaching, blueing and fluorescent whitening, and an example is given of the direct quantitative estimation of a fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) on a substrate by measuring reflectance in the ultraviolet region. Another chapter deals with the colorimetric estimation of the whiteness and the shade of a fluorescent white using modern apparatus in conjunction with a programmable minicomputer. A new simple and universally applicab,e formula was worked out: W=D-Y+P-x+Q-y+C which has been successfully used in routine tests and which for the first time gives different weight to whiteness values corresponding to all shade preferences existing in theory. Each user can match the formula to his own preference by appropriate adjustment of the D, P, Q andC values. Y,x and y are the customary colorimetric values as standardized by the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage). It was also found that with another formula the shades of fluorescent whitening effects (green to red tints) may be defined in a simple way. PMID:1064551

  13. The Embeddedness of White Fragility within White Pre-Service Principals' Reflections on White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Mack T., III

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the prevalence of white fragility within the six white, pre-service principals' online responses to readings about white privilege. Six white, pre-service principals were asked to provide commentary to class readings on the relevance of white privilege to their preparation for future positions as principals. The findings showed…

  14. Hypermedicalization in White Noise.

    PubMed

    Benson, Josef

    2015-09-01

    The Nazis hijacked Germany's medical establishment and appropriated medical language to hegemonize their ideology. In White Noise, shifting medical information stifles the public into docility. In Nazi Germany the primacy of language and medical authority magnified the importance of academic doctors. The muddling of identities caused complex insecurities and the need for psychological doubles. In White Noise, Professor Gladney is driven by professional insecurities to enact a double in Murray. Through the manipulation of language and medical overreach the U.S., exemplified in the novel White Noise, has become a hypermedicalized society where the spirit of the Hippocratic Oath has eroded. PMID:24458659

  15. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  16. Effects of an Agaricus blazei Aqueous Extract Pretreatment on Paracetamol-Induced Brain and Liver Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Andréia A.; de Oliveira, Andrea L.; Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis B.; Comar, Jurandir F.; Rampazzo, Ana P. S.; Vicentini, Fernando A.; Natali, Maria R. M.; Gomes da Costa, Sandra M.; Peralta, Rosane M.

    2013-01-01

    The action of an Agaricus blazei aqueous extract pretreatment on paracetamol injury in rats was examined not only in terms of the classical indicators (e.g., levels of hepatic enzymes in the plasma) but also in terms of functional and metabolic parameters (e.g., gluconeogenesis). Considering solely the classical indicators for tissue damage, the results can be regarded as an indication that the A. blazei extract is able to provide a reasonable degree of protection against the paracetamol injury in both the hepatic and brain tissues. The A. blazei pretreatment largely prevented the increased levels of hepatic enzymes in the plasma (ASP, ALT, LDH, and ALP) and practically normalized the TBARS levels in both liver and brain tissues. With respect to the functional and metabolic parameters of the liver, however, the extract provided little or no protection. This includes morphological signs of inflammation and the especially important functional parameter gluconeogenesis, which was impaired by paracetamol. Considering these results and the long list of extracts and substances that are said to have hepatoprotective effects, it would be useful to incorporate evaluations of functional parameters into the experimental protocols of studies aiming to attribute or refute effective hepatoprotective actions to natural products. PMID:23984368

  17. Aqueous Extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill Prevents Age-Related Changes in the Myenteric Plexus of the Jejunum in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Santi-Rampazzo, Ana Paula; Schoffen, João Paulo Ferreira; Cirilo, Carla Possani; Zapater, Mariana Cristina Vicente Umada; Vicentini, Fernando Augusto; Soares, Andréia Assunção; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Buttow, Nilza Cristina; Natali, Maria Raquel Marçal

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the supplementation with aqueous extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM) on biometric and blood parameters and quantitative morphology of the myenteric plexus and jejunal wall in aging Wistar rats. The animals were euthanized at 7 (C7), 12 (C12 and CA12), and 23 months of age (C23 and CA23). The CA12 and CA23 groups received a daily dose of ABM extract (26 mg/animal) via gavage, beginning at 7 months of age. A reduction in food intake was observed with aging, with increases in the Lee index, retroperitoneal fat, intestinal length, and levels of total cholesterol and total proteins. Aging led to a reduction of the total wall thickness, mucosa tunic, villus height, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells. In the myenteric plexus, aging quantitatively decreased the population of HuC/D+ neuronal and S100+ glial cells, with maintenance of the nNOS+ nitrergic subpopulation and increase in the cell body area of these populations. Supplementation with the ABM extract preserved the myenteric plexus in old animals, in which no differences were detected in the density and cell body profile of neurons and glial cells in the CA12 and CA23 groups, compared with C7 group. The supplementation with the aqueous extract of ABM efficiently maintained myenteric plexus homeostasis, which positively influenced the physiology and prevented the death of the neurons and glial cells. PMID:25960748

  18. A polysaccharide isolated from Agaricus blazei Murill (ABP-AW1) as a potential Th1 immunity-stimulating adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    CUI, LIRAN; SUN, YONGXU; XU, HAO; XU, HUIYU; CONG, HUAN; LIU, JICHENG

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a low molecular weight polysaccharide, ABP-AW1, isolated from Agaricus blazei Murill was assessed for its potential adjuvant activity. ABP-AW1 is considered to create a ‘depot’ of antigen at a subcutaneous injection site. ICR mice were immunized with 100 μg ovalbumin (OVA) alone or with 100 μg OVA formulated in 0.9% saline containing 200 μg aluminum (alum) or ABP-AW1 (50, 100 and 200 μg) on days 1 and 15. Two weeks after the secondary immunization, splenocyte proliferation, the expression of surface markers, cytokine production and the OVA-specific antibody levels in the serum were determined. The OVA/ABP-AW1 vaccine, in comparison with OVA alone, markedly increased the proliferation of splenic lymphocytes and elicited greater antigen-specific CD4+ T cell activation, as determined by splenic CD4+CD69+ T cells and Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-γ release. The combination of ABP-AW1 and OVA also enhanced IgG2b antibody responses to OVA. In conclusion, these data indicated that ABP-AW1 significantly enhanced the humoral and cellular immune responses against OVA in the mice, suggesting that ABP-AW1 stimulated Th1-type immunity. We suggest that ABP-AW1 may serve as a new adjuvant. PMID:24137460

  19. The Protective Effect of Agaricus blazei Murrill, Submerged Culture Using the Optimized Medium Composition, on Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Wenyu; Han, Chunchao; Xu, Xin; Li, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM), an edible mushroom native to Brazil, is widely used for nonprescript and medicinal purposes. Alcohol liver disease (ALD) is considered as a leading cause for a liver injury in modern dietary life, which can be developed by a prolonged or large intake of alcohol. In this study, the medium composition of ABM was optimized using response surface methodology for maximum mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production. The model predicts to gain a maximal mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide at 1.047 g/100 mL, and 0.367 g/100 mL, respectively, when the potato is 29.88 g/100 mL, the glucose is 1.01 g/100 mL, and the bran is 1.02 g/100 mL. The verified experiments showed that the model was significantly consistent with the model prediction and that the trends of mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide were predicted by artificial neural network. After that, the optimized medium was used for the submerged culture of ABM. Then, alcohol-induced liver injury in mice model was used to examine the protective effect of ABM cultured using the optimized medium on the liver. And the hepatic histopathological observations showed that ABM had a relatively significant role in mice model, which had alcoholic liver damage. PMID:25114908

  20. Characterization of pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris and its application in the C-2 specific conversion of D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Volc, Jindrich; Halada, Petr; Kubátová, Elena; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K

    2008-02-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH) of the mushroom Agaricus meleagris was purified from mycelial culture media to substantial homogeneity using ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The native enzyme is a monomeric polypeptide with a molecular mass of 66,547Da as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry containing approximately 7% carbohydrate and covalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide. The enzyme exhibited a broad sugar substrate tolerance, oxidizing different aldopyranoses to the corresponding C-2 or C-2,3 (di)dehydro sugars. Preferred electron donors with the highest k(cat)/K(m) values were major sugar constituents of cellulose and hemicellulose, namely d-glucose, D-galactose, l-arabinose, D-xylose and cellobiose. This indicates a possible physiological role of the enzyme in lignocellulose breakdown. PDH showed no detectable activity with oxygen, and its reactivity towards electron acceptors was limited to various substituted benzoquinones and complexed metal ions, with the ferricenium ion and the benzoquinone imine 2,6-dichloroindophenole displaying the highest k(cat)/K(m). The enzyme catalyzed in up to 95% yields the regiospecific conversion of D-galactose to 2-dehydro-D-galactose, an intermediate in a possible biotechnologically interesting process for redox isomerization of D-galactose to the prebiotic sugar D-tagatose. PMID:18083263

  1. Effects of Dietary Supplementation with Agaricus sylvaticus Schaeffer on Glycemia and Cholesterol after Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mascaro, Marcelo Betti; França, Cristiane Miranda; Esquerdo, Kamilla F; Lara, Marx A N; Wadt, Nilsa S Y; Bach, Erna E

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the Agaricus sylvaticus (sun mushroom) on biochemical tests of the plasma and on the morphology of the pancreas in an experimental model of type I diabetes mellitus (DM1) induced by streptozotocin. One gram of dry A. sylvaticus was homogenized and mixed with the chow. Male Wistar rats were allocated as follows: normoglycemic control that received commercial chow; normoglycemic control group that received chow with A. sylvaticus; diabetic group that received commercial chow; and diabetic group that received chow with A. sylvaticus. Weight, food, and water consumption were measured every two days. Blood glucose levels were measured twice a week. After 30 days, the animals were euthanized and blood was collected for the analysis of cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, blood sugar, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT), alkaline phosphatase, iron, transferrin, and urea. The pancreas was processed for microscopic analysis. A. sylvaticus modulated the levels of cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, blood sugar, GPT, alkaline phosphatase, iron, transferrin, and urea to levels similar to those found in the controls and led to compensatory hyperplasia of the islets of Langerhans. A. sylvaticus is potentially beneficial in the control of type 1 diabetes, and it may also prevent pancreas damage. PMID:24971142

  2. Chitosan oligosaccharides in combination with Agaricus blazei Murill extract reduces hepatoma formation in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ming-Yang; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chou, Jason; Yeh, Chun; Chang, Jin-Biou; Hung, Hsiao-Fang; Kuo, Wan-Lin; Wu, Lung-Yuan; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-07-01

    Chitosan and Agaricus blazei Murill (ABM) extracts possess antitumor activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether chitosan, ABM extract or the two in combination were effective against tumors in tumor‑bearing mice. The mice were subcutaneously injected with SK-Hep 1 cells and were then were divided into the following six groups: Group 1, control group; group 2, chitosan 5 mg/kg/day; group 3, chitosan 20 mg/kg/day; group 4, ABM (246 mg/kg/day) and chitosan (5 mg/kg/day) combined; group 5, ABM (984 mg/kg/day) and chitosan (20 mg/kg/day) combined; and group 6, ABM (984 mg/kg/day). The mice were treated with the different concentrations of chitosan, ABM or combinations of the two for 6 weeks. The levels of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tissue histopathological features were examined in the surviving animals. Based on the results of the investigation, the treatments performed in groups 2, 3 and 4 were identified as being capable of reducing the weights of the tumors, however, group 4, which was treated with chitosan (5 mg/kg/day) in combination with ABM (246 mg/kg/day) was able to reduce the levels of GOT and VEGF. As a result, treatment with chitosan in combination with ABM may offer potential in cancer therapy and requires further investigation. PMID:25760985

  3. Effects of sulfated and non-sulfated β-glucan extracted from Agaricus brasiliensis in breast adenocarcinoma cells - MCF-7.

    PubMed

    Baranoski, Adrivanio; Tempesta Oliveira, Marcelo; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Niwa, Andressa Megumi; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2015-11-01

    The β-glucans (β-G) are polysaccharides produced by various organisms, and sulfation of β-G renders them more soluble. With the objective to assess the effects of sulfated and non-sulfated β-G extracted from Agaricus brasiliensis in MCF-7 cells, assays were used to evaluate cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, cell proliferation and mRNA expression. The sulfated and non-sulfated β-G showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity at concentrations of 5 and 10 μg/mL, by the MTT assay. However, only cytotoxicity was observed after 24 h by the Red Neutral test for sulfated β-G, with no genotoxicity for either β-G in comet assay. Proliferation was decreased only at 72 h at a concentration of 100 μg/mL of sulfated β-G. Treatment with 5 μg/mL of sulfated β-G for 6 h reduced the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and stress signaling genes, cell cycle arrest, damage and cell migration. The 5 μg/mL of non-sulfated β-G for 6 h reduced the expression of the stress response gene and signaling damage. These results indicate that the cytotoxicity in the MTT is not cell death, and that, in general, sulfated β-G have greater cytotoxicity compared to non-sulfated β-G. PMID:25970150

  4. Chitosan oligosaccharides in combination with Agaricus blazei Murill extract reduces hepatoma formation in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    YEH, MING YANG; SHANG, HUNG SHENG; LU, HSU FENG; CHOU, JASON; YEH, CHUN; CHANG, JIN BIOU; HUNG, HSIAO FANG; KUO, WAN LIN; WU, LUNG YUAN; CHUNG, JING GUNG

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan and Agaricus blazei Murill (ABM) extracts possess antitumor activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether chitosan, ABM extract or the two in combination were effective against tumors in tumor-bearing mice. The mice were subcutaneously injected with SK-Hep 1 cells and were then were divided into the following six groups: Group 1, control group; group 2, chitosan 5 mg/kg/day; group 3, chitosan 20 mg/kg/day; group 4, ABM (246 mg/kg/day) and chitosan (5 mg/kg/day) combined; group 5, ABM (984 mg/kg/day) and chitosan (20 mg/kg/day) combined; and group 6, ABM (984 mg/kg/day). The mice were treated with the different concentrations of chitosan, ABM or combinations of the two for 6 weeks. The levels of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tissue histopathological features were examined in the surviving animals. Based on the results of the investigation, the treatments performed in groups 2, 3 and 4 were identified as being capable of reducing the weights of the tumors, however, group 4, which was treated with chitosan (5 mg/kg/day) in combination with ABM (246 mg/kg/day) was able to reduce the levels of GOT and VEGF. As a result, treatment with chitosan in combination with ABM may offer potential in cancer therapy and requires further investigation. PMID:25760985

  5. Anxiolytic Effects of Royal Sun Medicinal Mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis (Higher Basidiomycetes) on Ischemia-Induced Anxiety in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunjing; Gao, Xiulan; Sun, Yan; Sun, Xiaojie; Wu, Yanmin; Liu, Ying; Yu, Haitao; Cui, Guangcheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the anxiolytic effects Agaricus brasiliensis extract (AbSE) on ischemia-induced anxiety using the plus-maze test and the social interaction test. The animals were treated orally with AbSE (4, 8, and 10 mg/kg/d, respectively) for 30 d, followed by middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced cerebral ischemia. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin in the cerebral cortex of rats, as well as oxidative stress and plasma corticosterone levels were analyzed, respectively. The rota-rod test was carried out to exclude any false positive results in experimental procedures related to anxiety disorders, and the catalepsy test was carried out to investigate whether AbSE induces catalepsy. Our results demonstrate that oral administration of AbSE presented anxiolytic-like effects in the elevated plus-maze test and the social interaction test. Furthermore, AbSE did not induce extrapyramidal symptoms in the catalepsy test. The mechanism underlying the anxiolytic effect of AbSE might be increased brain monoamine levels and plasma corticosterone levels and decreased oxidative stress in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion rats. PMID:25746401

  6. Effects of an Agaricus blazei aqueous extract pretreatment on paracetamol-induced brain and liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andréia A; de Oliveira, Andrea L; Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis B; Comar, Jurandir F; Rampazzo, Ana P S; Vicentini, Fernando A; Natali, Maria R M; Gomes da Costa, Sandra M; Bracht, Adelar; Peralta, Rosane M

    2013-01-01

    The action of an Agaricus blazei aqueous extract pretreatment on paracetamol injury in rats was examined not only in terms of the classical indicators (e.g., levels of hepatic enzymes in the plasma) but also in terms of functional and metabolic parameters (e.g., gluconeogenesis). Considering solely the classical indicators for tissue damage, the results can be regarded as an indication that the A. blazei extract is able to provide a reasonable degree of protection against the paracetamol injury in both the hepatic and brain tissues. The A. blazei pretreatment largely prevented the increased levels of hepatic enzymes in the plasma (ASP, ALT, LDH, and ALP) and practically normalized the TBARS levels in both liver and brain tissues. With respect to the functional and metabolic parameters of the liver, however, the extract provided little or no protection. This includes morphological signs of inflammation and the especially important functional parameter gluconeogenesis, which was impaired by paracetamol. Considering these results and the long list of extracts and substances that are said to have hepatoprotective effects, it would be useful to incorporate evaluations of functional parameters into the experimental protocols of studies aiming to attribute or refute effective hepatoprotective actions to natural products. PMID:23984368

  7. Effects of Dietary Supplementation with Agaricus sylvaticus Schaeffer on Glycemia and Cholesterol after Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mascaro, Marcelo Betti; França, Cristiane Miranda; Esquerdo, Kamilla F.; Lara, Marx A. N.; Wadt, Nilsa S. Y.; Bach, Erna E.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the Agaricus sylvaticus (sun mushroom) on biochemical tests of the plasma and on the morphology of the pancreas in an experimental model of type I diabetes mellitus (DM1) induced by streptozotocin. One gram of dry A. sylvaticus was homogenized and mixed with the chow. Male Wistar rats were allocated as follows: normoglycemic control that received commercial chow; normoglycemic control group that received chow with A. sylvaticus; diabetic group that received commercial chow; and diabetic group that received chow with A. sylvaticus. Weight, food, and water consumption were measured every two days. Blood glucose levels were measured twice a week. After 30 days, the animals were euthanized and blood was collected for the analysis of cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, blood sugar, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT), alkaline phosphatase, iron, transferrin, and urea. The pancreas was processed for microscopic analysis. A. sylvaticus modulated the levels of cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, blood sugar, GPT, alkaline phosphatase, iron, transferrin, and urea to levels similar to those found in the controls and led to compensatory hyperplasia of the islets of Langerhans. A. sylvaticus is potentially beneficial in the control of type 1 diabetes, and it may also prevent pancreas damage. PMID:24971142

  8. When White Dwarfs Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Wendy Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    3D models of white dwarf collisions are used to assess the likelihood of double-degenerate mergers as progenitors for Type Ia supernovae (henceforth SNIa) and to identify observational signatures of double-degenerate collisions. Observations of individual SNIa, SNIa rates in different galaxy types, and double white dwarf binary systems suggest that mergers or collisions between two white dwarfs play a role in the overall SNIa population. Given the possibility of two progenitor systems (single-degenerate and double-degenerate), the sample of SNIa used in cosmological calcula- tions needs to be carefully examined. To improve calculations of cosmological parameters, the development of calibrated diagnostics for double-degenerate progenitor SNIa is essential. Head-on white dwarf collision simulations are used to provide an upper limit on the 56Ni production in white dwarf collisions. In chapter II, I explore zero impact parameter collisions of white dwarfs using the Eulerian grid code FLASH. The initial 1D white dwarf profiles are created assuming hydrostatic equilibrium and a uniform composition of 50% 12C and 50% 16O. The masses range from 0.64 to 0.81 solar masses and have an isothermal temperature of 107 K. I map these 1D models onto a 3D grid, where the dimensions of the grid are each eight times the white dwarf radius, and the dwarfs are initially placed four white dwarf radii apart (center to center). To provide insight into a larger range of physical possibilities, I also model non-zero impact parameter white dwarf collisions (Chapter III). Although head-on white dwarf collisions provide an upper limit on 56Ni production, non-zero impact parameter collisions provide insight into a wider range of physical scenarios. The initial conditions (box size, initial separation, composition, and initial temperature) are identical to those used for the head-on collisions (Chapter II) for the same range of masses. For each mass pair- ing, collision simulations are carried

  9. White Racial Identity Statuses as Predictors of White Privilege Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Danica G.; Chang, Catherine Y.; Havice, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between White privilege awareness and White racial identity development for 197 counseling trainees. Results indicated that 3 of J. E. Helms's (1984, 1990, 1995) White racial identity statuses (i.e., Contact, Reintegration, and Immersion/Emersian) significantly predicted White privilege awareness. Implications…

  10. Beyond Black and White.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, James P.

    Black and white conflict is a by-product of a more basic problem: the failure of this society to develop a social system that enables all people to meet their basic human needs at a reasonable level. Until this is done, we will not be able to move beyond black and white. The underlying problem is related to a sudden acceleration of human history…

  11. [Surprising white lesions].

    PubMed

    Nolte, J W; van der Waal, I

    2011-09-01

    A 46-year-old man appeared with white lesions of the oral cavity. A previously taken biopsy revealed no classifying diagnosis and treatment with mouth rinse produced no improvement. A new biopsy was taken, on which the pathologist performed additional tests. This resulted in the diagnosis 'syphilis'. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin and the oral white lesions disappeared. Although nowadays syphilis is rare, special attention is required when noticing these kinds of lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:21957637

  12. White coat, patient gown.

    PubMed

    Wellbery, Caroline; Chan, Melissa

    2014-12-01

    Much has been written about the symbolic function of the white coat: its implications of purity, its representation of authority and professionalism, and its role in consolidating a medical hierarchy. By contrast, the medical literature has paid almost no attention to the patient gown. In this article, we argue that in order to understand the full implications of the white coat in the doctor-patient relationship, we must also take into account patients' dress, and even undress. We explore contemporary artistic images of white coat and patient gown in order to reveal the power differential in the doctor-patient relationship. Artistic representations capture some of the cultural ambivalence surrounding the use of the white coat, which confers professional status on its wearer, while undermining his or her personal identity. At the other end of the sartorial spectrum, hospital gowns also strip wearers of their identity, but add to this an experience of vulnerability. Although compelling reasons for continuing to wear the white coat in circumscribed settings persist, physicians should be mindful of its hierarchical implications. Ample room remains for improving patients' privacy and dignity by updating the hospital gown. PMID:24687912

  13. White light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, J.; Schlotter, P.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN LEDs on SiC substrate chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white light emitting diodes (LUCOLEDs). The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta, is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence downconversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic dye molecules and many inorganic phosphors. For white light generation via the LUCOLED principle, the phosphor Y3Al5O12:Ce3+(4f1) is ideally suited. The optical characteristics of Ce3+(4f1) in Y3Al5O12(YAG) are discussed in detail. Possibilities to "tune" the white color by various substitutions in the garnet lattice are shortly outlined.

  14. White LED performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yimin; Narendran, Nadarajah; Freyssinier, Jean Paul

    2004-10-01

    Two life tests were conducted to compare the effects of drive current and ambient temperature on the degradation rate of 5 mm and high-flux white LEDs. Tests of 5 mm white LED arrays showed that junction temperature increases produced by drive current had a greater effect on the rate of light output degradation than junction temperature increases from ambient heat. A preliminary test of high-flux white LEDs showed the opposite effect, with junction temperature increases from ambient heat leading to a faster depreciation. However, a second life test is necessary to verify this finding. The dissimilarity in temperature effect among 5 mm and high-flux LEDs is likely caused by packaging differences between the two device types.

  15. White light velocity interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

  16. White light velocity interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, D.J.

    1997-06-24

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  17. White light velocity interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

  18. White cell design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannan, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The White cell is a unit-magnification image relay system consisting of three noncoaxial spherical mirrors of equal curvature. The cell is used to provide a long optical path in a relatively small physical space. Multiple reflections are used, in a manner similar to a unstable laser resonator. A particular application is an optical delay line on the input of a streak camera to allow for the finite triggering time of the sweep start. This paper addresses the first- and third-order properties of the White cell. A displacement sensitivity analysis is included.

  19. White light velocity interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  20. White cell design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannan, Paul

    1989-11-01

    The White cell is a unit-magnification image relay system consisting of three noncoaxial spherical mirrors of equal curvature. The cell is used to provide a long optical path in a relatively small physical space. Multiple reflections are used, in a manner similar to a unstable laser resonator. A particular application is an optical delay line on the input of a streak camera to allow for the finite triggering time of the sweep start. This paper addresses the first- and third-order properties of the White cell. A displacement sensitivity analysis is included.

  1. Royal Sun Medicinal Mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis (Agaricomycetidae), Derived Polysaccharides Exert Immunomodulatory Activities In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Fang, Leilei; Zhang, Yanqing; Xie, Junbo; Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Huan; Wei, Weilu; Li, Yingrui

    2016-01-01

    The royal sun mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis is a widely consumed mushroom around the world. In this study, the immunoregulatory potential of A. brasiliensis polysaccharides was investigated in vitro and in vivo. In vivo, the polysaccharides remarkably increased the spleen and thymus indexes in mice, and this effect was influenced significantly by age (the adult and the juvenile). The spleen index increased by 27.28% in adult mice treated with the polysaccharides, whereas the increase in juvenile mice was just 12.59% at the dose of 150 mg·kg-1·d-1. Moreover, the effect of the polysaccharides on the thymus and spleen indexes in adult mice was obvious both in males and females. The carbon clearance ability (phagocytic index) was improved with increasing doses, (32.81% at 120 mg·kg-1·d-1, and 38.34% at 150 mg·kg-1·d-1) in mice treated with the polysaccharides. In vitro, the polysaccharides increased the RAW264.7 cell proliferation with 34.78% at 25 µg/mL and 26.78% at 50 µg/mL. Furthermore, the polysaccharides also promoted mRNA expressions of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, cyclooxygenase-2, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), myeloid differentiation 88 (MYD88), and TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) in the cells, indicating that the polysaccharides induce the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by stimulating TLR4/MyD88 and TLR4/TRIF pathways. In conclusion, these results suggest that A. brasiliensis polysaccharides induce a very promising immunostimulation effect in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, it should be explored as a novel natural functional food additive. PMID:27279534

  2. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  3. Genetic Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences Suggest Introgression and Duplication in the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Moinard, Magalie; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Shouxian; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Zhao, Ruilin; Hyde, Kevin D.; Callac, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster is widely used in fungal taxonomy and phylogeographic studies. The medicinal and edible mushroom Agaricus subrufescens has a worldwide distribution with a high level of polymorphism in the ITS region. A previous analysis suggested notable ITS sequence heterogeneity within the wild French isolate CA487. The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern and potential mechanism of ITS sequence heterogeneity within this strain. Using PCR, cloning, and sequencing, we identified three types of ITS sequences, A, B, and C with a balanced distribution, which differed from each other at 13 polymorphic positions. The phylogenetic comparisons with samples from different continents revealed that the type C sequence was similar to those found in Oceanian and Asian specimens of A. subrufescens while types A and B sequences were close to those found in the Americas or in Europe. We further investigated the inheritance of these three ITS sequence types by analyzing their distribution among single-spore isolates from CA487. In this analysis, three co-dominant markers were used firstly to distinguish the homokaryotic offspring from the heterokaryotic offspring. The homokaryotic offspring were then analyzed for their ITS types. Our genetic analyses revealed that types A and B were two alleles segregating at one locus ITSI, while type C was not allelic with types A and B but was located at another unlinked locus ITSII. Furthermore, type C was present in only one of the two constitutive haploid nuclei (n) of the heterokaryotic (n+n) parent CA487. These data suggest that there was a relatively recent introduction of the type C sequence and a duplication of the ITS locus in this strain. Whether other genes were also transferred and duplicated and their impacts on genome structure and stability remain to be investigated. PMID:27228131

  4. Purification, characterization, and antioxidant activities of selenium-containing proteins and polysaccharides in royal sun mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis (Higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Mao, Guanghua; Feng, Weiwei; Xiao, Hui; Zhao, Ting; Li, Fang; Zou, Ye; Ren, Yuena; Zhu, Yang; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2014-01-01

    The Agaricus brasiliensis proves to be the main source of many minerals, especially selenium (Se). In this study, Se-containing polysaccharides and proteins were isolated, purified, and characterized. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of Se-containing proteins and polysaccharides were also studied. Selenium in A. brasiliensis is present mostly in organic forms, accounting for 81.57% of the total Se. The organic forms of selenium mainly present in Se proteins account for 73.53%, while 12.23% is in Se polysaccharides. Two Se-containing proteins (AB-SePA-22) and (AB-SePG-22) with Se contents of 4.935 µg/g and 6.083 µg/g were obtained. AB-SePA-22 appeared as four bands with molecular masses of 16.7, 21.7, 26.3, and 33.6 kDa, respectively. The Se content of the three Se-containing polysaccharides, namely AB-SeP-1, AB-SeP-2, and AB-SeP-3, were 1.911, 0.613, and 0.671 µg/g, respectively. AB-SeP-1 (3.1×103 Da) was composed of glucose and galactose in a 7.494:1 molar ratio, whereas AB-SeP-2 (2.1×104 Da and 3.5×104 Da) and AB-SeP-3 (1.1×105 Da) were composed of glucose, galactose, and mannose with molar ratios of 27.01:1.55:1 and 9.805:1:1.22, respectively. Moreover, crude Se polysaccharide and total soluble Se protein had good antioxidant activities on scavenging DPPH and hydroxyl radical, and further research is needed. PMID:25271981

  5. White Sea - Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At bottom center of this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from April 13, 2001, the White Sea in western Russia is becoming free of ice in its southern extent. Meanwhile, the blue-green waters along the coast of the peninsula jutting out into the Barents Sea to the northeast could be due to a phytoplankton bloom.

  6. Liquid White Enamel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmar, Marge

    1985-01-01

    A secondary teacher describes how she has her students use liquid white enamel. With the enameling process, students can create lasting, exciting artwork. They can exercise an understanding of design and color while learning the value of careful, sustained craft skills. (RM)

  7. The White Sea, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Editor's Note: The caption below, published on May 10, 2001, is incorrect. According to Masha Vorontsova, director of the International Fund for Animal Welfare in Moscow, the situation with the seal pups in the White Sea is normal. There is no disaster and there never was. For more details, refer to the article entitled 'No Danger' on the New Scientist home page. The Earth Observatory regrets the earlier errant report. Original Caption According to the Russian Polar Research Institute for Fisheries and Oceanography, between 250,000 and 300,000 Greenland seal pups face death by starvation over the next two months due to a cruel trick by mother nature. The seals, most of them less than two months old, are trapped on ice sheets that remain locked in the White Sea, located near Archangel in Northern Russia. Typically, during the spring thaw the ice sheets break up and flow with the currents northward into the Barents Sea, the seals' spring feeding grounds. The seal pups hitch a ride on the ice floes, living on their own individual stores of fat until they arrive in the Barents Sea. Their mothers departed for the Barents Sea weeks ago. In a normal year, the seal pups' trip from the White Sea out to the Barents takes about six weeks and the seals have adapted to rely upon this mechanism of mother nature. During their yearly migration, the mother seals usually stay with their pups and feed them until their pelts turn from white to grey--a sign that the pups are mature enough to swim and feed themselves. Unfortunately, this year unusually strong northerly winds created a bottleneck of ice near the mouth of the white sea, thus blocking the flow of ice and trapping the pups. These true-color images of the White Sea were acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. This image, taken May 2, 2000 that there is usually much less ice in the White Sea this time of year as most of it is typically en route to the

  8. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    White dwarfs are the evolutionary endpoint for nearly 95% of all stars born in our Galaxy, the final stages of evolution of all low- and intermediate mass stars, i.e., main sequence stars with masses below (8.5± 1.5) M_{odot}, depending on metallicity of the progenitor, mass loss and core overshoot. Massive white dwarfs are intrinsically rare objects, tand produce a gap in the determination of the initial vs. final mass relation at the high mass end (e.g. Weidemann 2000 A&A, 363, 647; Kalirai et al. 2008, ApJ, 676, 594; Williams, Bolte & Koester 2009, ApJ, 693, 355). Main sequences stars with higher masses will explode as SNII (Smartt S. 2009 ARA&A, 47, 63), but the limit does depend on the metallicity of the progenitor. Massive white dwarfs are probably SNIa progenitors through accretion or merger. They are rare, being the final product of massive stars (less common) and have smaller radius (less luminous). Kepler et al. 2007 (MNRAS, 375, 1315), Kleinman et al. 2013 (ApJS, 204, 5) estimate only 1-2% white dwarfs have masses above 1 M_{odot}. The final stages of evolution after helium burning are a race between core growth and loss of the H-rich envelope in a stellar wind. When the burning shell is exposed, the star rapidly cools and burning ceases, leaving a white dwarf. As they cool down, the magnetic field freezes in, ranging from a few kilogauss to a gigagauss. Peculiar type Ia SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg suggest progenitors in the range 2.4-2.8 M_{odot}, and Das U. & Mukhopadhyay B. (2012, Phys. Rev. D, 86, 042001) estimate that the Chandrasekhar limit increases to 2.3-2.6 M_{odot} for extremely high magnetic field stars, but differential rotation induced by accretion could also increase it, according to Hachisu I. et al. 2012 (ApJ, 744, 69). García-Berro et al. 2012, ApJ, 749, 25, for example, proposes double degenerate mergers are the progenitors of high-field magnetic white dwarfs. We propose magnetic fields enhance the line broadening in

  9. What is white?

    PubMed Central

    Bosten, J. M.; Beer, R. D.; MacLeod, D. I. A.

    2015-01-01

    To shed light on the perceptual basis of the color white, we measured settings of unique white in a dark surround. We find that settings reliably show more variability in an oblique (blue-yellow) direction in color space than along the cardinal axes of the cone-opponent mechanisms. This is against the idea that white perception arises at the null point of the cone-opponent mechanisms, but one alternative possibility is that it occurs through calibration to the visual environment. We found that the locus of maximum variability in settings lies close to the locus of natural daylights, suggesting that variability may result from uncertainty about the color of the illuminant. We tested this by manipulating uncertainty. First, we altered the extent to which the task was absolute (requiring knowledge of the illumination) or relative. We found no clear effect of this factor on the reduction in sensitivity in the blue-yellow direction. Second, we provided a white surround as a cue to the illumination or left the surround dark. Sensitivity was selectively worse in the blue-yellow direction when the surround was black than when it was white. Our results can be functionally related to the statistics of natural images, where a greater blue-yellow dispersion is characteristic of both reflectances (where anisotropy is weak) and illuminants (where it is very pronounced). Mechanistically, the results could suggest a neural signal responsive to deviations from the blue-yellow locus or an adaptively matched range of contrast response functions for signals that encode different directions in color space. PMID:26641948

  10. Jupiter's White Ovals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    These images show a newly created large-scale storm on Jupiter, known as a white oval. This storm is the size of Earth and was observed by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Galileo spacecraft's photopolarimeter radiometer in July 1998. The color composite image shown in the upper panel was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide-Field/Planetary Camera on July 16, 1998. The image in the lower panel was created from data taken by Galileo's photopolarimeter experiment on July 20, 1998, and it is sensitive to Jupiter's atmospheric temperatures.

    The white oval is believed to be the result of a merger between two smaller, 50-year-old ovals sometime in February, 1998. This white oval may be the strongest storm in the solar system outside Jupiter's 200-year old Great Red Spot. The Galileo spacecraft's measurements of the temperature field show that the feature is distinctly colder than its surroundings, as would be expected from rapidly upwelling winds in the center of the feature, and this temperature difference is at least as large as that of the two former white ovals. The temperature measurements also show that the feature to the left of the new white oval, once distinctly warmer that its surroundings (as expected of downdrafts) has cooled off.

    More images and information on the Galileo mission are available on the Internet at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov .

    The Hubble Space Telescope image is courtesy of Amy Simon and Reta Beebe, New Mexico State University, and the Space Telescope Science Institute.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

  11. I Also Said, "White Racial Identity Influences White Researchers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Janet E.

    1993-01-01

    Responds to earlier article by Mio and Iwamasa (1992) on white researchers investigating ethnic-minority populations and other cross-cultural issues. Briefly summarizes theory of white racial identity development as conceptualized by Helms and suggests some ways in which white scholar's stages might influence her or his scholarship endeavors.…

  12. Exploring Whiteness: A Study of Self Labels for White Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Judith N.; Krizek, Robert L.; Nakayama, Thomas K.; Bradford, Lisa

    1996-01-01

    Examines the preferences and meanings of labels for White Americans as discursively defined expressions of identity, after preliminary revelations of resistance by Whites to self-labeling was seen. Surveys 371 White undergraduate students, rating seven labels regarding preference and discussing feelings about self-labeling. Reveals that the most…

  13. 50 CFR 660.373 - Pacific whiting (whiting) fishery management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 CFR Part 660, subpart G, a vessel that is 75 feet or less LOA that harvests whiting and, in... affecting § 660.373, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific whiting (whiting)...

  14. Complicating Whiteness: Identifications of Veteran White Teachers in Multicultural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miele, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    A scrupulous search of whiteness literatures in relation to multicultural education reveals a preponderance of scholarship noting White privilege and race evasiveness. Given contrasting scholarship arguing White identity as complicated, multifarious, and bound to social and historical context, concurrent with a dearth of scholarship that examines…

  15. White Institutional Presence: The Impact of Whiteness on Campus Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusa, Diane Lynn

    2010-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, Diane Gusa highlights the salience of race by scrutinizing the culture of Whiteness within predominately White institutions of higher education. Using existing research in higher education retention literature, Gusa examines embedded White cultural ideology in the cultural practices, traditions, and perceptions of…

  16. White Students Reflecting on Whiteness: Understanding Emotional Responses

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Nathan R.; Spanierman, Lisa B.; Aber, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    In the present investigation, the authors explored potential predictors of White students’ general emotional responses after they reflected on their Whiteness in a semi-structured interview (n = 88) or written reflection (n = 187). Specifically, the authors examined how color-blindness (i.e., awareness of White privilege) and racial affect (i.e., White empathy, White guilt, and White fear), assessed before the interview or written reflection, may predict positive and negative emotional responses, assessed immediately following the interview or written reflection. Furthermore, the authors considered whether affective costs of racism to Whites moderated the association between racial color-blindness and general positive and negative emotional responses of White students. Findings indicated that affective costs of racism moderated associations between racial color-blindness and general emotional responses. Specifically, White fear moderated associations for the written reflection group whereas White empathy moderated an association in the interview. White guilt did not moderate, but instead directly predicted a negative emotional response in the written reflection group. Findings suggest that the interaction between racial color-blindness and racial affect is important when predicting students’ emotional responses to reflecting on their Whiteness. Implications for educators and administrators are discussed. PMID:20657811

  17. White matter of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    White matter is found in the deeper tissues of the brain (subcortical). It contains nerve fibers (axons), which are ... or covering called myelin. Myelin gives the white matter its color. It also protects the nerve fibers ...

  18. White Flight: Pros and Cons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossell, Christine

    1978-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of school desegregation on White enrollment, the policy impact from two long-term demographic trends among middle class Whites--suburbanization and the declining birth rate--must be isolated. (Author/MC)

  19. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a condition in which there is an extra electrical pathway of the heart. The ... to periods of rapid heart rate ( tachycardia ). Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is one of the most common ...

  20. Asteroseismology of White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Carl J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation has been to study various aspects of multimode pulsations in variable white dwarfs. In particular, nonlinear interactions among pulsation modes in white dwarfs (and, to some extent, in other variable stars), analysis of recent observations where such interactions are important, and preliminary work on the effects of crystallization in cool white dwarfs are reported.

  1. Egg White Phantoms for HIFU

    SciTech Connect

    Divkovic, Gabriela; Jenne, Juergen W.

    2005-03-28

    We used fresh egg white and polyacrylamide to create a transparent tissue mimicking phantom. Heating of phantoms by HIFU leads to egg white protein denaturation and creation of visible white lesions. We measured the acoustical and thermal properties and investigated the possibility to use such phantoms to study the lesion formation during the HIFU therapy.

  2. White Students' Understanding of Race: An Exploration of How White University Students, Raised in a Predominately White State, Experience Whiteness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines White university students' understanding of race. Based in the scholarship on higher education and diversity, and framed in Critical Race Theory (CRT), this study explores the racial awareness of White students. This study contributes to the literature on the racial experience of Whites and an understanding of how White…

  3. 'Snow White' Trench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 43, the 43rd Martian day after landing (July 8, 2008). This image shows the trench informally called 'Snow White.'

    Two samples were delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory, which is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The first sample was taken from the surface area just left of the trench and informally named 'Rosy Red.' It was delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory on Sol 30 (June 25, 2008). The second sample, informally named 'Sorceress,' was taken from the center of the 'Snow White' trench and delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory on Sol 41 (July 6, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. The effect of Cordyceps extract and a mixture of Ganoderma lucidum/Agaricus Blazi Murill extract on human endometrial cancer cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hahne, Jens C; Meyer, Susanne R; Dietl, Johannes; Honig, Arnd

    2014-07-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most common gynaecological malignancy. Nevertheless there is a lack of curative therapies, especially for patients diagnosed with late stage, recurrent or aggressive disease, who have a poor prognosis. Cordyceps Sinensis, Ganoderma lucidum and Agaricus Blazi Murill are three fungi widely used in traditional Chinese medicine, and effects as adjuvants in tumour therapy have been demonstrated. However, the function and effects of these fungi in regard to endometrial cancer are not known. Three endometrial cancer cell lines, Ishikawa, Hec-1A and AN3-CA (derived from endometrial cancers grade I, II and III, respectively), were used to determine the effect of the fungi extracts on endometrial cancer cell function and to analyze the molecular mechanism. All fungi extracts had an inhibitory effect on cell viability and proliferation most probably exerted through induction of autophagy. Our data suggest that these fungi extracts may be used as adjuvants in endometrial tumour therapy. PMID:24805296

  5. Effects of Treating Old Rats with an Aqueous Agaricus blazei Extract on Oxidative and Functional Parameters of the Brain Tissue and Brain Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis B.; Soares, Andréia A.; de Oliveira, Andrea Luiza; Fernando Comar, Jurandir; Peralta, Rosane M.; Bracht, Adelar

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and increased oxidative stress is a striking phenomenon in the brain of aged individuals. For this reason there has been a constant search for drugs and natural products able to prevent or at least to mitigate these problems. In the present study the effects of an aqueous extract of Agaricus blazei, a medicinal mushroom, on the oxidative state and on the functionality of mitochondria from the brain of old rats (21 months) were conducted. The extract was administered intragastrically during 21 days at doses of 200 mg/kg. The administration of the A. blazei extract was protective to the brain of old rats against oxidative stress by decreasing the lipid peroxidation levels and the reactive oxygen species content and by increasing the nonenzymic and enzymic antioxidant capacities. Administration of the A. blazei extract also increased the activity of several mitochondrial respiratory enzymes and, depending on the substrate, the mitochondrial coupled respiration. PMID:24876914

  6. The Mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill Elicits Medicinal Effects on Tumor, Infection, Allergy, and Inflammation through Its Modulation of Innate Immunity and Amelioration of Th1/Th2 Imbalance and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hetland, Geir; Johnson, Egil; Lyberg, Torstein; Kvalheim, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    The medicinal mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill from the Brazilian rain forest has been used in traditional medicine and as health food for the prevention of a range of diseases, including infection, allergy, and cancer. Other scientists and we have examined whether there is scientific evidence behind such postulations. Agaricus blazei M is rich in the immunomodulating polysaccharides, β-glucans, and has been shown to have antitumor, anti-infection, and antiallergic/-asthmatic properties in mouse models, in addition to anti-inflammatory effects in inflammatory bowel disease patients. These effects are mediated through the mushroom's stimulation of innate immune cells, such as monocytes, NK cells, and dendritic cells, and the amelioration of a skewed Th1/Th2 balance and inflammation. PMID:21912538

  7. 'Snow White' in Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the trench dubbed 'Snow White,' after further digging on the 25th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (June 19, 2008). The lander's solar panel is casting a shadow over a portion of the trench.

    The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. EPR investigation of some desiccated Ascomycota and Basidiomycota gamma-irradiated mushrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercu, V.; Negut, C. D.; Duliu, O. G.

    2010-12-01

    The suitability of the EPR spectroscopy for detection of γ-irradiation in five species of dried mushroom, currently used in gastronomy: yellow morel— Morchella esculenta, (L.) Pers. (Phylum Ascomycota), button mushroom— Agaricus bisporus (J.E.Lange), Agaricus haemorrhoidarius Fr., golden chantarelle— Cantharellus cibarius Fr., as well as oyster mushroom— Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) (Phylum Basidiomycota) is presented and discussed. Although after irradiation at doses up to 11 kGy, all specimens presented well defined EPR spectra, only A. bisporus EPR signal was enough stable to make detection possible after 18 months.

  9. The Achievement Gap between White and Non-White Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas-LeBouef, Ana; Slate, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This Collection contains three seminal modules by Authors Ana Rojas-LeBouef and John R. Slate, professors and researchers from Sam Houston State University in Texas. They are nationally recognized scholars in the area of the academic inequity between White and Non-White students. This paper is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1--The…

  10. One Black, One White: Power, White Privilege, & Creating Safe Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delano-Oriaran, Omobolade O.; Parks, Marguerite W.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of two professors as they teach about White privilege in predominately White institutions of higher education. The authors discuss how racial potentiality shapes the classroom climates of each of the professors and then present strategies that utilize safe spaces to navigate students away from the resistance…

  11. Breakin' down Whiteness in Antiracist Teaching: Introducing Critical Whiteness Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matias, Cheryl E.; Mackey, Janiece

    2016-01-01

    Because of the changing nature of race the role of antiracist teaching is a forever-evolving process. Acknowledging that the majority of the U.S. teaching force, from K-12 to teacher education in institutions of higher education, are white middle-class females, it becomes imperative to unveil pedagogical applications of critical whiteness studies.…

  12. White Faculty Transforming Whiteness in the Classroom through Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charbeneau, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this qualitative study is to present a conceptual framework of pedagogical practices reported by white faculty that serve to challenge the hegemony of whiteness in the university classroom. These transformative teaching practices surfaced through a review of racialized pedagogies discussed in the literature and in…

  13. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

    Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old.

    The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope.

    The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars.

    Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the

  14. White Cliffs: Operating Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneff, S.

    1984-01-01

    The fourteen dish white cliffs solar power station area is remote and subject to extreme environmental conditions, solution of the associated problems required careful and thoughtful attention and the application of resources. Notwithstanding the wide range and harshness of conditions, the difficulties caused by remoteness and the lack of a technological base and the need for relatively rapid demonstration of success, the project has had a very positive outcome. Qualitative and quantitative information and lessons are now available to enable considerable simplifications to be made for a new system, reducing both hardware and operation and maintenance costs. Experience and lessons are presented, particularly in relation to: system performance in various environmental conditions; design philosophies for collectors, the array, control systems, engine and plant; operation and maintenance strategies and cost reducing possibilities. Experience so far gives encouragement for the future of such paraboloidal dish systems in appropriate areas.

  15. What Can White Faculty Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Jill

    2007-01-01

    White faculty members, even those who desire to participate in institutional change, are often unsure what role they can play in making their campuses places where American racial minority students want, and are able, to learn. Knowing what they can do may be the first step for White faculty members to begin making changes that can positively…

  16. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  17. White Nationalism and Native Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stineback, David

    1977-01-01

    Suggesting there has been a nationalistic psychology inherent in white America's relationship with the American Indian, this article asserts that the Puritans and 19th century politicians are alike in their inability to accept the idea that Indians have not wanted to live like the white man. (JC)

  18. Acting White: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohn, Kitae

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis of acting White has been heatedly debated and influential over the last 20 years or so in explaining the Black-White test score gap. Recently, economists have joined the debate and started providing new theoretical and empirical analyses of the phenomenon. This paper critically reviews the arguments that have been advanced to…

  19. Genetics Home Reference: white sponge nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions white sponge nevus white sponge nevus Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description White sponge nevus is a condition characterized by the formation ...

  20. Solidification of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatzman, E.

    1982-01-01

    The internal structure of white dwarfs is discussed. Highly correlated plasmas are reviewed. Implications for phase separation in the core of cooling white dwarfs are considered. The consequences for evolution of white dwarfs are addressed.

  1. Cardioprotective abilities of white wine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianhua; Tosaki, Arpad; Cordis, Gerald A; Bertelli, Alberto A E; Bertelli, Aldo; Maulik, Nilanjana; Das, Dipak K

    2002-05-01

    To study if white wines, like red wine, can also protect the heart from ischemia reperfusion injury, ethanol-free extracts of three different white wines (WW1, WW2 and WW3) (100 mg/100 g body weight) were given orally to Sprague Dawley rats (200 g body weight) for three weeks. Control rats were given water only for the same period of time. After three weeks, rats were anesthetized and sacrificed, and the hearts excised for the preparation of isolated working rat heart. All hearts were subjected to 30 min global ischemia followed by two hours of reperfusion. The results demonstrated that among the three different white wines, only WW2 showed cardioprotection as evidenced by improved post-ischemic ventricular recovery compared to control. The amount of malonaldehyde production in white wine-fed rat hearts were lower compared to that found in control hearts indicating reduced formation of the reactive oxygen species. In vitro studies using chemiluminescence technique revealed that these white wines scavenged both superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals. The results of our study demonstrated that only WW2 white wine provided cardioprotection as evidenced by the improved the post-ischemic contractile recovery and reduced myocardial infarct size. The cardioprotective effect of this white wine may be attributed, at least in part, from its ability to function as an in vivo antioxidant. PMID:12074987

  2. Teeth white and fair.

    PubMed

    Reed, R V

    1998-03-01

    Most dentists practicing today, in fact most dentists living today, accept porcelain, in one form or another, as a fundamental determinant of dental armamentarium. It must be remembered, however, that porcelain, in spite of some admonishments by the Chicken Littles, has not and is not about to fall like the sky. A great amount of purpose, intellect, and dedication proffered by porcelain's protagonists was the springboard that eventually led to near total acceptance of that product by dentists and the public they treated. Porcelain's introduction, however, was not accompanied by a professional unity that orchestrated its arrival with a blare of bugles and a ruffle of drums. Rather, the early proponents and opponents churned and swiped at each other for some decades. Teeth White and Fair recounts the origin, struggle, and growth of an early porcelain manufacturing company; the diversity of the men involved in the production of porcelain; the profession's dichotomy regarding the acceptance of porcelain; and the details of manufacture of that then embryonic dental product. Finally, the reader is given a peek at evolving cosmetic oriented materials that desire to garner ascension as valued players on the stages of cosmetic dental restorative materials. PMID:9709660

  3. White Dwarf Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    This proposal was designed to study pulse and orbital modulations in candidate DQ Herculis stars. Data on 5 stars were obtained. The best results were obtained on YY Draconis, which exhibited a strongly pulsed hard X-ray flux, and even suggested a transition between one-pole and two-pole emission during the course of the observation. This result is being readied for inclusion in a comprehensive study of YY Draconis. A strong pulsation appeared to be present also in H0857-242, but with a period of about 50 minutes, confusion with the first harmonic of the satellite's orbital frequency is possible. So that result is uncertain. A negative result was obtained on 4UO608-49 (V347 Pup), suggesting either that the X-ray identification is incorrect, or that the source is very transient. Finally, data was obtained on V1432 Aql and WZ Sge, respectively the slowest and fastest of these stars. Combined with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data, the high-energy data demonstrates the latter to contain a white dwarf rotating with P = 27.87 s. Optical photometry contemporaneous with the X-ray data was obtained of V1432 Aql, in order to study the variations in the eclipse waveform. As anticipated, the width and centroid of the eclipse appeared to vary with the 50-day "supercycle". A paper reporting this study is now in preparation.

  4. Whiting in Lake Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Satellites provide a view from space of changes on the Earth's surface. This series of images from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) aboard the Orbview-2 satellite shows the dramatic change in the color of Lake Michigan during the summer. The bright color that appears in late summer is probably caused by calcium carbonate-chalk-in the water. Lake Michigan always has a lot of calcium carbonate in it because the floor of the lake is limestone. During most of the year the calcium carbonate remains dissolved in the cold water, but at the end of summer the lake warms up, lowering the solubility of calcium carbonate. As a result, the calcium carbonate precipitates out of the water, forming clouds of very small solid particles that appear as bright swirls from above. The phenomenon is appropriately called a whiting event. A similar event occured in 1999, but appears to have started later and subsided earlier. It is also possible that a bloom of the algae Microcystis is responsible for the color change, but unlikely because of Lake Michigan's depth and size. Microcystis blooms have occured in other lakes in the region, however. On the shore of the lake it is possible to see the cities of Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Both appear as clusters of gray-brown pixels. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  5. Evaluation of adjuvant activity of fractions derived from Agaricus blazei, when in association with the recombinant LiHyp1 protein, to protect against visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    de Jesus Pereira, Nathália Cristina; Régis, Wiliam César Bento; Costa, Lourena Emanuele; de Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; da Silva, Alanna Gomes; Martins, Vivian Tamietti; Duarte, Mariana Costa; de Souza, José Roberto Rodrigues; Lage, Paula Sousa; Schneider, Mônica Santos; Melo, Maria Norma; Soto, Manuel; Soares, Sandra Aguiar; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel Angel; Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz

    2015-06-01

    The development of effective prophylactic strategies to prevent leishmaniasis has become a high priority. No less important than the choice of an antigen, the association of an appropriate adjuvant is necessary to achieve a successful vaccination, as the majority of the tested antigens contain limited immunogenic properties, and need to be supplemented with immune response adjuvants in order to boost their immunogenicity. However, few effective adjuvants that can be used against leishmaniasis exist on the market today; therefore, it is possible to speculate that the research aiming to identify new adjuvants could be considered relevant. Recently, Agaricus blazei extracts have proved to be useful in enhancing the immune response to DNA vaccines against some diseases. This was based on the Th1 adjuvant activity of the polysaccharide-rich fractions from this mushroom. In this context, the present study evaluated purified fractions derived from Agaricus blazei as Th1 adjuvants through in vitro assays of their immune stimulation of spleen cells derived from naive BALB/c mice. Two of the tested six fractions (namely F2 and F4) were characterized as polysaccharide-rich fractions, and were able to induce high levels of IFN-γ, and low levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in the spleen cells. The efficacy of adjuvant action against L. infantum was evaluated in BALB/c mice, with these fractions being administered together with a recombinant antigen, LiHyp1, which was previously evaluated as a vaccine candidate, associated with saponin, against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The associations between LiHyp1/F2 and LiHyp1/F4 were able to induce an in vivo Th1 response, which was primed by high levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF, by low levels of IL-4 and IL-10; as well as by a predominance of IgG2a antibodies in the vaccinated animals. After infection, the immune profile was maintained, and the vaccines proved to be effective against L. infantum. The immune stimulatory effects in the

  6. Chemical composition and nutrition value of dried cultivated culinary-medicinal mushrooms from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cağlarirmak, Necla

    2011-01-01

    Dietary fiber, raw fiber, fructose, glucose, sucrose, maltose, vitamin A (retinol), B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B6 (pyridoxine), and niacin contents of dried cultivated mushroom species Agaricus bisporus (white and brown), Lentinus edodes, and Pleurotus ostreatus were determined and evaluated for nutrient and chemical composition. Assays of dried mushroom samples were carried out after the drying process. Dried shiitake samples showed the highest dietary fiber and raw fiber content (23.23 +/- 0.018 and 9.71 +/- 0.039 microg/100 g, respectively). Mushrooms in this study were valuable sources of vitamins such as retinol, thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine, and niacin. A. bisporus contained the highest vitamin A content (43.93 +/- 1.85 microg/100 g) and shiitake had the highest contents of thiamine and pyridoxine (0.63 +/- 0.012 and 0.56 +/- 0.01 mg/100 g, respectively). Portobello had the highest riboflavin and niacin contents (0.90 +/- 0.015 and 8.37 +/- 0.17 mg/100 g, respectively). PMID:22164765

  7. Antioxidant capacity of several Iranian, wild and cultivated strains of the button mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Tajalli, Faezeh; Malekzadeh, Khalil; Soltanian, Hadi; Janpoor, Javad; Rezaeian, Sharareh; Pourianfar, Hamid R.

    2015-01-01

    The white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, is the most commonly grown mushroom in Iran; however, there is a significant shortage of research on its antioxidant activity and other medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate antioxidant capacity of the methanolic extracts from four cultivated strains and four Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS)-identified, Iranian wild isolates of A. bisporus. Evaluations were made for total phenols, flavonoids and anthocyanins, and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity. Overall, results showed that all the wild isolates exhibited significantly lower DPPH-derived EC50, compared to the cultivated strains (p < 0.05). A relatively high relationship was observed between total phenols and flavonoids or anthocyanins (r2 > 0.60). However, these constituents could not statistically differentiate the group of wild samples from the cultivated ones, and there was low correlation with the DPPH-derived EC50s (r2 < 0.40). In conclusion, comparisons showed that wild isolate 4 and cultivated strains A15 and H1 had higher antioxidant capacity than the others (p < 0.05). This result identifies these mushrooms as good candidates for further investigation. PMID:26413059

  8. Antioxidant capacity of several Iranian, wild and cultivated strains of the button mushroom.

    PubMed

    Tajalli, Faezeh; Malekzadeh, Khalil; Soltanian, Hadi; Janpoor, Javad; Rezaeian, Sharareh; Pourianfar, Hamid R

    2015-01-01

    The white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, is the most commonly grown mushroom in Iran; however, there is a significant shortage of research on its antioxidant activity and other medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate antioxidant capacity of the methanolic extracts from four cultivated strains and four Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS)-identified, Iranian wild isolates of A. bisporus. Evaluations were made for total phenols, flavonoids and anthocyanins, and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity. Overall, results showed that all the wild isolates exhibited significantly lower DPPH-derived EC50, compared to the cultivated strains (p < 0.05). A relatively high relationship was observed between total phenols and flavonoids or anthocyanins (r(2) > 0.60). However, these constituents could not statistically differentiate the group of wild samples from the cultivated ones, and there was low correlation with the DPPH-derived EC50s (r(2) < 0.40). In conclusion, comparisons showed that wild isolate 4 and cultivated strains A15 and H1 had higher antioxidant capacity than the others (p < 0.05). This result identifies these mushrooms as good candidates for further investigation. PMID:26413059

  9. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  10. White mold of Jerusalem artichoke

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a Native American food plant closely related to the common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Tubers of Jerusalem artichoke are increasingly available in retail grocery outlets. White mold (Sclerotinia stem rot), caused by the fungus, Sclerotinia sclerotioru...

  11. The White Adolescent's Drug Odyssey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Douglas S.; Marel, Rozanne

    1980-01-01

    Presents a "typical" case history of a White middle-class teenager who becomes involved with marihuana and subsequently begins to abuse other drugs. Sociological findings from other research are interspersed in the anecdotal account. (GC)

  12. Another Day, Another White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Sally

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the proposals in the 2005 White Paper can be largely explained by a New Labour emphasis on "meritocracy" merging with a right-wing belief in education as a means of creating an hierarchical society.

  13. 'White Rock' of Pollack Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    1 January 2004 The famous 'White Rock' of Pollack Crater has been known for three decades; it was originally found in images acquired by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) close-up view, obtained in October 2003, shows some of the light-toned, wind-eroded sedimentary rock that makes up 'White Rock.' It is not actually white, except when viewed in a processed, grayscale image (in color, it is more of a light butterscotch to pinkish material). The sediment that comprises 'White Rock' was deposited in Pollack Crater a long time ago, perhaps billions of years ago; the material was later eroded by wind. Dark, windblown ripples are present throughout the scene. This picture is located near 8.2oS, 335.1oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  14. Perceptions of White Identity and White Liability: An Analysis of White Student Responses to a College Campus Racial Hate Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Ronald L., II; Heckman, Susan M.

    2002-01-01

    Examines perceptions of White student identity in response to a racial hate email circulated to minority students throughout a predominantly White university campus community in the U.S. in 1999. Indicates that even though White students did not feel the need to identify themselves as "White" because of its sense of normalcy, they enjoyed and…

  15. Let's Talk about Race, Baby: How a White Professor Teaches White Students about White Privilege and Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinze, Peter

    2008-01-01

    There are a variety of methods by which the themes of White privilege and racism can be presented to White students. By using the concept of racial identity a continuum of racism can be considered. Furthermore, addressing White privilege and racism in the context of a multicultural psychology course allows White students to have a greater…

  16. Molecular cloning of three pyranose dehydrogenase-encoding genes from Agaricus meleagris and analysis of their expression by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Kittl, Roman; Sygmund, Christoph; Halada, Petr; Volc, Jindrich; Divne, Christina; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K

    2008-02-01

    Sugar oxidoreductases such as cellobiose dehydrogenase or pyranose oxidase are widespread enzymes among fungi, whose biological function is largely speculative. We investigated a similar gene family in the mushroom Agaricus meleagris and its expression under various conditions. Three genes (named pdh1, pdh2 and pdh3) putatively encoding pyranose dehydrogenases were isolated. All three genes displayed a conserved structure and organization, and the respective cDNAs contained ORFs translating into polypeptides of 602 or 600 amino acids. The N-terminal sections of all three genes encode putative signal peptides consistent with the enzymes extracellular secretion. We cultivated the fungus on different carbon sources and analyzed the mRNA levels of all three genes over a period of several weeks using real-time RT-PCR. The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from A. meleagris was also isolated and served as reference gene. pdh2 and pdh3 are essentially transcribed constitutively, whereas pdh1 expression is upregulated upon exhaustion of the carbon source; pdh1 appears to be additionally regulated under conditions of oxygen limitation. These data are consistent with an assumed role in lignocellulose degradation. PMID:18097667

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations give insight into D-glucose dioxidation at C2 and C3 by Agaricus meleagris pyranose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Graf, Michael M H; Bren, Urban; Haltrich, Dietmar; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2013-04-01

    The flavin-dependent sugar oxidoreductase pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH) from the plant litter-degrading fungus Agaricus meleagris oxidizes D-glucose (GLC) efficiently at positions C2 and C3. The closely related pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) from Trametes multicolor oxidizes GLC only at position C2. Consequently, the electron output per molecule GLC is twofold for PDH compared to P2O making it a promising catalyst for bioelectrochemistry or for introducing novel carbonyl functionalities into sugars. The aim of this study was to rationalize the mechanism of GLC dioxidation employing molecular dynamics simulations of GLC-PDH interactions. Shape complementarity through nonpolar van der Waals interactions was identified as the main driving force for GLC binding. Together with a very diverse hydrogen-bonding pattern, this has the potential to explain the experimentally observed promiscuity of PDH towards different sugars. Based on geometrical analysis, we propose a similar reaction mechanism as in P2O involving a general base proton abstraction, stabilization of the transition state, an alkoxide intermediate, through interaction with a protonated catalytic histidine followed by a hydride transfer to the flavin N5 atom. Our data suggest that the presence of the two potential catalytic bases His-512 and His-556 increases the versatility of the enzyme, by employing the most suitably oriented base depending on the substrate and its orientation in the active site. Our findings corroborate and rationalize the experimentally observed dioxidation of GLC by PDH and its promiscuity towards different sugars. PMID:23591812

  18. Effect of Agaricus sylvaticus supplementation on nutritional status and adverse events of chemotherapy of breast cancer: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Fabiana; Garbi Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho; Cañete, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer (BC) represents the highest incidence of malignancy in women throughout the world. Medicinal fungi can stimulate the body, reduce side-effects associated with chemotherapy and improve the quality of life in patients with cancer. Aim: To evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation of Agaricus sylvaticus on clinical and nutritional parameters in BC patients undergoing chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical trial was carried out at the Oncology Clinic, Hospital of the Federal District-Brazil from September 2007 to July 2009. Forty six patients with BC, Stage II and III, were randomly assigned to receive either nutritional supplement with A. sylvaticus (2.1 g/day) or placebo. Patients were evaluated during treatment period. Results: Patient supplemented with A. sylvaticus improved in clinical parameters and gastrointestinal functions. Poor appetite decreased by 20% with no changes in bowel functions (92.8%), nausea and vomiting (80%). Conclusion: Dietary supplementation with A. sylvaticus improved nutritional status and reduced abnormal bowel functions, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia in patients with BC receiving chemotherapy. PMID:23833361

  19. Influence of Lentinus edodes and Agaricus blazei extracts on the prevention of oxidation and retention of tocopherols in soybean oil in an accelerated storage test.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ana Carolina; Jorge, Neuza

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the methanol extracts of mushrooms Lentinus edodes and Agaricus blazei on the retention of tocopherols in soybean oil, when subjected to an accelerated storage test. The following treatments were subjected to an accelerated storage test in an oven at 60 °C for 15 days: Control (soybean oil without antioxidants), TBHQ (soybean oil + 100 mg/kg of TBHQ), BHT (soybean oil + 100 mg/kg of BHT), L. edodes (soybean oil + 3,500 mg/kg of L. edodes extract) and A. blazei (soybean oil + 3,500 mg/kg of A. blazei extract). The samples were analyzed for tocopherols naturally present in soybean oil and mass gain. The results showed, the time required to reach a 0.5% increase in mass was 13 days for TBHQ and 15 days for A. blazei. The content of tocopherols for TBHQ was 457.50 mg/kg and the A. blazei, 477.20 mg/kg. PMID:24876658

  20. 21 CFR 160.140 - Egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Egg whites. 160.140 Section 160.140 Food and Drugs... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.140 Egg whites. (a) Egg whites, liquid egg whites, liquid egg albumen is the food obtained from eggs of...

  1. 21 CFR 160.140 - Egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Egg whites. 160.140 Section 160.140 Food and Drugs... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.140 Egg whites. (a) Egg whites, liquid egg whites, liquid egg albumen is the food obtained from eggs of...

  2. 21 CFR 160.140 - Egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Egg whites. 160.140 Section 160.140 Food and Drugs... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.140 Egg whites. (a) Egg whites, liquid egg whites, liquid egg albumen is the food obtained from eggs of...

  3. 21 CFR 160.140 - Egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Egg whites. 160.140 Section 160.140 Food and Drugs... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.140 Egg whites. (a) Egg whites, liquid egg whites, liquid egg albumen is the food obtained from eggs of...

  4. 21 CFR 160.140 - Egg whites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Egg whites. 160.140 Section 160.140 Food and Drugs... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.140 Egg whites. (a) Egg whites, liquid egg whites, liquid egg albumen is the food obtained from eggs of...

  5. White Men's Racial Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lensmire, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Increasingly, researchers and educators have argued that alternative conceptions of Whiteness and White racial identity are needed because current conceptions have undermined, rather than strengthened, our critical pedagogies with White people. Grounded in critical Whiteness studies, and drawing especially on the writings of…

  6. Veratrole biosynthesis in white campion.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Tariq A; Pichersky, Eran

    2013-05-01

    White campion (Silene latifolia) is a dioecious plant that emits 1,2-dimethoxybenzene (veratrole), a potent pollinator attractant to the nocturnal moth Hadena bicruris. Little is known about veratrole biosynthesis, although methylation of 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol), another volatile emitted from white campion flowers, has been proposed. Here, we explore the biosynthetic route to veratrole. Feeding white campion flowers with [(13)C9]l-phenylalanine increased guaiacol and veratrole emission, and a significant portion of these volatile molecules contained the stable isotope. When white campion flowers were treated with the phenylalanine ammonia lyase inhibitor 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid, guaiacol and veratrole levels were reduced by 50% and 63%, respectively. Feeding with benzoic acid (BA) or salicylic acid (SA) increased veratrole emission 2-fold, while [(2)H5]BA and [(2)H6]SA feeding indicated that the benzene ring of both guaiacol and veratrole is derived from BA via SA. We further report guaiacol O-methyltransferase (GOMT) activity in the flowers of white campion. The enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity, and the peptide sequence matched that encoded by a recently identified complementary DNA (SlGOMT1) from a white campion flower expressed sequence tag database. Screening of a small population of North American white campion plants for floral volatile emission revealed that not all plants emitted veratrole or possessed GOMT activity, and SlGOMT1 expression was only observed in veratrole emitters. Collectively these data suggest that veratrole is derived by the methylation of guaiacol, which itself originates from phenylalanine via BA and SA, and therefore implies a novel branch point of the general phenylpropanoid pathway. PMID:23547102

  7. You Showed Your Whiteness: You Don't Get a "Good" White People's Medal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Cleveland; Juarez, Brenda G.

    2009-01-01

    The White liberal is a person who finds themselves defined as White, as an oppressor, in short, and retreats in horror from that designation. The desire to be and to be known as a good White person stems from the recognition that Whiteness is problematic, recognition that many White liberals try to escape by being demonstrably different from…

  8. Genome Sequence of Mushroom Soft-Rot Pathogen Janthinobacterium agaricidamnosum

    PubMed Central

    Graupner, Katharina; Lackner, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Janthinobacterium agaricidamnosum causes soft-rot disease of the cultured button mushroom Agaricus bisporus and is thus responsible for agricultural losses. Here, we present the genome sequence of J. agaricidamnosum DSM 9628. The 5.9-Mb genome harbors several secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters, which renders this neglected bacterium a promising source for genome mining approaches. PMID:25883287

  9. Genome Sequence of Mushroom Soft-Rot Pathogen Janthinobacterium agaricidamnosum.

    PubMed

    Graupner, Katharina; Lackner, Gerald; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Janthinobacterium agaricidamnosum causes soft-rot disease of the cultured button mushroom Agaricus bisporus and is thus responsible for agricultural losses. Here, we present the genome sequence of J. agaricidamnosum DSM 9628. The 5.9-Mb genome harbors several secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters, which renders this neglected bacterium a promising source for genome mining approaches. PMID:25883287

  10. Transgene expression in the basidiomycete root pathogen Armillaria mellea.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toward development of a genetic transformation system for Armillaria mellea, we used particle bombardment to identify promoters for driving transgene expression. The plasmid tested was pYES-hph-004iGFP, on which the green fluorescence protein gene, gfp, is linked to the Agaricus bisporus gpdII promo...

  11. Bootstrapping white matter segmentation, Eve++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew; Hinton, Kendra E.; Venkatraman, Vijay; Gonzalez, Christopher; Resnick, Susan M.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-atlas labeling has come in wide spread use for whole brain labeling on magnetic resonance imaging. Recent challenges have shown that leading techniques are near (or at) human expert reproducibility for cortical gray matter labels. However, these approaches tend to treat white matter as essentially homogeneous (as white matter exhibits isointense signal on structural MRI). The state-of-the-art for white matter atlas is the single-subject Johns Hopkins Eve atlas. Numerous approaches have attempted to use tractography and/or orientation information to identify homologous white matter structures across subjects. Despite success with large tracts, these approaches have been plagued by difficulties in with subtle differences in course, low signal to noise, and complex structural relationships for smaller tracts. Here, we investigate use of atlas-based labeling to propagate the Eve atlas to unlabeled datasets. We evaluate single atlas labeling and multi-atlas labeling using synthetic atlases derived from the single manually labeled atlas. On 5 representative tracts for 10 subjects, we demonstrate that (1) single atlas labeling generally provides segmentations within 2mm mean surface distance, (2) morphologically constraining DTI labels within structural MRI white matter reduces variability, and (3) multi-atlas labeling did not improve accuracy. These efforts present a preliminary indication that single atlas labels with correction is reasonable, but caution should be applied. To purse multi-atlas labeling and more fully characterize overall performance, more labeled datasets would be necessary.

  12. White matter dementia in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M; Thompson, L L; Sze, C I; Simon, J A; Paskavitz, J F; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K

    1999-03-01

    Cerebral white matter disorders may be associated with profound neurobehavioral dysfunction. We report a 62-year-old man who had a slowly progressive 25-year history of personality change, psychosis, mood disorder, and dementia. Neurologic examination disclosed abulia, impaired memory retrieval, and preserved language, with only minimal motor impairment. Neuropsychological testing found a sustained attention deficit, cognitive slowing, impaired learning with intact recognition, and perseveration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed extensive leukoencephalopathy. Right frontal brain biopsy showed ill-defined white matter pallor with hyaline narrowing of white matter arterioles. Granular osmiophilic material adjacent to vascular smooth muscle cells on electron microscopy of a skin biopsy, and an arginine for cysteine replacement at position 169 in the 4 EGF motif of the notch 3 region on chromosome 19q12 established the diagnosis of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). This case illustrates that CADASIL can manifest as an isolated neurobehavioral disorder over an extended time period. The dementia associated with CADASIL closely resembles that which may occur with other white matter disorders, and represents an example of white matter dementia. PMID:10371078

  13. White Mountain Wilderness, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Segerstrom, K.; Stotelmeyer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey made during 1971-1973, the White Mountain Wilderness, which constitutes much of the western and northern White Mountains, New Mexico, is appraised to have six areas of probable mineral potential for base and precious metals. In mineral deposits exist in the wilderness, the potential is for small deposits of base and precious metals in veins and breccia pipes or, more significantly, the possibility for large low-grade disseminated porphyry-type molybdenum deposits. There is little promise for the occurrence of geothermal energy resources in the area.

  14. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  15. Models-Based Practice: Great White Hope or White Elephant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many critical curriculum theorists in physical education have advocated a model- or models-based approach to teaching in the subject. This paper explores the literature base around models-based practice (MBP) and asks if this multi-models approach to curriculum planning has the potential to be the great white hope of pedagogical change…

  16. Working through Whiteness: White, Male College Students Challenging Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Nolan L.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study relies on Freire's conception of liberatory praxis to examine White male college students' becoming aware of racism and translating awareness into action. The participants developed racial cognizance via cross-racial contact and course content. They also tended to be open to interrogating racism and racial privilege due to…

  17. ACHA Campus Violence White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Joetta L.; Ward, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    In 1999, the American College Health Association (ACHA) adopted a position statement for the Association that addresses acts of violence, bias, and other violations of human rights that have been occurring all too often within or adjacent to college communities. The purpose of this ACHA White Paper is to confront this serious college health issue…

  18. The Black- White Earnings Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Sandra; Bernard, Keith

    1974-01-01

    Using projected labor force data (race, sex, and education) nondiscriminatory and discriminatory black-white occupational patterns and earnings ratios are defined to the year 2000. Rather than realistic estimates, the projections are designed as standards to measure progress in eliminating racial discrimination in the labor market. (EA)

  19. White Attitudes Toward Black Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, B. William

    1976-01-01

    Reviews several national surveys of white racial attitudes done between 1963 and 1974 by Harris and Associates, the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research, and Potomac Associates, focusing on perceptions of discrimination and attitudes towards housing, jobs, education, the police, legislation, and reverse discrimination. (JM)

  20. Whites' Beliefs about Blacks' Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluegel, James R.; Smith, Eliot R.

    1982-01-01

    Cites data which show that Whites tend to perceive widespread reverse discrimination, to see Blacks' opportunities as having greatly improved in recent years, and to deny structural limits to Black opportunity. Posits that these perceptions are related to (1) prevailing public beliefs about stratification and (2) peoples' own social positions and…

  1. Binary complementary white LED illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John K.

    2001-12-01

    For widespread adoption in general-purpose illumination applications, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) must reliably produce a substantial amount of white light at a reasonable cost. While several white LED technologies appear capable of meeting the implicit technical requirements for illumination, their high purchase price (relative to traditional light sources) has heretofore impeded their market advancement. Binary complementary white (BCW) LED illuminators, first introduced commercially in late 1997, appear to offer great potential for addressing the commercial and technical demands of general-purpose illumination applications. Many properties of BCW LED systems derive from AlInGaP LED chips, the source of up to 80% of the luminous flux projected from BCW devices. This configuration yields a number of benefits, relative to other white LED approaches, including high luminous efficacy, low cost per lumen, and high luminous flux per discrete component. This document describes BCW illumination systems in detail, beginning with a review of generic LED attributes, basic illumination requirements and applied photometric and colorimetric techniques.

  2. The Physics of White Dwarfs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Hugh M.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the current understanding of the structure and evolution of the white dwarf stars that was gained as a result of the increasingly sensitive and detailed astronomical observations coupled with calculations of the properties of matter under extreme conditions. (Author/GA)

  3. Readiness for Change. White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    This white paper by ICF International's Caitlin Howley discusses commonalities and differences among various understandings of readiness and highlights conceptualizations of readiness for change in selected change models. How leaders can use such theories to best to prepare their organizations--and the people enlivening them--for new ways of…

  4. Window into the White House

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Hover, Stephanie; Selverstone, Marc J.; Preston-Grimes, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    The American public often wonders what goes on in the White House and how domestic and foreign policy are made. Designed for use by the research and teaching communities, whitehousetapes.org provides teachers and students the opportunity to learn more about how American presidents have made decisions and exercised leadership during pivotal moments…

  5. White LED motorcycle headlamp design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Shing

    2015-09-01

    The motorcycle headlamp is composed of a white LED module, an elliptical reflector, a parabolic reflector and a toric lens. We use non-sequential ray to improve the optical efficiency of the compound reflectors. Using the toric lens can meet ECE_113 regulation and obtain a good uniformity.

  6. One-Dimensionality and Whiteness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderon, Dolores

    2006-01-01

    This article is a theoretical discussion that links Marcuse's concept of one-dimensional society and the Great Refusal with critical race theory in order to achieve a more robust interrogation of whiteness. The author argues that in the context of the United States, the one-dimensionality that Marcuse condemns in "One-Dimensional Man" is best…

  7. Unlocking the Color of White

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabiston, Duane

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes that teaching students how to unlock the color of white is his passion. Like so many other art teachers, he struggled for years teaching color wheels and making value scales, only to be frustrated when students produced colorful charts and then made colorless paintings. He was teaching students how to mix…

  8. Celebrating White Cane Awareness Month.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Judy; McGraw, Jane M.

    1995-01-01

    White Cane Awareness Month was created to teach the public that the long cane is a tool for maintaining independence and dignity and a symbol of freedom, not of pity or helplessness. Public relations materials were developed, including a demonstration for television stations on use of the long cane and a quiz to distribute at information booths.…

  9. Pulsating Helium Atmosphere White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Judith; Montgomery, Michael H.; Bischoff-Kim, Agnes; Shipman, Harry; Nitta, Atsuko; Whole Earth Telescope Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The overwhelming majority of all stars currently on the main sequence as well as those from earlier generations will or have ended their stellar lives as white dwarf stars. White dwarfs are rich forensic laboratories linking the history and future evolution of our Galaxy. Their structure and atmospheric composition provide evidence of how the progenitors lived, how they evolved, and how they died. This information reveals details of processes governing the behavior of contemporary main sequence stars. Combined with their distribution in luminosity/temperature, white dwarfs strongly constrain models of galactic and cosmological evolution.GD358 is among the brightest (mv =13.7) and best studied of the pulsating white dwarfs. This helium atmoshere pulsator (DBV) has an extensive photometric database spanning 30 years, including nine multisite Whole Earth Telescope campaigns. GD358 exhibits a range of behaviors, from drastic changes in excited pulsation modes to variable multiplet splittings. We use GD358 as a template for an examination of the DBV class, combining photometric results with recent COS spectroscopy. The results present new questions concerning DB formation and evolution.

  10. About White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Information on the White Sands Missile Range is given in viewgraph form. Navy programs, test sites, rocket programs, research rockets' booster capacity, current boost capabilities, ordnance and payload assembly areas, commercial space launch history and agreements, and lead times are among the topics covered.

  11. "White Privilege": A Mild Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    White privilege analysis has been influential in philosophy of education. I offer some mild criticisms of this largely salutary direction--its inadequate exploration of its own normative foundations, and failure to distinguish between "spared injustice", "unjust enrichment" and "non-injustice-related" privileges; its inadequate exploration of the…

  12. Black Students in White Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epps, Edgar G., Ed.

    This volume is concerned with the impact of a new black student population on traditionally white colleges and universities and the reactions of the students to the intellectual and social climates in which they are expected to pursue their academic and social goals. Two chapters are reprints of articles which have appeared in other publications;…

  13. An Indian in White America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Mark; Reyer, Carolyn, Ed.

    In his autobiography, Mark Monroe relates his life experiences as a Lakota Sioux Indian in White America. The book begins with Monroe reminiscing about his happy childhood on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. In 1941 his family moved to Alliance, Nebraska, and his father Dakota. In 1941 his family moved to Alliance, Nebraska, and his father…

  14. White Dwarfs in Intermediate Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Kunegunda E.; Sion, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Intermediate polars (IPs), magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) in which the white dwarf (WD) has an intermediate strength magnetic field (B< 5 MG), present an interesting laboratory for the study of the evolution of CVs as they contain elements of both non-magnetic and magnetic systems. Do magnetic CVs and IPs evolve in the same manner as non-magnetic systems? One answer in this puzzle may come from understanding the nature of the white dwarf in a magnetic CV. Standard CV evolution theory predicts a white dwarf temperature for a given CV orbital period and accretion rate. By investigating the temperature of white dwarfs in IPs and comparing the temperatures to those predicted from theory, we can learn where IPs fit into the model of CV evolution. Here we present the results of our continued study of the nature of WDs in IPs. We compare temperatures derived from model fits to UV spectra with temperatures calculated based on the accretion rate and binary orbital period. Our preliminary results indicate that IPs follow the general trend of magnetic CVs containing cooler WDs than non-magnetic CVs.

  15. White Resentment in Settler Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schick, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Teaching about the history and culture of aboriginal peoples in schools of white settler societies can serve as a counter to the dominant story that serves as the national narrative. Even though the actual teaching may well be among the least political and least disruptive type of curricular knowledge on offer, the inclusion of counter stories can…

  16. Immunomodulatory Effects of the Agaricus blazei Murrill-Based Mushroom Extract AndoSan in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing High Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: A Randomized, Double Blinded Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Tierens, Anne; Caers, Jo; Binsfeld, Marilene; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Trøseid, Anne-Marie Siebke; Wang, Junbai; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Hetland, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Forty patients with multiple myeloma scheduled to undergo high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support were randomized in a double blinded fashion to receive adjuvant treatment with the mushroom extract AndoSan, containing 82% of Agaricus blazei Murrill (19 patients) or placebo (21 patients). Intake of the study product started on the day of stem cell mobilizing chemotherapy and continued until the end of aplasia after high dose chemotherapy, a period of about seven weeks. Thirty-three patients were evaluable for all study endpoints, while all 40 included patients were evaluable for survival endpoints. In the leukapheresis product harvested after stem cell mobilisation, increased percentages of Treg cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were found in patients receiving AndoSan. Also, in this group, a significant increase of serum levels of IL-1ra, IL-5, and IL-7 at the end of treatment was found. Whole genome microarray showed increased expression of immunoglobulin genes, Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) genes, and HLA genes in the Agaricus group. Furthermore, AndoSan displayed a concentration dependent antiproliferative effect on mouse myeloma cells in vitro. There were no statistically significant differences in treatment response, overall survival, and time to new treatment. The study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970021. PMID:25664323

  17. The Effects of Light Intensity, Casing Layers, and Layering Styles on Royal Sun Medicinal Mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis (Higher Basidiomycetes) Cultivation in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Adanacioglu, Neşe; Boztok, Kaya; Akdeniz, Ramazan Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the effects of light intensity, casing layers, and layering styles on the production of the culinary-medicinal mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis in Turkey. The experiments were designed in split-split plots and replicated twice. Three different light intensities-I1, 350 lux; I2, 450 lux; and I3, 750 lux-were used in main plots as environmental factors. A mixture of 4 different casing layers- peat (100%), peat-perlite (75%:25%), peat-clinoptilolite (75%:25%), and peat-perlite-clinoptilolite (60%:20%:20%)-were used at split plots and at split plots. S1, a flat, 3-cm casing layer; S2, a flat, 5-cm casing layer; and S3, casing soil ridges 10 cm wide × 4 cm high, 10 cm apart, were deposited on top of 1-cm overall soil casing layers. At the end of the harvest phase, the total yield was estimated per 100 kg of substrate. Biological efficiency (percentage) was determined from the fresh weight of the mushrooms and the dry weight of the compost at the end of the harvesting period. The highest total yield (7.2 kg/100 kg compost) and biological efficiency (27.63%) were achieved from I2 × peat-perlite-clinoptilolite × S2 treatment. Influence of light intensity, casing layer, layering style, and their interaction in treatments with color values (L*, a*, b*, chroma*, and hue*) also were examined. It has been shown that within color values, chroma* (saturation) values of mushroom caps were affected by light intensity, casing layer, and layering style treatments and light intensity × casing layer treatments and the brightness of mushroom caps tended to increase as light intensity increased. PMID:25954965

  18. Ethanolic Extract of Agaricus blazei Fermentation Product Inhibits the Growth and Invasion of Human Hepatoma HA22T/VGH and SK-Hep-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Yen-Chen; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Kuo, Min-Liang; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Hepatoma is a leading cause of death in the world. SK-Hep-1 and HA22T/VGH cells are poorly differentiated human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines with invasive and migratory abilities. Agaricus blazei (AB) is a mushroom with many biological effects and active ingredients, and the ethanolic extract of AB fermentation product (AB-pE) was demonstrated to inhibit the growth of hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in our previous study. In this study, we further investigated the anticancer and anti-invasive abctivities of the AB-pE. Results showed that the AB-pE inhibited the growth of SK-Hep1 and HA22T/VGH cells (with IC50 values of 26.8 and 28.7 μg/mL, respectively) and led cells toward apoptosis after 48 h of treatment. Activation of caspase-3 by AB-pE (12.5~200 μg/mL) in a dose-dependent manner was observed in both cell lines using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The apoptosis triggered by the AB-pE was regulated by the increased expression of Bax, the activation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP, and the decreased expression of Bcl-2. Additionally, the AB-pE showed the potential ability to inhibit invasion of SK-Hep1 and HA22T/VGH cells according to the results of a Matrigel invasion assay. Our results suggested that the AB-pE may be a further developed for its potential against hepatoma due to its antiproliferative (via apoptosis) and anti-invasive activities in hepatoma cells. PMID:24716127

  19. White Sturgeon Bibliography, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fickeisen, Duane H.

    1986-03-01

    This bibliography presents citations to the majority of published materials on white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). The purpose was to assist in planning and implementing research on white sturgeon in the Columbia River system. (ACR)

  20. The Pulsating White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2008-10-01

    We present a summary of what is currently known about the three distinct families of isolated pulsating white dwarfs. These are the GW Vir stars (He/C/O-atmosphere stars with Teff sime 120,000 K), the V777 Her stars (He-atmosphere, Teff sime 25,000 K), and the ZZ Ceti stars (H-atmosphere, Teff sime 12,000 K), all showing multiperiodic luminosity variations caused by low-order and low-degree g-mode instabilities. We also provide, in an Appendix, a very brief overview of the newly found evidence in favor of the existence of a fourth category of oscillating white dwarfs bearing strong similarities with these families of pulsators. We begin our survey with a short historical introduction, followed by a general discussion of pulsating white dwarfs as compact pulsators. We then discuss the class properties of these objects, including an updated census. We next focus on the instability domains for each family of pulsators in the log g - Teff diagram, and present their time-averaged properties in more detail. This is followed by a section on excitation physics, i.e., the causes of the pulsational instabilities, with emphasis on the common properties of the different types of pulsator. We then discuss the time-dependent properties of the pulsating white dwarfs featuring, among other things, a brief "picture tour" across the ZZ Ceti instability strip. We next review the methods used to infer or constrain the angular geometry of a pulsation mode in a white dwarf. These include multicolor photometry and time-resolved spectroscopy, the exploitation of the nonlinear features in the observed light curves, and rotational splitting. We also consider basic adiabatic asteroseismology starting with a discussion of the reaction of the period spectrum to variations of model parameters. We next review the various asteroseismological inferences that have so far been claimed for white dwarfs. We also discuss the potential of exploiting the rates of period change. We finally provide some

  1. Transgressive and Negotiated White Racial Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    This critical case study investigated the experiences of six White preservice teachers as they learned about race and racism during the first semester of an urban-focused teacher preparation program. The author identified two broad themes of "transgressive White racial knowledge" and "negotiated White racial knowledge" to…

  2. Emotions and White Racial Identity Status Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Matthew P.; Carter, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between emotional states and White racial identity status attitudes (Helms, 1984, 1990) were tested on a sample of 286 White students. The stimulus was a vignette in which one condition involved explicit racial information and one did not. Participants rated baseline and posttest emotions and completed the White Racial Identity…

  3. White speck potential for mechanically harvested cottons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper examines the white speck phenomena as seen in mechanically picked cottons based on HVI, AFIS and white speck fabric data. White specks are dye defects that can be inherent from the variety or can be caused by weather or other field conditions, and the fabric manufacturer is often caught ...

  4. Multiculturalism, Teaching Slavery, and White Supremacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bery, Sadhana

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that multiculturalism, especially when it is led and controlled by Whites, and in the absence of collective anti-racist struggles, can reproduce the ontologies, epistemologies, and practices of white supremacy. I use a case study of a reenactment of Atlantic black slavery, produced by white teachers to investigate whether…

  5. Accounting for Whiteness through Collaborative Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Samuel Jaye

    2016-01-01

    This arts-based, qualitative teacher-researcher study considers how a group of mostly white high school students worked with their white facilitators to consider whiteness using Youth Participatory Action Research in conjunction with playbuilding and drama pedagogy. First, the author locates his reflexive stance. Then, relying on critical race…

  6. Unraveling the Threads of White Teachers' Conceptions of Caring: Repositioning White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Julie L.; Brock, Cynthia H.; Ndura, Elavie

    2012-01-01

    This study explored two White inservice teachers' understandings of Whiteness in relation to privilege and caring. A yearlong professional development set of courses used a multimodal construction of three significant course experiences designed to reposition Whiteness and illuminate White teachers' predisposition to care for their students in…

  7. Making Whites from the Dark Side: Teaching Whiteness Studies at San Francisco State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sueyoshi, Amy

    2013-01-01

    While whiteness studies at most institutions aims to expose the persistence of white supremacy to a disbelieving audience, whiteness studies within the College of Ethnic Studies (COES) at San Francisco State University (SFSU) begins with the assumption that racism still exists. The course then traces how whiteness is constructed and fortified to…

  8. White Dialectics: A New Framework for Theory, Research, and Practice with White Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Nathan R.; Abrams, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents White dialectics, or the tensions that White students experience as dominant group members in the United States, as a new framework to understand and intervene with White students and counselor trainees. Developed from and supported by our qualitative analysis, the authors present the six dialectics of (a) Whiteness and self,…

  9. Discourses of Whiteness: White Students at Catholic Women's Colleges (Dis)Engaging Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ropers-Huilman, Rebecca; Winters, Kelly T.; Enke, Kathryn A. E.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand how White college women understand and are influenced by whiteness, we discursively analyzed data from interviews and focus groups with 25 White seniors at two Catholic women's colleges. Findings suggest that participants understood whiteness through discourses of insignificance, nominal difference, responsibility, and…

  10. The physics of white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern, Jordi; García-Berro, Enrique; Hernanz, Margarida; Mochkovitch, Robert

    1998-12-01

    White dwarfs are the final remnants of low- and intermediate-mass stars. Their evolution is essentially a cooling process that lasts for 0953-8984/10/49/015/img6 and allows one to obtain information about the age of the Galaxy as well as about the past stellar formation rate in the solar neighbourhood. Therefore, it is important to identify all of the relevant sources of energy as well as the mechanisms that control its flow to the space. We show in this paper that the inclusion of a detailed treatment of phase transitions in Coulomb plasmas made up of a mixture of different chemical species is crucial, since their redistribution can keep the white dwarf warm for 0.5 to 9 Ga depending on the chemical composition and physical assumptions adopted.

  11. Branes constrictions with White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Aspeitia, Miguel A.

    2015-11-01

    We consider here a robust study of stellar dynamics for white dwarf stars with polytropic matter in the weak-field approximation using the Lane-Emden equation from the brane-world scenario. We also derive an analytical solution to the nonlocal energy density and show the behavior and sensitivity of these stars to the presence of extra dimensions. Similarly, we analyze stability and compactness, in order to show whether it is possible to agree with the conventional wisdom of white dwarfs dynamics. Our results predict an average value of the brane tension of < λ rangle ≳ 84.818MeV^4, with a standard deviation σ ˜eq 82.021MeV^4, which comes from a sample of dwarf stars, being weaker than other astrophysical observations but remaining higher than cosmological results provided by nucleosynthesis among others.

  12. Chasing White-Light Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this memoir I describe my life in research, mostly in the area of solar physics. The recurring theme is "white-light flares," and several sections of this paper deal with this and related phenomena; I wind up describing how I see the state of the art in this still-interesting and crucially important (as it has been since 1859) area of flare research. I also describe my participation in two long-lived satellite programs dedicated to solar observations ( Yohkoh and RHESSI) and elaborate on their discoveries. These have both helped with white-light flares both directly and also with closely related X-ray and γ-ray emissions), with the result that this article leans heavily in that direction.

  13. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morscher, J H

    1992-02-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a cardiac conduction disorder that presents with potentially life-threatening consequences. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome-induced dysrhythmias account for 20% of all supraventricular tachycardias that occur in the general population. Clinical presentations range from no symptoms to a sudden cardiac arrest. The risk of sudden death is always present with WPW syndrome, and it is the motivating force in the evaluation and treatment of this syndrome. Current diagnostic modalities are accurate in identifying patients with WPW syndrome, but lack the sensitivity to predict sudden cardiac death. This article reviews the history of WPW syndrome, as well as its general characteristics, diagnostic criteria, treatment modalities, and nursing implications. PMID:1554559

  14. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines. PMID:25794745

  15. Chasing White-Light Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this memoir I describe my life in research, mostly in the area of solar physics. The recurring theme is "white-light flares," and several sections of this paper deal with this and related phenomena; I wind up describing how I see the state of the art in this still-interesting and crucially important (as it has been since 1859) area of flare research. I also describe my participation in two long-lived satellite programs dedicated to solar observations (Yohkoh and RHESSI) and elaborate on their discoveries. These have both helped with white-light flares both directly and also with closely related X-ray and γ-ray emissions), with the result that this article leans heavily in that direction.

  16. Expanded niche for white sharks.

    PubMed

    Boustany, Andre M; Davis, Scott F; Pyle, Peter; Anderson, Scot D; Le Boeuf, Burney J; Block, Barbara A

    2002-01-01

    Until the advent of electronic tagging technology, the inherent difficulty of studying swift and powerful marine animals made ecological information about sharks of the family Lamnidae difficult to obtain. Here we report the tracking of movements of white sharks by using pop-up satellite archival tags, which reveal that their migratory movements, depth and ambient thermal ranges are wider than was previously thought. PMID:11780105

  17. Perceptual organization and White's illusion.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barton L

    2003-01-01

    The apparent lightness of a surface can be strongly modulated by the spatial context in which it is embedded. Early theories of such context dependence emphasized the role of low-level mechanisms that sense border contrast, whereas a number of recent authors have emphasized the role of perceptual organization in determining perceived lightness. One of the simplest and most theoretically challenging lightness illusions was described by White. This illusion has been explained with a variety of different models, ranging from low-level filter outputs to computations underlying the extraction of mid-level representations of surfaces. Here, I present a new method for determining the organizational forces that shape this illusion. I show that the spatial context of White's pattern not only transforms the apparent lightness of homogeneous target patches. but can also induce dramatic inversions of figure-ground relationships of textured target regions. These phenomena provide new evidence for the role of scission in causing the lightness illusion experienced in White's effect. PMID:12729379

  18. Characterizing Accreting White Dwarf Pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the population, mass distribution, and evolution of accreting white dwarfs impacts the entire realm of binary interaction, including the creation of Type Ia supernovae. We are concentrating on accreting white dwarf pulsators, as the pulsation properties allow us a view of how the accretion affects the interior of the star. Our ground- based photometry on 11 accreting pulsators with corresponding temperatures from HST UV spectra suggest a broad instability strip in the range of 10500 to 16000K. Additionally, tracking a post-outburst heated white dwarf as it cools and crosses the blue edge and resumes pulsation provides an independent method to locate the empirical instability strip. Determining a post-outburst cooling curve yields an estimate of the amount of heating and the accreted mass during the outburst. We request additional photometry of 2 objects that present unique properties: GW Lib which has not yet returned to its pre-outburst pulsation spectrum after 6 yrs, and EQ Lyn which returned to its pre- outburst pulsation after 3 yrs but is now turning on and off without ongoing outbursts. Following the pulsation spectrum changes over stretches of several nights in a row will provide specific knowledge of the stability of the observed modes.

  19. Observing white-light flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neidig, D. F.; Beckers, J. M.

    1983-03-01

    Observational techniques and instrumentation for tracking the occurrence of solar white light flares back to their origin are discussed. The rare events have been found to happen in the chromospheric and coronal regions over sunspots, and are thought to be the release of accumulated energy breaking free from the magnetic field lines and reforming into simpler structures. Use of an achromatic f/15 objective lens, together with a reimaging system for field magnification as a prelude to 35 mm photography, at the Sacramento Peak Observatory is described. A Wollaston prism is also used to split the image into two beams for detection of intensity variations due to polarization, which has thus far not been observed in the white light flares. Spectroscopic data indicate visual emission due to negatively-charged hydrogen ions in the upper photosphere, and shorter wavelength neutral hydrogen Balmer continuum features. A white light flare can be up to 300% as brilliant as the surrounding region, and involve several percent of the total spontaneous solar output.

  20. Appeasement: Whites' strategic support for affirmative action.

    PubMed

    Chow, Rosalind M; Lowery, Brian S; Hogan, Caitlin M

    2013-03-01

    This article explores the possibility that dominant-group members will attempt to appease subordinate groups to protect the hierarchy. In four studies, we find that (a) prohierarchy Whites perceive more intergroup threat when they believe ethnic minorities hold Whites in low regard, (b) prohierarchy Whites respond to ethnic minorities' low regard for Whites by increasing their support for redistributive policies (e.g., affirmative action), (c) the increase in support only occurs when prohierarchy Whites perceive the hierarchy to be unstable, and (d) prohierarchy Whites perceive the hierarchy to be more stable if they believe Whites support redistributive policies. These results suggest that prohierarchy dominant-group members' support for redistributive policies can stem from a concern about maintaining the hierarchical status quo, and provides evidence that support for redistributive policies can be a hierarchy-enhancing strategy. PMID:23376890

  1. White constancy method for mobile displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Ji Young; Park, Hyun Hee; Jang, Seul Ki; Lee, Jae Hyang; Kim, Jong Ho; Yi, Ji Young; Lee, Min Woo

    2014-03-01

    In these days, consumer's needs for image quality of mobile devices are increasing as smartphone is widely used. For example, colors may be perceived differently when displayed contents under different illuminants. Displayed white in incandescent lamp is perceived as bluish, while same content in LED light is perceived as yellowish. When changed in perceived white under illuminant environment, image quality would be degraded. Objective of the proposed white constancy method is restricted to maintain consistent output colors regardless of the illuminants utilized. Human visual experiments are performed to analyze viewers'perceptual constancy. Participants are asked to choose the displayed white in a variety of illuminants. Relationship between the illuminants and the selected colors with white are modeled by mapping function based on the results of human visual experiments. White constancy values for image control are determined on the predesigned functions. Experimental results indicate that propsed method yields better image quality by keeping the display white.

  2. What Lies Beneath? Minority Group Members' Suspicion of Whites' Egalitarian Motivation Predicts Responses to Whites' Smiles.

    PubMed

    Kunstman, Jonathan W; Tuscherer, Taylor; Trawalter, Sophie; Lloyd, E Paige

    2016-09-01

    Antiprejudice norms and attempts to conceal racial bias have made Whites' positive treatment of racial minorities attributionally ambiguous. Although some minorities believe Whites' positivity is genuine, others are suspicious of Whites' motives and believe their kindness is primarily motivated by desires to avoid appearing prejudiced. For those suspicious of Whites' motives, Whites' smiles may paradoxically function as threat cues. To the extent that Whites' smiles cue threat among suspicious minorities, we hypothesized that suspicious minorities would explicitly perceive Whites' smiles as threatening (Study 1), automatically orient to smiling White-as opposed to smiling Black-targets (Study 2), and accurately discriminate between Whites' real and fake smiles (Study 3). These results provide convergent evidence that cues typically associated with acceptance and affiliation ironically function as threat cues among suspicious racial minorities. PMID:27340154

  3. The 1.6 Å Crystal Structure of Pyranose Dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris Rationalizes Substrate Specificity and Reveals a Flavin Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Krondorfer, Iris; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Peterbauer, Clemens K.; Divne, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenases (PDHs) are extracellular flavin-dependent oxidoreductases secreted by litter-decomposing fungi with a role in natural recycling of plant matter. All major monosaccharides in lignocellulose are oxidized by PDH at comparable yields and efficiencies. Oxidation takes place as single-oxidation or sequential double-oxidation reactions of the carbohydrates, resulting in sugar derivatives oxidized primarily at C2, C3 or C2/3 with the concomitant reduction of the flavin. A suitable electron acceptor then reoxidizes the reduced flavin. Whereas oxygen is a poor electron acceptor for PDH, several alternative acceptors, e.g., quinone compounds, naturally present during lignocellulose degradation, can be used. We have determined the 1.6-Å crystal structure of PDH from Agaricus meleagris. Interestingly, the flavin ring in PDH is modified by a covalent mono- or di-atomic species at the C(4a) position. Under normal conditions, PDH is not oxidized by oxygen; however, the related enzyme pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) activates oxygen by a mechanism that proceeds via a covalent flavin C(4a)-hydroperoxide intermediate. Although the flavin C(4a) adduct is common in monooxygenases, it is unusual for flavoprotein oxidases, and it has been proposed that formation of the intermediate would be unfavorable in these oxidases. Thus, the flavin adduct in PDH not only shows that the adduct can be favorably accommodated in the active site, but also provides important details regarding the structural, spatial and physicochemical requirements for formation of this flavin intermediate in related oxidases. Extensive in silico modeling of carbohydrates in the PDH active site allowed us to rationalize the previously reported patterns of substrate specificity and regioselectivity. To evaluate the regioselectivity of D-glucose oxidation, reduction experiments were performed using fluorinated glucose. PDH was rapidly reduced by 3-fluorinated glucose, which has the C2 position accessible

  4. Microbacterium agarici sp. nov., Microbacterium humi sp. nov. and Microbacterium pseudoresistens sp. nov., isolated from the base of the mushroom Agaricus blazei.

    PubMed

    Young, C-C; Busse, H-J; Langer, S; Chu, Jiunn-Nan; Schumann, P; Arun, A B; Shen, Fo-Ting; Rekha, P D; Kämpfer, P

    2010-04-01

    Three Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria (strains CC-SBCK-209( T), CC-12309(T) and CC-5209(T)) were isolated from the stalk of the edible mushroom Agaricus blazei grown in the laboratory. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that all three isolates clearly belonged to the genus Microbacterium. Strains CC-SBCK-209( T) and CC-12309(T) were most related closely to the type strain of Microbacterium halotolerans (95.9 and 96.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). These two novel strains shared 97.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Levels of similarity to the type strains of all other recognized Microbacterium species were lower than 95.5 %. The third strain (CC-5209( T)) showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strain of Microbacterium resistens (97.6 %); levels of similarity to the type strains of all other recognized Microbacterium species were lower than 96 %. The quinone systems of strains CC-SBCK-209(T), CC-12309(T) and CC-5209(T) consisted of MK-11/MK-12, MK-11/MK-10 and MK-13 as major compounds, respectively. All three strains contained ornithine in their peptidoglycan. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and an unknown glycolipid. The polyamine pattern consisted of spermidine and spermine as predominant components. Fatty acid profiles (anteiso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(16 : 0) and anteiso-C(17 : 0 ) as major components) supported the affiliation of all three strains to the genus Microbacterium. The results of physiological and biochemical tests and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments allowed the clear phenotypic and genotypic differentiation of strains CC-SBCK-209(T) and CC-12309( T) from M. halotolerans and other closely related Microbacterium species. Strain CC-5209(T) could be differentiated clearly from M. resistens both genotypically and phenotypically. Based on these data, the novel strains are considered to represent three novel species of the genus Microbacterium. The names

  5. White Vegetables: Glycemia and Satiety12

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G. Harvey; Soeandy, Chesarahmia Dojo; Smith, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to discuss the effect of white vegetable consumption on glycemia, satiety, and food intake. White vegetables is a term used to refer to vegetables that are white or near white in color and include potatoes, cauliflowers, turnips, onions, parsnips, white corn, kohlrabi, and mushrooms (technically fungi but generally considered a vegetable). They vary greatly in their contribution to the energy and nutrient content of the diet and glycemia and satiety. As with other foods, the glycemic effect of many white vegetables has been measured. The results illustrate that interpretation of the semiquantitative comparative ratings of white vegetables as derived by the glycemic index must be context dependent. As illustrated by using the potato as an example, the glycemic index of white vegetables can be misleading if not interpreted in the context of the overall contribution that the white vegetable makes to the carbohydrate and nutrient composition of the diet and their functionality in satiety and metabolic control within usual meals. It is concluded that application of the glycemic index in isolation to judge the role of white vegetables in the diet and, specifically in the case of potato as consumed in ad libitum meals, has led to premature and possibly counterproductive dietary guidance. PMID:23674805

  6. Color temperature tunable white light LED system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speier, Ingo; Salsbury, Marc

    2006-08-01

    Efficient white light LED systems with continuously tunable color temperature (CT) over a range of 3000 K to 6500 K are reviewed. Typically, white light sources have a fixed CT and color rendering index (CRI). White light with user-specified color temperatures is currently generated by solid-state systems with red green blue ("R/G/B"), red green blue amber ("R/G/B/A"), and warm white cool white ("WW/CW") LED combinations, but their performance is suboptimal for architectural lighting applications. We propose and discuss an LED module with a combination of warm white, green and blue ("WW/G/B") LEDs. In this scenario, the white LEDs have fixed intensity, while the blue and green LED intensities are adjusted to shift the LED module chromaticity along the blackbody locus. We also propose and discuss an LED module with a combination of red, green, blue, and cool white ("R/G/B/CW") LEDs. The white LEDs still have a fixed intensity, while the intensities of the red, green, and blue LEDs are again adjusted to shift the LED module chromaticity along the blackbody locus. The white LEDs ensure that an improved CRI is maintained in comparison to a simple "R/G/B" solution.

  7. Theories of white dwarf oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhorn, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of theoretical understanding of the oscillations observed in the ZZ Ceti stars and cataclysmic variables is briefly reviewed. Nonradial g-mode oscillations appear to provide a satisfactory explanation for the low amplitude variables such as R548, with periods in the range of approximately 200 to 300 seconds, but for the longer period (800 to 1000 seconds) oscillators, the situation is still unclear. Rotation may play an important role in this problem, and the effects of both slow and fast rotation upon the mode structure are discussed. In the cataclysmic variables, both accretion and thermonuclear burning may act to excite oscillations of the white dwarf.

  8. White blood cell counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and tests of a prototype white blood cell counting system for use in the Skylab IMSS are presented. The counting system consists of a sample collection subsystem, sample dilution and fluid containment subsystem, and a cell counter. Preliminary test results show the sample collection and the dilution subsystems are functional and fulfill design goals. Results for the fluid containment subsystem show the handling bags cause counting errors due to: (1) adsorption of cells to the walls of the container, and (2) inadequate cleaning of the plastic bag material before fabrication. It was recommended that another bag material be selected.

  9. White liver disease in goats.

    PubMed

    Black, H; Hutton, J B; Sutherland, R J; James, M P

    1988-03-01

    Three field cases of ill-thrift, hepatic lipodystrophy and low tissue levels of vitamin B12 in young angora cross goats are reported. The cases meet the criteria for the diagnosis of white liver disease (WLD) described for sheep. The hypothesis that WLD is a metabolic consequence of cobalt/vit B12 deficiency in sheep and goats on a diet rich in propionate is developed, together with possible reasons for its occurrence in these species but not in cattle or red deer. PMID:16031425

  10. Double White Dwarf Merger Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toonen, Silvia; Nelemans, Gijs; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are very successfully used as standard candles on cosmological distance scales, but so far the nature of the progenitor(s) is unclear. A possible scenario for SNe Ia are merging carbon/oxygen white dwarfs with a combined mass exceeding the Chandrasekhar mass. We determine the theoretical rates and delay time distribution of these mergers for two different common envelope prescriptions and metallicities. The shape of the delay time distributions is rather insensitive to the assumptions. The normalization is a factor ~3-13 too low compared to observations.

  11. Brilliant Whiteness in Ultrathin Beetle Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukusic, Pete; Hallam, Benny; Noyes, Joe

    2007-01-01

    The colored appearances of animals are controlled by pigmentation, highly periodic ultrastructure, or a combination of both. Whiteness, however, is less common and is generated by neither of these, because it requires scattering processes appropriate for all visible wavelengths. We report whiteness resulting from a three-dimensional photonic solid in the scales of Cyphochilus spp. beetles. Their scales are characterized by their exceptional whiteness, their perceived brightness, and their optical brilliance, but they are only 5 micrometers thick. This thickness is at least two orders of magnitude thinner than common synthetic systems designed for equivalent-quality whiteness.

  12. Brilliant whiteness in ultrathin beetle scales.

    PubMed

    Vukusic, Pete; Hallam, Benny; Noyes, Joe

    2007-01-19

    The colored appearances of animals are controlled by pigmentation, highly periodic ultrastructure, or a combination of both. Whiteness, however, is less common and is generated by neither of these, because it requires scattering processes appropriate for all visible wavelengths. We report whiteness resulting from a three-dimensional photonic solid in the scales of Cyphochilus spp. beetles. Their scales are characterized by their exceptional whiteness, their perceived brightness, and their optical brilliance, but they are only 5 micrometers thick. This thickness is at least two orders of magnitude thinner than common synthetic systems designed for equivalent-quality whiteness. PMID:17234940

  13. White matter injury in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Gang; Hong, Dandan; Chen, Fenghua; Ji, Xunming; Cao, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability and mortality worldwide. It is well known that ischemic stroke can cause gray matter injury. However, stroke also elicits profound white matter injury, a risk factor for higher stroke incidence and poor neurological outcomes. The majority of damage caused by stroke is located in subcortical regions and, remarkably, white matter occupies nearly half of the average infarct volume. Indeed, white matter is exquisitely vulnerable to ischemia and is often injured more severely than gray matter. Clinical symptoms related to white matter injury include cognitive dysfunction, emotional disorders, sensorimotor impairments, as well as urinary incontinence and pain, all of which are closely associated with destruction and remodeling of white matter connectivity. White matter injury can be noninvasively detected by MRI, which provides a three-dimensional assessment of its morphology, metabolism, and function. There is an urgent need for novel white matter therapies, as currently available strategies are limited to preclinical animal studies. Optimal protection against ischemic stroke will need to encompass the fortification of both gray and white matter. In this review, we discuss white matter injury after ischemic stroke, focusing on clinical features and tools, such as imaging, manifestation, and potential treatments. We also briefly discuss the pathophysiology of WMI and future research directions. PMID:27090751

  14. Substellar companions to white dwarves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, Fergal Robert

    2007-08-01

    We search for planets and brown dwarves around white dwarves (WDs). Finding extra-solar planets is the first step toward establishing the existence and abundance of life in the Universe. The low mass and luminosity of WDs make them ideal stars to search for low mass companion objects. Theoretical predictions generally agree that a star will consume and destroy close-in, low mass planets as it ascends the red giant and asymptotic giant branch evolutionary tracks, but larger mass objects and those further out will survive. The matter ejected from the star as it evolves into a white dwarf may also be accreted onto daughter planets, or may coalesce into a disk from which planets can then form. We employ two techniques to search for planets and brown dwarves (BDs) around WDs. A subset of pulsating white dwarf stars have a pulsational stability that rivals pulsars and atomic clocks. When a planet is in orbit around a such a star the orbital motion of the star around the centre of mass is detectable as a change in arrival times of the otherwise stable pulsations. We search for, and find, a sample of suitable pulsators, monitor them for between three and four years, and place limits on companions by constraining the variation in the pulse arrival times. For one star, we detect a variation consistent with a 2.4M J planet in a 4.6 year orbit. We also observe a large sample of WDs to search for a mid-infrared excess caused by the presence of sub-stellar companions. We present evidence for a potential binary system consisting of a WD and a BD on the basis of an observed excess flux at near and mid-infrared wavelengths. We also place limits on the presence of planetary mass companions around these stars and compare our results to predictions of planetary survival theories. Our findings do not support suggestions of planet formation or accretion of extra mass during stellar death.

  15. Beyond Black and White: How White, Male, College Students See Their Asian American Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Nolan L.

    2014-01-01

    This research is a cross-site analysis of how white, male, college students see their Asian American peers. Semi-structured interviews with 43 white males were conducted at two universities that differed substantially in their representation of Asian American students. The interviews were theoretically framed by Critical Whiteness Studies and Bobo…

  16. Microvasculature of the human cerebral white matter: arteries of the deep white matter.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroko; Akima, Michio; Hatori, Tsutomu; Nagayama, Tadashi; Zhang, Zean; Ihara, Fumie

    2003-06-01

    The vascular architecture of the human cerebral deep white matter was studied using soft X-ray and diaphanized specimens, achieved by intra-arterial injection of barium and vascular stain respectively, and also by electron microscopic examination of the corrosion cast of arteries in normal adult brains. The deep white matter arteries passed through the cerebral cortex with a few branches to the cortex and ran straight through the white matter. The arteries concentrated ventriculopetally to the white matter around the lateral ventricle. Anastomoses were noted around the ventricular wall at the terminals of the deep white matter arteries. No centrifugal branches irrigating the periventricular white matter from the lenticulo-striate arteries were observed in the present study. The presence of anastomoses among the terminal branches of deep white matter arteries protects against ischemic change or infarction in this area from an occlusion of a single deep white matter artery. This may lead to development of terminal zone infarction from ischemia or vascular diseases, affecting multiple deep white matter arteries. The subcortical and deep white matter arteries had thick adventitial sheaths and large adventitial spaces in the white matter but not in the cortex. The presence or absence of the adventitial space is regarded as another characteristic difference between the arteries in the white matter and cortex. This difference may influence pathological changes in vascular lesions in these respective areas. PMID:12777099

  17. "I Never Hear It Talked About": Exploring Discourses of Whiteness in a Predominantly White Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuschkel, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Much is known about the practices, beliefs, assumptions, and discourses of teachers as they look at issues of racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity but little has been done to understand how racial injustice is sustained in these school settings and how whiteness operates in predominantly white educational contexts. White elementary school…

  18. Unmasking Whiteness: A Framework for Understanding Inclusive Leadership at a Predominately White Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latino, Nicole Marie

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the personal journey of 11 White college administrators who were identified as inclusive leaders at a predominately White institution (PWI), recognized nationally for its work on partnering diversity and excellence. One overall question guided this study: How do White college administrators describe their journey to becoming…

  19. White House nominates nuclear commissioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-06-01

    Just 3 days after U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission chairman Gregory Jaczko announced his intention to resign (Eos, 93(22), 211, doi:10.1029/2012EO220005, 2012), President Barack Obama nominated Allison Macfarlane to serve out the remainder of Jaczko's term, through June 2013. The White House announced that upon her appointment, Macfarlane would be designated as chair of the commission. Macfarlane is an associate professor of environmental science and policy at George Mason University. A member of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future from March 2010 to January 2012, she is also the author of the 2006 book Uncertainty Underground: Yucca Mountain and the Nation's High-Level Nuclear Waste and is an AGU member.

  20. Object technology: A white paper

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.R.; Arrowood, L.F.; Cain, W.D.; Stephens, W.M.; Vickers, B.D.

    1992-05-11

    Object-Oriented Technology (OOT), although not a new paradigm, has recently been prominently featured in the trade press and even general business publications. Indeed, the promises of object technology are alluring: the ability to handle complex design and engineering information through the full manufacturing production life cycle or to manipulate multimedia information, and the ability to improve programmer productivity in creating and maintaining high quality software. Groups at a number of the DOE facilities have been exploring the use of object technology for engineering, business, and other applications. In this white paper, the technology is explored thoroughly and compared with previous means of developing software and storing databases of information. Several specific projects within the DOE Complex are described, and the state of the commercial marketplace is indicated.

  1. Magnetars and white dwarf pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, Manuel; Coelho, Jaziel G.

    2016-07-01

    The anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are a class of pulsars understood as neutron stars (NSs) with super strong surface magnetic fields, namely B ≳ 1014G, and for that reason are known as magnetars. However, in the last years, some SGRs/AXPs with low surface magnetic fields B ˜ (1012-1013)G have been detected, challenging the magnetar description. Moreover, some fast and very magnetic white dwarfs (WDs) have also been observed, and at least one showed X-ray energy emission as an ordinary pulsar. Following this fact, an alternative model based on WDs pulsars has been proposed to explain this special class of pulsars. In this model, AXPs and SGRs as dense and magnetized WDs can have surface magnetic field B ˜ 107-1010 G and rotate very fast with frequencies Ω ˜ 1rad/s, consistent with the observed rotation periods P ˜ (2-12)s.

  2. Research in black and white.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Joy; Donovan, Jenny L

    2002-07-01

    The authors consider the methodological, interpretative, and practical issues that arise when there is a difference in ethnicity between researcher and informant in qualitative research by drawing on the academic literature and their fieldwork experiences as White researchers undertaking studies with individuals of African/Caribbean and South Asian descent. Some contemporary issues raised by "researching the other" in the context of pragmatic health services research are highlighted, including access to same-ethnicity researchers, the involvement of interpreters, and the potential for ethnocentric interpretation. The authors believe that qualitative research should be judged by the plausibility of the findings and by a critical evaluation of the way in which the research was conducted and the reflexivity of the researcher. PMID:12109726

  3. Off White: Readings on Race, Power, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Michelle, Ed.; Weis, Lois, Ed.; Powell, Linda C., Ed.; Wong, L. Mun, Ed.

    The contributions in this volume analyze the white racialization process in the context of multiculturalism and examine how racism is established in institutional structures. The chapters are: (1) "The Achievement (K)not: Whiteness and 'Black Underachievement'" (Linda C. Powell); (2) "White Experimenters, White Blood, and Other White Conditions:…

  4. 21 CFR 137.265 - Degerminated white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Degerminated white corn meal. 137.265 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.265 Degerminated white corn meal. (a) Degerminated white corn meal, degermed white corn meal, is the food prepared by grinding cleaned white corn and removing...

  5. 21 CFR 137.265 - Degerminated white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Degerminated white corn meal. 137.265 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.265 Degerminated white corn meal. (a) Degerminated white corn meal, degermed white corn meal, is the food prepared by grinding cleaned white corn and removing...

  6. 21 CFR 137.265 - Degerminated white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Degerminated white corn meal. 137.265 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.265 Degerminated white corn meal. (a) Degerminated white corn meal, degermed white corn meal, is the food prepared by grinding cleaned white corn and removing...

  7. 21 CFR 137.265 - Degerminated white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Degerminated white corn meal. 137.265 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.265 Degerminated white corn meal. (a) Degerminated white corn meal, degermed white corn meal, is the food prepared by grinding cleaned white corn and removing...

  8. 21 CFR 137.265 - Degerminated white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Degerminated white corn meal. 137.265 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.265 Degerminated white corn meal. (a) Degerminated white corn meal, degermed white corn meal, is the food prepared by grinding cleaned white corn and removing...

  9. White Racial Identity and the Counseling Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.

    1993-01-01

    Responds to earlier article by Mio and Iwamasa (1993) on white researchers investigating ethnic-minority populations and other cross-cultural issues. Discusses original rationale for symposium summarized in previous article, presents a white identity case study--the symposium audience--and makes recommendations for counseling training. (NB)

  10. WHITE LUPIN NITROGEN FIXATION UNDER PHOSPHORUS DEFICIENCY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White lupin is highly adapted to growth in a low P environment. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether white lupin grown under P-stress has adaptations in nodulation and N2 fixation that facilitate continued functioning. Nodulated plants were grown in silica sand supplied with N-...

  11. The Keys to the White House

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    The Keys to the White House is a historically-based system for predicting the result of the popular vote in American presidential elections. The Keys system tracks the big picture of how well the party holding the White House has governed and does not shift with events of the campaign. This model gives specificity to the idea that it is…

  12. Gaia --- A White Dwarf Discovery Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, S.

    2007-09-01

    Gaia is a satellite mission of the ESA, aiming at absolute astrometric measurements of about one billion stars (V<20) with unprecedented accuracy. Additionally, magnitudes and colors will be obtained for all these stars, while radial-velocities will be determined only for bright objects (V<17.5). However, the wavelength range for the radial-velocity instrument is rather unsuitable for most white dwarfs. Gaia will probably discover about 400,000 white dwarfs; up to 100 pc the detection probability for white dwarfs is almost 100 %. This survey of white dwarfs will have very clear, easy to understand selection criteria, and will therefore be very suitable for statistical investigations. The Gaia data will help to improve the construction of a luminosity function for the disk and the halo and will provide a more accurate determination of the age of our solar neighborhood. Moreover, reliable stellar dynamical investigations of the disk and halo components will be possible. For the first time it will be possible to test the mass-radius relation of white dwarfs in great detail. Moreover, more accurate masses of magnetic and cool white dwarfs can be expected. Gaia is also expected to discover many new pulsating white dwarfs. The Gaia measurements can also complement the measurements of gravitational waves from close white dwarf binaries with Lisa.

  13. Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Alyce

    2004-01-01

    This brief article describes notable events in Margaret Bourke-White's life and links these events to one of her well-known prints, "The George Washington Bridge." Margaret Bourke-White is best known for her photojournalism and commercial photography. Her photograph of the George Washington Bridge published in Fortune magazine in 1933, explores…

  14. 21 CFR 102.46 - Pacific whiting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacific whiting. 102.46 Section 102.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 102.46 Pacific whiting. “Pacific whiting” or “North Pacific whiting” is the common or usual name...

  15. 21 CFR 102.46 - Pacific whiting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacific whiting. 102.46 Section 102.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 102.46 Pacific whiting. “Pacific whiting” or “North Pacific whiting” is the common or usual name...

  16. 21 CFR 102.46 - Pacific whiting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacific whiting. 102.46 Section 102.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 102.46 Pacific whiting. “Pacific whiting” or “North Pacific whiting” is the common or usual name...

  17. Reducing the White-Nonwhite Achievement Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Madelaine

    It is well documented that there continues to be a gap between white and nonwhite student achievement. A study develops and tests a measure of white-nonwhite achievement gap reduction. The ultimate purpose is to use the measure as the dependent variable in a qualitative study of what works in reducing the gap. The strategy used in addressing this…

  18. Facilitation of Retention by White Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Alfred A.; Kistler, Doris

    1975-01-01

    This study attempted to determine if white noise (an arousing stimulus), when presented at the time of recall, facilitates performance of second and fifth grade students, and if this effect generalizes across different kinds of learning tasks. Findings indicate that white noise produces improvements in performance in both age groups. (GO)

  19. WHITE CLOVER MORPHOLOGY CHANGES WITH STRESS TREATMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plasticity of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) results in morphological changes in plant habit in response to different environmental stresses. This research characterized morphological changes in white clover clones derived either from two cultivars and a germplasm exposed to treatments in 2-...

  20. White Middle Class Identities and Urban Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Dympna; Savage, Mike; Ingram, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The authors review "White middle class identities and urban schooling," by D. Reay, G. Crozier and D. James. This book focuses on the perspectives of white middle-class parents who make "against"-the-grain school choices for their children in urban England. It provides key insights into the dynamics of class practising that are played out in these…

  1. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  2. A Hidden Minority Amidst White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Miriam J.

    2008-01-01

    It seems rather amusing to say that the author belongs to a minority, no less a hidden minority. After all, at first glance, she appears to be just another white girl (or woman). She grew up in the mid-west in a predominantly white community, middle class, and well educated. The paradox comes in their definition of minority. Today, as they seek to…

  3. 33 CFR 117.139 - White River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false White River. 117.139 Section 117.139 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.139 White River. (a) The draws of the St....

  4. 33 CFR 117.139 - White River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false White River. 117.139 Section 117.139 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.139 White River. (a) The draws of the St....

  5. 33 CFR 117.139 - White River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false White River. 117.139 Section 117.139 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.139 White River. (a) The draws of the St....

  6. 33 CFR 117.139 - White River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false White River. 117.139 Section 117.139 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.139 White River. (a) The draws of the St....

  7. 33 CFR 117.139 - White River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false White River. 117.139 Section 117.139 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Arkansas § 117.139 White River. (a) The draws of the St....

  8. Astrocytes and Developmental White Matter Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Ellora; Levison, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the astrocytes in the immature periventricular white matter are vulnerable to ischemia and respond to inflammation. Here we provide a synopsis of the articles that have evaluated the causes and consequences of developmental brain injuries to white matter astrocytes as well as the consequences of several…

  9. White Piedra in a Mother and Daughter

    PubMed Central

    Roshan, Anupama S; Janaki, C; Parveen, B

    2009-01-01

    White Piedra is a superficial fungal infection of the hair caused by Trichosporon asahii. It is also known as trichomycosis nodosa or trichomycosis nodularis. We report two cases of White Piedra in a mother and her daughter for the rarity of such occurrence. PMID:20927238

  10. White piedra in a mother and daughter.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Anupama S; Janaki, C; Parveen, B

    2009-07-01

    White Piedra is a superficial fungal infection of the hair caused by Trichosporon asahii. It is also known as trichomycosis nodosa or trichomycosis nodularis. We report two cases of White Piedra in a mother and her daughter for the rarity of such occurrence. PMID:20927238

  11. 21 CFR 102.46 - Pacific whiting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacific whiting. 102.46 Section 102.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 102.46 Pacific whiting. “Pacific whiting” or “North Pacific whiting” is the common or usual name...

  12. A white dwarf with an oxygen atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kepler, S O; Koester, Detlev; Ourique, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    Stars born with masses below around 10 solar masses end their lives as white dwarf stars. Their atmospheres are dominated by the lightest elements because gravitational diffusion brings the lightest element to the surface. We report the discovery of a white dwarf with an atmosphere completely dominated by oxygen, SDSS J124043.01+671034.68. After oxygen, the next most abundant elements in its atmosphere are neon and magnesium, but these are lower by a factor of ≥25 by number. The fact that no hydrogen or helium are observed is surprising. Oxygen, neon, and magnesium are the products of carbon burning, which occurs in stars at the high-mass end of pre-white dwarf formation. This star, a possible oxygen-neon white dwarf, will provide a rare observational test of the evolutionary paths toward white dwarfs. PMID:27034367

  13. Ecological release in White Sands lizards

    PubMed Central

    Roches, S Des; Robertson, J M; Harmon, L J; Rosenblum, E B

    2011-01-01

    Ecological opportunity is any change that allows populations to escape selection from competition and predation. After encountering ecological opportunity, populations may experience ecological release: enlarged population size, broadened resource use, and/or increased morphological variation. We identified ecological opportunity and tested for ecological release in three lizard colonists of White Sands, New Mexico (Sceloporus undulatus, Holbrookia maculata, and Aspidoscelis inornata). First, we provide evidence for ecological opportunity by demonstrating reduced species richness and abundance of potential competitors and predators at White Sands relative to nearby dark soils habitats. Second, we characterize ecological release at White Sands by demonstrating density compensation in the three White Sands lizard species and expanded resource use in White Sands S. undulatus. Contrary to predictions from ecological release models, we observed directional trait change but not increased trait variation in S. undulatus. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity and ecological release can be identified in natural populations, especially those that have recently colonized isolated ecosystems. PMID:22393523

  14. White matter microstructure alterations in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bellani, Marcella; Perlini, Cinzia; Ferro, Adele; Cerruti, Stefania; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Isola, Miriam; Cerini, Roberto; Dusi, Nicola; Andreone, Nicola; Balestrieri, Matteo; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi; Tansella, Michele; Brambilla, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Genetic, neuropathological and magnetic resonance imaging findings support the presence of diffuse white matter cytoarchitectural disruption in bipolar disorder. In this study, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was applied to study cortical white matter microstructure organisation in 24 patients with DSM-IV bipolar disorder and 35 matched normal controls. DWI images were obtained using a 1.5 Tesla scanner and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were determined over regions of interest placed, bilaterally, in the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital white matter. Significantly increased ADC values were found in bipolar patients with respect to normal controls in the right temporal lobe, left parietal lobe and bilateral occipital lobes. ADC values did not associate significantly with age or with clinical variables (p>0.05). Diffuse cortical white matter alterations on DWI in bipolar disorder denote widespread disruption of white matter integrity and may be due to altered myelination and/or axonal integrity. PMID:22687164

  15. A white dwarf with an oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.; Koester, Detlev; Ourique, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    Stars born with masses below around 10 solar masses end their lives as white dwarf stars. Their atmospheres are dominated by the lightest elements because gravitational diffusion brings the lightest element to the surface. We report the discovery of a white dwarf with an atmosphere completely dominated by oxygen, SDSS J124043.01+671034.68. After oxygen, the next most abundant elements in its atmosphere are neon and magnesium, but these are lower by a factor of ≥25 by number. The fact that no hydrogen or helium are observed is surprising. Oxygen, neon, and magnesium are the products of carbon burning, which occurs in stars at the high-mass end of pre-white dwarf formation. This star, a possible oxygen-neon white dwarf, will provide a rare observational test of the evolutionary paths toward white dwarfs.

  16. Committed White Male Teachers and Identifications: Toward Creative Identifications and a "Second Wave" of White Identity Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jupp, James C.; Slattery, G. Patrick, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Committed White male teachers of inner-city students seeks to supersede previous research on White teacher and other White identities by narrating respondents' "creative identifications" and initiating a "second wave" of White identity studies. This research reflection articulates complex, viable, and creative White identities, reconceptualized…

  17. Human Brain White Matter Atlas: Identification and Assignment of Common Anatomical Structures in Superficial White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Kenichi; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Faria, Andreia; Jiang, Hangyi; Li, Xin; Akhter, Kazi; Hua, Kegang; Woods, Roger; Toga, Arthur W.; Pike, G. Bruce; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Evans, Alan; Zhang, Jiangyang; Huang, Hao; Miller, Michael I.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Mazziotta, John; Mori, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Structural delineation and assignment are the fundamental steps in understanding the anatomy of the human brain. The white matter has been structurally defined in the past only at its core regions (deep white matter). However, the most peripheral white matter areas, which are interleaved between the cortex and the deep white matter, have lacked clear anatomical definitions and parcellations. We used axonal fiber alignment information from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to delineate the peripheral white matter, and investigated its relationship with the cortex and the deep white matter. Using DTI data from 81 healthy subjects, we identified nine common, blade-like anatomical regions, which were further parcellated into 21 subregions based on the cortical anatomy. Four short association fiber tracts connecting adjacent gyri (U-fibers) were also identified reproducibly among the healthy population. We anticipate that this atlas will be useful resource for atlas-based white matter anatomical studies. PMID:18692144

  18. PREFACE: 16th European White Dwarfs Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Hernanz, Margarita; Isern, Jordi; Torres, Santiago

    2009-07-01

    The 16th European Workshop on White Dwarfs was held in Barcelona, Spain, from 30 June to 4 July 2008 at the premises of the UPC. Almost 120 participants from Europe (France, Germany, United Kingdom, Italy, and several others), America (USA, Canada, Argentina, Brazil, and Chile), and other continents (Australia, South Africa, . . . ) attended the workshop. Among these participants were the most relevant specialists in the field. The topics covered by the conference were: White dwarf structure and evolution Progenitors and Planetary Nebulae White dwarfs in binaries: cataclysmic variables, double degenerates and other binaries White dwarfs, dust disks and planetary systems Atmospheres, chemical composition, magnetic fields Variable white dwarfs White dwarfs in stellar clusters and the halo White Dwarfs as SNIa progenitors The programme included 54 talks, and 45 posters. The oral presentations were distributed into the following sessions: Luminosity function, mass function and populations White dwarf structure and evolution White dwarf ages White dwarf catalogs and surveys Central stars of planetary nebulae Supernovae progenitors White dwarfs in novae and CVs Physical processes in white dwarfs and magnetic white dwarfs Disks, dust and planets around white dwarfs Pulsating white dwarfs Additionally we had a special open session about Spitzer and white dwarfs. The Proceedings of the 16th European Workshop on White Dwarfs are representative of the current state-of-the-art of the research field and include new and exciting results. We acknowledge the very positive attitude of the attendants to the workshop, which stimulated very fruitful discussions that took place in all the sessions and after the official schedule. Also, the meeting allowed new collaborations tp start that will undoubtedly result in significant advances in the research field. We also acknowledge the willingness of the participants to deliver their contributions before the final deadline. We sincerely

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a condition characterized by abnormal ...

  20. 7. VIEW NORTHWEST, OLD WHITE HORSE PIKE FORM CIRCLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW NORTHWEST, OLD WHITE HORSE PIKE FORM CIRCLE - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  1. SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Koester, D.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-15

    We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

  2. Concept of white light in stage lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Mauricio R.

    2002-06-01

    In perceiving objects, generally we see them in a white light situation. But, actually, there is not an absolute white, in such a manner that the different light sources have a determined kind of white, what it is known as color temperature. Even the white light may be of different kinds (different color temperature), the individual mind tends to perceive it as the same kind of white, that is to say, there is in our mind a psychological function by which we operate an integration in the perception in order to do the object perceptually invariable. On the other hand, it is a common practice in stage lighting to use color light sources. It is a well known phenomenon that a color of light produces a change in the object color perception. However, when we go to theater, we see the objects as having their real color, even if the lighting is not white. In this paper the concept of white light in stage lighting is presented, showing its possibilities of aesthetical expression.

  3. Chromaticity of unique white in object mode.

    PubMed

    Kevin, A G Smet; Geert, Deconinck; Peter, Hanselaer

    2014-10-20

    The chromaticity of unique white viewed in object mode and under dark adapted conditions was investigated for 3 luminance levels (200, 1000 and 2000 cd/m(2)) using two experimental methods: unique white setting and rating. The results of the two methods were found to agree well. Both showed quite large observer variation and an apparent shift of the average unique white (across observers) towards colder correlated color temperatures as the stimulus luminance was dropped from 2000 cd/m(2) to 200 cd/m(2), although no such trend was observable at the individual observer level. Unique white was shown to encompass a region in color space, mostly located below the blackbody locus at around 6000 K. The low and high color temperature ends of the CIE class A and B white regions tend to respectively over- and slightly underestimate the size of the chromaticity area perceived as white by the dark adapted average observer. However, the agreement along a direction approximately perpendicular to the blackbody locus was quite good. Finally, the unique white ratings were modeled by a bivariate Gaussian function, resulting in a simple empirical metric to predict the degree of neutrality of any object stimulus viewed under dark adapted conditions. PMID:25401616

  4. The unbearable whiteness of being (in nursing).

    PubMed

    Puzan, Elayne

    2003-09-01

    My purpose in writing this paper is to uncover some of the ways in which nursing participates in, reproduces, and resists the detrimental practices associated with white cultural privilege and to share some instances of its personal and social costs. It draws upon the body of scholarship which interrogates racism as it is enacted through whiteness in North America. Whiteness is depicted not as a preordained biological property, but as a socially constructed category of race, wherein non-white people are racially designated, while whites escape such designation and occupy positions which allow them to carry on as if what they say is neutral, rather than historically and ideologically situated. While the concept of whiteness may not have much resonance in nursing, it offers another way to talk about racism, one that does not stop with the scrutiny of the racialized Other. The presumed neutrality of whiteness has been institutionalized so that its authority to define knowledge, membership, and language, as well as its ability to stipulate and enforce the rules and regulations of everyday concourse and discourse within nursing is concealed. PMID:12940974

  5. [Was Snow White a transsexual?].

    PubMed

    Michel, A; Mormont, C

    2002-01-01

    modalities in the transsexual dynamics. Nevertheless, one can ask oneself about the possibility of a request based on a desire rather than on a defense, or even on the existence of a defensive process diametrically opposed to the counter-phobic attitude and which, instead of actively provoking the dreaded reality, would privilege its avoidance and the search of passivity. This latter hypothesis has the advantage of being rather easy to explore with the Rorschach because, according to Exner, the predominance of passive compared to active human movement responses (which he terms the Snow White Syndrome) indicates the propensity to escape into passive fantasies and the tendency to avoid the initiative for behaviour or decision-making, if other people can do it in the subject's place (12). Our results largely confirmed the hypothesis of the existence of an opposite mechanism, as a third of subjects (n = 26) presented Snow White Syndrome. According to Exner, these transsexuals are typically characterized by hiding into a world of make believe, avoiding all responsibility, as well as any decision-making. This passivity in our Snow White Syndrome group was all the more remarkable in that, on the whole, it infiltrated into all the movement responses and seemed to define a rigid style of thinking and mental elaboration, in addition to a suggestive content of passivity. However, this condition cannot be associated with a general lack of dynamism or energy. In fact, the treatment of information, which provides data concerning the motivation to treat a stimulus field of the stimulus--whether this concerns the capture (L) of the stimulus or the elaboration (DQ+) of the response--displayed a sufficient amount of motivation. Furthermore, internal resources (EA) were considerable and were brought into play whenever it was necessary to adopt a behaviour or make a decision. Furthermore, based on these Rorschach findings, we note that in transsexuals with Snow White Syndrome, there is a

  6. Simulations of Double White Dwarf Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patick; Staff, Jan; Marcello, Dominic; Clayton, Geoffrey; Frank, Juhan

    2016-03-01

    We present numerical simulations of double white dwarf mergers initiated by mass transfer instability. In particular, we are interested in the possible connection between such double degenerate mergers and the peculiar irregular variable R Corona Borealis stars. For the merger of a Carbon-Oxygen white dwarf with a Helium white dwarf, the degree to which Carbon from the accreting star is dredged up plays a crucial role in the appearance of the rejuvenated, merged object. We explore the amount of dredge up in the accreting star and its influence in stellar evolution models initialized from the merged object resulting from dynamical evolutions.

  7. Radiative backwarming in white-light flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, Marcos E.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Avrett, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to empirical atmospheric structures that are consistent with enhanced white-light continuum emission in solar flares. Results are presented from calculations of radiative transfer in lines and continua in empirical white-light flare model atmospheres, showing that flares with strong emission in the Balmer lines and continuum must show increases at longer wavelengths due to H(-) emission from overheated photospheric levels, which the Paschen continuum contribution in the same wavelength range is neglible. Also, plausible heating mechanisms that can lead to white-light flare emission are examined.

  8. Is the Universe a white-hole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marcelo Samuel

    2007-10-01

    Pathria (1972) has shown, for a pressureless closed Universe, that it is inside a black (or white) hole. We show now, that the Universe with a cosmic pressure obeying Einstein’s field equations, can be inside a white-hole. In the closed case, a positive cosmological constant does the job; for the flat and open cases, the condition we find is not verified for the very early Universe, but with the growth of the scale-factor, the condition will be certainly fulfilled for a positive cosmological constant, after some time. We associate the absolute temperature of the Universe, with the temperature of the corresponding white-hole.

  9. White Dwarf Critical Tests for Modified Gravity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Kouvaris, Chris; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2016-04-15

    Scalar-tensor theories of gravity can lead to modifications of the gravitational force inside astrophysical objects. We exhibit that compact stars such as white dwarfs provide a unique setup to test beyond Horndeski theories of G^{3} type. We obtain stringent and independent constraints on the parameter ϒ characterizing the deviations from Newtonian gravity using the mass-radius relation, the Chandrasekhar mass limit, and the maximal rotational frequency of white dwarfs. We find that white dwarfs impose stronger constraints on ϒ than red and brown dwarfs. PMID:27127952

  10. White Dwarf Critical Tests for Modified Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Kouvaris, Chris; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2016-04-01

    Scalar-tensor theories of gravity can lead to modifications of the gravitational force inside astrophysical objects. We exhibit that compact stars such as white dwarfs provide a unique setup to test beyond Horndeski theories of G3 type. We obtain stringent and independent constraints on the parameter ϒ characterizing the deviations from Newtonian gravity using the mass-radius relation, the Chandrasekhar mass limit, and the maximal rotational frequency of white dwarfs. We find that white dwarfs impose stronger constraints on ϒ than red and brown dwarfs.

  11. Blue-white screening liquid can eliminate false positives in blue-white colony screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Although blue-white screening based on α-complementation has been widely used in the screening of genetically modified bacteria, only a single blue-white screening is typically not enough to eliminate false positives. Sometimes, a secondary blue-white screening for the target colonies is required. In this study, two methods were used to investigate the feasibility of secondary blue-white screening for target colonies on lysogeny broth (LB)-ampicillin agar plates. The first method consisted of covering the target colonies grown on LB-ampicillin plate medium with a sterilized filter paper soaked in a solution of 60 μL 20 mg/mL X-gal and 8 μL 20% IPTG. The second method was that blue and white colonies were randomly selected from the blue-white screening plate medium and then re-streaked onto the blue-white screening medium. The colonies were then treated by two methods and incubated at 37°C for 12 h. The results showed that some of the white colonies treated by the two methods showed results similar to the colonies grown on the blue-white screening medium. These results indicate that the target colonies grown on blue-white screening medium can still be used to carry out a secondary blue-white screening. Thus, a blue-white screening liquid was successfully developed. Using the blue-white screening liquid, false positives can be eliminated directly based on the color of the target colonies. This will greatly improve the screening efficiency of positive clones and has important practical implications. PMID:27323169

  12. Discrimination method of the volatiles from fresh mushrooms by an electronic nose using a trapping system and statistical standardization to reduce sensor value variation.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Shimizu, Nobuo; Manome, Yoshinobu; Ikeda, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2013-01-01

    Electronic noses have the benefit of obtaining smell information in a simple and objective manner, therefore, many applications have been developed for broad analysis areas such as food, drinks, cosmetics, medicine, and agriculture. However, measurement values from electronic noses have a tendency to vary under humidity or alcohol exposure conditions, since several types of sensors in the devices are affected by such variables. Consequently, we show three techniques for reducing the variation of sensor values: (1) using a trapping system to reduce the infering components; (2) performing statistical standardization (calculation of z-score); and (3) selecting suitable sensors. With these techniques, we discriminated the volatiles of four types of fresh mushrooms: golden needle (Flammulina velutipes), white mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), shiitake (Lentinus edodes), and eryngii (Pleurotus eryngii) among six fresh mushrooms (hen of the woods (Grifola frondosa), shimeji (Hypsizygus marmoreus) plus the above mushrooms). Additionally, we succeeded in discrimination of white mushroom, only comparing with artificial mushroom flavors, such as champignon flavor and truffle flavor. In conclusion, our techniques will expand the options to reduce variations in sensor values. PMID:24233028

  13. Effects of UV-B Radiation Levels on Concentrations of Phytosterols, Ergothioneine, and Polyphenolic Compounds in Mushroom Powders Used As Dietary Supplements.

    PubMed

    Sapozhnikova, Yelena; Byrdwell, William Craig; Lobato, Amada; Romig, Bill

    2014-03-27

    Compositional changes of powder dietary supplements made from mushrooms exposed to different levels of UV-B irradiation were evaluated for the bioactive naturally occurring mushroom antioxidant, ergothioneine; other natural polyphenolic compounds, e.g., flavonoids, lignans, etc.; and selected phytosterols. Four types of mushroom powder consisting of white, brown (Agaricus bisporus), oyster (Pleurotus ostreatus), and shiitake (Lentinula edodes) mushrooms from three different treatment groups (control, low and high UV-B exposures) were evaluated. Ergothioneine concentrations found in mushroom powders were 0.4-10.4 mg/g dry weight (dw) and were not appreciably affected by UV-B radiation. No individual polyphenols were detected above 0.1 μg/g. Phytosterols ergosterol (2.4-6.2 mg/g dw) and campesterol (14-43 μg/g dw) were measured in mushroom powder samples. Ergosterol concentrations decreased significantly with the increased level of UV-B treatment for all mushroom powder types, except for white. These results provide some new information on effects of UV-B radiation on these important natural bioactive compounds in mushrooms. PMID:24628700

  14. Discrimination Method of the Volatiles from Fresh Mushrooms by an Electronic Nose Using a Trapping System and Statistical Standardization to Reduce Sensor Value Variation

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Shimizu, Nobuo; Manome, Yoshinobu; Ikeda, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2013-01-01

    Electronic noses have the benefit of obtaining smell information in a simple and objective manner, therefore, many applications have been developed for broad analysis areas such as food, drinks, cosmetics, medicine, and agriculture. However, measurement values from electronic noses have a tendency to vary under humidity or alcohol exposure conditions, since several types of sensors in the devices are affected by such variables. Consequently, we show three techniques for reducing the variation of sensor values: (1) using a trapping system to reduce the infering components; (2) performing statistical standardization (calculation of z-score); and (3) selecting suitable sensors. With these techniques, we discriminated the volatiles of four types of fresh mushrooms: golden needle (Flammulina velutipes), white mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), shiitake (Lentinus edodes), and eryngii (Pleurotus eryngii) among six fresh mushrooms (hen of the woods (Grifola frondosa), shimeji (Hypsizygus marmoreus) plus the above mushrooms). Additionally, we succeeded in discrimination of white mushroom, only comparing with artificial mushroom flavors, such as champignon flavor and truffle flavor. In conclusion, our techniques will expand the options to reduce variations in sensor values. PMID:24233028

  15. An aryl-alcohol oxidase of Pleurotus sapidus: heterologous expression, characterization, and application in a 2-enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Ilya; Javeed, Aysha; Luig, Hanno; Lochnit, Günter; Rühl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Aryl-alcohol oxidases (AAOs) are enzymes supporting the degradation of lignin by fungal derived class II peroxidases produced by white-rot fungi. AAOs are able to generate H2O2 as a by-product via oxidation of an aryl-alcohol into its correspondent aldehyde. In this study, an AAO was heterologously expressed in a basidiomycete host for the first time. The gene for an AAO of the white-rot fungus Pleurotus sapidus, a close relative to the oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus, was cloned into an expression vector and put under control of the promotor of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene 2 (gpdII) of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The expression vector was transformed into the model basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea, and several positive transformants were obtained. The best producing transformants were grown in shake-flasks and in a stirred tank reactor reaching enzymatic activities of up to 125 U L(-1) using veratryl alcohol as a substrate. The purified AAO was biochemically characterized and compared to the previously described native and recombinant AAOs from other Pleurotus species. In addition, a two-enzyme system comprising a dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) from Mycetinis scorodonius and the P. sapidus AAO was successfully employed to bleach the anthraquinone dye Reactive Blue 5. PMID:27138199

  16. The White Nile sedimentary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Andò, Sergio; Padoan, Marta; Resentini, Alberto; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Villa, Igor

    2014-05-01

    The Nile River flows for ~6700 km from south of the Equator to finally reach the Mediterranean Sea at northern subtropical latitudes (Woodward et al. 2007). This is the longest sedimentological laboratory on Earth, a unique setting in which we are investigating changes in sediment composition associated with diverse chemical and physical processes, including weathering and hydraulic sorting. The present study focuses on the southern branch of the Nile across 20° of latitude, from hyperhumid Burundi and Rwanda highlands in central Africa to Khartoum, the capital city of Sudan at the southern edge of the Sahara. Our study of the Kagera basin emphasizes the importance of weathering in soils at the source rather than during stepwise transport, and shows that the transformation of parent rocks into quartzose sand may be completed in one sedimentary cycle (Garzanti et al. 2013a). Micas and heavy minerals, less effectively diluted by recycling than main framework components, offer the best key to identify the original source-rock imprint. The different behaviour of chemical indices such as the CIA (a truer indicator of weathering) and the WIP (markedly affected by quartz dilution) helps us to distinguish strongly weathered first-cycle versus polycyclic quartz sands (Garzanti et al. 2013b). Because sediment is efficiently trapped in East African Rift lakes, the composition of Nile sediments changes repeatedly northwards across Uganda. Downstream of both Lake Kyoga and Lake Albert, quartzose sands are progressively enriched in metamorphiclastic detritus supplied from tributaries draining amphibolite-facies basements. The evolution of White Nile sediments across South Sudan, a scarcely accessible region that suffered decades of civil war, was inferred from the available information (Shukri 1950), integrated by original petrographic, heavy-mineral and geochemical data (Padoan et al. 2011). Mineralogical and isotopic signatures of Bahr-el-Jebel and Sobat sediments, derived

  17. Smart white-light dazzler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Timothy D.; Ludman, Jacques E.; Watt, David W.

    2004-09-01

    The Smart, White-Light Dazzler (SWLD) is a nonlethal weapon designed to aim and deliver a dazzling and disabling light flash of maximum eye-safe energy to a selected target. The two key features of the SWLD technology are its self-aiming and power-adjusting capabilities; optical barriers, such as dark glasses, rifle scopes, binoculars, etc., and iris aperture, whether the eyes are light or dark adapted, are automatically taken into account by using a low-power infrared (IR) laser to probe and return a glint from the eye(s) of the target. Using the retro-reflected glint the dazzle pulse is adjusted and directed to arrive at the target with maximum allowable nonlethal energy at any range from 1 m to 100 m. The collateral risk of this technology is very small. If the weapon is misaimed dramatically, the returned glint may come from an unintended person who will then be dazzled. Although this person will be incapacitated for 2-3 minutes, he will suffer no long-term effects. We assume all persons in dangerous situations would rather be accidentally, temporarily dazzled than suffer more serious consequences. The SWLD adds an important tool to the spectrum of nonlethal responses available for use by military and law enforcement personnel. Applications include dispersing persons in crowd control and disabling terrorists in hijacking situations. The dazzle process may be repeated, choosing the next most susceptible target until a crowd is subdued. One important application in counter-terrorism is onboard planes where a pilot can fire a SWLD through a cockpit-door window and dazzle a hijacker with no damage to passengers.

  18. Merging white dwarfs and thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    van Kerkwijk, M H

    2013-06-13

    Thermonuclear supernovae result when interaction with a companion reignites nuclear fusion in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, causing a thermonuclear runaway, a catastrophic gain in pressure and the disintegration of the whole white dwarf. It is usually thought that fusion is reignited in near-pycnonuclear conditions when the white dwarf approaches the Chandrasekhar mass. I briefly describe two long-standing problems faced by this scenario, and the suggestion that these supernovae instead result from mergers of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, including those that produce sub-Chandrasekhar-mass remnants. I then turn to possible observational tests, in particular, those that test the absence or presence of electron captures during the burning. PMID:23630372

  19. White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, P.

    1977-01-01

    The three possible fates of burned-out stars: white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, are described in elementary terms. Characteristics of these celestial bodies, as provided by Einstein's work, are described. (CP)

  20. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  1. White-light quantitative phase imaging unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, YoonSeok; Lee, KyeoReh; Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the white light quantitative phase imaging unit (WQPIU) as a practical realization of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) on standard microscope platforms. The WQPIU is a compact stand-alone unit which measures sample induced phase delay under white-light illumination. It does not require any modification of the microscope or additional accessories for its use. The principle of the WQPIU based on lateral shearing interferometry and phase shifting interferometry provides a cost-effective and user-friendly use of QPI. The validity and capacity of the presented method are demonstrated by measuring quantitative phase images of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, HeLa cells and mouse white blood cells. With speckle-free imaging capability due to the use of white-light illumination, the WQPIU is expected to expand the scope of QPI in biological sciences as a powerful but simple imaging tool.

  2. White-light quantitative phase imaging unit.

    PubMed

    Baek, YoonSeok; Lee, KyeoReh; Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the white-light quantitative phase imaging unit (WQPIU) as a practical realization of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) on standard microscope platforms. The WQPIU is a compact stand-alone unit which measures sample induced phase delay under white-light illumination. It does not require any modification of the microscope or additional accessories for its use. The principle of the WQPIU based on lateral shearing interferometry and phase shifting interferometry provides a cost-effective and user-friendly use of QPI. The validity and capacity of the presented method are demonstrated by measuring quantitative phase images of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, HeLa cells and mouse white blood cells. With speckle-free imaging capability due to the use of white-light illumination, the WQPIU is expected to expand the scope of QPI in biological sciences as a powerful but simple imaging tool. PMID:27137546

  3. Size of the great white shark (carcharodon).

    PubMed

    Randall, J E

    1973-07-13

    The maximum length of 36.5 feet (11.1 meters) attributed to the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) by Günther and others is a mistake. Examination of the jaws and teeth of the specimen referred to by Günther and comparison with the jaws of white sharks of known length revealed a length of about 17 feet ( approximately 5 meters). The largest white shark reliably measured was a 21-foot (6.4-meter) individual from Cuba. Bites on whale carcasses found off southern Australia suggest that white sharks as long as 25 or 26 feet (7 (1/2) or 8 meters) exist today. The size of extinct Carcharodon has also been grossly exaggerated. Based on a projection of a curve of tooth size of Recent Carcharodon carcharias, the largest fossil Carcharodon were about 43 feet ( approximately 13 meters) long. PMID:17746627

  4. White Light Photorefractive Phase Zone Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuan-Mei; Liu, Si-Min

    2008-02-01

    Incoherent white light from an incandescent source is employed to fabricate volume phase zone plates in LiNbO3: Fe, for the first time to our knowledge, which can guide and modulate the input white light or laser light. The diffractive efficiency of the white light volume phase zone plates fabricated can reach as high as 12%. In addition, we test the volume phase zone plates by a probe beam and find that the volume phase zone plate is present in the direction perpendicular to the c-axis and absent in the direction parallel to the c-axis. This directly proves the existence of photovoltaic photorefractive anisotropy of white light.

  5. Accretion Flows in Magnetic White Dwarf Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, James N.

    2005-01-01

    We received Type A and B funding under the NASA Astrophysics Data Program for the analysis and interpretation of hard x-ray data obtained by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and other NASA sponsored missions for Intermediate Polars (IPS) and Polars. For some targets, optical data was available. We reduced and analyzed the X-ray spectra and the X-ray and optical (obtained at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory) timing data using detailed shock models (which we constructed) to place constraints on the properties of the accreting white dwarfs, the high energy emission mechanisms of white dwarfs, and the large-scale accretion flows of Polars and IPS. IPS and Polars are white dwarf mass-transfer binaries, members of the larger class of cata,clysmic variables. They differ from the bulk of the cataclysmic variables in that they contain strongly magnetic white dwarfs; the white dwarfs in Polars have B, = 7 to 230 MG and those in IPS have B, less than 10 MG. The IPS and Polars are both examples of funneled accretion flows in strong magnetic field systems. The IPS are similar to x-ray pulsars in that accretion disks form in the systems which are disrupted by the strong stellar magnetic fields of the white dwarfs near the stellar surface from where the plasma is funneled to the surface of the white dwarf. The localized hot spots formed at the footpoints of the funnels coupled with the rotation of the white dwarf leads to coherent pulsed x-ray emission. The Polars offer an example of a different accretion topology; the magnetic field of the white dwarf controls the accretion flow from near the inner Lagrangian point of the system directly to the stellar surface. Accretion disks do not form. The strong magnetic coupling generally leads to synchronous orbital/rotational motion in the Polars. The physical system in this sense resembles the Io/Jupiter system. In both IPS and Polars, pulsed emission from the infrared to x-rays is produced as the funneled flows merge onto the

  6. NGNP High Temperature Materials White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Lew Lommers; George Honma

    2012-08-01

    This white paper is one in a series of white papers that address key generic issues of the combined construction and operating license (COL) pre-application program key generic issues for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant reactor using the prismatic block fuel technology. The purpose of the pre-application program interactions with the NRC staff is to reduce the time required for COL application review by identifying and addressing key regulatory issues and, if possible, obtaining agreements for their resolution

  7. White-spot disease of salmon fry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazuranich, J.J.; Nielson, W.E.

    1959-01-01

     White-spot disease, sometimes referred to as coagulated-yolk disease, has been associated with excessive mortalities occurring among the fry and early fingerling stages of the fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytacha) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Stations at Carson, Cook, Underwood, and Willard, Washington. This disease of eggs and fry should not be confused with the "white-spot" infection that is caused in fingerlings by members of the protozoan genus Ichthyophthirius.

  8. Relevance of chemistry to white biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Munishwar N; Raghava, Smita

    2007-01-01

    White biotechnology is a fast emerging area that concerns itself with the use of biotechnological approaches in the production of bulk and fine chemicals, biofuels, and agricultural products. It is a truly multidisciplinary area and further progress depends critically on the role of chemists. This article outlines the emerging contours of white biotechnology and encourages chemists to take up some of the challenges that this area has thrown up. PMID:17880746

  9. Black-white asymmetry in visual perception.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhong-Lin; Sperling, George

    2012-01-01

    With eleven different types of stimuli that exercise a wide gamut of spatial and temporal visual processes, negative perturbations from mean luminance are found to be typically 25% more effective visually than positive perturbations of the same magnitude (range 8-67%). In Experiment 12, the magnitude of the black-white asymmetry is shown to be a saturating function of stimulus contrast. Experiment 13 shows black-white asymmetry primarily involves a nonlinearity in the visual representation of decrements. Black-white asymmetry in early visual processing produces even-harmonic distortion frequencies in all ordinary stimuli and in illusions such as the perceived asymmetry of optically perfect sine wave gratings. In stimuli intended to stimulate exclusively second-order processing in which motion or shape are defined not by luminance differences but by differences in texture contrast, the black-white asymmetry typically generates artifactual luminance (first-order) motion and shape components. Because black-white asymmetry pervades psychophysical and neurophysiological procedures that utilize spatial or temporal variations of luminance, it frequently needs to be considered in the design and evaluation of experiments that involve visual stimuli. Simple procedures to compensate for black-white asymmetry are proposed. PMID:22984221

  10. Nonlinear Analysis of Pulsating White Dwarf Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, J. L.; Montgomery, M. H.; Shipman, H.; WET TEam

    2015-06-01

    Convection remains one of the largest sources of theoretical uncertainty in our understanding of stellar physics. For example, Bergeron (1995) show that basic parameters such as flux, line profiles, energy distribution, color indices, and equivalent widths are extremely sensitive to the assumed convective parameterization. This is compelling, since we use our knowledge of these basic parameters to calibrate white dwarf cooling sequences, provide detailed estimates for the ages of individual white dwarfs, and determine the age of the Galactic disk. The Whole Earth Telescope (WET) is engaged in a long term project to empirically calibrate the physical properties of convection in pulsating white dwarfs by combining asteroseismology and analysis of nonlinear light curves. Nonsinusoidal distortions, in the form of narrow peaks and wider valleys, are observed in many pulsating white dwarf light curves. These are a reflection of the local depth of the convection zone, a value which varies during a pulsation cycle. Applying asteroseismology and convective light curve fitting to a wide sample of pulsating white dwarfs provides an empirical map of how the convective response time (the convection zone “depth”) varies as a function of effective temperature, and this can be compared with theoretical models, both MLT and hydrodynamic. This project has resulted in a large database of white dwarf lightcurves and pulsation frequencies. We present current results for DA and DB pulsators, and provide a few examples of interesting pulsation behavior seen along the way.

  11. The superficial white matter in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Owen R; Joshi, Shantanu H; Piras, Fabrizio; Orfei, Maria Donata; Iorio, Mariangela; Narr, Katherine L; Shattuck, David W; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Di Paola, Margherita

    2016-04-01

    White matter abnormalities have been shown in the large deep fibers of Alzheimer's disease patients. However, the late myelinating superficial white matter comprised of intracortical myelin and short-range association fibers has not received much attention. To investigate this area, we extracted a surface corresponding to the superficial white matter beneath the cortex and then applied a cortical pattern-matching approach which allowed us to register and subsequently sample diffusivity along thousands of points at the interface between the gray matter and white matter in 44 patients with Alzheimer's disease (Age: 71.02 ± 5.84, 16M/28F) and 47 healthy controls (Age 69.23 ± 4.45, 19M/28F). In patients we found an overall increase in the axial and radial diffusivity across most of the superficial white matter (P < 0.001) with increases in diffusivity of more than 20% in the bilateral parahippocampal regions and the temporal and frontal lobes. Furthermore, diffusivity correlated with the cognitive deficits measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination scores (P < 0.001). The superficial white matter has a unique microstructure and is critical for the integration of multimodal information during brain maturation and aging. Here we show that there are major abnormalities in patients and the deterioration of these fibers relates to clinical symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26801955

  12. Broad-Band Activatable White-Opsin

    PubMed Central

    Batabyal, Subrata; Cervenka, Gregory; Ha, Ji Hee; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the use of optogenetic sensitization of retinal cells combined with activation/inhibition has the potential to be an alternative to retinal implants that would require electrodes inside every single neuron for high visual resolution. However, clinical translation of optogenetic activation for restoration of vision suffers from the drawback that the narrow spectral sensitivity of an opsin requires active stimulation by a blue laser or a light emitting diode with much higher intensities than ambient light. In order to allow an ambient light-based stimulation paradigm, we report the development of a ‘white-opsin’ that has broad spectral excitability in the visible spectrum. The cells sensitized with white-opsin showed excitability at an order of magnitude higher with white light compared to using only narrow-band light components. Further, cells sensitized with white-opsin produced a photocurrent that was five times higher than Channelrhodopsin-2 under similar photo-excitation conditions. The use of fast white-opsin may allow opsin-sensitized neurons in a degenerated retina to exhibit a higher sensitivity to ambient white light. This property, therefore, significantly lowers the activation threshold in contrast to conventional approaches that use intense narrow-band opsins and light to activate cellular stimulation. PMID:26360377

  13. Black-White Health Inequalities in Canada.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Gerry; Patterson, Andrew C

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about Black-White health inequalities in Canada or the applicability of competing explanations for them. To address this gap, we used nine cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey to analyze multiple health outcomes in a sample of 3,127 Black women, 309,720 White women, 2,529 Black men and 250,511 White men. Adjusting for age, marital status, urban/rural residence and immigrant status, Black women and men were more likely than their White counterparts to report diabetes and hypertension, Black women were less likely than White women to report cancer and fair/poor mental health and Black men were less likely than White men to report heart disease. These health inequalities persisted after controlling for education, household income, smoking, physical activity and body-mass index. We conclude that high rates of diabetes and hypertension among Black Canadians may stem from experiences of racism in everyday life, low rates of heart disease and cancer among Black Canadians may reflect survival bias and low rates of fair/poor mental health among Black Canadian women represent a mental health paradox similar to the one that exists for African Americans in the United States. PMID:25894533

  14. Black–white asymmetry in visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhong-Lin; Sperling, George

    2012-01-01

    With eleven different types of stimuli that exercise a wide gamut of spatial and temporal visual processes, negative perturbations from mean luminance are found to be typically 25% more effective visually than positive perturbations of the same magnitude (range 8–67%). In Experiment 12, the magnitude of the black–white asymmetry is shown to be a saturating function of stimulus contrast. Experiment 13 shows black–white asymmetry primarily involves a nonlinearity in the visual representation of decrements. Black–white asymmetry in early visual processing produces even-harmonic distortion frequencies in all ordinary stimuli and in illusions such as the perceived asymmetry of optically perfect sine wave gratings. In stimuli intended to stimulate exclusively second-order processing in which motion or shape are defined not by luminance differences but by differences in texture contrast, the black–white asymmetry typically generates artifactual luminance (first-order) motion and shape components. Because black–white asymmetry pervades psychophysical and neurophysiological procedures that utilize spatial or temporal variations of luminance, it frequently needs to be considered in the design and evaluation of experiments that involve visual stimuli. Simple procedures to compensate for black–white asymmetry are proposed. PMID:22984221

  15. White matter injury detection in neonatal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Irene; Hajari, Nasim; Firouzmanesh, Amirhossein; Shen, Rui; Miller, Steven; Poskitt, Ken; Basu, Anup

    2013-02-01

    Early detection of white matter injury in premature newborns can facilitate timely clinical treatments reducing the potential risk of later developmental deficits. It was reported that there were more than 5% premature newborns in British Columbia, Canada, among which 5-10% exhibited major motor deficits and 25-50% exhibited significant developmental and visual deficits. With the advancement of computer assisted detection systems, it is possible to automatically identify white matter injuries, which are found inside the grey matter region of the brain. Atlas registration has been suggested in the literature to distinguish grey matter from the soft tissues inside the skull. However, our subjects are premature newborns delivered at 24 to 32 weeks of gestation. During this period, the grey matter undergoes rapid changes and differs significantly from one to another. Besides, not all detected white spots represent injuries. Additional neighborhood information and expert input are required for verification. In this paper, we propose a white matter feature identification system for premature newborns, which is composed of several steps: (1) Candidate white matter segmentation; (2) Feature extraction from candidates; (3) Validation with data obtained at a later stage on the children; and (4) Feature confirmation for automated detection. The main challenge of this work lies in segmenting white matter injuries from noisy and low resolution data. Our approach integrates image fusion and contrast enhancement together with a fuzzy segmentation technique to achieve promising results. Other applications, such as brain tumor and intra-ventricular haemorrhage detection can also benefit from our approach.

  16. White Rock in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image shows the wind eroded deposit in Pollack Crater called 'White Rock'. This image was collected during the Southern Fall Season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8, Longitude 25.2 East (334.8 West). 0 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of

  17. Wave climate of the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Victor; Dobrolyubov, Sergey; Myslenkov, Stanislav; Korablina, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    The implementation of the SWAN spectral wave model for the White Sea with using unstructured grid was presented. The main area of the Barents Sea was added to calculation region because it produces swell which incomes to the White Sea from the outside. Spatial resolution of unstructured grid is 500 m-5 km for the White Sea and 10-20 km for the Barents sea. NCEP/CFSR (~0.3°) input wind forcing was used. The results of the numerical modeling include wind wave fields for the White Sea with time step of 3 hours from 1979 to 2010. Spatial extreme value analysis of significant wave heights was performed. The storm situations, when the significant wave height exceeded 3 and 4 meters, were identified for the 32-year period. It allowed to analyze the variability of wind wave climate in the White Sea. The storminess of the White Sea tended to increase from 1979 to 1991, then decreased to minimum at 2000 and increased again till 2010. This work showed the following results. For example, in the Voronka (part of the White Sea) the synoptic situations with a wave height of more than 2 m (50-60 cases) took place about three times more than in the Basin (part of the White Sea), with heights of more than 3 m (25-40 cases) five or six times more. Cases with wave heights greater than 5 m in the Basin is extremely rare, while in the Voronka they occur 10 times a year. The significant wave height of a possible one time in 100 years is up to 7 meters in the Basin, up to 13 m in the Voronka, up to 3 m in the Onega Bay. In May, the smallest wavelength occurs in the Onega Bay, and is only 25 m. In the Basin wavelength is increased to 50 m. The longer wavelengths observed in the Voronka - 100 m. In November in the Basin (especially in the western part) and in the Voronka wavelength greatly increased to 75 and 200 m, respectively. In May, in the Onega Bay, Basin and Gorlo (part of the White Sea) swell height does not exceed 1 m. Only in the Voronka, it increases up to 3 meters. By November

  18. 49 CFR 172.436 - RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label. 172.436 Section 172.436... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.436 RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... background on the RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label must be white. The printing and symbol must be black, except...

  19. 49 CFR 172.436 - RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label. 172.436 Section 172.436... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.436 RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... background on the RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label must be white. The printing and symbol must be black, except...

  20. 49 CFR 172.436 - RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label. 172.436 Section 172.436... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.436 RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... background on the RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label must be white. The printing and symbol must be black, except...

  1. 49 CFR 172.436 - RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label. 172.436 Section 172.436... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.436 RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... background on the RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label must be white. The printing and symbol must be black, except...

  2. 49 CFR 172.436 - RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label. 172.436 Section 172.436... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.436 RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE... background on the RADIOACTIVE WHITE-I label must be white. The printing and symbol must be black, except...

  3. 21 CFR 137.255 - Bolted white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bolted white corn meal. 137.255 Section 137.255... Flours and Related Products § 137.255 Bolted white corn meal. (a) Bolted white corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding and sifting cleaned white corn that: (1) Its crude fiber content is less than...

  4. 21 CFR 137.255 - Bolted white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bolted white corn meal. 137.255 Section 137.255... Flours and Related Products § 137.255 Bolted white corn meal. (a) Bolted white corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding and sifting cleaned white corn that: (1) Its crude fiber content is less than...

  5. Ambivalent White Racial Identities: Fear and an Elusive Innocence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lensmire, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the complex social production of white racial identity. Specifically, the author theorizes white people's fear of people of color and make a case for conceiving of white racial identities as profoundly ambivalent. Drawing from a larger ethnographic interview study conducted in a small, rural, white community in the Midwest of…

  6. 21 CFR 137.211 - White corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false White corn flour. 137.211 Section 137.211 Food and... Related Products § 137.211 White corn flour. (a) White corn flour is the food prepared by so grinding and bolting cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this...

  7. 21 CFR 137.255 - Bolted white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bolted white corn meal. 137.255 Section 137.255... Flours and Related Products § 137.255 Bolted white corn meal. (a) Bolted white corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding and sifting cleaned white corn that: (1) Its crude fiber content is less than...

  8. 21 CFR 137.211 - White corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false White corn flour. 137.211 Section 137.211 Food and... Related Products § 137.211 White corn flour. (a) White corn flour is the food prepared by so grinding and bolting cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this...

  9. 21 CFR 137.211 - White corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false White corn flour. 137.211 Section 137.211 Food and... Related Products § 137.211 White corn flour. (a) White corn flour is the food prepared by so grinding and bolting cleaned white corn that when tested by the method prescribed in paragraph (b)(2) of this...

  10. 21 CFR 137.255 - Bolted white corn meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bolted white corn meal. 137.255 Section 137.255... Flours and Related Products § 137.255 Bolted white corn meal. (a) Bolted white corn meal is the food prepared by so grinding and sifting cleaned white corn that: (1) Its crude fiber content is less than...

  11. The Challenge of White Dialectics: Making the "Invisible" Visible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sue, Derald Wing

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author comments on the substance of Todd and Abrams's study on "White Dialectics: A New Framework for Theory, Research, and Practice With White Students" (2011). The study is a major contribution to the importance of raising awareness of how Whiteness, White privilege, and one's own complicity in the perpetuation of racism are…

  12. 50 CFR 660.336 - Pacific whiting vessel licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pacific whiting vessel licenses. 660.336... Groundfish Fisheries § 660.336 Pacific whiting vessel licenses. (a) Pacific whiting vessel license—(1...(b) requires: (i) An owner of any vessel that catches Pacific whiting must hold a limited...

  13. Challenging the Status Quo? Whiteness in the Diversity Management Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Diane Susan

    2002-01-01

    Presents three perspectives on whiteness that have important implications for power in organizations. Offers a textual analysis of diversity management magazine and journal articles. Notes that "interrogating whiteness" works to name, unmask, and de-center whiteness; while "re-centering whiteness" recognizes difference yet ultimately keeps…

  14. New knowledge about 'white spots' in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, L.A. ); Maurer, G.E. ); Widge, S. )

    1993-05-01

    In April 1991, the first in a series of workshops was held to discuss ways in which the gas turbine industry could better understand defects in nickel-base superalloys. The group's primary objective was to better define, and expand knowledge about, segregation in superalloys such as Alloy 718 and Waspaloy,with emphasis on light-etching areas referred to as solute-lean defects or 'white spots'. This 'White Spots Committee' formed four subcommittees to focus efforts on classification, inspection, mechanisms, and mechanical properties. Completion of the tasks that these subcommittees have undertaken should greatly improve the gas turbine industry's understanding of the physical and mechanical nature of white spots. The primary purpose of this article is to formalize the characterization and classification of white spots in high-strength superalloys so that the metallurgical community can begin to use a common vocabulary when referring to them. An overview of formation mechanisms is presented along with a brief description of detection methods. Also discussed are preliminary test results, which should help shed light on the effects of solute-lean microstructures on tensile and fatigue properties. Although white spots are not limited to any single superalloy or class of superalloy, Alloy 718 is emphasized because it is so widely used, and because its relatively large solidus-liquidus temperature interval ([approximately]75 C, 135 F) and high niobium content ([approximately]5.3% Nb) make it prone to segregation. Three distinct types of white spots have been identified and named by the committee: discrete, dendritic, and solidification white spots.

  15. Shifting White Ideological Scripts: The Educational Benefits of Inter- and Intraracial Curricular Dialogues on the Experiences of White College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Kristie A.

    2012-01-01

    What pedagogies and inter-/intragroup dynamics facilitate increased understanding of issues of race, white racial identity development, and racism in the U.S.? Can white students effectively learn about whiteness by themselves as well as in collaboration with students of diverse racial backgrounds? This project examines white student learning in…

  16. White Teachers in Urban Classrooms: Embracing Non-White Students' Cultural Capital for Better Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Barry M.

    2014-01-01

    The racial "mismatch" between a non-White student public school population and a primarily White teaching force continues to be underexamined through an appropriate cultural lens. This literature review provides examples of how White teachers must properly recognize non-White students' actions and rhetoric in classroom settings as…

  17. Dismantling White Privilege: Pedagogy, Politics, and Whiteness. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education, Vol. 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Nelson M., Ed.; Villaverde, Leila E., Ed.

    Challenging the assumption that the study of race focuses only on "people of color," many scholars are investigating the historical and social construction of "Whiteness." This book critically interrogates whiteness across contexts; contends that "marking" Whiteness--illuminating veiled cultural assumptions of Whiteness as the norm--is an…

  18. The origin of low-mass white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Schreiber, M. R.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Girven, J.; Gomez-Moran, A. Nebot

    2010-11-23

    We present white dwarf mass distributions of a large sample of post common-envelope binaries and wide white dwarf main sequence binaries and demonstrate that these distributions are statistically independent. While the former contains a much larger fraction of low-mass white dwarfs, the latter is similar to single white dwarf mass distributions. Taking into account observational biases we also show that the majority of low-mass white dwarfs are formed in close binaries.

  19. The effects of recessive white and dominant white genotypes on early growth rate.

    PubMed

    Fox, W; Smyth, J R

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of the studies reported herein was to determine whether the depressing effects on growth rate of dominant white (I) and recessive white (c/c) are additive or possibly interact with each other. A synthetic stock was used that was segregating for both dominant white and recessive white. Using phenotypic observations of down color and juvenile plumage color; it was possible to identify the genotypes at the I and C+ loci and to utilize a factorial experiment that provided for an evaluation of interaction effects between the loci. Five replications of this design were conducted with the following results: 1) the main effect of dominant white on 6 and 8 week body weight was not statistically significant; 2) recessive white consistently depresses early growth rate and the difference (congruent to 4%) between C+/- vs. c/c was highly significant (P less than .01); 3) there was a significant interaction (P less than .05) between I and c indicating that depressing effects of these loci are not additive. It does not appear to be necessary to eliminate (I) from recessive white broiler stocks, but it would be economically advantageous to remove hypostatic (c) from dominant white lines. PMID:3991420

  20. Toxicity of White Snakeroot (Ageratina altissima) and chemical extracts of White Snakeroot in goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White snakeroot (Ageratina altissima) is a sporadically toxic plant that causes trembles in livestock and milk sickness in humans that drink tainted milk. The putative toxin in white snakeroot is tremetone and possibly other benzofuran ketones even though it has not been demonstrated in vivo. Toxi...

  1. Assessing the Learning of White Students on Themes of White Privilege & Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinze, Peter; DeCandia, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    In an earlier article appearing in "Multicultural Education" (Volume 16, Number 1, Fall 2008) a number of pedagogical techniques were presented for teaching White students about White privilege and racism (Heinze, 2008). That article emphasized that racism exists along a continuum and that the instructor needs to examine and disclose his or her…

  2. Do White Students Perceive Racism toward Minority Students on Predominantly White Campuses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Leonard; And Others

    This study tested a causal model of influences on white students' perceptions of racism toward minority students on predominantly white college campuses. The study was part of the National Study of Student Learning and utilized a three-wave, longitudinal design. The institutional sample consisted of 11 traditional institutions in 9 states. The…

  3. The "Rightness of Whiteness": The World of the White Child in a Segregated Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citron, Abraham F.

    White children in our White-dominant society come early to feel that their skin color is the accepted one. If children are to have attitudes and behavior different from the general culture, they will have to be reared in a subculture of equality at home. Children should see their parents acting towards Blacks as they see them acting towards…

  4. Tough or Tender: (Dis)Similarities in White College Students' Perceptions of Black and White Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Roxanne A.

    2011-01-01

    Although intersectional theory and empirical evidence suggest that race impacts how women are perceived, there is a dearth of research on how the dominant culture stereotypes Black women compared to White women. The current study addresses this gap using an intersectional framework to investigate White college students' stereotypes of Black and…

  5. When White Women Cry: How White Women's Tears Oppress Women of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Accapadi, Mamta Motwani

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the tension that arises as the result of the intersection of social identities, namely gender and race. Through examination of a case study I consider the ways in which White women benefit from White privilege through their interactions with Women of Color using the Privileged Identity Exploration Model as the tool for…

  6. Coincidence or Conspiracy? Whiteness, Policy and the Persistence of the Black/White Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillborn, David

    2008-01-01

    Adopting an approach shaped by critical race theory (CRT) the paper proposes a radical analysis of the nature of race inequality in the English educational system. Focusing on the relative achievements of White school leavers and their Black (African Caribbean) peers, it is argued that long standing Black/White inequalities have been obscured by a…

  7. The Treatment of White and Non-White Women in U.S. Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Jesus; Woodrick, Carol S.

    1979-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether selected U.S. History textbooks portray females in a sexist fashion. The results indicate that authors need to be more conscious of the treatment accorded women, and there exists a need for accurate, balanced, and comprehensive descriptions of White and non-White females. (KC)

  8. White Teachers/White Schools: Oral Histories from the Struggle against Apartheid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieder, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Presents the oral histories of two white teachers who taught in white South African schools during apartheid. Both combined pedagogy and politics in their lives as teachers and joined other teachers in the struggle against apartheid. Describes the oral history project, apartheid and education, and oral history methodology. Both teachers spent…

  9. White Dwarfs in the GALEX Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawka, Adela; Vennes, Stephane

    2007-01-01

    We have cross-correlated the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) white dwarf catalog with the GALEX 2nd Data Release and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 5 to obtain ultraviolet photometry (FUV, NUV) for approximately 700 objects and optical photometry (ugriz) for approximately 800 objects. We have compared the optical-ultraviolet colors to synthetic white dwarf colors to obtain temperature estimates for approximately 250 of these objects. These white dwarfs have effective temperatures ranging from 10 000 K (cooling age of about 1Gyr) up to about 40000 K (cooling age of about 3 Myrs), with a few that have even higher temperatures. We found that to distinguish white dwarfs from other stellar luminosity classes both optical and ultraviolet colors are necessary, in particular for the hotter objects where there is contamination from B and 0 main-sequence stars. Using this sample we build a luminosity function for the DA white dwarfs with Mv < 12 mag.

  10. White dwarf stars with carbon atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Dufour, P; Liebert, J; Fontaine, G; Behara, N

    2007-11-22

    White dwarfs represent the endpoint of stellar evolution for stars with initial masses between approximately 0.07 and 8-10, where is the mass of the Sun (more massive stars end their life as either black holes or neutron stars). The theory of stellar evolution predicts that the majority of white dwarfs have a core made of carbon and oxygen, which itself is surrounded by a helium layer and, for approximately 80 per cent of known white dwarfs, by an additional hydrogen layer. All white dwarfs therefore have been traditionally found to belong to one of two categories: those with a hydrogen-rich atmosphere (the DA spectral type) and those with a helium-rich atmosphere (the non-DAs). Here we report the discovery of several white dwarfs with atmospheres primarily composed of carbon, with little or no trace of hydrogen or helium. Our analysis shows that the atmospheric parameters found for these stars do not fit satisfactorily in any of the currently known theories of post-asymptotic giant branch evolution, although these objects might be the cooler counterpart of the unique and extensively studied PG 1159 star H1504+65 (refs 4-7). These stars, together with H1504+65, might accordingly form a new evolutionary sequence that follows the asymptotic giant branch. PMID:18033290

  11. Gravitational Interactions of White Dwarf Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, James; Robinson, Chloe; Ortiz, Bridget; Hira, Ajit

    2016-03-01

    In the light of the possible role of White Dwarf stars as progenitors of Type Ia supernovas, we present computational simulations of some astrophysical phenomena associated with a study of gravitationally-bound binary stars, composed of at least one white dwarf star. Of particular interest to astrophysicists are the conditions inside a white dwarf star in the time frame leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova, for an understanding of the massive stellar explosions. In addition, the studies of the evolution of white dwarfs could serve as promising probes of theories of gravitation. We developed FORTRAN computer programs to implement our models for white dwarfs and other stars. These codes allow for different sizes and masses of stars. Simulations were done in the mass interval from 0.1 to 2.5 solar masses. Our goal was to obtain both atmospheric and orbital parameters. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant observational data. The data are further analyzed to identify trends in terms of sizes and masses of stars. We will extend our computational studies to blue giant and red giant stars in the future. Funding from National Science Foundation.

  12. The Potential of White Dwarf Cosmochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Bergeron, P.

    2001-04-01

    In the light of recent significant progress on both the observational and theoretical fronts, we review the status of white dwarf stars as cosmochronometers. These objects represent the end products of stellar evolution for the vast majority of stars and, as such, can be used to constrain the ages of various populations of evolved stars in the Galaxy. For example, the oldest white dwarfs in the solar neighborhood (the remnants of the very first generation of intermediate-mass stars in the Galactic disk) are still visible and can be used, in conjunction with cooling theory, to estimate the age of the disk. More recent observations suggest the tantalizing possibility that a population of very old white dwarfs inhabits the Galactic halo. Such a population may contribute significantly to baryonic ``dark'' matter in the Milky Way and may be used to obtain an independent estimate of the age of the halo. In addition, white dwarf cosmochronology is likely to play a very significant role in the coming era of giant 8-10 m telescopes when faint white dwarf populations should be routinely discovered and studied in open and globular clusters. Based, in part, on the C. S. Beals Lecture presented by G. Fontaine at the Annual General Meeting of the Canadian Astronomical Society held in Vancouver (2000 May).

  13. THE MASSES OF POPULATION II WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Davis, D. Saul; Richer, Harvey B.; Bergeron, P.; Catelan, Marcio; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Michael Rich, R. E-mail: sdavis@astro.ubc.c E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.c E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.ed

    2009-11-01

    Globular star clusters are among the first stellar populations to have formed in the Milky Way, and thus only a small sliver of their initial spectrum of stellar types are still burning hydrogen on the main sequence today. Almost all of the stars born with more mass than 0.8 M{sub sun} have evolved to form the white dwarf cooling sequence of these systems, and the distribution and properties of these remnants uniquely holds clues related to the nature of the now evolved progenitor stars. With ultra-deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging observations, rich white dwarf populations of four nearby Milky Way globular clusters have recently been uncovered, and are found to extend impressive 5-8 mag in the faint-blue region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. In this paper, we characterize the properties of these population II remnants by presenting the first direct mass measurements of individual white dwarfs near the tip of the cooling sequence in the nearest of the Milky Way globulars, M4. Based on Gemini/GMOS and Keck/LRIS multiobject spectroscopic observations, our results indicate that 0.8 M{sub sun} population II main-sequence stars evolving today form 0.53 +- 0.01 M{sub sun} white dwarfs. We discuss the implications of this result as it relates to our understanding of stellar structure and evolution of population II stars and for the age of the Galactic halo, as measured with white dwarf cooling theory.

  14. Efficient White SSL Component for General Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Evans

    2011-01-31

    Cree has developed a new, high-efficiency, low-cost, light emitting diode (LED) module that should be capable of replacing standard, halogen, fluorescent and metal halide lamps based on the total cost of ownership. White LEDs are produced by combining one or more saturated color LEDs with a phosphor or other light down-converting media to achieve white broad-band illumination. This two year project addressed LED chip, package and phosphor efficiency improvements to establish a technology platform suitable for low-cost, high-efficiency commercial luminaires. New phosphor materials with improved quantum efficiency at 'real-life' operating conditions were developed along with new package technology to improve the efficiency of warm white LED modules compared to the baseline technology. Specifically, Cree has successfully demonstrated warm white LED modules providing 540 lumens at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3000 K. The LED module had an efficacy of 102.8 lumens per watt (LPW) using 1 mm2 chips biased at 350 mA - a 27% improvement over the technology at project start (81 LPW at 3000K). The white modules also delivered an efficacy of 88 LPW at elevated junction temperatures of 125 C. In addition, a proof-of-concept 4-inch downlight luminaire produced a flux of 1183 lumens at a CCT of 2827 K and a color rendering index (CRI) of 80 using this project's phosphor developments.

  15. Phase transformations of nano-sized cubic boron nitride to white graphene and white graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Xue, Wenhua; Anderson, Ryan S.; Sewell, Cody R.; Xue, Sha; Crunkleton, Daniel W.; Shen, Yaogen; Wang, Sanwu

    2014-03-03

    We report quantum-mechanical investigations that predict the formation of white graphene and nano-sized white graphite from the first-order phase transformations of nano-sized boron nitride thin-films. The phase transformations from the nano-sized diamond-like structure, when the thickness d > 1.4 nm, to the energetically more stable nano-sized white graphite involve low activation energies of less than 1.0 eV. On the other hand, the diamond-like structure transforms spontaneously to white graphite when d ≤ 1.4 nm. In particular, the two-dimensional structure with single-layer boron nitride, the so-called white graphene, could be formed as a result of such transformation.

  16. White dwarfs as tracers of galactic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern, J.; Hernanz, M.; García-Berro, E.; Salaris, M.

    White dwarfs are the final remnants of low and intermediate mass stars. Their evolution is essentially a cooling process that lasts for ~ 10 Gyr and allows to obtain information about the age of the Galaxy as well as about the past stellar formation rate in the solar neighborhood. We show in this paper the state of the art of the white dwarf cooling theory and the uncertainties still remaining. We also provide some applications of the theory of cooling white dwarfs to escrutiny the past history of the Milky Way. These applications range from an independent derivation of the past history of the local star formation rate to a determination of the properties of the halo.

  17. Be stars with white dwarf companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina; Luna, Gerardo; Zemko, Polina; Kotulla, Ralf; Gallagher, Jay; Harbeck, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    A handful of supersoft X-ray sources in the Magellanic Clouds that could not be identified with transient nova outbursts turned out to be mainly massive close binaries. Recently, we have clearly identified a Be binary in M31, and are currently collecting data for another candidate in that galaxy. Work is in progress to assess whether the compact object companion really is a hydrogen burning white dwarf (the alternative being a massive stellar-mass black hole). If we can prove that Be+white dwarf interacting close binaries are common, and that hydrogen is often ignited on the white dwarf in these systems, we have discovered a new promising channel towards the explosion of supernovae of type Ia in star forming regions, without invoking double degenerate systems

  18. Recombination energy in double white dwarf formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandez, J. L. A.; Ivanova, N.; Lombardi, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the role of recombination energy during a common envelope event. We confirm that taking this energy into account helps to avoid the formation of the circumbinary envelope commonly found in previous studies. For the first time, we can model a complete common envelope event, with a clean compact double white dwarf binary system formed at the end. The resulting binary orbit is almost perfectly circular. In addition to considering recombination energy, we also show that between 1/4 and 1/2 of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejected material. We apply this new method to the case of the double white dwarf system WD 1101+364, and we find that the progenitor system at the start of the common envelope event consisted of an ˜1.5 M⊙ red giant star in an ˜30 d orbit with a white dwarf companion.

  19. White dwarfs, the Galaxy and Dirac's cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.

    1976-01-01

    The additive and multiplicative versions of Dirac's cosmological hypothesis relating the gravitational constant variation with elapsed time and number of particles populating the universe is invoked to account for the deficiency or absence of white dwarfs fainter than about 0.0001 solar luminosity. An estimate is made of white dwarf luminosity in accordance with the two evolutionary models, and it is conjectured that some old white dwarfs with high space velocities may be on the verge of gravitational collapse. Lack of a special mechanism to produce the vast numbers of black holes or other dead stars accounting for 'missing matter' in the vicinity of the sun and in the galactic halo is noted in Dirac's multiplicative model. Results indicate that either Dirac's theory is untenable, or that radiation and heating are of some unknown nature, or that the process of creation of new matter requires a corresponding input of energy.

  20. White Rabbit in space related application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JamroŻy, M.; Gumiński, M.; Kasprowicz, G.; Romaniuk, R.; Poźniak, K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes study results regarding potential use of White Rabbit technology in Space Related Applications. During the study Technology Readiness Level and Compliance with Space Related Applications was evaluated. After considering possible deployment and development scenarios, main focus has been put on European Space Agency's tracking station system. This outcome derived from specific requirements of tracking system which are coherent with White Rabbit technology scope of application and further development plans. Current state of Time and Frequency Distribution technology implemented into tracking stations is based on multiple different technologies coexisting in parallel creating a complex system. It requires specific, custom made hardware to combine all the technologies which makes it expensive and difficult to maintain. White Rabbit could be use to reduce Time and Frequency Distribution to a single Ethernet based network with link redundancy, payload data transfer and sub-nanosecond accuracy.

  1. White Flame Energy switches to backhoes

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2005-06-01

    The mountaintop coal operator, White Flame Energy has switched to different truck-shovel arrangement. Along with many surface mining operations throughout central Appalachia, the company is using hoe-configured hydraulic excavators as opposed to the traditional front-shovel arrangements. Located in Varney, WV, White Flame Energy uses two Terex O & K mining shovels, an RH170 and an RH 200, which have the capacity to move 2 million cu yards per month from five seams, primarily the Coalburg, Stockton, and No 5 Block and associated rider seams. The article records conversations on the operations with Mike Vines, the general manager, and Don Nicewonder, the owner of White Flame Energy. 2 photos.

  2. White Privilege? The Intersection of Hip-Hop and Whiteness as a Catalyst for Cross-Racial Interaction among White Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulé, Venice Thandi

    2015-01-01

    Given the prevalence of racial segregation in the U.S., college is an opportunity to prepare students for diversity through cross-racial interaction. Hip-hop, a culture steeped in black and Latino experiences, has significant white supporters. Through diversity and critical whiteness frameworks, this research considers how white hip-hop collegians…

  3. Effects of white phosphorus on mallard reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vann, S.I.; Sparling, D.W.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive waterfowl mortality involving thousands of ducks, geese, and swans has occurred annually at Eagle River Flats, Alaska since at least 1982. The primary agent for this mortality has been identified as white phosphorus. Although acute and subacute lethality have been described, sublethal effects are less well known. This study reports on the effects of white phosphorus on reproductive function in the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) in captivity. Fertility, hatching success, teratogenicity, and egg laying frequency were examined in 70 adult female mallards who received up to 7 daily doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg of white phosphorus. Measurements of fertility and hatchability were reduced by the white phosphorus. Teratogenic effects were observed in embryos from hens dosed at all treatment levels. Egg laying frequency was reduced even at the lowest treatment level; treated hens required a greater number of days to lay a clutch of 12 eggs than control hens. After two doses at 2.0 mg/kg, all females stopped laying completely for a minimum of 10 days and laying frequency was depressed for at least 45 days. Fertility of 10 adult male mallards dosed with 1.0 mg/kg of white phosphorus did not differ from 10 controls, but plasma testosterone levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the treated males 1 day after dosing ended. These results provide evidence that productivity of free-ranging mallards may be impaired if they are exposed to white phosphorus at typical field levels.

  4. White dwarf stars with chemically stratified atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muchmore, D.

    1982-01-01

    Recent observations and theory suggest that some white dwarfs may have chemically stratified atmospheres - thin layers of hydrogen lying above helium-rich envelopes. Models of such atmospheres show that a discontinuous temperature inversion can occur at the boundary between the layers. Model spectra for layered atmospheres at 30,000 K and 50,000 K tend to have smaller decrements at 912 A, 504 A, and 228 A than uniform atmospheres would have. On the basis of their continuous extreme ultraviolet spectra, it is possible to distinguish observationally between uniform and layered atmospheres for hot white dwarfs.

  5. Spectral response measurements with white light bias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devaney, W.; Lorenz, S.; Meakin, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The spectral response of solar cells such as the CdS/Cu2S cell is non-linear with distinct quenching and enhancement bands. One possible technique to produce standardized solar efficiencies is to fold in spectral response with a standard solar spectrum. The spectral response of a cell was measured in a way which matched cell behavior under white light illumination. A technique was developed to measure the response of a cell to low intensity chopped monochromatic light while the cell is also illuminated with a white light bias corresponding to AMI.

  6. Gilbert White talks about natural hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1978-01-01

    Dr. Gilbert White is Director of the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he is responsible for natural Hazards Research and Applications Information Center supported by the National Science Foundation. He served in the Executive Office of the president in 1941-42, on the Federal Flood Control Policy Task Force in 1964-65, and on the U.S Geological Survey Advisory Panel on Earthquake Studies. Dr. White has authored five books on the social and economic aspects of natural resources, including water supply and river development, and on floods and other natural hazards. 

  7. The empirical white dwarf cooling sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, H.; Goldsbury, R.; Heyl, J.; Bergeron, P.; Dotter, A.; Kalirai, J. S.; MacDonald, J.; Rich, R. M.; Stetson, P. B.; Tremblay, P.-E.; Woodley, K. A.

    White dwarf stars cool as they age, hence they can be used as chronometers for various stellar systems. Their value as clocks depends critically on how well we understand the physics of cooling. In this contribution we outline how to derive an empirical cooling sequence and then compare it with a standard white dwarf cooling model. Some differences are noted suggesting that there is still missing physics in the models. A more detailed version of this communication can be found in Goldsbury et al. (2012).

  8. New White Dwarfs in the SDSS DR10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, I.; Koester, D.; Ourique, G.; Kleinman, S. J.; Romero, A. D.; Nitta, A.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Costa, J. E. S.; Külebi, B.; Jordan, S.; Dufour, P.; Giommi, P.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.

    2015-06-01

    We report the discovery of 8 991 new spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs and subdwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. We obtain Teff, log g and mass for hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf stars (DAs) and helium atmosphere white dwarf stars (DBs), and estimate the calcium/helium abundances for the white dwarf stars with metallic lines (DZs) and carbon/helium for cool carbon dominated spectra DQs. We found 2 new oxygen dominated spectra white dwarfs, 69 DQs, 42 hot DO/PG1159s, 175 white dwarf+main sequence star binaries, 206 magnetic DAHs, 325 continuum dominated DCs, 397 metal polluted white dwarfs, 450 helium dominated white dwarfs, 636 subdwarfs and 6796 new hydrogen dominated white dwarf stars.

  9. Exposing Whiteness in Higher Education: White Male College Students Minimizing Racism, Claiming Victimization, and Recreating White Supremacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Nolan León

    2014-01-01

    This research critically examines racial views and experiences of 12 white men in a single higher education institution via semi-structured interviews. Participants tended to utilize individualized definitions of racism and experience high levels of racial segregation in both their pre-college and college environments. This corresponded to…

  10. On describing human white matter anatomy: the white matter query language.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Demian; Makris, Nikos; Rathi, Yogesh; Shenton, Martha; Kikinis, Ron; Kubicki, Marek; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    The main contribution of this work is the careful syntactical definition of major white matter tracts in the human brain based on a neuroanatomist's expert knowledge. We present a technique to formally describe white matter tracts and to automatically extract them from diffusion MRI data. The framework is based on a novel query language with a near-to-English textual syntax. This query language allows us to construct a dictionary of anatomical definitions describing white matter tracts. The definitions include adjacent gray and white matter regions, and rules for spatial relations. This enables automated coherent labeling of white matter anatomy across subjects. We use our method to encode anatomical knowledge in human white matter describing 10 association and 8 projection tracts per hemisphere and 7 commissural tracts. The technique is shown to be comparable in accuracy to manual labeling. We present results applying this framework to create a white matter atlas from 77 healthy subjects, and we use this atlas in a proof-of-concept study to detect tract changes specific to schizophrenia. PMID:24505722

  11. THE LINK BETWEEN PLANETARY SYSTEMS, DUSTY WHITE DWARFS, AND METAL-POLLUTED WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Walsh, Kevin J.; Stark, Christopher

    2012-03-10

    It has long been suspected that metal-polluted white dwarfs (types DAZ, DBZ, and DZ) and white dwarfs with dusty disks possess planetary systems, but a specific physical mechanism by which planetesimals are perturbed close to a white dwarf has not yet been fully posited. In this paper, we demonstrate that mass loss from a central star during post-main-sequence evolution can sweep planetesimals into interior mean motion resonances with a single giant planet. These planetesimals are slowly removed through chaotic excursions of eccentricity that in time create radial orbits capable of tidally disrupting the planetesimal. Numerical N-body simulations of the solar system show that a sufficient number of planetesimals are perturbed to explain white dwarfs with both dust and metal pollution, provided other white dwarfs have more massive relic asteroid belts. Our scenario requires only one Jupiter-sized planet and a sufficient number of asteroids near its 2:1 interior mean motion resonance. Finally, we show that once a planetesimal is perturbed into a tidal crossing orbit, it will become disrupted after the first pass of the white dwarf, where a highly eccentric stream of debris forms the main reservoir for dust-producing collisions. These simulations, in concert with observations of white dwarfs, place interesting limits on the frequency of planetary systems around main-sequence stars, the frequency of planetesimal belts, and the probability that dust may obscure future terrestrial planet finding missions.

  12. Mystery of a Dimming White Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    In the wake of the recent media attention over an enigmatic, dimming star, another intriguing object has been discovered: J1529+2928, a white dwarf that periodically dims. This mystery, however, may have a simple solution with interesting consequences for future surveys of white dwarfs.Unexpected VariabilityJ1529+2928 is an isolated white dwarf that appears to have a mass of slightly more than the Sun. But rather than radiating steadily, J1529+2928 dims once every 38 minutes almost as though it were being eclipsed.The team that discovered these variations, led by Mukremin Kilic (University of Oklahoma), used telescopes at the Apache Point Observatory and the McDonald Observatory to obtain follow-up photometric data of J1529+2928 spread across 66 days. The team also took spectra of the white dwarf with the Gemini North telescope.Kilic and collaborators then began, one by one, to rule out possible causes of this objects variability.Eliminating OptionsThe period of the variability is too long for J1529+2928 to be a pulsating white dwarf with luminosity variation caused by gravity-wave pulsations.The variability cant be due to an eclipse by a stellar or brown-dwarf companion, because there isnt any variation in J1529+2928s radial velocity.Its not due to the orbit of a solid-body planetary object; such a transit would be too short to explain observations.It cant be due to the orbit of a disintegrated planet; this wouldnt explain the light curves observed in different filters plus the light curve doesnt change over the 66-day span.Spotty SurfaceTop and middle two panels: light curves from three different nights observing J1529+2928s periodic dimming. Bottom panel: The Fourier transform shows a peak at 37.7 cycles/day (and another, smaller peak at its first harmonic). [Kilic et al. 2015]So what explanation is left? The authors suggest that J1529+2928s variability is likely caused by a starspot on the white dwarfs surface that rotates into and out of our view. Estimates

  13. Purification and Characterization of Melanogenic Enzyme Tyrosinase from Button Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ayesha S.; Ali, Sharique A.

    2014-01-01

    Melanogenesis is a biosynthetic pathway for the formation of the pigment melanin in human skin. A key enzyme, tyrosinase, catalyzes the first and only rate-limiting steps in melanogenesis. Since the discovery of its melanogenic properties, tyrosinase has been in prime focus and microbial sources of the enzyme are sought. Agaricus bisporus widely known as the common edible mushroom, it's taking place in high amounts of proteins, enzyme, carbohydrates, fibers, and low fat contents are frequently cited in the literature in relation to their nutritional value. In the present study tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis followed by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100, and ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Cellulose; the enzyme was purified, 16.36-fold to give 26.6% yield on total activity in the crude extract and final specific activity of 52.19 U/mg. The SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed a migrating protein band molecular weight of 95 kDa. The purified tyrosinase was optimized and the results revealed that the optimum values are pH 7.0 and temperature 35°C. The highest activity was reported towards its natural substrate, L-DOPA, with an apparent Km value of 0.933 mM. This indicated that tyrosinase purified from Agaricus bisporus is a potential source for medical applications. PMID:25197562

  14. Kootenai River White Sturgeon Investigations; White Sturgeon Spawning and Recruitment Evaluation, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, Pete; Wakkinen, Virginia

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the environmental requirements for successful spawning and recruitment of the Kootenai River white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus population. Annual tasks include monitoring and evaluating the various life stages of Kootenai River white sturgeon. Sampling for adult Kootenai River white sturgeon in 2003 began in March and continued through April. Eighty-one adult white sturgeon were captured with 3,576 hours of angling and set-lining effort in the Kootenai River. Discharge from Libby Dam and river stage at Bonners Ferry in 2003 peaked in May and early June. Flows remained above 500 m{sup 3}/s throughout June, decreased rapidly through mid July, and increased back to near 500 m{sup 3}/s after mid July and through mid August. By late August, flows had decreased to below 400 m{sup 3}/s. We monitored the movements of 24 adult sturgeon in Kootenay Lake, British Columbia (BC) and the Kootenai River from March 15, 2003 to August 31, 2003. Some of the fish were radio or sonic tagged in previous years. Twelve adult white sturgeon were moved upstream to the Hemlock Bar reach (rkm 260.0) and released as part of the Set and Jet Program. Transmitters were attached to seven of these fish, and their movements were monitored from the time of release until they moved downstream of Bonners Ferry. Eight additional radio-tagged white sturgeon adults were located in the traditional spawning reach (rkm 228-240) during May and June. Sampling with artificial substrate mats began May 21, 2003 and ended June 30, 2003. We sampled 717 mat d (a mat d is one 24 h set) during white sturgeon spawning. Three white sturgeon eggs were collected near Shortys Island on June 3, 2003, and five eggs were collected from the Hemlock Bar reach on June 5, 2003. Prejuvenile sampling began June 17, 2003 and continued until July 31, 2003. Sampling occurred primarily at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.0) in an attempt to document any recruitment that might have occurred from

  15. Unpacking the CRT in Negotiating White Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Eileen R. Carlton; Rhodes, Billye; Brown, Corliss

    2011-12-01

    In this forum, we summarize CRT's origins, tenets common to most CRT writings, and CRT's evolution. We discuss Yerrick's article Negotiating White Science with respect to certain CRT premises. Specifically, we use the CRT tenet of racism as emphasized in first- and second-generation CRT and CRT elements liberal racial ideology and voices of color to critically examine Yerrick's propositions.

  16. "White Privilege": A Shield against Reason

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author takes a stand against the unthinking evocation of so-called white privilege he found on campus and among his students at California State University, Chico, and argues for the reinstatement of true diversity--intellectual diversity. He says people in the academia should be clear in the classroom, on committees, in…

  17. NUCLEAR CONDENSATE AND HELIUM WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Bedaque, Paulo F.; Berkowitz, Evan; Cherman, Aleksey E-mail: evanb@umd.edu

    2012-04-10

    We consider a high-density region of the helium phase diagram, where the nuclei form a Bose-Einstein condensate rather than a classical plasma or a crystal. Helium in this phase may be present in helium-core white dwarfs. We show that in this regime there is a new gapless quasiparticle not previously noticed, arising when the constraints imposed by gauge symmetry are taken into account. The contribution of this quasiparticle to the specific heat of a white dwarf core turns out to be comparable in a range of temperatures to the contribution from the particle-hole excitations of the degenerate electrons. The specific heat in the condensed phase is two orders of magnitude smaller than in the uncondensed plasma phase, which is the ground state at higher temperatures, and four orders of magnitude smaller than the specific heat that an ion lattice would provide, if formed. Since the specific heat of the core is an important input for setting the rate of cooling of a white dwarf star, it may turn out that such a change in the thermal properties of the cores of helium white dwarfs has observable implications.

  18. Southern White English: The Changing Verb Phrase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feagin, Louise Crawford

    In a sociolinguistic study of the verb phrase in Southern White English, a pattern of change in progress was observed. The 14 variables studied showed that certain variants were increasing, others decreasing, and yet others stable across time within the community, and that each variable's change was progressing in a wave sensitive to age, social…

  19. The Mississippi Chinese: Between Black and White.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewen, James W.

    Society in the Delta region of Mississippi is still rigidly segregated. A vast social and economic gulf yawns between the dominant white and subordinate black. Yet one group in Mississippi, a "third race," the Chinese, has managed to leap that chasm. This book focuses on the causes of their changes in status, the processes by which it came about,…

  20. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.