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Sample records for agarose hydrogel particles

  1. Thermoresponsive chitosan-agarose hydrogel for skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Sónia P; Ribeiro, Maximiano P; Brancal, Hugo; Coutinho, Paula; Correia, Ilídio J

    2014-10-13

    Healing enhancement and pain control are critical issues on wound management. So far, different wound dressings have been developed. Among them, hydrogels are the most applied. Herein, a thermoresponsive hydrogel was produced using chitosan (deacetylation degree 95%) and agarose. Hydrogel bactericidal activity, biocompatibility, morphology, porosity and wettability were characterized by confocal microscopy, MTS assay and SEM. The performance of the hydrogel in the wound healing process was evaluated through in vivo assays, during 21 days. The attained results revealed that hydrogel has a pore size (90-400 μm) compatible with cellular internalization and proliferation. A bactericidal activity was observed for hydrogels containing more than 188 μg/mL of chitosan. The improved healing and the lack of a reactive or a granulomatous inflammatory reaction in skin lesions treated with hydrogel demonstrate its suitability to be used in a near future as a wound dressing. PMID:25037363

  2. Optical investigation of diffusion of levofloxacin mesylate in agarose hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shuaixia; Dai, Hongjun; Wu, Juejie; Zhao, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xu, Jian

    2009-09-01

    Real-time electronic speckle pattern interferometry method has been applied to study the diffusion behavior of levofloxacin mesylate (MSALVFX) in agarose hydrogel. The results show that the diffusivity of solute decreases with the increase of concentration of agarose and adapts to Kohlrausch's law. Furthermore, Amsden's model, based on the retardance effect associated with polymer chain flexibility, was employed to simulate the diffusion behavior. The consistent results suggest that the retardance effect dominates the diffusion process of MSALFVX in hydrogel; moreover, polymer chain flexibility greatly affects drug transport within the polymer matrix.

  3. Rheological study of reinforcement of agarose hydrogels by cellulose nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Kevin J; Gaillard, Cedric; Helbert, William; Garnier, Catherine; Aubry, Thierry

    2015-02-13

    The influence of the addition of tunicate cellulose nanowhiskers on the structural and rheological properties of an agarose hydrogel matrix has been studied, with the objective to design innovative green material, with good mechanical properties. The cellulose nanowhiskers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, and their charge surface density was determined by a titration method. Oscillatory shear and stress relaxation tests were performed in order to characterize the rheological properties of the agarose matrix, and of the agarose hydrogels filled by nanowhiskers at volume fractions below 0.2%. The results show a significant reinforcement effect due to the addition of nanowhiskers, and suggest changes in the matrix network structure induced by the cellulose nanoparticles. PMID:25458280

  4. Porous Agarose-Based Semi-IPN Hydrogels: Characterization and Cell Affinity Studies.

    PubMed

    Vardar, E; Vert, Michel; Coudane, Jean; Hasirci, V; Hasirci, N

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels are frequently considered for medical applications due to the ease of preparation in different forms and high water content that makes them comparable to natural tissues. However, these general properties are not sufficient to make any hydrogel suitable for cell attachment and growth which are necessary for their use in tissue regeneration. Besides, the high water content makes the hydrogels mechanically weak. The formation of semi-interpenetrating networks (semi-IPNs) can be used in attempts to enhance physical, mechanical and thermal properties. In this study, semi-IPNs of agarose were prepared with chitosan and alginate, two polyelectrolytes that are positively and negatively charged under physiological conditions, respectively. Zeta potential was used to confirm the formation of charged hydrogels. All hydrogels had ultimate compression strengths in the range of 91-210 Pa where the value for pure agarose was about 103 Pa. Chitosan increased the compressive strength about two folds whereas the alginate had opposite effects. The amount of strongly bound water present in the hydrogels were estimated from TGA and DSC analysis and the highest value was found for alginate-agarose hydrogels as about 15%. The attachment and the migration of L929 fibroblasts were monitored in vitro using the MTS assay and confocal microscopy. The highest cell proliferation and penetration were observed for positively charged chitosan-agarose semi-IPN hydrogels.

  5. Fabrication of Self-Healable and Patternable Polypyrrole/Agarose Hybrid Hydrogels for Smart Bioelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Park, Nokyoung; Chae, Seung Chul; Kim, Il Tae; Hur, Jaehyun

    2016-02-01

    We present a new class of electrically conductive, mechanically moldable, and thermally self-healable hybrid hydrogels. The hybrid gels consist of polypyrrole and agarose as the conductive component and self-healable matrix, respectively. By using the appropriate oxidizing agent under conditions of mild temperature, the polymerization of pyrrole occurred along the three-dimensional network of the agarose hydrogel matrix. In contrast to most commercially available hydrogels, the physical crosslinking of agarose gel allows for reversible gelation in the case of our hybrid gel, which could be manipulated by temperature variation, which controls the electrical on/off behavior of the hybrid gel electrode. Exploiting this property, we fabricated a hybrid conductive hydrogel electrode which also self-heals thermally. The novel composite material we report here will be useful for many technological and biological applications, especially in reactive biomimetic functions and devices, artificial muscles, smart membranes, smart full organic batteries, and artificial chemical synapses. PMID:27433594

  6. Fenugreek hydrogel-agarose composite entrapped gold nanoparticles for acetylcholinesterase based biosensor for carbamates detection.

    PubMed

    Kestwal, Rakesh Mohan; Bagal-Kestwal, Dipali; Chiang, Been-Huang

    2015-07-30

    A biosensor was fabricated to detect pesticides in food samples. Acetylcholinesterase was immobilized in a novel fenugreek hydrogel-agarose matrix with gold nanoparticles. Transparent thin films with superior mechanical strength and stability were obtained with 2% fenugreek hydrogel and 2% agarose. Immobilization of acetylcholinesterase on the membrane resulted in high enzyme retention efficiency (92%) and a significantly prolonged shelf life of the enzyme (half-life, 55 days). Transmission electron microscopy revealed that, gold nanoparticles (10-20 nm in diameter) were uniformly dispersed in the fenugreek hydrogel-agarose-acetylcholinesterase membrane. This immobilized enzyme-gold nanoparticle dip-strip system detected various carbamates, including carbofuran, oxamyl, methomyl, and carbaryl, with limits of detection of 2, 21, 113, and 236 nM (S/N = 3), respectively. Furthermore, the fabricated biosensor exhibited good testing capabilities when used to detect carbamates added to various fruit and vegetable samples. PMID:26320646

  7. Fenugreek hydrogel-agarose composite entrapped gold nanoparticles for acetylcholinesterase based biosensor for carbamates detection.

    PubMed

    Kestwal, Rakesh Mohan; Bagal-Kestwal, Dipali; Chiang, Been-Huang

    2015-07-30

    A biosensor was fabricated to detect pesticides in food samples. Acetylcholinesterase was immobilized in a novel fenugreek hydrogel-agarose matrix with gold nanoparticles. Transparent thin films with superior mechanical strength and stability were obtained with 2% fenugreek hydrogel and 2% agarose. Immobilization of acetylcholinesterase on the membrane resulted in high enzyme retention efficiency (92%) and a significantly prolonged shelf life of the enzyme (half-life, 55 days). Transmission electron microscopy revealed that, gold nanoparticles (10-20 nm in diameter) were uniformly dispersed in the fenugreek hydrogel-agarose-acetylcholinesterase membrane. This immobilized enzyme-gold nanoparticle dip-strip system detected various carbamates, including carbofuran, oxamyl, methomyl, and carbaryl, with limits of detection of 2, 21, 113, and 236 nM (S/N = 3), respectively. Furthermore, the fabricated biosensor exhibited good testing capabilities when used to detect carbamates added to various fruit and vegetable samples.

  8. Potential of Agarose/Silk Fibroin Blended Hydrogel for in Vitro Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yogendra Pratap; Bhardwaj, Nandana; Mandal, Biman B

    2016-08-24

    An osteoarthritis pandemic has accelerated exploration of various biomaterials for cartilage reconstruction with a special emphasis on silk fibroin from mulberry (Bombyx mori) and non-mulberry (Antheraea assamensis) silk worms. Retention of positive attributes of the agarose standard and nullification of its negatives are central to the current agarose/silk fibroin hydrogel design. In this study, hydrogels of mulberry and non-mulberry silk fibroin blended with agarose were fabricated and evaluated in vitro for two weeks for cartilaginous tissue formation. The fabricated hydrogels were physicochemically characterized and analyzed for cell viability, proliferation, and extra cellular matrix deposition. The amalgamation of silk fibroin with agarose impacted the pore size, as illustrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy studies, swelling behavior, and in vitro degradation of the hydrogels. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicated the blend formation and confirmed the presence of both components in the fabricated hydrogels. Rheological studies demonstrated enhanced elasticity of blended hydrogels with G' > G″. Biochemical analysis revealed significantly higher levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) and collagen (p ≤ 0.01) in blended hydrogels. More specifically, the non-mulberry silk fibroin blend showed sGAG and collagen content (∼1.5-fold) higher than that of the mulberry blend (p ≤ 0.05). Histological and immunohistochemical analyses further validated the enhanced deposition of sGAG and collagen, indicating maintenance of chondrogenic phenotype within constructs after two weeks of culture. Real-time PCR analysis further confirmed up-regulation of cartilage-specific aggrecan, sox-9 (∼1.5-fold) and collagen type II (∼2-fold) marker genes (p ≤ 0.01) in blended hydrogels. The hydrogels demonstrated immunocompatibility, which was evidenced by minimal in vitro secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by murine

  9. Oxidized dextrins as alternative crosslinking agents for polysaccharides: application to hydrogels of agarose-chitosan.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mascaraque, Laura G; Méndez, José Alberto; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; Vázquez, Blanca; San Román, Julio

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogel networks that combine suitable physical and biomechanical characteristics for tissue engineering scaffolds are in demand. The aim of this work was the development of hydrogel networks based on agarose and chitosan using oxidized dextrins as low cytotoxicity crosslinking agents, paying special attention to the study of the influence of the polysaccharide composition and oxidation degree of the dextrins in the final characteristics of the network. The results show that the formation of an interpenetrating or a semi-interpenetrating polymer network was mainly dependent on a minimum agarose content and degree of oxidation of dextrin. Spectroscopic, thermal and swelling analysis revealed good compatibility with an absence of phase separation of polysaccharides at agarose:chitosan proportions of 50:50 and 25:75. The analysis of atomic force microscopy images showed the formation of a fibrillar microstructure whose distribution within the crosslinked chitosan depended mainly on the crosslinker. All materials exhibited the viscoelastic behaviour typical of gels, with a constant storage modulus independent of frequency for all compositions. The stiffness was strongly influenced by the degree of oxidation of the crosslinker. Cellular response to the hydrogels was studied with cells of different strains, and cell adhesion and proliferation was correlated with the homogeneity of the samples and their elastic properties. Some hydrogel formulations seemed to be candidates for tissue engineering applications such as wound healing or soft tissue regeneration.

  10. Hierarchically Designed Agarose and Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Interpenetrating Network Hydrogels for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    DeKosky, Brandon J.; Dormer, Nathan H.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Roatch, Christopher H.; Lomakin, Joseph; Detamore, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    A new method for encapsulating cells in interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels of superior mechanical integrity was developed. In this study, two biocompatible materials—agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) diacrylate—were combined to create a new IPN hydrogel with greatly enhanced mechanical performance. Unconfined compression of hydrogel samples revealed that the IPN displayed a fourfold increase in shear modulus relative to a pure PEG-diacrylate network (39.9 vs. 9.9 kPa) and a 4.9-fold increase relative to a pure agarose network (8.2 kPa). PEG and IPN compressive failure strains were found to be 71% ± 17% and 74% ± 17%, respectively, while pure agarose gels failed around 15% strain. Similar mechanical property improvements were seen when IPNs-encapsulated chondrocytes, and LIVE/DEAD cell viability assays demonstrated that cells survived the IPN encapsulation process. The majority of IPN-encapsulated chondrocytes remained viable 1 week postencapsulation, and chondrocytes exhibited glycosaminoglycan synthesis comparable to that of agarose-encapsulated chondrocytes at 3 weeks postencapsulation. The introduction of a new method for encapsulating cells in a hydrogel with enhanced mechanical performance is a promising step toward cartilage defect repair. This method can be applied to fabricate a broad variety of cell-based IPNs by varying monomers and polymers in type and concentration and by adding functional groups such as degradable sequences or cell adhesion groups. Further, this technology may be applicable in other cell-based applications where mechanical integrity of cell-containing hydrogels is of great importance. PMID:20626274

  11. Rheological and mechanical behavior of polyacrylamide hydrogels chemically crosslinked with allyl agarose for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Suriano, R; Griffini, G; Chiari, M; Levi, M; Turri, S

    2014-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis currently represents one of the most standard techniques for protein separation. In addition to the most commonly employed polyacrylamide crosslinked hydrogels, acrylamide-agarose copolymers have been proposed as promising systems for separation matrices in 2-D electrophoresis, because of the good resolution of both high and low molecular mass proteins made possible by careful control and optimization of the hydrogel pore structure. As a matter of fact, a thorough understanding of the nature of the hydrogel pore structure as well as of the parameters by which it is influenced is crucial for the design of hydrogel systems with optimal sieving properties. In this work, a series of acrylamide-based hydrogels covalently crosslinked with different concentrations of allyl agarose (0.2-1%) is prepared and characterized by creep-recovery measurements, dynamic rheology and tensile tests, in the attempt to gain a clearer understanding of structure-property relationships in crosslinked polyacrylamide-based hydrogels. The rheological and mechanical properties of crosslinked acrylamide-agarose hydrogels are found to be greatly affected by crosslinker concentration. Dynamic rheological tests show that hydrogels with a percentage of allyl agarose between 0.2% and 0.6% have a low density of elastically effective crosslinks, explaining the good separation of high molecular mass proteins in 2-D gel electrophoresis. Over the same range of crosslinker concentration, creep-recovery measurements reveal the presence of non-permanent crosslinks in the hydrogel network that justifies the good resolution of low molecular mass proteins as well. In tensile tests, the hydrogel crosslinked with 0.4% of allyl agarose exhibits the best results in terms of mechanical strength and toughness. Our results show how the control of the viscoelastic and the mechanical properties of these materials allow the design of mechanically stable hydrogels with improved

  12. Rheological and mechanical behavior of polyacrylamide hydrogels chemically crosslinked with allyl agarose for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Suriano, R; Griffini, G; Chiari, M; Levi, M; Turri, S

    2014-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis currently represents one of the most standard techniques for protein separation. In addition to the most commonly employed polyacrylamide crosslinked hydrogels, acrylamide-agarose copolymers have been proposed as promising systems for separation matrices in 2-D electrophoresis, because of the good resolution of both high and low molecular mass proteins made possible by careful control and optimization of the hydrogel pore structure. As a matter of fact, a thorough understanding of the nature of the hydrogel pore structure as well as of the parameters by which it is influenced is crucial for the design of hydrogel systems with optimal sieving properties. In this work, a series of acrylamide-based hydrogels covalently crosslinked with different concentrations of allyl agarose (0.2-1%) is prepared and characterized by creep-recovery measurements, dynamic rheology and tensile tests, in the attempt to gain a clearer understanding of structure-property relationships in crosslinked polyacrylamide-based hydrogels. The rheological and mechanical properties of crosslinked acrylamide-agarose hydrogels are found to be greatly affected by crosslinker concentration. Dynamic rheological tests show that hydrogels with a percentage of allyl agarose between 0.2% and 0.6% have a low density of elastically effective crosslinks, explaining the good separation of high molecular mass proteins in 2-D gel electrophoresis. Over the same range of crosslinker concentration, creep-recovery measurements reveal the presence of non-permanent crosslinks in the hydrogel network that justifies the good resolution of low molecular mass proteins as well. In tensile tests, the hydrogel crosslinked with 0.4% of allyl agarose exhibits the best results in terms of mechanical strength and toughness. Our results show how the control of the viscoelastic and the mechanical properties of these materials allow the design of mechanically stable hydrogels with improved

  13. In vivo bioengineered ovarian tumors based on collagen, matrigel, alginate and agarose hydrogels: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Hu, Xuefeng; Huang, Yuanjie; Xu, Guojie; Yang, Jinsong; Li, Li

    2015-01-29

    Scaffold-based tumor engineering is rapidly evolving the study of cancer progression. However, the effects of scaffolds and environment on tumor formation have seldom been investigated. In this study, four types of injectable hydrogels, namely, collagen type I, Matrigel, alginate and agarose gels, were loaded with human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells and then injected into nude mice subcutaneously. The growth of the tumors in vitro was also investigated. After four weeks, the specimens were harvested and analyzed. We found that tumor formation by SKOV3 cells was best supported by collagen, followed by Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose in vivo. The collagen I group exhibited a larger tumor volume with increased neovascularization and increased necrosis compared with the other materials. Further, increased MMP activity, upregulated expression of laminin and fibronectin and higher levels of HIF-1α and VEGF-A in the collagen group revealed that the engineered tumor is closer to human ovarian carcinoma. In order, collagen, Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose exhibited decreases in tumor formation. All evidence indicated that the in vivo engineered tumor is scaffold-dependent. Bioactive hydrogels are superior to inert hydrogels at promoting tumor regeneration. In particular, biomimetic hydrogels are advantageous because they provide a microenvironment that mimics the ECM of natural tumors. On the other hand, typical features of cancer cells and the expression of genes related to cancer malignancy were far less similar to the natural tumor in vitro, which indicated the importance of culture environment in vivo. Superior to the in vitro culture, nude mice can be considered satisfactory in vivo 'bioreactors' for the screening of favorable cell vehicles for tumor engineering in vitro.

  14. Carbon dots rooted agarose hydrogel hybrid platform for optical detection and separation of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Neelam; Barooah, Mayuri; Majumdar, Gitanjali; Chowdhury, Devasish

    2015-02-11

    A robust solid sensing platform for an on-site operational and accurate detection of heavy metal is still a challenge. We introduce chitosan based carbon dots rooted agarose hydrogel film as a hybrid solid sensing platform for detection of heavy metal ions. The fabrication of the solid sensing platform is centered on simple electrostatic interaction between the NH3+ group present in the carbon dots and the OH- groups present in agarose. Simply on dipping the hydrogel film strip into the heavy metal ion solution, in particular Cr6+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Pb2+, Mn2+, the strip displays a color change, viz., Cr6+→yellow, Cu2+→blue, Fe3+→brown, Pb2+→white, Mn2+→tan brown. The optical detection limit of the respective metal ion is found to be 1 pM for Cr6+, 0.5 μM for Cu2+, and 0.5 nM for Fe3+, Pb2+, and Mn2+ by studying the changes in UV-visible reflectance spectrum of the hydrogel film. Moreover, the hydrogel film finds applicability as an efficient filtration membrane for separation of these quintet heavy metal ions. The strategic fundamental feature of this sensing platform is the successful capability of chitosan to form colored chelates with transition metals. This proficient hybrid hydrogel solid sensing platform is thus the most suitable to employ as an on-site operational, portable, cheap colorimetric-optical detector of heavy metal ion with potential skill in their separation. Details of the possible mechanistic insight into the colorimetric detection and ion separation are also discussed.

  15. Combination of fibrin-agarose hydrogels and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriel, Víctor; Garrido-Gómez, Juan; Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Garzón, Ingrid; García-García, Salomé; Sáez-Moreno, José Antonio; Sánchez-Quevedo, María del Carmen; Campos, Antonio; Alaminos, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Objective. The objective was to study the effectiveness of a commercially available collagen conduit filled with fibrin-agarose hydrogels alone or with fibrin-agarose hydrogels containing autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Approach. A 10 mm gap was created in the sciatic nerve of 48 rats and repaired using saline-filled collagen conduits or collagen conduits filled with fibrin-agarose hydrogels alone (acellular conduits) or with hydrogels containing ADMSCs (ADMSC conduits). Nerve regeneration was assessed in clinical, electrophysiological and histological studies. Main results. Clinical and electrophysiological outcomes were more favorable with ADMSC conduits than with the acellular or saline conduits, evidencing a significant recovery of sensory and motor functions. Histological analysis showed that ADMSC conduits produce more effective nerve regeneration by Schwann cells, with higher remyelination and properly oriented axonal growth that reached the distal areas of the grafted conduits, and with intensely positive expressions of S100, neurofilament and laminin. Extracellular matrix was also more abundant and better organized around regenerated nerve tissues with ADMSC conduits than those with acellular or saline conduits. Significance. Clinical, electrophysiological and histological improvements obtained with tissue-engineered ADMSC conduits may contribute to enhancing axonal regeneration by Schwann cells.

  16. Tuning mechanical performance of poly(ethylene glycol) and agarose interpenetrating network hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rennerfeldt, Deena A; Renth, Amanda N; Talata, Zsolt; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogels are attractive for tissue engineering applications due to their incredible versatility, but they can be limited in cartilage tissue engineering applications due to inadequate mechanical performance. In an effort to address this limitation, our team previously reported the drastic improvement in the mechanical performance of interpenetrating networks (IPNs) of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) and agarose relative to pure PEG-DA and agarose networks. The goal of the current study was specifically to determine the relative importance of PEG-DA concentration, agarose concentration, and PEG-DA molecular weight in controlling mechanical performance, swelling characteristics, and network parameters. IPNs consistently had compressive and shear moduli greater than the additive sum of either single network when compared to pure PEG-DA gels with a similar PEG-DA content. IPNs withstood a maximum stress of up to 4.0 MPa in unconfined compression, with increased PEG-DA molecular weight being the greatest contributing factor to improved failure properties. However, aside from failure properties, PEG-DA concentration was the most influential factor for the large majority of properties. Increasing the agarose and PEG-DA concentrations as well as the PEG-DA molecular weight of agarose/PEG-DA IPNs and pure PEG-DA gels improved moduli and maximum stresses by as much as an order of magnitude or greater compared to pure PEG-DA gels in our previous studies. Although the viability of encapsulated chondrocytes was not significantly affected by IPN formulation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content was significantly influenced, with a 12-fold increase over a three-week period in gels with a lower PEG-DA concentration. These results suggest that mechanical performance of IPNs may be tuned with partial but not complete independence from biological performance of encapsulated cells.

  17. Culture phases, cytotoxicity and protein expressions of agarose hydrogel induced Sp2/0, A549, MCF-7 cell line 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Maddaly; Kaviya, S R; Paramesh, V

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in cell cultures are occurring at a rapid pace, an important direction is culturing cells in 3D conditions. We demonstrate the usefulness of agarose hydrogels in obtaining 3 dimensional aggregates of three cell lines, A549, MCF-7 and Sp2/0. The differences in culture phases, susceptibility to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity are studied. Also, the 3D aggregates of the three cell lines were reverted into 2D cultures and the protein profile differences among the 2D, 3D and revert cultures were studied. The analysis of protein profile differences using UniProt data base further augment the usefulness of agarose hydrogels for obtaining 3D cell cultures.

  18. Using chondroitin sulfate to improve the viability and biosynthesis of chondrocytes encapsulated in interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels of agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Dormer, Nathan H; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    We recently introduced agarose-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels to cartilage tissue engineering that were able to encapsulate viable cells and provide a significant improvement in mechanical performance relative to its two constituent hydrogels. The goal of the current study was to develop a novel synthesis protocol to incorporate methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (MCS) into the IPN design hypothesized to improve cell viability and biosynthesis. The IPN was formed by encapsulating porcine chondrocytes in agarose, soaking the construct in a solution of 1:10 MCS:PEGDA, which was then photopolymerized to form a copolymer network as the second network. The IPN with incorporated CS (CS-IPN) (~0.5 wt%) resulted in a 4- to 5-fold increase in the compressive elastic modulus relative to either the PEGDA or agarose gels. After 6 weeks of in vitro culture, more than 50% of the encapsulated chondrocytes remained viable within the CS-modified IPN, in contrast to 35% viability observed in the unmodified. At week 6, the CS-IPN had significantly higher normalized GAG contents (347 ± 34 μg/μg) than unmodified IPNs (158 ± 27 μg/μg, P < 0.05). Overall, the approach of incorporating biopolymers such as CS from native tissue may provide favorable micro-environment and beneficial signals to cells to enhance their overall performance in IPNs. PMID:22116661

  19. Using chondroitin sulfate to improve the viability and biosynthesis of chondrocytes encapsulated in interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels of agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Dormer, Nathan H.; Gehrke, Stevin H.

    2013-01-01

    We recently introduced agarose-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels to cartilage tissue engineering that were able to encapsulate viable cells and provide a significant improvement in mechanical performance relative to its two constituent hydrogels. The goal of the current study was to develop a novel synthesis protocol to incorporate methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (MCS) into the IPN design hypothesized to improve cell viability and biosynthesis. The IPN was formed by encapsulating porcine chondrocytes in agarose, soaking the construct in a solution of 1:10 MCS:PEGDA, which was then photopolymerized to form a copolymer network as the second network. The IPN with incorporated CS (CS-IPN) (~0.5 wt%) resulted in a 4- to 5-fold increase in the compressive elastic modulus relative to either the PEGDA or agarose gels. After 6 weeks of in vitro culture, more than 50% of the encapsulated chondrocytes remained viable within the CS-modified IPN, in contrast to 35% viability observed in the unmodified. At week 6, the CS-IPN had significantly higher normalized GAG contents (347 ± 34 µg/µg) than unmodified IPNs (158 ± 27 µg/µg, P < 0.05). Overall, the approach of incorporating biopolymers such as CS from native tissue may provide favorable micro-environment and beneficial signals to cells to enhance their overall performance in IPNs. PMID:22116661

  20. Particle transport through hydrogels is charge asymmetric.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Hansing, Johann; Netz, Roland R; DeRouchey, Jason E

    2015-02-01

    Transport processes within biological polymer networks, including mucus and the extracellular matrix, play an important role in the human body, where they serve as a filter for the exchange of molecules and nanoparticles. Such polymer networks are complex and heterogeneous hydrogel environments that regulate diffusive processes through finely tuned particle-network interactions. In this work, we present experimental and theoretical studies to examine the role of electrostatics on the basic mechanisms governing the diffusion of charged probe molecules inside model polymer networks. Translational diffusion coefficients are determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements for probe molecules in uncharged as well as cationic and anionic polymer solutions. We show that particle transport in the charged hydrogels is highly asymmetric, with diffusion slowed down much more by electrostatic attraction than by repulsion, and that the filtering capability of the gel is sensitive to the solution ionic strength. Brownian dynamics simulations of a simple model are used to examine key parameters, including interaction strength and interaction range within the model networks. Simulations, which are in quantitative agreement with our experiments, reveal the charge asymmetry to be due to the sticking of particles at the vertices of the oppositely charged polymer networks.

  1. Particle Transport through Hydrogels Is Charge Asymmetric

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Hansing, Johann; Netz, Roland R.; DeRouchey, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Transport processes within biological polymer networks, including mucus and the extracellular matrix, play an important role in the human body, where they serve as a filter for the exchange of molecules and nanoparticles. Such polymer networks are complex and heterogeneous hydrogel environments that regulate diffusive processes through finely tuned particle-network interactions. In this work, we present experimental and theoretical studies to examine the role of electrostatics on the basic mechanisms governing the diffusion of charged probe molecules inside model polymer networks. Translational diffusion coefficients are determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements for probe molecules in uncharged as well as cationic and anionic polymer solutions. We show that particle transport in the charged hydrogels is highly asymmetric, with diffusion slowed down much more by electrostatic attraction than by repulsion, and that the filtering capability of the gel is sensitive to the solution ionic strength. Brownian dynamics simulations of a simple model are used to examine key parameters, including interaction strength and interaction range within the model networks. Simulations, which are in quantitative agreement with our experiments, reveal the charge asymmetry to be due to the sticking of particles at the vertices of the oppositely charged polymer networks. PMID:25650921

  2. Preparation and characterization of agarose-nickel nanoporous composite particles customized for liquid expanded bed adsorption.

    PubMed

    Asghari, F; Jahanshahi, M; Ghoreyshi, A A

    2012-06-15

    Agarose-nickel nanoporous composite matrices with a series of densities, named Ag-Ni, were prepared herein for expanded bed adsorption of nanobioproduct/bioproduct by a water-in-oil emulsification method. The optical microscope (OM), scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and particle size analyzer (PSA) were utilized in order to characterize the structure and morphology of the agarose-nickel composite. The results indicated that the matrices prepared had a spherical appearance, appropriate wet density of 1.73-2.56 g/ml, water content of 32.2-58.5% and porosity of 79.4-96.37% and pore size of about 100-150 nm. All the Ag-Ni beads follow logarithmic normal size distribution with the range of 60-230 μm and average diameter of 133.68-148.4 μm. One of the useful properties of the Ag-Ni particles is the high wet density up to 2.56 g/ml, which shows a potential for the operation in an expanded bed at high flow rate. The impact of nickel powder addition on the physical and hydrodynamic properties was also investigated. In addition, the fluidization behavior of the Ag-Ni particles under various conditions was characterized by the measurement of bed expansion and axial dispersion coefficients for the liquid phase when operated in a standard fluidized bed contactor. It was observed that the expansion factors were decreased with the increasing matrix density under the same velocity. The bed expansion and fluid velocity were correlated with Richardson-Zaki equation for all particles prepared and the correlation parameters (the terminal settling velocity U(t) and expansion index n) were investigated. Using measurements of residence time distributions, hydrodynamic properties in the expanded beds were investigated and were compared with reported matrices in other literatures. In addition, the impact of the flow velocity, bed expansion degree and density of adsorbent on hydrodynamic properties in the expanded beds were investigated. The results indicated that the expansion factor

  3. Manufacturing of agarose-based chromatographic adsorbents--effect of ionic strength and cooling conditions on particle structure and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Nicolas; Bowen, James; Pacek, Andrzej; Zhang, Zhibing

    2012-02-01

    The effect of ionic strength of agarose solution and quenching temperature of the emulsion on the structure and mechanical strength of agarose-based chromatographic adsorbents was investigated. Solutions of agarose containing different amounts of NaCl were emulsified at elevated temperature in mineral oil using a high-shear mixer. The hot emulsion was quenched at different temperatures leading to the gelation of agarose and formation of soft particles. Analysis of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images of particle surfaces shows that pore size of particles increases with ionic strength and/or high quenching temperature. Additionally it has been found that the compressive strength of particles measured by micromanipulation also increases with ionic strength of the emulsion and/or high quenching temperature but these two parameters have no significant effect on the resulting particle size and particle size distribution. Results from both characterization methods were compared with Sepharose 4B, a commercial agarose-based adsorbent. This is the first report examining the effect of ionic strength and cooling conditions on the microstructure of micron-sized agarose beads for bioseparation.

  4. Flexible Octopus-Shaped Hydrogel Particles for Specific Cell Capture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lynna; An, Harry Z; Haghgooie, Ramin; Shank, Aaron T; Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-04-01

    Multiarm hydrogel microparticles with varying geometry are fabricated to specifically capture cells expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecule. Results show that particle shape influences cell-capture efficiency due to differences in surface area, hydrodynamic effects, and steric constraints. These findings can lead to improved particle design for cell separation and diagnostic applications. PMID:26929053

  5. Tuning the Mechanical Properties of Hydrogel Core-Shell Particles by Inwards Interweaving Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Pan, Houwen Matthew; Seuss, Maximilian; Neubauer, Martin P; Trau, Dieter W; Fery, Andreas

    2016-01-20

    Mechanical properties of hydrogel particles are of importance for their interactions with cells or tissue, apart from their relevance to other applications. While so far the majority of works aiming at tuning particle mechanics relied on chemical cross-linking, we report a novel approach using inwards interweaving self-assembly of poly(allylamine) (PA) and poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PSSA) on agarose gel beads. Using this technique, shell thicknesses up to tens of micrometers can be achieved from single-polymer incubations and accurately controlled by varying the polymer concentration or incubation period. We quantified the changes in mechanical properties of hydrogel core-shell particles. The effective elastic modulus of core-shell particles was determined from force spectroscopy measurements using the colloidal probe-AFM (CP-AFM) technique. By varying the shell thickness between 10 and 24 μm, the elastic modulus of particles can be tuned in the range of 10-190 kPa and further increased by increasing the layer number. Through fluorescence quantitative measurements, the polymeric shell density was found to increase together with shell thickness and layer number, hence establishing a positive correlation between elastic modulus and shell density of core-shell particles. This is a valuable method for constructing multidensity or single-density shells of tunable thickness and is particularly important in mechanobiology as studies have reported enhanced cellular uptake of particles in the low-kilopascal range (<140 kPa). We anticipate that our results will provide the first steps toward the rational design of core-shell particles for the separation of biomolecules or systemic study of stiffness-dependent cellular uptake.

  6. Tuning the Mechanical Properties of Hydrogel Core-Shell Particles by Inwards Interweaving Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Pan, Houwen Matthew; Seuss, Maximilian; Neubauer, Martin P; Trau, Dieter W; Fery, Andreas

    2016-01-20

    Mechanical properties of hydrogel particles are of importance for their interactions with cells or tissue, apart from their relevance to other applications. While so far the majority of works aiming at tuning particle mechanics relied on chemical cross-linking, we report a novel approach using inwards interweaving self-assembly of poly(allylamine) (PA) and poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PSSA) on agarose gel beads. Using this technique, shell thicknesses up to tens of micrometers can be achieved from single-polymer incubations and accurately controlled by varying the polymer concentration or incubation period. We quantified the changes in mechanical properties of hydrogel core-shell particles. The effective elastic modulus of core-shell particles was determined from force spectroscopy measurements using the colloidal probe-AFM (CP-AFM) technique. By varying the shell thickness between 10 and 24 μm, the elastic modulus of particles can be tuned in the range of 10-190 kPa and further increased by increasing the layer number. Through fluorescence quantitative measurements, the polymeric shell density was found to increase together with shell thickness and layer number, hence establishing a positive correlation between elastic modulus and shell density of core-shell particles. This is a valuable method for constructing multidensity or single-density shells of tunable thickness and is particularly important in mechanobiology as studies have reported enhanced cellular uptake of particles in the low-kilopascal range (<140 kPa). We anticipate that our results will provide the first steps toward the rational design of core-shell particles for the separation of biomolecules or systemic study of stiffness-dependent cellular uptake. PMID:26691168

  7. The bioactivity of agarose-PEGDA interpenetrating network hydrogels with covalently immobilized RGD peptides and physically entrapped aggrecan

    PubMed Central

    Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous reports of interpenetrating networks (IPNs) have demonstrated drastic improvements in mechanical performance relative to individual constituent networks while maintaining viability of encapsulated cells. The current study investigated whether covalent linkage of RGD to the poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) network could improve upon cell viability and performance of agarose-PEGDA IPNs compared to unmodified IPNs (control) and to IPNs with different concentrations of physically entrapped aggrecan, providing a point of comparison to previous work. The inclusion of RGD or aggrecan generally did not adversely affect mechanical performance, and significantly improved chondrocyte viability and performance. Although both 4 and 100 μ g/mL of aggrecan improved cell viability, only 100 μ g/mL aggrecan was clearly beneficial to improving biosynthesis, whereas 100 μg/mL of RGD was beneficial to both chondrocyte viability and biosynthesis. Interestingly, clustering of cells within the IPNs with RGD and the higher aggrecan concentration were observed, likely indicating cell migration and/or preferred regional proliferation. This clustering resulted in a clearly visible enhancement of matrix production compared to the other IPNs. With this cell migration, we also observed significant cell proliferation and matrix synthesis beyond the periphery of the IPN, which could have important implications in facilitating integration with surrounding cartilage in vivo. With RGD and aggrecan (at its higher concentration) providing substantial and comparable improvements in cell performance, RGD would be the recommended bioactive signal for this particular IPN formulation and cell source given the significant cost savings and potentially more straightforward regulatory pathway in commercialization. PMID:24462353

  8. Degradation potential of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase from crude extract of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain KB2 immobilized in calcium alginate hydrogels and on glyoxyl agarose.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Urszula; Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Krysiak, Marta; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Microbial intradiol dioxygenases have been shown to have a great potential for bioremediation; however, their structure is sensitive to various environmental and chemical agents. Immobilization techniques allow for the improvement of enzyme properties. This is the first report on use of glyoxyl agarose and calcium alginate as matrixes for the immobilization of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. Multipoint attachment of the enzyme to the carrier caused maintenance of its initial activity during the 21 days. Immobilization of dioxygenase in calcium alginate or on glyoxyl agarose resulted in decrease in the optimum temperature by 5 °C and 10 °C, respectively. Entrapment of the enzyme in alginate gel shifted its optimum pH towards high-alkaline pH while immobilization of the enzyme on glyoxyl agarose did not influence pH profile of the enzyme. Protocatechuate 3,4-dioygenase immobilized in calcium alginate showed increased activity towards 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate, caffeic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate, and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate. Slightly lower activity of the enzyme was observed after its immobilization on glyoxyl agarose. Entrapment of the enzyme in alginate gel protected it against chelators and aliphatic alcohols while its immobilization on glyoxyl agarose enhanced enzyme resistance to inactivation by metal ions. PMID:24693536

  9. Degradation potential of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase from crude extract of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain KB2 immobilized in calcium alginate hydrogels and on glyoxyl agarose.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Urszula; Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Krysiak, Marta; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Microbial intradiol dioxygenases have been shown to have a great potential for bioremediation; however, their structure is sensitive to various environmental and chemical agents. Immobilization techniques allow for the improvement of enzyme properties. This is the first report on use of glyoxyl agarose and calcium alginate as matrixes for the immobilization of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. Multipoint attachment of the enzyme to the carrier caused maintenance of its initial activity during the 21 days. Immobilization of dioxygenase in calcium alginate or on glyoxyl agarose resulted in decrease in the optimum temperature by 5 °C and 10 °C, respectively. Entrapment of the enzyme in alginate gel shifted its optimum pH towards high-alkaline pH while immobilization of the enzyme on glyoxyl agarose did not influence pH profile of the enzyme. Protocatechuate 3,4-dioygenase immobilized in calcium alginate showed increased activity towards 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate, caffeic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate, and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate. Slightly lower activity of the enzyme was observed after its immobilization on glyoxyl agarose. Entrapment of the enzyme in alginate gel protected it against chelators and aliphatic alcohols while its immobilization on glyoxyl agarose enhanced enzyme resistance to inactivation by metal ions.

  10. Preparation and stability of agarose microcapsules containing BCG.

    PubMed

    Esquisabel, A; Hernandez, R M; Igartua, M; Gascón, A R; Calvo, B; Pedraz, J L

    2002-01-01

    An emulsification/internal gelation method of preparing small-sized agarose microcapsules containing Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is reported. Agarose microcapsules have been prepared by the emulsification of the hydrogel within a vegetable oil followed by its gelation due to the cooling of the system. Four different oils (sesame, sweet almonds, camomile and jojoba) were assayed. The rheological analysis of the oils showed a Newtonian behaviour, with viscosity values of 37.7, 51.2, 59.3 and 67.1 mPa s for jojoba, camomile, sesame and sweet almonds oil, respectively. The particle size of the microcapsules obtained ranged from 23.1 microm for the microcapsules prepared with sweet almonds oil to 42.6 microm for those prepared with jojoba. The microcapsule particle size was found to be dependent on the viscosity of the oil used in the emulsification step. The encapsulated BCG was identified by the Difco TB stain set K, followed by observation under optical microscopy. Once prepared, microcapsules were freeze-dried using 5% trehalose as cryoprotectant and the stability of the microcapsules was assayed during 12 months storage at room temperature, observing that agarose microcapsules were stable after 12 months storage, since there was no evidence of alteration in the freeze-dried appearance, resuspension rate, observation under microscope, or particle size.

  11. Soft matter strategies for controlling food texture: formation of hydrogel particles by biopolymer complex coacervation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bi-cheng; Degner, Brian; McClements, David Julian

    2014-11-19

    Soft matter physics principles can be used to address important problems in the food industry. Starch granules are widely used in foods to create desirable textural attributes, but high levels of digestible starch may pose a risk of diabetes. Consequently, there is a need to find healthier replacements for starch granules. The objective of this research was to create hydrogel particles from protein and dietary fiber with similar dimensions and functional attributes as starch granules. Hydrogel particles were formed by mixing gelatin (0.5 wt%) with pectin (0 to 0.2 wt%) at pH values above the isoelectric point of the gelatin (pH 9, 30 °C). When the pH was adjusted to pH 5, the biopolymer mixture spontaneously formed micron-sized particles due to electrostatic attraction of cationic gelatin with anionic pectin through complex coacervation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy showed that the hydrogel particles were translucent and spheroid, and that their dimensions were determined by pectin concentration. At 0.01 wt% pectin, hydrogel particles with similar dimensions to swollen starch granules (D3,2 ≈ 23 µm) were formed. The resulting hydrogel suspensions had similar appearances to starch pastes and could be made to have similar textural attributes (yield stress and shear viscosity) by adjusting the effective hydrogel particle concentration. These hydrogel particles may therefore be used to improve the texture of reduced-calorie foods and thereby help tackle obesity and diabetes.

  12. Development of CMC hydrogels loaded with silver nano-particles for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Hebeish, Ali; Hashem, M; El-Hady, M M Abd; Sharaf, S

    2013-01-30

    Innovative CMC-based hydrogels with great potentials for usage in medical area were principally synthesized as per two strategies .The first involved reaction of epichlorohydrin in alkaline medium containing silver nitrate to yield silver nano-particles (AgNPs)-loaded CMC hydrogel. While CMC acted as stabilizing for AgNPs, trisodium citrate was added to the reaction medium to assist CMC in establishing reduction of Ag(+) to AgNPs. The second strategy entailed preparation of CMC hydrogel which assists the in situ preparation of AgNPs under the same conditions. In both strategies, factors affecting the characterization of AgNPs-loaded CMC hydrogels were studied. Analysis and characterization of the so obtained hydrogels were performed through monitoring swelling behavior, FTIR spectroscopy, SEM, EDX, UV-vis spectrophotometer and TEM. Antimicrobial activity of the hydrogels was examined and mechanisms involved in their synthesis were reported.

  13. Using dissipative particle dynamics to model micromechanics of responsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Fernandez de Las Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The ability of responsive hydrogels to undergo complex and reversible shape transformations in response to external stimuli such as temperature, magnetic/electric fields, pH levels, and light intensity has made them the material of choice for tissue scaffolding, drug delivery, bio-adhesive, bio-sensing, and micro-sorting applications. The complex micromechanics and kinetics of these responsive networks however, currently hinders developments in the aforementioned areas. In order to better understand the mechanical properties of these systems and how they change during the volume transition we have developed a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for responsive polymer networks. We use this model to examine the impact of the Flory-Huggins parameter on the bulk and shear moduli. In this fashion we evaluate how environmental factors can affect the micromechanical properties of these networks. Support from NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255288) is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Tuning the Receding Contact Angle on Hydrogels by Addition of Particles.

    PubMed

    Boulogne, François; Ingremeau, François; Limat, Laurent; Stone, Howard A

    2016-06-01

    Control of the swelling, chemical functionalization, and adhesivity of hydrogels are finding new applications in a wide range of material systems. We investigate experimentally the effect of adsorbed particles on hydrogels on the depinning of contact lines. In our experiments, a water drop containing polystyrene microspheres is deposited on a swelling hydrogel, which leads to the drop absorption and particle deposition. Two regimes are observed: a decreasing drop height with a pinned contact line followed by a receding contact line. We show that increasing the particles concentration increases the duration of the first regime and significantly decreases the total absorption time. The adsorbed particles increase the pinning force at the contact line. Finally, we develop a method to measure the receding contact angle with the consideration of the hydrogel swelling. PMID:27185647

  15. Soft matter strategies for controlling food texture: formation of hydrogel particles by biopolymer complex coacervation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bi-cheng; Degner, Brian; McClements, David Julian

    2014-11-01

    Soft matter physics principles can be used to address important problems in the food industry. Starch granules are widely used in foods to create desirable textural attributes, but high levels of digestible starch may pose a risk of diabetes. Consequently, there is a need to find healthier replacements for starch granules. The objective of this research was to create hydrogel particles from protein and dietary fiber with similar dimensions and functional attributes as starch granules. Hydrogel particles were formed by mixing gelatin (0.5 wt%) with pectin (0 to 0.2 wt%) at pH values above the isoelectric point of the gelatin (pH 9, 30 °C). When the pH was adjusted to pH 5, the biopolymer mixture spontaneously formed micron-sized particles due to electrostatic attraction of cationic gelatin with anionic pectin through complex coacervation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy showed that the hydrogel particles were translucent and spheroid, and that their dimensions were determined by pectin concentration. At 0.01 wt% pectin, hydrogel particles with similar dimensions to swollen starch granules (D3,2 ≈ 23 µm) were formed. The resulting hydrogel suspensions had similar appearances to starch pastes and could be made to have similar textural attributes (yield stress and shear viscosity) by adjusting the effective hydrogel particle concentration. These hydrogel particles may therefore be used to improve the texture of reduced-calorie foods and thereby help tackle obesity and diabetes.

  16. Blood-aggregating hydrogel particles for use as a hemostatic agent.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Adam M; Sikorski, Michael J; Li, Tieluo; Wu, Zhongjun J; Griffith, Bartley P; Kofinas, Peter

    2014-02-01

    The body is unable to control massive blood loss without treatment. Available hemostatic agents are often expensive, ineffective or raise safety concerns. Synthetic hydrogel particles are an inexpensive and promising alternative. In this study we synthesized and characterized N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide (APM) hydrogel particles and investigated their use as a hemostatic material. The APM hydrogel particles were synthesized via inverse suspension polymerization with a narrow size distribution and rapid swelling behavior. In vitro coagulation studies showed hydrogel particle blood aggregate formation as well as bulk blood coagulation inhibition. In vivo studies using multiple rat injury and ovine liver laceration models demonstrated the particles' ability to aid in rapid hemostasis. Subsequent hematoxylin and eosin and Carstairs' method staining of the ovine liver incision sites showed significant hemostatic plug formation. This study suggests that these cationic hydrogel particles form a physical barrier to blood loss by forming aggregates, while causing a general decrease in coagulation activity in the bulk. The formation of a rapid sealant through aggregation and the promotion of local hemostasis through electrostatic interactions are coupled with a decrease in overall coagulation activity. These interactions require the interplay of a variety of mechanisms stemming from a simple synthetic platform. PMID:24185001

  17. Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Durian, D J

    2014-10-01

    We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

  18. Modulating the morphology of hydrogel particles by thermal annealing: mixed biopolymer electrostatic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bi-cheng; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-01

    Biopolymer hydrogel particles formed by electrostatic complexation of proteins and polysaccharides have various applications within the food and other industries, including as delivery systems for bioactive compounds, as texture modifiers, and as fat replacers. The functional attributes of these electrostatic complexes are strongly influenced by their morphology, which is determined by the molecular interactions between the biopolymer molecules. In this study, electrostatic complexes were formed using an amphoteric protein (gelatin) and an anionic polysaccharide (pectin). Gelatin undergoes a helix-to-coil transition when heated above a critical temperature, which impacts its molecular interactions and hydrogel formation. The aim of this research was to study the influence of thermal annealing on the properties of hydrogel particles formed by electrostatic complexation of gelatin and pectin. Hydrogel particles were fabricated by mixing 0.5 wt% gelatin and 0.01 wt% pectin at pH 10 (where both were negatively charged) at various temperatures, followed by acidification to pH 5 (where they have opposite charges) with controlled acidification and stirring. The gelation ({{T}\\text{g}} ) and melting temperature ({{T}\\text{m}} ) of the electrostatic complexes were measuring using a small amplitude oscillation test: {{T}\\text{g}}=26.3 °C and {{T}\\text{m}}=32.3 °C. Three annealing temperatures (5, 30 and 50 °C) corresponding to different regimes (T<{{T}\\text{g}} , {{T}\\text{g}}\\text{m}} , and T>{{T}\\text{m}} ) were selected to control the configuration of the gelatin chain. The effects of formation temperature, annealing temperature, and incubation time on the morphology of the hydrogel particles were characterized by turbidity, static light scattering, and microscopy. The results of this study will facilitate the rational design of hydrogel particles with specific particle dimensions and morphologies, which has important implications for tailoring their

  19. Particle Deformation and Concentration Polarization in Electroosmotic Transport of Hydrogels through Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report detection of deformable, hydrogel particles by the resistive-pulse technique using single pores in a polymer film. The hydrogels pass through the pores by electroosmosis and cause formation of a characteristic shape of resistive pulses indicating the particles underwent dehydration and deformation. These effects were explained via a non-homogeneous pressure distribution along the pore axis modeled by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. The local pressure drops are induced by the electroosmotic fluid flow. Our experiments also revealed the importance of concentration polarization in the detection of hydrogels. Due to the negative charges as well as branched, low density structure of the hydrogel particles, concentration of ions in the particles is significantly higher than in the bulk. As a result, when electric field is applied across the membrane, a depletion zone can be created in the vicinity of the particle observed as a transient drop of the current. Our experiments using pores with openings between 200 and 1600 nm indicated the concentration polarization dominated the hydrogels detection for pores wider than 450 nm. The results are of importance for all studies that involve transport of molecules, particles and cells through pores with charged walls. The developed inhomogeneous pressure distribution can potentially influence the shape of the transported species. The concentration polarization changes the interpretation of the resistive pulses; the observed current change does not necessarily reflect only the particle size but also the size of the depletion zone that is formed in the particle vicinity.

  20. The distribution of particles characterized by size and free mobility within polydisperse populations of protein-polysaccharide conjugates, determined from two-dimensional agarose electropherograms.

    PubMed

    Tietz, D; Aldroubi, A; Schneerson, R; Unser, M; Chrambach, A

    1991-01-01

    New approaches for the characterization of polydisperse particle populations are presented*. The investigated samples contain virus-sized protein-polysaccharide conjugates which had previously been prepared as immunogens against bacterial meningitis (Hib). The analysis is based on two-dimensional agarose electrophoresis (Serwer-type). This method, like the one of O'Farrell, achieves a separation according to size and charge. It relies on a different principle, however, and is applicable to nondenatured particles which are 100 to more than 1000 times larger in mass than regular uncrosslinked proteins. Data from stained gel patterns are evaluated by the computer program ELPHOFIT, which makes it possible to standardize the gel and to construct a nomogram which defines every position on the gel in terms of particle size and free mobility (related to surface net charge density). The output of ELPHOFIT, consisting of nomogram parameters, is transferred to the image processing program GELFIT. This software is used to evaluate the computer images obtained by digitizing the stained gel patterns: (i) The nomogram is electronically superimposed on the computer image. (ii) The gel pattern is transformed from a curvilinear to a rectangular coordinate system of particle size and free mobility. The center of gravity as well as density maxima are given in coordinates of particle size and free mobility. Ranges of grey levels can be accentuated by adding 16 pseudocolors. (iii) Using surface-stripping techniques, GELFIT provides an estimate for the number of major subpopulations within each preparation. (iv) Numerical values for the distribution of particle size and free mobility are determined. Using program IMAGE, the quantitative physical assessment of a given conjugate preparation is presented in the form of a computer-generated three-dimensional plot, the shape of which serves to identify and characterize the preparation visually. The data analysis based on digitized two

  1. Controlled drug delivery attributes of co-polymer micelles and xanthan-O-carboxymethyl hydrogel particles.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sabyasachi; Mukherjee, Susweta

    2014-09-01

    Herein, C16 alkyl chain-grafted-xanthan copolymer was synthesized and characterized. The copolymer self-assembled into nanometer-size spherical micellar structures in water and incorporated ∼100% glibenclamide into its deeper lipophilic confines. The micellar dispersion exhibited negative zeta potential value (-27.6 mV). The copolymer micelles controlled the drug release rate in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8) for an extended period. Further incorporation of drug-loaded copolymer micelles into O-carboxymethyl xanthan hydrogel particles slowed the drug release rate in HCl solution (pH 1.2) as well as in phosphate-buffered solution (pH 6.8) (releasing only ∼8% drug in 2 h). The drug release data correlated well with the degree of swelling of the hydrogel particles in different drug release media. Scanning electron microscopy revealed spherical shape of the hydrogel particles (600 μm). X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses suggested amorphous encapsulation of the drug and its chemical compatibility with the polymers, respectively. Pharmacodynamic evaluation suggested that the formulations had an immense potential in controlling blood glucose level in animal model over a longer duration. In summary, it was pointed out that the copolymer micelles of glibenclamide, a poor water-soluble anti-diabetic, and their subsequent entrapment into hydrogel particles could be a promising approach in the controlled and effective management of diabetes. PMID:24954271

  2. Preparation and characterization of nanosized P(NIPAM-MBA) hydrogel particles and adsorption of bovine serum albumin on their surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Gu, Xiangling; Zhang, Lina; Kong, Xiang-Zheng

    2012-09-24

    Thermosensitive polymer hydrogel particles with size varying from 480 to 620 nm were prepared through precipitation copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide with N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) in water with ammonium persulfate as the initiator. Only polymer hydrogels without any coagula were obtained when MBA concentration in the monomer mixture was kept between 2.5 and 10.0 wt%; with increased MBA concentration, the monomer conversion was enhanced, the size of the hydrogels was increased, and their shrinking was lessened when heated from 25°C to 40°C. Bovine serum albumin adsorption on the surface of the hydrogels of different MBA content was measured at different pH levels and under different temperatures. The results demonstrated that the adsorption of the protein on the hydrogels could be controlled by adjusting the pH, the temperature of adsorption, and the crosslinking in the hydrogels. The results were interpreted, and the mechanisms of the polymerization were proposed.

  3. Preparation and characterization of nanosized P(NIPAM-MBA) hydrogel particles and adsorption of bovine serum albumin on their surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Gu, Xiangling; Zhang, Lina; Kong, Xiang-Zheng

    2012-09-01

    Thermosensitive polymer hydrogel particles with size varying from 480 to 620 nm were prepared through precipitation copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide with N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) in water with ammonium persulfate as the initiator. Only polymer hydrogels without any coagula were obtained when MBA concentration in the monomer mixture was kept between 2.5 and 10.0 wt%; with increased MBA concentration, the monomer conversion was enhanced, the size of the hydrogels was increased, and their shrinking was lessened when heated from 25°C to 40°C. Bovine serum albumin adsorption on the surface of the hydrogels of different MBA content was measured at different pH levels and under different temperatures. The results demonstrated that the adsorption of the protein on the hydrogels could be controlled by adjusting the pH, the temperature of adsorption, and the crosslinking in the hydrogels. The results were interpreted, and the mechanisms of the polymerization were proposed.

  4. Hydrogel Composites Containing Sacrificial Collapsed Hollow Particles as Dual Action pH-Responsive Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Pafiti, Kyriaki; Cui, Zhengxing; Adlam, Daman; Hoyland, Judith; Freemont, Anthony J; Saunders, Brian R

    2016-07-11

    In this study hydrogel composites are investigated that contain sacrificial pH-responsive collapsed hollow particles (CHPs) entrapped within a poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) network. The CHPs were prepared using a scalable (mainly) water-based method and had a bowl-like morphology that was comparable to that of red blood cells. The CHPs were constructed from poly(methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid), which is a pH-responsive copolymer. The PAAm/CHP composite morphology was probed with optical microscopy, CLSM and SEM. These data showed the CHPs were dispersed throughout the PAAm network. Inclusion of the CHPs within the gel composites increased the modulus in a tunable manner. The CHPs fragmented at pH values greater than the pKa of the particles, and this process decreased the gel modulus to values similar to that of the parent PAAm hydrogel. CHPs containing a model drug were used to demonstrate pH-triggered release from PAAm/CHP and the release kinetics obeyed Fickian diffusion. The composite gels had low cytotoxicity as evidenced by Live/Dead and MTT assays. The hydrogel composites showed dual action pH-triggered softening with simultaneous drug release which occurred without a volume increase. The hydrogel composites may have potential application as enteric gels or for intra-articular drug delivery. PMID:27267971

  5. Endochondral bone formation in gelatin methacrylamide hydrogel with embedded cartilage-derived matrix particles.

    PubMed

    Visser, Jetze; Gawlitta, Debby; Benders, Kim E M; Toma, Selynda M H; Pouran, Behdad; van Weeren, P René; Dhert, Wouter J A; Malda, Jos

    2015-01-01

    The natural process of endochondral bone formation in the growing skeletal system is increasingly inspiring the field of bone tissue engineering. However, in order to create relevant-size bone grafts, a cell carrier is required that ensures a high diffusion rate and facilitates matrix formation, balanced by its degradation. Therefore, we set out to engineer endochondral bone in gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) hydrogels with embedded multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and cartilage-derived matrix (CDM) particles. CDM particles were found to stimulate the formation of a cartilage template by MSCs in the GelMA hydrogel in vitro. In a subcutaneous rat model, this template was subsequently remodeled into mineralized bone tissue, including bone-marrow cavities. The GelMA was almost fully degraded during this process. There was no significant difference in the degree of calcification in GelMA with or without CDM particles: 42.5 ± 2.5% vs. 39.5 ± 8.3% (mean ± standard deviation), respectively. Interestingly, in an osteochondral setting, the presence of chondrocytes in one half of the constructs fully impeded bone formation in the other half by MSCs. This work offers a new avenue for the engineering of relevant-size bone grafts, by the formation of endochondral bone within a degradable hydrogel.

  6. Fine Adjustment of Interfacial Potential between pH-Responsive Hydrogels and Cell-Sized Particles.

    PubMed

    Monzel, Cornelia; Veschgini, Mariam; Madsen, Jeppe; Lewis, Andrew L; Armes, Steven P; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-08-11

    We quantitatively determined interfacial potentials between cell-sized particles and stimulus-responsive hydrogels using a microinterferometer. The hydrogel is based on physically interconnected ABA triblock copolymer micelles comprising an inner biocompatible PMPC block and two outer pH-responsive PDPA blocks. The out-of-plane temporal fluctuation in the position of the cell-sized particles was calculated from changes in the interference pattern measured by Reflection Interference Contrast Microscopy (RICM), thus yielding the particle-substrate interaction potential V (Δh). Measurements in pH buffers ranging from 7.0 to 7.8 resulted in a systematic reduction in height of the potential minima ⟨Δh⟩ and a concomitant increase in the potential curvature V″ (Δh). The experimental data were analyzed by applying the modified Ross and Pincus model for polyelectrolytes, while accounting for gravitation, lubrication and van der Waals interactions. Elastic moduli calculated from V″ (Δh) were in good agreement with those measured by Atomic Force Microscopy. The ability to fine-tune both the gel elasticity and the interfacial potential at around physiological pH makes such triblock copolymer hydrogels a promising biocompatible substrate for dynamic switching of cell-material interactions. PMID:26190346

  7. Influence of clay particles on microfluidic-based preparation of hydrogel composite microsphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Joung Sook

    2016-05-01

    For the successful fabrication of a hydrogel composite microsphere, this study aimed to investigate the influence of clay particles on microsphere formation in a microfluidic device which has flow focusing and a 4.5:1 contraction channel. A poly alginic acid solution (2.0 wt.%) with clay particles was used as the dispersed phase to generate drops in an oil medium, which then merged with drops of a CaCl2 solution for gelation. Drop generations were observed with different flow rates and particles types. When the flow rate increased, drop generation was enhanced and drop size decreased by the build-up of more favorable hydrodynamic flow conditions to detach the droplets. The addition of a small amount of particles insignificantly changed the drop generation behavior even though it reduced interfacial tension and increased the viscosity of the solution. Instead, clays particles significantly affected hydro-gelation depending on the hydrophobicity of particles, which produced further heterogeneity in the shape and size of microsphere.

  8. Chemotaxis: Under Agarose Assay.

    PubMed

    Brazill, Derrick

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum represents a superb model for examining chemotaxis. Under vegetative conditions, the amoebae are chemotactically responsive to pterins, such as folate. Under starved conditions, they lose their sensitivity to pterins, and become chemotactically responsive to cAMP. As an NIH model system, Dictyostelium offers a variety of advantages in studying chemotaxis, including its conservation of mammalian signaling pathways, its ease of growth, and its genetic tractability. In this chapter, we describe the use of the under agarose chemotaxis assay to identify proteins involved in controlling motility and directional sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum. Given the similarities between Dictyostelium and mammalian cells, this allows us to dissect the conserved pathways involved in eukaryotic chemotaxis.

  9. Preparation of hydrogel hollow particles for cell encapsulation by a method of polyester core degradation.

    PubMed

    Rabanel, J-M; Hildgen, P

    2004-06-01

    Implantation of encapsulated cells in particles of less than 1 mm (micro-encapsulation) has been proposed as a cell synthesized bio-molecule delivery system. Encapsulation provides immuno-isolation, protecting foreign cells from host immune system while nutrients, oxygen and therapeutic products can diffuse freely across capsule walls. A new method is described for the synthesis of a new family of hollow microparticles for cell encapsulation. Unlike other micro-encapsulation methods, encapsulation in those devices will take place after capsule synthesis, by micro-injection. The microcapsules were prepared by a three-steps original procedure: first, synthesis of a core particle, followed by coating with a layer of epichlorohydrin cross-linked amylo-pectin gel and, finally, selective degradation of the core particle to create the cavity. Initial experiments make use of amylo-pectin cross-linked with trimetaphosphate as core particle material. However, selective degradation was difficult to achieve. In further essays, polyesters were used successfully for the preparation of core particles. Optimizations were carried out and the permeability and morphology of the hollow particles were investigated. The preliminary results show that the new method has the potential to become a standard procedure to obtain hydrogel hollow particles. Moreover, the permeability study seems to be in accordance with specifications for immuno-isolation.

  10. Function, structure, and stability of enzymes confined in agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Jeffrey; Asuri, Prashanth

    2014-01-01

    Research over the past few decades has attempted to answer how proteins behave in molecularly confined or crowded environments when compared to dilute buffer solutions. This information is vital to understanding in vivo protein behavior, as the average spacing between macromolecules in the cell cytosol is much smaller than the size of the macromolecules themselves. In our study, we attempt to address this question using three structurally and functionally different model enzymes encapsulated in agarose gels of different porosities. Our studies reveal that under standard buffer conditions, the initial reaction rates of the agarose-encapsulated enzymes are lower than that of the solution phase enzymes. However, the encapsulated enzymes retain a higher percentage of their activity in the presence of denaturants. Moreover, the concentration of agarose used for encapsulation had a significant effect on the enzyme functional stability; enzymes encapsulated in higher percentages of agarose were more stable than the enzymes encapsulated in lower percentages of agarose. Similar results were observed through structural measurements of enzyme denaturation using an 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid fluorescence assay. Our work demonstrates the utility of hydrogels to study protein behavior in highly confined environments similar to those present in vivo; furthermore, the enhanced stability of gel-encapsulated enzymes may find use in the delivery of therapeutic proteins, as well as the design of novel strategies for biohybrid medical devices.

  11. Continuous superporous agarose beds for chromatography and electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, P E; Larsson, P O

    1999-02-01

    Continuous agarose beds (monoliths) were prepared by casting agarose emulsions designed to generate superporous agarose. The gel structures obtained were transected by superpores (diameters could be varied in the range 20-200 microns) through which liquids could be pumped. The pore structure and the basic properties of the continuous gel were investigated by microscopy and size exclusion chromatography. The chromatographic behaviour was approximately the same as for beds packed with homogeneous agarose beads with a particle diameter equivalent to the distance between the superpores. In one application, the superporous continuous agarose bed was derivatized with a NAD+ analogue and used in the affinity purification of bovine lactate dehydrogenase from a crude extract. In another application, a new superporous composite gel material was prepared by adding hydroxyapatite particles to the agarose phase. The composite bed was used to separate a protein mixture by hydroxyapatite chromatography. In a third application, the continuous superporous agarose material was used as an electrophoresis gel. Here, a water-immiscible organic liquid was pumped through the superpores to dissipate the joule heat evolved, thus allowing high current densities.

  12. Oxidative stability of n-3 fatty acids encapsulated in filled hydrogel particles and of pork meat systems containing them.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Matalanis, Alison; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The effect of storage time (2°C, 19 days) and heating (70°C, 30 min) on physical characteristics and oxidative stability of fish oil encapsulated in filled hydrogel particles was determined and compared with a conventional oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion with the same oil content (8.5%). Subsequently they were used to enrich meat systems with n-3 LCPUFAs, and their lipid oxidation was evaluated and compared with two other meat systems: one containing all animal fat and another with fish oil added directly. Filled hydrogel particles were more effective in lowering the oxidation rate than O/W emulsion, even when thermal treatment was applied. Oxidative stability over the storage time was best in the n-3 LCPUFA-enriched meat system containing filled hydrogel particles, in which TBARS levels were up to 62% lower than other systems containing fish oil. Hydrogel particles offer a promising means of controlling lipid oxidation in n-3 LCPUFA-enriched meat products.

  13. Oxidative stability of n-3 fatty acids encapsulated in filled hydrogel particles and of pork meat systems containing them.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Matalanis, Alison; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The effect of storage time (2°C, 19 days) and heating (70°C, 30 min) on physical characteristics and oxidative stability of fish oil encapsulated in filled hydrogel particles was determined and compared with a conventional oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion with the same oil content (8.5%). Subsequently they were used to enrich meat systems with n-3 LCPUFAs, and their lipid oxidation was evaluated and compared with two other meat systems: one containing all animal fat and another with fish oil added directly. Filled hydrogel particles were more effective in lowering the oxidation rate than O/W emulsion, even when thermal treatment was applied. Oxidative stability over the storage time was best in the n-3 LCPUFA-enriched meat system containing filled hydrogel particles, in which TBARS levels were up to 62% lower than other systems containing fish oil. Hydrogel particles offer a promising means of controlling lipid oxidation in n-3 LCPUFA-enriched meat products. PMID:25872446

  14. Superporous agarose anion exchangers for plasmid isolation.

    PubMed

    Tiainen, Peter; Gustavsson, Per-Erik; Ljunglöf, Anders; Larsson, Per-Olof

    2007-01-01

    Superporous agarose beads have wide, connecting flow pores allowing large molecules such as plasmids to be transported into the interior of the beads by convective flow. The pore walls provide additional surface for plasmid binding thus increasing the binding capacity of the adsorbent. Novel superporous agarose anion exchangers have been prepared, differing with respect to bead diameter, superpore diameter and type of anion-exchange functional group (poly(ethyleneimine) and quaternary amine). The plasmid binding capacities were obtained from breakthrough curves and compared with the binding capacity of homogeneous agarose beads of the same particle size. Significantly, the smaller diameter superporous agarose beads were found to have four to five times higher plasmid binding capacity than the corresponding homogeneous agarose beads. The experimentally determined plasmid binding capacity was compared with the theoretically calculated surface area for each adsorbent and fair agreement was found. Confocal microscopy studies of beads with adsorbed, fluorescently labelled plasmids aided in the interpretation of the results. Superporous poly(ethyleneimine)-substituted beads with a high ion capacity (230 micromol/ml) showed a plasmid binding of 3-4 mg/ml adsorbent. Superporous quaternary amine-substituted beads had a lower ion capacity (81 micromol/ml) and showed a correspondingly lower plasmid binding capacity (1-2 mg/ml adsorbent). In spite of the lower capacity, the beads with quaternary amine ligand were preferred, due to their much better plasmid recovery (70-100% recovery). Interestingly, both capacity and recovery was improved when the plasmid adsorption step was carried out in the presence of a moderate salt concentration. The most suitable superporous bead type (45-75 microm diameter beads; 4 microm superpores; quaternary amine ligand) was chosen for the capture of plasmid DNA from a clarified alkaline lysate. Two strategies were evaluated, one with and one

  15. Surfactant-stabilized small hydrogel particles in oil: hosts for remarkable activation of enzymes in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Das, Dibyendu; Roy, Sangita; Debnath, Sisir; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2010-04-26

    Hydrogels of amino acid based cationic surfactant having C(16) tails were used to immobilize heme proteins and enzyme. These hydrogel-entrapped proteins/enzyme showed remarkable activation when dispersed in organic solvent. The activation effect (ratio of the activity of the hydrogel-entrapped enzyme in organic solvent to the activity of the native enzyme in water) of cytochrome c increased up to 350-fold with varying protein and gelator concentration. Hydrogel-entrapped hemoglobin and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) also showed markedly improved activity in organic solvent. Alteration in the structure of the gelator and its supramolecular arrangement showed that the protein immobilized within amphiphilic networks with larger interstitial space exhibited higher activation. This striking activation of hydrogel-entrapped proteins stems from the following effects: 1) the hydrophilic domain of the amphiphilic networks facilitates accessibility of the enzyme to the water-soluble substrate. 2) the surfactant, as an integral part of the amphiphilic network, assists in the formation of a distinct interface through which reactants and products are easily transferred between hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. 3) Surfactant gelators help in the dispersion and stabilization of gel matrix into small particles in organic solvent, which enhances the overall surface area and results in improved mass transfer. The activation was dramatically improved up to 675-fold in the presence of nongelating anionic surfactants that helped in disintegration of the gel into further smaller-sized particles. Interestingly, hydrogel-immobilized HRP exhibited about 2000-fold higher activity in comparison to the activity of the suspended enzyme in toluene. Structural changes of the entrapped enzyme and the morphology of the matrix were investigated to understand the mechanism of this activation.

  16. Compression behaviour of biphasic calcium phosphate and biphasic calcium phosphate-agarose scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, J A; Vadillo, J L; Sánchez-Salcedo, S; Nieto, A; Gómez-Barrena, E; Vallet-Regí, M

    2011-02-01

    There is an acknowledged need for shaping 3-D scaffolds with adequate porosity and mechanical properties for biomedical applications. The mechanical properties under static and cyclic compressive testing of dense and designed porous architecture bioceramic scaffolds based on the biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) systems and BCP-agarose systems have been evaluated. The dense and designed porous architecture scaffolds in BCP systems exhibited a brittle behaviour. Agarose, a biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogel, has been used to shape designed architecture ceramic-agarose scaffolds following a low-temperature shaping method. Agarose conferred toughness, ductility and a rubbery consistency for strains of up to 60% of in ceramic BCP-agarose systems. This combination of ceramic and organic matrix helps to avoid the inherent brittleness of the bioceramic and enhances the compression resistance of hydrogel. The presence of mechanical hysteresis, permanent deformation after the first cycle and recovery of the master monotonous curve indicate a Mullins-like effect such as that observed in carbon-filled rubber systems. We report this type of mechanical behaviour, the Mullins effect, for the first time in bioceramics and bioceramic-agarose systems.

  17. "Clickable" agarose for affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Punna, Sreenivas; Kaltgrad, Eiton; Finn, M G

    2005-01-01

    Successful purification of biological molecules by affinity chromatography requires the attachment of desired ligands to biocompatible chromatographic supports. The Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of azides and alkynes-the premier example of "click chemistry"-is an efficient way to make covalent connections among diverse molecules and materials. Both azide and alkyne units are highly selective in their reactivity, being inert to most chemical functionalities and stable to wide ranges of solvent, temperature, and pH. We show that agarose beads bearing alkyne and azide groups can be easily made and are practical precursors to functionalized agarose materials for affinity chromatography.

  18. Core-Shell Hydrogel Particles Harvest, Concentrate and Preserve Labile Low Abundance Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Caterina; Patanarut, Alexis; George, Tony; Bishop, Barney; Zhou, Weidong; Fredolini, Claudia; Ross, Mark M.; Espina, Virginia; Pellacani, Giovanni; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Luchini, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Background The blood proteome is thought to represent a rich source of biomarkers for early stage disease detection. Nevertheless, three major challenges have hindered biomarker discovery: a) candidate biomarkers exist at extremely low concentrations in blood; b) high abundance resident proteins such as albumin mask the rare biomarkers; c) biomarkers are rapidly degraded by endogenous and exogenous proteinases. Methodology and Principal Findings Hydrogel nanoparticles created with a N-isopropylacrylamide based core (365 nm)-shell (167 nm) and functionalized with a charged based bait (acrylic acid) were studied as a technology for addressing all these biomarker discovery problems, in one step, in solution. These harvesting core-shell nanoparticles are designed to simultaneously conduct size exclusion and affinity chromatography in solution. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a clinically relevant, highly labile, and very low abundance biomarker, was chosen as a model. PDGF, spiked in human serum, was completely sequestered from its carrier protein albumin, concentrated, and fully preserved, within minutes by the particles. Particle sequestered PDGF was fully protected from exogenously added tryptic degradation. When the nanoparticles were added to a 1 mL dilute solution of PDGF at non detectable levels (less than 20 picograms per mL) the concentration of the PDGF released from the polymeric matrix of the particles increased within the detection range of ELISA and mass spectrometry. Beyond PDGF, the sequestration and protection from degradation for a series of additional very low abundance and very labile cytokines were verified. Conclusions and Significance We envision the application of harvesting core-shell nanoparticles to whole blood for concentration and immediate preservation of low abundance and labile analytes at the time of venipuncture. PMID:19274087

  19. Microencapsulation of probiotics in hydrogel particles: enhancing Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris LM0230 viability using calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Timothy W; Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; McClements, David J; Sela, David A

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics are beneficial microbes often added to food products to enhance the health and wellness of consumers. A major limitation to producing efficacious functional foods containing probiotic cells is their tendency to lose viability during storage and gastrointestinal transit. In this study, the impact of encapsulating probiotics within food-grade hydrogel particles to mitigate sensitivity to environmental stresses was examined. Confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed that Lactococcus lactis were trapped within calcium alginate beads formed by dripping a probiotic-alginate mixture into a calcium solution. Encapsulation improved the viability of the probiotics during aerobic storage: after seven days, less than a two-log reduction was observed in encapsulated cells stored at room temperature, demonstrating that a high concentration of cells survived relative to non-encapsulated bacteria. These hydrogel beads may have applications for improving the stability and efficacy of probiotics in functional foods.

  20. Silk hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Yodmuang, Supansa; Wang, Xiaoqin; Sun, Lin; Kaplan, David L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering based on cultivation of immature chondrocytes in agarose hydrogel can yield tissue constructs with biomechanical properties comparable to native cartilage. However, agarose is immunogenic and non-degradable, and our capability to modify the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of this material is rather limited. In contrast, silk hydrogel is biocompatible and biodegradable, and it can be produced using a water-based method without organic solvents that enables precise control of structural and mechanical properties in a range of interest for cartilage tissue engineering. We observed that one particular preparation of silk hydrogel yielded cartilaginous constructs with biochemical content and mechanical properties matching constructs based on agarose. This finding and the possibility to vary the properties of silk hydrogel motivated this study of the factors underlying the suitability of hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering. We present data resulting from a systematic variation of silk hydrogel properties, silk extraction method, gel concentration, and gel structure. Data suggest that silk hydrogel can be used as a tool for studies of the hydrogel-related factors and mechanisms involved in cartilage formation, as well as a tailorable and fully degradable scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:20725950

  1. Mullins effect behaviour under compression in micelle-templated silica and micelle-templated silica/agarose systems.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, J A; Vadillo, J L; Sánchez-Salcedo, S; Nieto, A; Gómez-Barrena, E; Vallet-Regí, M

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of bioceramic conformed pieces based on micelle-templated silica (MTS) such as SBA15, MCM41 and MCM48 as well as MTS/agarose systems have been evaluated under static and cyclic compressive tests. The MTS pieces exhibited a brittle behaviour. Agarose, a biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogel, has been used to shape ceramic-agarose pieces following a low temperature shaping method. Agarose conferred toughness, ductility and a rubbery consistency up to a 60% strain in ceramic MTS/agarose systems leading to a maximum strength of 10-50 MPa, without losing their initial cylindrical structure. This combination of ceramic and organic matrix contributes to avoiding the inherent brittleness of the bioceramic and enhances the compression resistance of hydrogel. The presence of mechanical hysteresis, permanent deformation after the first cycle and recovery of the master monotonous curve of MTS/agarose systems indicate a Mullins-like effect similar to that found in carbon-filled rubber systems. We report this type of mechanical behaviour, the Mullins effect, for the first time in MTS bioceramics and MTS bioceramic/agarose systems. PMID:22076528

  2. Recovering DNA from agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Hegen, P N

    1994-09-01

    Methods and reagents is a unique monthly column that highlights current discussions in the newsgroup bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts, available on the internet. A commonly occurring theme on the net is the recovery of DNA, and this month's column discusses the pros and cons of various methods used to extract DNA fragments directly from agarose gels. For details on how to partake in the newsgroup, see the accompanying box. PMID:7985233

  3. Superporous agarose beads as a hydrophobic interaction chromatography support.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, P E; Axelsson, A; Larsson, P O

    1999-01-15

    Superporous agarose beads were used as a support for hydrophobic interaction chromatography. These beads have large connecting flow pores in addition to their normal diffusion pores. The flow pores, which are approximately one fifth of the overall diameter of the superporous agarose beads, were earlier shown to give the beads improved mass transfer properties relative to homogeneous agarose beads (Gustavsson and Larsson, J. Chromatogr. A, 734 (1996) 231-240). Superporous agarose beads and homogeneous agarose beads of the same particle size range (106-180 microns) were derivatized with phenyl groups. The properties of the superporous beads were then compared with the homogeneous beads in the separation of a mixture of three model proteins (ribonuclease A, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin) at various superficial flow velocities from 30 to 600 cm/h. The superporous beads gave satisfactory separation at flow velocities five times higher than was possible for homogeneous beads. The performance of the two types of beads was also compared in the purification of lactate dehydrogenase from a beef heart extract at a superficial flow velocity of 150 cm/h. The superporous beads performed considerably better, leading to twice the purification factor and twice the concentration of the desired product. The results were interpreted using the theoretical treatment given by Carta and Rodrigues (Carta and Rodrigues, Chem. Eng. Sci., 48 (1993) 3927).

  4. In-situ photo-assisted deposition of silver particles on hydrogel fibers for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Raho, Riccardo; Paladini, Federica; Lombardi, Fiorella Anna; Boccarella, Sandro; Zunino, Benedetta; Pollini, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted intensive research interest and have been recently incorporated in polymers, medical devices, hydrogels and burn dressings to control the proliferation of microorganisms. In this study a novel silver antibacterial coating was deposited for the first time on hydrogel fibers through an in-situ photo-chemical reaction. Hydrogel blends obtained by mixing different percentages of silver-treated and untreated fibers were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Four different fluids, such as phosphate buffered saline (PBS), simulated body fluid (SBF), chemical simulated wound fluid (cSWF), and deionized water (DI water), were used for evaluating the swelling properties. The results obtained confirmed that the presence of silver did not affect the properties of the hydrogel. Moreover, the results obtained through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) demonstrated very low silver release values, thus indicating the perfect adhesion of the silver coating to the substrate. Good antibacterial capabilities were demonstrated by any hydrogel blend on Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) through agar diffusion tests and optical density readings.

  5. In-situ photo-assisted deposition of silver particles on hydrogel fibers for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Raho, Riccardo; Paladini, Federica; Lombardi, Fiorella Anna; Boccarella, Sandro; Zunino, Benedetta; Pollini, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have attracted intensive research interest and have been recently incorporated in polymers, medical devices, hydrogels and burn dressings to control the proliferation of microorganisms. In this study a novel silver antibacterial coating was deposited for the first time on hydrogel fibers through an in-situ photo-chemical reaction. Hydrogel blends obtained by mixing different percentages of silver-treated and untreated fibers were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Four different fluids, such as phosphate buffered saline (PBS), simulated body fluid (SBF), chemical simulated wound fluid (cSWF), and deionized water (DI water), were used for evaluating the swelling properties. The results obtained confirmed that the presence of silver did not affect the properties of the hydrogel. Moreover, the results obtained through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) demonstrated very low silver release values, thus indicating the perfect adhesion of the silver coating to the substrate. Good antibacterial capabilities were demonstrated by any hydrogel blend on Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) through agar diffusion tests and optical density readings. PMID:26117737

  6. Hydrogel microparticles for biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Le Goff, Gaelle C.; Srinivas, Rathi L.; Hill, W. Adam; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their hydrophilic, biocompatible, and highly tunable nature, hydrogel materials have attracted strong interest in the recent years for numerous biotechnological applications. In particular, their solution-like environment and non-fouling nature in complex biological samples render hydrogels as ideal substrates for biosensing applications. Hydrogel coatings, and later, gel dot surface microarrays, were successfully used in sensitive nucleic acid assays and immunoassays. More recently, new microfabrication techniques for synthesizing encoded particles from hydrogel materials have enabled the development of hydrogel-based suspension arrays. Lithography processes and droplet-based microfluidic techniques enable generation of libraries of particles with unique spectral or graphical codes, for multiplexed sensing in biological samples. In this review, we discuss the key questions arising when designing hydrogel particles dedicated to biosensing. How can the hydrogel material be engineered in order to tune its properties and immobilize bioprobes inside? What are the strategies to fabricate and encode gel particles, and how can particles be processed and decoded after the assay? Finally, we review the bioassays reported so far in the literature that have used hydrogel particle arrays and give an outlook of further developments of the field. PMID:26594056

  7. Agarose-Based Substrate Modification Technique for Chemical and Physical Guiding of Neurons In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Krumpholz, Katharina; Rogal, Julia; El Hasni, Akram; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Bräunig, Peter; Bui-Göbbels, Katrin

    2015-08-26

    A new low cost and highly reproducible technique is presented that provides patterned cell culture substrates. These allow for selective positioning of cells and a chemically and mechanically directed guiding of their extensions. The patterned substrates consist of structured agarose hydrogels molded from reusable silicon micro templates. These templates consist of pins arranged equidistantly in squares, connected by bars, which mold corresponding wells and channels in the nonadhesive agarose hydrogel. Subsequent slice production with a standard vibratome, comprising the described template pattern, completes substrate production. Invertebrate neurons of locusts and pond snails are used for this application as they offer the advantage over vertebrate cells as being very large and suitable for cultivation in low cell density. Their neurons adhere to and grow only on the adhesive areas not covered by the agarose. Agarose slices of 50 μm thickness placed on glass, polystyrene, or MEA surfaces position and immobilize the neurons in the wells, and the channels guide their neurite outgrowth toward neighboring wells. In addition to the application with invertebrate neurons, the technique may also provide the potential for the application of a wide range of cell types. Long-term objective is the achievement of isolated low-density neuronal networks on MEAs or different culture substrates for various network analysis applications. PMID:26237337

  8. Multi-responsive hybrid particles: thermo-, pH-, photo-, and magneto-responsive magnetic hydrogel cores with gold nanorod optical triggers.

    PubMed

    Rittikulsittichai, Supparesk; Kolhatkar, Arati G; Sarangi, Subhasis; Vorontsova, Maria A; Vekilov, Peter G; Brazdeikis, Audrius; Randall Lee, T

    2016-06-01

    The research strategy described in this manuscript harnesses the attractive properties of hydrogels, gold nanorods (Aurods), and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by synthesizing one unique multi-responsive nanostructure. This novel hybrid structure consists of silica-coated magnetic particles encapsulated within a thermo-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel network on which Aurods are assembled. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that these composite particles respond to several forms of external stimuli (temperature, pH, light, and/or applied magnetic field) owing to their specific architecture. Exposure of the hybrid particles to external stimuli led to a systematic and reversible variation in the hydrodynamic diameter (swelling-deswelling) and thus in the optical properties of the hybrid particles (red-shifting of the plasmon band). Such stimuli-responsive volume changes can be effectively exploited in drug-delivery applications.

  9. Multi-responsive hybrid particles: thermo-, pH-, photo-, and magneto-responsive magnetic hydrogel cores with gold nanorod optical triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittikulsittichai, Supparesk; Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Sarangi, Subhasis; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Vekilov, Peter G.; Brazdeikis, Audrius; Randall Lee, T.

    2016-06-01

    The research strategy described in this manuscript harnesses the attractive properties of hydrogels, gold nanorods (Aurods), and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by synthesizing one unique multi-responsive nanostructure. This novel hybrid structure consists of silica-coated magnetic particles encapsulated within a thermo-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel network on which Aurods are assembled. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that these composite particles respond to several forms of external stimuli (temperature, pH, light, and/or applied magnetic field) owing to their specific architecture. Exposure of the hybrid particles to external stimuli led to a systematic and reversible variation in the hydrodynamic diameter (swelling-deswelling) and thus in the optical properties of the hybrid particles (red-shifting of the plasmon band). Such stimuli-responsive volume changes can be effectively exploited in drug-delivery applications.The research strategy described in this manuscript harnesses the attractive properties of hydrogels, gold nanorods (Aurods), and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by synthesizing one unique multi-responsive nanostructure. This novel hybrid structure consists of silica-coated magnetic particles encapsulated within a thermo-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel network on which Aurods are assembled. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that these composite particles respond to several forms of external stimuli (temperature, pH, light, and/or applied magnetic field) owing to their specific architecture. Exposure of the hybrid particles to external stimuli led to a systematic and reversible variation in the hydrodynamic diameter (swelling-deswelling) and thus in the optical properties of the hybrid particles (red-shifting of the plasmon band). Such stimuli-responsive volume changes can be effectively exploited in drug-delivery applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Contains detailed information about the synthesis of

  10. Fabrication and characterization of cross-linkable hydrogel particles based on hyaluronic acid: potential application in vocal fold regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Nurettin; Jha, Amit K; Nguyen, David; Jia, Xinqiao

    2008-01-01

    There is a critical need to engineer hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogels with prolonged in vivo residence time, temporal release of therapeutics and matching viscoelasticity for use in vocal fold tissue engineering. We have previously demonstrated the synthesis and characterization of HA-based soft hydrogel particles (HGP) and particle cross-linked networks as injectable materials to treat vocal fold scarring. In this paper, we report a more versatile technique for preparing cross-linkable HA HGP with reduced sizes. HA HGP were synthesized via chemical cross-linking with divinyl sulfone using a sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane reverse micelle system in the presence of 1-heptanol. These HGP were rendered cross-linkable by introducing aldehyde groups via sodium periodate oxidation (oxHGP). The presence of aldehyde groups was confirmed by multi-photon confocal microscope upon fluorescence staining using cascade blue hydrazide. The aldehyde groups were used as reactive handles for covalent cross-linking with HA that has been previously modified with adipic acid dihydrazide (HADH). The resulting doubly cross-linked networks (DXN) are highly pliable and do not break until approx. 200-300% strain. The measured elastic modulus of the DXN is around 500 Pa, while the dynamic viscosity decreases linearly with frequency in log- log scale. The mechanical characteristics of DXN are similar to that of vocal fold lamina propria. In vitro cell-proliferation assays showed that the cross-linkable HA HGP did not adversely affect the proliferation of the cultured fibroblasts as assessed by MTT assay. A low-molecular-weight model drug, rhodamine 6G (R6G), was loaded into oxHGP, and its release was monitored using UV-Vis spectroscopy. R6G-loaded oxHGP maintained their ability to form DXN when mixed with the HAADH solution. Approximately 84% of entrapped R6G was liberated from oxHGP at a rate of 0.24%/min in the first 6 h. When encapsulated in the DXN, R6G was

  11. Fabrication and characterization of cross-linkable hydrogel particles based on hyaluronic acid: potential application in vocal fold regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Nurettin; Jha, Amit K; Nguyen, David; Jia, Xinqiao

    2008-01-01

    There is a critical need to engineer hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogels with prolonged in vivo residence time, temporal release of therapeutics and matching viscoelasticity for use in vocal fold tissue engineering. We have previously demonstrated the synthesis and characterization of HA-based soft hydrogel particles (HGP) and particle cross-linked networks as injectable materials to treat vocal fold scarring. In this paper, we report a more versatile technique for preparing cross-linkable HA HGP with reduced sizes. HA HGP were synthesized via chemical cross-linking with divinyl sulfone using a sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane reverse micelle system in the presence of 1-heptanol. These HGP were rendered cross-linkable by introducing aldehyde groups via sodium periodate oxidation (oxHGP). The presence of aldehyde groups was confirmed by multi-photon confocal microscope upon fluorescence staining using cascade blue hydrazide. The aldehyde groups were used as reactive handles for covalent cross-linking with HA that has been previously modified with adipic acid dihydrazide (HADH). The resulting doubly cross-linked networks (DXN) are highly pliable and do not break until approx. 200-300% strain. The measured elastic modulus of the DXN is around 500 Pa, while the dynamic viscosity decreases linearly with frequency in log- log scale. The mechanical characteristics of DXN are similar to that of vocal fold lamina propria. In vitro cell-proliferation assays showed that the cross-linkable HA HGP did not adversely affect the proliferation of the cultured fibroblasts as assessed by MTT assay. A low-molecular-weight model drug, rhodamine 6G (R6G), was loaded into oxHGP, and its release was monitored using UV-Vis spectroscopy. R6G-loaded oxHGP maintained their ability to form DXN when mixed with the HAADH solution. Approximately 84% of entrapped R6G was liberated from oxHGP at a rate of 0.24%/min in the first 6 h. When encapsulated in the DXN, R6G was

  12. Perlecan domain I-conjugated, hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel particles for enhanced chondrogenic differentiation via BMP-2 release

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Amit K.; Yang, Weidong; Kirn-Safran, Catherine B.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a biomimetic growth factor delivery system that effectively stimulates the chondrogenic differentiation of the cultured mesenchymal stem cells via the controlled presentation of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based, microscopic hydrogel particles (HGPs) with inherent nanopores and defined functional groups were synthesized by an inverse emulsion polymerization technique. Recombinantly produced, heparan sulfate (HS)-bearing perlecan domain I (PlnDI) was covalently immobilized to HA HGPs (HGP-P1) via a flexible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker through the lysine amines in the core protein of PlnDI employing reductive amination. Compared to HGP without PlnDI, HGP-P1 exhibited significantly (p<0.05) higher BMP-2 binding capacity and distinctly different BMP-2 release kinetics. Heparitinase treatment increased the amount of BMP-2 released from HGP-P1, confirming the HS-dependent BMP-2 binding. While BMP-2 was released from HGPs with a distinct burst release followed by a minimal cumulative release, its release from HGP-P1 exhibited a minimal burst release followed by linear release kinetics over 15 days. The bioactivity of the hydrogel particles was evaluated using micromass culture of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and the chondrogenic differentiation was assessed by the production of glycosaminoglycan, aggrecan and collagen type II. Our results revealed that BMP-2 loaded HGP-P1 stimulates more robust cartilage specific ECM production as compared to BMP-2 loaded HGP, due to the ability of HGP-P1 to potentiate BMP-2 and modulate its release with a near zero-order release kinetics. The PlnDI conjugated, HA HGPs provide an improved BMP-2 delivery system for stimulating chondrogenic differentiation in vitro, with potential therapeutic application for cartilage repair and regeneration. PMID:19775743

  13. Filled hydrogel particles as a delivery system for n-3 long chain PUFA in low-fat frankfurters: Consequences for product characteristics with special reference to lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    This article examines the suitability of filled hydrogel particles for use as a delivery system for n-3 long chain PUFAs in low-fat frankfurters. Their effects on product characteristics over chilled storage were compared with those of frankfurters containing all-pork fat (control) or a comparable amount of fish oil (n-3 LCPUFA) incorporated in liquid form or in an oil-in-water emulsion. In modified samples n-3 fatty acids ranged between 801.34 to 996.37 mg/100g as opposed to 66 mg/100g in all-pork fat product. As compared with the control, hardness and chewiness values were similar (P>0.05) in filled hydrogel frankfurter. The presence of fish oil favoured lipid oxidation to varying degrees depending on delivery system, in descending order: direct oil addition>oil-in-water emulsion>hydrogels. Sensory evaluation demonstrated the advantages, from a sensory point of view, of hydrogel filled particles as n-3 delivery systems in frankfurters. PMID:26232749

  14. Hydrothermally Treated Chitosan Hydrogel Loaded with Copper and Zinc Particles as a Potential Micronutrient-Based Antimicrobial Feed Additive

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale use of antibiotics in food animal farms as growth promoters is considered as one of the driving factors behind increasing incidence of microbial resistance. Several alternatives are under investigation to reduce the amount of total antibiotics used in order to avoid any potential transmission of drug resistant microbes to humans through food chain. Copper sulfate and zinc oxide salts are used as feed supplement as they exhibit antimicrobial properties in addition to being micronutrients. However, higher dosage of copper and zinc (often needed for growth promoting effect) to animals is not advisable because of potential environmental toxicity arising from excreta. Innovative strategies are needed to utilize the complete potential of trace minerals as growth promoting feed supplements. To this end, we describe here the development and preliminary characterization of hydrothermally treated chitosan as a delivery vehicle for copper and zinc nanoparticles that could act as a micronutrient-based antimicrobial feed supplement. Material characterization studies showed that hydrothermal treatment makes a chitosan hydrogel that rearranged to capture the copper and zinc metal particles. Systemic antimicrobial assays showed that this chitosan biopolymer matrix embedded with copper (57.6 μg/ml) and zinc (800 μg/ml) reduced the load of model gut bacteria (target organisms of growth promoting antibiotics), such as Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Lactobacillus fermentum under in vitro conditions. Particularly, the chitosan/copper/zinc hydrogel exhibited significantly higher antimicrobial effect against L. fermentum, one of the primary targets of antibiotic growth promoters. Additionally, the chitosan matrix ameliorated the cytotoxicity levels of metal supplements when screened against a murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and in TE-71, a murine thymic epithelial cell line. In this proof-of-concept study, we show that by using

  15. Hydrothermally Treated Chitosan Hydrogel Loaded with Copper and Zinc Particles as a Potential Micronutrient-Based Antimicrobial Feed Additive.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale use of antibiotics in food animal farms as growth promoters is considered as one of the driving factors behind increasing incidence of microbial resistance. Several alternatives are under investigation to reduce the amount of total antibiotics used in order to avoid any potential transmission of drug resistant microbes to humans through food chain. Copper sulfate and zinc oxide salts are used as feed supplement as they exhibit antimicrobial properties in addition to being micronutrients. However, higher dosage of copper and zinc (often needed for growth promoting effect) to animals is not advisable because of potential environmental toxicity arising from excreta. Innovative strategies are needed to utilize the complete potential of trace minerals as growth promoting feed supplements. To this end, we describe here the development and preliminary characterization of hydrothermally treated chitosan as a delivery vehicle for copper and zinc nanoparticles that could act as a micronutrient-based antimicrobial feed supplement. Material characterization studies showed that hydrothermal treatment makes a chitosan hydrogel that rearranged to capture the copper and zinc metal particles. Systemic antimicrobial assays showed that this chitosan biopolymer matrix embedded with copper (57.6 μg/ml) and zinc (800 μg/ml) reduced the load of model gut bacteria (target organisms of growth promoting antibiotics), such as Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Lactobacillus fermentum under in vitro conditions. Particularly, the chitosan/copper/zinc hydrogel exhibited significantly higher antimicrobial effect against L. fermentum, one of the primary targets of antibiotic growth promoters. Additionally, the chitosan matrix ameliorated the cytotoxicity levels of metal supplements when screened against a murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and in TE-71, a murine thymic epithelial cell line. In this proof-of-concept study, we show that by using

  16. A simple route to synthesize conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole nanocomposite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties and their performance for removal of hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Hasan; Rahman, Mohammad Mostafizar; Ali, Mohammad Azgar; Minami, Hideto; Tauer, Klaus; Gafur, Mohammad Abdul; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubor

    2016-08-01

    A combination of maghemite polypyrrole (PPy/γ-Fe2O3) and stimuli-responsive properties in the same hydrogel microspheres is expected to enhance their application potential in various fields such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, biosensors, biomedical applications and removal of heavy metals from waste water, catalysis etc. In this investigation a simple two step process is used to prepare conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole (PPy) composite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties. Poly(styrene-methacrylic acid-N-isopropylacrylamide-polyethelene glycol methacrylate) or P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles are first prepared by soap-free precipitation copolymerization. The copolymer hydrogel particles exhibited both temperature- and pH-responsive volume phase transition. Conductive P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposite hydrogel particles are then prepared by seeded chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles using FeCl3 as a oxidant and p-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA) as a dopant. In the reaction system FeCl3 functioned as a source of Fe(III) for the formation of γ-Fe2O3. This reaction also requires the initial presence of Fe(II) provided by the addition of FeCl2. The size and size distribution, surface structure, and morphology of the prepared conductive composite hydrogel particles are confirmed by FTIR, electron micrographs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-visible spectroscopy. The performance of nanocomposite hydrogel particles has been evaluated for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr) ions from water.

  17. Microstructured polyacrylamide hydrogels made with hydrophobic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nuño-Donlucas, S M; Sánchez-Díaz, J C; Rabelero, M; Cortés-Ortega, J; Luhrs-Olmos, C C; Fernández-Escamilla, V V; Mendizábal, E; Puig, J E

    2004-02-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) nanosize particles, made by microemulsion polymerization, were dispersed in an acrylamide aqueous solution, which was polymerized in the presence of a cross-linking agent to yield microstructured hydrogels. The kinetics of swelling and the mechanical properties of these hydrogels were investigated as a function of concentration of particles. The microstructured hydrogels exhibit higher equilibrium swelling and larger Young modulus than conventional (that is, without particles) polyacrylamide hydrogel. The morphology of the microstructured hydrogels was examined by transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Microporous Cell-laden Hydrogels for Engineered Tissue Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hong; Chung, Bong Geun; Lee, Won Gu; Kim, Jinseok; Brigham, Mark D.; Shim, Jaesool; Lee, Seunghwan; Hwang, Changmo; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Demirci, Utkan; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach to generate microporous cell-laden hydrogels for fabricating biomimetic tissue engineered constructs. Micropores at different length scales were fabricated in cell-laden hydrogels by micromolding fluidic channels and leaching sucrose crystals. Microengineered channels were created within cell-laden hydrogel precursors that contained agarose solution mixed with sucrose crystals. The rapid cooling of the agarose solution was used to gel the solution and form micropores in place of the sucrose crystals. The sucrose leaching process generated micropores that were homogeneously distributed within the gels, while enabling the direct immobilization of cells within the gels. We also characterized the physical, mechanical, and biological properties (i.e. microporosity, diffusivity, and cell viability) of cell-laden agarose gels as a function of engineered porosity. The microporosity was controlled from 0% to 40% and the diffusivity of molecules in the porous agarose gels increased as compared to controls. Furthermore, the viability of human hepatocyte cells that were cultured in microporous agarose gels corresponded to the diffusion profile generated away from the microchannels. Based on their enhanced diffusive properties, microporous cell-laden hydrogels containing a microengineered fluidic channel could be a useful tool for generating tissue structures for regenerative medicine and drug discovery applications. PMID:20091766

  19. 3D printing enables separation of orthogonal functions within a hydrogel particle.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ritu; Clay, Nicholas E; Sen, Sanjeet; Melhem, Molly; Qin, Ellen; Kong, Hyunjoon; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional particles with distinct physiochemical phases are required by a variety of applications in biomedical engineering, such as diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery. This motivates the development of a repeatable, efficient, and customizable approach to manufacturing particles with spatially segregated bioactive moieties. This study demonstrates a stereolithographic 3D printing approach for designing and fabricating large arrays of biphasic poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) gel particles. The fabrication parameters governing the physical and biochemical properties of multi-layered particles are thoroughly investigated, yielding a readily tunable approach to manufacturing customizable arrays of multifunctional particles. The advantage in spatially organizing functional epitopes is examined by loading superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in separate layers of biphasic PEGDA gel particles and examining SPION-induced magnetic resonance (MR) contrast and BSA-release kinetics. Particles with spatial segregation of functional moieties have demonstrably higher MR contrast and BSA release. Overall, this study will contribute significant knowledge to the preparation of multifunctional particles for use as biomedical tools. PMID:27215416

  20. 3D printing enables separation of orthogonal functions within a hydrogel particle.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ritu; Clay, Nicholas E; Sen, Sanjeet; Melhem, Molly; Qin, Ellen; Kong, Hyunjoon; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional particles with distinct physiochemical phases are required by a variety of applications in biomedical engineering, such as diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery. This motivates the development of a repeatable, efficient, and customizable approach to manufacturing particles with spatially segregated bioactive moieties. This study demonstrates a stereolithographic 3D printing approach for designing and fabricating large arrays of biphasic poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) gel particles. The fabrication parameters governing the physical and biochemical properties of multi-layered particles are thoroughly investigated, yielding a readily tunable approach to manufacturing customizable arrays of multifunctional particles. The advantage in spatially organizing functional epitopes is examined by loading superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in separate layers of biphasic PEGDA gel particles and examining SPION-induced magnetic resonance (MR) contrast and BSA-release kinetics. Particles with spatial segregation of functional moieties have demonstrably higher MR contrast and BSA release. Overall, this study will contribute significant knowledge to the preparation of multifunctional particles for use as biomedical tools.

  1. A composite scaffold of MSC affinity peptide-modified demineralized bone matrix particles and chitosan hydrogel for cartilage regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyang; Man, Zhentao; Dai, Linghui; Huang, Hongjie; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Shao, Zhenxing; Zhu, Jingxian; Zhang, Jiying; Fu, Xin; Duan, Xiaoning; Ao, Yingfang

    2015-12-01

    Articular cartilage injury is still a significant challenge because of the poor intrinsic healing potential of cartilage. Stem cell-based tissue engineering is a promising technique for cartilage repair. As cartilage defects are usually irregular in clinical settings, scaffolds with moldability that can fill any shape of cartilage defects and closely integrate with the host cartilage are desirable. In this study, we constructed a composite scaffold combining mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) E7 affinity peptide-modified demineralized bone matrix (DBM) particles and chitosan (CS) hydrogel for cartilage engineering. This solid-supported composite scaffold exhibited appropriate porosity, which provided a 3D microenvironment that supports cell adhesion and proliferation. Cell proliferation and DNA content analysis indicated that the DBM-E7/CS scaffold promoted better rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMMSCs) survival than the CS or DBM/CS groups. Meanwhile, the DBM-E7/CS scaffold increased matrix production and improved chondrogenic differentiation ability of BMMSCs in vitro. Furthermore, after implantation in vivo for four weeks, compared to those in control groups, the regenerated issue in the DBM-E7/CS group exhibited translucent and superior cartilage-like structures, as indicated by gross observation, histological examination, and assessment of matrix staining. Overall, the functional composite scaffold of DBM-E7/CS is a promising option for repairing irregularly shaped cartilage defects.

  2. A composite scaffold of MSC affinity peptide-modified demineralized bone matrix particles and chitosan hydrogel for cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingyang; Man, Zhentao; Dai, Linghui; Huang, Hongjie; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Shao, Zhenxing; Zhu, Jingxian; Zhang, Jiying; Fu, Xin; Duan, Xiaoning; Ao, Yingfang

    2015-12-03

    Articular cartilage injury is still a significant challenge because of the poor intrinsic healing potential of cartilage. Stem cell-based tissue engineering is a promising technique for cartilage repair. As cartilage defects are usually irregular in clinical settings, scaffolds with moldability that can fill any shape of cartilage defects and closely integrate with the host cartilage are desirable. In this study, we constructed a composite scaffold combining mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) E7 affinity peptide-modified demineralized bone matrix (DBM) particles and chitosan (CS) hydrogel for cartilage engineering. This solid-supported composite scaffold exhibited appropriate porosity, which provided a 3D microenvironment that supports cell adhesion and proliferation. Cell proliferation and DNA content analysis indicated that the DBM-E7/CS scaffold promoted better rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMMSCs) survival than the CS or DBM/CS groups. Meanwhile, the DBM-E7/CS scaffold increased matrix production and improved chondrogenic differentiation ability of BMMSCs in vitro. Furthermore, after implantation in vivo for four weeks, compared to those in control groups, the regenerated issue in the DBM-E7/CS group exhibited translucent and superior cartilage-like structures, as indicated by gross observation, histological examination, and assessment of matrix staining. Overall, the functional composite scaffold of DBM-E7/CS is a promising option for repairing irregularly shaped cartilage defects.

  3. A composite scaffold of MSC affinity peptide-modified demineralized bone matrix particles and chitosan hydrogel for cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingyang; Man, Zhentao; Dai, Linghui; Huang, Hongjie; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Shao, Zhenxing; Zhu, Jingxian; Zhang, Jiying; Fu, Xin; Duan, Xiaoning; Ao, Yingfang

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury is still a significant challenge because of the poor intrinsic healing potential of cartilage. Stem cell-based tissue engineering is a promising technique for cartilage repair. As cartilage defects are usually irregular in clinical settings, scaffolds with moldability that can fill any shape of cartilage defects and closely integrate with the host cartilage are desirable. In this study, we constructed a composite scaffold combining mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) E7 affinity peptide-modified demineralized bone matrix (DBM) particles and chitosan (CS) hydrogel for cartilage engineering. This solid-supported composite scaffold exhibited appropriate porosity, which provided a 3D microenvironment that supports cell adhesion and proliferation. Cell proliferation and DNA content analysis indicated that the DBM-E7/CS scaffold promoted better rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMMSCs) survival than the CS or DBM/CS groups. Meanwhile, the DBM-E7/CS scaffold increased matrix production and improved chondrogenic differentiation ability of BMMSCs in vitro. Furthermore, after implantation in vivo for four weeks, compared to those in control groups, the regenerated issue in the DBM-E7/CS group exhibited translucent and superior cartilage-like structures, as indicated by gross observation, histological examination, and assessment of matrix staining. Overall, the functional composite scaffold of DBM-E7/CS is a promising option for repairing irregularly shaped cartilage defects. PMID:26632447

  4. Protein crystallization in hydrogel beads.

    PubMed

    Willaert, Ronnie; Zegers, Ingrid; Wyns, Lode; Sleutel, Mike

    2005-09-01

    The use of hydrogel beads for the crystallization of proteins is explored in this contribution. The dynamic behaviour of the internal precipitant, protein concentration and relative supersaturation in a gel bead upon submerging the bead in a precipitant solution is characterized theoretically using a transient diffusion model. Agarose and calcium alginate beads have been used for the crystallization of a low-molecular-weight (14.4 kDa, hen egg-white lysozyme) and a high-molecular-weight (636.0 kDa, alcohol oxidase) protein. Entrapment of the protein in the agarose-gel matrix was accomplished using two methods. In the first method, a protein solution is mixed with the agarose sol solution. Gel beads are produced by immersing drops of the protein-agarose sol mixture in a cold paraffin solution. In the second method (which was used to produce calcium alginate and agarose beads), empty gel beads are first produced and subsequently filled with protein by diffusion from a bulk solution into the bead. This latter method has the advantage that a supplementary purification step is introduced (for protein aggregates and large impurities) owing to the diffusion process in the gel matrix. Increasing the precipitant, gel concentration and protein loading resulted in a larger number of crystals of smaller size. Consequently, agarose as well as alginate gels act as nucleation promoters. The supersaturation in a gel bead can be dynamically controlled by changing the precipitant and/or the protein concentration in the bulk solution. Manipulation of the supersaturation allowed the nucleation rate to be varied and led to the production of large crystals which were homogeneously distributed in the gel bead.

  5. Silk microfiber-reinforced silk hydrogel composites for functional cartilage tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Yodmuang, Supansa; McNamara, Stephanie L.; Nover, Adam B.; Mandal, Biman B.; Agarwal, Monica; Kelly, Terri-Ann N.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Hung, Clark; Kaplan, David L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage tissue lacks an intrinsic capacity for self-regeneration due to slow matrix turnover, a limited supply of mature chondrocytes and insufficient vasculature. Although cartilage tissue engineering has achieved some success using agarose as a scaffolding material, major challenges of agarose-based cartilage repair, including non-degradability, poor tissue–scaffold integration and limited processing capability, have prompted the search for an alternative biomaterial. In this study, silk fiber–hydrogel composites (SF–silk hydrogels) made from silk microfibers and silk hydrogels were investigated for their potential use as a support material for engineered cartilage. We demonstrated the use of 100% silk-based fiber–hydrogel composite scaffolds for the development of cartilage constructs with properties comparable to those made with agarose. Cartilage constructs with an equilibrium modulus in the native tissue range were fabricated by mimicking the collagen fiber and proteoglycan composite architecture of native cartilage using biocompatible, biodegradable silk fibroin from Bombyx mori. Excellent chondrocyte response was observed on SF–silk hydrogels, and fiber reinforcement resulted in the development of more mechanically robust constructs after 42 days in culture compared to silk hydrogels alone. Thus, we demonstrate the versatility of silk fibroin as a composite scaffolding material for use in cartilage tissue repair to create functional cartilage constructs that overcome the limitations of agarose biomaterials, and provide a much-needed alternative to the agarose standard. PMID:25281788

  6. An agarose gel-based neurosphere culture system leads to enrichment of neuronal lineage cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyuhee; Nam, Yeonju; Choi, Yongmun

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell-based therapy holds great potential especially for neurological disorders. However, clinical applications await further understanding of many aspects of stem cell differentiation and development of technology enabling manipulation of stem cells into desired cell types in the central nervous system. Here, we developed a new method that leads to enrichment of neuronal lineage cells in neural stem cell cultures. The protocol involves cultivation of primary cells derived from the forebrains of rat E18 embryos above a layer of nonadhesive hard agarose gel in the form of neurospheres. In contrast to the neurospheres that were cultured above an anti-adhesive hydrogel layer, the primary cells that were cultured above a layer of agarose gel preferentially differentiated into β-III tubulin-positive neurons when allowed to undergo differentiation in vitro.In an effort to investigate the mechanism behind this observation, we found that the gene expression of a vertebrate neuronal determination gene (neurogenin1) was enhanced in the neurospheres that proliferated above a layer of agarose gel as compared with the control, and the gene expression level of neurogenin1 was quite well correlated with the rigidity of agarose gel. These results indicate that agarose gel can contribute, at least in part, to enrich neuronal progenitors and immature postmitotic neurons during neurosphere formation and may provide additional information to establish efficient protocols for the neural stem cell-based study.

  7. Effect of hydrogel particle additives on water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils: a custom pressure plate apparatus and capillary bundle model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Durian, D J

    2013-05-01

    To probe the effects of hydrogel particle additives on the water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils, we introduce a custom pressure plate method in which the volume of water expelled from a wet granular packing is measured as a function of applied pressure. Using a capillary bundle model, we show that the differential change in retained water per pressure increment is directly related to the cumulative cross-sectional area distribution f(r) of the water-accessible pores with radii less than r. This is validated by measurements of water expelled from a model sandy soil composed of 2-mm-diameter glass beads. In particular, it is found that the expelled water is dramatically dependent on sample height and that analysis using the capillary bundle model gives the same pore size distribution for all samples. The distribution is found to be approximately log normal, and the total cross-sectional area fraction of the accessible pore space is found to be f(0)=0.34. We then report on how the pore distribution and total water-accessible area fraction are affected by superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives, uniformly mixed into a fixed-height sample at varying concentrations. Under both fixed volume and free swelling conditions, the total area fraction of water-accessible pore space in a packing decreases exponentially as the gel concentration increases. The size distribution of the pores is significantly modified by the swollen hydrogel particles, such that large pores are clogged while small pores are formed.

  8. A simple cell patterning method using magnetic particle-containing photosensitive poly (ethylene glycol) hydrogel blocks: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chien-Yu; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chu, Wen-Chen; Chang, Hwan-You

    2011-08-01

    All human organs consist of multiple types of cells organized in a complex pattern to meet specific functional needs. One possible approach for reconstructing human organs in vitro is to generate cell sheets of a specific pattern and later stack them systematically by layer into a three-dimensional organoid. However, many commonly used cell patterning techniques suffer drawbacks such as dependence on sophisticated instruments and manipulation of cells under suboptimal growth conditions. Here, we describe a simple cell patterning method that may overcome these problems. This method is based on magnetic force and photoresponsive poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogels. The PEG-DA hydrogel was magnetized by mixing with iron ferrous microparticles and then fabricated into blocks with a specific pattern by photolithography. The resolution of the hydrogel empty space pattern was approximately 150  μm and the generated hydrogel blocks can be remotely manipulated with a magnet. The magnetic PEG-DA blocks were used as a stencil to define the area for cell adhesion in the cell culture dish, and the second types of cells could be seeded after the magnetic block was removed to create heterotypic cell patterns. Cell viability assay has demonstrated that magnetic PEG-DA and the patterning process produced negligible effects on cell growth. Together, our results indicate that this magnetic hydrogel-based cell patterning method is simple to perform and is a useful tool for tissue surrogate assembly for disease mechanism study and drug screening. PMID:21486199

  9. Effect of decellularized adipose tissue particle size and cell density on adipose-derived stem cell proliferation and adipogenic differentiation in composite methacrylated chondroitin sulphate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cody F C; Yan, Jing; Han, Tim Tian Y; Marecak, Dale M; Amsden, Brian G; Flynn, Lauren E

    2015-07-30

    An injectable composite scaffold incorporating decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) as a bioactive matrix within a hydrogel phase capable of in situ polymerization would be advantageous for adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) delivery in the filling of small or irregular soft tissue defects. Building on previous work, the current study investigates DAT milling methods and the effects of DAT particle size and cell seeding density on the response of human ASCs encapsulated in photo-cross-linkable methacrylated chondroitin sulphate (MCS)-DAT composite hydrogels. DAT particles were generated by milling lyophilized DAT and the particle size was controlled through the processing conditions with the goal of developing composite scaffolds with a tissue-specific 3D microenvironment tuned to enhance adipogenesis. ASC proliferation and adipogenic differentiation were assessed in vitro in scaffolds incorporating small (average diameter of 38   ±   6 μm) or large (average diameter of 278   ±   3 μm) DAT particles in comparison to MCS controls over a period of up to 21 d. Adipogenic differentiation was enhanced in the composites incorporating the smaller DAT particles and seeded at the higher density of 5   ×   10(5) ASCs/scaffold, as measured by glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) enzyme activity, semi-quantitative analysis of perilipin expression and oil red O staining of intracellular lipid accumulation. Overall, this study demonstrates that decellularized tissue particle size can impact stem cell differentiation through cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, providing relevant insight towards the rational design of composite biomaterial scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering.

  10. Effect of decellularized adipose tissue particle size and cell density on adipose-derived stem cell proliferation and adipogenic differentiation in composite methacrylated chondroitin sulphate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cody F C; Yan, Jing; Han, Tim Tian Y; Marecak, Dale M; Amsden, Brian G; Flynn, Lauren E

    2015-08-01

    An injectable composite scaffold incorporating decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) as a bioactive matrix within a hydrogel phase capable of in situ polymerization would be advantageous for adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) delivery in the filling of small or irregular soft tissue defects. Building on previous work, the current study investigates DAT milling methods and the effects of DAT particle size and cell seeding density on the response of human ASCs encapsulated in photo-cross-linkable methacrylated chondroitin sulphate (MCS)-DAT composite hydrogels. DAT particles were generated by milling lyophilized DAT and the particle size was controlled through the processing conditions with the goal of developing composite scaffolds with a tissue-specific 3D microenvironment tuned to enhance adipogenesis. ASC proliferation and adipogenic differentiation were assessed in vitro in scaffolds incorporating small (average diameter of 38   ±   6 μm) or large (average diameter of 278   ±   3 μm) DAT particles in comparison to MCS controls over a period of up to 21 d. Adipogenic differentiation was enhanced in the composites incorporating the smaller DAT particles and seeded at the higher density of 5   ×   10(5) ASCs/scaffold, as measured by glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) enzyme activity, semi-quantitative analysis of perilipin expression and oil red O staining of intracellular lipid accumulation. Overall, this study demonstrates that decellularized tissue particle size can impact stem cell differentiation through cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, providing relevant insight towards the rational design of composite biomaterial scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering. PMID:26225549

  11. Crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid.

    PubMed

    Awadhiya, Ankur; Kumar, David; Verma, Vivek

    2016-10-20

    We report chemical crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid. Crosslinking was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of crosslinking on the tensile strength, swelling, thermal stability, and degradability of the bioplastic were studied in detail. The tensile strength of the bioplastic films increased from 25.1MPa for control films up to a maximum of 52.7MPa for citric acid crosslinked films. At 37°C, the amount of water absorbed by crosslinked agarose bioplastic was only 11.5% of the amount absorbed by non-crosslinked controls. Thermogravimetric results showed that the crosslinked samples retain greater mass at high temperature (>450°C) than control samples. Moreover, while the crosslinked films were completely degradable, the rate of degradation was lower compared to non-crosslinked controls.

  12. Crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid.

    PubMed

    Awadhiya, Ankur; Kumar, David; Verma, Vivek

    2016-10-20

    We report chemical crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid. Crosslinking was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of crosslinking on the tensile strength, swelling, thermal stability, and degradability of the bioplastic were studied in detail. The tensile strength of the bioplastic films increased from 25.1MPa for control films up to a maximum of 52.7MPa for citric acid crosslinked films. At 37°C, the amount of water absorbed by crosslinked agarose bioplastic was only 11.5% of the amount absorbed by non-crosslinked controls. Thermogravimetric results showed that the crosslinked samples retain greater mass at high temperature (>450°C) than control samples. Moreover, while the crosslinked films were completely degradable, the rate of degradation was lower compared to non-crosslinked controls. PMID:27474543

  13. Agarose-assisted micro-contact printing for high-quality biomolecular micro-patterns.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Jee; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-05-01

    Micro-contact printing has been developed to print biomolecules, such as cell adhesive molecules, proteins, or DNAs, on a substrate, which can serve as experimental platforms for investigating biological issues and engineering biosensors. Despite the popularity of this method, it has been technically challenging to use a conventional stamp made of a hydrophobic polydimethoxysilane (PDMS) elastomer that often requires surface treatments to facilitate the inking and stamping of biomolecules. In this work, we proposed a new surface modification method for a PDMS stamp using agarose hydrogel and demonstrated the applications to the design of micro-patterned substrates with biomolecules. By using a simple bench-top dip-coating method with a commercial syringe pump to steadily pull out the stamp from boiled agarose solution, we coated an agarose layer on the stamp. It consequentially enhanced the transferability of ink molecules to the target substrate and the uniformity of printed patterns compared to the traditional methods for treating stamp surface such as surfactant coating and temporary oxidation with air plasma. In addition, this microstamping method was also used to produce patterns of proteins with the preservation of bioactivity, which could guide neuronal growth. Thus, we demonstrated the applicability to the interface designs of biochips and biosensors.

  14. Plaque assay of Heliothis zea baculovirus employing a mixed agarose overlay.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Maramorosch, K

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea has been titrated in Heliothis zea cells by the plaque method, using 1 percent mixed agarose containing a mixture of Seakem and Ultra pure agarose. Visible plaques, formed 8 days postinfection, ranged in diameter from 0.5 to 2 mm. Dose-response experiments indicated that a single particle initiated the formation of a plaque. The titration of Heliothis zea baculovirus by the newly described plaque method provides an accurate technique for the determination of virus concentration.

  15. Micron-size metal-binding hydrogel particles improve germination and radicle elongation of Australian metallophyte grasses in mine waste rock and tailings.

    PubMed

    Guterres, J; Rossato, L; Pudmenzky, A; Doley, D; Whittaker, M; Schmidt, S

    2013-03-15

    Metal contamination of landscapes as a result of mining and other industrial activities is a pervasive problem worldwide. Metal contaminated soils often lack effective vegetation cover and are prone to contaminant leaching and dispersion through erosion, leading to contamination of the environment. Metal-binding hydrogel particle amendments could ameliorate mine wastes prior to planting and enhance seedling emergence. In this study, micron-size thiol functional cross-linked acrylamide polymer hydrogel particles (X3) were synthesised and tested in laboratory-scale experiments on phytotoxic mine wastes to determine their capacity to: (i) increase substrate water holding capacity (WHC); (ii) reduce metal availability to plants to below the phytotoxicity threshold; and (iii) enhance germination characteristics and early radicle development of two Australian metallophyte grasses under limiting and non-limiting water conditions. Addition of X3 to mine wastes significantly increased their WHC and lowered toxic soluble metal concentrations in mine waste leachates. Germination percentages and radicle elongation of both grasses in wastes were significantly increased. Highest germination percentages and greater radicle development recorded in X3 amended wastes under water limited conditions suggests that X3 was able to ameliorate metal toxicity to radicles, and provide moisture, which improved the imbibition and consequent germination of the seeds. PMID:23416872

  16. Hydrogel-Assisted Transfer of Graphene Oxides into Nonpolar Organic Media for Oil Decontamination.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chongling; Wang, Dayang

    2016-06-01

    In this work, graphene oxide (GO)-loaded agarose hydrogel was transferred into oil such as hexadecane via stepwise solvent exchange with no chemical modification of the GO hydrophilic surface and the agarose network. After transfer, the GOs, loaded in the agarose network, could effectively and efficiently adsorb lipophilic dyes in oil via hydrogen bonding between the polar groups of the GOs and the dyes. The maximum adsorption capacity was 355.9 mg g(-1) for Nile red for instance, which is substantially larger than that of pristine agarose hydrogel and hydrophilic GO powder. The dye concentration for effective adsorption can be as low as 0.5 ppm. Thus, the present work demonstrates the promising potential of using hydrophilic adsorbents for efficient removal of polar impurities from oil.

  17. Formation of dentin-like particles in dentin defects above exposed pulp by controlled release of fibroblast growth factor 2 from gelatin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Naoki; Kitamura, Chiaki; Morotomi, Takahiko; Inuyama, Yoshio; Ishimatsu, Hirotaka; Tabata, Yashuhiko; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Terashita, Masamichi

    2007-10-01

    The induction of dentin formation on exposed dental pulp is a major challenge in research on the regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex. We examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), which was delivered in either a collagen sponge (noncontrolled release) or incorporated into gelatin hydrogels (controlled release), on the formation of dentin in exposed rat molar pulps. During the early phase of pulp wound healing, pulp cell proliferation and invasion of vessels into dentin defects above exposed pulp were induced in both groups. In the late phase, the induction of dentin formation was distinctly different between the 2 types of FGF2 release. The noncontrolled release of free FGF2 from collagen sponge induced excessive reparative dentin formation in the residual dental pulp, although dentin defects were not noted. In contrast, controlled release of FGF2 from gelatin hydrogels induced the formation of dentin-like particles with dentin defects above exposed pulp. These results suggest the possibility of a novel therapeutic approach for dentin-pulp complex by controlled release of bioactive FGF2.

  18. Stable environmentally sensitive cationic hydrogels for controlled delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Deo, Namita; Ruetsch, S; Ramaprasad, K R; Kamath, Y

    2010-01-01

    New thermosensitive, cationic hydrogels were synthesized by the dispersion copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and (3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride (AAPTAC). In the polymerization protocol, an amide-based comonomer, (3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride, was reacted as a new alternative monomer for introducing positive charges into the thermosensitive hydrogel. The hydrogels were synthesized without making any pH adjustment in the aqueous medium. These hydrogel particles exhibited colloidal stability in the pH range of 1.5 to 11.0, while similar cationic hydrogels were reported to be unstable at pHs higher than 6. The stronger cationic character of the selected comonomer provided higher colloidal stability to the poly(NIPAM-co-AAPTAC) hydrogels. Furthermore, these hydrogels displayed sensitivity towards temperature, pH, and salt concentration. Interestingly, the particle size of hydrogels was found to be decreased significantly with an increase in temperature and salt concentration. In addition, using pyrene fluorescence spectroscopy, it was established that the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the hydrogel particles was largely controlled by both pH and temperature. The thermosensitive hydrogels reported in this paper may be suitable for delivering different actives for cosmetic and medical applications. Although direct application of these hydrogel particles in cosmetics has not been shown at this stage, the methodology of making them and controlling their absorption and release properties as a function of temperature and pH has been demonstrated. Furthermore, these hydrogels may also have applications in scavenging organic and inorganic toxics.

  19. Biohybrid Carbon Nanotube/Agarose Fibers for Neural Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lewitus, Dan Y.; Landers, John; Branch, Jonathan; Smith, Karen L.; Callegari, Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    We report a novel approach for producing carbon nanotube fibers (CNF) composed with the polysaccharide agarose. Current attempts to make CNF’s require the use of a polymer or precipitating agent in the coagulating bath that may have negative effects in biomedical applications. We show that by taking advantage of the gelation properties of agarose one can substitute the bath with distilled water or ethanol and hence reduce the complexity associated with alternating the bath components or the use of organic solvents. We also demonstrate that these CNF can be chemically functionalized to express biological moieties through available free hydroxyl groups in agarose. We corroborate that agarose CNF are not only conductive and nontoxic, but their functionalization can facilitate cell attachment and response both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest that agarose/CNT hybrid materials are excellent candidates for applications involving neural tissue engineering and biointerfacing with the nervous system. PMID:21887125

  20. Finite difference time domain model of ultrasound propagation in agarose scaffold containing collagen or chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Malo, Markus K H; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of ultrasound backscattering is a promising diagnostic technique for arthroscopic evaluation of articular cartilage. However, contribution of collagen and chondrocytes on ultrasound backscattering and speed of sound in cartilage is not fully understood and is experimentally difficult to study. Agarose hydrogels have been used in tissue engineering applications of cartilage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to simulate the propagation of high frequency ultrasound (40 MHz) in agarose scaffolds with varying concentrations of chondrocytes (1 to 32 × 10(6) cells/ml) and collagen (1.56-200 mg/ml) using transversely isotropic two-dimensional finite difference time domain method (FDTD). Backscatter and speed of sound were evaluated from the simulated pulse-echo and through transmission measurements, respectively. Ultrasound backscatter increased with increasing collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Furthermore, speed of sound increased with increasing collagen concentration. However, this was not observed with increasing chondrocyte concentrations. The present study suggests that the FDTD method may have some applicability in simulations of ultrasound scattering and propagation in constructs containing collagen and chondrocytes. Findings of this study indicate the significant role of collagen and chondrocytes as ultrasound scatterers and can aid in development of modeling approaches for understanding how cartilage architecture affects to the propagation of high frequency ultrasound. PMID:27475127

  1. Composition of agarose substrate affects behavioral output of Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A.; Hersperger, Fabian; Mazija, Lorena; Widmann, Annekathrin; Wüst, Alexander; Thum, Andreas S.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade the Drosophila larva has evolved into a simple model organism offering the opportunity to integrate molecular genetics with systems neuroscience. This led to a detailed understanding of the neuronal networks for a number of sensory functions and behaviors including olfaction, vision, gustation and learning and memory. Typically, behavioral assays in use exploit simple Petri dish setups with either agarose or agar as a substrate. However, neither the quality nor the concentration of the substrate is generally standardized across these experiments and there is no data available on how larval behavior is affected by such different substrates. Here, we have investigated the effects of different agarose concentrations on several larval behaviors. We demonstrate that agarose concentration is an important parameter, which affects all behaviors tested: preference, feeding, learning and locomotion. Larvae can discriminate between different agarose concentrations, they feed differently on them, they can learn to associate an agarose concentration with an odor stimulus and change locomotion on a substrate of higher agarose concentration. Additionally, we have investigated the effect of agarose concentration on three quinine based behaviors: preference, feeding and learning. We show that in all cases examined the behavioral output changes in an agarose concentration-dependent manner. Our results suggest that comparisons between experiments performed on substrates differing in agarose concentration should be done with caution. It should be taken into consideration that the agarose concentration can affect the behavioral output and thereby the experimental outcomes per se potentially due to the initiation of an escape response or changes in foraging behavior on more rigid substrates. PMID:24478658

  2. Variably elastic hydrogel patterned via capillary action in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Dong, Rui; Jensen, Tor W; Engberg, Kristin; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Leckband, Deborah E

    2007-01-30

    Agarose hydrogels of varied elastic modulus can be patterned into 100-microm-wide channels with wall heights of 60 microm. After modifying the hydrogels with chloroacetic acid (acid gels), they are amenable to modification with amine-containing ligands using EDC-NHS chemistry. Using both rheometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation measurements, the elastic modulus of unmodified hydrogels increases linearly from 3.6 +/- 0.5 kPa to 45.2 +/- 5.5 kPa for 0.5 to 2.0 wt/vol % hydrogel, respectively. The elastic modulus of acid gels is 2.2 +/- 0.3 kPa to 16.2 +/- 1.6 kPa for 0.5 to 2.0 wt/vol %, respectively. No further changes were measured after further modifying the acid gels with fibronectin. Confocal images of rhodamine-modified acid gels show that the optimal filling viscosity of the agarose solutions is between 1 and 4 cP. This new method of patterning allows for the creation of substrates that take advantage of both micron-scale patterns and variably elastic hydrogels.

  3. Sequential assembly of 3D perfusable microfluidic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    He, Jiankang; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-11-01

    Bottom-up tissue engineering provides a promising way to recreate complex structural organizations of native organs in artificial constructs by assembling functional repeating modules. However, it is challenging for current bottom-up strategies to simultaneously produce a controllable and immediately perfusable microfluidic network in modularly assembled 3D constructs. Here we presented a bottom-up strategy to produce perfusable microchannels in 3D hydrogels by sequentially assembling microfluidic modules. The effects of agarose-collagen composition on microchannel replication and 3D assembly of hydrogel modules were investigated. The unique property of predefined microchannels in transporting fluids within 3D assemblies was evaluated. Endothelial cells were incorporated into the microfluidic network of 3D hydrogels for dynamic culture in a house-made bioreactor system. The results indicated that the sequential assembly method could produce interconnected 3D predefined microfluidic networks in optimized agarose-collagen hydrogels, which were fully perfusable and successfully functioned as fluid pathways to facilitate the spreading of endothelial cells. We envision that the presented method could be potentially used to engineer 3D vascularized parenchymal constructs by encapsulating primary cells in bulk hydrogels and incorporating endothelial cells in predefined microchannels. PMID:25027302

  4. Supplementation of exogenous adenosine 5'-triphosphate enhances mechanical properties of 3D cell-agarose constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Yodmuang, Supansa; Spiller, Kara; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-10-01

    Formation of tissue-engineered cartilage is greatly enhanced by mechanical stimulation. However, direct mechanical stimulation is not always a suitable method, and the utilization of mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction might allow for a highly effective and less aggressive alternate means of stimulation. In particular, the purinergic, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-mediated signaling pathway is strongly implicated in mechanotransduction within the articular cartilage. We investigated the effects of transient and continuous exogenous ATP supplementation on mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs engineered using bovine chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in an agarose hydrogel. For both cell types, we have observed significant increases in equilibrium and dynamic compressive moduli after transient ATP treatment applied in the fourth week of cultivation. Continuous ATP treatment over 4 weeks of culture only slightly improved the mechanical properties of the constructs, without major changes in the total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content. Structure-function analyses showed that transiently ATP-treated constructs, and in particular those based on hMSCs, had the highest level of correlation between compositional and mechanical properties. Transiently treated groups showed intense staining of the territorial matrix for GAGs and collagen type II. These results indicate that transient ATP treatment can improve functional mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs based on chondrogenic cells and agarose hydrogels, possibly by improving the structural organization of the bulk phase and territorial extracellular matrix (ECM), that is, by increasing correlation slopes between the content of the ECM components (GAG, collagen) and mechanical properties of the construct.

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy of the mycotoxin citrinin in condensed phase and hydrogel films.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Milena H; Gehlen, Marcelo H; de Jesus, Karen; Berlinck, Roberto G S

    2014-05-01

    The emission spectra, quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes of citrinin in organic solvents and hydrogel films have been determined. Citrinin shows complex fluorescence decays due to the presence of two tautomers in solution and interconversion from excited-state double proton transfer (ESDPT) process. The fluorescence decay times associated with the two tautomers have values near 1 and 5 ns depending on the medium. In hydrogel films of agarose and alginate, fluorescence imaging showed that citrinin is not homogeneously dispersed and highly emissive micrometer spots may be formed. Fluorescence spectrum and decay analysis are used to recognize the presence of citrinin in hydrogel films using confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy.

  6. Evaluation of apparent fracture toughness of articular cartilage and hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinghua; Rennerfeldt, Deena A.; Friis, Elizabeth A.; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, biomaterials-based tissue-engineering strategies, including the use of hydrogels, have offered great promise for repairing articular cartilage. Mechanical failure testing in outcome analyses is of crucial clinical importance to the success of engineered constructs. Interpenetrating networks (IPNs) are gaining more attention, due to their superior mechanical integrity. This study provided a combination testing method of apparent fracture toughness, which was applied to both articular cartilage and hydrogels. The apparent fracture toughnesses of two groups, hydrogels and articular cartilage, were evaluated based on the modified single-edge notch test and ASTM standards on the single-edge notch test and compact tension test. The results demonstrated that the toughness for articular cartilage (348 ± 43 MPa/mm½) was much higher than that for hydrogels. With a toughness value of 10.8 ± 1.4 MPa/mm½, IPNs of agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) looked promising. The IPNs were 1.4 times tougher than PEG-DA alone, although still over an order of magnitude less tough than cartilage. A new method was developed to evaluate hydrogels and cartilage in a manner that enabled a more relevant direct comparison for fracture testing of hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, a target toughness value for cartilage of using this direct comparison method has been identified (348 ± 43 MPa/mm½), and the toughness discrepancy to be overcome between hydrogels and cartilage has been quantified. PMID:24700577

  7. Rapid monoclonal antibody adsorption on dextran-grafted agarose media for ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yinying; Carta, Giorgio

    2008-11-21

    The binding capacity and adsorption kinetics of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) are measured for experimental cation exchangers obtained by grafting dextran polymers to agarose beads and compared with measurements for two commercial agarose-based cation exchangers with and without dextran grafts. Introduction of charged dextran polymers results in enhanced adsorption kinetics despite a dramatic reduction of the accessible pore size as determined by inverse size-exclusion chromatography. Incorporation of neutral dextran polymers in a charged agarose bead results instead in substantially lower binding capacities. The effective pore diffusivities obtained from batch uptake curves increase substantially as the protein concentration is reduced for the resins containing charged dextran grafts, but are much less dependent on protein concentration for the resins with no dextran or uncharged dextran grafts. The batch uptake results are corroborated by microscopic observations of transient adsorption in individual particles. In all cases studied, the adsorption kinetics is characterized by a sharp adsorption front consistent with a shell-progressive, diffusion limited mechanism. Greatly enhanced transport rates are obtained with an experimental resin containing charged dextran grafts with effective pore diffusivities that are 1-9 times larger than the free solution diffusivity and adsorption capacity approaching 300 mg/cm3 of particle volume.

  8. Metal-binding hydrogel particles alleviate soil toxicity and facilitate healthy plant establishment of the native metallophyte grass Astrebla lappacea in mine waste rock and tailings.

    PubMed

    Bigot, M; Guterres, J; Rossato, L; Pudmenzky, A; Doley, D; Whittaker, M; Pillai-McGarry, U; Schmidt, S

    2013-03-15

    Soil contaminants are potentially a major threat to human and ecosystem health and sustainable production of food and energy where mineral processing wastes are discharged into the environment. In extreme conditions, metal concentrations in wastes often exceed even the metal tolerance thresholds of metallophytes (metal-tolerant plants) and sites remain barren with high risks of contaminant leaching and dispersion into the environment via erosion. A novel soil amendment based on micron-size thiol functional cross-linked acrylamide polymer hydrogel particles (X3) binds toxic soluble metals irreversibly and significantly reduces their concentrations in the soil solution to below the phytotoxicity thresholds. X3 mixed into the top 50mm of phytotoxic mine waste materials in pots in glasshouse conditions reduced total soluble concentrations of toxic contaminants by 90.3-98.7% in waste rock, and 88.6-96.4% in tailings immediately after application. After 61 days, quality of unamended bottom layer of X3-treated pots was also significantly improved in both wastes. Combination of X3 and metallophytes was more efficient at improving soil solution quality than X3 alone. Addition of X3 to substrates increased substrate water retention and water availability to plants by up to 108% and 98% for waste rock and tailings respectively. Soil quality improvement by X3 allowed successful early establishment of the native metallophyte grass Astrebla lappacea on both wastes where plants failed to establish otherwise. PMID:23416487

  9. Metal-binding hydrogel particles alleviate soil toxicity and facilitate healthy plant establishment of the native metallophyte grass Astrebla lappacea in mine waste rock and tailings.

    PubMed

    Bigot, M; Guterres, J; Rossato, L; Pudmenzky, A; Doley, D; Whittaker, M; Pillai-McGarry, U; Schmidt, S

    2013-03-15

    Soil contaminants are potentially a major threat to human and ecosystem health and sustainable production of food and energy where mineral processing wastes are discharged into the environment. In extreme conditions, metal concentrations in wastes often exceed even the metal tolerance thresholds of metallophytes (metal-tolerant plants) and sites remain barren with high risks of contaminant leaching and dispersion into the environment via erosion. A novel soil amendment based on micron-size thiol functional cross-linked acrylamide polymer hydrogel particles (X3) binds toxic soluble metals irreversibly and significantly reduces their concentrations in the soil solution to below the phytotoxicity thresholds. X3 mixed into the top 50mm of phytotoxic mine waste materials in pots in glasshouse conditions reduced total soluble concentrations of toxic contaminants by 90.3-98.7% in waste rock, and 88.6-96.4% in tailings immediately after application. After 61 days, quality of unamended bottom layer of X3-treated pots was also significantly improved in both wastes. Combination of X3 and metallophytes was more efficient at improving soil solution quality than X3 alone. Addition of X3 to substrates increased substrate water retention and water availability to plants by up to 108% and 98% for waste rock and tailings respectively. Soil quality improvement by X3 allowed successful early establishment of the native metallophyte grass Astrebla lappacea on both wastes where plants failed to establish otherwise.

  10. Direct measurements of convective fluid velocities in superporous agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, P E; Axelsson, A; Larsson, P O

    1998-02-01

    Superporous agarose beads contain two sets of pores, diffusion pores and so-called superpores or flow pores, in which the chromatographic flow can transport substances to the interior of each individual bead [Gustavsson and Larsson, J. Chromatogr. A 734 (1996) 231]. The existence of pore flow may be proven indirectly by the chromatographic performance of beads but it has never been directly demonstrated in a chromatographic bed. In this report, pore flow was directly measured by following the movement of micro-particles (dyed yeast cells) in a packed bed. The passage of the micro-particles through the superpores and through the interstitial pores was followed by a microscope/video camera focused on beads which were situated four layers from the glass wall. The video recordings were subsequently used to determine the convective fluid velocities in both the superpores and the interstitial pores. Experiments were carried out with three different bead size ranges, all of which contained superporous beads having an average superpore diameter of 30 microns. The superpore fluid velocity as % of interstitial fluid velocity was determined to be 2-5% for columns packed with 300-500-micron beads (3% average value), 6-12% for columns packed with 180-300-micron beads (7% average value) and 11-24% for columns packed with 106-180-micron beads (17% average value). These data were compared to and found to agree with theoretically calculated values based on the Kozeny-Carman equation. In order to observe and accurately measure fluid velocities within a chromatographic bed, special techniques were adopted. Also, precautions were made to ensure that the experimental conditions used were representative of normal chromatography runs.

  11. Effect of strain on viscoelastic behavior of fresh, swelled and mineralized PVP-CMC hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Nabanita; Vyroubal, Radek; Shah, Rushita; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Petr

    2013-04-01

    Mineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in hydrogel matrix is one of the most interesting topics of research by material scientists for the development of bio-inspired polymeric biomaterial for biomedical applications especially for bone tissue regeneration. As per our knowledge there was no work reported about rheological properties of CaCO3 mineralized hydrogel though some works have done on mineralization of CaCO3 in various gel membranes, and also it was reported about the viscoelastic properties of Agarose, Cellulose, PVA and PVPCMC hydrogels. This paper mainly focuses about the effect of strain on viscoelastic properties of fresh, swelled and mineralized (CaCO3) PVP-CMC hydrogel. All these three types of hydrogel sustain (or keep) strictly the elastic properties when low strain (1%) is applied, but at higher strain (10%) the viscoelastic moduli (G' and G") show significant change, and the nature of these materials turned from elastic to viscous.

  12. Bioprinting Organotypic Hydrogels with Improved Mesenchymal Stem Cell Remodeling and Mineralization Properties for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Blaeser, Andreas; Buellesbach, Kate; Sen, Kshama Shree; Xun, Weiwei; Tillmann, Walter; Fischer, Horst

    2016-06-01

    3D-manufactured hydrogels with precise contours and biological adhesion motifs are interesting candidates in the regenerative medicine field for the culture and differentiation of human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). 3D-bioprinting is a powerful technique to approach one step closer the native organization of cells. This study investigates the effect of the incorporation of collagen type I in 3D-bioprinted polysaccharide-based hydrogels to the modulation of cell morphology, osteogenic remodeling potential, and mineralization. By combining thermo-responsive agarose hydrogels with collagen type I, the mechanical stiffness and printing contours of printed constructs can be improved compared to pure collagen hydrogels which are typically used as standard materials for MSC osteogenic differentiation. The results presented here show that MSC not only survive the 3D-bioprinting process but also maintain the mesenchymal phenotype, as proved by live/dead staining and immunocytochemistry (vimentin positive, CD34 negative). Increased solids concentrations of collagen in the hydrogel blend induce changes in cell morphology, namely, by enhancing cell spreading, that ultimately contribute to enhanced and directed MSC osteogenic differentiation. 3D-bioprinted agarose-collagen hydrogels with high-collagen ratio are therefore feasible for MSC osteogenic differentiation, contrarily to low-collagen blends, as proved by two-photon microscopy, Alizarin Red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction.

  13. Monolithic cryogels made of agarose-chitosan composite and loaded with agarose beads for purification of immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sijuan; Tang, Yuhai; Fu, Qiang; Liu, Xuan; Guo, Li'an; Zhao, Yanding; Chang, Chun

    2012-05-01

    In order to obtain a novel absorbent with high adsorption capacity for the purification of immunoglobulin G (IgG), continuous supermacroporous agarose beads embedded agarose-chitosan composite monolithic cryogels (agarose-chitosan cryogels) were prepared by cryo-copolymerization of agarose-chitosan blend solutions with glutaraldehyde as the crosslinker in the presence of agarose beads. After coupling 2-mercaptopyridine onto divinylsulfone-activated matrix, the obtained cryogels were used for the purification of IgG. The microstructure morphologies of the cryogels were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the obtained cryogels possess interconnected pores of 10-100 μm size. The specific surface area was 350 m(2)/g with maximum adsorption capacity of IgG 71.4 mg/g. The cryogels showed workable stability, and can be reused at least 15 times without significant loss in adsorption capacity. IgG purity after one-step purification from human plasma was monitored by electrophoresis and the average recovery was estimated to be 90%.

  14. Agarose gel investigation of quantum dots conjugated with short ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Herein, we investigate the migration distance of quantum-dot-functionalized complexes in electrophoresis. The quantitative study of these moving particles in an electrophoretic environment is modeled using an extended Smoluchowski equation. An extended Smoluchowski equation is proposed to addressed the D(m) to Ln(N) plot slope variation issue present in previous work and agreement between experiment and theory is found. The procedures underlying this work then discusses the potential of using agarose electrophoresis as a mean of monitoring the composition of nano-complexes consisting of quantum dots functionalized with differing numbers of DNA molecules.

  15. Topical delivery of dexamethasone acetate from hydrogel containing nanostructured liquid carriers and the drug.

    PubMed

    Tung, Nguyen-Thach; Huyen, Vu-Thu; Chi, Sang-Cheol

    2015-11-01

    The potential of hydrogel containing nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) to enhance the skin permeation rate and skin deposition of dexamethasone acetate (DEA) was investigated. The particle size of obtained NLCs was around 224.4 nm. NLCs had core-shell structure and DEA existed in amorphous state in NLCs. The permeation rate of DEA through excised mouse skins from hydrogel containing DEA-NLC (DEA-NLC-hydrogel) was 7.3 times higher than DEA-ointment. The skin deposition of DEA from DEA-NLC-hydrogel increased 3.8 folds compared to that from solution of DEA in hydrogel (DEA-hydrogel).

  16. Hydrogels dispersed by doped rare earth fluoride nanocrystals: ionic liquid dispersion and down/up-conversion luminescence.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-Yuan; Jia, Li-Ping; Yan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Two typical kinds of rare earth fluoride nanocrystals codoped with rare earth ions (Eu(3+) and Tm(3+)/Er(3+),Yb(3+)) are synthesized and dispersed in ionic liquid compound (1-chlorohexane-3-methylimidazolium chloride, abbreviated as [C6mim][Cl]). Assisted by agarose, the luminescent hydrogels are prepared homogeneously. The down/up-conversion luminescence of these hydrogels can be realized for the dispersed rare earth fluoride nanocrystals. The results provide a strategy to prepare luminescent (especially up-conversion luminescent) hydrogels with ionic liquid to disperse rare earth fluoride nanocrystals.

  17. Properties of cellulase immobilized on agarose gel with spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chim-anage, P.; Kashiwagi, Y.; Magae, Y.; Ohta, T.; Sasaki, T.

    1986-12-01

    Cellulase produced by fungus Trichoderma viride was immobilized on agarose beads (Sepharose 4B) activated by cyanogen bromide and also on activated agarose beads that contained spacer arm (activated Ch-Sepharose 4B and Affi-Gel 15). The CMCase activity retained by immobilized cellulase on activated Sepharose containing the spacer tended to be higher than that immobilized without spacer, although the extent of protein immobilization was lower. Also, the higher substrate specificity for cellulase immobilized on beads with spacer was obtained for cellobiose, acid-swollen cellulose, or cellulose powder. The hydrolysis product from their substrates was mainly glucose. 10 references.

  18. A study of physical and covalent hydrogels containing pH-responsive microgel particles and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhengxing; Milani, Amir H; Greensmith, Paula J; Yan, Junfeng; Adlam, Daman J; Hoyland, Judith A; Kinloch, Ian A; Freemont, Anthony J; Saunders, Brian R

    2014-11-11

    In this study we mixed low concentrations of graphene oxide (GO) with microgel (MG) particles and formed composite doubly cross-linked microgels (DX MG/GO) gels. The MG particles comprised poly(ethyl acrylate-co-methacrylic acid-co-1,4-butanediol diacrylate) with pendant glycidyl methacrylate units. The MG/GO mixed dispersions formed physical gels of singly cross-linked MGs (termed SX MG/GO), which were subsequently heated to produce DX MG/GO gels by free-radical reaction. The influence of the GO concentration on the mechanical properties of the SX MG/GO and DX MG/GO gels was investigated using dynamic rheology and static compression measurements. The SX MG/GO physical gels were injectable and moldable. The moduli for the DX MG/GO gels increased by a factor of 4-6 when only ca. 1.0 wt % of GO was included. The isostrain model was used to describe the variation of modulus with DX MG/GO composition. Inclusion of GO dramatically altered the stress dissipation and yielding mechanisms for the gels. GO acted as a high surface area, high modulus filler and played an increasing role in load distribution as the GO concentration increased. It is proposed that MG domains were dispersed within a percolated GO network. Comparison of the modulus data with those published for GO-free DX MGs showed that inclusion of GO provided an unprecedented rate of modulus increase with network volume fraction for this family of colloid gels. Furthermore, the DX MG/GO gels were biocompatible and the results imply that there may be future applications of these new systems as injectable load supporting gels for soft tissue repair. PMID:25313805

  19. Agarose coated spherical micro resonator for humidity measurements.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Arun Kumar; Liu, Dejun; Kavungal, Vishnu; Wu, Qiang; Farrell, Gerald; Semenova, Yuliya

    2016-09-19

    A new type of fiber optic relative humidity (RH) sensor based on an agarose coated silica microsphere resonator is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in the micro resonator are excited by evanescent coupling using a tapered fiber with ~3.3 µm waist diameter. A change in the relative humidity of the surrounding the resonator air induces changes in the refractive index (RI) and thickness of the Agarose coating layer. These changes in turn lead to a spectral shift of the WGM resonances, which can be related to the RH value after a suitable calibration. Studies of the repeatability, long-term stability, measurement accuracy and temperature dependence of the proposed sensor are carried out. The RH sensitivity of the proposed sensor depends on the concentration of the agarose gel which determines the initial thickness of the deposited coating layer. Studies of the micro- resonators with coating layers fabricated from gels with three different Agarose concentrations of 0.5%, 1.125% and 2.25 wt./vol.% showed that an increase in the initial thickness of the coating material results in an increase in sensitivity but also leads to a decrease of quality factor (Q) of the micro resonator. The highest sensitivity achieved in our experiments was 518 pm/%RH in the RH range from 30% to 70%. The proposed sensor offers the advantages of a very compact form factor, low hysteresis, good repeatability, and low cross sensitivity to temperature. PMID:27661866

  20. Evaluation of the friction coefficient, the radial stress, and the damage work during needle insertions into agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Urrea, Fabián A; Casanova, Fernando; Orozco, Gustavo A; García, José J

    2016-03-01

    Agarose hydrogels have been extensively used as a phantom material to mimic the mechanical behavior of soft biological tissues, e.g. in studies aimed to analyze needle insertions into the organs producing tissue damage. To better predict the radial stress and damage during needle insertions, this study was aimed to determine the friction coefficient between the material of commercial catheters and hydrogels. The friction coefficient, the tissue damage and the radial stress were evaluated at 0.2, 1.8, and 10mm/s velocities for 28, 30, and 32 gauge needles of outer diameters equal to 0.36, 0.31, and 0.23mm, respectively. Force measurements during needle insertions and retractions on agarose gel samples were used to analyze damage and radial stress. The static friction coefficient (0.295±0.056) was significantly higher than the dynamic (0.255±0.086). The static and dynamic friction coefficients were significantly smaller for the 0.2mm/s velocity compared to those for the other two velocities, and there was no significant difference between the friction coefficients for 1.8 and 10mm/s. Radial stress averages were 131.2±54.1, 248.3±64.2, and 804.9±164.3Pa for the insertion velocity of 0.2, 1.8, and 10mm/s, respectively. The radial stress presented a tendency to increase at higher insertion velocities and needle size, which is consistent with other studies. However, the damage work did not show to be a good predictor of tissue damage, which appears to be due to simplifications in the analytical model. Differently to other approaches, the method proposed here based on radial stress may be extended in future studies to quantity tissue damage in vivo along the entire needle track.

  1. Evaluation of the friction coefficient, the radial stress, and the damage work during needle insertions into agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Urrea, Fabián A; Casanova, Fernando; Orozco, Gustavo A; García, José J

    2016-03-01

    Agarose hydrogels have been extensively used as a phantom material to mimic the mechanical behavior of soft biological tissues, e.g. in studies aimed to analyze needle insertions into the organs producing tissue damage. To better predict the radial stress and damage during needle insertions, this study was aimed to determine the friction coefficient between the material of commercial catheters and hydrogels. The friction coefficient, the tissue damage and the radial stress were evaluated at 0.2, 1.8, and 10mm/s velocities for 28, 30, and 32 gauge needles of outer diameters equal to 0.36, 0.31, and 0.23mm, respectively. Force measurements during needle insertions and retractions on agarose gel samples were used to analyze damage and radial stress. The static friction coefficient (0.295±0.056) was significantly higher than the dynamic (0.255±0.086). The static and dynamic friction coefficients were significantly smaller for the 0.2mm/s velocity compared to those for the other two velocities, and there was no significant difference between the friction coefficients for 1.8 and 10mm/s. Radial stress averages were 131.2±54.1, 248.3±64.2, and 804.9±164.3Pa for the insertion velocity of 0.2, 1.8, and 10mm/s, respectively. The radial stress presented a tendency to increase at higher insertion velocities and needle size, which is consistent with other studies. However, the damage work did not show to be a good predictor of tissue damage, which appears to be due to simplifications in the analytical model. Differently to other approaches, the method proposed here based on radial stress may be extended in future studies to quantity tissue damage in vivo along the entire needle track. PMID:26700572

  2. Micro PIV measurement of slip flow on a hydrogel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Mochizuki, O.

    2014-06-01

    Slip flow on a hydrogel surface was investigated in order to clarify the effect of drag reduction on the aqueous surface of living things. Thin-film flow along the hydrogel surface was measured by using a micro PIV (particle image velocimetry) system for comparison with theoretical velocity distribution which satisfied the non-slip condition on a solid surface. The slip flow on the hydrogel was found to be related to the degree of swelling and molecular weight of the hydrogel materials. This shows the possibility of a reduction in wall shear stress as a result of the decrease in the velocity gradient near a wall surface.

  3. Free gp70 from FeLV: enrichment from cell culture fluid by ferric oxide-agarose chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zelikman, I; Akerblom, L; Hjertèn, S; Morein, B

    1989-04-01

    A new chromatographic material based on beads of macroporous crosslinked agarose containing ferric oxide particles was used for enrichment of gp70--the envelope glycoprotein of feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Free gp70 was purified from cell culture fluid in one step with a recovery of 50 to 60% and a purification of about 60 times. The described procedure is a suitable first step for the purification of gp70 from large volumes of cell culture fluid.

  4. Hydrogel Bioprinted Microchannel Networks for Vascularization of Tissue Engineering Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Bertassoni, Luiz E.; Cecconi, Martina; Manoharan, Vijayan; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Cristino, Ana Luiza; Barabaschi, Giada; Demarchi, Danilo; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Yang, Yunzhi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization remains a critical challenge in tissue engineering. The development of vascular networks within densely populated and metabolically functional tissues facilitate transport of nutrients and removal of waste products, thus preserving cellular viability over a long period of time. Despite tremendous progress in fabricating complex tissue constructs in the past few years, approaches for controlled vascularization within hydrogel based engineered tissue constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a three dimensional (3D) micromolding technique utilizing bioprinted agarose template fibers to fabricate microchannel networks with various architectural features within photo cross linkable hydrogel constructs. Using the proposed approach, we were able to successfully embed functional and perfusable microchannels inside methacrylated gelatin (GelMA), star poly (ethylene glycol-co-lactide) acrylate (SPELA), poly (ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels at different concentrations. In particular, GelMA hydrogels were used as a model to demonstrate the functionality of the fabricated vascular networks in improving mass transport, cellular viability and differentiation within the cell-laden tissue constructs. In addition, successful formation of endothelial monolayers within the fabricated channels was confirmed. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an effective technique for vascularization of hydrogel constructs with useful applications in tissue engineering and organs on a chip. PMID:24860845

  5. Hydrogel bioprinted microchannel networks for vascularization of tissue engineering constructs.

    PubMed

    Bertassoni, Luiz E; Cecconi, Martina; Manoharan, Vijayan; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Cristino, Ana Luiza; Barabaschi, Giada; Demarchi, Danilo; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Yang, Yunzhi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Vascularization remains a critical challenge in tissue engineering. The development of vascular networks within densely populated and metabolically functional tissues facilitate transport of nutrients and removal of waste products, thus preserving cellular viability over a long period of time. Despite tremendous progress in fabricating complex tissue constructs in the past few years, approaches for controlled vascularization within hydrogel based engineered tissue constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a three dimensional (3D) micromolding technique utilizing bioprinted agarose template fibers to fabricate microchannel networks with various architectural features within photocrosslinkable hydrogel constructs. Using the proposed approach, we were able to successfully embed functional and perfusable microchannels inside methacrylated gelatin (GelMA), star poly(ethylene glycol-co-lactide) acrylate (SPELA), poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels at different concentrations. In particular, GelMA hydrogels were used as a model to demonstrate the functionality of the fabricated vascular networks in improving mass transport, cellular viability and differentiation within the cell-laden tissue constructs. In addition, successful formation of endothelial monolayers within the fabricated channels was confirmed. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an effective technique for vascularization of hydrogel constructs with useful applications in tissue engineering and organs on a chip.

  6. Novel-porous-Ag0 nanocomposite hydrogels via green process for advanced antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Vimala, Kanikireddy; Kanny, K; Varaprasad, Kokkarachedu; Kumar, N Mithil; Reddy, G S M

    2014-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) antibacterial characteristics were depends on its particle stabilization, particles size and nucleation agent. In this study, we report on green process of porous silver nanocomposite hydrogels for advanced antibacterial applications. The porous poly(acrylamide) (PAM) hydrogels were developed employing sucrose as porogenator. Silver NPs were nucleated with natural biomass Neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf extracts within the porous hydrogel networks. The formation of silver NPs in the porous hydrogels was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermo gravimetric analysis. Morphological studies done by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the hydrogels were porous in nature and stabilization of NPs, size, and particles shape. The porous PAM silver nanoparticle hydrogels demonstrated excellent antimicrobial activity with significant effect against Escherichia coli, Micrococcus, and Candida albicus. Hence, it was clear that the developed hydrogels can be used effectively for preventing and treating infections.

  7. A serum amyloid P-binding hydrogel speeds healing of partial thickness wounds in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Gomer, Richard H.; Pilling, Darrell; Kauvar, Lawrence M.; Ellsworth, Stote; Ronkainen, Sanna D.; Roife, David; Davis, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    During wound healing, some circulating monocytes enter the wound, differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, and appear to then further differentiate into myofibroblasts, cells that play a key role in collagen deposition, cytokine release, and wound contraction. The differentiation of monocytes into fibrocytes is inhibited by the serum protein serum amyloid P (SAP). Depleting SAP at a wound site thus might speed wound healing. SAP binds to some types of agarose in the presence of Ca2+. We found that human SAP binds to an agarose with a KD of 7×10−8M and a Bmax of 2.1 μg SAP/mg wet weight agarose. Mixing this agarose 1: 5 w/v with 30 μg/mL human SAP (the average SAP concentration in normal serum) in a buffer containing 2mM Ca2+ reduced the free SAP concentration to ~0.02 μg/mL, well below the concentration that inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. Compared with a hydrogel dressing and a foam dressing, dressings containing this agarose and Ca2+ significantly increased the speed of wound healing in partial thickness wounds in pigs. This suggests that agarose/Ca2+ dressings may be beneficial for wound healing in humans. PMID:19660048

  8. A serum amyloid P-binding hydrogel speeds healing of partial thickness wounds in pigs.

    PubMed

    Gomer, Richard H; Pilling, Darrell; Kauvar, Lawrence M; Ellsworth, Stote; Ronkainen, Sanna D; Roife, David; Davis, Stephen C

    2009-01-01

    During wound healing, some circulating monocytes enter the wound, differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, and appear to then further differentiate into myofibroblasts, cells that play a key role in collagen deposition, cytokine release, and wound contraction. The differentiation of monocytes into fibrocytes is inhibited by the serum protein serum amyloid P (SAP). Depleting SAP at a wound site thus might speed wound healing. SAP binds to some types of agarose in the presence of Ca(2+). We found that human SAP binds to an agarose with a K(D) of 7 x 10(-8) M and a B(max) of 2.1 microg SAP/mg wet weight agarose. Mixing this agarose 1 : 5 w/v with 30 microg/mL human SAP (the average SAP concentration in normal serum) in a buffer containing 2 mM Ca(2+) reduced the free SAP concentration to approximately 0.02 microg/mL, well below the concentration that inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. Compared with a hydrogel dressing and a foam dressing, dressings containing this agarose and Ca(2+) significantly increased the speed of wound healing in partial thickness wounds in pigs. This suggests that agarose/Ca(2+) dressings may be beneficial for wound healing in humans. PMID:19660048

  9. Apatite formed on/in agarose gel as a bone-grafting material in the treatment of periodontal infrabony defect.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Masashi; Shimoda, Toru; Sugihara, Kazumasa; Ogomi, Daisuke; Ohgushi, Hajime; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2005-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of a hydroxyapatite/agarose (HA/agarose) composite gel formed by a novel alternate soaking process for the treatment of periodontal infrabony defects in three dogs. After creating two-wall infrabony periodontal defects on the medial aspect of the maxillary and mandibular second and forth premolars, the defects were implanted with temporary dental filling material (stopping) to induce inflammatory periodontal disease. Two months later, the mucoperiosteal flaps were raised, and after debridement, the infrabony defects were filled with one of the following three materials: (a) HA/agarose, (b) Bone ject (True-Bone Ceramic-collagen combined bone graft material, Koken, Japan), or (c) no material implantation (negative control). The animals were then randomly scheduled for sacrifice at 1, 2, and 6 months, and samples were taken for histological examination. In the HA/agarose gels, the 2-month postoperative cavities exhibited regeneration to new attachments with the apposition of a new cementum and well-oriented fibers. The neocementum was narrow and acellular, and the new bone apposition was limited. Six months postoperatively, newly formed bone was predominantly observed. The neocementum was wider and cellular. In the negative control, the 2-month postoperative cavities exhibited no regeneration of the cementum, nor any formation of periodontal pockets. The six-month postoperative cavities were nearly the same as the 2-month cavities. The Bone ject, 2-month postoperative cavities exhibited no regeneration of the periodontal tissue, nor any formation of periodontal pockets. Six months postoperatively, inflammatory granulation tissue was observed around the particles. The present study suggests that HA/agarose gels may play an important role in the regeneration of lost periodontal tissue. PMID:16034996

  10. Posing for a picture: vesicle immobilization in agarose gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, Rafael B.; Steinkühler, Jan; Knorr, Roland L.; Dimova, Rumiana; Riske, Karin A.

    2016-05-01

    Taking a photo typically requires the object of interest to stand still. In science, imaging is potentiated by optical and electron microscopy. However, living and soft matter are not still. Thus, biological preparations for microscopy usually include a fixation step. Similarly, immobilization strategies are required for or substantially facilitate imaging of cells or lipid vesicles, and even more so for acquiring high-quality data via fluorescence-based techniques. Here, we describe a simple yet efficient method to immobilize objects such as lipid vesicles with sizes between 0.1 and 100 μm using agarose gel. We show that while large and giant unilamellar vesicles (LUVs and GUVs) can be caged in the pockets of the gel meshwork, small molecules, proteins and micelles remain free to diffuse through the gel and interact with membranes as in agarose-free solutions, and complex biochemical reactions involving several proteins can proceed in the gel. At the same time, immobilization in agarose has no adverse effect on the GUV size and stability. By applying techniques such as FRAP and FCS, we show that the lateral diffusion of lipids is not affected by the gel. Finally, our immobilization strategy allows capturing high-resolution 3D images of GUVs.

  11. Posing for a picture: vesicle immobilization in agarose gel

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Rafael B.; Steinkühler, Jan; Knorr, Roland L.; Dimova, Rumiana; Riske, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    Taking a photo typically requires the object of interest to stand still. In science, imaging is potentiated by optical and electron microscopy. However, living and soft matter are not still. Thus, biological preparations for microscopy usually include a fixation step. Similarly, immobilization strategies are required for or substantially facilitate imaging of cells or lipid vesicles, and even more so for acquiring high-quality data via fluorescence-based techniques. Here, we describe a simple yet efficient method to immobilize objects such as lipid vesicles with sizes between 0.1 and 100 μm using agarose gel. We show that while large and giant unilamellar vesicles (LUVs and GUVs) can be caged in the pockets of the gel meshwork, small molecules, proteins and micelles remain free to diffuse through the gel and interact with membranes as in agarose-free solutions, and complex biochemical reactions involving several proteins can proceed in the gel. At the same time, immobilization in agarose has no adverse effect on the GUV size and stability. By applying techniques such as FRAP and FCS, we show that the lateral diffusion of lipids is not affected by the gel. Finally, our immobilization strategy allows capturing high-resolution 3D images of GUVs. PMID:27140695

  12. Hydrogel Composite Materials for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Jenna M.; Oyen, Michelle L.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogels are appealing for biomaterials applications due to their compositional similarity with highly hydrated natural biological tissues. However, for structurally demanding tissue engineering applications, hydrogel use is limited by poor mechanical properties. Here, composite materials approaches are considered for improving hydrogel properties while attempting to more closely mimic natural biological tissue structures. A variety of composite material microstructures is explored, based on multiple hydrogel constituents, particle reinforcement, electrospun nanometer to micrometer diameter polymer fibers with single and multiple fiber networks, and combinations of these approaches to form fully three-dimensional fiber-reinforced hydrogels. Natural and synthetic polymers are examined for formation of a range of scaffolds and across a range of engineered tissue applications. Following a discussion of the design and fabrication of composite scaffolds, interactions between living biological cells and composite scaffolds are considered across the full life cycle of tissue engineering from scaffold fabrication to in vivo use. We conclude with a summary of progress in this area to date and make recommendations for continuing research and for advanced hydrogel scaffold development.

  13. Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus classification by electropherotype; validation by serological analyses and agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mertens, P P; Crook, N E; Rubinstein, R; Pedley, S; Payne, C C

    1989-01-01

    Serological analyses of several different cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses (CPVs), including two type 1 CPVs from Bombyx mori, type 1 CPV from Dendrolimus spectabilis, type 12 CPV from Autographa gamma, type 2 CPV from Inachis io, type 5 CPV from Orgyia pseudotsugata and type 5 CPV from Heliothis armigera, demonstrated a close correlation between the antigenic properties of the polyhedrin or virus particle structural proteins and the genomic dsRNA electropherotypes. The dsRNAs of these viruses were analysed by electrophoresis in 3% and 10% polyacrylamide gels with a discontinuous Tris-HCl/Tris-glycine buffer system or by 1% agarose gel electrophoresis using a continuous Tris-acetate-EDTA buffer system. Electrophoretic analysis in agarose gels was found to be the most suitable for the classification of CPV isolates into electropherotypes, and the results obtained showed a close correlation with the observed antigenic relationships between different virus isolates. However, electrophoretic analysis in 10% polyacrylamide gels was most sensitive for the detection of intra-type variation and the presence of mixed virus isolates. PMID:2499658

  14. Hydrogels derived from demineralized and decellularized bone extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Sawkins, M.J.; Bowen, W.; Dhadda, P.; Markides, H.; Sidney, L.E.; Taylor, A.J.; Rose, F.R.A.J.; Badylak, S.F.; Shakesheff, K.M.; White, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of mammalian tissues has been isolated, decellularized and utilized as a scaffold to facilitate the repair and reconstruction of numerous tissues. Recent studies have suggested that superior function and complex tissue formation occurred when ECM scaffolds were derived from site-specific homologous tissues compared with heterologous tissues. The objectives of the present study were to apply a stringent decellularization process to demineralized bone matrix (DBM), prepared from bovine bone, and to characterize the structure and composition of the resulting ECM materials and DBM itself. Additionally, we sought to produce a soluble form of DBM and ECM which could be induced to form a hydrogel. Current clinical delivery of DBM particles for treatment of bone defects requires incorporation of the particles within a carrier liquid. Differences in osteogenic activity, inflammation and nephrotoxicity have been reported with various carrier liquids. The use of hydrogel forms of DBM or ECM may reduce the need for carrier liquids. DBM and ECM hydrogels exhibited sigmoidal gelation kinetics consistent with a nucleation and growth mechanism, with ECM hydrogels characterized by lower storage moduli than the DBM hydrogels. Enhanced proliferation of mouse primary calvarial cells was achieved on ECM hydrogels, compared with collagen type I and DBM hydrogels. These results show that DBM and ECM hydrogels have distinct structural, mechanical and biological properties and have the potential for clinical delivery without the need for carrier liquids. PMID:23624219

  15. An Efficient, Recyclable, and Stable Immobilized Biocatalyst Based on Bioinspired Microcapsules-in-Hydrogel Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaohua; Jiang, Zhongyi; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xueyan; Han, Pingping; Qian, Weilun

    2016-09-28

    Design and preparation of high-performance immobilized biocatalysts with exquisite structures and elucidation of their profound structure-performance relationship are highly desired for green and sustainable biotransformation processes. Learning from nature has been recognized as a shortcut to achieve such an impressive goal. Loose connective tissue, which is composed of hierarchically organized cells by extracellular matrix (ECM) and is recognized as an efficient catalytic system to ensure the ordered proceeding of metabolism, may offer an ideal prototype for preparing immobilized biocatalysts with high catalytic activity, recyclability, and stability. Inspired by the hierarchical structure of loose connective tissue, we prepared an immobilized biocatalyst enabled by microcapsules-in-hydrogel (MCH) scaffolds via biomimetic mineralization in agarose hydrogel. In brief, the in situ synthesized hybrid microcapsules encapsulated with glucose oxidase (GOD) are hierarchically organized by the fibrous framework of agarose hydrogel, where the fibers are intercalated into the capsule wall. The as-prepared immobilized biocatalyst shows structure-dependent catalytic performance. The porous hydrogel permits free diffusion of glucose molecules (diffusion coefficient: ∼6 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1), close to that in water) and retains the enzyme activity as much as possible after immobilization (initial reaction rate: 1.5 × 10(-2) mM min(-1)). The monolithic macroscale of agarose hydrogel facilitates the easy recycling of the immobilized biocatalyst (only by using tweezers), which contributes to the nonactivity decline during the recycling test. The fiber-intercalating structure elevates the mechanical stability of the in situ synthesized hybrid microcapsules, which inhibits the leaching and enhances the stability of the encapsulated GOD, achieving immobilization efficiency of ∼95%. This study will, therefore, provide a generic method for the hierarchical organization of (bio

  16. An Efficient, Recyclable, and Stable Immobilized Biocatalyst Based on Bioinspired Microcapsules-in-Hydrogel Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaohua; Jiang, Zhongyi; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xueyan; Han, Pingping; Qian, Weilun

    2016-09-28

    Design and preparation of high-performance immobilized biocatalysts with exquisite structures and elucidation of their profound structure-performance relationship are highly desired for green and sustainable biotransformation processes. Learning from nature has been recognized as a shortcut to achieve such an impressive goal. Loose connective tissue, which is composed of hierarchically organized cells by extracellular matrix (ECM) and is recognized as an efficient catalytic system to ensure the ordered proceeding of metabolism, may offer an ideal prototype for preparing immobilized biocatalysts with high catalytic activity, recyclability, and stability. Inspired by the hierarchical structure of loose connective tissue, we prepared an immobilized biocatalyst enabled by microcapsules-in-hydrogel (MCH) scaffolds via biomimetic mineralization in agarose hydrogel. In brief, the in situ synthesized hybrid microcapsules encapsulated with glucose oxidase (GOD) are hierarchically organized by the fibrous framework of agarose hydrogel, where the fibers are intercalated into the capsule wall. The as-prepared immobilized biocatalyst shows structure-dependent catalytic performance. The porous hydrogel permits free diffusion of glucose molecules (diffusion coefficient: ∼6 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1), close to that in water) and retains the enzyme activity as much as possible after immobilization (initial reaction rate: 1.5 × 10(-2) mM min(-1)). The monolithic macroscale of agarose hydrogel facilitates the easy recycling of the immobilized biocatalyst (only by using tweezers), which contributes to the nonactivity decline during the recycling test. The fiber-intercalating structure elevates the mechanical stability of the in situ synthesized hybrid microcapsules, which inhibits the leaching and enhances the stability of the encapsulated GOD, achieving immobilization efficiency of ∼95%. This study will, therefore, provide a generic method for the hierarchical organization of (bio

  17. Hindered diffusion in agarose gels: test of effective medium model.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E M; Berk, D A; Jain, R K; Deen, W M

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivities of uncharged macromolecules in gels (D) are typically lower than in free solution (D infinity), because of a combination of hydrodynamic and steric factors. To examine these factors, we measured D and D infinity for dilute solutions of several fluorescein-labeled macromolecules, using an image-based fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Test macromolecules with Stokes-Einstein radii (rs) of 2.1-6.2 nm, including three globular proteins (bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, lactalbumin) and four narrow fractions of Ficoll, were studied in agarose gels with agarose volume fractions (phi) of 0.038-0.073. The gels were characterized by measuring the hydraulic permeability of supported agarose membranes, allowing calculation of the Darcy permeability (kappa) for each gel sample. It was found that kappa, which is a measure of the intrinsic hydraulic conductance of the gel, decreased by an order of magnitude as phi was increased over the range indicated. The diffusivity ratio D/D infinity, which varied from 0.20 to 0.63, decreased with increases in rs or phi. Thus as expected, diffusional hindrances were the most severe for large macromolecules and/or relatively concentrated gels. According to a recently proposed theory for hindered diffusion through fibrous media, the diffusivity ratio is given by the product of a hydrodynamic factor (F) and a steric factor (S). The functional form is D/D infinity = F(rs/k1/2) S(f), where f = [(rs+rf)/rf]2 phi and rf is the fiber radius. Values of D/D infinity calculated from this effective medium theory, without use of adjustable parameters, were in much better agreement with the measured values than were predictions based on other approaches. The strengths and limitations of the effective medium theory for predicting diffusivities in gels are discussed. PMID:8789119

  18. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn , Mukkamala, Ravindranath , Chen, Oing , Hu, Hopin , Baude, Dominique

    2003-04-22

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  19. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mukkamala, Ravindranath; Chen, Qing; Hu, Hopin; Baude, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  20. Dynamic Compression of Chondrocyte-Agarose Constructs Reveals New Candidate Mechanosensitive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bougault, Carole; Aubert-Foucher, Elisabeth; Paumier, Anne; Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Huot, Ludovic; Hot, David; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage is physiologically exposed to repeated loads. The mechanical properties of cartilage are due to its extracellular matrix, and homeostasis is maintained by the sole cell type found in cartilage, the chondrocyte. Although mechanical forces clearly control the functions of articular chondrocytes, the biochemical pathways that mediate cellular responses to mechanical stress have not been fully characterised. The aim of our study was to examine early molecular events triggered by dynamic compression in chondrocytes. We used an experimental system consisting of primary mouse chondrocytes embedded within an agarose hydrogel; embedded cells were pre-cultured for one week and subjected to short-term compression experiments. Using Western blots, we demonstrated that chondrocytes maintain a differentiated phenotype in this model system and reproduce typical chondrocyte-cartilage matrix interactions. We investigated the impact of dynamic compression on the phosphorylation state of signalling molecules and genome-wide gene expression. After 15 min of dynamic compression, we observed transient activation of ERK1/2 and p38 (members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways) and Smad2/3 (members of the canonical transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathways). A microarray analysis performed on chondrocytes compressed for 30 min revealed that only 20 transcripts were modulated more than 2-fold. A less conservative list of 325 modulated genes included genes related to the MAPK and TGF-β pathways and/or known to be mechanosensitive in other biological contexts. Of these candidate mechanosensitive genes, 85% were down-regulated. Down-regulation may therefore represent a general control mechanism for a rapid response to dynamic compression. Furthermore, modulation of transcripts corresponding to different aspects of cellular physiology was observed, such as non-coding RNAs or primary cilium. This study provides new insight into how chondrocytes respond

  1. Encapsulation of adult human mesenchymal stem cells within collagen-agarose microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Batorsky, Anna; Liao, Jiehong; Lund, Amanda W; Plopper, George E; Stegemann, Jan P

    2005-11-20

    Reliable control over the process of cell differentiation is a major challenge in moving stem cell-based therapies forward. The composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to play an important role in modulating differentiation. We have developed a system to encapsulate adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) within spherical three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments consisting of a defined mixture of collagen Type I and agarose polymers. These protein-based beads were produced by emulsification of liquid hMSC-matrix suspensions in a silicone fluid phase and subsequent gelation to form hydrogel beads, which were collected by centrifugation and placed in culture. Bead size and size distribution could be varied by changing the encapsulation parameters (impeller speed and blade separation), and beads in the range of 30-150 microns in diameter were reliably produced. Collagen concentrations up to 40% (wt/wt) could be incorporated into the bead matrix. Visible light and fluorescence microscopy confirmed that the collagen matrix was uniformly distributed throughout the beads. Cell viability post-encapsulation was in the range of 75-90% for all bead formulations (similar to control slab gels) and remained at this level for 8 days in culture. Fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton revealed that hMSC spreading increased with increasing collagen concentration. This system of producing 3D microenvironments of defined matrix composition therefore offers a way to control cell-matrix interactions and thereby guide hMSC differentiation. The bead format allows the use of small amounts of matrix proteins, and such beads can potentially be used as a cell delivery vehicle in tissue repair applications.

  2. Photonic hydrogel sensors.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Butt, Haider; Volpatti, Lisa R; Pavlichenko, Ida; Humar, Matjaž; Kwok, Sheldon J J; Koo, Heebeom; Kim, Ki Su; Naydenova, Izabela; Khademhosseini, Ali; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Analyte-sensitive hydrogels that incorporate optical structures have emerged as sensing platforms for point-of-care diagnostics. The optical properties of the hydrogel sensors can be rationally designed and fabricated through self-assembly, microfabrication or laser writing. The advantages of photonic hydrogel sensors over conventional assay formats include label-free, quantitative, reusable, and continuous measurement capability that can be integrated with equipment-free text or image display. This Review explains the operation principles of photonic hydrogel sensors, presents syntheses of stimuli-responsive polymers, and provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative readout technologies. Applications in clinical samples are discussed, and potential future directions are identified. PMID:26485407

  3. Antifouling properties of hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murosaki, Takayuki; Ahmed, Nafees; Gong, Jian Ping

    2011-12-01

    Marine sessile organisms easily adhere to submerged solids such as rocks, metals and plastics, but not to seaweeds and fishes, which are covered with soft and wet 'hydrogel'. Inspired by this fact, we have studied long-term antifouling properties of hydrogels against marine sessile organisms. Hydrogels, especially those containing hydroxy group and sulfonic group, show excellent antifouling activity against barnacles both in laboratory assays and in the marine environment. The extreme low settlement on hydrogels in vitro and in vivo is mainly caused by antifouling properties against the barnacle cypris.

  4. Photonic hydrogel sensors.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Butt, Haider; Volpatti, Lisa R; Pavlichenko, Ida; Humar, Matjaž; Kwok, Sheldon J J; Koo, Heebeom; Kim, Ki Su; Naydenova, Izabela; Khademhosseini, Ali; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Analyte-sensitive hydrogels that incorporate optical structures have emerged as sensing platforms for point-of-care diagnostics. The optical properties of the hydrogel sensors can be rationally designed and fabricated through self-assembly, microfabrication or laser writing. The advantages of photonic hydrogel sensors over conventional assay formats include label-free, quantitative, reusable, and continuous measurement capability that can be integrated with equipment-free text or image display. This Review explains the operation principles of photonic hydrogel sensors, presents syntheses of stimuli-responsive polymers, and provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative readout technologies. Applications in clinical samples are discussed, and potential future directions are identified.

  5. Hydrogel Actuation by Electric Field Driven Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Daniel Humphrey

    Hydrogels are networks of crosslinked, hydrophilic polymers capable of absorbing and releasing large amounts of water while maintaining their structural integrity. Polyelectrolyte hydrogels are a subset of hydrogels that contain ionizable moieties, which render the network sensitive to the pH and the ionic strength of the media and provide mobile counterions, which impart conductivity. These networks are part of a class of "smart" material systems that can sense and adjust their shape in response to the external environment. Hence, the ability to program and modulate hydrogel shape change has great potential for novel biomaterial and soft robotics applications. We utilized electric field driven effects to manipulate the interaction of ions within polyelectrolyte hydrogels in order to induce controlled deformation and patterning. Additionally, electric fields can be used to promote the interactions of separate gel networks, as modular components, and particle assemblies within gel networks to develop new types of soft composite systems. First, we present and analyze a walking gel actuator comprised of cationic and anionic gel legs attached by electric field-promoted polyion complexation. We characterize the electro-osmotic response of the hydrogels as a function of charge density and external salt concentration. The gel walkers achieve unidirectional motion on flat elastomer substrates and exemplify a simple way to move and manipulate soft matter devices in aqueous solutions. An 'ionoprinting' technique is presented with the capability to topographically structure and actuate hydrated gels in two and three dimensions by locally patterning ions induced by electric fields. The bound charges change the local mechanical properties of the gel to induce relief patterns and evoke localized stress, causing rapid folding in air. The ionically patterned hydrogels exhibit programmable temporal and spatial shape transitions which can be tuned by the duration and/or strength of

  6. Structural and molecular micropatterning of dual hydrogel constructs for neural growth models using photochemical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Horn-Ranney, Elaine L.; Curley, J. Lowry; Catig, Gary C.; Huval, Renee M.; Moore, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotactic and haptotactic cues guide neurite growth toward appropriate targets by eliciting attractive or repulsive responses from the neurite growth cones. Here we present an integrated system allowing both structural and molecular micropatterning in dual hydrogel 3D tissue culture constructs for directing in vitro neuronal growth via structural, immobilized, and soluble guidance cues. These tissue culture constructs were fabricated into specifiable geometries using UV light reflected from a digital micromirror device acting as a dynamic photomask, resulting in dual hydrogel constructs consisting of a cell growth-restrictive polyethylene glycol (PEG) boundary with a cell growth-permissive interior of photolabile α-carboxy-2-nitrobenzyl cysteine agarose (CNBC-A). This CNBC-A was irradiated in discrete areas and subsequently tagged with maleimide-conjugated biomolecules. Fluorescent microscopy showed biomolecule binding only at the sites of irradiation in CNBC-A, and confocal microscopy confirmed 3D binding through the depth of the construct. Neurite outgrowth studies showed contained growth throughout CNBC-A. The diffusion rate of soluble fluorescein-bovine serum albumin through the dual hydrogel construct was controlled by PEG concentration and the distance between the protein source and the agarose interior; the timescale for a transient protein gradient changed with these parameters. These findings suggest the dual hydrogel system is a usefulplatform for manipulating a 3D in vitro microenvironment with patterned structural and molecular guidance cues for modeling neural growth and guidance. PMID:22903647

  7. A constitutive model of nanocomposite hydrogels with nanoparticle crosslinkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming; Gao, Zheming

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposite hydrogels with only nanoparticle crosslinkers exhibit extraordinarily higher stretchability and toughness than the conventional organically crosslinked hydrogels, thus showing great potential in the applications of artificial muscles and cartilages. Despite their potential, the microscopic mechanics details underlying their mechanical performance have remained largely elusive. Here, we develop a constitutive model of the nanoparticle hydrogels to elucidate the microscopic mechanics behaviors, including the microarchitecture and evolution of the nanoparticle crosslinked polymer chains during the mechanical deformation. The constitutive model enables us to understand the Mullins effect of the nanocomposite hydrogels, and the effects of nanoparticle concentrations and sizes on their cyclic stress-strain behaviors. The theory is quantitatively validated by the tensile tests on a nanocomposite hydrogel with nanosilica crosslinkers. The theory can also be extended to explain the mechanical behaviors of existing hydrogels with nanoclay crosslinkers, and the necking instability of the composite hydrogels with both nanoparticle crosslinkers and organic crosslinkers. We expect that this constitutive model can be further exploited to reveal mechanics behaviors of novel particle-polymer chain interactions, and to design unprecedented hydrogels with both high stretchability and toughness.

  8. Superporous agarose beads as a solid support for microfluidic immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoonsun; Nam, Seong-Won; Lee, Nae Yoon; Kim, Youn Sang; Park, Sungsu

    2008-09-01

    We demonstrate here with the feasibility of superporous agarose (SA) beads as a solid support in microfluidic immunoassay by detecting goat IgG. In our procedure, SA beads containing superpores were covalently conjugated to protein A. The conjugated beads were introduced into a polydimethyl siloxane microfluidic device. The sandwich immunoassay was performed in the microfluidic device by subsequently introducing anti-goat IgG as the primary antibodies, goat IgG as analytes, alkaline phosphatase-conjugated F(ab')2 anti-goat IgG as detection antibodies, and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolylphosphate/nitroblue tetrazolium as substrate in a flow. Depending on the goat IgG concentration, dark and pinky precipitates appeared inside the microchannel immediately after the introduction of all the reagents. The minimum detection limit, 100 pg goat IgG/mL in PBS, was achieved with the naked eye. This enhanced sensitivity is mainly because analytical reagents were allowed to access the outer surface as well as the inner matrices of the beads. This is supported by the facts that the binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate IgG happened throughout the inside matrices of protein A-conjugated SA beads but was limited to the outer surface of protein A-conjugated homogeneous agarose beads. These results suggest that SA beads are highly suitable as a solid support for microfluidic immunoassays.

  9. Survival of different cell lines in alginate-agarose microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Orive, G; Hernández, R M; Gascón, A R; Igartua, M; Pedraz, J L

    2003-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy to treat a wide range of diseases. The optimisation of this technology depends on several critical issues such as the careful selection of the cell line, the controlled manufacture of microcapsules and the suitable adaptation of the construct design to the selected cell line. In this work, we studied the behavior of hybridoma cells once enclosed in solid and liquefied core alginate-agarose beads. Results show that hybridoma cells presented a better growing pattern and improved their viability and antibody production within liquefied beads. However, when these beads were evaluated with a compression resistance study, they were found to be mechanically more fragile than solid ones. To address this problem, we entrapped non-autologous cells (BHK fibroblast and C2C12 myoblast) in solid alginate-agarose beads and observed that they showed an improved growing profile and prolonged their viability up to 70 days in comparison to the 15 days seen for the hybridoma cells.

  10. Hydrogels Constructed from Engineered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbin; Kong, Na; Laver, Bryce; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-02-24

    Due to their various potential biomedical applications, hydrogels based on engineered proteins have attracted considerable interest. Benefitting from significant progress in recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering/design techniques, the field of protein hydrogels has made amazing progress. The latest progress of hydrogels constructed from engineered recombinant proteins are presented, mainly focused on biorecognition-driven physical hydrogels as well as chemically crosslinked hydrogels. The various bio-recognition based physical crosslinking strategies are discussed, as well as chemical crosslinking chemistries used to engineer protein hydrogels, and protein hydrogels' various biomedical applications. The future perspectives of this fast evolving field of biomaterials are also discussed. PMID:26707834

  11. Hydrogels Constructed from Engineered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbin; Kong, Na; Laver, Bryce; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-02-24

    Due to their various potential biomedical applications, hydrogels based on engineered proteins have attracted considerable interest. Benefitting from significant progress in recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering/design techniques, the field of protein hydrogels has made amazing progress. The latest progress of hydrogels constructed from engineered recombinant proteins are presented, mainly focused on biorecognition-driven physical hydrogels as well as chemically crosslinked hydrogels. The various bio-recognition based physical crosslinking strategies are discussed, as well as chemical crosslinking chemistries used to engineer protein hydrogels, and protein hydrogels' various biomedical applications. The future perspectives of this fast evolving field of biomaterials are also discussed.

  12. Use of Cross-Linked Poly(ethylene glycol)-Based Hydrogels for Protein Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels are highly biocompatible materials extensively used for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, controlled drug release, and tissue engineering. In this work, PEG cross-linked hydrogels, synthesized under various conditions, were used to grow lysozyme crystals by the counterdiffusion technique. Crystallization experiments were conducted using a three-layer arrangement. Results demonstrated that PEG fibers were incorporated within lysozyme crystals controlling the final crystal shape. PEG hydrogels also induced the nucleation of lysozyme crystals to a higher extent than agarose. PEG hydrogels can also be used at higher concentrations (20–50% w/w) as a separation chamber (plug) in counterdiffusion experiments. In this case, PEG hydrogels control the diffusion of the crystallization agent and therefore may be used to tailor the supersaturation to fine-tune crystal size. As an example, insulin crystals were grown in 10% (w/w) PEG hydrogel. The resulting crystals were of an approximate size of 500 μm. PMID:25383049

  13. Microscale Strategies for Generating Cell-Encapsulating Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Selimović, Šeila; Oh, Jonghyun; Bae, Hojae; Dokmeci, Mehmet; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogels in which cells are encapsulated are of great potential interest for tissue engineering applications. These gels provide a structure inside which cells can spread and proliferate. Such structures benefit from controlled microarchitectures that can affect the behavior of the enclosed cells. Microfabrication-based techniques are emerging as powerful approaches to generate such cell-encapsulating hydrogel structures. In this paper we introduce common hydrogels and their crosslinking methods and review the latest microscale approaches for generation of cell containing gel particles. We specifically focus on microfluidics-based methods and on techniques such as micromolding and electrospinning. PMID:23626908

  14. Radiation synthesis and characterization of nanosilver/gelatin/carboxymethyl chitosan hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Yinghui; Wang, Lu; Xu, Ling; Zhai, Maolin; Wei, Shicheng

    2012-05-01

    A series of antibacterial hydrogels were fabricated from an aqueous solution of AgNO3, gelatin and carboxymethyl chitosan (CM-chitosan) by radiation-induced reduction and crosslinking at ambient temperature. The nanosilver particles were in situ synthesized accompanying with the formation of gelatin/CM-chitosan hydrogel. Transmission Electron Microscope and UV-vis analysis have verified the formation and homogeneous distribution of nanosilver particles in the hydrogel matrix. The nanosilver/gelatin/CM-chitosan hydrogels possessed interconnected porous structure, had a compressive modulus of 44 to 56 kPa, and could absorb 62 to 108 times of deionized water to its dry weight. Furthermore, the hydrogels were found to have sound antibacterial effect on Escherichia coli (E. coli), and their antibacterial ability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing of AgNO3 content. The comprehensive results of this study suggest that nanosilver/gelatin/CM-chitosan hydrogels have potential as an antibacterial wound dressing.

  15. Synthesis and patterning of hydrogel-nanoparticle composites.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L. A.; Mancini, D. C.; Rich, L. E.; Divan, R.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a novel method for patterning nanoscale composite hydrogel materials on silicon through electron beam lithography. Gold particles were introduced into poly N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAam) patterned by e-beam lithography. By including BAC, the polymer can covalently bond to the colloidal gold nanoparticles. Such composites can be stable for long periods of time. We describe the structure, quality, and properties of the resulting patterned hydrogel-nanoparticle composite films.

  16. Extraction and identification of electroimmunoprecipitated proteins from agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Natascha Helena; Schou, Christian; Houen, Gunnar; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2008-01-31

    A method for the identification of protein antigens captured in electroimmunoprecipitates was developed. Different antigen-antibody precipitates were generated by agarose gel immunoelectrophoresis. The immunoprecipitates were excised and various methods for extracting and dissociating the precipitates were systematically studied by analyzing for protein components of the extracts using peptide mass fingerprinting after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimal recovery of antigen was obtained by 24-h extraction at 37 degrees C using a minimal volume of 0.06 M Tris-HCl, 10% SDS (pH 7). This simple and robust method is useful for the characterization of antibody specificity. It can also be used to identify antigens generating unknown precipitates in crossed immunoelectrophoresis with polyspecific antisera, including human IgG-antigen complexes electroimmunoprecipitated by secondary antibodies. Thus, the method may prove useful as an additional technique in biomarker discovery.

  17. Direct measurement of intraparticle fluid velocity in superporous agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P O; Gustavsson, P E; Axelsson, A

    1998-01-01

    Superporous agarose beads contain both normal diffusion pores and special, very wide superpores through which part of the chromatographic flow is transported, a situation that may greatly improve the chromatographic performance. For the first time such pore flow was measured directly by following the movement of microparticles (dyed yeast cells) through superporous beads packed in a chromatographic bed. The passage of the microparticles through the superpores and through the interstitial pores was recorded by a microscope/video camera. The video recordings were subsequently used to determine flow paths as well as the convective fluid velocities in both the superpores and the interstitial pores. The superpore fluid velocity was found to be proportional to the ratio between the squares of the respective pore diameters, which is in agreement with the Kozeny-Carman equation. Values for two-dimensional and three-dimensional tortuosity of the flow paths were measured and calculated respectively.

  18. Analysis of cell surface properties using derivatized agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Salbilla, B A; Vaghefi, H; Chhabra, P; Hall, G; Brown, D; Sadoughi, F; Francisco, E; Attas, L; Walker, S L; Nguyen, B N; Oppenheimer, S B

    1999-07-01

    An assay has been developed to analyse cell surface properties using agarose beads derivatized with amino acids, sugars, proteins, and other molecules. The assay is simple and rapid and is useful to identify new cell surface markers. Various species and strains of yeast, paramecium, and Euglena were tested for their ability to bind to over 100 types of derivatized beads. A variety of specificity studies were performed in order to understand the nature of cell-bead binding. Our results indicate that cell-bead binding is often specific enough to distinguish between configurational isomers and spacer sizes and can be blocked by addition of specific molecules to the incubation medium. In some cases, different species or strains differed only by their binding to a single bead type. This simple and rapid assay may help to uncover new cell surface receptors and may lead to the development of clinically useful compounds for therapeutic applications.

  19. In vitro refolding of porcine pepsin immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, E; Harada, T; Akiyama, A; Sakai, T; Kato, K

    2001-08-01

    Since in vitro refolding of pepsin has long been attempted without success, it has been suspected that pepsin has no intrinsic refolding ability. In the present study, in order to eliminate unfavorable intermolecular interactions bringing about aggregation and autoproteolysis, we immobilized pepsin onto agarose beads. This technique enabled us to search extensively for appropriate refolding conditions without limitation of the refolding period. Renaturation of immobilized pepsin was observed exclusively at pH 3-5. This process was extremely slow and reached equilibrium after 300 h. Sixty percent of the proteolytic activity was recovered at pH 5. Addition of salts raised the recovery to 80% but had no significant effect on the refolding rate, suggesting that the salts mainly stabilize the native state of pepsin. This is the first report on the successful in vitro refolding of pepsin.

  20. Refolding of firefly luciferase immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Zako, T; Deguchi, H; Kitayama, A; Ueda, H; Nagamune, T

    2000-03-01

    The renaturation yield of the denatured firefly luciferase decreased strongly with increasing protein concentration in a renaturation buffer, because of aggregation. In this study, firefly luciferase was immobilized on agarose beads at a high concentration. Although the protein concentration was extremely high (about 100-fold) compared to that of soluble luciferase, the renaturation yield was comparable with that for the soluble one. Thus, immobilization was shown to be effective for avoiding aggregation of firefly luciferase. It was also shown that the optimum buffer conditions for renaturation of the immobilized luciferase were the same as those for the renaturation in solution. Also, it was indicated that electrostatic interactions between a protein and the matrix have a negative effect on renaturation of the immobilized luciferase since the renaturation yield decreased at acidic pH only for the immobilized luciferase. These novel observations are described in detail in this paper.

  1. Cloning of DNA fragments: ligation reactions in agarose gel.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Agnelo

    2014-01-01

    Ligation reactions to ligate a desired DNA fragment into a vector can be challenging to beginners and especially if the amount of the insert is limiting. Although additives known as crowding agents, such as PEG 8000, added to the ligation mixes can increase the success one has with ligation reactions, in practice the amount of insert used in the ligation can determine the success or the failure of the ligation reaction. The method described here, which uses insert DNA in gel slice added directly into the ligation reaction, has two benefits: (a) using agarose as the crowding agent and (b) reducing steps of insert purification. The use of rapid ligation buffer and incubation of the ligation reaction at room temperature greatly increase the efficiency of the ligation reaction even for blunt-ended ligation. PMID:24243199

  2. Contemporary issues in hydrogels research

    SciTech Connect

    Peppas, N.A.

    1993-12-31

    The last ten years has seen an explosion in hydrogels research, the result of improved understanding of the structure and behavior of these water-swollen, crosslinked polymers. After the early developments of Flory And Katchalsky in the 1940s, the great Czechoslovakian researchers of the 1960s and Andrade, Hoffman, Ratner and Merrill of the early 1970s, hydrogels have again attracted significant research interest, especially through the imaginative research of Tanaka in the 1980s and others. Eight general areas of contemporary research in hydrogels are identified: (i) kinetic analysis of the copolymerization/crosslinking reactions used in hydrogel preparation; (ii) gelation and percolation theories; (iii) novel methods for tailor-made copolymers with desirable functional groups, or biodegradable chains; (iv) biomimetic hydrogels; (V) hydrogels of controlled porous structure; (vi) ultrapure hydrogels devoid of crosslinking agents, emulsifiers, etc.; (vii) critical phenomena in hydrogels; and (viii) behavior of anionic, cationic and amphiphilic hydrogels.

  3. High-quality substrate for fluorescence enhancement using agarose-coated silica opal film.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Li, Juan; Sun, Liguo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Lv, Linli; Zhao, Xiangwei; Xiao, Pengfeng; Hu, Jing; Lv, Mei; Gu, Zhongze

    2010-08-01

    To improve the sensitivity of fluorescence detection in biochip, a new kind of substrates was developed by agarose coating on silica opal film. In this study, silica opal film was fabricated on glass substrate using the vertical deposition technique. It can provide stronger fluorescence signals and thus improve the detection sensitivity. After coating with agarose, the hybrid film could provide a 3D support for immobilizing sample. Comparing with agarose-coated glass substrate, the agarose-coated opal substrates could selectively enhance particular fluorescence signals with high sensitivity when the stop band of the silica opal film in the agarose-coated opal substrate overlapped the fluorescence emission wavelength. A DNA hybridization experiment demonstrated that fluorescence intensity of special type of agarose-coated opal substrates was about four times that of agarose-coated glass substrate. These results indicate that the optimized agarose-coated opal substrate can be used for improving the sensitivity of fluorescence detection with high quality and selectivity.

  4. Preparation of gold nanoparticles-agarose gel composite and its application in SERS detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Ni, Lili; Song, Liangjing; Wang, Zhouping

    2014-03-01

    Agarose gel/gold nanoparticles hybrid was prepared by adding gold nanoparticles to preformed agarose gel. Nanocomposite structures and properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy. Based on the swelling-contraction characteristics of agarose gel and the adjustable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the gold nanoparticles, the nanocomposites were used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to detect the Raman signal molecules (NBA, MBA, 1NAT). Results revealed that the porous structure of the agarose gel provided a good carrier for the enrichment of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles dynamic hot-spot effect arising from the agarose gel contraction loss of water in the air greatly enhanced the Raman signal. Furthermore, the gel could be cleaned with washing solution and recycling could be achieved for Raman detection.

  5. Agarose droplet microfluidics for highly parallel and efficient single molecule emulsion PCR.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xuefei; Zhang, Wenhua; Wang, Chunming; Cui, Liang; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2010-11-01

    An agarose droplet method was developed for highly parallel and efficient single molecule emulsion PCR. The method capitalizes on the unique thermoresponsive sol-gel switching property of agarose for highly efficient DNA amplification and amplicon trapping. Uniform agarose solution droplets generated via a microfluidic chip serve as robust and inert nanolitre PCR reactors for single copy DNA molecule amplification. After PCR, agarose droplets are gelated to form agarose beads, trapping all amplicons in each reactor to maintain the monoclonality of each droplet. This method does not require cocapsulation of primer labeled microbeads, allows high throughput generation of uniform droplets and enables high PCR efficiency, making it a promising platform for many single copy genetic studies.

  6. Micro-environmentally restricted hybridoma cell growth within polysaccharide hydrogel microbeads.

    PubMed

    Pajic-Lijakovic, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of micro-environmentally restricted hybridoma cell growth caused by action of local mechanical compression stress generated within various polysaccharide hydrogel matrixes is estimated by comparing the growth of hybridoma cells within (1) 1.5% Ca-alginate microbeads from Bugarski et al. [in: Fundamentals of Animal Cells Immobilization and Microencapsulation, M.F.A. Goosen, ed., CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1993, p. 267] and (2) 1.3% alginate-agarose microbeads from Shen et al. [Animal Cell Technology: Basic & Applied Aspects, H. Murakami ed., Kluwer Academic Publishers, The Netherlands, 1992, p. 173].Consideration of restricted cell growth dynamics based on developed kinetic model and kinetic 3D Monte Carlo simulation include: (1) changes the fraction of active proliferating cells in the exponential phase and (2) changes of non-proliferating cell concentration in the plateau phase.Higher value of the specific decrease of active fraction of proliferating cells κ is obtained for 1.3% alginate-agarose compared to 1.5% alginate microbeads. It corresponds to higher compression stress generated within hydrogel matrix during cell growth obtained for 1.3% alginate-agarose microbeads. PMID:23988708

  7. Hydrogel Biomaterials: A Smart Future?

    PubMed Central

    Kopeček, Jindřich

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogels were the first biomaterials developed for human use. The state-of-the-art and potential for the future are discussed. Recently, new designs have produced mechanically strong synthetic hydrogels. Protein based hydrogels and hybrid hydrogels containing protein domains present a novel advance; such biomaterials may self-assemble from block or graft copolymers containing biorecognition domains. One of the domains, the coiled-coil, ubiquitously found in nature, has been used as an example to demonstrate the developments in the design of smart hydrogels. The application potential of synthetic, protein-based, DNA-based, and hybrid hydrogels bodes well for the future of this class of biomaterials. PMID:17697712

  8. Stem Cells in Aggregate Form to Enhance Chondrogenesis in Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, BanuPriya; Lin, Staphany M; Hwu, Alexander T; Laflin, Amy D; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    There are a variety of exciting hydrogel technologies being explored for cartilage regenerative medicine. Our overall goal is to explore whether using stem cells in an aggregate form may be advantageous in these applications. 3D stem cell aggregates hold great promise as they may recapitulate the in vivo skeletal tissue condensation, a property that is not typically observed in 2D culture. We considered two different stem cell sources, human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly cells (hWJCs, currently being used in clinical trials) and rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs). The objective of the current study was to compare the influence of cell phenotype, aggregate size, and aggregate number on chondrogenic differentiation in a generic hydrogel (agarose) platform. Despite being differing cell sources, both rBMSC and hWJC aggregates were consistent in outperforming cell suspension control groups in biosynthesis and chondrogenesis. Higher cell density impacted biosynthesis favorably, and the number of aggregates positively influenced chondrogenesis. Therefore, we recommend that investigators employing hydrogels consider using cells in an aggregate form for enhanced chondrogenic performance.

  9. Stem Cells in Aggregate Form to Enhance Chondrogenesis in Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, BanuPriya; Lin, Staphany M.; Hwu, Alexander T.; Laflin, Amy D.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    There are a variety of exciting hydrogel technologies being explored for cartilage regenerative medicine. Our overall goal is to explore whether using stem cells in an aggregate form may be advantageous in these applications. 3D stem cell aggregates hold great promise as they may recapitulate the in vivo skeletal tissue condensation, a property that is not typically observed in 2D culture. We considered two different stem cell sources, human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly cells (hWJCs, currently being used in clinical trials) and rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs). The objective of the current study was to compare the influence of cell phenotype, aggregate size, and aggregate number on chondrogenic differentiation in a generic hydrogel (agarose) platform. Despite being differing cell sources, both rBMSC and hWJC aggregates were consistent in outperforming cell suspension control groups in biosynthesis and chondrogenesis. Higher cell density impacted biosynthesis favorably, and the number of aggregates positively influenced chondrogenesis. Therefore, we recommend that investigators employing hydrogels consider using cells in an aggregate form for enhanced chondrogenic performance. PMID:26719986

  10. Polymer hydrogels: Chaperoning vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, Herman F.; Leong, Kam W.

    2010-07-01

    A cationic nanosized hydrogel (nanogel) shows controlled antigen delivery in vivo following intranasal administration and hence holds promise for a clinically effective adjuvant-free and needle-free vaccine system.

  11. Nanocomposite hydrogels for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels mimic native tissue microenvironment due to their porous and hydrated molecular structure. An emerging approach to reinforce polymeric hydrogels and to include multiple functionalities focuses on incorporating nanoparticles within the hydrogel network. A wide range of nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, polymeric, ceramic, and metallic nanomaterials can be integrated within the hydrogel networks to obtain nanocomposites with superior properties and tailored functionality. Nanocomposite hydrogels can be engineered to possess superior physical, chemical, electrical, and biological properties. This review focuses on the most recent developments in the field of nanocomposite hydrogels with emphasis on biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. In particular, we discuss synthesis and fabrication of nanocomposite hydrogels, examine their current limitations and conclude with future directions in designing more advanced nanocomposite hydrogels for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:24264728

  12. Collagen and chondrocyte concentrations control ultrasound scattering in agarose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, S; Liukkonen, J; Ylärinne, J H; Puhakka, P H; Lammi, M J; Virén, T; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed for diagnostics of osteoarthritis and cartilage injuries in vivo. However, the specific contribution of chondrocytes and collagen to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage has not been systematically studied. We investigated the role of these tissue structures by measuring ultrasound scattering in agarose scaffolds with varying collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Ultrasound catheters with center frequencies of 9 MHz (7.1-11.0 MHz, -6 dB) and 40 MHz (30.1-45.3 MHz, -6 dB) were applied using an intravascular ultrasound device. Ultrasound backscattering quantified in a region of interest starting right below sample surface differed significantly (p < 0.05) with the concentrations of collagen and chondrocytes. An ultrasound frequency of 40 MHz, as compared with 9 MHz, was more sensitive to variations in collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. The present findings may improve diagnostic interpretation of arthroscopic ultrasound imaging and provide information necessary for development of models describing ultrasound propagation within cartilage. PMID:24972499

  13. Immobilization of angiotensin-converting enzyme on glyoxyl-agarose.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; del Mar Yust, María; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Millán, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2006-06-28

    The assay of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition by food-derived peptides is usually carried out by using soluble ACE in a batch process. The purification of this enzyme from tissues is not an easy task, and the resulting preparation loses activity very fast. In addition, ACE commercial preparations are very expensive. In this work the immobilization of ACE, through lysine amino groups, to 4% beads cross-linked (4 BCL) glyoxyl-agarose is described. The amount of immobilized enzyme increased with increasing concentrations of enzyme and with incubation time until a saturation point was reached at 50 mg protein/mL gel and 3.5 hours, respectively. The IC50 values for a noncompetitive sunflower peptide inhibitor were similar for the soluble (30.56 microM) and immobilized (32.7 microM) enzymes. An immobilized derivative was obtained that was 60 times more stable than the soluble enzyme at 60 degrees C. This procedure yields a derivative that can be reused and has increased thermal stability compared to that of the soluble enzyme. Thus, ACE immobilization is a good alternative to using soluble freshly prepared or commercial preparations because of economical and practical reasons.

  14. Polymer hydrogel functionalized with biodegradable nanoparticles as composite system for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Filippo; Ferrari, Raffaele; Castiglione, Franca; Mele, Andrea; Perale, Giuseppe; Moscatelli, Davide

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to direct pharmacological treatments targeting specific cell lines using polymer nanoparticles is one of the main novelties and perspectives in nanomedicine. However, sometimes, the ability to maintain NPs localized at the site of the injection that work as a drug reservoir can represent a good and complementary option. In this direction we built a composite material made of polymeric hydrogel functionalized with polymer NPs. ɛ-caprolactone and polyethylene glycol have been copolymerized in a two-step synthesis of PEGylated NPs, while hydrogel was synthesized through polycondensation between NPs, agarose and branched polyacrylic acid. NP functionalization was verified with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high resolution magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS-NMR) spectroscopy and release kinetics from a hydrogel matrix and compared with NPs only physically entrapped into a hydrogel matrix. The characteristics of the resulting composite hydrogel-NPs system were studied both in terms of rheological properties and in its ability to sustain the release of To-Pro3, used as a drug mimetic compound to represent a promising drug delivery device.

  15. Removal of digoxin from plasma using monoclonal anti-digoxin antibodies immobilized on agarose

    SciTech Connect

    Brizgys, M.; Pincus, S.; Rollins, D.E.

    1986-05-01

    Monoclonal anti-digoxin antibodies (dig-Ab) have been covalently coupled to agarose supports to evaluate them as part of an extracorporeal device for removal of digoxin from the circulation. The agarose supports studied were Sepharose CL-6B, agarose-polyacrolein microsphere (APAM) beads, Bio Gel A-5m and Affi-gel 15 (Bio-Rad). Antibody concentrations between 2 and 4 mg/g gel were coupled to the agarose beads which were then placed in glass columns. Bovine ..cap alpha..-globulin coupled to the agarose supports was used as a control. Binding capacity and affinity of the immobilized antibody were determined by perfusing the dig-Ab agarose beads with a plasma solution containing /sup 3/H-digoxin and various concentrations of digoxin. The binding capacity of the immobilized dig-Ab was 30% of the theoretical value for Sepharose, Bio Gel and Affigel, and 10% of the theoretical value for dig-Ab coupled to APAM beads. The affinity of the immobilized dig-Ab was 10-100 fold less than non-immobilized Ab (3.4 x 10/sup 8/M/sup -1/. The APAM beads showed a significant decrease in binding of digoxin as the flow rate was increased from 0.5 to 5.0 ml/min. These data demonstrate that dig-Ab coupled to agarose and incorporated into a column can be used to remove digoxin from plasma in vitro.

  16. [Modification of seaweed polysaccharide-agarose and its application as skin dressing (III)--skin regeneration with agarose grafting hyaluronic acid sponge].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianyan; Zhang, Lingmin; Chu, Bin; Chen, Peng; Tang, Shunqing

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, a kind of skin dressing, agarose- grafting- hyaluronic acid (Ag-g-HA) sponge was applied to test the modified agarose based scaffold for skin regeneration. The bFGF loading agarose-grafting hyaluronan scaffold had homogenous porosities, and the loaded bFGF was bioactive in 2 weeks. The Ag-g-HA sponge was applied into skin of mice, and it was found that the dressing promoted skin regeneration and no infection and leakage in lesion site took place. H&E staining results showed that the repaired skin was similar to autologous skin. These demonstrate that Ag-g-HA sponge has a promise in skin regeneration.

  17. Fast contact of solid-liquid interface created high strength multi-layered cellulose hydrogels with controllable size.

    PubMed

    He, Meng; Zhao, Yanteng; Duan, Jiangjiang; Wang, Zhenggang; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Lina

    2014-02-12

    Novel onion-like and multi-layered tubular cellulose hydrogels were constructed, for the first time, from the cellulose solution in a 7% NaOH/12% urea aqueous solvent by changing the shape of the gel cores. In our findings, the contacting of the cellulose solution with the surface of the agarose gel rod or sphere loaded with acetic acid led to the close chain packing to form immediately a gel layer, as a result of the destruction of the cellulose inclusion complex by acid through inducing the cellulose self-aggregation. Subsequently, multi-layered cellulose hydrogels were fabricated via a multi-step interrupted gelation process. The size, layer thickness and inter-layer space of the multi-layered hydrogels could be controlled by adjusting the cellulose concentrations, the gel core diameter and the contacting time of the solid-liquid interface. The multi-layered cellulose hydrogels displayed good architectural stability and solvent resistance. Moreover, the hydrogels exhibited high compressive strength and excellent biocompatibility. L929 cells could adhere and proliferate on the surface of the layers and in interior space, showing great potential as tissue engineering scaffolds and cell culture carrier. This work opens up a new avenue for the construction of the high strength multi-layered cellulose hydrogels formed from inner to outside via a fast contact of solid-liquid interface. PMID:24405277

  18. Agarose Gel Electrophoresis Reveals Structural Fluidity of a Phage T3 DNA Packaging Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Serwer, Philip; Wright, Elena T.

    2012-01-01

    We find a new aspect of DNA packaging-associated structural fluidity for phage T3 capsids. The procedure is (1) glutaraldehyde cross-linking of in vivo DNA packaging intermediates for stabilization of structure and then (2) determining of effective radius by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis (2d-AGE). The intermediates are capsids with incompletely packaged DNA (ipDNA) and without an external DNA segment; these intermediates are called ipDNA-capsids. We initially increase production of ipDNA-capsids by raising NaCl concentration during in vivo DNA packaging. By 2d-AGE, we find a new state of contracted shell for some particles of one previously identified ipDNA-capsid. The contracted shell-state is found when ipDNA length/mature DNA length (F) is above 0.17, but not at lower F. Some contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids have the phage tail; others do not. The contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids are explained by premature DNA maturation cleavage that makes accessible a contracted-shell intermediate of a cycle of the T3 DNA packaging motor. The analysis of ipDNA-capsids, rather than intermediates with uncleaved DNA, provides a simplifying strategy for a complete biochemical analysis of in vivo DNA packaging. PMID:22222979

  19. Multilayer microfluidic PEGDA hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Cuchiara, Michael P; Allen, Alicia C B; Chen, Theodore M; Miller, Jordan S; West, Jennifer L

    2010-07-01

    Development of robust 3D tissue analogs in vitro is limited by passive, diffusional mass transport. Perfused microfluidic tissue engineering scaffolds hold the promise to improve mass transport limitations and promote the development of complex, metabolically dense, and clinically relevant tissues. We report a simple and robust multilayer replica molding technique in which poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) are serially replica molded to develop microfluidic PEGDA hydrogel networks embedded within independently fabricated PDMS housings. We demonstrate the ability to control solute-scaffold effective diffusivity as a function of solute molecular weight and hydrogel concentration. Within cell laden microfluidic hydrogels, we demonstrate increased cellular viability in perfused hydrogel systems compared to static controls. We observed a significant increase in cell viability at all time points greater than zero at distances up to 1 mm from the perfused channel. Knowledge of spatiotemporal mass transport and cell viability gradients provides useful engineering design parameters necessary to maximize overall scaffold viability and metabolic density. This work has applications in the development of hydrogels as in vitro diagnostics and ultimately as regenerative medicine based therapeutics.

  20. Design of biomimetic super-lubricants by hydrogel-biopolymer aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, Raymond; Dever, Rachel; Zhu, Yingxi

    2013-03-01

    Inspired by the superb lubricity of natural synovial fluids for moving articular cartilage joints, we investigate a biomimetic artificial lubricant based on a hydrogel-biopolymer mixture with optimized rheological properties at a microscopic level. Specifically, we examine the structure and rheological relationship of stimuli-responsive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) hydrogel added with hyaluronic acid (HA) to simulate the complexes of HA with a globule protein, lubricin, which are credited as the two key lubricious constituents in natural synovial fluids. By combined microscopic structural characterization and rheology measurement, we tune the rheological and frictional behaviors of HA solutions by optimizing the content of added micron-sized PNIPAM hydrogel particles to form stable PNIPAM-HA network. In a recent work on using zwitterionic hydrogel particles instead of negatively charged PNIPAM, comparable structure and rheological properties of hydrogel-HA aggregates are observed, which may give insight to design new biocompatible lubricants and lubricious coatings for medical ramification.

  1. Hydrogels in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, Brandon V.; Khurshid, Shahana S.; Fisher, Omar Z.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels, due to their unique biocompatibility, flexible methods of synthesis, range of constituents, and desirable physical characteristics, have been the material of choice for many applications in regenerative medicine. They can serve as scaffolds that provide structural integrity to tissue constructs, control drug and protein delivery to tissues and cultures, and serve as adhesives or barriers between tissue and material surfaces. In this work, the properties of hydrogels that are important for tissue engineering applications and the inherent material design constraints and challenges are discussed. Recent research involving several different hydrogels polymerized from a variety of synthetic and natural monomers using typical and novel synthetic methods are highlighted. Finally, special attention is given to the microfabrication techniques that are currently resulting in important advances in the field. PMID:20882499

  2. Design and development of hydrogel nanoparticles for mercaptopurine

    PubMed Central

    Senthil, V.; Kumar, R. Suresh; Nagaraju, C. V. V.; Jawahar, N.; Ganesh, G. N. K.; Gowthamarajan, K.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogel nanoparticles have gained attention in recent years as they demonstrate the features and characters of hydrogels and nanoparticles at the same time. In the present study chitosan and carrageenan have been used, as hydrogel nanoparticles of mercaptopurine are developed using natural, biodegradable, and biocompatible polymers like chitosan and carrageenan. As these polymers are hydrophilic in nature, the particles will have a long life span in systemic circulation. Hydrogel nanoparticles with mercaptopurine is form an antileukemia drug by the counter polymer gelation method. Fourier-Transform Infrared (FT-IR) studies have shown a compatibility of polymers with the drug. The diameter of hydrogel nanoparticles was about 370 – 800 nm with a positive zeta potential of 26 – 30 mV. The hydrogel nanoparticles were almost spherical in shape, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Drug loading varied from 9 to 17%. Mercaptopurine released from the nanoparticles at the end of the twenty-fourth hour was about 69.48 – 76.52% at pH 7.4. The drug release from the formulation was following zero order kinetics, which was evident from the release kinetic studies and the mechanism of drug release was anomalous diffusion, which indicated that the drug release was controlled by more than one process. PMID:22247867

  3. Adhesion in hydrogel contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. R.; Jay, G. D.; Kim, K.-S.; Bothun, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    A generalized thermomechanical model for adhesion was developed to elucidate the mechanisms of dissipation within the viscoelastic bulk of a hyperelastic hydrogel. Results show that in addition to the expected energy release rate of interface formation, as well as the viscous flow dissipation, the bulk composition exhibits dissipation due to phase inhomogeneity morphological changes. The mixing thermodynamics of the matrix and solvent determines the dynamics of the phase inhomogeneities, which can enhance or disrupt adhesion. The model also accounts for the time-dependent behaviour. A parameter is proposed to discern the dominant dissipation mechanism in hydrogel contact detachment.

  4. Improved Skin Penetration Using In Situ Nanoparticulate Diclofenac Diethylamine in Hydrogel Systems: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Soma; Banerjee, Sarita; Sinha, Biswadip; Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2016-04-01

    Delivering diclofenac diethylamine transdermally by means of a hydrogel is an approach to reduce or avoid systemic toxicity of the drug while providing local action for a prolonged period. In the present investigation, a process was developed to produce nanosize particles (about 10 nm) of diclofenac diethylamine in situ during the development of hydrogel, using simple mixing technique. Hydrogel was developed with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (5.8% w/w) and carbopol 71G (1.5% w/w). The formulations were evaluated on the basis of field emission scanning electron microscopy, texture analysis, and the assessment of various physiochemical properties. Viscosity (163-165 cps for hydrogel containing microsize drug particles and 171-173 cps for hydrogel containing nanosize drug particles, respectively) and swelling index (varied between 0.62 and 0.68) data favor the hydrogels for satisfactory topical applications. The measured hardness of the different hydrogels was uniform indicating a uniform spreadability. Data of in vitro skin (cadaver) permeation for 10 h showed that the enhancement ratios of the flux of the formulation containing nanosize drug (without the permeation enhancer) were 9.72 and 1.30 compared to the formulation containing microsized drug and the marketed formulations, respectively. In vivo plasma level of the drug increased predominantly for the hydrogel containing nanosize drug-clusters. The study depicts a simple technique for preparing hydrogel containing nanosize diclofenac diethylamine particles in situ, which can be commercially viable. The study also shows the advantage of the experimental transdermal hydrogel with nanosize drug particles over the hydrogel with microsize drug particles. PMID:26089167

  5. Performance improvement of injectable poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate-based hydrogels with finely dispersed hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziyou; Ren, Yongjuan; Yang, Dongzhi; Nie, Jun

    2009-06-01

    Injectable hydrogels are attractive materials for biomedical application. In this work, a chemical mixing technique was developed to promote the dispersion of hydroxyapatite (HA) in injectable poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA)-based hydrogels. Nano-sized HA particles were distributed homogenously within the organic network, whereby HA crystals were formed in the presence of PEGDMA macromers. In addition, hydrogels were also prepared by physical mixing of dry HA particles with PEGDMA, as a comparison. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate the morphology and crystal structure of HA formed in the PEGDMA aqueous solution before polymerization. According to Fourier transform infrared spectra and x-ray diffraction results, hydrogels prepared by different methods have similar components and crystal structures. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the hydrogels' morphology, which showed that HA in hydrogels made by chemical mixing was well dispersed and nano sized. Mechanical evaluation indicated that the mean value of the compressive strength and modulus of hydrogels prepared by physical mixing were 0.137 MPa and 0.518 MPa, respectively, while those of hydrogels prepared by chemical mixing were 0.290 MPa and 0.696 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, temperature measurement showed that the mean value of the maximum temperature in the crosslinking process of hydrogels made by chemical mixing was 38.0 degrees C, which was significantly lower than that of for hydrogels made by physical mixing (38.6 degrees C). The results indicated that the performance of composite hydrogels could be promoted by chemical mixing of the inorganic network into a polymer network.

  6. Nanoparticle gel electrophoresis: bare charged spheres in polyelectrolyte hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Hill, Reghan J

    2013-03-15

    Nanoparticle gel electrophoresis has recently emerged as an attractive means of separating and characterizing nanoparticles. Consequently, a theory that accounts for electroosmotic flow in the gel, and coupling of the nanoparticle and hydrogel electrostatics and hydrodynamics, is required, particularly for gels in which the mesh size is comparable to or smaller than the particle radii. Here, we present an electrokinetic model for charged, spherical colloidal particles undergoing electrophoresis in charged (polyelectrolyte) hydrogels: the gel-electrophoresis analogue of Henry's theory for electrophoresis in Newtonian electrolytes. We compare numerically exact solutions of the model with several independent asymptotic approximations, identifying regions in the parameter space where these approximations are accurate or break down. As previously assumed in the literature, Henry's formula, modified by the addition of a constant electroosmotic flow mobility, is accurate only for nanoparticles that are small compared to the hydrogel mesh size. We derived an exact analytical solution of the full model by judiciously modifying the theory of Allison et al. for uncharged gels, drawing on the superposition methodology of Doane et al. to account for hydrogel charge. This furnishes accurate and economical mobility predictions for the entire parameter space. The present model suggests that nanoparticle size separations (with diameters ≲40 nm) are optimal at low ionic strength, with a gel mesh size that is selected according to the particle charging mechanism. For weakly charged particles, optimal size separation is achieved when the Brinkman screening length is matched to the mean particle size. PMID:23153681

  7. Lipid-coated hydrogel shapes as components of electrical circuits and mechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapra, K. Tanuj; Bayley, Hagan

    2012-11-01

    Recently, two-dimensional networks of aqueous droplets separated by lipid bilayers, with engineered protein pores as functional elements, were used to construct millimeter-sized devices such as a light sensor, a battery, and half- and full-wave rectifiers. Here, for the first time, we show that hydrogel shapes, coated with lipid monolayers, can be used as building blocks for such networks, yielding scalable electrical circuits and mechanical devices. Examples include a mechanical switch, a rotor driven by a magnetic field and painted circuits, analogous to printed circuit boards, made with centimeter-length agarose wires. Bottom-up fabrication with lipid-coated hydrogel shapes is therefore a useful step towards the synthetic biology of functional devices including minimal tissues.

  8. Peptide-modified zwitterionic porous hydrogels for endothelial cell and vascular engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Yeh; Wang, Yi-Ren; Lin, Che-Wei; Wang, Shih-Wen; Chien, Hsiu-Wen; Cheng, Nai-Chen; Tsai, Wei-Bor; Yu, Jiashing

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogels allow control of gel composition and mechanics, and permit incorporation of cells and a wide variety of molecules from nanoparticles to micromolecules. Peptide-linked hydrogels should tune the basic polymer into a more bioactive template to influence cellular activities. In this study, we first introduced the generation of 2D poly-(sulfobetaine methacrylate [SBMA]) hydrogel surfaces. By incorporating with functional peptide RGD and vascular endothelial growth factor-mimicking peptide KLTWQELYQLKYKG (QK) peptides, endothelial cells attached to the surface well and proliferated in a short-term culturing. However, the mechanical property, which plays a crucial role directing the cellular functions and supporting the structures, decreased when peptides graft onto hydrogels. Manipulating the mechanical property was thus necessary, and the most related factor was the monomer concentration. From our results, the higher amount of SBMA caused greater stiffness in hydrogels. Following the 2D surface studies, we fabricated 3D porous hydrogels for cell scaffolds by several methods. The salt/particle leaching method showed a more reliable way than gas-foaming method to fabricate homogeneous and open-interconnected pores within the hydrogel. Using the salt/particle leaching method, we can control the pore size before leaching. Morphology of endothelial cells within scaffolds was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and histological analysis was conducted in vitro and in vivo to test the biocompatibility of SB hydrogel and its potential as a therapeutic reagent for ischemic tissue repair in mice. PMID:25469315

  9. Peptide-Modified Zwitterionic Porous Hydrogels for Endothelial Cell and Vascular Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Yeh; Wang, Yi-Ren; Lin, Che-Wei; Wang, Shih-Wen; Chien, Hsiu-Wen; Cheng, Nai-Chen; Tsai, Wei-Bor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hydrogels allow control of gel composition and mechanics, and permit incorporation of cells and a wide variety of molecules from nanoparticles to micromolecules. Peptide-linked hydrogels should tune the basic polymer into a more bioactive template to influence cellular activities. In this study, we first introduced the generation of 2D poly-(sulfobetaine methacrylate [SBMA]) hydrogel surfaces. By incorporating with functional peptide RGD and vascular endothelial growth factor-mimicking peptide KLTWQELYQLKYKG (QK) peptides, endothelial cells attached to the surface well and proliferated in a short-term culturing. However, the mechanical property, which plays a crucial role directing the cellular functions and supporting the structures, decreased when peptides graft onto hydrogels. Manipulating the mechanical property was thus necessary, and the most related factor was the monomer concentration. From our results, the higher amount of SBMA caused greater stiffness in hydrogels. Following the 2D surface studies, we fabricated 3D porous hydrogels for cell scaffolds by several methods. The salt/particle leaching method showed a more reliable way than gas-foaming method to fabricate homogeneous and open-interconnected pores within the hydrogel. Using the salt/particle leaching method, we can control the pore size before leaching. Morphology of endothelial cells within scaffolds was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and histological analysis was conducted in vitro and in vivo to test the biocompatibility of SB hydrogel and its potential as a therapeutic reagent for ischemic tissue repair in mice. PMID:25469315

  10. A new strategy for electrochemical immunoassay based on enzymatic silver deposition on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Mao, Xun; Peng, Zhao-Feng; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2008-02-15

    A novel, sensitive electrochemical immunoassay in a homogeneously dispersed medium is described herein based on the unique features of agarose beads and the special amplified properties of biometallization. The immunochemical recognition event between human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and goat anti-human IgG antibody is chosen as the model system to demonstrate the proposed immunoassay approach. Avidin-agarose beads rapidly react with the biotinylated goat anti-human IgG antibody to form agarose beads-goat anti-human IgG conjugate (agarose bead-Ab). Agarose bead-Ab, alkaline phosphatase conjugated goat anti-human IgG antibody (ALP-Ab) and the human IgG analyte are mixed to form sandwich-type immunocomplex followed by the addition of the enzymatic silver deposition solution to deposit silver onto the surface of proteins and agarose beads. The silver deposited are dissolved and quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry. The influence of relevant experimental variables was examined and optimized. The logarithm of the anodic stripping peak current depended linearly on the logarithm of the concentration of human IgG in the range from 1 to 1000ng/ml. A detection limit as low as 0.5ng/ml human IgG was attained by 3sigma-rule. The R.S.D. of the approach is 9.65% for eight times determination of 10ng/ml human IgG under same conditions. Optical microscope and TEM graphs were also utilized to characterize agarose beads and silver nanoparticles formed.

  11. Cyclodextrin Inclusion Polymers Forming Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun

    This chapter reviews the advances in the developments of supramolecular hydrogels based on the polypseudorotaxanes and polyrotaxanes formed by inclusion complexes of cyclodextrins threading onto polymer chains. Both physical and chemical supramolecular hydrogels of many different types are discussed with respect to their preparation, structure, property, and gelation mechanism. A large number of physical supramolecular hydrogels were formed induced by self-assembly of densely packed cyclodextrin rings threaded on polymer or copolymer chains acting as physical crosslinking points. The thermo-reversible and thixotropic properties of these physical supramolecular hydrogels have inspired their applications as injectable drug delivery systems. Chemical supramolecular hydrogels synthesized from polypseudorotaxanes and polyrotaxanes were based on the chemical crosslinking of either the cyclodextrin molecules or the included polymer chains. The chemical supramolecular hydrogels were often made biodegradable through incorporation of hydrolyzable threading polymers, end caps, or crosslinkers, for their potential applications as biomaterials.

  12. Differential maturation and structure-function relationships in mesenchymal stem cell- and chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Isaac E; Huang, Alice H; Chung, Cindy; Li, Ryan T; Burdick, Jason A; Mauck, Robert L

    2009-05-01

    Degenerative disease and damage to articular cartilage represents a growing concern in the aging population. New strategies for engineering cartilage have employed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a cell source. However, recent work has suggested that chondrocytes (CHs) produce extracellular matrix (ECM) with superior mechanical properties than MSCs do. Because MSC-biomaterial interactions are important for both initial cell viability and subsequent chondrogenesis, we compared the growth of MSC- and CH-based constructs in three distinct hydrogels-agarose (AG), photocrosslinkable hyaluronic acid (HA), and self-assembling peptide (Puramatrix, Pu). Bovine CHs and MSCs were isolated from the same group of donors and seeded in AG, Pu, and HA at 20 million cells/mL. Constructs were cultured for 8 weeks with biweekly analysis of construct physical properties, viability, ECM content, and mechanical properties. Correlation analysis was performed to determine quantitative relationships between formed matrix and mechanical properties for each cell type in each hydrogel. Results demonstrate that functional chondrogenesis, as evidenced by increasing mechanical properties, occurred in each MSC-seeded hydrogel. Interestingly, while CH-seeded constructs were strongly dependent on the 3D environment in which they were encapsulated, similar growth profiles were observed in each MSC-laden hydrogel. In every case, MSC-laden constructs possessed mechanical properties significantly lower than those of CH-seeded AG constructs. This finding suggests that methods for inducing MSC chondrogenesis have yet to be optimized to produce cells whose functional matrix-forming potential matches that of native CHs.

  13. Nondestructive evaluation of hydrogel mechanical properties using ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jason M.; Myers, Ashley M.; Schluchter, Mark D.; Goldberg, Victor M.; Caplan, Arnold I.; Berilla, Jim A.; Mansour, Joseph M.; Welter, Jean F.

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasound technology as a noninvasive, nondestructive method for evaluating the mechanical properties of engineered weight-bearing tissues was evaluated. A fixture was designed to accurately and reproducibly position the ultrasound transducer normal to the test sample surface. Agarose hydrogels were used as phantoms for cartilage to explore the feasibility of establishing correlations between ultrasound measurements and commonly used mechanical tissue assessments. The hydrogels were fabricated in 1–10% concentrations with a 2–10 mm thickness. For each concentration and thickness, six samples were created, for a total of 216 gel samples. Speed of sound was determined from the time difference between peak reflections and the known height of each sample. Modulus was computed from the speed of sound using elastic and poroelastic models. All ultrasonic measurements were made using a 15 MHz ultrasound transducer. The elastic modulus was also determined for each sample from a mechanical unconfined compression test. Analytical comparison and statistical analysis of ultrasound and mechanical testing data was carried out. A correlation between estimates of compressive modulus from ultrasonic and mechanical measurements was found, but the correlation depended on the model used to estimate the modulus from ultrasonic measurements. A stronger correlation with mechanical measurements was found using the poroelastic rather than the elastic model. Results from this preliminary testing will be used to guide further studies of native and engineered cartilage. PMID:21773854

  14. Synthesis of Gold Nanoflowers Encapsulated with Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bae, Saet-Byeol; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2015-10-01

    In this work, hydrogel-coated gold nanoflowers (AuNFs@hydrogel) were facilely prepared. First, gold nanoflowers (AuNFs) were synthesized by reducing gold acid with ascorbic acid in the presence of chitosan biopolymers, and the chitosan-mediated AuNFs were subsequently conjugated with oleic acid with carboxylate groups. Finally, the olefin-conjugated AuNFs were encapsulated with P(NIPAM-co-AAC) hydrogels via a radical polymerization reaction with co-monomer ratio of [NIPAM:AAc = 91:9 wt%]. The encapsulated hydrogels had a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) slightly above the physiological temperature and demonstrated a thermo-sensitive variation of particle size. The hydrogel-coated AuNFs can be utilized as a promising thermo-responsive drug delivery system with a unique optical property. As-prepared samples were characterized by DLS, SEM, TEM, UV-vis and Zeta potential meter. PMID:26726447

  15. Direct printing of silver nanoparticles by an agarose stamp on planar and patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Chih; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we have used an agarose stamp to conduct direct printing of silver nanoparticles, nanowires and nanoplates on both planar and structured substrates. Nanoparticle solution could be first coated on an agarose stamp, and then transferred to a planar substrate. Micro-patterns comprising metal nanoparticles could be printed on planar substrates without the formation of residual layers. Thus a three-dimensional metal microstructure could be easily fabricated. The patterning of electrodes by printing Ag nanowires directly on TiO(2) was also demonstrated to fabricate resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices by all-solution-processing methods. By using a flat agarose stamp, the patterns printed on the microstructured substrates were quite different from those on the nanostructured substrates. On the microstructured substrates, direct printing could print silver nanoparticles onto the protrusion surface, and could print silver layers as thick as several microns, useful for high conductivity electrodes. On the substrates with nanostructures such as photonic crystals or nano-gratings, direct printing could transfer nanoparticles into the grooves or cavities only due to the contact of the agarose stamp with the groove or concavity surface. A new approach to fabricate metal wire grid polarizers was further demonstrated. A nanoporous agarose stamp has a good potential for printing using nanoparticle suspension.

  16. Rapid agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay for quantitating protein: RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ream, Jennifer A; Lewis, L Kevin; Lewis, Karen A

    2016-10-15

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids are frequently analyzed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). This technique separates bound protein:nucleic acid complexes from free nucleic acids by electrophoresis, most commonly using polyacrylamide gels. The current study utilizes recent advances in agarose gel electrophoresis technology to develop a new EMSA protocol that is simpler and faster than traditional polyacrylamide methods. Agarose gels are normally run at low voltages (∼10 V/cm) to minimize heating and gel artifacts. In this study we demonstrate that EMSAs performed using agarose gels can be run at high voltages (≥20 V/cm) with 0.5 × TB (Tris-borate) buffer, allowing for short run times while simultaneously yielding high band resolution. Several parameters affecting band and image quality were optimized for the procedure, including gel thickness, agarose percentage, and applied voltage. Association of the siRNA-binding protein p19 with its target RNA was investigated using the new system. The agarose gel and conventional polyacrylamide gel methods generated similar apparent binding constants in side-by-side experiments. A particular advantage of the new approach described here is that the short run times (5-10 min) reduce opportunities for dissociation of bound complexes, an important concern in non-equilibrium nucleic acid binding experiments. PMID:27495142

  17. Isolation and restriction endonuclease cleavage of Anaplasma marginale DNA in situ in agarose.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, C M; Buening, G M

    1988-01-01

    Bacterial restriction endonucleases were used to produce DNA cleavage patterns that could be useful as tools to study the relatedness among Anaplasma marginale isolates. Bovine erythrocytes infected with A. marginale were lysed, washed, and embedded in agarose. The embedded erythrocytes and bacterial pathogens were partially digested by sequential infiltration of the agarose with acetone, lysozyme, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and proteinase K. The unfragmented genomic DNA was left supported and protected in a porous matrix. The DNA was digested in situ in agarose under the following conditions: (i) brief treatment with phenol, (ii) brief washing with distilled water, and (iii) adjustment of restriction enzyme digestion mixture to compensate for the volume of the agarose. The cleaved DNA was electrophoresed horizontally to produce a DNA cleavage pattern. Of 19 restriction enzymes screened, 12 produced distinct DNA bands from the genomes of each of the five A. marginale isolates examined. The DNA cleavage pattern produced from each isolate with a given restriction enzyme was reproducible. However, the DNA cleavage patterns produced from different isolates with a given restriction enzyme were not necessarily identical. This procedure could be modified for general bacterial DNA isolation, in situ agarose digestion, and manipulations. Images PMID:2838504

  18. Chitosan Hydrogel Structure Modulated by Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most important polysaccharide, chitosan (CS) has generated a great deal of interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. In the utilization of CS materials, hydrogel is a major and vital branch. CS has the ability to coordinate with many metal ions by a chelation mechanism. While most researchers focused on the applications of complexes between CS and metal ions, the complexes can also influence gelation process and structure of CS hydrogel. In the present work, such influence was studied with different metal ions, revealing two different kinds of mechanisms. Strong affinity between CS and metal ions leads to structural transition from orientation to multi-layers, while weak affinity leads to composite gel with in-situ formed inorganic particles. The study gave a better understanding of the gelation mechanism and provided strategies for the modulation of hydrogel morphology, which benefited the design of new CS-based materials with hierarchical structure and facilitated the utilization of polysaccharide resources. PMID:27777398

  19. Mucin Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: Western Blotting for High-molecular-weight Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Rushton, Zachary L; Ehre, Camille

    2016-06-14

    Mucins, the heavily-glycosylated proteins lining mucosal surfaces, have evolved as a key component of innate defense by protecting the epithelium against invading pathogens. The main role of these macromolecules is to facilitate particle trapping and clearance while promoting lubrication of the mucosa. During protein synthesis, mucins undergo intense O-glycosylation and multimerization, which dramatically increase the mass and size of these molecules. These post-translational modifications are critical for the viscoelastic properties of mucus. As a result of the complex biochemical and biophysical nature of these molecules, working with mucins provides many challenges that cannot be overcome by conventional protein analysis methods. For instance, their high-molecular-weight prevents electrophoretic migration via regular polyacrylamide gels and their sticky nature causes adhesion to experimental tubing. However, investigating the role of mucins in health (e.g., maintaining mucosal integrity) and disease (e.g., hyperconcentration, mucostasis, cancer) has recently gained interest and mucins are being investigated as a therapeutic target. A better understanding of the production and function of mucin macromolecules may lead to novel pharmaceutical approaches, e.g., inhibitors of mucin granule exocytosis and/or mucolytic agents. Therefore, consistent and reliable protocols to investigate mucin biology are critical for scientific advancement. Here, we describe conventional methods to separate mucin macromolecules by electrophoresis using an agarose gel, transfer protein into nitrocellulose membrane, and detect signal with mucin-specific antibodies as well as infrared fluorescent gel reader. These techniques are widely applicable to determine mucin quantitation, multimerization and to test the effects of pharmacological compounds on mucins.

  20. A new three dimensional biomimetic hydrogel to deliver factors secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Caron, Ilaria; Rossi, Filippo; Papa, Simonetta; Aloe, Rossella; Sculco, Marika; Mauri, Emanuele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Erba, Eugenio; Panini, Nicolò; Parazzi, Valentina; Barilani, Mario; Forloni, Gianluigi; Perale, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Lorenza; Veglianese, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) represents a promising strategy in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, both systemic and parenchymal hMSCs administrations show significant drawbacks as a limited number and viability of stem cells in situ. Biomaterials able to encapsulate and sustain hMSCs represent a viable approach to overcome these limitations potentially improving the stem cell therapy. In this study, we evaluate a new agarose/carbomer based hydrogel which combines different strategies to optimize hMSCs viability, density and delivery of paracrine factors. Specifically, we evaluate a new loading procedure on a lyophilized scaffold (soaked up effect) that reduces mechanical stress in encapsulating hMSCs into the hydrogel. In addition, we combine arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide and 3D extracellular matrix deposition to increase the capacity to attach and maintain healthy hMSCs within the hydrogel over time. Furthermore, the fluidic diffusion from the hydrogel toward the injury site is improved by using a cling film that oriented efficaciously the delivery of paracrine factors in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that an improved combination as here proposed of hMSCs and biomimetic hydrogel is able to immunomodulate significantly the pro-inflammatory environment in a SCI mouse model, increasing M2 macrophagic population and promoting a pro-regenerative environment in situ.

  1. Gelatin methacrylate as a promising hydrogel for 3D microscale organization and proliferation of dielectrophoretically patterned cells.

    PubMed

    Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Ahadian, Samad; Obregón, Raquel; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Ostrovidov, Serge; Hosseini, Vahid; Kaji, Hirokazu; Ino, Kosuke; Shiku, Hitoshi; Khademhosseini, Ali; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2012-08-21

    Establishing the 3D microscale organization of cells has numerous practical applications, such as in determining cell fate (e.g., proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis) and in making functional tissue constructs. One approach to spatially pattern cells is by dielectrophoresis (DEP). DEP has characteristics that are important for cell manipulation, such as high accuracy, speed, scalability, and the ability to handle both adherent and non-adherent cells. However, widespread application of this method is largely restricted because there is a limited number of suitable hydrogels for cell encapsulation. To date, polyethylene glycol-diacrylate (PEG-DA) and agarose have been used extensively for dielectric patterning of cells. In this study, we propose gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) as a promising hydrogel for use in cell dielectropatterning because of its biocompatibility and low viscosity. Compared to PEG hydrogels, GelMA hydrogels showed superior performance when making cell patterns for myoblast (C2C12) and endothelial (HUVEC) cells as well as in maintaining cell viability and growth. We also developed a simple and robust protocol for co-culture of these cells. Combined application of the GelMA hydrogels and the DEP technique is suitable for creating highly complex microscale tissues with important applications in fundamental cell biology and regenerative medicine in a rapid, accurate, and scalable manner.

  2. A new three dimensional biomimetic hydrogel to deliver factors secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Caron, Ilaria; Rossi, Filippo; Papa, Simonetta; Aloe, Rossella; Sculco, Marika; Mauri, Emanuele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Erba, Eugenio; Panini, Nicolò; Parazzi, Valentina; Barilani, Mario; Forloni, Gianluigi; Perale, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Lorenza; Veglianese, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) represents a promising strategy in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, both systemic and parenchymal hMSCs administrations show significant drawbacks as a limited number and viability of stem cells in situ. Biomaterials able to encapsulate and sustain hMSCs represent a viable approach to overcome these limitations potentially improving the stem cell therapy. In this study, we evaluate a new agarose/carbomer based hydrogel which combines different strategies to optimize hMSCs viability, density and delivery of paracrine factors. Specifically, we evaluate a new loading procedure on a lyophilized scaffold (soaked up effect) that reduces mechanical stress in encapsulating hMSCs into the hydrogel. In addition, we combine arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide and 3D extracellular matrix deposition to increase the capacity to attach and maintain healthy hMSCs within the hydrogel over time. Furthermore, the fluidic diffusion from the hydrogel toward the injury site is improved by using a cling film that oriented efficaciously the delivery of paracrine factors in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that an improved combination as here proposed of hMSCs and biomimetic hydrogel is able to immunomodulate significantly the pro-inflammatory environment in a SCI mouse model, increasing M2 macrophagic population and promoting a pro-regenerative environment in situ. PMID:26497428

  3. Understanding the adhesion phenomena in carbohydrate-hydrogel-based systems: Water up-take, swelling and elastic detachment.

    PubMed

    Caccavo, Diego; Lamberti, Gaetano; Cascone, Sara; Barba, Anna Angela; Larsson, Anette

    2015-10-20

    The bio-adhesion is a complex phenomenon which takes place when two materials (at least one of biological nature, the other usually is a polymeric one) are held together for extended periods of time, usually for local drug delivery purposes. Despite bio-adhesion is widely exploited in commercial pharmaceuticals such as the buccal patches, the underlying phenomena of the process are not completely clarified yet. In this study experimental tests, in which the role of biological membranes is played by a water-rich agarose gel whereas patches are mimicked by hydrogel tablets (made of Carbopol or of Carbopol added with NaCl), have been used to analyze the behavior of the model system above described. Tablets have been forced to adhere on the agarose gel, and after a given contact time they have been detached, recording the required forces. Furthermore weight gain of the tablets (the water transported from the agarose gel toward the tablet) has been quantified. Water transport (during the time in which the contact between tablet and agarose gel is held) and elastic part of mechanical response during the detachment are modelled to achieve a better understanding of the adhesion process. Both the two sub-models nicely reproduce, respectively, the weight gain as well as the swelling of the Carbopol tablets, and the point at which the mechanical response ceases to be purely elastic. PMID:26256158

  4. Cartilage Tissue Engineering Application of Injectable Gelatin Hydrogel with In Situ Visible-Light-Activated Gelation Capability in Both Air and Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hang; Cheng, Anthony Wai-Ming; Alexander, Peter G.; Beck, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Chondroprogenitor cells encapsulated in a chondrogenically supportive, three-dimensional hydrogel scaffold represents a promising, regenerative approach to articular cartilage repair. In this study, we have developed an injectable, biodegradable methacrylated gelatin (mGL)–based hydrogel capable of rapid gelation via visible light (VL)–activated crosslinking in air or aqueous solution. The mild photocrosslinking conditions permitted the incorporation of cells during the gelation process. Encapsulated human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) showed high, long-term viability (up to 90 days) throughout the scaffold. To assess the applicability of the mGL hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering, we have evaluated the efficacy of chondrogenesis of the encapsulated hBMSCs, using hBMSCs seeded in agarose as control. The ability of hBMSC-laden mGL constructs to integrate with host tissues after implantation was further investigated utilizing an in vitro cartilage repair model. The results showed that the mGL hydrogel, which could be photopolymerized in air and aqueous solution, supports hBMSC growth and TGF-β3-induced chondrogenesis. Compared with agarose, mGL constructs laden with hBMSCs are mechanically stronger with time, and integrate well with native cartilage tissue upon implantation based on push-out mechanical testing. VL-photocrosslinked mGL scaffold thus represents a promising scaffold for cell-based repair and resurfacing of articular cartilage defects. PMID:24575844

  5. Fabrication of micropatterned hydrogels for neural culture systems using dynamic mask projection photolithography.

    PubMed

    Curley, J Lowry; Jennings, Scott R; Moore, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, patterned cell culture environments are becoming a relevant technique to study cellular characteristics, and many researchers believe in the need for 3D environments to represent in vitro experiments which better mimic in vivo qualities. Studies in fields such as cancer research, neural engineering, cardiac physiology, and cell-matrix interaction have shown cell behavior differs substantially between traditional monolayer cultures and 3D constructs. Hydrogels are used as 3D environments because of their variety, versatility and ability to tailor molecular composition through functionalization. Numerous techniques exist for creation of constructs as cell-supportive matrices, including electrospinning, elastomer stamps, inkjet printing, additive photopatterning, static photomask projection-lithography, and dynamic mask microstereolithography. Unfortunately, these methods involve multiple production steps and/or equipment not readily adaptable to conventional cell and tissue culture methods. The technique employed in this protocol adapts the latter two methods, using a digital micromirror device (DMD) to create dynamic photomasks for crosslinking geometrically specific poly-(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels, induced through UV initiated free radical polymerization. The resulting "2.5D" structures provide a constrained 3D environment for neural growth. We employ a dual-hydrogel approach, where PEG serves as a cell-restrictive region supplying structure to an otherwise shapeless but cell-permissive self-assembling gel made from either Puramatrix or agarose. The process is a quick simple one step fabrication which is highly reproducible and easily adapted for use with conventional cell culture methods and substrates. Whole tissue explants, such as embryonic dorsal root ganglia (DRG), can be incorporated into the dual hydrogel constructs for experimental assays such as neurite outgrowth. Additionally, dissociated cells can be encapsulated in the

  6. Improved lectin-mediated immobilization of human red blood cells in superporous agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Ingo; Gustavsson, Per Erik; Ersson, Bo; Lundahl, Per

    2003-01-25

    A new type of agarose bead, superporous agarose, was used as a gel support for immobilization of human red blood cells (RBCs) mediated by wheat germ lectin. The number of immobilized cells was similar to that obtained with commercial wheat germ lectin-agarose but the cell stability appeared to be superior. This allowed improved frontal affinity chromatographic analyses of cytochalasin B (CB)-binding to the glucose transporter GLUT1 which established a ratio of one CB-binding site per GLUT1 dimer for both plain RBCs or those treated with different poly amino acids. The measured dissociation constants, 70+/-14 nM for CB and 12+/-3 mM for glucose binding to GLUT1, are similar to those reported earlier.

  7. Quantitative determination of glycine in aqueous solution using glutamate dehydrogenase-immobilized glyoxal agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Semra Yilmazer; Keskin, Can Serkan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an enzymatic procedure for the determination of glycine (Gly) was developed by using a column containing immobilized glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) on glyoxal agarose beads. Ammonia is produced from the enzymatic reactions between Gly and GDH with NAD(+) in phosphate buffer medium. The indophenol blue method was used for ammonia detection based on the spectrophotometric measurements of blue-colored product absorbing at 640 nm. The calibration graph is linear in the range of 0.1-10 mM of Gly concentrations. The effect of pH, temperature, and time interval was studied to find column stability, and also the interference effects of other amino acids was investigated. The interaction between GDH and glyoxal agarose beads was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The morphology of the immobilized and non-immobilized agarose beads were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  8. Agarose- and alginate-based biopolymers for sample preparation: Excellent green extraction tools for this century.

    PubMed

    Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Loh, Saw Hong; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Nazihah; Pourmand, Neda; Salisu, Ahmed; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Ali, Imran

    2016-03-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in the use of miniaturized sample preparation techniques before the chromatographic monitoring of the analytes in unknown complex compositions. The use of biopolymer-based sorbents in solid-phase microextraction techniques has achieved a good reputation. A great variety of polysaccharides can be extracted from marine plants or microorganisms. Seaweeds are the major sources of polysaccharides such as alginate, agar, agarose, as well as carrageenans. Agarose and alginate (green biopolymers) have been manipulated for different microextraction approaches. The present review is focused on the classification of biopolymer and their applications in multidisciplinary research. Besides, efforts have been made to discuss the state-of-the-art of the new microextraction techniques that utilize commercial biopolymer interfaces such as agarose in liquid-phase microextraction and solid-phase microextraction.

  9. Characterization and swelling-deswelling properties of wheat straw cellulose based semi-IPNs hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Li, Qian; Su, Yuan; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu

    2014-07-17

    A novel wheat straw cellulose-g-poly(potassium acrylate)/polyvinyl alcohol (WSC-g-PKA/PVA) semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) hydrogel was prepared by polymerizing wheat straw and an aqueous solution of acrylic acid (AA), and further semi-interpenetrating with PVA occurred during the chemosynthesis. The swelling and deswelling properties of WSC-g-PKA/PVA semi-IPNs hydrogel and WSC-g-PKA hydrogel were studied and compared in various pH solutions, salt solutions, temperatures, particle sizes and ionic strength. The results indicated that both hydrogels had the largest swelling capacity at pH=6, and the effect of ions on the swelling of hydrogels was in the order: Na(+)>K(+)>Mg(2+)>Ca(2+). The Schott's pseudo second order model can be effectively used to evaluate swelling kinetics of hydrogels. Moreover, the semi-IPNs hydrogel had improved swelling-deswelling properties compared with that of WSC-g-PKA hydrogel. PMID:24702940

  10. Incorporation of aggrecan in interpenetrating network hydrogels to improve cellular performance for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Frei, Anthony W; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-06-01

    Interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels were recently introduced to the cartilage tissue engineering literature, with the approach of encapsulating cells in thermally gelling agarose that is then soaked in a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) solution, which is then photopolymerized. These IPNs possess significantly enhanced mechanical performance desirable for cartilage regeneration, potentially allowing patients to return to weight-bearing activities quickly after surgical implantation. In an effort to improve cell viability and performance, inspiration was drawn from previous studies that have elicited positive chondrogenic responses to aggrecan, the proteoglycan largely responsible for the compressive stiffness of cartilage. Aggrecan was incorporated into the IPNs in conservative concentrations (40 μg/mL), and its effect was contrasted with the incorporation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), the primary glycosaminoglycan associated with aggrecan. Aggrecan was incorporated by physical entrapment within agarose and methacrylated CS was incorporated by copolymerization with PEGDA. The IPNs incorporating aggrecan or CS exhibited over 50% viability with encapsulated chondrocytes after 6 weeks. Both aggrecan and CS improved cell viability by 15.6% and 20%, respectively, relative to pure IPNs at 6 weeks culture time. In summary, we have introduced the novel approach of including a raw material from cartilage, namely aggrecan, to serve as a bioactive signal to cells encapsulated in IPN hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering, which led to improved performance of encapsulated chondrocytes. PMID:23379843

  11. Incorporation of Aggrecan in Interpenetrating Network Hydrogels to Improve Cellular Performance for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Frei, Anthony W.; Gehrke, Stevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels were recently introduced to the cartilage tissue engineering literature, with the approach of encapsulating cells in thermally gelling agarose that is then soaked in a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) solution, which is then photopolymerized. These IPNs possess significantly enhanced mechanical performance desirable for cartilage regeneration, potentially allowing patients to return to weight-bearing activities quickly after surgical implantation. In an effort to improve cell viability and performance, inspiration was drawn from previous studies that have elicited positive chondrogenic responses to aggrecan, the proteoglycan largely responsible for the compressive stiffness of cartilage. Aggrecan was incorporated into the IPNs in conservative concentrations (40 μg/mL), and its effect was contrasted with the incorporation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), the primary glycosaminoglycan associated with aggrecan. Aggrecan was incorporated by physical entrapment within agarose and methacrylated CS was incorporated by copolymerization with PEGDA. The IPNs incorporating aggrecan or CS exhibited over 50% viability with encapsulated chondrocytes after 6 weeks. Both aggrecan and CS improved cell viability by 15.6% and 20%, respectively, relative to pure IPNs at 6 weeks culture time. In summary, we have introduced the novel approach of including a raw material from cartilage, namely aggrecan, to serve as a bioactive signal to cells encapsulated in IPN hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering, which led to improved performance of encapsulated chondrocytes. PMID:23379843

  12. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  13. Magnetically aligned supramolecular hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Matthew; Cardoso, Andre Zamith; Frith, William J; Iggo, Jonathan A; Adams, Dave J

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic-field-induced alignment of the fibrillar structures present in an aqueous solution of a dipeptide gelator, and the subsequent retention of this alignment upon transformation to a hydrogel upon the addition of CaCl2 or upon a reduction in solution pH is reported. Utilising the switchable nature of the magnetic field coupled with the slow diffusion of CaCl2 , it is possible to precisely control the extent of anisotropy across a hydrogel, something that is generally very difficult to do using alternative methods. The approach is readily extended to other compounds that form viscous solutions at high pH. It is expected that this work will greatly expand the utility of such low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWG) in areas where alignment is key. PMID:25345918

  14. Neovascularization within porous PEG hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yu-Chieh

    The goal of this work described was to develop techniques that can be used to enhance vascularized tissue formation in PEG-based hydrogels. In the first part of the study a technique was developed to generate porous PEG hydrogels using a salt leaching technique. This technique was then used to examine the role of pore size on vascularization and tissue remodeling in porous PEG hydrogel in vitro and in vitro. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that vessel invasion was pore size dependent. In addition, a thin layer of inflammatory tissue was observed between PEG hydrogel and blood vessels that formed within the gels. The porous PEG hydrogels were very stable in vitro and in vivo and did not exhibit any signs of degradation. Hydrogels used in tissue engineering need to exhibit controlled degradation. In order to address the stability of PEG hydrogels, porous hydrogels were rendered using degradable PEG-co-(L-Lactic acid) diacrylate PEG-PLLA-DA. This polymer is degraded via hydrolysis of the PLLA chains. The hydrogels were found to exhibit autofluorescence that allowed for the unique ability to nondestructively image hydrogel structure under fully swelled conditions using confocal microscopy. Interestingly, pore size remained stable though out the study, and was not a function of degradation. In addition, degradation time of porous PEG-LLA-DA hydrogels was influenced by polymer concentration. Compressive modulus was a function of polymer concentration and pore size and decreased during hydrogel degradation. The incorporation of cell adhesion sequences into the hydrogel showed that they can support cell adhesion with morphology varying with pore size. This technique could be used to tailor porous biodegradable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. In the final portion of this thesis a poly-lysine (PLL) molecule was synthesized in order to allow clustering of adhesion sequences in PEG hydrogels. Clusters of peptide sequences have been shown to enhance cell

  15. Fabrication of superporous agarose beads for protein adsorption: effect of CaCO3 granules content.

    PubMed

    Du, Kai-Feng; Bai, Shu; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-09-10

    Agarose gels were fabricated by water-in-oil emulsification with the addition of CaCO(3) granules at 8-16 wt%. Thus agarose beads of different superporosities were produced after dissolving the solid porogen. The superporous agarose (SA) and homogeneous agarose gels were double cross-linked and modified with diethylaminoethyl chloride to produce anion exchangers. We have proposed to use a superporous replica (porous titania microspheres) to examine the superporous structure and pore size distribution of the soft gel. The replica was prepared with the agarose gel entrapping CaCO(3) granules by a sol-gel-templating method. It was found that the superpores created by CaCO(3) granules were uniformly distributed and ranged from 0.95 microm to 1.33 microm. The physical properties of the gels were significantly affected by the porogen content. Importantly, by increasing the solid porogen to 12 wt%, the bed permeability and effective porosity increased about 48% and 33%, respectively. Further increase in the porogen to 16 wt% led to a decrease of the mechanical strength. With increasing superpores in the beads, the dynamic adsorption capacity of the packed columns increased obviously at 305-916 cm/h. Besides, the column efficiency changed less with increasing flow velocity up to 1200 cm/h. It was concluded that the use of 12 wt% CaCO(3) granules in agarose solution was beneficial for the fabrication of the SA gel with good mechanical stability and promising performance for protein chromatography.

  16. Enzyme Induced Formation of Monodisperse Hydrogel Nanoparticles Tunable in Size

    SciTech Connect

    Bocharova, Vera; Sharp, Danna; Jones, Aaron; Cheng, Shiwang; Griffin, Philip J.; Agapov, Alexander L.; Voylov, Dmitry; Wang, Yangyang; Kisliuk, Alexander; Melman, Artem; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-03-09

    Here, we report a novel approach to synthesize monodisperse hydrogel nanoparticles that are tunable in size. The distinctive feature of our approach is the use of a multicopper oxidase enzyme, laccase, as both a biocatalyst and template for nanoparticle growth. We utilize the ferroxidase activity of laccase to initiate localized production of iron(III) cations from the oxidation of iron(II) cations. We demonstrate that nanoparticles are formed in a dilute polymer solution of alginate as a result of cross-linking between alginate and enzymatically produced iron(III) cations. Exerting control over the enzymatic reaction allows for nanometer-scale tuning of the hydrogel nanoparticle radii in the range of 30–100 nm. Moreover, the nanoparticles and their growth kinetics were characterized via dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and UV–vis spectroscopy. Our finding opens up a new avenue for the synthesis of tunable nanoscale hydrogel particles for biomedical applications.

  17. Studies of assay conditions for macrophage migration from an agarose droplet.

    PubMed

    Fahlbusch, B; Dornberger, G

    1979-01-01

    The agarose microdroplet method is a relatively simple and economic technique to determine migration inhibition of leukocytes or macrophages in vitro. In the present study, further cultural and technical requirements of this method for the determination of macrophage migration inhibition have been defined: influence of macrophage handling before the assay, kinetics of migration and dependence on the pH of the medium. Considering defined conditions, the agarose microdoplet assay gives highly reliable and reproducible results. In comparative experiments, it proved to be as sensitive and valid as the capillary tube technique.

  18. Continuous Separation of Metallic and Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes Using Agarose Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Urabe, Yasuko; Nishide, Daisuke; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a novel method to separate metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with high purities using agarose gel. When an SWCNTs/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) dispersion was applied to a column containing agarose gel beads, semiconducting SWCNTs were trapped by the beads, while metallic SWCNTs passed through the column. After the semiconducting SWCNTs adsorbed to the beads were eluted with sodium deoxycholate solution, the column could be used for repeated separation. Because this continuous, repeatable separation method is applicable to a low-cost, large-scale process, it should enable the industrial production of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs.

  19. Starch nanocrystals based hydrogel: Construction, characterizations and transdermal application.

    PubMed

    Bakrudeen, Haja Bava; Sudarvizhi, C; Reddy, B S R

    2016-11-01

    Bio-based nanocomposites were prepared using starch nanocrystals obtained by acid hydrolysis of native starches using different acid sources. In recent times, focuses on starch nanocrystals (SNCs) have been increasing in number of research works dedicated to the development of bio-nanocomposites by blending with different biopolymeric matrices. The work mainly deals with the preparation of starch nanocrystals using different native starches by acid hydrolysis using hydrochloric acid and trifluroacetic acid. The as-prepared starch nanocrystals are having high crystallinity and more platelet morphologies, and used as a drug carrying filler material in the hydrogel formulations with the care of different polymer matrices. The condensed work also concentrates on the dispersion of antiviral drug in the hydrogels, which are applied onto biocompatible bio-membrane to be formulating a complete transdermal patch. The acid hydrolysed starch nanocrystals were thoroughly characterized using TEM, SEM, particle size analysis and zeta potential. Their thermal stability and the crystalline properties were also characterized using TG-DSC and XRD respectively. The physiochemical interaction and compatibility between the drug and the SNCs filler in the polymeric hydrogels were evaluated using FT-IR analysis. The formulated hydrogels were subjected to evaluation of in vitro permeation studies using Franz diffusion studies. The in vitro study was indicated substantial guarantee for the fabrication of drug dispersed in polymeric hydrogels using SNCs as filler matrices for a successful transdermal drug delivery. PMID:27524091

  20. Self-Adjustable Adhesion of Polyampholyte Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Roy, Chanchal Kumar; Guo, Hong Lei; Sun, Tao Lin; Ihsan, Abu Bin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Takahata, Masakazu; Nonoyama, Takayuki; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2015-12-01

    Developing nonspecific, fast, and strong adhesives that can glue hydrogels and biotissues substantially promotes the application of hydrogels as biomaterials. Inspired by the ubiquitous adhesiveness of bacteria, it is reported that neutral polyampholyte hydrogels, through their self-adjustable surface, can show rapid, strong, and reversible adhesion to charged hydrogels and biological tissues through the Coulombic interaction.

  1. Rapid self-healing hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Ameya; Zhang, Chao; Arman, Bedri; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Mashelkar, Raghunath A.; Lele, Ashish K.; Tauber, Michael J.; Arya, Gaurav; Varghese, Shyni

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic materials that are capable of autonomous healing upon damage are being developed at a rapid pace because of their many potential applications. Despite these advancements, achieving self-healing in permanently cross-linked hydrogels has remained elusive because of the presence of water and irreversible cross-links. Here, we demonstrate that permanently cross-linked hydrogels can be engineered to exhibit self-healing in an aqueous environment. We achieve this feature by arming the hydrogel network with flexible-pendant side chains carrying an optimal balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that allows the side chains to mediate hydrogen bonds across the hydrogel interfaces with minimal steric hindrance and hydrophobic collapse. The self-healing reported here is rapid, occurring within seconds of the insertion of a crack into the hydrogel or juxtaposition of two separate hydrogel pieces. The healing is reversible and can be switched on and off via changes in pH, allowing external control over the healing process. Moreover, the hydrogels can sustain multiple cycles of healing and separation without compromising their mechanical properties and healing kinetics. Beyond revealing how secondary interactions could be harnessed to introduce new functions to chemically cross-linked polymeric systems, we also demonstrate various potential applications of such easy-to-synthesize, smart, self-healing hydrogels. PMID:22392977

  2. Stretchable Hydrogel Electronics and Devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaoting; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Zhang, Teng; Parada, German Alberto; Koo, Hyunwoo; Yu, Cunjiang; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2016-06-01

    Stretchable hydrogel electronics and devices are designed by integrating stretchable conductors, functional chips, drug-delivery channels, and reservoirs into stretchable, robust, and biocompatible hydrogel matrices. Novel applications include a smart wound dressing capable of sensing the temperatures of various locations on the skin, delivering different drugs to these locations, and subsequently maintaining sustained release of drugs.

  3. Stretchable Hydrogel Electronics and Devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaoting; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Zhang, Teng; Parada, German Alberto; Koo, Hyunwoo; Yu, Cunjiang; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2016-06-01

    Stretchable hydrogel electronics and devices are designed by integrating stretchable conductors, functional chips, drug-delivery channels, and reservoirs into stretchable, robust, and biocompatible hydrogel matrices. Novel applications include a smart wound dressing capable of sensing the temperatures of various locations on the skin, delivering different drugs to these locations, and subsequently maintaining sustained release of drugs. PMID:26639322

  4. Constructing 3D heterogeneous hydrogels from electrically manipulated prepolymer droplets and crosslinked microgels

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Min-Yu; Hsu, Yao-Wen; Hsieh, Hsin-Yi; Chen, San-Yuan; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Formation of multifunctional, heterogeneous, and encoded hydrogel building blocks, or microgels, by crosslinking and assembly of microgels are two essential steps in establishing hierarchical, complicated, and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel architectures that recapitulate natural and biological structures or originate new materials by design. However, for the variety of the hydrogel materials crosslinked differently and for the varied scales of microgels and architectures, the formation and assembly processes are usually performed separately, which increases the manufacturing complexity of designed hydrogel materials. We show the construction of hydrogel architectures through programmable formation and assembly on an electromicrofluidic platform, adopting two reciprocal electric manipulations (electrowetting and dielectrophoresis) to manipulate varied objects (i) in multiple phases, including prepolymer liquid droplets and crosslinked microgels, (ii) on a wide range of scales from micrometer functional particles or cells to millimeter-assembled hydrogel architectures, and (iii) with diverse properties, such as conductive and dielectric droplets that are photocrosslinkable, chemically crosslinkable, or thermally crosslinkable. Prepolymer droplets, particles, and dissolved molecules are electrically addressable to adjust the properties of the microgel building blocks in liquid phase that subsequently undergo crosslinking and assembly in a flexible sequence to accomplish heterogeneous and seamless hydrogel architectures. We expect the electromicrofluidic platform to become a general technique to obtain 3D complex architectures.

  5. Computerized methods for analyzing two-dimensional agarose gel electropherograms.

    PubMed

    Aldroubi, A; Unser, M; Tietz, D; Trus, B

    1991-01-01

    Previous methods interpret zonal or polydisperse gel patterns of two-dimensional Serwer-type gels in terms of size and free mobility (surface net charge density). These two parameters have been determined for each component without quantitatively measuring the abundance of the components. The present study advances these previous methods by determining the relative concentration of each component by computer evaluation of densitometrically analyzed gel patterns. Suitable procedures and their underlying algorithms are presented. The mathematical routines are implemented in a user-friendly software package, called GelFit and designed for a Macintosh personal computer. The program input consists of digitized images of gel staining patterns exemplified by those obtained from electrophoresis of native subcellular-sized particles. The data are processed through the following steps: (i) Noise reduction and calibration. (ii) Geometrical transformation of the pattern onto a rectangular size/free mobility coordinate system using rationales of the extended Ogston model. (iii) Analysis of the transformed image to determine density maxima, density profiles along iso-free-mobility or iso-size lines, curve fitting of one-dimensional profiles or two-dimensional surfaces using Gaussian functions and curve stripping of surfaces to determine the possible number of particle populations.

  6. Can You Solve the Crime? Using Agarose Electrophoresis To Identify an Unknown Colored Protein.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiltfong, Cynthia L.; Chester, Emily; Albertin, Faith; Smith, Julia; Hall, Judith C.; Arth, Emily C.; Martin, Stephanie

    2003-01-01

    Describes a lab that introduces agarose electrophoresis techniques and basic information on proteins to middle school and high school students. Insists that, built around a scenario in which students must solve a crime, the lab has real-world applications that should spark student interest. (KHR)

  7. Enhanced Resolution of DNA Separation Using Agarose Gel Electrophoresis Doped with Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Jialiang; Yang, Yushi; Mao, Zhou; Huang, Wenjie; Qiu, Tong; Wu, Qingzhi

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a novel agarose gel electrophoresis strategy has been developed for separation of DNA fragments by doping graphene oxide (GO) into agarose gel. The results show that the addition of GO into agarose gel significantly improved the separation resolution of DNA fragments by increasing the shift distances of both the single DNA fragments and the adjacent DNA fragments and completely eliminating the background noise derived from the diffusion of the excessive ethidium bromide (EB) dye in the gel after electrophoresis. The improved resolution of DNA fragments in GO-doped agarose gel could be attributed to the successive adsorption-desorption processes between DNA fragments and GO sheets, while the elimination of the background noise could be attributed to the adsorption of the excessive EB dye on the surface of GO sheets and high fluorescence quenching efficiency of GO. These results provide promising potential for graphene and its derivate utilized in various electrophoresis techniques for separation and detection of DAN fragments and other biomolecules. PMID:27637896

  8. Enhanced Resolution of DNA Separation Using Agarose Gel Electrophoresis Doped with Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jialiang; Yang, Yushi; Mao, Zhou; Huang, Wenjie; Qiu, Tong; Wu, Qingzhi

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a novel agarose gel electrophoresis strategy has been developed for separation of DNA fragments by doping graphene oxide (GO) into agarose gel. The results show that the addition of GO into agarose gel significantly improved the separation resolution of DNA fragments by increasing the shift distances of both the single DNA fragments and the adjacent DNA fragments and completely eliminating the background noise derived from the diffusion of the excessive ethidium bromide (EB) dye in the gel after electrophoresis. The improved resolution of DNA fragments in GO-doped agarose gel could be attributed to the successive adsorption-desorption processes between DNA fragments and GO sheets, while the elimination of the background noise could be attributed to the adsorption of the excessive EB dye on the surface of GO sheets and high fluorescence quenching efficiency of GO. These results provide promising potential for graphene and its derivate utilized in various electrophoresis techniques for separation and detection of DAN fragments and other biomolecules.

  9. Agarose/gelatin immobilisation of tissues or embryo segments for orientated paraffin embedding and sectioning.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Kathryn S; Ng, Ee Ting; Bowles, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    The technique described in this protocol allows the user to position small tissues in the optimal orientation for paraffin embedding and sectioning by first immobilising the tissue in an agarose/gelatin cube. This method is an adaptation of methods used for early embryos and can be used for any small tissues or embryo segments. Processing of larger tissue sections using molds to create agarose/gelatin blocks has been described previously; this detailed protocol provides a method for dealing with much smaller tissues or embryos (≤5mm). The tissue is briefly fixed then an agarose/gelatin drop is created to surround the tissue. The tissue can be orientated as per the user's preference in the drop before it sets as is carved into a cube with a domed top. The cube is then dehydrated and goes through the embedding and sectioning process. The domed cube is easy to orientate when embedding the tissue in a wax block giving the user assured orientation of the small tissue for sectioning. Additionally, the agarose/gelatin cube is easy to see in the unmolded wax once embedded, making the region of interest easy to identify. PMID:26742717

  10. Effects of calcium salts of acidic monomers on mineral induction of phosphoprotein immobilized to agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shuichi; Iijima, Masahiro; Motai, Fumiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru; Saito, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the mineralizing potential of acidic monomers and their calcium salts for mineralization, using an in vitro mineral induction model. Phosvitin (PV) was used as a model phosphoprotein in this study. PV was immobilized on agarose beads with divinyl sulfone. Five aliquots of agarose-immobilized PV, acidic monomers, and their calcium salts were incubated in mineralizing solution at various concentrations. The PV beads and acidic monomers were incubated at 37°C. Samples were taken at several time points during the incubation. Then, the agarose beads were analyzed for bound calcium by atomic absorption spectrometry. The mineral formed on the agarose beads was identified as an apatite by microarea X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mineral induction time decreased with increasing solution saturation. 4-METCa salt [calcium salt of 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate (CMET)] significantly reduced the mineral induction time. Using these data, the interfacial tension for mineral induction of PV and CMET was determined to be 90.1 and 92.7 ergs/cm(2), respectively. The mineral induced in each specimen after incubation for 24 h was identified by its X-ray diffraction pattern as apatite. SEM observation showed that lath-shaped crystals were formed on the surfaces of the CMET. We conclude that CMET could play a role in dentin remineralization.

  11. Hydrogels and scaffolds for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankur; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2014-10-01

    For over two decades, immunologists and biomaterials scientists have co-existed in parallel world with the rationale of understanding the molecular profile of immune responses to vaccination, implantation, and treating incurable diseases. Much of the field of biomaterial-based immunotherapy has relied on evaluating model antigens such as chicken egg ovalbumin in mouse models but their relevance to humans has been point of much discussion. Nevertheless, such model antigens have provided important insights into the mechanisms of immune regulation and served as a proof-of-concept for plethora of biomaterial-based vaccines. After years of extensive development of numerous biomaterials for immunomodulation, it is only recently that an experimental scaffold vaccine implanted beneath the skin has begun to use the human model to study the immune responses to cancer vaccination by co-delivering patient-derived tumor lysates and immunomodulatory proteins. If successful, this scaffold vaccine will change the way we approached untreatable cancers, but more importantly, will allow a faster and more rational translation of therapeutic regimes to other cancers, chronic infections, and autoimmune diseases. Most materials reviews have focused on immunomodulatory adjuvants and micro-nano-particles. Here we provide an insight into emerging hydrogel and scaffold based immunomodulatory approaches that continue to demonstrate efficacy against immune associated diseases.

  12. Hydrogels and scaffolds for immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For over two decades, immunologists and biomaterials scientists have co-existed in parallel world with the rationale of understanding the molecular profile of immune responses to vaccination, implantation, and treating incurable diseases. Much of the field of biomaterials-based immunotherapy has relied on evaluating model antigens such as chicken egg ovalbumin in mouse models but their relevance to humans has been point of much discussion. Nevertheless, such model antigens have provided important insights about the mechanisms of immune regulation and served as a proof-of-concept for plethora of biomaterials-based vaccines. After years of extensive development of numerous biomaterials for immunomodulation, it is only recently that an experimental scaffold vaccine implanted beneath the skin has begun to use the human model to study the immune responses to cancer vaccination by co-delivering patient-derived tumor lysates and immunomodulatory proteins. If successful, this scaffold vaccine will change the way we approached untreatable cancers, but more importantly, will allow a faster and more rational translation of therapeutic regimes to other cancers, chronic infections, and autoimmune diseases. Most materials reviews have focused on immunomodulatory adjuvants and micro-nano-particles. Here we provide an insight into emerging hydrogel and scaffold based immunomodulatory approaches that continue to demonstrate efficacy against immune associated diseases. PMID:25155610

  13. Non-toxic agarose/gelatin-based microencapsulation system containing gallic acid for antifungal application.

    PubMed

    Lam, P-L; Gambari, R; Kok, S H-L; Lam, K-H; Tang, J C-O; Bian, Z-X; Lee, K K-H; Chui, C-H

    2015-02-01

    Aspergillus niger (A. niger) is a common species of Aspergillus molds. Cutaneous aspergillosis usually occurs in skin sites near intravenous injection and approximately 6% of cutaneous aspergillosis cases which do not involve burn or HIV-infected patients are caused by A. niger. Biomaterials and biopharmaceuticals produced from microparticle-based drug delivery systems have received much attention as microencapsulated drugs offer an improvement in therapeutic efficacy due to better human absorption. The frequently used crosslinker, glutaraldehyde, in gelatin-based microencapsulation systems is considered harmful to human beings. In order to tackle the potential risks, agarose has become an alternative polymer to be used with gelatin as wall matrix materials of microcapsules. In the present study, we report the eco-friendly use of an agarose/gelatin-based microencapsulation system to enhance the antifungal activity of gallic acid and reduce its potential cytotoxic effects towards human skin keratinocytes. We used optimal parameter combinations, such as an agarose/gelatin ratio of 1:1, a polymer/oil ratio of 1:60, a surfactant volume of 1% w/w and a stirring speed of 900 rpm. The minimum inhibitory concentration of microencapsulated gallic acid (62.5 µg/ml) was significantly improved when compared with that of the original drug (>750 µg/ml). The anti-A. niger activity of gallic acid -containing microcapsules was much stronger than that of the original drug. Following 48 h of treatment, skin cell survival was approximately 90% with agarose/gelatin microcapsules containing gallic acid, whereas cell viability was only 25-35% with free gallic acid. Our results demonstrate that agarose/gelatin-based microcapsules containing gallic acid may prove to be helpful in the treatment of A. niger-induced skin infections near intravenous injection sites.

  14. Biomimetic fiber assembled gradient hydrogel to engineer glycosaminoglycan enriched and mineralized cartilage: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Neethu; Wilson, Jijo; Joseph, Dexy; Vaikkath, Dhanesh; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-12-01

    The study investigated the potential of electrospun fiber assembled hydrogel, with physical gradients of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and sol-gel-derived bioactive glass (BG), to engineer hyaline and mineralized cartilage in a single 3D system. Electrospun poly(caprolactone) (PCL) fibers incorporated with 0.1% w/w of CS (CSL) and 0.5% w/w of CS (CSH), 2.4% w/w of BG (BGL) and 12.5% w/w of BG (BGH) were fabricated. The CS showed a sustained release up to 3 days from CSL and 14 days from CSH fibers. Chondrocytes secreted hyaline like matrix with higher sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), collagen type II and aggrecan on CSL and CSH fibers. Mineralization was observed on BGL and BGH fibers when incubated in simulated body fluid for 14 days. Chondrocytes cultured on these fibers secreted a mineralized matrix that consisted of sGAG, hypertrophic proteins, collagen type X, and osteocalcin. The CS and BG incorporated PCL fiber mats were assembled in an agarose-gelatin hydrogel to generate a 3D hybrid scaffold. The signals in the fibers diffused and generated continuous opposing gradients of CS (chondrogenic signal) and BG (mineralization) in the hydrogel. The chondrocytes were encapsulated in hybrid scaffolds; live dead assay at 48 h showed viable cells. Cells maintained their phenotype and secreted specific extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to signals within the hydrogel. Continuous opposing gradients of sGAG enriched and mineralized ECM were observed surrounding each cell clusters on gradient hydrogel after 14 days of culture in response to the physical gradients of raw materials CS and BG. A construct with gradient mineralization might accelerate integration to subchondral bone during in vivo regeneration. PMID:26014103

  15. Biomimetic fiber assembled gradient hydrogel to engineer glycosaminoglycan enriched and mineralized cartilage: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Neethu; Wilson, Jijo; Joseph, Dexy; Vaikkath, Dhanesh; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-12-01

    The study investigated the potential of electrospun fiber assembled hydrogel, with physical gradients of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and sol-gel-derived bioactive glass (BG), to engineer hyaline and mineralized cartilage in a single 3D system. Electrospun poly(caprolactone) (PCL) fibers incorporated with 0.1% w/w of CS (CSL) and 0.5% w/w of CS (CSH), 2.4% w/w of BG (BGL) and 12.5% w/w of BG (BGH) were fabricated. The CS showed a sustained release up to 3 days from CSL and 14 days from CSH fibers. Chondrocytes secreted hyaline like matrix with higher sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), collagen type II and aggrecan on CSL and CSH fibers. Mineralization was observed on BGL and BGH fibers when incubated in simulated body fluid for 14 days. Chondrocytes cultured on these fibers secreted a mineralized matrix that consisted of sGAG, hypertrophic proteins, collagen type X, and osteocalcin. The CS and BG incorporated PCL fiber mats were assembled in an agarose-gelatin hydrogel to generate a 3D hybrid scaffold. The signals in the fibers diffused and generated continuous opposing gradients of CS (chondrogenic signal) and BG (mineralization) in the hydrogel. The chondrocytes were encapsulated in hybrid scaffolds; live dead assay at 48 h showed viable cells. Cells maintained their phenotype and secreted specific extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to signals within the hydrogel. Continuous opposing gradients of sGAG enriched and mineralized ECM were observed surrounding each cell clusters on gradient hydrogel after 14 days of culture in response to the physical gradients of raw materials CS and BG. A construct with gradient mineralization might accelerate integration to subchondral bone during in vivo regeneration.

  16. Hyaluronic Acid-Based Hydrogels: from a Natural Polysaccharide to Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xian; Jha, Amit K.; Harrington, Daniel A.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of nature's most versatile and fascinating macromolecules. Being an essential component of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM), HA plays an important role in a variety of biological processes. Inherently biocompatible, biodegradable and non-immunogenic, HA is an attractive starting material for the construction of hydrogels with desired morphology, stiffness and bioactivity. While the interconnected network extends to the macroscopic level in HA bulk gels, HA hydrogel particles (HGPs, microgels or nanogels) confine the network to microscopic dimensions. Taking advantage of various scaffold fabrication techniques, HA hydrogels with complex architecture, unique anisotropy, tunable viscoelasticity and desired biologic outcomes have been synthesized and characterized. Physical entrapment and covalent integration of hydrogel particles in a secondary HA network give rise to hybrid networks that are hierarchically structured and mechanically robust, capable of mediating cellular activities through the spatial and temporal presentation of biological cues. This review highlights recent efforts in converting a naturally occurring polysaccharide to drug releasing hydrogel particles, and finally, complex and instructive macroscopic networks. HA-based hydrogels are promising materials for tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:22419946

  17. Syneresis in agar hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Boral, Shilpi; Saxena, Anita; Bohidar, H B

    2010-03-01

    Agar hydrogels exhibit syneresis which creates internal osmotic stress on the physical network. It was observed that such a stress gives rise to characteristic pulsating modes (breathing modes). Experiments carried over a period of 60-day revealed that the network deformations grew monotonously when the solvent released by syneresis was removed periodically from gel surface. However, when the solvent was not withdrawn, the gel exhibited very slowly relaxing breathing modes. The swelling-deswelling dynamics has been discussed in the generalized framework of a dissipative damped oscillator.

  18. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-14

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. PMID:26815946

  19. Uniform biodegradable hydrogel microspheres fabricated by a surfactant-free electric-field-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Choy, Young Bin; Choi, Hyungsoo; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin

    2007-04-10

    Uniform biodegradable hydrogel microspheres (HMS) with precisely controlled size have been fabricated using an electric-field-assisted precision particle fabrication technique. Particle agglomeration was prevented by charging the hydrogel drops and allowing Coulomb repulsion to separate them. As a result, surfactant-free and non-toxic particle fabrication was possible and the resulting microspheres were most suitable for biomedical and food-related applications. Due to the size uniformity, the present HMS may serve as a convenient yet most accurate vehicle for controlled delivery of therapeutic agents and other active ingredients.

  20. [Modern dressings. Hydrogels].

    PubMed

    Sedlarik, K M; Vacik, J; Wichterle, O; Hájek, M

    1995-02-01

    Hydrogels are occlusive types of dressings. They are three-dimensional nets made up of hydrophil polymers. They can be produced from synthetic or semisynthetic materials or a combination of the two. Hydrogels retain different percentages of water but are themselves insoluble in water. This is why they maintain on the wound surface their structure and do not dissolve. They are suited for the dressing of wounds with low secretion such as grade I and II burns, grade I and II bedsores and above all epithelial defects, major skin abrasions and areas after collection of epithelial grafts. Their use is contraindicated in infected wounds, in wounds with a massive secretion and ulcers of arterial origin. Although the domain of their clinical use are clean granulating or already epithelizing wounds, they are very well suited also for rehydration of dry and black skin necroses. Their advantages include minimal pain in the wound as well as the fact that they can be left on the wound without redressing till complete healing. This is made possible also by the fact that they are translucent. PMID:7777948

  1. Environmentally Responsive Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueneman, Susan M.; Chen, Wei

    2002-07-01

    A hydrogel experimental module was designed for an undergraduate upper-level laboratory course. Cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAM) is a thermo-sensitive hydrogel; it undergoes a volume collapse driven by hydrophobic interactions in pure water as the temperature increases to 32 °C. The extent and temperature of the volume transition are two critical parameters in its applications ranging from pharmaceutics to biotechnology and they can be controlled by incorporating ionic components in the PIPAM system. In this experiment, linear PIPAM, cross-linked neutral PIPAM gel, and cross-linked ionic PIPAM gel were prepared by radical polymerization. Viscosity, molecular weight, and thermal transition (cloud point) of linear PIPAM were determined. Volume collapses of the neutral and ionic PIPAM gels as a function of temperature were examined and compared. In this module, students were exposed to original literature and contemporary chemical research in polymer chemistry and they learned to integrate concepts from different disciplines of chemistry into a unified experimental approach to problem solving. This module could also be used for polymer chemistry or physical chemistry laboratory courses.

  2. Reduced Graphene Oxide-GelMA Hybrid Hydrogels as Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Zihlmann, Claudio; Akbari, Mohsen; Assawes, Pribpandao; Cheung, Louis; Zhang, Kaizhen; Manoharan, Vijayan; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yüksekkaya, Mehmet; Wan, Kai-Tak; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Biomaterials currently used in cardiac tissue engineering have certain limitations, such as lack of electrical conductivity and appropriate mechanical properties, which are two parameters playing a key role in regulating cardiac cell behavior. Here, the myocardial tissue constructs are engineered based on reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-incorporated gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hybrid hydrogels. The incorporation of rGO into the GelMA matrix significantly enhances the electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of the material. Moreover, cells cultured on composite rGO-GelMA scaffolds exhibit better biological activities such as cell viability, proliferation, and maturation compared to ones cultured on GelMA hydrogels. Cardiomyocytes show stronger contractility and faster spontaneous beating rate on rGO-GelMA hydrogel sheets compared to those on pristine GelMA hydrogels, as well as GO-GelMA hydrogel sheets with similar mechanical property and particle concentration. Our strategy of integrating rGO within a biocompatible hydrogel is expected to be broadly applicable for future biomaterial designs to improve tissue engineering outcomes. The engineered cardiac tissue constructs using rGO incorporated hybrid hydrogels can potentially provide high-fidelity tissue models for drug studies and the investigations of cardiac tissue development and/or disease processes in vitro. PMID:27254107

  3. Adsorption of protein-coated lipid droplets to mixed biopolymer hydrogel surfaces: role of biopolymer diffusion.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Maria; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, D Julian

    2007-12-18

    The adsorption of charged particles to hydrogel surfaces is important in a number of natural and industrial processes. In this study, the adsorption of cationic lipid droplets to the surfaces of anionic hydrogels was examined. An oil-in-water emulsion containing cationic beta-lactoglobulin-coated lipid droplets was prepared (d32=0.24 microm, zeta=+74 mV, pH 3.0). An anionic hydrogel containing 0.1 wt % beet pectin and 1.5 wt % agar (pH 3.0) was prepared. Emulsions containing different lipid droplet concentrations (0.3-5 wt %) were brought into contact with the hydrogel surfaces for different times (0-24 h). The adsorption of lipid droplets to the hydrogel surfaces could not be explained by a typical adsorption isotherm. We found that the electrical charge on the nonadsorbed lipid droplets became less positive or even became negative in the presence of the hydrogel and that extensive droplet aggregation occurred, which was attributed to the ability of pectin molecules to diffuse through the hydrogels and interact with the lipid droplets. These results may have important consequences for understanding certain industrial and biological processes, as well as for the design of controlled or triggered release systems.

  4. Reduced Graphene Oxide-GelMA Hybrid Hydrogels as Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Zihlmann, Claudio; Akbari, Mohsen; Assawes, Pribpandao; Cheung, Louis; Zhang, Kaizhen; Manoharan, Vijayan; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yüksekkaya, Mehmet; Wan, Kai-Tak; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Biomaterials currently used in cardiac tissue engineering have certain limitations, such as lack of electrical conductivity and appropriate mechanical properties, which are two parameters playing a key role in regulating cardiac cell behavior. Here, the myocardial tissue constructs are engineered based on reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-incorporated gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hybrid hydrogels. The incorporation of rGO into the GelMA matrix significantly enhances the electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of the material. Moreover, cells cultured on composite rGO-GelMA scaffolds exhibit better biological activities such as cell viability, proliferation, and maturation compared to ones cultured on GelMA hydrogels. Cardiomyocytes show stronger contractility and faster spontaneous beating rate on rGO-GelMA hydrogel sheets compared to those on pristine GelMA hydrogels, as well as GO-GelMA hydrogel sheets with similar mechanical property and particle concentration. Our strategy of integrating rGO within a biocompatible hydrogel is expected to be broadly applicable for future biomaterial designs to improve tissue engineering outcomes. The engineered cardiac tissue constructs using rGO incorporated hybrid hydrogels can potentially provide high-fidelity tissue models for drug studies and the investigations of cardiac tissue development and/or disease processes in vitro.

  5. Antimicrobial chitosan-PVA hydrogel as a nanoreactor and immobilizing matrix for silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnihotri, Shekhar; Mukherji, Soumyo; Mukherji, Suparna

    2012-09-01

    Hydrogels are water-insoluble crosslinked hydrophilic networks capable of retaining a large amount of water. The present work aimed to develop a novel chitosan-PVA-based hydrogel which could behave both as a nanoreactor and an immobilizing matrix for silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with promising antibacterial applications. The hydrogel containing AgNPs were prepared by repeated freeze-thaw treatment using varying amounts of the crosslinker, followed by in situ reduction with sodium borohydride as a reducing agent. Characterization studies established that the hydrogel provides a controlled and uniform distribution of nanoparticles within the polymeric network without addition of any further stabilizer. The average particle size was found to be 13 nm with size distribution from 8 to 21 nm as per HR-TEM studies. Swelling studies confirmed that higher amount of crosslinker and silver incorporation inside the gel matrices significantly enhanced the porosity and chain entanglement of the polymeric species of the hydrogel, respectively. The AgNP-hydrogel exhibited good antibacterial activity and was found to cause significant reduction in microbial growth ( Escherichia coli) in 12 h while such activity was not observed for the hydrogel without AgNPs.

  6. Hydrogel-derived non-precious electrocatalysts for efficient oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    You, Bo; Yin, Peiqun; Zhang, Junli; He, Daping; Chen, Gaoli; Kang, Fei; Wang, Huiqiao; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Li, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    The development of highly active, cheap and robust oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts to replace precious metal platinum is extremely urgent and challenging for renewable energy devices. Herein we report a novel, green and especially facile hydrogel strategy to construct N and B co-doped nanocarbon embedded with Co-based nanoparticles as an efficient non-precious ORR catalyst. The agarose hydrogel provides a general host matrix to achieve a homogeneous distribution of key precursory components including cobalt (II) acetate and buffer salts, which, upon freeze-drying and carbonization, produces the highly active ORR catalyst. The gel buffer containing Tris base, boric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, commonly adopted for pH and ionic strength control, plays distinctively different roles here. These include a green precursor for N- and B-doping, a salt porogen and a Co2+ chelating agent, all contributing to the excellent ORR activity. This hydrogel-based process is potentially generalizable for many other catalytic materials. PMID:26130371

  7. Hydrogel-derived non-precious electrocatalysts for efficient oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Bo; Yin, Peiqun; Zhang, Junli; He, Daping; Chen, Gaoli; Kang, Fei; Wang, Huiqiao; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Li, Yadong

    2015-07-01

    The development of highly active, cheap and robust oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts to replace precious metal platinum is extremely urgent and challenging for renewable energy devices. Herein we report a novel, green and especially facile hydrogel strategy to construct N and B co-doped nanocarbon embedded with Co-based nanoparticles as an efficient non-precious ORR catalyst. The agarose hydrogel provides a general host matrix to achieve a homogeneous distribution of key precursory components including cobalt (II) acetate and buffer salts, which, upon freeze-drying and carbonization, produces the highly active ORR catalyst. The gel buffer containing Tris base, boric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, commonly adopted for pH and ionic strength control, plays distinctively different roles here. These include a green precursor for N- and B-doping, a salt porogen and a Co2+ chelating agent, all contributing to the excellent ORR activity. This hydrogel-based process is potentially generalizable for many other catalytic materials.

  8. Agarose functionalization: Synthesis of PEG-agarose amino acid nano-conjugate - its structural ramifications and interactions with BSA in a varying pH regime.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Nishith A; Prasad, Kamalesh; Siddhanta, Arup Kumar

    2016-10-20

    In a rapid one-step method protein-mimicking large agarose amino acid framework (AAE; GPC 156.7kDa) was conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG 9kDa) affording nano-sized PEGylated amphoteric agarose (PEG-AAE; <10nm; DLS) containing amino, carboxyl and ester groups [overall degree of substitution (DS) 0.91]. The PEG groups were at the residual free carboxylic acid groups of succinate half-ester moiety at C-6 positions of the 1, 3 β-d-galactopyranose moieties of AAE. This new nano-sized PEG-AAE performed like a giant protein conjugate (GPC 331.2kDa) and exhibited pH-responsive interconversion between the triple helix and single-stranded random structures (optical rotatory dispersion) presenting a mixed solubility pattern like random coil (soluble), helical (soluble) and aggregate (precipitation) formations. Circular dichroism studies showed its pH-dependent complexation and decomplexation with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Such pH-responsive PEG-conjugate may be of pronounced therapeutic potential in the area of pharmacology as well as in sensing applications. PMID:27474620

  9. Agarose functionalization: Synthesis of PEG-agarose amino acid nano-conjugate - its structural ramifications and interactions with BSA in a varying pH regime.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Nishith A; Prasad, Kamalesh; Siddhanta, Arup Kumar

    2016-10-20

    In a rapid one-step method protein-mimicking large agarose amino acid framework (AAE; GPC 156.7kDa) was conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG 9kDa) affording nano-sized PEGylated amphoteric agarose (PEG-AAE; <10nm; DLS) containing amino, carboxyl and ester groups [overall degree of substitution (DS) 0.91]. The PEG groups were at the residual free carboxylic acid groups of succinate half-ester moiety at C-6 positions of the 1, 3 β-d-galactopyranose moieties of AAE. This new nano-sized PEG-AAE performed like a giant protein conjugate (GPC 331.2kDa) and exhibited pH-responsive interconversion between the triple helix and single-stranded random structures (optical rotatory dispersion) presenting a mixed solubility pattern like random coil (soluble), helical (soluble) and aggregate (precipitation) formations. Circular dichroism studies showed its pH-dependent complexation and decomplexation with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Such pH-responsive PEG-conjugate may be of pronounced therapeutic potential in the area of pharmacology as well as in sensing applications.

  10. Pulsatile dynamic stiffness of cartilage-like materials and use of agarose gels to validate mechanical methods and models.

    PubMed

    Scandiucci de Freitas, P; Wirz, D; Stolz, M; Göpfert, B; Friederich, N-F; Daniels, A U

    2006-08-01

    Stiffness is a fundamental indicator of the functional state of articular cartilage. Reported test modes include compressive incremental strain to determine the equilibrium modulus, and sinusoidal strain to determine the dynamic modulus and stress/strain loss angle. Here, initial development is described for a method recognizing that gait is pulsatile. Agarose gels have been used by others for validation or comparison of mechanical test methods and models for cartilage and proteoglycan aggregate. Accordingly, gels ranging from 0.5 to 20% agarose were prepared. Pulsatile stiffness in both indentation and unconfined compression were closely reproducible. Stiffness as a function of agarose concentration rose exponentially, as found using other methods. Indentation stiffness was higher than for unconfined compression and ranged from approximately 2.0 kPa for 0.5% gel to approximately 3,800 kPa for 20% gel. Pulsatile dynamic stiffness appears to be a useful method, although further development is needed. Agarose gel stiffness values obtained by other methods were reviewed for comparison. Unfortunately, reported values for a given agarose concentration ranged widely (e.g. fourfold) even when test methods were similar. Causes appear to include differences in molecular weight and gel preparation time-temperature regimens. Also, agarose is hygroscopic, leading to unintended variations in gel composition. Agarose gels are problematic materials for validation or comparison of cartilage mechanical test methods and models. PMID:16470817

  11. Massively parallel single-molecule and single-cell emulsion reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using agarose droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huifa; Jenkins, Gareth; Zou, Yuan; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-04-17

    A microfluidic device for performing single copy, emulsion Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) within agarose droplets is presented. A two-aqueous-inlet emulsion droplet generator was designed and fabricated to produce highly uniform monodisperse picoliter agarose emulsion droplets with RT-PCR reagents in carrier oil. Template RNA or cells were delivered from one inlet with RT-PCR reagents/cell lysis buffer delivered separately from the other. Efficient RNA/cell encapsulation and RT-PCR at the single copy level was achieved in agarose-in-oil droplets, which, after amplification, can be solidified into agarose beads for further analysis. A simple and efficient method to graft primer to the polymer matrix using 5'-acrydite primer was developed to ensure highly efficient trapping of RT-PCR products in agarose. High-throughput single RNA molecule/cell RT-PCR was demonstrated in stochastically diluted solutions. Our results indicate that single-molecule RT-PCR can be efficiently carried out in agarose matrix. Single-cell RT-PCR was successfully performed which showed a clear difference in gene expression level of EpCAM, a cancer biomarker gene, at the single-cell level between different types of cancer cells. This work clearly demonstrates for the first time, single-copy RT-PCR in agarose droplets. We believe this will open up new possibilities for viral RNA detection and single-cell transcription analysis.

  12. Zwitterionic hydrogels: an in vivo implantation study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Chao, Timothy; Liu, Lingyun; Cheng, Gang; Ratner, Buddy D; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2009-01-01

    Zwitterionic hydrogels, including poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA) and poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) (polyCBMA), and co-polymeric hydrogels of CBMA and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (poly(CBMA-co-HEMA)) were prepared. Their in vitro and in vivo properties were evaluated and compared with those of polyHEMA hydrogels. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) were incubated with zwitterionic and polyHEMA hydrogels to evaluate their bioadhesion properties. Both polySBMA and polyCBMA hydrogels were found to be non-cytotoxic and their endotoxin levels were found to be acceptable for in vivo implantation. Results from in vivo subcutaneous implantation showed reduced cell attachment to the surfaces of polySBMA and poly(CBMA-co-HEMA) hydrogels after one-week implantation as compared with polyHEMA hydrogels. After a 4-week implantation, capsules with higher vascularities surrounding the two zwitterionic hydrogels were found. However, polyHEMA, polySBMA and poly(CBMA-co-HEMA) hydrogels showed similar capsule thicknesses and similar numbers of attached foreign body giant cells (FBGCs). In this work, zwitterionic hydrogels demonstrate healing and integration comparable to polyHEMA hydrogels, but with improved vascularity. These zwitterionic hydrogels are promising alternatives to polyHEMA hydrogels as implantable materials. PMID:19793443

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Starch Hydrogel Incorporated with Copper Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, María Emilia; Diez, Ana María Del Rosario; González, Joaquín Antonio; Pérez, Claudio Javier; Orrego, Manuel; Piehl, Lidia; Teves, Sergio; Copello, Guillermo Javier

    2016-06-29

    In order to obtain an antimicrobial gel, a starch-based hydrogel reinforced with silica-coated copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) was developed. Cu NPs were synthesized by use of a copper salt and hydrazine as a reducing agent. In order to enhance Cu NP stability over time, they were synthesized in a starch medium followed by a silica coating. The starch hydrogel was prepared by use of urea and water as plasticizers and it was treated with different concentrations of silica-coated copper nanoparticles (Si-Cu NPs). The obtained materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and rheometry. FT-IR and EPR spectra were used for characterization of Cu NPs and Si-Cu NPs, confirming that a starch cap was formed around the Cu NP and demonstrating the stability of the copper nanoparticle after the silica coating step. SEM images showed Cu NP, Si-Cu NP, and hydrogel morphology. The particle size was polydisperse and the structure of the gels changed along with particle concentration. Increased NP content led to larger pores in starch structure. These results were in accordance with the rheological behavior, where reinforcement by the Si-Cu NP was seen. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial species. The hydrogels were demonstrated to maintain antimicrobial activity for at least four cycles of use. A dermal acute toxicity test showed that the material could be scored as slightly irritant, proving its biocompatibility. With these advantages, it is believed that the designed Si-Cu NP loaded hydrogel may show high potential for applications in various clinical fields, such as wound dressings and fillers. PMID:27295333

  14. Energy conversion in polyelectrolyte hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Erbas, Aykut; Olvera de la Cruz Team

    Energy conversion and storage have been an active field of research in nanotechnology parallel to recent interests towards renewable energy. Polyelectrolyte (PE) hydrogels have attracted considerable attention in this field due to their mechanical flexibility and stimuli-responsive properties. Ideally, when a hydrogel is deformed, applied mechanical work can be converted into electrostatic, elastic and steric-interaction energies. In this talk, we discuss the results of our extensive molecular dynamics simulations of PE hydrogels. We demonstrate that, on deformation, hydrogels adjust their deformed state predominantly by altering electrostatic interactions between their charged groups rather than excluded-volume and bond energies. This is due to the hydrogel's inherent tendency to preserve electro-neutrality in its interior, in combination with correlations imposed by backbone charges. Our findings are valid for a wide range of compression ratios and ionic strengths. The electrostatic-energy alterations that we observe in our MD simulations may induce pH or redox-potential changes inside the hydrogels. The resulting energetic difference can be harvested, for instance, analogously to a Carnot engine, or facilitated for sensor applications. Center for Bio-inspired Energy Science (CBES).

  15. Enzyme-sensing chitosan hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sadat Ebrahimi, Mir Morteza; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-07-01

    We report on a chitosan hydrogel-based platform for the detection of enzymes, which is compatible with the implementation in infection-sensing wound dressings. Thin films of the established wound dressing biopolymer chitosan were functionalized with a fluorogenic substrate, which is released upon enzymatic degradation, resulting in a pronounced increase in fluorescence emission intensity. In this first model study, the fluorogenic substrate alanyl-alanyl-phenylalanine-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin (AAP-AMC) was covalently conjugated via amide bond formation to chitosan and was shown to facilitate the detection of the serine protease α-chymotrypsin. Systematic investigations established the dependence of hydrogel thickness and substrate loading on the hydrogel preparation conditions, as well as the dependence of the rate of the reaction on the initial enzyme concentration and the loading of AAP-AMC in the hydrogel. The initial release rate of the fluorophore 7-AMC was found to be linear with enzyme concentration and substrate loading and was independent of hydrogel thickness. Under optimized conditions the hydrogel reports the presence of α-chymotrypsin in <5 min with a limit of detection of ≤10 nM. This generic approach, which can be adapted to detect different kinds of enzymes by using appropriate fluorogenic or chromogenic substrates, is highly interesting for targeting the detection of specific pathogenic bacteria, e.g., in wound dressings. PMID:24914451

  16. Zwitterionic Hydrogel-Biopolymer Assembly towards Biomimetic Superlubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, Raymond; Zhu, Elaine

    2014-03-01

    One superlubricant in nature is the synovial fluid (SF), comprising of a high molecular weight polysaccharide, hyaluronic acid (HA), and a globule protein, lubricin. In this bio-inspired materials research, we have explored hydrogel particles to mimic lubricin as a ``ball-bearing'' and control their interaction with the viscoelastic HA matrix. Biocompatible poly(N-[2-(Methacyloyloxy)ethyl]dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide) (PMSA) hydrogel particles are synthesized to examine the electrostatic induced assembly of PMSA-HA supramolecular complexes in aqueous solutions. Fluorescence microscopy and rheology experiments have characterized the tunable network structure and viscoelastic properties of PMSA-HA aggregates by HA concentration and ionic conditions in aqueous solution. When being grafted to a solid surface, the PMSA-HA composite thin film exhibits superior low biofouling and friction performance, suggesting great promises as artificial superlubricants.

  17. High-water-content mouldable polyvinyl alcohol-borax hydrogels reinforced by well-dispersed cellulose nanoparticles: dynamic rheological properties and hydrogel formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingquan; Lei, Tingzhou; Wu, Qinglin

    2014-02-15

    Cellulose nanoparticle (CNP) reinforced polyvinyl alcohol-borax (PB) hydrogels were produced via a facile approach in an aqueous system. The effects of particle size, aspect ratio, crystal structure, and surface charge of CNPs on the rheological properties of the composite hydrogels were investigated. The rheological measurements confirmed the incorporation of well-dispersed CNPs to PB system significantly enhanced the viscoelasticity and stiffness of hydrogels. The obtained free-standing, high elasticity and mouldable hydrogels exhibited self-recovery under continuous step strain and thermo-reversibility under temperature sweep. With the addition of cellulose I nanofibers, a 19-fold increase in the high-frequency plateau of storage modulus was obtained compared with that of the pure PB. CNPs acted as multifunctional crosslinking agents and nanofillers to physically and chemically bridge the 3D network hydrogel. The plausible mechanism for the multi-complexation between CNPs, polyvinyl alcohol and borax was proposed to understand the relationship between the 3D network and hydrogel properties. PMID:24507286

  18. High-water-content mouldable polyvinyl alcohol-borax hydrogels reinforced by well-dispersed cellulose nanoparticles: dynamic rheological properties and hydrogel formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingquan; Lei, Tingzhou; Wu, Qinglin

    2014-02-15

    Cellulose nanoparticle (CNP) reinforced polyvinyl alcohol-borax (PB) hydrogels were produced via a facile approach in an aqueous system. The effects of particle size, aspect ratio, crystal structure, and surface charge of CNPs on the rheological properties of the composite hydrogels were investigated. The rheological measurements confirmed the incorporation of well-dispersed CNPs to PB system significantly enhanced the viscoelasticity and stiffness of hydrogels. The obtained free-standing, high elasticity and mouldable hydrogels exhibited self-recovery under continuous step strain and thermo-reversibility under temperature sweep. With the addition of cellulose I nanofibers, a 19-fold increase in the high-frequency plateau of storage modulus was obtained compared with that of the pure PB. CNPs acted as multifunctional crosslinking agents and nanofillers to physically and chemically bridge the 3D network hydrogel. The plausible mechanism for the multi-complexation between CNPs, polyvinyl alcohol and borax was proposed to understand the relationship between the 3D network and hydrogel properties.

  19. Isolation of DNA from agarose gels using DEAE-paper. Application to restriction site mapping of adenovirus type 16 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, G; Hammarskjöld, M L

    1980-01-01

    A new method for isolating DNA from agarose gels is described. The method involves the simultaneous transfer of all DNA-fragments from an agarose slab gel onto DEAE-cellulose paper and the elution of the individual fragments from the paper with 1 M NaCl. DNA isolated from agarose gels in this way is susceptible to cleavage with several restriction endonucleases, and can be labeled in vitro with E coli DNA-polymerase I, T4 DNA-polymerase and T4 polynucleotide kinase. We have used the method to construct restriction endonuclease maps of adenovirus type 16 DNA. Images PMID:6252542

  20. Enzymatic Dissolution of Biocomposite Solids Consisting of Phosphopeptides to Form Supramolecular Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junfeng; Yuan, Dan; Haburcak, Richard; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Xixiang; Xu, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed dephosphorylation is essential for biomineralization and bone metabolism. Here we report the exploration of using enzymatic reaction to transform biocomposites of phosphopeptides and calcium (or strontium) ions to supramolecular hydrogels as a mimic of enzymatic dissolution of biominerals. (31) P NMR shows that strong affinity between the phosphopeptides and alkaline metal ions (e.g., Ca(2+) or Sr(2+) ) induces the formation of biocomposites as precipitates. Electron microscopy reveals that the enzymatic reaction regulates the morphological transition from particles to nanofibers. Rheology confirms the formation of a rigid hydrogel. As the first example of enzyme-instructed dissolution of a solid to form supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels, this work provides an approach to generate soft materials with desired properties, expands the application of supramolecular hydrogelators, and offers insights to control the demineralization of calcified soft tissues. PMID:26462722

  1. Enzymatic Dissolution of Biocomposite Solids Consisting of Phosphopeptides to Form Supramolecular Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junfeng; Yuan, Dan; Haburcak, Richard; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Xixiang; Xu, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed dephosphorylation is essential for biomineralization and bone metabolism. Here we report the exploration of using enzymatic reaction to transform biocomposites of phosphopeptides and calcium (or strontium) ions to supramolecular hydrogels as a mimic of enzymatic dissolution of biominerals. (31) P NMR shows that strong affinity between the phosphopeptides and alkaline metal ions (e.g., Ca(2+) or Sr(2+) ) induces the formation of biocomposites as precipitates. Electron microscopy reveals that the enzymatic reaction regulates the morphological transition from particles to nanofibers. Rheology confirms the formation of a rigid hydrogel. As the first example of enzyme-instructed dissolution of a solid to form supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels, this work provides an approach to generate soft materials with desired properties, expands the application of supramolecular hydrogelators, and offers insights to control the demineralization of calcified soft tissues.

  2. Application of carboxymethylcellulose hydrogel based silver nanocomposites on cotton fabrics for antibacterial property.

    PubMed

    Bozaci, Ebru; Akar, Emine; Ozdogan, Esen; Demir, Asli; Altinisik, Aylin; Seki, Yoldas

    2015-12-10

    In this study, fumaric acid (FA) crosslinked carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrogel (CMCF) based silver nanocomposites were coated on cotton fabric for antibacterial property for the first time. The performance of the nanocomposite treated cotton fabric was tested for different mixing times of hydrogel solution, padding times and concentrations of silver. The cotton fabrics treated with CMC hydrogel based silver nanocomposites demonstrated 99.9% reduction for both Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) and Klebsiella pneumonia (Kp). After one cycle washing processes of treated cotton fabric, there is no significant variation observed in antibacterial activity. From SEM and AFM analyses, silver particles in nano-size, homogenously distributed, were observed. The treated samples were also evaluated by tensile strength, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, fluid absorbency properties, and whiteness index. The treatment of cotton fabric with CMCF hydrogel did not affect the whiteness considerably, but increased the absorbency values of cotton.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of zinc chloride containing poly(acrylic acid) hydrogel by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Seok; Kuang, Jia; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Lim, Youn-Mook; Jeong, Sung-In; Shin, Young-Min; Seob Khil, Myung; Nho, Young-Chang

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the characterization of zinc chloride incorporated into a poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) hydrogel prepared by gamma-ray irradiation was investigated. Zinc chloride powder with different concentrations was dissolved in the PAAc solution, and it was crosslinked with gamma-ray irradiation. The effects of various parameters such as zinc ion concentration and irradiation doses on characteristics of the hydrogel formed were investigated in detail for obtaining an antibacterial wound dressing. In addition, the gel content, pH-sensitive (pH 4 or 7) swelling ratio, and UV-vis absorption spectra of the zinc particles in the hydrogels were characterized. Moreover, antibacterial properties of these new materials against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains were observed on solid growth media. The antibacterial tests indicated that the zinc chloride containing PAAc hydrogels have good antibacterial activity.

  4. Application of carboxymethylcellulose hydrogel based silver nanocomposites on cotton fabrics for antibacterial property.

    PubMed

    Bozaci, Ebru; Akar, Emine; Ozdogan, Esen; Demir, Asli; Altinisik, Aylin; Seki, Yoldas

    2015-12-10

    In this study, fumaric acid (FA) crosslinked carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrogel (CMCF) based silver nanocomposites were coated on cotton fabric for antibacterial property for the first time. The performance of the nanocomposite treated cotton fabric was tested for different mixing times of hydrogel solution, padding times and concentrations of silver. The cotton fabrics treated with CMC hydrogel based silver nanocomposites demonstrated 99.9% reduction for both Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) and Klebsiella pneumonia (Kp). After one cycle washing processes of treated cotton fabric, there is no significant variation observed in antibacterial activity. From SEM and AFM analyses, silver particles in nano-size, homogenously distributed, were observed. The treated samples were also evaluated by tensile strength, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, fluid absorbency properties, and whiteness index. The treatment of cotton fabric with CMCF hydrogel did not affect the whiteness considerably, but increased the absorbency values of cotton. PMID:26428108

  5. Minimizing inhibition of PCR-STR typing using digital agarose droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tao; Mathies, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    The presence of PCR inhibitors in forensic and other biological samples reduces the amplification efficiency, sometimes resulting in complete PCR failure. Here we demonstrate a high-performance digital agarose droplet microfluidics technique for single-cell and single-molecule forensic short tandem repeat (STR) typing of samples contaminated with high concentrations of PCR inhibitors. In our multifaceted strategy, the mitigation of inhibitory effects is achieved by the efficient removal of inhibitors from the porous agarose microgel droplets carrying the DNA template through washing and by the significant dilution of targets and remaining inhibitors to the stochastic limit within the ultralow nL volume droplet reactors. Compared to conventional tube-based bulk PCR, our technique shows enhanced (20 ×, 10 ×, and 16 ×) tolerance of urea, tannic acid, and humic acid, respectively, in STR typing of GM09948 human lymphoid cells. STR profiling of single cells is not affected by small soluble molecules like urea and tannic acid because of their effective elimination from the agarose droplets; however, higher molecular weight humic acid still partially inhibits single-cell PCR when the concentration is higher than 200 ng/μL. Nevertheless, the full STR profile of 9948 male genomic DNA contaminated with 500 ng/μL humic acid was generated by pooling and amplifying beads carrying single-molecule 9948 DNA PCR products in a single secondary reaction. This superior performance suggests that our digital agarose droplet microfluidics technology is a promising approach for analyzing low-abundance DNA targets in the presence of inhibitors.

  6. Confined Flocculation of Ionic Pollutants by Poly(L-dopa)-Based Polyelectrolyte Complexes in Hydrogel Beads for Three-Dimensional, Quantitative, Efficient Water Decontamination.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Liu, Xiaokong; Yuan, Weichang; Brown, Lauren Joan; Wang, Dayang

    2015-06-16

    The development of simple and recyclable adsorbents with high adsorption capacity is a technical imperative for water treatment. In this work, we have successfully developed new adsorbents for the removal of ionic pollutants from water via encapsulation of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) made from positively charged poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and negatively charged poly(l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) (PDopa), obtained via the self-polymerization of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-Dopa). Given the outstanding mass transport through the hydrogel host matrixes, the PDopa-PAH PEC guests loaded inside can effectively and efficiently remove various ionic pollutants, including heavy metal ions and ionic organic dyes, from water. The adsorption efficiency of the PDopa-PAH PECs can be quantitatively correlated to and tailored by the PDopa-to-PAH molar ratio. Because PDopa embodies one catechol group, one carboxyl group, and one amino group in each repeating unit, the resulting PDopa-PAH PECs exhibit the largest capacity of adsorption of heavy metal ions compared to available adsorbents. Because both PDopa and PAH are pH-sensitive, the PDopa-PAH PEC-loaded agarose hydrogel beads can be easily and completely recovered after the adsorption of ionic pollutants by adjusting the pH of the surrounding media. The present strategy is similar to the conventional process of using PECs to flocculate ionic pollutants from water, while in our system flocculation is confined to the agarose hydrogel beads, thus allowing easy separation of the resulting adsorbents from water.

  7. A Photonic Crystal Protein Hydrogel Sensor for Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhongyu; Kwak, Daniel H; Punihaole, David; Hong, Zhenmin; Velankar, Sachin S; Liu, Xinyu; Asher, Sanford A

    2015-10-26

    We report two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) sensing materials that selectively detect Candida albicans (C. albicans). These sensors utilize Concanavalin A (Con A) protein hydrogels with a 2D PC embedded on the Con A protein hydrogel surface, that multivalently and selectively bind to mannan on the C. albicans cell surface to form crosslinks. The resulting crosslinks shrink the Con A protein hydrogel, reduce the 2D PC particle spacing, and blue-shift the light diffracted from the PC. The diffraction shifts can be visually monitored, measured with a spectrometer, or determined from the Debye diffraction ring diameter. Our unoptimized hydrogel sensor has a detection limit of around 32 CFU/mL for C. albicans. This sensor distinguishes between C. albicans and those microbes devoid of cell-surface mannan such as the gram-negative bacterium E. coli. This sensor provides a proof-of-concept for utilizing recognition between lectins and microbial cell surface carbohydrates to detect microorganisms in aqueous environments. PMID:26480336

  8. Methods for determining agent concentration profiles in agarose gel during convection-enhanced delivery.

    PubMed

    Sindhwani, Nikhil; Ivanchenko, Oleksandr; Lueshen, Eric; Prem, Komal; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-03-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a promising technique to deliver large molecular weight drugs to the human brain for treatment of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, or brain tumors. Researchers have used agarose gels to study mechanisms of agent transport in soft tissues like brain due to its similar mechanical and transport properties. However, inexpensive quantitative techniques to precisely measure achieved agent distribution in agarose gel phantoms during CED are missing. Such precise measurements of concentration distribution are needed to optimize drug delivery. An optical experimental method to accurately quantify agent concentration in agarose is presented. A novel geometry correction algorithm is used to determine real concentrations from observable light intensities captured by a digital camera. We demonstrate the technique in dye infusion experiments that provide cylindrical and spherical distributions when infusing with porous membrane and conventional single-port catheters, respectively. This optical method incorporates important parameters, such as optimum camera exposure, captured camera intensity calibration, and use of collimated light source for maximum precision. We compare experimental results with numerical solutions to the convection diffusion equation. The solutions of convection-diffusion equations in the cylindrical and spherical domains were found to match the experimental data obtained by geometry correction algorithm.

  9. A disposable bio-nano-chip using agarose beads for high performance immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Du, Nan; Chou, Jie; Kulla, Eliona; Floriano, Pierre N; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; McDevitt, John T

    2011-10-15

    This article reports on the fabrication of a disposable bio-nano-chip (BNC), a microfluidic device composed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and thiolene-based optical epoxy which is both cost-effective and suitable for high performance immunoassays. A novel room temperature (RT) bonding technique was utilized so as to achieve irreversible covalent bonding between PDMS and thiolene-based epoxy layers, while at the same time being compatible with the insertion of agarose bead sensors, selectively arranged in an array of pyramidal microcavities replicated in the thiolene thin film layer. In the sealed device, the bead-supporting epoxy film is sandwiched between two PDMS layers comprising of fluidic injection and drain channels. The agarose bead sensors used in the device are sensitized with anti-C-reactive protein (CRP) antibody, and a fluorescent sandwich-type immunoassay was run to characterize the performance of this device. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used based on the device specifications to model the bead penetration. Experimental data revealed analyte penetration of the immunocomplex to 100 μm into the 280 μm diameter agarose beads, which correlated well with the simulation. A dose-response curve was obtained and the linear dynamic range of the assay was established over 1 ng/mL to 50 ng/mL with a limit of detection less than 1 ng/mL.

  10. Aqueous phase catalytic conversion of agarose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by metal chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lishi; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Yang, Bin

    2013-12-14

    Abstract: 5-HMF is a key intermediate for producing chemicals and fuels that can substitute for today’s petroleum-derived feedstocks. A series of metal chlorides, including NaCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, ZnCl2, CuCl2, FeCl3, and CrCl3, were comparatively investigated to catalyze agarose degradation for production of 5-HMF at temperature 180 oC, 200 oC, and 220 oC for 30 min, with catalyst concentration of 0.5% (w/w), 1% (w/w) and 5% (w/w), and substrate concentration of 2% (w/w). Our results revealed that alkali metal chlorides and alkali earth metal chlorides such as NaCl, CaCl2 and MgCl2 gave better 5-HMF yield compared with transition metal chlorides including ZnCl2, CrCl3, CuCl2 and FeCl3. 1% (w/w) MgCl2 was the more favorable catalyst for 5-HMF production from agarose, and resulted in 40.7% 5-HMF yield but no levulinic acid or lactic acid at 200 oC, 35 min. The reaction pathways of agarose degradation catalyzed by MgCl2 were also discussed.

  11. Homogeneous tosylation of agarose as an approach toward novel functional polysaccharide materials.

    PubMed

    Gericke, Martin; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The homogeneous tosylation of agarose was studied with respect to the effects of reaction parameters, such as reaction medium, time, and molar ratio, on the reaction course, the degree of substitution (DS) with tosyl/chloro deoxy groups, and the molecular structure. Tosyl agaroses (TOSA) with DS tosyl ≤ 1 .81 could be obtained in completely homogeneous reactions by using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA)/LiCl or 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as solvents. The products were characterized by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy and it was demonstrated that two types of substitution pattern can be achieved: (i) non-preferential substitution at position 6 of the 1 → 3-linked β-d-galactose unit (G-6) and position 2 of the 1 → 4-linked 3,6-anyhdro-α-L-galactose unit (LA-2) and (ii) regioselective tosylation at G-6, depending on whether the reaction is performed with or without LiCl. Finally, the nucleophilic displacement reaction of TOSA was studied using azide and ethylenediamine as representative nucleophiles. Novel deoxy-agarose derivatives were obtained that showed an interesting solubility behavior and will be used for creating functional polysaccharide materials.

  12. Chondroitin sulfate-derivatized agarose beads: a new system for studying cation binding to glycosaminoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, G.K.

    1987-09-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) has been covalently attached to aminoethyl-agarose beads in a carbodiimide-catalyzed reaction. In this process, an amide bond is formed between carboxylate groups on the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and the primary amine groups of the beads. Under optimal conditions, up to 160 micrograms of CS is attached per milligram of beads. CS-agarose beads have been used to study Ca binding to GAGs. The beads are mixed with a solution containing CaCl/sub 2/ and /sup 45/Ca and allowed to sediment under unit gravity. An aliquot of supernatant is then removed and /sup 45/Ca activity is determined to quantitate remaining (free) Ca. Using this system, it was shown that CS binds approximately 0.7 Ca/disaccharide unit at saturation. Under the conditions used, the apparent association constant (KA) is approximately 14 mM. In principle, this derivatization protocol may be used to attach any proteoglycan or GAG (except keratan sulfate) to an insoluble support. CS-agarose beads provide a rapid, simple, and relatively artifact-free system for studying cation-GAG interactions.

  13. Preparation of uniform-sized agarose beads by microporous membrane emulsification technique.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing-Zhu; Wang, Lian-Yan; Ma, Guang-Hui; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2007-07-01

    Uniform-sized agarose beads were prepared by membrane emulsification technique in this study. Agarose was dissolved in boiling water (containing 0.9% sodium chloride) and used as water phase. A mixture of liquid paraffin and petroleum ether containing 4 wt% of hexaglycerin penta ester (PO-500) emulsifier was used as oil phase. At 55 degrees C, the water phase permeated through uniform pores of microporous membrane into the oil phase by a pressure of nitrogen gas to form uniform W/O emulsion. Then the emulsion was cooled down to room temperature under gentle agitation to form gel beads. The effect of oil phase, emulsifier, especially temperature on the uniformity of the beads were investigated and interpreted from interfacial tension between water phase and oil phase. Under optimized condition, the coefficient variation (C.V.) showing the size distribution of the beads was under 15%. This was the first report to prepare uniform agarose beads by membrane emulsification, and to investigate the effect of temperature on the size distribution of the droplets and beads. The beads with different size can be prepared by using membranes with different pore size, and the result showed that there was a linear relationship between the average diameter of beads and pore size of the membranes; beads with diameter from 15 to 60 microm were able to obtain in this study.

  14. Homogeneous tosylation of agarose as an approach toward novel functional polysaccharide materials.

    PubMed

    Gericke, Martin; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The homogeneous tosylation of agarose was studied with respect to the effects of reaction parameters, such as reaction medium, time, and molar ratio, on the reaction course, the degree of substitution (DS) with tosyl/chloro deoxy groups, and the molecular structure. Tosyl agaroses (TOSA) with DS tosyl ≤ 1 .81 could be obtained in completely homogeneous reactions by using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA)/LiCl or 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as solvents. The products were characterized by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy and it was demonstrated that two types of substitution pattern can be achieved: (i) non-preferential substitution at position 6 of the 1 → 3-linked β-d-galactose unit (G-6) and position 2 of the 1 → 4-linked 3,6-anyhdro-α-L-galactose unit (LA-2) and (ii) regioselective tosylation at G-6, depending on whether the reaction is performed with or without LiCl. Finally, the nucleophilic displacement reaction of TOSA was studied using azide and ethylenediamine as representative nucleophiles. Novel deoxy-agarose derivatives were obtained that showed an interesting solubility behavior and will be used for creating functional polysaccharide materials. PMID:25965480

  15. Hydrogels with covalent and noncovalent crosslinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilck, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds from hydrogels is presented. The method involves administering to a cell a hydrogel in which a therapeutic compound is noncovalently bound to heparin. The hydrogel may contain covalent and non-covalent crosslinks.

  16. Novel Hydrogels from Renewable Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaaslan, Muzafer Ahmet

    2011-12-01

    The cell wall of most plant biomass from forest and agricultural resources consists of three major polymers, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Of these, hemicelluloses have gained increasing attention as sustainable raw materials. In the first part of this study, novel pH-sensitive semi-IPN hydrogels based on hemicelluloses and chitosan were prepared using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinking agent. The hemicellulose isolated from aspen was analyzed for sugar content by HPLC, and its molecular weight distribution was determined by high performance size exclusion chromatography. Results revealed that hemicellulose had a broad molecular weight distribution with a fair amount of polymeric units, together with xylose, arabinose and glucose. The effect of hemicellulose content on mechanical properties and swelling behavior of hydrogels were investigated. The semi-IPNs hydrogel structure was confirmed by FT-IR, X-ray study and ninhydrin assay method. X-ray analysis showed that higher hemicellulose contents yielded higher crystallinity. Mechanical properties were mainly dependent on the crosslink density and average molecular weight between crosslinks. Swelling ratios increased with increasing hemicellulose content and were high at low pH values due to repulsion between similarly charged groups. In vitro release study of a model drug showed that these semi-IPN hydrogels could be used for controlled drug delivery into gastric fluid. The aim of the second part of this study was to control the crosslink density and the mechanical properties of hemicellulose/chitosan semi-IPN hydrogels by changing the crosslinking sequence. It has been hypothesized that by performing the crosslinking step before introducing hemicellulose, covalent crosslinking of chitosan would not be hindered and therefore more and/or shorter crosslinks could be formed. Furthermore, additional secondary interactions and crystalline domains introduced through hemicellulose could be favorable in terms of

  17. Evaluation of multifunctional polysaccharide hydrogels with varying stiffness for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Vaibhav; Zuidema, Jonathan M; Venuto, Kathryn N; Macione, James; Dai, Guohao; Gilbert, Ryan J; Kotha, Shiva P

    2013-11-01

    The use of hydrogels for bone regeneration has been limited due to their inherent low modulus to support cell adhesion and proliferation as well as their susceptibility to bacterial infections at the wound site. To overcome these limitations, we evaluated multifunctional polysaccharide hydrogels of varying stiffness to obtain the optimum stiffness at which the gels (1) induce proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts, human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs), and murine preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1), (2) induce osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, and (3) exhibit an antibacterial activity. Rheological studies demonstrated that the stiffness of hydrogels made of a polysaccharide blend of methylcellulose, chitosan, and agarose was increased by crosslinking the chitosan component to different extents with increasing amounts of genipin. The gelation time decreased (from 210 to 60 min) with increasing genipin concentrations. Proliferation of HUVECs decreased by 10.7 times with increasing gel stiffness, in contrast to fibroblasts and osteoblasts, where it increased with gel stiffness by 6.37 and 7.8 times, respectively. At day 14 up to day 24, osteoblast expression of differentiation markers-osteocalcin, osteopontin-and early mineralization marker-alkaline phosphatase, were significantly enhanced in the 0.5% (w/v) crosslinked gel, which also demonstrated enhanced mineralization by day 25. The antibacterial efficacy of the hydrogels decreased with the increasing degree of crosslinking as demonstrated by biofilm formation experiments, but gels crosslinked with 0.5% (w/v) genipin still demonstrated significant bacterial inhibition. Based on these results, gels crosslinked with 0.5% (w/v) genipin, where 33% of available groups on chitosan were crosslinked, exhibited a stiffness of 502±64.5 Pa and demonstrated the optimal characteristics to support bone regeneration.

  18. Role of Electrostatic Interactions on the Transport of Druglike Molecules in Hydrogel-Based Articular Cartilage Mimics: Implications for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fengbin; Baldursdottir, Stefania; Hvidt, Søren; Jensen, Henrik; Larsen, Susan W; Yaghmur, Anan; Larsen, Claus; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    In the field of drug delivery to the articular cartilage, it is advantageous to apply artificial tissue models as surrogates of cartilage for investigating drug transport and release properties. In this study, artificial cartilage models consisting of 0.5% (w/v) agarose gel containing 0.5% (w/v) chondroitin sulfate or 0.5% (w/v) hyaluronic acid were developed, and their rheological and morphological properties were characterized. UV imaging was utilized to quantify the transport properties of the following four model compounds in the agarose gel and in the developed artificial cartilage models: H-Ala-β-naphthylamide, H-Lys-Lys-β-naphthylamide, lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin. The obtained results showed that the incorporation of the polyelectrolytes chondroitin sulfate or hyaluronic acid into agarose gel induced a significant reduction in the apparent diffusivities of the cationic model compounds as compared to the pure agarose gel. The decrease in apparent diffusivity of the cationic compounds was not caused by a change in the gel structure since a similar reduction in apparent diffusivity was not observed for the net negatively charged protein α-lactalbumin. The apparent diffusivity of the cationic compounds in the negatively charged hydrogels was highly dependent on the ionic strength, pointing out the importance of electrostatic interactions between the diffusant and the polyelectrolytes. Solution based affinity studies between the model compounds and the two investigated polyelectrolytes further confirmed the electrostatic nature of their interactions. The results obtained from the UV imaging diffusion studies are important for understanding the effect of drug physicochemical properties on the transport in articular cartilage. The extracted information may be useful in the development of hydrogels for in vitro release testing having features resembling the articular cartilage. PMID:26808484

  19. Magnetic hydrogel with high coercivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sözeri, H.; Alveroğlu, E.; Kurtan, U.; Şenel, M.; Baykal, A.

    2013-08-01

    Highlights: • Polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels containing magnetic BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles have been prepared. • Magnetization measurements reveal that hydrogels have hard magnetic properties with high coercivity. • Magnetic nanoparticles makes the gel more homogeneous and do not diffuse out of the gel during water intake. • These gels are useful in applications as wastewater treatment once gels are magnetized before its usage. - Abstract: This study investigates the synthesis and characterization of polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels containing magnetic BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles. Structural, electrical, and magnetic characterization of the gels have been performed with X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, DC conductivity, magnetization and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The preparation and characterization of polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels that contain 5 and 10 mg BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (16 and 21 nm diameter) nanoparticles are described herein. It is seen from the fluorescence spectra that, nanoparticles surrounded to pyranine molecules so that some of pyranine molecules could not bound to the polymer strands. Electrical measurements show that presence of nanoparticles make the gel more homogeneous. Magnetization measurements reveal that hydrogels have hard magnetic properties with quite high coercivity of 4.2 kOe, which does not change with swelling. This feature makes these gels useful in applications as wastewater treatment if they are magnetized before use.

  20. Microfluidics assisted generation of innovative polysaccharide hydrogel microparticles.

    PubMed

    Marquis, M; Davy, J; Cathala, B; Fang, A; Renard, D

    2015-02-13

    Capillary flow-based approach such as microfluidic devices offer a number of advantages over conventional flow control technology because they ensure highly versatile geometry and can be used to produce monodisperse spherical and non-spherical polymeric microparticles. Based on the principle of a flow-focusing device to emulsify the coflow of aqueous solutions in an organic phase, we were able to produce the following innovative polysaccharide hydrogel microparticles: - Janus hydrogel microparticles made of pectin–pectin (homo Janus) and pectin–alginate (hetero Janus) were produced. The efficiency of separation of the two hemispheres was investigated by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) of previously labelled biopolymers. The Janus structure was confirmed by subjecting each microparticle hemisphere to specific enzymatic degradation. As a proof of concept, free BSA or BSA grafted with dextran, were encapsulated in each hemisphere of the hetero Janus hydrogel microparticles. While BSA, free or grafted with dextran, was always confined in the alginate hemisphere, a fraction of BSA diffused from the pectin to the alginate hemisphere. Methoxy groups along the pectin chain will be responsible of the decrease of the number of attractive electrostatic interactions occurring between amino groups of BSA and carboxylic groups of pectin. - Pectin hydrogel microparticles of complex shapes were successfully produced by combining on-chip the phenomenon of gelation and water diffusion induced self-assembly, using dimethyl carbonate as continuous phase, or by deformation of the pre-gelled droplets off-chip at a fluid–fluid interface. Sphere, oblate ellipsoid, torus or mushroom-type morphologies were thus obtained. Moreover, it was established that after crossing the interface during their collect, mushroom-type microparticles did not migrate in the calcium or DMC phase but stayed at the liquid–liquid interface. These new and original hydrogel microparticles will

  1. Microfluidics assisted generation of innovative polysaccharide hydrogel microparticles.

    PubMed

    Marquis, M; Davy, J; Cathala, B; Fang, A; Renard, D

    2015-02-13

    Capillary flow-based approach such as microfluidic devices offer a number of advantages over conventional flow control technology because they ensure highly versatile geometry and can be used to produce monodisperse spherical and non-spherical polymeric microparticles. Based on the principle of a flow-focusing device to emulsify the coflow of aqueous solutions in an organic phase, we were able to produce the following innovative polysaccharide hydrogel microparticles: - Janus hydrogel microparticles made of pectin–pectin (homo Janus) and pectin–alginate (hetero Janus) were produced. The efficiency of separation of the two hemispheres was investigated by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) of previously labelled biopolymers. The Janus structure was confirmed by subjecting each microparticle hemisphere to specific enzymatic degradation. As a proof of concept, free BSA or BSA grafted with dextran, were encapsulated in each hemisphere of the hetero Janus hydrogel microparticles. While BSA, free or grafted with dextran, was always confined in the alginate hemisphere, a fraction of BSA diffused from the pectin to the alginate hemisphere. Methoxy groups along the pectin chain will be responsible of the decrease of the number of attractive electrostatic interactions occurring between amino groups of BSA and carboxylic groups of pectin. - Pectin hydrogel microparticles of complex shapes were successfully produced by combining on-chip the phenomenon of gelation and water diffusion induced self-assembly, using dimethyl carbonate as continuous phase, or by deformation of the pre-gelled droplets off-chip at a fluid–fluid interface. Sphere, oblate ellipsoid, torus or mushroom-type morphologies were thus obtained. Moreover, it was established that after crossing the interface during their collect, mushroom-type microparticles did not migrate in the calcium or DMC phase but stayed at the liquid–liquid interface. These new and original hydrogel microparticles will

  2. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells.Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06368j

  3. Catalysis of Supramolecular Hydrogelation.

    PubMed

    Trausel, Fanny; Versluis, Frank; Maity, Chandan; Poolman, Jos M; Lovrak, Matija; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-07-19

    One often thinks of catalysts as chemical tools to accelerate a reaction or to have a reaction run under more benign conditions. As such, catalysis has a role to play in the chemical industry and in lab scale synthesis that is not to be underestimated. Still, the role of catalysis in living systems (cells, organisms) is much more extensive, ranging from the formation and breakdown of small molecules and biopolymers to controlling signal transduction cascades and feedback processes, motility, and mechanical action. Such phenomena are only recently starting to receive attention in synthetic materials and chemical systems. "Smart" soft materials could find many important applications ranging from personalized therapeutics to soft robotics to name but a few. Until recently, approaches to control the properties of such materials were largely dominated by thermodynamics, for instance, looking at phase behavior and interaction strength. However, kinetics plays a large role in determining the behavior of such soft materials, for instance, in the formation of kinetically trapped (metastable) states or the dynamics of component exchange. As catalysts can change the rate of a chemical reaction, catalysis could be used to control the formation, dynamics, and fate of supramolecular structures when the molecules making up these structures contain chemical bonds whose formation or exchange are susceptible to catalysis. In this Account, we describe our efforts to use synthetic catalysts to control the properties of supramolecular hydrogels. Building on the concept of synthesizing the assembling molecule in the self-assembly medium from nonassembling precursors, we will introduce the use of catalysis to change the kinetics of assembler formation and thereby the properties of the resulting material. In particular, we will focus on the synthesis of supramolecular hydrogels where the use of a catalyst provides access to gel materials with vastly different appearance and mechanical

  4. Morphological effect on swelling behaviour of hydrogel

    SciTech Connect

    Yacob, Norzita; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2014-02-12

    Hydrogels are hydrophilic polymer networks that are capable of imbibing large amounts of water. In this work, hydrogels prepared from natural and synthetic polymers were irradiated by using electron beam irradiation. The morphology of hydrogel inter-polymeric network (IPN) was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The studies reveal correlations between pore sizes of IPN with degree of cross-linking. This relation also has an effect on swelling properties of the hydrogel. The results indicated that hydrogel with smaller pore size, as a result of much dense IPN, would decrease water uptake capacity. Combination of natural and synthetic polymers to form hydrogel affects the pore size and swelling property of the hydrogel as compared to each component of polymer.

  5. Morphological effect on swelling behaviour of hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacob, Norzita; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogels are hydrophilic polymer networks that are capable of imbibing large amounts of water. In this work, hydrogels prepared from natural and synthetic polymers were irradiated by using electron beam irradiation. The morphology of hydrogel inter-polymeric network (IPN) was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The studies reveal correlations between pore sizes of IPN with degree of cross-linking. This relation also has an effect on swelling properties of the hydrogel. The results indicated that hydrogel with smaller pore size, as a result of much dense IPN, would decrease water uptake capacity. Combination of natural and synthetic polymers to form hydrogel affects the pore size and swelling property of the hydrogel as compared to each component of polymer.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Polymer nanocomposite hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Di; Rafailovich, Miriam; Gersappe, Dilip

    2013-03-01

    Polymer hydrogels are widely used in fields like food science, tissue engineering and drug delivery. A lot of research has focused on developing hydrogels with novel properties. However, a lack of understanding of the dynamics and structure of the hydrogel has become a big obstacle. We use molecular dynamic simulations, which provide a direct observation of gel formation and gel structures, to study the local structural and dynamic properties of hydrogels. Our work focuses on using coarse-graining molecule dynamic simulations to study physically linked polymer nano-composite hydrogels. Our goal is to study how the aspect ratio and shape of the nanofiller introduced to the hydrogel can lead to different mechanical behavior. Our simulation looks at the effects of polymer species, chain length, and water content and the effect on the mechanical properties of the hydrogel.

  7. Synthetically Simple, Highly Resilient Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jun; Lackey, Melissa A.; Madkour, Ahmad E.; Saffer, Erika M.; Griffin, David M.; Bhatia, Surita R.; Crosby, Alfred J.; Tew, Gregory N.

    2014-01-01

    Highly resilient synthetic hydrogels were synthesized by using the efficient thiol-norbornene chemistry to cross-link hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer chains. The swelling and mechanical properties of the hydrogels were well-controlled by the relative amounts of PEG and PDMS. In addition, the mechanical energy storage efficiency (resilience) was more than 97% at strains up to 300%. This is comparable with one of the most resilient materials known: natural resilin, an elastic protein found in many insects, such as in the tendons of fleas and the wings of dragonflies. The high resilience of these hydrogels can be attributed to the well-defined network structure provided by the versatile chemistry, low cross-link density, and lack of secondary structure in the polymer chains. PMID:22372639

  8. Hydrogels and their medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosiak, Janusz M.; Yoshii, Fumio

    1999-05-01

    Biomaterials play a key role in most approaches for engineering tissues as substitutes for functional replacement, for components of devices related to therapy and diagnosis, for drug delivery systems and supportive scaffolds for guided tissue growth. Modern biomaterials could be composed of various components, e.g. metals, ceramics, natural tissues, polymers. In this last group, the hydrogels, hydrophilic polymeric gels with requested biocompatibility and designed interaction with living surrounding seem to be one of the most promising group of biomaterials. Especially, if they are formed by means of ionizing radiation. In early 1950s, the pioneers of the radiation chemistry of polymers began some experiments with radiation crosslinking of hydrophilic polymers. However, hydrogels were analyzed mainly from the point of view of the phenomenon associated with radiation synthesis, with topology of network and relation between radiation parameters of the processes. Fundamental monographs on radiation polymer physics and chemistry written by A. Charlesby (Atomic Radition and polymers, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1960) and A. Chapiro (Radiation Chemistry of Polymeric Systems, Interscience, New York, 1962) proceed from this time. The noticeable interest in the application of radiation techniques to obtain hydrogels for biomedical purposes began in the late sixties as a result of the papers and patents invented by Japanese and American scientists, headed by Kaetsu in Japan and Hoffman in USA. Immobilization of biologically active species in hydrogel matrices, their use as drug delivery systems and enzyme traps as well as the modification of material surfaces to improve biocompatibility and their ability to bond antigens and antibodies had been the main subjects of these investigations. In this article a brief summary of investigations on mechanism and kinetics of radiation formation of hydrogels as well as some examples of commercialized hydrogel biomaterials have been

  9. Freestanding 3-D microvascular networks made of alginate hydrogel as a universal tool to create microchannels inside hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chong; Sun, Han; Liu, Zhengzhi; Chen, Yin; Chen, Yangfan; Wu, Hongkai; Ren, Kangning

    2016-07-01

    The diffusion of molecules such as nutrients and oxygen through densely packed cells is impeded by blockage and consumption by cells, resulting in a limited depth of penetration. This has been a major hurdle to a bulk (3-D) culture. Great efforts have been made to develop methods for generating branched microchannels inside hydrogels to support mass exchange inside a bulk culture. These previous attempts faced a common obstacle: researchers tried to fabricate microchannels with gels already loaded with cells, but the fabrication procedures are often harmful to the embedded cells. Herein, we present a universal strategy to create microchannels in different types of hydrogels, which effectively avoids cell damage. This strategy is based on a freestanding alginate 3-D microvascular network prepared by in-situ generation of copper ions from a sacrificial copper template. This alginate network could be used as implants to create microchannels inside different types of hydrogels. This approach effectively addresses the issue of cell damage during microfabrication and made it possible to create microchannels inside different types of gels. The microvascular network produced with this method is (1) strong enough to allow handling, (2) biocompatible to allow cell culturing, and (3) appropriately permeable to allow diffusion of small molecules, while sufficiently dense to prevent blocking of channels when embedded in different types of gels. In addition, composite microtubules could be prepared by simply pre-loading other materials, e.g., particles and large biomolecules, in the hydrogel. Compared with other potential strategies to fabricate freestanding gel channel networks, our method is more rapid, low-cost and scalable due to parallel processing using an industrially mass-producible template. We demonstrated the use of such vascular networks in creating microchannels in different hydrogels and composite gels, as well as with a cell culture in a nutrition gradient based

  10. Multiresponsive hydrogel photonic crystal microparticles with inverse-opal structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianying; Hu, Yuandu; Deng, Renhua; Liang, Ruijing; Li, Weikun; Liu, Shanqin; Zhu, Jintao

    2013-07-16

    Hydrogel photonic crystal microparticles (HPCMs) with inverse-opal structure are generated through a combination of microfluidic and templating technique. Temperature and pH responsive HPCMs have firstly been prepared by copolymerizing functional monomers, for example, N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) and methacrylic acid (MAA). HPCMs not only show tunable color variation almost covering the entire wavelength of visible light (above 150 nm of stop-band shift) by simply tailoring temperature or pH value of the solution, but also display rapid response (less than 1 min) due to the small volume and well-ordered porous structure. Importantly, the temperature sensing window of the HPCMs can be enlarged by controlling the transition temperature of the hydrogel matrix, and the HPCMs also exhibit good reversibility and reproducibility for pH response. Moreover, functional species or particles (such as azobenzene derivative or magnetic nanoparticles) can be further introduced into the hydrogel matrix by using post-treatment process. These functionalized HPCMs can respond to the UV/visible light without significantly influencing the temperature and pH response, and thus, multiresponsive capability within one single particle can be realized. The presence of magnetic nanoparticles may facilitate secondary assembly, which has potential applications in advanced optical devices. PMID:23768084

  11. Forward osmosis desalination using polymer hydrogels as a draw agent: influence of draw agent, feed solution and membrane on process performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zhang, Xinyi; Simon, George P; Wang, Huanting

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported the use of hydrogel particles as the draw agent for forward osmosis desalination. In the present work, the effects of draw agent, feed concentration and membrane on the process performance were systematically examined. Our results showed that the incorporation of carbon filler particles in polymer hydrogels led to enhanced swelling ratios of the draw agents and thus higher water fluxes in the FO process. The composite polymer hydrogel particles of sizes ranging from 100 μm to 200 μm as draw agents induced greater water fluxes in FO desalination as compared with those with larger particle sizes (500-700 μm). Similar to other types of draw solutes, as the salt concentration in the feed increased, the water flux created by the polymer hydrogel draw agent decreased; the use of a cellulose triacetate forward osmosis membrane resulted in higher water flux compared with the use of a polyamide composite reverse osmosis membrane.

  12. Forward osmosis desalination using polymer hydrogels as a draw agent: influence of draw agent, feed solution and membrane on process performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zhang, Xinyi; Simon, George P; Wang, Huanting

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported the use of hydrogel particles as the draw agent for forward osmosis desalination. In the present work, the effects of draw agent, feed concentration and membrane on the process performance were systematically examined. Our results showed that the incorporation of carbon filler particles in polymer hydrogels led to enhanced swelling ratios of the draw agents and thus higher water fluxes in the FO process. The composite polymer hydrogel particles of sizes ranging from 100 μm to 200 μm as draw agents induced greater water fluxes in FO desalination as compared with those with larger particle sizes (500-700 μm). Similar to other types of draw solutes, as the salt concentration in the feed increased, the water flux created by the polymer hydrogel draw agent decreased; the use of a cellulose triacetate forward osmosis membrane resulted in higher water flux compared with the use of a polyamide composite reverse osmosis membrane. PMID:23103058

  13. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s−1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening. PMID:25615864

  14. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2014-06-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s-1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  15. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    DOE PAGES

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; et al

    2014-06-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s-1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from themore » inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.« less

  16. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Cuttitta, Christina M; Ericson, Daniel L; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s(-1)) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  17. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  18. Diffusivity of ions in agarose gels and intervertebral disc: effect of porosity.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei Yong; Yao, Hai; Vega, Adriana L; Flagler, Daniel

    2004-12-01

    The effect of tissue porosity on ion (sodium, potassium, and chloride) diffusivity in agarose gels and porcine intervertebral disc tissues was investigated using an electrical conductivity method. An empirical, constitutive model for diffusivity (D) of solutes in porous fibrous media was proposed: D/Do = exp[-alpha(r(s)/k(1/2))beta] where r(s) is the Stokes radius of a solute, kappa is the Darcy permeability of the porous medium, Do is the diffusivity in free solution, alpha and beta are two positive parameters whose values depend on material structure. It is found that alpha = 1.25 +/- 0.138, beta = 0.681 +/- 0.059 (95% confidence interval, R2 = 0.92, n = 72) for agarose gels and alpha = 1.29 +/- 0.171 and beta = 0.372 +/- 0.088 (95% confidence interval, R2 = 0.88, n = 86) for porcine annulus fibrosus. The functional relationship between solute diffusivity and tissue deformation was derived. Comparisons of our model prediction with experimental data on diffusion coefficients of macromolecules (proteins, dextrans, polymer beads) in agarose gels in the literature were made. Our results were also compared to the data on ion diffusivity in charged gels and in cartilaginous tissues reported in the literature. There was a good agreement between our model prediction and the data in the literature. The present study provides additional information on solute diffusivity in uncharged gels and charged tissues, and is important for understanding nutritional transport in avascular cartilaginous tissues under different mechanical loading conditions.

  19. Hydrolysis of proteins by immobilized-stabilized alcalase-glyoxyl agarose.

    PubMed

    Tardioli, Paulo W; Pedroche, Justo; Giordano, Raquel L C; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José M

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents stable Alcalase-glyoxyl derivatives, to be used in the controlled hydrolysis of proteins. They were produced by immobilizing-stabilizing Alcalase on cross-linked 10% agarose beads, using low and high activation grades of the support and different immobilization times. The Alcalase glyoxyl derivatives were compared to other agarose derivatives, prepared using glutaraldehyde and CNBr as activation reactants. The performance of derivatives in the hydrolysis of casein was also tested. At pH 8.0 and 50 degrees C, Alcalase derivatives produced with 1 h of immobilization time on agarose activated with glutaraldehyde, CNBr, and low and high glyoxyl groups concentration presented half-lives of ca. 10, 29, 60, and 164 h, respectively. More extensive immobilization monotonically led to higher stabilization. The most stabilized Alcalase-glyoxyl derivative was produced using 96 h of immobilization time and high activation grade of the support. It presented half-life of ca. 23 h, at pH 8.0 and 63 degrees C and was ca. 500-fold more stable than the soluble enzyme. Thermal inactivation of all derivatives followed a single-step non-first-order kinetics. The most stable derivative presented ca. 54% of the activity of the soluble enzyme for the hydrolysis of casein and of the small substrate Boc-Ala-ONp. This behavior suggests that the decrease in activity was due to enzyme distortion but not to wrong orientation. The hydrolysis degree of casein at 80 degrees C with the most stabilized enzyme was 2-fold higher than that achieved using soluble enzyme, as a result of the thermal inactivation of the latter. Therefore, the high stability of the new Alcalase-glyoxyl derivative allows the design of continuous processes to hydrolyze proteins at temperatures that avoid microbial growth.

  20. A rapid photoelectric method for reading cell migration from agarose microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Rahman, S; Morlat, J L; Leca, G; Bouin, M

    1982-08-27

    A rapid photoelectric method for reading cell migration from agarose microdroplets is described. Practically instantaneous, the method eliminates drawing and planimetry and makes feasible the use of a wide range of antigen concentrations. The results obtained are similar to those obtained by planimetry, but the photoelectric method is more sensitive. Enhancement of migration as well as inhibition were significantly demonstrated by this method. Migration inhibition of immune mouse spleen cells was found to be bizonal, with 2 peaks, one at very low antigen concentrations (10(-3) microgram/ml ovalbumin) and one at 10 microgram/ml.

  1. Ribosome display for selection of active dihydrofolate reductase mutants using immobilized methotrexate on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumio; Ebihara, Takashi; Mie, Masayasu; Yanagida, Yasuko; Endo, Yaeta; Kobatake, Eiry; Aizawa, Masuo

    2002-03-01

    Ribosome display was applied to the selection of an enzyme. As a model, we selected and amplified the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene by ribosome display utilizing a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system based on binding affinity to its substrate analog, methotrexate, immobilized on agarose beads. After three rounds of selection, the DHFR gene could be effectively selected and preferentially amplified from a small proportion in a mixture also containing competitive genes. Active enzymes were expressed and amplified and by sequence analysis, four mutants of DHFR were identified. These mutants showed as much activity as the wild-type enzyme.

  2. Self-Healing Nanocomposite Hydrogel with Well-Controlled Dynamic Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiaochu; Mishra, Sumeet; Chen, Pangkuan; Tracy, Joseph; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    Network dynamics is a crucial factor that determines the macroscopic self-healing rate and efficiency in polymeric hydrogel materials, yet its controllability is seldom studied in most reported self-healing hydrogel systems. Inspired by mussel's adhesion chemistry, we developed a novel approach to assemble inorganic nanoparticles and catechol-decorated PEG polymer into a hydrogel network. When utilized as reversible polymer-particle crosslinks, catechol-metal coordination bonds yield a unique gel network with dynamic mechanics controlled directly by interfacial crosslink structure. Taking advantage of this structure-property relationship at polymer-particle interfaces, we next designed a hierarchically structured hybrid gel with two distinct relaxation timescales. By tuning the relative contribution of the two hierarchical relaxation modes, we are able to finely control the gel's dynamic mechanical behavior from a viscoelastic fluid to a stiff solid, yet preserving its fast self-healing property without the need for external stimuli.

  3. Cluster dynamics, growth and syneresis during silica hydrogel polymerisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2000-04-01

    The aggregation and syneresis of silica particles during hydrogel polymerisation has been observed in situ for the first time with near-Å resolution using a new approach based on the combined fluorescence anisotropy decay of solvated and bound dye molecules. Primary particles of mean hydrodynamic diameter ˜1.5 nm are found to be present within 20 min of mixing sodium silicate solution and sulphuric acid. Clustering then occurs during siloxane polymerisation to produce after ˜30 h secondary particles with a mean diameter up to ˜4.5 nm at a growth rate which depends on silicate concentration and time to microgelation, tg. Subsequent condensation to ˜4 nm diameter occurs within 1 week as particle syneresis dominates. The effects on particle growth of adding D 2O and inorganic salts are demonstrated.

  4. Smart Magnetically Responsive Hydrogel Nanoparticles Prepared by a Novel Aerosol-Assisted Method for Biomedical and Drug Delivery Applications

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Smyth, Hugh D. C.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel spray gelation-based method to synthesize a new series of magnetically responsive hydrogel nanoparticles for biomedical and drug delivery applications. The method is based on the production of hydrogel nanoparticles from sprayed polymeric microdroplets obtained by an air-jet nebulization process that is immediately followed by gelation in a crosslinking fluid. Oligoguluronate (G-blocks) was prepared through the partial acid hydrolysis of sodium alginate. PEG-grafted chitosan was also synthesized and characterized (FTIR, EA, and DSC). Then, magnetically responsive hydrogel nanoparticles based on alginate and alginate/G-blocks were synthesized via aerosolization followed by either ionotropic gelation or both ionotropic and polyelectrolyte complexation using CaCl2 or PEG-g-chitosan/CaCl2 as crosslinking agents, respectively. Particle size and dynamic swelling were determined using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and microscopy. Surface morphology of the nanoparticles was examined using SEM. The distribution of magnetic cores within the hydrogels nanoparticles was also examined using TEM. In addition, the iron and calcium contents of the particles were estimated using EDS. Spherical magnetic hydrogel nanoparticles with average particle size of 811 ± 162 to 941 ± 2 nm were obtained. This study showed that the developed method is promising for the manufacture of hydrogel nanoparticles, and it represents a relatively simple and potential low-cost system. PMID:21808638

  5. Fabrication of Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogel Structures for Pharmaceutical Applications using Electron beam and Optical Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Misuk; Divan, Ralu; Suthar, Kamlesh J.; Mancini, Derrick C.; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Soft-polymer based microparticles are currently being applied in many biomedical applications, ranging from bioimaging and bioassays to drug delivery carriers. As one class of soft-polymers, hydrogels are materials, which can be used for delivering drug cargoes and can be fabricated in controlled sizes. Among the various hydrogel-forming polymers, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogel systems are widely used due to their negligible toxicity and limited immunogenic recognition. Physical and chemical properties of particles (i.e., particle size, shape, surface charge, and hydrophobicity) are known to play an important role in cell-particle recognition and response. To understand the role of physicochemical properties of PEG-based hydrogel structures on cells, it is important to have geometrically precise and uniform hydrogel structures. To fabricate geometrically uniform structures, we have employed electron beam lithography (EBL) and ultra-violet optical lithography (UVL) using PEG or PEG diacrylate polymers. These hydrogel structures have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical microscopy, and attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirming control of chemistry, size, and shape. PMID:21423572

  6. The rotation and translation of non-spherical particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byron, Margaret

    The motion of particles suspended in environmental turbulence is relevant to many scientific fields, from sediment transport to biological interactions to underwater robotics. At very small scales and simple shapes, we are able to completely mathematically describe the motion of inertial particles; however, the motion of large aspherical particles is significantly more complex, and current computational models are inadequate for large or highly-resolved domains. Therefore, we seek to experimentally investigate the coupling between freely suspended particles and ambient turbulence. A better understanding of this coupling will inform not only engineering and physics, but the interactions between small aquatic organisms and their environments. In the following pages, we explore the roles of shape and buoyancy on the motion of passive particles in turbulence, and allow these particles to serve as models for meso-scale aquatic organisms. We fabricate cylindrical and spheroidal particles and suspend them in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence that is generated via randomly-actuated jet arrays. The particles are fabricated with agarose hydrogel, which is refractive-index-matched to the surrounding fluid (water). Both the fluid and the particle are seeded with passive tracers, allowing us to perform Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) simultaneously on the particle and fluid phase. To investigate the effects of shape, particles are fabricated at varying aspect ratios; to investigate the effects of buoyancy, particles are fabricated at varying specific gravities. Each particle type is freely suspended at a volume fraction of F=0.1%, for which four-way coupling interactions are negligible. The suspended particles are imaged together with the surrounding fluid and analyzed using stereoscopic PIV, which yields three velocity components in a two-dimensional measurement plane. Using image thresholding, the results are separated into simultaneous fluid-phase and solid-phase velocity

  7. pH-responsive and enzymatically-responsive hydrogel microparticles for the oral delivery of therapeutic proteins: Effects of protein size, crosslinking density, and hydrogel degradation on protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Michael Clinton; Guido, Joseph Frank; Gupta, Malvika; Zhang, Annie; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2016-01-10

    Two potential platform technologies for the oral delivery of protein therapeutics were synthesized and tested. pH-responsive poly(itaconic acid-co-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (P(IA-co-NVP)) hydrogel microparticles were tested in vitro with model proteins salmon calcitonin, urokinase, and rituximab to determine the effects of particle size, protein size, and crosslinking density on oral delivery capability. Particle size showed no significant effect on overall delivery potential but did improve percent release of encapsulated protein over the micro-scale particle size range studied. Protein size was shown to have a significant impact on the delivery capability of the P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel. We show that when using P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel microparticles with 3 mol% tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate crosslinker, a small polypeptide (salmon calcitonin) loads and releases up to 45 μg/mg hydrogel while the mid-sized protein urokinase and large monoclonal antibody rituximab load and release only 19 and 24 μg/mg hydrogel, respectively. We further demonstrate that crosslinking density offers a simple method for tuning hydrogel properties to variously sized proteins. Using 5 mol% TEGDMA crosslinker offers optimal performance for the small peptide, salmon calcitonin, whereas lower crosslinking density of 1 mol% offers optimal performance for the much larger protein rituximab. Finally, an enzymatically-degradable hydrogels of P(MAA-co-NVP) crosslinked with the peptide sequence MMRRRKK were synthesized and tested in simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. These hydrogels offer ideal loading and release behavior, showing no degradative release of encapsulated salmon calcitonin in gastric conditions while yielding rapid and complete release of encapsulated protein within 1h in intestinal conditions.

  8. Repairable, nanostructured biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, M.; Brombosz, S.; Grubjesic, S.

    2013-03-01

    Proteins facilitate many key cellular processes, including signal recognition and energy transduction. The ability to harness this evolutionarily-optimized functionality could lead to the development of protein-based systems useful for advancing alternative energy storage and conversion. The future of protein-based, however, requires the development of materials that will stabilize, order and control the activity of the proteins. Recently we have developed a synthetic approach for the preparation of a durable biomimetic chemical hydrogel that can be reversibly swollen in water. The matrix has proven ideal for the stable encapsulation of both water- and membrane-soluble proteins. The material is composed of an aqueous dispersion of a diacrylate end-derivatized PEO-PPO-PEO macromer, a saturated phospholipid and a zwitterionic co-surfactant that self-assembles into a nanostructured physical gel at room temperature as determined by X-ray scattering. The addition of a water soluble PEGDA co-monomer and photoinitator does not alter the self-assembled structure and UV irradiation serves to crosslink the acrylate end groups on the macromer with the PEGDA forming a network within the aqueous domains as determined by FT-IR. More recently we have begun to incorporate reversible crosslinks employing Diels-Alder chemistry, allowing for the extraction and replacement of inactive proteins. The ability to replenish the materials with active, non-denatured forms of protein is an important step in advancing these materials for use in nanostructured devices This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences, USDoE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. Frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility of magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles embedded in PAA hydrogel.

    PubMed

    van Berkum, Susanne; Dee, Joris T; Philipse, Albert P; Erné, Ben H

    2013-05-14

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid)-based hydrogels (PAA). To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network.

  10. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    van Berkum, Susanne; Dee, Joris T.; Philipse, Albert P.; Erné, Ben H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid)-based hydrogels (PAA). To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network. PMID:23673482

  11. Hydrogels for therapeutic cardiovascular angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Seliktar, Dror

    2016-01-15

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) caused by ischemia is the most common cause of cardiac dysfunction. While growth factor or cell therapy is promising, the retention of bioactive agents in the highly vascularized myocardium is limited and prevents sustained activation needed for adequate cellular responses. Various types of biomaterials with different physical and chemical properties have been developed to improve the localized delivery of growth factor and/or cells for therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic tissues. Hydrogels are particularly advantageous as carrier systems because they are structurally similar to the tissue extracellular matrix (ECM), they can be processed under relatively mild conditions and can be delivered in a minimally invasive manner. Moreover, hydrogels can be designed to degrade in a timely fashion that coincides with the angiogenic process. For these reasons, hydrogels have shown great potential as pro-angiogenic matrices. This paper reviews a few of the hydrogel systems currently being applied together with growth factor delivery and/or cell therapy to promote therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic tissues, with emphasis on myocardial applications.

  12. Conductive hydrogel containing 3-ionene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping Siao (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Cationic polyelectrolytes formed by the polymerization in absence of oxygen of a monomer of the general formula: dispersed ##STR1## where x is 3 or more than 6 and Z is I, Br or Cl to form high charge density linear polymers are dispered in a water-soluble polymer such as polyvinyl alcohol to form a conductive hydrogel.

  13. Imine Hydrogels with Tunable Degradability

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Natalie; Cam, Cynthia; Bat, Erhan; Segura, Tatiana; Maynard, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    A shortage of available organ donors has created a need for engineered tissues. In this context, polymer-based hydrogels that break down inside the body are often used as constructs for growth factors and cells. Herein, we report imine cross-linked gels where degradation is controllable by the introduction of mixed imine cross-links. Specifically, hydrazide-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) reacts with aldehyde-functionalized PEG (PEG-CHO) to form hydrazone linked hydrogels that degrade quickly in media. The time to degradation can be controlled by changing the structure of the hydrazide group or by introducing hydroxylamines to form non-reversible oxime linkages. Hydrogels containing adipohydrazide-functionalized PEG (PEG-ADH) and PEG-CHO were found to degrade more rapidly than gels formed from carbodihydrazide-functionalized PEG (PEG-CDH). Incorporating oxime linkages via aminooxy-functionalized PEG (PEG-AO) into the hydrazone cross-linked gels further stabilized the hydrogels. This imine crosslinking approach should be useful for modulating the degradation characteristics of 3D cell culture supports for controlled cell release. PMID:26061010

  14. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels for iontohporesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Prasanta; Alam, Asif Ali; Arora, Neha; Tibarewala, Dewaki Nandan; Basak, Piyali

    2013-06-01

    Transdermal therapeutic systems propound controlled release of active ingredients through the skin into the systemic circulation in a predictive manner. Drugs administered through these systems escape first-pass metabolism and maintain a steady state scenario similar to a continuous intravenous infusion for up to several days. The iontophoresis deal with the systemic delivery of the bioactive agents (drug) by applying an electric current. It is basically an injection without the needle. The iontophoretic system requires a gel-based matrix to accommodate the bioactive agent. Hydrogels have been used by many investigators in controlled-release drug delivery systems because of their good tissue compatibility and easy manipulation of swelling level and, thereby, solute permeability. In this work we have prepared polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel. We have cross linked polyvinyl alcohol chemically with Glutaraldehyde with different wt%. FTIR study reveals the chemical changes during cross linking. Swelling in water, is done to have an idea about drug loading and drug release from the membrane. After drug loading to the hydrogels, we have studied the drug release property of the hydrogels using salicylic acid as a model drug.

  15. Simulated moving bed separation of agarose-hydrolyzate components for biofuel production from marine biomass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pung-Ho; Nam, Hee-Geun; Park, Chanhun; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda; Chang, Yong Keun; Mun, Sungyong

    2015-08-01

    The economically-efficient separation of galactose, levulinic acid (LA), and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) in acid hydrolyzate of agarose has been a key issue in the area of biofuel production from marine biomass. To address this issue, an optimal simulated moving bed (SMB) process for continuous separation of the three agarose-hydrolyzate components with high purities, high yields, and high throughput was developed in this study. As a first step for this task, the adsorption isotherm and mass-transfer parameters of each component on the qualified adsorbent were determined through a series of multiple frontal experiments. The determined parameters were then used in optimizing the SMB process for the considered separation. Finally, the optimized SMB process was tested experimentally using a self-assembled SMB unit with four zones. The SMB experimental results and the relevant computer simulations verified that the developed process in this study was quite successful in the economically-efficient separation of galactose, LA, and 5-HMF in a continuous mode with high purities and high yields. It is thus expected that the developed SMB process in this study will be able to serve as one of the trustworthy ways of improving the economic feasibility of biofuel production from marine biomass.

  16. Dependence of light attenuation and backscattering on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density in agarose scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhakka, P. H.; Ylärinne, J. H.; Lammi, M. J.; Saarakkala, S.; Tiitu, V.; Kröger, H.; Virén, T.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Töyräs, J.

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been applied for high resolution imaging of articular cartilage. However, the contribution of individual structural elements of cartilage on OCT signal has not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesize that both collagen and chondrocytes, essential structural components of cartilage, act as important light scatterers and that variation in their concentrations can be detected by OCT through changes in backscattering and attenuation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we established a controlled model system using agarose scaffolds embedded with variable collagen concentrations and chondrocyte densities. Using OCT, we measured the backscattering coefficient (µb) and total attenuation coefficient (µt) in these scaffolds. Along our hypothesis, light backscattering and attenuation in agarose were dependent on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density. Significant correlations were found between µt and chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001) and between µt and collagen concentration (ρ = 0.694, p < 0.001). µb correlated significantly with chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.504, p < 0.001) but not with collagen concentration (ρ = 0.103, p = 0.422) of the scaffold. Thus, quantitation of light backscattering and, especially, attenuation could be valuable when evaluating the integrity of soft tissues, such as articular cartilage with OCT.

  17. Dependence of light attenuation and backscattering on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density in agarose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Puhakka, P H; Ylärinne, J H; Lammi, M J; Saarakkala, S; Tiitu, V; Kröger, H; Virén, T; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been applied for high resolution imaging of articular cartilage. However, the contribution of individual structural elements of cartilage on OCT signal has not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesize that both collagen and chondrocytes, essential structural components of cartilage, act as important light scatterers and that variation in their concentrations can be detected by OCT through changes in backscattering and attenuation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we established a controlled model system using agarose scaffolds embedded with variable collagen concentrations and chondrocyte densities. Using OCT, we measured the backscattering coefficient (µb) and total attenuation coefficient (µt) in these scaffolds. Along our hypothesis, light backscattering and attenuation in agarose were dependent on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density. Significant correlations were found between µt and chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001) and between µt and collagen concentration (ρ = 0.694, p < 0.001). µb correlated significantly with chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.504, p < 0.001) but not with collagen concentration (ρ = 0.103, p = 0.422) of the scaffold. Thus, quantitation of light backscattering and, especially, attenuation could be valuable when evaluating the integrity of soft tissues, such as articular cartilage with OCT. PMID:25310088

  18. A Novel Agarolytic β-Galactosidase Acts on Agarooligosaccharides for Complete Hydrolysis of Agarose into Monomers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan Hyoung; Kim, Hee Taek; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Ah Reum; Kim, Sa Rang; Kim, Jae-Han; Choi, In-Geol

    2014-01-01

    Marine red macroalgae have emerged to be renewable biomass for the production of chemicals and biofuels, because carbohydrates that form the major component of red macroalgae can be hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars. The main carbohydrate in red algae is agarose, and it is composed of d-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose (AHG), which are alternately bonded by β1-4 and α1-3 linkages. In this study, a novel β-galactosidase that can act on agarooligosaccharides (AOSs) to release galactose was discovered in a marine bacterium (Vibrio sp. strain EJY3); the enzyme is annotated as Vibrio sp. EJY3 agarolytic β-galactosidase (VejABG). Unlike the lacZ-encoded β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli, VejABG does not hydrolyze common substrates like lactose and can act only on the galactose moiety at the nonreducing end of AOS. The optimum pH and temperature of VejABG on an agarotriose substrate were 7 and 35°C, respectively. Its catalytic efficiency with agarotriose was also similar to that with agaropentaose or agaroheptaose. Since agarotriose lingers as the unreacted residual oligomer in the currently available saccharification system using β-agarases and acid prehydrolysis, the agarotriose-hydrolyzing capability of this novel β-galactosidase offers an enormous advantage in the saccharification of agarose or agar in red macroalgae for its use as a biomass feedstock for fermentable sugar production. PMID:25038102

  19. An improvement of restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA using capillary electrophoresis in agarose solution.

    PubMed

    Klepárník, K; Malá, Z; Doskar, J; Rosypal, S; Bocek, P

    1995-03-01

    Seven representatives of the serogroup B Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophages, 29, 53, 55, 83A, 85, phi 11 and 80 alpha, were examined by capillary electrophoresis (CE) for genomic homology using DNA restriction analysis. Genomic DNA of individual bacteriophages was cleaved by HindIII restriction endonuclease, and the resulting restriction fragments were separated by standard horizontal agarose slab gel electrophoresis (SGE) as well as by CE in low-melting-point agarose solutions. The number and size of restriction fragments identified by both methods were compared. The high separation power of CE makes it possible to extend the restriction fragment patterns. In most of the restriction patterns, some additional restriction fragments as small as 150 bp, not identified by SGE, were detected. With respect to speed, high separation efficiency, low sample consumption and automation, CE offers a simple procedure for processing of multiple samples cost-effectively in a reasonable time. The comparison of the complemented restriction patterns of the different phage strains and the subsequent identification of their common fragments leads to a deeper understanding of their phylogenetic relationships. The genome homologies expressed for individual phage pairs in terms of coefficient F values ranged from 15 to 69%. These values are in good accordance with the degree of DNA homology of these phages as determined by DNA hybridization studies and thermal denaturation analysis of DNA by other authors. The total size of each phage genome was estimated by adding the sizes of individual restriction fragments.

  20. A novel agarolytic β-galactosidase acts on agarooligosaccharides for complete hydrolysis of agarose into monomers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan Hyoung; Kim, Hee Taek; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Ah Reum; Kim, Sa Rang; Kim, Jae-Han; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2014-10-01

    Marine red macroalgae have emerged to be renewable biomass for the production of chemicals and biofuels, because carbohydrates that form the major component of red macroalgae can be hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars. The main carbohydrate in red algae is agarose, and it is composed of D-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose (AHG), which are alternately bonded by β1-4 and α1-3 linkages. In this study, a novel β-galactosidase that can act on agarooligosaccharides (AOSs) to release galactose was discovered in a marine bacterium (Vibrio sp. strain EJY3); the enzyme is annotated as Vibrio sp. EJY3 agarolytic β-galactosidase (VejABG). Unlike the lacZ-encoded β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli, VejABG does not hydrolyze common substrates like lactose and can act only on the galactose moiety at the nonreducing end of AOS. The optimum pH and temperature of VejABG on an agarotriose substrate were 7 and 35°C, respectively. Its catalytic efficiency with agarotriose was also similar to that with agaropentaose or agaroheptaose. Since agarotriose lingers as the unreacted residual oligomer in the currently available saccharification system using β-agarases and acid prehydrolysis, the agarotriose-hydrolyzing capability of this novel β-galactosidase offers an enormous advantage in the saccharification of agarose or agar in red macroalgae for its use as a biomass feedstock for fermentable sugar production. PMID:25038102

  1. Image-guided convection-enhanced delivery into agarose gel models of the brain.

    PubMed

    Sillay, Karl A; McClatchy, S Gray; Shepherd, Brandon A; Venable, Garrett T; Fuehrer, Tyler S

    2014-05-14

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) has been proposed as a treatment option for a wide range of neurological diseases. Neuroinfusion catheter CED allows for positive pressure bulk flow to deliver greater quantities of therapeutics to an intracranial target than traditional drug delivery methods. The clinical utility of real time MRI guided CED (rCED) lies in the ability to accurately target, monitor therapy, and identify complications. With training, rCED is efficient and complications may be minimized. The agarose gel model of the brain provides an accessible tool for CED testing, research, and training. Simulated brain rCED allows practice of the mock surgery while also providing visual feedback of the infusion. Analysis of infusion allows for calculation of the distribution fraction (Vd/Vi) allowing the trainee to verify the similarity of the model as compared to human brain tissue. This article describes our agarose gel brain phantom and outlines important metrics during a CED infusion and analysis protocols while addressing common pitfalls faced during CED infusion for the treatment of neurological disease.

  2. Agarose gel-coated LPG based on two sensing mechanisms for relative humidity measurement.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinping; Zhang, Kaikiang; Yuam, Yujie; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Yan; Yao, Jianquan

    2013-01-01

    A relative humidity (RH) sensor based on long-period grating (LPG) with different responses is proposed by utilizing agarose gel as the sensitive cladding film. The spectral characteristic is discussed as the ambient humidity level ranges from 25% to 95% RH. Since increment of RH will result in volume expansion and refractive index increment of the agarose gel, the LPG is sensitive to applied strain and ambient refractive index; both the resonance wavelength and coupling intensity present particular responses to RH within two different RH ranges (25%-65% RH and 65%-96% RH). The coupling intensity decreases within a lower RH range while it increases throughout a higher RH range. The resonance wavelength is sensitive to the higher RH levels, and the highest sensitivity reaches 114.7 pm/% RH, and shares the same RH turning point with coupling intensity response. From a practical perspective, the proposed RH sensor would find its potential applications in high humidity level, temperature-independent RH sensing and multiparameter sensing based on wavelength/power hybrid demodulation and even static RH alarm for automatic monitoring of a particular RH value owing to the nonmonotonic RH dependence of the transmission power within the whole tested RH range.

  3. Method for trapping affinity chromatography of transcription factors using aldehyde-hydrazide coupling to agarose.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yinshan; Jarrett, Harry W

    2015-08-01

    The use of a method of coupling DNA was investigated for trapping and purifying transcription factors. Using the GFP-C/EBP (CAAT/enhancer binding protein) fusion protein as a model, trapping gives higher purity and comparable yield to conventional affinity chromatography. The chemistry used is mild and was shown to have no detrimental effect on GFP fluorescence or GFP-C/EBP DNA binding. The method involves introducing a ribose nucleotide to the 3' end of a DNA sequence. Reaction with mM NaIO4 (sodium metaperiodate) produces a dialdehyde of ribose that couples to hydrazide-agarose. The DNA is combined at nM concentration with a nuclear extract or other protein mixture, and DNA-protein complexes form. The complex is then coupled to hydrazide-agarose for trapping the DNA-protein complex and the protein eluted by increasing NaCl concentration. Using a different oligonucleotide with the proximal E-box sequence from the human telomerase promoter, USF-2 transcription factor was purified by trapping, again with higher purity than results from conventional affinity chromatography and similar yield. Other transcription factors binding E-boxes, including E2A, c-Myc, and Myo-D, were also purified, but myogenin and NFκB were not. Therefore, this approach proved to be valuable for both affinity chromatography and the trapping approach. PMID:25935261

  4. Method for trapping affinity chromatography of transcription factors using aldehyde-hydrazide coupling to agarose

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yinshan; Jarrett, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    The uses of a method of coupling DNA is investigated for trapping and purifying transcription factors. Using the GFP-C/EBP fusion protein as a model, trapping gives higher purity and comparable yield to conventional affinity chromatography. The chemistry utilized is mild and was shown to have no detrimental effect on GFP fluorescence or GFP-C/EBP DNA-binding. The method involves introducing a ribose nucleotide to the 3′ end of a DNA sequence. Reaction with mM NaIO4 (sodium metaperiodate) produces a dialdehyde of ribose which couples to hydrazide-agarose. The DNA is combined at nM concentration with a nuclear extract or other protein mixture and DNA-protein complexes form. The complex is then coupled to hydrazide-agarose for trapping the DNA-protein complex and the protein eluted by increasing NaCl concentration. Using a different oligonucleotide with the proximal E-box sequence from the human telomerase promoter, USF-2 transcription factor was purified by trapping, again with higher purity than results from conventional affinity chromatography and similar yield. Other transcription factors binding E-boxes including E2A, c-myc, and myo-D were also purified but myogenenin and NFκB were not. Therfore, this approach proved valuable for both affinity chromatography and for the trapping approach. PMID:25935261

  5. Porous ceramic/agarose composite adsorbents for fast protein liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haifeng; Jin, Xionghua; Wu, Puqiang; Zheng, Zhiyong

    2012-02-01

    Porous ceramic/agarose composite adsorbents were designed and prepared with silica ceramic beads and 4% agarose gel, and then functionalized with a special ligand carboxymethyl. A novel method was introduced to fabricating of the porous silica ceramic beads. The morphology of SEM shows a spherical shape and a porous structure of the ceramic beads. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis gives an average pore size of 287.5 Å, a BET surface area of 29.33 m²/g and a porosity of 41.8%, respectively. Additionally, X-ray diffraction pattern indicates that the amorphous silica has been transformed into two crystal phases of quartz and cristobalite, leading to a porous and rigid skeleton and ensuring the application of the composite beads at high flow velocities. Lysozyme of hen egg-white with the activity of 12,700 U/mg was purified by the composite ion-exchanger in one step and the recovery and purification factor reaches 95.2% and 7.9, respectively.

  6. Location of biomarkers and reagents within agarose beads of a programmable bio-nano-chip.

    PubMed

    Jokerst, Jesse V; Chou, Jie; Camp, James P; Wong, Jorge; Lennart, Alexis; Pollard, Amanda A; Floriano, Pierre N; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Simmons, Glennon W; Zhou, Yanjie; Ali, Mehnaaz F; McDevitt, John T

    2011-03-01

    The slow development of cost-effective medical microdevices with strong analytical performance characteristics is due to a lack of selective and efficient analyte capture and signaling. The recently developed programmable bio-nano-chip (PBNC) is a flexible detection device with analytical behavior rivaling established macroscopic methods. The PBNC system employs ≈300 μm-diameter bead sensors composed of agarose "nanonets" that populate a microelectromechanical support structure with integrated microfluidic elements. The beads are an efficient and selective protein-capture medium suitable for the analysis of complex fluid samples. Microscopy and computational studies probe the 3D interior of the beads. The relative contributions that the capture and detection of moieties, analyte size, and bead porosity make to signal distribution and intensity are reported. Agarose pore sizes ranging from 45 to 620 nm are examined and those near 140 nm provide optimal transport characteristics for rapid (<15 min) tests. The system exhibits efficient (99.5%) detection of bead-bound analyte along with low (≈2%) nonspecific immobilization of the detection probe for carcinoembryonic antigen assay. Furthermore, the role analyte dimensions play in signal distribution is explored, and enhanced methods for assay building that consider the unique features of biomarker size are offered.

  7. Analysis of protein-DNA binding by streptavidin-agarose pulldown.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kenneth K

    2006-01-01

    Binding of nuclear transactivators to sequence-specific regulatory elements on the promoter regions is of fundamental importance in gene expression and regulation. DNA-bound transactivators recruit transcription coactivators or repressors and an array of associated proteins that interact with the basal transcription factors, thereby activating the transcription machinery. Analysis of the large complex of proteins that bind to DNA is an important step in elucidating the mechanisms by which gene expressions are regulated. Commonly used techniques to determine DNA-protein binding such as the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) have limited value for analyzing simultaneously a large number of proteins in the complex. We describe here a streptavidin-agarose pulldown assay that is capable of analyzing quantitatively binding of an array of proteins to DNA probes. The assay is easy to perform and does not require radiolabeled probes. It involves incubation of nuclear extract proteins with 5'biotinylated double-stranded DNA probes and streptavidin-agarose beads. The complex is pulled down, and proteins in the complex are dissociated and analyzed by Western blotting. This method has been shown to be useful in determining the regulation of binding of transactivators, p300/CBP, and associated proteins to the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) promoter.

  8. Covalent attachment of lipases on glyoxyl-agarose beads: application in fruit flavor and biodiesel synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Adriano A; de Castro, Heizir F; Giordano, Raquel L C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare biocatalysts to catalyze the synthesis of butyl butyrate by esterification reaction, and the synthesis of biodiesel by transesterification of palm and babassu oils with ethanol. Lipase preparations Lipolase® (TLL1) and Lipex® 100 L (TLL2) from Thermomyces lanuginosus and Lipase AK from Pseudomonas fluorescens (PFL) were immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose beads prepared by activation with glycidol (Gly) and epichlorohydrin (Epi). The influence of immobilization time, lipase source and activating agents on the catalytic activity of the biocatalysts were evaluated in both aqueous and organic media. TLL1 immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose by 24 h of incubation resulted biocatalysts with high hydrolytic activity (varying from 1347.3 to 1470.0 IU/g of support) and thermal-stability, around 300-fold more stable than crude TLL1 extract. The maximum load of immobilized TLL1 was around 20 mg of protein/g of support. The biocatalyst prepared exhibited high activity and operational stability on the butyl butyrate synthesis by esterification after five successive cycles of 24 h each (conversion around 85-90%). Immobilized TLL1 and PFL were active in the synthesis of biodiesel by transesterification reaction. Maximum transesterification yield (≥98.5% after 48 h of reaction at 45°C) was provided by using palm oil as feedstock.

  9. Peptide hydrogelation triggered by enzymatic induced pH switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Li, Ying

    2016-07-01

    It remains challenging to develop methods that can precisely control the self-assembling kinetics and thermodynamics of peptide hydrogelators to achieve hydrogels with optimal properties. Here we report the hydrogelation of peptide hydrogelators by an enzymatically induced pH switch, which involves the combination of glucose oxidase and catalase with D-glucose as the substrate, in which both the gelation kinetics and thermodynamics can be controlled by the concentrations of D-glucose. This novel hydrogelation method could result in hydrogels with higher mechanical stability and lower hydrogelation concentrations. We further illustrate the application of this hydrogelation method to differentiate different D-glucose levels.

  10. Rapid fabrication of reconstructible hydrogels by electrophoretic microbead adhesion.

    PubMed

    Asoh, Taka-Aki; Kikuchi, Akihiko

    2012-10-14

    Hydrogel constructs were rapidly fabricated via the electrophoretic adhesion of oppositely charged microbeads. The reversible preparation of hydrogel constructs was achieved by the reconstruction of microbead networks.

  11. Bonding of synthetic hydrogels with fibrin as the glue to engineer hydrogel-based biodevices.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Kuniaki; Okamoto, Kohei; Kaji, Hirokazu; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko

    2014-07-01

    We show the fibrous protein fibrin can serve as biocompatible glue with which to bind synthetic cationic or anionic hydrogels together. Both the bonding to and detachment from the hydrogels by fibrin (gelation and degradation, respectively) proceeded enzymatically under physiological conditions. We built a hydrogel-based actuator to demonstrate the method.

  12. Pericellular hydrogel/nanonets inhibit cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yi; Shi, Junfeng; Li, Jie; Yuan, Dan; Alberti, Kyle A; Xu, Qiaobing; Xu, Bing

    2014-07-28

    Fibrils formed by proteins are vital components for cells. However, selective formation of xenogenous nanofibrils of small molecules on mammalian cells has yet to be observed. Here we report an unexpected observation of hydrogel/nanonets of a small D-peptide derivative in pericellular space. Surface and secretory phosphatases dephosphorylate a precursor of a hydrogelator to trigger the self-assembly of the hydrogelator and to result in pericellular hydrogel/nanonets selectively around the cancer cells that overexpress phosphatases. Cell-based assays confirm that the pericellular hydrogel/nanonets block cellular mass exchange to induce apoptosis of cancer cells, including multidrug-resistance (MDR) cancer cells, MES-SA/Dx5. Pericellular hydrogel/nanonets of small molecules to exhibit distinct functions illustrates a fundamentally new way to engineer molecular assemblies spatiotemporally in cellular microenvironment for inhibiting cancer cell growth and even metastasis.

  13. Chitosan based hydrogels: characteristics and pharmaceutical applications

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, F.; Oveisi, Z.; Samani, S. Mohammadi; Amoozgar, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogel scaffolds serve as semi synthetic or synthetic extra cellular matrix to provide an amenable environment for cellular adherence and cellular remodeling in three dimensional structures mimicking that of natural cellular environment. Additionally, hydrogels have the capacity to carry small molecule drugs and/or proteins, growth factors and other necessary components for cell growth and differentiation. In the context of drug delivery, hydrogels can be utilized to localize drugs, increase drugs concentration at the site of action and consequently reduce off-targeted side effects. The current review aims to describe and classify hydrogels and their methods of production. The main highlight is chitosan-based hydrogels as biocompatible and medically relevant hydrogels for drug delivery. PMID:26430453

  14. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S. P.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation. PMID:26184185

  15. Hydrogels for Engineering of Perfusable Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Zheng, Huaiyuan; Poh, Patrina S P; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schilling, Arndt F

    2015-07-14

    Hydrogels are commonly used biomaterials for tissue engineering. With their high-water content, good biocompatibility and biodegradability they resemble the natural extracellular environment and have been widely used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture and studies of cell biology. The possible size of such hydrogel constructs with embedded cells is limited by the cellular demand for oxygen and nutrients. For the fabrication of large and complex tissue constructs, vascular structures become necessary within the hydrogels to supply the encapsulated cells. In this review, we discuss the types of hydrogels that are currently used for the fabrication of constructs with embedded vascular networks, the key properties of hydrogels needed for this purpose and current techniques to engineer perfusable vascular structures into these hydrogels. We then discuss directions for future research aimed at engineering of vascularized tissue for implantation.

  16. Nanostructure controlled sustained delivery of human growth hormone using injectable, biodegradable, pH/temperature responsive nanobiohybrid hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Narendra K.; Nguyen, Quang Vinh; Kim, Bong Sup; Lee, Doo Sung

    2015-02-01

    The clinical efficacy of a therapeutic protein, the human growth hormone (hGH), is limited by its short plasma half-life and premature degradation. To overcome this limitation, we proposed a new protein delivery system by the self-assembly and intercalation of a negatively charged hGH onto a positively charged 2D-layered double hydroxide nanoparticle (LDH). The LDH-hGH ionic complex, with an average particle size of approximately 100 nm, retards hGH diffusion. Nanobiohybrid hydrogels (PAEU/LDH-hGH) were prepared by dispersing the LDH-hGH complex into a cationic pH- and temperature-sensitive injectable PAEU copolymer hydrogel to enhance sustained hGH release by dual ionic interactions. Biodegradable copolymer hydrogels comprising poly(β-amino ester urethane) and triblock poly(ε-caprolactone-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly-(ε-caprolactone-lactide) (PCLA-PEG-PCLA) were synthesized and characterized. hGH was self-assembled and intercalated onto layered LDH nanoparticles through an anion exchange technique. X-ray diffraction and zeta potential results showed that the LDH-hGH complex was prepared successfully and that the PAEU/LDH-hGH nanobiohybrid hydrogel had a disordered intercalated nanostructure. The biocompatibility of the nanobiohybrid hydrogel was confirmed by an in vitro cytotoxicity test. The in vivo degradation of pure PAEU and its nanobiohybrid hydrogels was investigated and it showed a controlled degradation of the PAEU/LDH nanobiohybrids compared with the pristine PAEU copolymer hydrogel. The LDH-hGH loaded injectable hydrogels suppressed the initial burst release of hGH and extended the release period for 13 days in vitro and 5 days in vivo. The developed nanohybrid hydrogel has the potential for application as a protein carrier to improve patient compliance.The clinical efficacy of a therapeutic protein, the human growth hormone (hGH), is limited by its short plasma half-life and premature degradation. To overcome this limitation, we proposed a new

  17. Single-Step RNA Extraction from Different Hydrogel-Embedded Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Köster, Natascha; Schmiermund, Alexandra; Grubelnig, Stefan; Leber, Jasmin; Ehlicke, Franziska; Czermak, Peter; Salzig, Denise

    2016-06-01

    For many tissue engineering applications, cells such as human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) must be embedded in hydrogels. The analysis of embedded hMSCs requires RNA extraction, but common extraction procedures often produce low yields and/or poor quality RNA. We systematically investigated four homogenization methods combined with eight RNA extraction protocols for hMSCs embedded in three common hydrogel types (alginate, agarose, and gelatin). We found for all three hydrogel types that using liquid nitrogen or a rotor-stator produced low RNA yields, whereas using a microhomogenizer or enzymatic/chemical hydrogel digestion achieved better yields regardless of which extraction protocol was subsequently applied. The hot phenol extraction protocol generally achieved the highest A260 values (representing up to 40.8 μg RNA per 10(6) cells), but the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method produced RNA of better quality, with A260/A280 and A260/A230 ratios and UV spectra similar to the pure RNA control. The RNA produced by this method was also suitable as a template for endpoint and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), achieving low Ct values of ∼20. The prudent choice of hydrogel homogenization and RNA extraction methods can ensure the preparation of high-quality RNA that generates reliable endpoint and quantitative RT-PCR data. We therefore propose a universal method that is suitable for the extraction of RNA from cells embedded in all three hydrogel types commonly used for tissue engineering. PMID:27094052

  18. Single-Step RNA Extraction from Different Hydrogel-Embedded Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Köster, Natascha; Schmiermund, Alexandra; Grubelnig, Stefan; Leber, Jasmin; Ehlicke, Franziska; Czermak, Peter; Salzig, Denise

    2016-06-01

    For many tissue engineering applications, cells such as human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) must be embedded in hydrogels. The analysis of embedded hMSCs requires RNA extraction, but common extraction procedures often produce low yields and/or poor quality RNA. We systematically investigated four homogenization methods combined with eight RNA extraction protocols for hMSCs embedded in three common hydrogel types (alginate, agarose, and gelatin). We found for all three hydrogel types that using liquid nitrogen or a rotor-stator produced low RNA yields, whereas using a microhomogenizer or enzymatic/chemical hydrogel digestion achieved better yields regardless of which extraction protocol was subsequently applied. The hot phenol extraction protocol generally achieved the highest A260 values (representing up to 40.8 μg RNA per 10(6) cells), but the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method produced RNA of better quality, with A260/A280 and A260/A230 ratios and UV spectra similar to the pure RNA control. The RNA produced by this method was also suitable as a template for endpoint and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), achieving low Ct values of ∼20. The prudent choice of hydrogel homogenization and RNA extraction methods can ensure the preparation of high-quality RNA that generates reliable endpoint and quantitative RT-PCR data. We therefore propose a universal method that is suitable for the extraction of RNA from cells embedded in all three hydrogel types commonly used for tissue engineering.

  19. Fast deswelling of nanocomposite polymer hydrogels via magnetic field-induced heating for emerging FO desalination.

    PubMed

    Razmjou, Amir; Barati, Mohammad Reza; Simon, George P; Suzuki, Kiyonori; Wang, Huanting

    2013-06-18

    Freshwater shortage is one of the most pressing global issues. Forward osmosis (FO) desalination technology is emerging for freshwater production from saline water, which is potentially more energy-efficient than the current reverse osmosis process. However, the lack of a suitable draw solute is the major hurdle for commercial implementation of the FO desalination technology. We have previously reported that thermoresponsive hydrogels can be used as the draw agent for a FO process, and this new hydrogel-driven FO process holds promise for further development for practical application. In the present work, magnetic field-induced heating is explored for the purpose of developing a more effective way to recover water from swollen hydrogel draw agents. The composite hydrogel particles are prepared by copolymerization of sodium acrylate and N-isopropylacrylamide in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3, <50 nm). The results indicate that the magnetic heating is an effective and rapid method for dewatering of hydrogels by generating the heat more uniformly throughout the draw agent particles, and thus, a dense skin layer commonly formed via conventional heating from the outside of the particle is minimized. The FO dewatering performance is affected by the loading of magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic field intensity. Significantly enhanced liquid water recovery (53%) is achieved under magnetic heating, as opposed to only around 7% liquid water recovery obtained via convection heating. Our study shows that the magnetic heating is an attractive alternative stimulus for the extraction of highly desirable liquid water from the draw agent in the polymer hydrogel-driven forward osmosis process. PMID:23663180

  20. Fast deswelling of nanocomposite polymer hydrogels via magnetic field-induced heating for emerging FO desalination.

    PubMed

    Razmjou, Amir; Barati, Mohammad Reza; Simon, George P; Suzuki, Kiyonori; Wang, Huanting

    2013-06-18

    Freshwater shortage is one of the most pressing global issues. Forward osmosis (FO) desalination technology is emerging for freshwater production from saline water, which is potentially more energy-efficient than the current reverse osmosis process. However, the lack of a suitable draw solute is the major hurdle for commercial implementation of the FO desalination technology. We have previously reported that thermoresponsive hydrogels can be used as the draw agent for a FO process, and this new hydrogel-driven FO process holds promise for further development for practical application. In the present work, magnetic field-induced heating is explored for the purpose of developing a more effective way to recover water from swollen hydrogel draw agents. The composite hydrogel particles are prepared by copolymerization of sodium acrylate and N-isopropylacrylamide in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3, <50 nm). The results indicate that the magnetic heating is an effective and rapid method for dewatering of hydrogels by generating the heat more uniformly throughout the draw agent particles, and thus, a dense skin layer commonly formed via conventional heating from the outside of the particle is minimized. The FO dewatering performance is affected by the loading of magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic field intensity. Significantly enhanced liquid water recovery (53%) is achieved under magnetic heating, as opposed to only around 7% liquid water recovery obtained via convection heating. Our study shows that the magnetic heating is an attractive alternative stimulus for the extraction of highly desirable liquid water from the draw agent in the polymer hydrogel-driven forward osmosis process.

  1. Control of the pore architecture in three-dimensional hydroxyapatite-reinforced hydrogel scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román, Jesús; Cabañas, María Victoria; Peña, Juan; Vallet-Regí, María

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogels (gellan or agarose) reinforced with nanocrystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite (nCHA) were prepared by the GELPOR3D technique. This simple method is characterized by compositional flexibility; it does not require expensive equipment, thermal treatment, or aggressive or toxic solvents, and yields a three-dimensional (3D) network of interconnected pores 300-900 μm in size. In addition, an interconnected porosity is generated, yielding a hierarchical porous architecture from the macro to the molecular scale. This porosity depends on both the drying/preservation technology (freeze drying or oven drying at 37 circleC) and on the content and microstructure of the reinforcing ceramic. For freeze-dried samples, the porosities were approximately 30, 66 and below 3% for pore sizes of 600-900 μm, 100-200 μm and 50-100 nm, respectively. The pore structure depends much on the ceramic content, so that higher contents lead to the disappearance of the characteristic honeycomb structure observed in low-ceramic scaffolds and to a lower fraction of the 100-200-μm-sized pores. The nature of the hydrogel did not affect the pore size distribution but was crucial for the behavior of the scaffolds in a hydrated medium: gellan-containing scaffolds showed a higher swelling degree owing to the presence of more hydrophilic groups.

  2. Seaweed polysaccharide-based hydrogels used for the regeneration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Popa, Elena Geta; Reis, Rui Luís; Gomes, Manuela Estima

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript provides an overview of the in vitro and in vivo studies reported in the literature focusing on seaweed polysaccharides based hydrogels that have been proposed for applications in regenerative medicine, particularly, in the field of cartilage tissue engineering. For a better understanding of the main requisites for these specific applications, the main aspects of the native cartilage structure, as well as recognized diseases that affect this tissue are briefly described. Current available treatments are also presented to emphasize the need for alternative techniques. The following part of this review is centered on the description of the general characteristics of algae polysaccharides, as well as relevant properties required for designing hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering purposes. An in-depth overview of the most well known seaweed polysaccharide, namely agarose, alginate, carrageenan and ulvan biopolymeric gels, that have been proposed for engineering cartilage is also provided. Finally, this review describes and summarizes the translational aspect for the clinical application of alternative systems emphasizing the importance of cryopreservation and the commercial products currently available for cartilage treatment.

  3. Seaweed polysaccharide-based hydrogels used for the regeneration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Popa, Elena Geta; Reis, Rui Luís; Gomes, Manuela Estima

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript provides an overview of the in vitro and in vivo studies reported in the literature focusing on seaweed polysaccharides based hydrogels that have been proposed for applications in regenerative medicine, particularly, in the field of cartilage tissue engineering. For a better understanding of the main requisites for these specific applications, the main aspects of the native cartilage structure, as well as recognized diseases that affect this tissue are briefly described. Current available treatments are also presented to emphasize the need for alternative techniques. The following part of this review is centered on the description of the general characteristics of algae polysaccharides, as well as relevant properties required for designing hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering purposes. An in-depth overview of the most well known seaweed polysaccharide, namely agarose, alginate, carrageenan and ulvan biopolymeric gels, that have been proposed for engineering cartilage is also provided. Finally, this review describes and summarizes the translational aspect for the clinical application of alternative systems emphasizing the importance of cryopreservation and the commercial products currently available for cartilage treatment. PMID:24646368

  4. Photocrosslinkable Gelatin Hydrogel for Epidermal Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Lang, Qi; Yildirimer, Lara; Lin, Zhi Yuan; Cui, Wenguo; Annabi, Nasim; Ng, Kee Woei; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Natural hydrogels are promising scaffolds to engineer epidermis. Currently, natural hydrogels used to support epidermal regeneration are mainly collagen- or gelatin-based, which mimic the natural dermal extracellular matrix but often suffer from insufficient and uncontrollable mechanical and degradation properties. In this study, a photocrosslinkable gelatin (i.e., gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA)) with tunable mechanical, degradation, and biological properties is used to engineer the epidermis for skin tissue engineering applications. The results reveal that the mechanical and degradation properties of the developed hydrogels can be readily modified by varying the hydrogel concentration, with elastic and compressive moduli tuned from a few kPa to a few hundred kPa, and the degradation times varied from a few days to several months. Additionally, hydrogels of all concentrations displayed excellent cell viability (>90%) with increasing cell adhesion and proliferation corresponding to increases in hydrogel concentrations. Furthermore, the hydrogels are found to support keratinocyte growth, differentiation, and stratification into a reconstructed multilayered epidermis with adequate barrier functions. The robust and tunable properties of GelMA hydrogels suggest that the keratinocyte laden hydrogels can be used as epidermal substitutes, wound dressings, or substrates to construct various in vitro skin models.

  5. Hydrogel nanoparticle based immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Espina, Virginia

    2015-04-21

    An immunoassay device incorporating porous polymeric capture nanoparticles within either the sample collection vessel or pre-impregnated into a porous substratum within fluid flow path of the analytical device is presented. This incorporation of capture particles within the immunoassay device improves sensitivity while removing the requirement for pre-processing of samples prior to loading the immunoassay device. A preferred embodiment is coreshell bait containing capture nanoparticles which perform three functions in one step, in solution: a) molecular size sieving, b) target analyte sequestration and concentration, and c) protection from degradation. The polymeric matrix of the capture particles may be made of co-polymeric materials having a structural monomer and an affinity monomer, the affinity monomer having properties that attract the analyte to the capture particle. This device is useful for point of care diagnostic assays for biomedical applications and as field deployable assays for environmental, pathogen and chemical or biological threat identification.

  6. Modular enzymatically crosslinked protein polymer hydrogels for in situ gelation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nicolynn E.; Ding, Sheng; Forster, Ryan; Pinkas, Daniel M.; Barron, Annelise E.

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials that mimic the extracellular matrix in both modularity and crosslinking chemistry have the potential to recapitulate the instructive signals that ultimately control cell fate. Toward this goal, modular protein polymer-based hydrogels were created through genetic engineering and enzymatic crosslinking. Animal derived tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and recombinant human transglutaminase (hTG) enzymes were used for coupling two classes of protein polymers containing either lysine or glutamine, which have the recognition substrates for enzymatic crosslinking, evenly spaced along the protein backbone. Utilizing tTG under physiological conditions, crosslinking occurred within two minutes, as determined by particle tracking microrheology. Hydrogel composition impacted the elastic storage modulus of the gel over 4-fold and also influenced microstructure and degree of swelling, but did not appreciably effect degradation by plasmin. Mouse 3T3 and primary human fibroblasts were cultured in both 2- and 3-dimensions without a decrease in cell viability and displayed spreading in 2D. The properties of these gels, which are controlled through the specific nature of the protein polymer precursors, render these gels valuable for in situ therapies. Furthermore, the modular hydrogel composition allows tailoring of mechanical and physical properties for specific tissue engineering applications. PMID:20609472

  7. Enzyme Induced Formation of Monodisperse Hydrogel Nanoparticles Tunable in Size

    DOE PAGES

    Bocharova, Vera; Sharp, Danna; Jones, Aaron; Cheng, Shiwang; Griffin, Philip J.; Agapov, Alexander L.; Voylov, Dmitry; Wang, Yangyang; Kisliuk, Alexander; Melman, Artem; et al

    2015-03-09

    Here, we report a novel approach to synthesize monodisperse hydrogel nanoparticles that are tunable in size. The distinctive feature of our approach is the use of a multicopper oxidase enzyme, laccase, as both a biocatalyst and template for nanoparticle growth. We utilize the ferroxidase activity of laccase to initiate localized production of iron(III) cations from the oxidation of iron(II) cations. We demonstrate that nanoparticles are formed in a dilute polymer solution of alginate as a result of cross-linking between alginate and enzymatically produced iron(III) cations. Exerting control over the enzymatic reaction allows for nanometer-scale tuning of the hydrogel nanoparticle radiimore » in the range of 30–100 nm. Moreover, the nanoparticles and their growth kinetics were characterized via dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and UV–vis spectroscopy. Our finding opens up a new avenue for the synthesis of tunable nanoscale hydrogel particles for biomedical applications.« less

  8. Hydrogels containing porphyrin-loaded nanoparticles for topical photodynamic applications.

    PubMed

    González-Delgado, José A; Castro, Pedro M; Machado, Alexandra; Araújo, Francisca; Rodrigues, Francisca; Korsak, Bárbara; Ferreira, Marta; Tomé, João P C; Sarmento, Bruno

    2016-08-20

    5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-porphyrin tetra-iodide (TMPyP), a potent water-soluble photosensitizer (PS) used in antimicrobial applications, was encapsulated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (TMPyP-PLGA) for topical delivery purposes. Nanoparticles resulted in a mean particle size around 130nm, narrow polydispersity index (PdI), spherical morphology and association efficiency up to 93%. Free TMPyP and TMPyP-PLGA nanoparticles were incorporated into Carbopol(®) hydrogels, resulting in controlled TMPyP release of about 60% and 20% after 4.5h, respectively. Critical properties such as appearance, clarity, viscosity and pH were maintained over time, as hydrogels were stable during 6 months at 4°C, 25°C/60% RH and 40°C/75% RH. For photodynamic applications, the photoproduction of singlet oxygen from these hydrogels was quite efficient being both formulations very photostable after 20min. No TMPyP permeation through pig ear skin was observed after 24h, and histological assays did not show relevant damages in surrounding tissues. All these excellent characteristics make them promising platforms for photodynamic applications through topical clinical use. PMID:27321129

  9. Nanostructure controlled sustained delivery of human growth hormone using injectable, biodegradable, pH/temperature responsive nanobiohybrid hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narendra K; Nguyen, Quang Vinh; Kim, Bong Sup; Lee, Doo Sung

    2015-02-21

    The clinical efficacy of a therapeutic protein, the human growth hormone (hGH), is limited by its short plasma half-life and premature degradation. To overcome this limitation, we proposed a new protein delivery system by the self-assembly and intercalation of a negatively charged hGH onto a positively charged 2D-layered double hydroxide nanoparticle (LDH). The LDH-hGH ionic complex, with an average particle size of approximately 100 nm, retards hGH diffusion. Nanobiohybrid hydrogels (PAEU/LDH-hGH) were prepared by dispersing the LDH-hGH complex into a cationic pH- and temperature-sensitive injectable PAEU copolymer hydrogel to enhance sustained hGH release by dual ionic interactions. Biodegradable copolymer hydrogels comprising poly(β-amino ester urethane) and triblock poly(ε-caprolactone-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly-(ε-caprolactone-lactide) (PCLA-PEG-PCLA) were synthesized and characterized. hGH was self-assembled and intercalated onto layered LDH nanoparticles through an anion exchange technique. X-ray diffraction and zeta potential results showed that the LDH-hGH complex was prepared successfully and that the PAEU/LDH-hGH nanobiohybrid hydrogel had a disordered intercalated nanostructure. The biocompatibility of the nanobiohybrid hydrogel was confirmed by an in vitro cytotoxicity test. The in vivo degradation of pure PAEU and its nanobiohybrid hydrogels was investigated and it showed a controlled degradation of the PAEU/LDH nanobiohybrids compared with the pristine PAEU copolymer hydrogel. The LDH-hGH loaded injectable hydrogels suppressed the initial burst release of hGH and extended the release period for 13 days in vitro and 5 days in vivo. The developed nanohybrid hydrogel has the potential for application as a protein carrier to improve patient compliance.

  10. Directionality of replication fork movement determined by two-dimensional native-native DNA agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ivessa, Andreas S

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of replication intermediates by the neutral-neutral two-dimensional agarose gel technique allows determining the chromosomal positions where DNA replication initiates, whether replication forks pause or stall at specific sites, or whether two DNA molecules undergo DNA recombination events. This technique does not, however, immediately tell in which direction replication forks migrate through the DNA region under investigation. Here, we describe the procedure to determine the direction of replication fork progression by carrying out a restriction enzyme digest of DNA imbedded in agarose after the completion of the first dimension of a 2D gel.

  11. Enabling Surgical Placement of Hydrogels through Achieving Paste-Like Rheological Behavior in Hydrogel Precursor Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Emily C.; Lohman, Brooke L.; Tabakh, Daniel B.; Kieweg, Sarah L.; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Berkland, Cory J.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are a promising class of materials for tissue regeneration, but they lack the ability to be molded into a defect site by a surgeon because hydrogel precursors are liquid solutions that are prone to leaking during placement. Therefore, although the main focus of hydrogel technology and developments are on hydrogels in their crosslinked form, our primary focus is on improving the fluid behavior of hydrogel precursor solutions. In this work, we introduce a method to achieve paste-like hydrogel precursor solutions by combining hyaluronic acid nanoparticles with traditional crosslinked hyaluronic acid hydrogels. Prior to crosslinking, the samples underwent rheological testing to assess yield stress and recovery using linear hyaluronic acid as a control. The experimental groups containing nanoparticles were the only solutions that exhibited a yield stress, demonstrating that the nanoparticulate rather than the linear form of hyaluronic acid was necessary to achieve paste-like behavior. The gels were also photocrosslinked and further characterized as solids, where it was demonstrated that the inclusion of nanoparticles did not adversely affect the compressive modulus and that encapsulated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells remained viable. Overall, this nanoparticle-based approach provides a platform hydrogel system that exhibits a yield stress prior to crosslinking, and can then be crosslinked into a hydrogel that is capable of encapsulating cells that remain viable. This behavior may hold significant impact for hydrogel applications where a paste-like behavior is desired in the hydrogel precursor solution. PMID:25691398

  12. Stimulation of cytolytic T cells by isolated viral peptides and HN protein coupled to agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Guertin, D P; Fan, D P

    1980-01-17

    Sendai virus-infected mouse cells can be lysed by mouse cytolytic thymus-dependent lymphocytes (CTL) directed specifically against the infected cells. The CTL is known to recognise the H-2 antigens on the target cells together with structure(s) including at least the two viral surface glycoproteins also found on purified virus. We report here that anti-Sendai CTL can be stimulated in vitro by detergent-solubilised viral haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), either as the isolated protein or coupled to agarose beads. We further show stimulation by the hydrophilic portion of a protein removed from the virus by the protease subtilisin BPN', and we demonstrate that cyanogen bromide- (CNBr-) cleaved viral peptides also produce such stimulation.

  13. Topological analysis of plasmid DNA replication intermediates using two-dimensional agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Hyrien, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental process in DNA replication is the disentangling of the two parental strands by DNA topoisomerases. In this chapter, I detail the topological analysis of plasmid replication intermediates using two-dimensional (2D) agarose gels. The method can resolve replication intermediates according to mass and topology, and can resolve unlinked monomeric circles from catenated dimers of varying topology. The method has been used, alone or in combination with a procedure for purifying covalent protein-DNA complexes, to analyse the effect oftopoisomerase inhibitors on the topology of replication intermediates, to map the location of drug-stabilized topoisomerase cleavage complexes with respect to replication forks and to detect the breakage and repair of replication forks following collision with cleavage complexes. Other applications include the detection of knots that form independently of, or concomitantly with, DNA replication.

  14. Fractionation of SWNT/nucleic acid complexes by agarose gel electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetcher, Alexandre A.; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Vetcher, Ivan A.; Abramov, Semen M.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Baughman, Ray H.; Levene, Stephen D.

    2006-08-01

    We show that aqueous dispersions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), prepared with the aid of nucleic acids (NAs) such as RNA or DNA, can be separated into fractions using agarose gel electrophoresis. In a DC electric field, SWNT/NA complexes migrate in the gel in the direction of positive potential to form well-defined bands. Raman spectroscopy as a function of band position shows that nanotubes having different spectroscopic properties possess different electrophoretic mobilities. The migration patterns for SWNT/RNA and SWNT/DNA complexes differ. Parallel elution of the SWNT/NA complexes from the gel during electrophoresis and subsequent characterization by AFM reveals differences in nanotube diameter, length and curvature. The results suggest that fractionation of nanotubes can be achieved by this procedure. We discuss factors affecting the mobility of the nanotube complexes and propose analytical applications of this technique.

  15. Hydrolysis of chickpea proteins with Flavourzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose gels improves functional properties.

    PubMed

    del Mar Yust, María; del Carmen Millán-Linares, María; Alcaide-Hidalgo, Juan María; Millán, Francisco; Pedroche, Justo

    2013-06-01

    Chickpea protein isolate was hydrolyzed using Flavourzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose beads by multipoint covalent attachment. This Flavourzyme-glyoxyl derivative, produced after 1 h of immobilization at 4 °C followed by 5.5 h at room temperature, presented approximately 51% of the endoprotease activity of Flavourzyme but was around 700 times more stable than soluble enzyme. Chickpea protein hydrolysates ranging from 1% to 10% degree of hydrolysis were produced and their chemical composition was very close to that of protein isolate used as starting material. Solubility, oil absorption, emulsifying activity and stability, and foaming capacity and stability were determined. All protein hydrolysates showed higher solubility than intact proteins, especially at pHs near isoelectric point of native chickpea proteins. Moreover, all hydrolysates had better functional properties, except emulsifying activity, than the original protein isolate.

  16. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target. PMID:22808067

  17. Using cells encapsulated in agarose microbeads to analyse nuclear structure and functions.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dean

    2009-01-01

    It is now generally agreed that the nuclei of higher eukaryotes, and particularly of mammalian cells, are highly structured and that different aspects of this structure contribute to the regulation of function (1, 2). Despite the general consensus, the key mechanisms that link nuclear structure and function have proved elusive. A major reason for this is a lack of techniques that allow nuclei to be manipulated in a way that preserves the complex architectural features that are present in vivo. Historically, significant progress in understanding the makeup of nuclei from mammalian cells has been made using cells that are permeabilised in a physiological buffer after being encapsulated in agarose microbeads. By using such beads, cells are protected from shear forces that otherwise can degrade crucial elements of the architecture that it is essential to preserve.

  18. Multi-featured macroporous agarose-alginate cryogel: synthesis and characterization for bioengineering applications.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anuj; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-01-10

    In this study agarose-alginate scaffolds are synthesized using cryogelation technology in different formats like monolith, sheet, discs, and beads, and show amiable mechanical strength like soft tissue properties and high interconnected macroporous degradable architecture. In cell-material interactions, fibroblast (NIH-3T3) cells showed good adherence and proliferation on these scaffolds presenting its potential application in soft tissue engineering. The application of cryogel beads and monoliths was also examined by the efficient immobilization of bacterial cells (BL21) on these matrices revealing their use for recovery of product from continuous fermentation systems without cell leakage. These scaffolds also showed potential as a filter for repeated recovery of heavy metal binding, such as copper and nickel from the waste water. The cryogels prepared herein do have a number of unique features that make them an important class of soft materials for developing multi-featured scaffolds as a novel carrier for bioengineering applications.

  19. Multi-featured macroporous agarose-alginate cryogel: synthesis and characterization for bioengineering applications.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anuj; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-01-10

    In this study agarose-alginate scaffolds are synthesized using cryogelation technology in different formats like monolith, sheet, discs, and beads, and show amiable mechanical strength like soft tissue properties and high interconnected macroporous degradable architecture. In cell-material interactions, fibroblast (NIH-3T3) cells showed good adherence and proliferation on these scaffolds presenting its potential application in soft tissue engineering. The application of cryogel beads and monoliths was also examined by the efficient immobilization of bacterial cells (BL21) on these matrices revealing their use for recovery of product from continuous fermentation systems without cell leakage. These scaffolds also showed potential as a filter for repeated recovery of heavy metal binding, such as copper and nickel from the waste water. The cryogels prepared herein do have a number of unique features that make them an important class of soft materials for developing multi-featured scaffolds as a novel carrier for bioengineering applications. PMID:21077225

  20. Purification of CD47-streptavidin fusion protein from bacterial lysate using biotin-agarose affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Nasrin; Peng, Ching-An

    2016-07-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein that modulates the activity of a plethora of immune cells via its extracellular domain. Therefore, CD47 plays important roles in the regulation of immune responses and may serve as targets for the development of immunotherapeutic agents. To make sure CD47 functionality is intact under the process of protein conjugation, CD47-streptavidin fusion protein was expressed and purified because it can easily bind to biotin-tagged materials via the unique biotin-streptavidin affinity. In this study, gene sequences of CD47 extracellular domain (CD47ECD) and core streptavidin (coreSA) with a total 834 bp were inserted into pET20b plasmid to construct recombinant plasmid encoding CD47-SA fusion gene. After bacteria transformation, the CD47-SA fusion protein was expressed by isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction. The collected bacteria lysate was loaded on biotinylated agarose to proceed the purification of CD47-SA fusion protein. Due to the unexpected high affinity between biotin and coreSA, standard washing and elution approaches (e.g., varying pH, using biotin, and applying guanidine hydrochloride) reported for biotin-streptavidin affinity chromatography were not able to separate the target fusion protein. Instead, using low concentration of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 followed with alkaline buffer could efficiently weaken the binding between biotin and coreSA, thereby eluting out CD47-SA fusion protein from the biotin agarose column. The purified CD47-SA fusion protein was further characterized by molecular biology methods and its antiphagocytic functionality was confirmed by the phagocytosis assay. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:949-958, 2016. PMID:27110670

  1. A new simplified procedure for C1 inhibitor purification. A novel use for jacalin-agarose.

    PubMed

    Pilatte, Y; Hammer, C H; Frank, M M; Fries, L F

    1989-06-01

    C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), the major regulatory protein of the classical pathway of complement activation, is also involved in the regulation of several other plasma proteolytic systems including the coagulation, fibrinolytic and contact systems. All the previously published methods for the purification of C1-INH are time-consuming and some do not yield highly pure protein. Recently, it was reported that Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) lectin, also called jacalin, binds C1-INH. Since jacalin binds only a small number of human serum proteins it appeared that jacalin-agarose affinity chromatography would constitute a very selective early step for the purification of C1-INH. Consequently we have designed a new, simplified three-step procedure for the purification of C1-INH which includes PEG fractionation, jacalin-agarose chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose which takes advantage of the marked hydrophilicity of the inhibitor. This procedure has three major advantages over those which have been the most frequently used. Firstly, it includes only two fast chromatographic steps. Secondly, because the C1-INH pool is cleanly and predictably separated from the unwanted proteins by differential elution conditions in both chromatographic steps, no antigenic or functional assays are required to define the desired peaks. Thirdly, only the final product is dialyzed while all other methods required several buffer changes. For these reasons this procedure is much faster and simpler than the previously published methods. About 10-12 mg of highly purified and fully active C1-INH can be obtained within 1 day from 120 ml of plasma giving an average yield of 40-45%. This method may thus be highly adaptable to bulk purification for clinical use or for preparation of genetically or pathologically altered C1-INH from clinical specimens.

  2. Bundle Formation in Biomimetic Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Maarten; Pape, A C H; Voets, Ilja K; Rowan, Alan E; Portale, Giuseppe; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-08-01

    Bundling of single polymer chains is a crucial process in the formation of biopolymer network gels that make up the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. This bundled architecture leads to gels with distinctive properties, including a large-pore-size gel formation at very low concentrations and mechanical responsiveness through nonlinear mechanics, properties that are rarely observed in synthetic hydrogels. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we study the bundle formation and hydrogelation process of polyisocyanide gels, a synthetic material that uniquely mimics the structure and mechanics of biogels. We show how the structure of the material changes at the (thermally induced) gelation point and how factors such as concentration and polymer length determine the architecture, and with that, the mechanical properties. The correlation of the gel mechanics and the structural parameters obtained from SAXS experiments is essential in the design of future (synthetic) mimics of biopolymer networks.

  3. Protease degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Here, we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fiber populations support selective fiber degradation based on individual fiber degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications. PMID:25799370

  4. Morphological Characterization of Silicone Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gido, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Silicone hydrogel materials are used in the latest generation of extended wear soft contact lenses. To ensure comfort and eye health, these materials must simultaneously exhibit high oxygen permeability and high water permeability / hydrophilicity. The materials achieve these opposing requirements based on bicontinuous composite of nanoscale domains of oxygen permeable (silicones) and hydrophilic (water soluble polymer) materials. The microphase separated morphology of silicone hydrogel contact lens materials was imaged using field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Additional morphological information was provided by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). These results all indicate a nanophase separated structure of silicone rich (oxygen permeable) and carbon rich (water soluble polymer) domains separated on a length scale of about 10 nm.

  5. Fewer Bacteria Adhere to Softer Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kolewe, Kristopher W.; Peyton, Shelly R.; Schiffman, Jessica D.

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, biofilm-associated infections commonly form on intravascular catheters and other hydrogel surfaces. The overuse of antibiotics to treat these infections has led to the spread of antibiotic resistance and underscores the importance of developing alternative strategies that delay the onset of biofilm formation. Previously, it has been reported that during surface contact, bacteria can detect surfaces through subtle changes in the function of their motors. However, how the stiffness of a polymer hydrogel influences the initial attachment of bacteria is unknown. Systematically, we investigated poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and agar hydrogels that were twenty times thicker than the cumulative size of bacterial cell appendages, as a function of Young’s moduli. Soft (44.05 – 308.5 kPa), intermediate (1495 – 2877 kPa), and stiff (5152 – 6489 kPa) hydrogels were synthesized. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus attachment onto the hydrogels was analyzed using confocal microscopy after 2 and 24 hr incubation periods. Independent of hydrogel chemistry and incubation time, E. coli and S. aureus attachment correlated positively to increasing hydrogel stiffness. For example, after a 24 hr incubation period, there were 52% and 82% less E. coli adhered to soft PEGDMA hydrogels, than to the intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels, respectively. A 62% and 79% reduction in the area coverage by the Gram-positive microbe S. aureus occurred after 24 hr incubation on the soft versus intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels. We suggest that hydrogel stiffness is an easily tunable variable that, potentially, could be used synergistically with traditional antimicrobial strategies to reduce early bacterial adhesion, and therefore the occurrence of biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26291308

  6. Fewer Bacteria Adhere to Softer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kolewe, Kristopher W; Peyton, Shelly R; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2015-09-01

    Clinically, biofilm-associated infections commonly form on intravascular catheters and other hydrogel surfaces. The overuse of antibiotics to treat these infections has led to the spread of antibiotic resistance and underscores the importance of developing alternative strategies that delay the onset of biofilm formation. Previously, it has been reported that during surface contact, bacteria can detect surfaces through subtle changes in the function of their motors. However, how the stiffness of a polymer hydrogel influences the initial attachment of bacteria is unknown. Systematically, we investigated poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and agar hydrogels that were 20 times thicker than the cumulative size of bacterial cell appendages, as a function of Young's moduli. Soft (44.05-308.5 kPa), intermediate (1495-2877 kPa), and stiff (5152-6489 kPa) hydrogels were synthesized. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus attachment onto the hydrogels was analyzed using confocal microscopy after 2 and 24 h incubation periods. Independent of hydrogel chemistry and incubation time, E. coli and S. aureus attachment correlated positively to increasing hydrogel stiffness. For example, after a 24 h incubation period, there were 52 and 82% fewer E. coli adhered to soft PEGDMA hydrogels than to the intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels, respectively. A 62 and 79% reduction in the area coverage by the Gram-positive microbe S. aureus occurred after 24 h incubation on the soft versus intermediate and stiff PEGDMA hydrogels. We suggest that hydrogel stiffness is an easily tunable variable that could potentially be used synergistically with traditional antimicrobial strategies to reduce early bacterial adhesion and therefore the occurrence of biofilm-associated infections.

  7. Tragacanth gum/nano silver hydrogel on cotton fabric: In-situ synthesis and antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Montazer, M; Keshvari, A; Kahali, P

    2016-12-10

    This paper is mainly focused on introducing cotton fabric with hydrogel and antimicrobial properties using Tragacanth gum as a natural polymer with hydrogel properties, silver nitrate as silver precursor, citric acid as a cross-linking agent and sodium hypophosphite as catalyst. The water absorption behavior of the treated fabrics was investigated with moisture regain, water retention, drying time of wetted fabric at room condition and vertical wicking tests. Antibacterial properties of the samples were evaluated against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcous aureus. The SEM pictures confirmed formation of nano silver and hydrogel layer on the fabric surface and XRD performed the crystal and particle size of the nano silver. The chemical structure of the fabric samples was identified with FTIR spectra. The central composite design (CCD) was used for statistical modelling, evaluated effective parameters and created optimum conditions. The treated cotton fabrics showed good water absorption properties along with reasonable antibacterial effectiveness. PMID:27577917

  8. Tragacanth gum/nano silver hydrogel on cotton fabric: In-situ synthesis and antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Montazer, M; Keshvari, A; Kahali, P

    2016-12-10

    This paper is mainly focused on introducing cotton fabric with hydrogel and antimicrobial properties using Tragacanth gum as a natural polymer with hydrogel properties, silver nitrate as silver precursor, citric acid as a cross-linking agent and sodium hypophosphite as catalyst. The water absorption behavior of the treated fabrics was investigated with moisture regain, water retention, drying time of wetted fabric at room condition and vertical wicking tests. Antibacterial properties of the samples were evaluated against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcous aureus. The SEM pictures confirmed formation of nano silver and hydrogel layer on the fabric surface and XRD performed the crystal and particle size of the nano silver. The chemical structure of the fabric samples was identified with FTIR spectra. The central composite design (CCD) was used for statistical modelling, evaluated effective parameters and created optimum conditions. The treated cotton fabrics showed good water absorption properties along with reasonable antibacterial effectiveness.

  9. Controlled release of theophylline from poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels/porous silicon nanostructured systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Rincón, N.; Medellín-Rodríguez, F. J.; Escobar-Barrios, V. A.; Palestino, G.

    2013-03-01

    In this research, hybrid hydrogels of poly (vinyl alcohol)/ porous silicon (PSi)/theophylline were synthesized by the freezing and thawing method. We evaluated the influence of the synthesis parameters of the poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels in relation to their ability to swell and drug released. The parameters studied (using an experimental design developed in Minitab 16) were the polymer concentration, the freezing temperature and the number of freezing/thawing (f/t) cycles. Nanostructured porous silicon particles (NsPSi) and theophylline were added within the polymer matrix to increase the drug charge and the polymer mechanical strength. The hybrid hydrogels were characterized by Infrared Spectroscopy Fourier Transform (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), drug delivery kinetics were engineered according to the desired drug release schedule.

  10. A Novel Nanosilver/Nanosilica Hydrogel for Bone Regeneration in Infected Bone Defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiwen; Guo, Yuchen; Dong, Yuliang; Wu, Yunshu; Cheng, Lei; Wang, Yongyue; Xing, Malcolm; Yuan, Quan

    2016-06-01

    Treating bone defects in the presence of infection is a formidable clinical challenge. The use of a biomaterial with the dual function of bone regeneration and infection control is a novel therapeutic approach to this problem. In this study, we fabricated an innovative, dual-function biocomposite hydrogel containing nanosilver and nanosilica (nAg/nSiO2) particles and evaluated its characteristics using FT-IR, SEM, swelling ratio, and stiffness assays. The in vitro antibacterial analysis showed that this nAg/nSiO2 hydrogel inhibited both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, this nontoxic material could promote osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). We then created infected bone defects in rat calvaria in order to evaluate the function of the hydrogel in vivo. The hydrogel demonstrated effective antibacterial ability while promoting bone regeneration in these defects. Our results indicate that this nAg/nSiO2 hydrogel has the potential to both control infection and to promote bone healing in contaminated defects.

  11. Polymersomes containing a hydrogel network for high stability and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Kim, Jin Woong; Kim, Do-Hoon; Han, Sang-Hoon; Weitz, David A

    2013-01-14

    Capillary microfluidic devices are used to prepare monodisperse polymersomes consisting of a hydrogel core and a bilayer membrane of amphiphilic diblock-copolymers. To make polymersomes, water-in-oil-in-water double-emulsion drops are prepared as templates through single-step emulsification in a capillary microfluidic device. The amphiphile-laden middle oil phase of the double-emulsion drop dewets from the surface of the innermost water drop, which contains hydrogel prepolymers; this dewetting leads to the formation of a bilayer membrane. Subsequently, the oil phase completely separates from the innermost water drop, leaving a polymersome. Upon UV illumination of the polymersome, the prepolymers encapsulated within the interior are crosslinked, forming a hydrogel core. The hydrogel network within the polymersomes facilitates sustained release of the encapsulated materials and increases the stability of the polymersomes through the formation of a scaffold to support the bilayer. In addition, this approach provides a facile method to make monodisperse hydrogel particles directly dispersed in water.

  12. Tunable functional hydrogels formed from a versatile water-soluble chitosan.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Congming; You, Rongrui; Fan, Ying; Zhang, Yue

    2016-04-01

    A versatile water-soluble chitosan (WSC) was applied to construct two kinds of controllable functional hydrogels. Magnetic beads were prepared by physical cross-linking WSC with sodium alginate, soaking particles with ferrous chloride and being subjected to self-oxidation. Magnetic character of the beads was tunable by simply changing the initial concentration of ferrous ions. The beads could bind compounds that contained different charges. Their adsorption capacities for coomassie brilliant blue, rhodamine and hemoglobin were 1, 0.5 and 2.3mg/g respectively. Another kind of functional hydrogel was prepared through radical cross-linking reaction between WSC and a macromonomer (PVAM) derived from well-defined polyvinyl alcohol. The dynamic mechanical thermal analysis and thermogravimetric analysis results revealed that the mechanical strength and thermal stability of this hydrogel depended on the structure of PVAM. The capability to bind heavy metal ions of the hydrogel also relied on the structure of PVAM. The adsorption capacities of the hydrogels for Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) could reach 20.3 and 60.1mg/g respectively. PMID:26772916

  13. Development and evaluation of wound healing hydrogels based on a quinolone, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and biodegradable microfibres.

    PubMed

    Agubata, Chukwuma O; Okereke, Chiadikaobi; Nzekwe, Ifeanyi T; Onoja, Remigius I; Obitte, Nicholas C

    2016-06-30

    Ofloxacin is a synthetic antibiotic of the fluoroquinolone class, with activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Wound healing involves a complex interaction of cells and processes which can be improved using appropriate wound- dressing materials. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate wound healing hydrogels containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), ofloxacin and biodegradable microfibres from surgical sutures. The hydrogels were formulated by air-drying mixtures of dilute dispersions of micronized sutures (polyglycolic acid, Vicryl® and catgut), ofloxacin and HPMC gel. The prepared hydrogels were evaluated for gel fraction, swelling capacity, breaking elongation, particle size and morphology, and chemical interactions. Furthermore, in vivo wound healing activities were studied in rats using excision wound model and histological examination. The percentage gel fraction was ≥50% in all the batches, the percentage swelling ratio was within the range of 531.8-1700% and the percentage breaking elongation was found to be in the range of 70-120%. The chemical interaction studies using Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that there was no interaction between the drug and excipients used. Ofloxacin-loaded hydrogels containing dilute microfibres of the sutures showed 95% wound size reduction after fourteen days. These formulations also caused high collagen deposition after twenty one days of wounding, with minimal scar formation. Ofloxacin hydrogels containing HPMC and micronized suture fibres can be applied for effective wound healing. PMID:27094907

  14. Rapid Self-Integrating, Injectable Hydrogel for Tissue Complex Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sen; Wang, Xuefei; Park, Sean; Jin, Xiaobing; Ma, Peter X

    2015-07-15

    A novel rapid self-integrating, injectable, and bioerodible hydrogel is developed for bone-cartilage tissue complex regeneration. The hydrogels are able to self-integrate to form various structures, as can be seen after dying some hydrogel disks pink with rodamine. This hydrogel is demonstrated to engineer cartilage-bone complex.

  15. Switchable antimicrobial and antifouling hydrogels with enhanced mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bin; Tang, Qiong; Li, Linlin; Humble, Jayson; Wu, Haiyan; Liu, Lingyun; Cheng, Gang

    2013-08-01

    New switchable hydrogels are developed. Under acidic conditions, hydrogels undergo self-cyclization and can catch and kill bacteria. Under neutral/basic conditions, hydrogels undergo ring-opening and can release killed bacterial cells and resist protein adsorption and bacterial attachment. Smart hydrogels also show a dramatically improved mechanical property, which is highly desired for biomedical applications.

  16. Design of Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Hiroyuki; Li, Xiang; Chung, Ung-Il; Sakai, Takamasa

    2015-11-18

    Hydrogels are considered key tools for the design of biomaterials, such as wound dressings, drug reservoirs, and temporary scaffolds for cells. Despite their potential, conventional hydrogels have limited applicability under wet physiological conditions because they suffer from the uncontrollable temporal change in shape: swelling takes place immediately after the installation. Swollen hydrogels easily fail under mechanical stress. The morphological change may cause not only the slippage from the installation site but also local nerve compression. The design of hydrogels that can retain their original shape and mechanical properties in an aqueous environment is, therefore, of great importance. On the one hand, the controlled degradation of used hydrogels has to be realized in some biomedical applications. This Progress Report provides a brief overview of the recent progress in the development of hydrogels for biomedical applications. Practical approaches to control the swelling properties of hydrogels are discussed. The designs of hydrogels with controlled degradation properties as well as the theoretical models to predict the degradation behavior are also introduced. Moreover, current challenges and limitation toward biomedical applications are discussed, and future directions are offered.

  17. Flexible hydrogel-based functional composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Song, Jie; Saiz, Eduardo; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Tomasia, Antoni P

    2013-10-08

    A composite having a flexible hydrogel polymer formed by mixing an organic phase with an inorganic composition, the organic phase selected from the group consisting of a hydrogel monomer, a crosslinker, a radical initiator, and/or a solvent. A polymerization mixture is formed and polymerized into a desired shape and size.

  18. Investigating hydrogel dosimeter decomposition by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The chemical oxidative decomposition of leucocrystal violet micelle hydrogel dosimeters was investigated using the reaction of ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide or sodium bicarbonate with hydrogen peroxide. The second reaction is more effective at dye decomposition in gelatin hydrogels. Additional chemical analysis is required to determine the decomposition products.

  19. Immobilization and stabilization of a cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase by covalent attachment on highly activated glyoxyl-agarose supports.

    PubMed

    Ferrarotti, Susana Alicia; Bolivar, Juan M; Mateo, Cesar; Wilson, Lorena; Guisan, Jose M; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Covalent immobilization of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase on glyoxyl-agarose beads promotes a very high stabilization of the enzyme against any distorting agent (temperature, pH, organic solvents). For example, the optimized immobilized preparation preserves 90% of initial activity when incubated for 22 h in 30% ethanol at pH 7 and 40 degrees C. Other immobilized preparations (obtained via other immobilization protocols) exhibit less than 10% of activity after incubation under similar conditions. Optimized glyoxyl-agarose immobilized preparation expressed a high percentage of catalytic activity (70%). Immobilization using any technique prevents enzyme inactivation by air bubbles during strong stirring of the enzyme. Stabilization of the enzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose is higher when using the highest activation degree (75 micromol of glyoxyl per milliliter of support) as well as when performing long enzyme-support incubation times (4 h) at room temperature. Multipoint covalent immobilization seems to be responsible for this very high stabilization associated to the immobilization process on highly activated glyoxyl-agarose. The stabilization of the enzyme against the inactivation by ethanol seems to be interesting to improve cyclodextrin production: ethanol strongly inhibits the enzymatic degradation of cyclodextrin while hardly affecting the cyclodextrin production rate of the immobilized-stabilized preparation.

  20. Immobilization of Lipases on Heterofunctional Octyl-Glyoxyl Agarose Supports: Improved Stability and Prevention of the Enzyme Desorption.

    PubMed

    Rueda, N; Dos Santos, J C S; Torres, R; Ortiz, C; Barbosa, O; Fernandez-Lafuente, R

    2016-01-01

    Lipases are among the most widely used enzymes in industry. Here, a novel method is described to rationally design the support matrix to retain the enzyme on the support matrix without leaching and also activate the enzyme for full activity retention. Lipases are interesting biocatalysts because they show the so-called interfacial activation, a mechanism of action that has been used to immobilize lipases on hydrophobic supports such as octyl-agarose. Thus, adsorption of lipases on hydrophobic surfaces is very useful for one step purification, immobilization, hyperactivation, and stabilization of most lipases. However, lipase molecules may be released from the support under certain conditions (high temperature, organic solvents), as there are no covalent links between the enzyme and the support matrix. A heterofunctional support has been proposed in this study to overcome this problem, such as the heterofunctional glyoxyl-octyl agarose beads. It couples the numerous advantages of the octyl-agarose support to covalent immobilization and creates the possibility of using the biocatalyst under any experimental conditions without risk of enzyme desorption and leaching. This modified support may be easily prepared from the commercially available octyl-agarose. Preparation of this useful support and enzyme immobilization on it via covalent linking is described here. The conditions are described to increase the possibility of achieving at least one covalent attachment between each enzyme molecule and the support matrix.

  1. Poly(vinylamine) microgel-dextran composite hydrogels: characterisation; properties and pH-triggered degradation.

    PubMed

    McCann, Judith; Behrendt, Jonathan M; Yan, Junfeng; Halacheva, Silvia; Saunders, Brian R

    2015-07-01

    The present study involves an investigation of the formation, characterisation and triggered-degradation of mixed dispersions involving cationic poly(vinylamine-co-bis(ethyl vinylamine) ether) (PVAM-BEVAME) microgel (MG) particles and partially oxidised dextran (Dexox). In this approach to colloidal hydrogel composite formation, imine bonds were formed by reaction between aldehyde groups of Dexox and the primary amine groups on the MG particles. The composite hydrogels contained MG particles that were externally cross-linked by Dexox to form an elastically effective network with high storage modulus (G') values and low tanδ (=G″/G', where G″ is the loss modulus) values. The G' values for the MG-Dexox gels increased exponentially with increasing mass ratio (MR) of Dexox to MG. Interestingly, the yield strains determined from rheology also increased with MR and yield strains of up to 130% were measured. Au nanoparticles of comparable size to the Dexox chains adsorbed to the surface of the MG particles, which suggests that the pore size of the MG particles may have been smaller than that of the Dexox coils. The MG-Dexox gels were also subjected to acidic conditions to demonstrate pH-triggered gel network breakdown via imine bond cleavage. We show that new PVAM MG/aldehyde mixtures studied here for the first time form ductile and versatile colloidal gels and our new method provides a route to increasing ductility of hydrogels containing MG particles.

  2. Hybrid hydrogels produced by ionizing radiation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. J. A.; Amato, V. S.; Lugão, A. B.; Parra, D. F.

    2012-09-01

    The interest in biocompatible hydrogels with particular properties has increased considerably in recent years due to their versatile applications in biomedicine, biotechnology, pharmacy, agriculture and controlled release of drugs. The use of hydrogels matrices for particular drug-release applications has been investigated with the synthesis of modified polymeric hydrogel of PVAl and 0.5, 1.0, 1.5% nano-clay. They were processed using gamma radiation from Cobalt-60 source at 25 kGy dose. The characterization of the hydrogels was conducted and toxicity was evaluated. The dried hydrogel was analyzed for thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and swelling in solutions of different pH. The membranes have no toxicity. The nano-clay influences directly the equilibrium swelling.

  3. Thermoresponsive hydrogels in biomedical applications - a review

    PubMed Central

    Klouda, Leda; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2011-01-01

    Environmentally responsive hydrogels have the ability to turn from solution to gel when a specific stimulus is applied. Thermoresponsive hydrogels utilize temperature change as the trigger that determines their gelling behavior without any additional external factor. These hydrogels have been interesting for biomedical uses as they can swell in situ under physiological conditions and provide the advantage of convenient administration. The scope of this paper is to review the aqueous polymer solutions that exhibit transition to gel upon temperature change. Typically, aqueous solutions of hydrogels used in biomedical applications are liquid at ambient temperature and gel at physiological temperature. The review focuses mainly on hydrogels based on natural polymers, N-isopropylacrylamide polymers, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymers as well as poly(ethylene glycol)-biodegradable polyester copolymers. PMID:17881200

  4. Thin Hydrogel Films for Optical Biosensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mateescu, Anca; Wang, Yi; Dostalek, Jakub; Jonas, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogel materials consisting of water-swollen polymer networks exhibit a large number of specific properties highly attractive for a variety of optical biosensor applications. This properties profile embraces the aqueous swelling medium as the basis of biocompatibility, non-fouling behavior, and being not cell toxic, while providing high optical quality and transparency. The present review focuses on some of the most interesting aspects of surface-attached hydrogel films as active binding matrices in optical biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance and optical waveguide mode spectroscopy. In particular, the chemical nature, specific properties, and applications of such hydrogel surface architectures for highly sensitive affinity biosensors based on evanescent wave optics are discussed. The specific class of responsive hydrogel systems, which can change their physical state in response to externally applied stimuli, have found large interest as sophisticated materials that provide a complex behavior to hydrogel-based sensing devices. PMID:24957962

  5. Elastic, Conductive, Polymeric Hydrogels and Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yun; He, Weina; Cao, Tai; Guo, Haitao; Zhang, Yongyi; Li, Qingwen; Shao, Ziqiang; Cui, Yulin; Zhang, Xuetong

    2014-01-01

    As a result of inherent rigidity of the conjugated macromolecular chains resulted from the delocalized π-electron system along the polymer backbone, it has been a huge challenge to make conducting polymer hydrogels elastic by far. Herein elastic and conductive polypyrrole hydrogels with only conducting polymer as the continuous phase have been simply synthesized in the indispensable conditions of 1) mixed solvent, 2) deficient oxidant, and 3) monthly secondary growth. The elastic mechanism and oxidative polymerization mechanism on the resulting PPy hydrogels have been discussed. The resulting hydrogels show some novel properties, e.g., shape memory elasticity, fast functionalization with various guest objects, and fast removal of organic infectants from aqueous solutions, all of which cannot be observed from traditional non-elastic conducting polymer counterparts. What's more, light-weight, elastic, and conductive organic sponges with excellent stress-sensing behavior have been successfully achieved via using the resulting polypyrrole hydrogels as precursors. PMID:25052015

  6. Hydrogels made from chitosan and silver nitrate.

    PubMed

    Kozicki, Marek; Kołodziejczyk, Marek; Szynkowska, Małgorzata; Pawlaczyk, Aleksandra; Leśniewska, Ewa; Matusiak, Aleksandra; Adamus, Agnieszka; Karolczak, Aleksandra

    2016-04-20

    This work describes a gelation of chitosan solution with silver nitrate. Above the critical concentration of chitosan (c*), continuous hydrogels of chitosan-silver can be formed. At lower concentrations, the formation of nano- and micro-hydrogels is discussed. The sol-gel analysis was performed to characterise the hydrogels' swelling properties. Moreover, the following were employed: (i) mechanical testing of hydrogels, (ii) inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for the measurement of silver concentration, (iii) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the morphology of products obtained, and (iv) dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-vis spectrophotometry to examine products formed at low concentration of chitosan (chydrogels were used for modification of cotton fabric in order to give it antimicrobial properties. The products obtained acted against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis apart from the chitosan used that showed no such activity. PMID:26876830

  7. Cellulose/polyvinyl alcohol-based hydrogels for reconfigurable lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaramudu, T.; Ko, Hyun-U.; Gao, Xiaoyuan; Li, Yaguang; Kim, Sang Youn; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-04-01

    Electroactive hydrogels are attractive for soft robotics and reconfigurable lens applications. Here we describe the design and fabrication of cellulose-poly vinyl alcohol based hydrogels. The fabricated hydrogels were confirmed by Fourier transformer spectroscopy, swelling studies, thermal analysis, surface morphology of fabricated hydrogel was study by using scanning electron microscopy. The effect of poly vinyl alcohol concentration on the optical and electrical behavior of hydrogels was studied.

  8. Simple approach to reinforce hydrogels with cellulose nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Han, Chun-Rui; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-05-01

    The physical crosslinking of colloidal nanoparticles via dynamic and directional non-covalent interactions has led to significant advances in composite hydrogels. In this paper, we report a simple approach to fabricate tough, stretchable and hysteretic isotropic nanocomposite hydrogels, where rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are encapsulated by flexible polymer chains of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA). The CNC-PDMA colloidal clusters build a homogeneously cross-linked network and lead to significant reinforcing effect of the composites. Hierarchically structured CNC-PDMA clusters, from isolated particles to an interpenetrated network, are observed by transmission electron microscopy measurements. Dynamic shear oscillation measurements are applied to demystify the differences in network rheological behaviors, which were compared with network behaviors of chemically cross-linked PDMA counterparts. Tensile tests indicate that the hybrid hydrogels possess higher mechanical properties and a more efficient energy dissipation mechanism. In particular, with only 0.8 wt% of CNC loading, a 4.8-fold increase in Young's modulus, 9.2-fold increase in tensile strength, and 5.8-fold increase in fracture strain are achieved, which is ascribed to a combination of CNC reinforcement in the soft matrix and CNC-PDMA colloidal cluster conformational rearrangement under stretching. Physical interactions within networks serve as reversible sacrificial bonds that dissociate upon deformation, exhibiting large hysteresis as an energy dissipation mechanism via cluster mobility. This result contrasts with the case of chemically cross-linked PDMA counterparts where the stress relaxation is slow due to the permanent cross-links and low resistance against crack propagation within the covalent network.The physical crosslinking of colloidal nanoparticles via dynamic and directional non-covalent interactions has led to significant advances in composite hydrogels. In this paper, we report

  9. Control of collagen production in mouse chondrocytes by using a combination of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and small interfering RNA targeting Col1a1 for hydrogel-based tissue-engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Galéra, Philippe; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    Because articular cartilage does not self-repair, tissue-engineering strategies should be considered to regenerate this tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is already used for treatment of focal damage of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, this technique includes a step of cell amplification, which results in dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, with expression of type I collagen, a protein characteristic of fibrotic tissues. Therefore, the risk of producing a fibrocartilage exists. The aim of this study was to propose a new strategy for authorizing the recovery of the differentiated status of the chondrocytes after their amplification on plastic. Because the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are cytokines both proposed as stimulants for cartilage repair, we undertook a detailed comparative analysis of their biological effects on chondrocytes. As a cellular model, we used mouse chondrocytes after their expansion on plastic and we tested the capability of BMP-2 or TGF-β1 to drive their redifferentiation, with special attention given to the nature of the proteins synthesized by the cells. To prevent any fibrotic character of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix, we silenced type I collagen by transfecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the chondrocytes, before their exposure to BMP-2 or TGF-β1. Our results showed that addition of siRNA targeting the mRNA encoded by the Col1a1 gene (Col1a1 siRNA) and BMP-2 represents the most efficient combination to control the production of cartilage-characteristic collagen proteins. To go one step further toward scaffold-based cartilage engineering, Col1a1 siRNA-transfected chondrocytes were encapsulated in agarose hydrogel and cultured in vitro for 1 week. The analysis of the chondrocyte-agarose constructs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western-blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy techniques demonstrated that the BMP-2/Col1a1 si

  10. Control of Collagen Production in Mouse Chondrocytes by Using a Combination of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Small Interfering RNA Targeting Col1a1 for Hydrogel-Based Tissue-Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Galéra, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Because articular cartilage does not self-repair, tissue-engineering strategies should be considered to regenerate this tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is already used for treatment of focal damage of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, this technique includes a step of cell amplification, which results in dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, with expression of type I collagen, a protein characteristic of fibrotic tissues. Therefore, the risk of producing a fibrocartilage exists. The aim of this study was to propose a new strategy for authorizing the recovery of the differentiated status of the chondrocytes after their amplification on plastic. Because the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are cytokines both proposed as stimulants for cartilage repair, we undertook a detailed comparative analysis of their biological effects on chondrocytes. As a cellular model, we used mouse chondrocytes after their expansion on plastic and we tested the capability of BMP-2 or TGF-β1 to drive their redifferentiation, with special attention given to the nature of the proteins synthesized by the cells. To prevent any fibrotic character of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix, we silenced type I collagen by transfecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the chondrocytes, before their exposure to BMP-2 or TGF-β1. Our results showed that addition of siRNA targeting the mRNA encoded by the Col1a1 gene (Col1a1 siRNA) and BMP-2 represents the most efficient combination to control the production of cartilage-characteristic collagen proteins. To go one step further toward scaffold-based cartilage engineering, Col1a1 siRNA-transfected chondrocytes were encapsulated in agarose hydrogel and cultured in vitro for 1 week. The analysis of the chondrocyte–agarose constructs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western-blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy techniques demonstrated that the BMP-2/Col1a1 si

  11. Engineering tissues with a perfusable vessel-like network using endothelialized alginate hydrogel fiber and spheroid-enclosing microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Sakai, Shinji; Taya, Masahito

    2016-02-01

    Development of the technique for constructing an internal perfusable vascular network is a challenging issue in fabrication of dense three-dimensional tissues in vitro. Here, we report a method for realizing it. We assembled small tissue (about 200 μm in diameter)-enclosing hydrogel microcapsules and a single hydrogel fiber, both covered with human vascular endothelial cells in a collagen gel. The microcapsules and fiber were made from alginate and gelatin derivatives, and had cell adhesive surfaces. The endothelial cells on the hydrogel constructs sprouted and spontaneously formed a network connecting the hydrogel constructs with each other in the collagen gel. Perfusable vascular network-like structure formation after degrading the alginate-based hydrogel constructs by alginate lyase was confirmed by introducing solution containing tracer particles of about 3 μm in diameter into the lumen templated by the alginate hydrogel fiber. The introduced solution flowed into the spontaneously formed capillary branches and passed around the individual spherical tissues.

  12. Ultrathin, freestanding, stimuli-responsive, porous membranes from polymer hydrogel-brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chengjun; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N.; Nelson, Adrienne; Cremmel, Clement V. M.; Vom Stein, Helena; Spencer, Nicholas D.; Isa, Lucio; Benetti, Edmondo M.

    2015-07-01

    The fabrication of freestanding, sub-100 nm-thick, pH-responsive hydrogel membranes with controlled nano-morphology, based on modified poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) is presented. Polymer hydrogel-brush films were first synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and subsequently detached from silicon substrates by UV-induced photo-cleavage of a specially designed linker within the initiator groups. The detachment was also assisted by pH-induced osmotic forces generated within the films in the swollen state. The mechanical properties and morphology of the freestanding films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Inclusion of nanopores of controlled diameter was accomplished by performing SI-ATRP from initiator-coated surfaces that had previously been patterned with polystyrene nanoparticles. Assembly parameters and particle sizes could be varied, in order to fabricate nanoporous hydrogel-brush membranes with tunable pore coverage and characteristics. Additionally, due to the presence of weak polyacid functions within the hydrogel, the membranes exhibited pH-dependent thickness in water and reversible opening/closing of the pores.The fabrication of freestanding, sub-100 nm-thick, pH-responsive hydrogel membranes with controlled nano-morphology, based on modified poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) is presented. Polymer hydrogel-brush films were first synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and subsequently detached from silicon substrates by UV-induced photo-cleavage of a specially designed linker within the initiator groups. The detachment was also assisted by pH-induced osmotic forces generated within the films in the swollen state. The mechanical properties and morphology of the freestanding films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Inclusion of nanopores of controlled diameter was accomplished by performing SI-ATRP from initiator-coated surfaces that had

  13. RF-interrogatable hydrogel-actuated biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, Z; Wang, A W; Darrow, C B; Lee, A P; McConaghy, C F; Krulevitch, P; Gilman, A; Satcher, J H; Lane, S M

    2000-01-10

    The authors present a novel micromachined sensor that couples a swellable hydrogel with capacitive detection. The hydrogel swells in response to analyte concentration, exerting contact pressure on a deformable conducting membrane. Results are presented for characterization of a PHEMA hydrogel swelling in response to a calcium nitrate solution. Pressure-deflection measurements are performed on NiTi-based membranes. Hydrogel-actuated deflections of the membranes are measured. These measurements are correlated to determine the pressure generating characteristics of the hydrogel. Membrane deflection techniques have not previously been employed for hydrogel characterization. The PHEMA sample exhibited greatest sensitivity in the pH range of 6.0--6.5 and performed an average of 2.8 Joules of work per m{sup 3} per pH unit in response to ambient conditions over the pH range 3.5--6.5. The membrane deflections correspond to capacitive shifts of about 4 pF per pH unit for a capacitive transducer with initial gap of 100 {micro}m, capacitor plate area of 18.5 mm{sup 2} , and initial hydrogel volume of 11 {micro}L.

  14. Heat resistance poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, F.; Makuuchi, K.; Darwis, D.; Iriawan, T.; Razzak, M. T.; Rosiak, Janusz M.

    1995-08-01

    Six methods were used to evaluate the heat resistance of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel prepared by a combination of electron beam irradiation and acetalization of PVA. The physical properties of the hydrogel depended on the degree of acetilization which was affected by content of water in PVA sheet of acetalization in formaldehyde solution at 60°C. It was found that the optimum water content was 20-30%. The acetalized PVA sheet gave maximum tensile strength in electron beams irradiation at 100 kGy. The tensile strength of the hydrogel film increased to 20 MPa from 14 MPa by the irradiation. Heat resistance of the hydrogel was evaluated by measuring the mechanical properties after sterilization in a steam autoclave at 121°C for 90 min. The tensile strength decreased to 10 MPa whereas the elongation at break increased to 300%. The tackiness of the hydrogel was improved by radiation grafting of acrylic acid. Wholesomeness of the hydrogel as a wound dressing was evaluated by attaching to a burn or wound of the back skin of marmots. Advantages of the hydrogel over a gauze dressing were homogeneous adhesion to the affected parts, easy removal without damage to renewed skin and slightly faster rate of reconstruction of the injured skin.

  15. Enzyme-catalysed assembly of DNA hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Soong Ho; Lee, Jong Bum; Park, Nokyoung; Kwon, Sang Yeon; Umbach, Christopher C.; Luo, Dan

    2006-10-01

    DNA is a remarkable polymer that can be manipulated by a large number of molecular tools including enzymes. A variety of geometric objects, periodic arrays and nanoscale devices have been constructed. Previously we synthesized dendrimer-like DNA and DNA nanobarcodes from branched DNA via ligases. Here we report the construction of a hydrogel entirely from branched DNA that are three-dimensional and can be crosslinked in nature. These DNA hydrogels were biocompatible, biodegradable, inexpensive to fabricate and easily moulded into desired shapes and sizes. The distinct difference of the DNA hydrogel to other bio-inspired hydrogels (including peptide-based, alginate-based and DNA (linear)-polyacrylamide hydrogels) is that the crosslinking is realized via efficient, ligase-mediated reactions. The advantage is that the gelling processes are achieved under physiological conditions and the encapsulations are accomplished in situ-drugs including proteins and even live mammalian cells can be encapsulated in the liquid phase eliminating the drug-loading step and also avoiding denaturing conditions. Fine tuning of these hydrogels is easily accomplished by adjusting the initial concentrations and types of branched DNA monomers, thus allowing the hydrogels to be tailored for specific applications such as controlled drug delivery, tissue engineering, 3D cell culture, cell transplant therapy and other biomedical applications.

  16. Synthesis of superporous hydrogels: hydrogels with fast swelling and superabsorbent properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Park, H; Park, K

    1999-01-01

    We have been interested in the synthesis of hydrogels with fast swelling kinetics and superabsorbent properties. To increase the water absorption rate, interconnected pores were introduced to the hydrogels. Since the pore size in the dried hydrogels is in the order of hundreds of micrometers, these hydrogels are called "superporous" hydrogels. Superporous hydrogels were synthesized by crosslinking polymerization of various vinyl monomers in the presence of gas bubbles formed by the chemical reaction of acid and NaHCO3. The polymerization process was optimized to capture the gas bubbles inside the synthesized hydrogels. The use of the NaHCO3/acid system allowed easy control of timing for gelation and foam formation. We found that PF127 was the best foam stabilizer for most of the monomer systems used in our study. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) pictures showed interconnected pores forming capillary channels. The capillary channels, which were critical for fast swelling, were preserved during drying by dehydrating water-swollen hydrogels with ethanol before drying. The ethanol-dehydrated superporous hydrogels reached equilibrium swelling within minutes. The equilibrium swelling time could be reduced to less than a minute with the use of a wetting agent. In our study, water moisture was used as a wetting agent since the amount of moisture content in the dried hydrogels easily could be controlled. Preparation of superporous hydrogels using the right blowing system, foam stabilizer, drying method, and wetting agent makes it possible to reduce the swelling time to less than a minute regardless of the size of the dried gels. The superporous hydrogels can be used where fast swelling and superabsorbent properties are critical.

  17. Photopatterning of Hydrogel Microarrays in Closed Microchips.

    PubMed

    Gumuscu, Burcu; Bomer, Johan G; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2015-12-14

    To date, optical lithography has been extensively used for in situ patterning of hydrogel structures in a scale range from hundreds of microns to a few millimeters. The two main limitations which prevent smaller feature sizes of hydrogel structures are (1) the upper glass layer of a microchip maintains a large spacing (typically 525 μm) between the photomask and hydrogel precursor, leading to diffraction of UV light at the edges of mask patterns, (2) diffusion of free radicals and monomers results in irregular polymerization near the illumination interface. In this work, we present a simple approach to enable the use of optical lithography to fabricate hydrogel arrays with a minimum feature size of 4 μm inside closed microchips. To achieve this, we combined two different techniques. First, the upper glass layer of the microchip was thinned by mechanical polishing to reduce the spacing between the photomask and hydrogel precursor, and thereby the diffraction of UV light at the edges of mask patterns. The polishing process reduces the upper layer thickness from ∼525 to ∼100 μm, and the mean surface roughness from 20 to 3 nm. Second, we developed an intermittent illumination technique consisting of short illumination periods followed by relatively longer dark periods, which decrease the diffusion of monomers. Combination of these two methods allows for fabrication of 0.4 × 10(6) sub-10 μm sized hydrogel patterns over large areas (cm(2)) with high reproducibility (∼98.5% patterning success). The patterning method is tested with two different types of photopolymerizing hydrogels: polyacrylamide and polyethylene glycol diacrylate. This method enables in situ fabrication of well-defined hydrogel patterns and presents a simple approach to fabricate 3-D hydrogel matrices for biomolecule separation, biosensing, tissue engineering, and immobilized protein microarray applications.

  18. Photopatterning of Hydrogel Microarrays in Closed Microchips.

    PubMed

    Gumuscu, Burcu; Bomer, Johan G; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2015-12-14

    To date, optical lithography has been extensively used for in situ patterning of hydrogel structures in a scale range from hundreds of microns to a few millimeters. The two main limitations which prevent smaller feature sizes of hydrogel structures are (1) the upper glass layer of a microchip maintains a large spacing (typically 525 μm) between the photomask and hydrogel precursor, leading to diffraction of UV light at the edges of mask patterns, (2) diffusion of free radicals and monomers results in irregular polymerization near the illumination interface. In this work, we present a simple approach to enable the use of optical lithography to fabricate hydrogel arrays with a minimum feature size of 4 μm inside closed microchips. To achieve this, we combined two different techniques. First, the upper glass layer of the microchip was thinned by mechanical polishing to reduce the spacing between the photomask and hydrogel precursor, and thereby the diffraction of UV light at the edges of mask patterns. The polishing process reduces the upper layer thickness from ∼525 to ∼100 μm, and the mean surface roughness from 20 to 3 nm. Second, we developed an intermittent illumination technique consisting of short illumination periods followed by relatively longer dark periods, which decrease the diffusion of monomers. Combination of these two methods allows for fabrication of 0.4 × 10(6) sub-10 μm sized hydrogel patterns over large areas (cm(2)) with high reproducibility (∼98.5% patterning success). The patterning method is tested with two different types of photopolymerizing hydrogels: polyacrylamide and polyethylene glycol diacrylate. This method enables in situ fabrication of well-defined hydrogel patterns and presents a simple approach to fabricate 3-D hydrogel matrices for biomolecule separation, biosensing, tissue engineering, and immobilized protein microarray applications. PMID:26558488

  19. Screening for amyloid aggregation by Semi-Denaturing Detergent-Agarose Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Halfmann, Randal; Lindquist, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation is associated with numerous protein misfolding pathologies and underlies the infectious properties of prions, which are conformationally self-templating proteins that are thought to have beneficial roles in lower organisms. Amyloids have been notoriously difficult to study due to their insolubility and structural heterogeneity. However, resolution of amyloid polymers based on size and detergent insolubility has been made possible by Semi-Denaturing Detergent-Agarose Gel Electrophoresis (SDD-AGE). This technique is finding widespread use for the detection and characterization of amyloid conformational variants. Here, we demonstrate an adaptation of this technique that facilitates its use in large-scale applications, such as screens for novel prions and other amyloidogenic proteins. The new SDD-AGE method uses capillary transfer for greater reliability and ease of use, and allows any sized gel to be accomodated. Thus, a large number of samples, prepared from cells or purified proteins, can be processed simultaneously for the presence of SDS-insoluble conformers of tagged proteins. PMID:19066511

  20. Agarose Microchambers for Long-term Calcium Imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Michal; Besseling, Judith; Bringmann, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Behavior is controlled by the nervous system. Calcium imaging is a straightforward method in the transparent nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to measure the activity of neurons during various behaviors. To correlate neural activity with behavior, the animal should not be immobilized but should be able to move. Many behavioral changes occur during long time scales and require recording over many hours of behavior. This also makes it necessary to culture the worms in the presence of food. How can worms be cultured and their neural activity imaged over long time scales? Agarose Microchamber Imaging (AMI) was previously developed to culture and observe small larvae and has now been adapted to study all life stages from early L1 until the adult stage of C. elegans. AMI can be performed on various life stages of C. elegans. Long-term calcium imaging is achieved without immobilizing the animals by using short externally triggered exposures combined with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera recording. Zooming out or scanning can scale up this method to image up to 40 worms in parallel. Thus, a method is described to image behavior and neural activity over long time scales in all life stages of C. elegans. PMID:26132740

  1. Identification of cisplatin-binding proteins using agarose conjugates of platinum compounds.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M; Steyger, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as an antineoplastic drug, but its ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects, as well as the inherent or acquired resistance of some cancers to cisplatin, remain significant clinical problems. Cisplatin's selectivity in killing rapidly proliferating cancer cells is largely dependent on covalent binding to DNA via cisplatin's chloride sites that had been aquated. We hypothesized that cisplatin's toxicity in slowly proliferating or terminally differentiated cells is primarily due to drug-protein interactions, instead of drug-DNA binding. To identify proteins that bind to cisplatin, we synthesized two different platinum-agarose conjugates, one with two amino groups and another with two chlorides attached to platinum that are available for protein binding, and conducted pull-down assays using cochlear and kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis on protein bands after gel electrophoresis and Coomassie blue staining identified several proteins, including myosin IIA, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), calreticulin, valosin containing protein (VCP), and ribosomal protein L5, as cisplatin-binding proteins. Future studies on the interaction of these proteins with cisplatin will elucidate whether these drug-protein interactions are involved in ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, or contribute to tumor sensitivity or resistance to cisplatin treatment. PMID:23755301

  2. Achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro): study of collagen in the tissue and in chondrocytes cultured in agarose.

    PubMed

    Freisinger, P; Stanescu, V; Jacob, B; Cohen-Solal, L; Maroteaux, P; Bonaventure, J

    1994-02-15

    A lethal chondrodysplasia characterized by extreme micromelia was diagnosed by ultrasound examination in two sibs whose nonconsanguineous parents were healthy. Radiographic and histopathologic data indicated that the two foetuses (18 and 21 weeks old) had achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro). Quantitation of total collagen extractable from dried cartilage samples demonstrated a 50% decrease when compared to an age-related control. This decrease was essentially related to type II collagen. Nevertheless, the alpha chains and the CB peptides of type II collagen had a normal electrophoretic mobility. A significant amount of collagen type I was also detected. The electrophoretic pattern of collagens type IX and XI did not differ significantly from control sample. The extracellular matrix elaborated by patient chondrocytes cultured in agarose for 10-12 days, contained less collagen type II than normal cells. Labelling with 14C-proline of cultured cells showed the presence of procollagen and type II collagen chains with a normal electrophoretic mobility, but an alpha 2(I) chain was detectable in the patient material, indicating the presence of collagen type I which supported the tissue findings. The significance of the type II collagen reduction in the patient's cartilage is unclear but it is unlikely to be the primary defect in achondrogenesis type I. PMID:8160740

  3. Stabilization of Candida antarctica Lipase B (CALB) Immobilized on Octyl Agarose by Treatment with Polyethyleneimine (PEI).

    PubMed

    Peirce, Sara; Tacias-Pascacio, Veymar G; Russo, Maria Elena; Marzocchella, Antonio; Virgen-Ortíz, José J; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB) was immobilized on octyl agarose (OC) and physically modified with polyethyleneimine (PEI) in order to confer a strong ion exchange character to the enzyme and thus enable the immobilization of other enzymes on its surface. The enzyme activity was fully maintained during the coating and the thermal stability was marginally improved. The enzyme release from the support by incubation in the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 was more difficult after the PEI-coating, suggesting that some intermolecular physical crosslinking had occurred, making this desorption more difficult. Thermal stability was marginally improved, but the stability of the OCCALB-PEI was significantly better than that of OCCALB during inactivation in mixtures of aqueous buffer and organic cosolvents. SDS-PAGE analysis of the inactivated biocatalyst showed the OCCALB released some enzyme to the medium during inactivation, and this was partially prevented by coating with PEI. This effect was obtained without preventing the possibility of reuse of the support by incubation in 2% ionic detergents. That way, this modified CALB not only has a strong anion exchange nature, while maintaining the activity, but it also shows improved stability under diverse reaction conditions without affecting the reversibility of the immobilization. PMID:27338317

  4. Tuning the catalytic properties of lipases immobilized on divinylsulfone activated agarose by altering its nanoenvironment.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Jose C S; Rueda, Nazzoly; Gonçalves, Luciana R B; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (TLL) and lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB) have been immobilized on divinylsulfone (DVS) activated agarose beads at pH 10 for 72 h. Then, as a reaction end point, very different nucleophiles have been used to block the support and the effect of the nature of the blocking reagent has been analyzed on the features of the immobilized preparations. The blocking has generally positive effects on enzyme stability in both thermal and organic solvent inactivations. For example, CALB improved 7.5-fold the thermal stability after blocking with imidazole. The effect on enzyme activity was more variable, strongly depending on the substrate and the experimental conditions. Referring to CALB; using p-nitrophenyl butyrate (p-NPB) and methyl phenylacetate, activity always improved by the blocking step, whatever the blocking reagent, while with methyl mandelate or ethyl hexanoate not always the blocking presented a positive effect. Other example is TLL-DVS biocatalyst blocked with Cys. This was more than 8 times more active than the non-blocked preparation and become the most active versus p-NPB at pH 7, the least active versus methyl phenylacetate at pH 5 but the third one most active at pH 9, versus methyl mandelate presented lower activity than the unblocked preparation at pH 5 and versus ethyl hexanoate was the most active at all pH values. That way, enzyme specificity could be strongly altered by this blocking step.

  5. Uranium (VI) recovery from aqueous medium using novel floating macroporous alginate-agarose-magnetite cryobeads.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anuj; Melo, Jose Savio; D'Souza, Stanislaus Francis

    2013-02-15

    This study presents a novel development of a floating polymeric-magnetite cryobead for the recovery of hexavalent uranium from the aqueous sub-surfaces. The alginate-agarose-magnetite cryobeads were synthesized by the process of cryotropic-gelation at subzero-temperature. The physico-chemical properties of cryobeads showed high surface area and high interconnected porosity (≈ 90%). Low density of these cryobeads explains their floating property in the aqueous medium. The rheological analysis of cryobeads showed its stability and increased stiffness after uranium adsorption. The presence of magnetite nanoparticles in the porous cryobeads facilitates the recovery of these beads by applying an external magnetic field. Maximum uranium adsorption (97 ± 2%) was observed in the pH range of 4.5-5.5. The thermodynamic parameters suggest passive endothermic adsorption behaviour. HCl was found to be an efficient eluent for the uranium desorption. Five repeated cycles for the desorption of uranium from biosorbent showed 69 ± 3% of uranium recovery. These results suggest stability of these novel floating magnetite-cryobeads under environmental conditions with potential for the recovery of uranium from contaminated aqueous subsurfaces.

  6. Analysis of surface properties of fixed and live cells using derivatized agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Vanessa M; Walker, Sherri L; Badali, Oliver; Abundis, Maria I; Ngo, Lylla L; Weerasinghe, Gayani; Barajas, Marcela; Zem, Gregory; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2002-01-01

    A novel assay has been developed for the histochemical characterization of surface properties of cells based on their adhesion to agarose beads derivatized with more than 100 types of molecules, including sugars, lectins and other proteins, and amino acids. The assay simply involves mixing small quantities of washed cells and beads in droplets on glass microscope slides and determining to which beads various cell types adhere. Distilled water was found to be the best medium for this assay because added ions or molecules in other media inhibit adhesion in some cases. Many cells, however, cannot tolerate distilled water. Here we show that cells fixed with either of two fixatives (1% formaldehyde or Prefer fixative) displayed similar bead-binding properties as did live cells. Specificity of cell-bead binding was tested by including specific free molecules in the test suspensions in hapten-type inhibition experiments. If a hapten compound inhibited live-cell adhesion to a specific bead, it also inhibited fixed-cell adhesion to a specific bead. The results of these experiments suggest that fixed cells display authentic surface properties, opening the door for the use of this assay with many cell types that cannot tolerate distilled water.

  7. Enrichment by organomercurial agarose and identification of cys-containing peptides from yeast cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Mark J

    2008-05-01

    Dynamic range and the presence of highly abundant proteins limit the number of proteins that may be identified within a complex mixture. Cysteine (Cys) has unique chemical reactivity that may be exploited for chemical tagging/capture with biotin/avidin reagents or affinity chromatography allowing specific isolation and subsequent identification of peptide sequences by mass spectrometry. Organomercurial agarose (Hg-beads) specifically captures Cys-containing peptides and proteins from cell lysates. Tryptic peptides from yeast lysates containing Cys were captured and eluted from Hg-beads after incubation with TCEP and trypsin. From two 1 h nano 1-D LC DDA/MS of the eluate >700 proteins were identified with an estimated false positive rate of approximately 1%. Few peptides were identified with high confidence without Cys within their sequence after capture, and extensive washing, indicating little nonspecific binding. The number of fragmentation spectra was increased using automated 2-D nano-LC/MS and allowed identification of 1496 proteins with an estimated false positive rate of 1.1%. Approximately 4% of the proteins identified were from peptides that did not contain Cys, and these were biased toward higher abundance proteins. Comparison of the 1496 proteins to those reported previously showed that >25% were from yeast proteins not previously observed. Most proteins were identified from a single peptide, and sequence coverage was sacrificed by focusing only on identifying Cys-containing peptides, but large numbers of proteins were rapidly identified by eliminating many of the peptides from the higher abundance proteins.

  8. Isoelectric focusing of human von Willebrand factor in urea-agarose gels

    SciTech Connect

    Fulcher, C.A.; Ruggeri, Z.M.; Zimmerman, T.S.

    1983-02-01

    An analytical technique has been developed for the isoelectric focusing (IEF) of plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) in agarose gels containing urea. Under these conditions, vWF freely enters the gel and focuses without artifact. The focused vWF is visualized by staining fixed gels with /sup 125/I-labeled affinity-purified heterologous antibody. Utilizing a pH gradient of 5.0-6.5, normal vWF in plasma or purified preparations focuses into at least three bands with apparent isoelectric points (pI) between pH 5.7 and 5.9. A reproducible difference in the IEF pattern of vWF has been established between normal plasmas and those of individuals with variant von Willebrand's disease (vWd) type IIA and type IIB. In type IIA, vWF has a distinctly lower pI than normal. This difference may be related to the presence of smaller vWF multimers in IIA plasma because forms of vWF of corresponding size contained in normal cryoprecipitate supernatant have a similar pI. Type IIB von Willebrand factor has a pI intermediate between normal and IIA. Neuraminidase treatment of plasma samples before IEF results in an increase in pI in normal, type IIA, and type IIB vWF. The data suggest that none of the 16 type IIA and 9 IIB plasmas studied here contain significantly decreased amounts of sialic acid.

  9. Hierarchically structured, hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel matrices via the covalent integration of microgels into macroscopic networks$

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Amit K.; Malik, Manisha S.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Duncan, Randall L.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to develop biomimetic hydrogel matrices that not only exhibit structural hierarchy and mechanical integrity, but also present biological cues in a controlled fashion. To this end, photocrosslinkable, hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) were synthesized via an inverse emulsion crosslinking process followed by chemical modification with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). HA modified with GMA (HA-GMA) was employed as the soluble macromer. Macroscopic hydrogels containing covalently integrated hydrogel particles (HA-c-HGP) were prepared by radical polymerization of HA-GMA in the presence of crosslinkable HGPs. The covalent linkages between the hydrogel particles and the secondary HA matrix resulted in the formation of a diffuse, fibrilar interface around the particles. Compared to the traditional bulk gels synthesized by photocrosslinking of HA-GMA, these hydrogels exhibited a reduced sol fraction and a lower equilibrium swelling ratio. When tested under uniaxial compression, the HA-c-HGP gels were more pliable than the HA-p-HGP gels and fractured at higher strain than the HA-GMA gels. Primary bovine chondrocytes were photoencapsulated in the HA matrices with minimal cell damage. The 3D microenvironment created by HA-GMA and HA HGPs not only maintained the chondrocyte phenotype but also fostered the production of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. To further improve the biological activities of the HA-c-HGP gels, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) was loaded into the immobilized HGPs. BMP-2 was released from the HA-c-HGP gels in a controlled manner with reduced initial burst over prolonged periods of time. The HA-c-HGP gels are promising candidates for use as bioactive matrices for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:20936090

  10. Hybrid Multicomponent Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinqiao; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2009-01-01

    Artificial ECMs that not only closely mimic the hybrid nature of the natural ECM but also provide tunable material properties and enhanced biological functions are attractive candidates for tissue engineering applications. This review summarizes recent advances in developing multicomponent hybrid hydrogels by integrating modular and heterogeneous building blocks into well-defined, multifunctional hydrogel composites. The individual building blocks can be chemically, morphologically, and functionally diverse, and the hybridization can occur at molecular level or microscopic scale. The modular nature of the designs, combined with the potential synergistic effects of the hybrid systems, has resulted in novel hydrogel matrices with robust structure and defined functions. PMID:19107720

  11. Evaluation of novel in situ synthesized nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/alginate hydrogels for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Jiang, Xianfang; Chen, Xuening; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-12-01

    Collagen hydrogel has been widely used for osteochondral repair, but its mechanical properties cannot meet the requirements of clinical application. Previous studies have shown that the addition of either polysaccharide or inorganic particles could reinforce the polymer matrix. However, their synergic effects on collagen-based hydrogel have seldom been studied, and the potential application of triple-phased composite gel in osteochondral regeneration has not been reported. In this study, nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) reinforced collagen-alginate hydrogel (nHCA) was prepared by the in situ synthesis of nano-HA in collagen gel followed by the addition of alginate and Ca(2+). The properties of triple-phased nHCA hydrogel were studied and compared with pure collagen and biphasic gels, and the triple-phased composite of collagen-alginate-HA gels showed a superiority in not only mechanical but also biological features, as evidenced by the enhanced tensile and compressive modulus, higher cell viability, faster cell proliferation and upregulated hyaline cartilage markers. In addition, it was found that the synthesis process could also affect the properties of the triple-phased composite, compared to blend-mixing HCA. The in situ-synthesized nHCA hydrogel showed an enhanced tensile modulus, as well as enhanced biological features compared with HCA. Our study demonstrated that the nHCA composite hydrogel holds promise in osteochondral regeneration. The addition of alginate and nano-HA contribute to the increase in both mechanical and biological properties. This study may provide a valuable reference for the design of an appropriate composite scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering.

  12. Hybrid model for an enzymatic reactor: hydrolysis of cheese whey proteins by alcalase immobilized in agarose gel particles.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ruy; Resende, Mariam M; Giordano, Raquel L C; Giordano, Roberto C

    2003-01-01

    Cheese whey proteolysis, carried out by immobilized enzymes, can either change or evidence functional properties of the produced peptides, increasing the potential applications of this byproduct of the dairy industry. Optimization and scale-up of the enzymatic reactor relies on its mathematical model-a set of mass balance equations, with reaction rates usually given by Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics; no information about the distribution of peptides' molecular sizes is supplied. In this article, a hybrid model of a batch enzymatic reactor is presented, consisting of differential mass balances coupled to a "neural-kinetic model," which provides the molecular weight distributions of the resulting peptides. PMID:12721464

  13. Fabricating customized hydrogel contact lens

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Andre; Li, Hao; Lewittes, Daniella M.; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Wenzhong; Shu, Xiao; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Contact lenses are increasingly used in laboratories for in vivo animal retinal imaging and pre-clinical studies. The lens shapes often need modification to optimally fit corneas of individual test subjects. However, the choices from commercially available contact lenses are rather limited. Here, we report a flexible method to fabricate customized hydrogel contact lenses. We showed that the fabricated hydrogel is highly transparent, with refractive indices ranging from 1.42 to 1.45 in the spectra range from 400 nm to 800 nm. The Young’s modulus (1.47 MPa) and hydrophobicity (with a sessile drop contact angle of 40.5°) have also been characterized experimentally. Retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography in rats wearing our customized contact lenses has the quality comparable to the control case without the contact lens. Our method could significantly reduce the cost and the lead time for fabricating soft contact lenses with customized shapes, and benefit the laboratorial-used contact lenses in pre-clinical studies. PMID:27748361

  14. Fabricating customized hydrogel contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Andre; Li, Hao; Lewittes, Daniella M.; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Wenzhong; Shu, Xiao; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-10-01

    Contact lenses are increasingly used in laboratories for in vivo animal retinal imaging and pre-clinical studies. The lens shapes often need modification to optimally fit corneas of individual test subjects. However, the choices from commercially available contact lenses are rather limited. Here, we report a flexible method to fabricate customized hydrogel contact lenses. We showed that the fabricated hydrogel is highly transparent, with refractive indices ranging from 1.42 to 1.45 in the spectra range from 400 nm to 800 nm. The Young’s modulus (1.47 MPa) and hydrophobicity (with a sessile drop contact angle of 40.5°) have also been characterized experimentally. Retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography in rats wearing our customized contact lenses has the quality comparable to the control case without the contact lens. Our method could significantly reduce the cost and the lead time for fabricating soft contact lenses with customized shapes, and benefit the laboratorial-used contact lenses in pre-clinical studies.

  15. Supercooled Water in Supramolecular Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Clinton; Vogt, Bryan; Weiss, R. A.

    The suppression of water crystallization with appreciable water supercooling is challenging due to its large enthalpy of fusion. A common theme to supercool water is to confine the water in the pores of microporous/mesoporous solids where mechanical confinement prevents water crystallization. Nature takes a different approach with crystallization suppression through a combination of preferential adsorption on ice nuclei and confinement between hydrophobic residues using organic components only. Here, we demonstrate that mechanically robust confinement within a hard material is not necessary to significantly supercool water. In this case, a supramolecular hydrogel, based on a random amphiphilic copolymer, is used to provide soft confinement of water between the hydrophobic aggregates with an interdomain spacing <8 nm. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides insight into the structural evolution of the supramolecular structure of the hydrogel on supercooling. The structural changes are sensitive to the composition of the copolymer as determined by contrast variation SANS. Similarly, the dynamics of both the copolymer and water are probed using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). Using QENS, a highly mobile water phase (tau ~23 ps) is identified to be present even when slowly cooling to as low as 220K.

  16. Novel Crosslinked Graft Copolymer of Methacrylic Acid and Collagen as a Protein-Based Superabsorbent Hydrogel with Salt and Ph-Responsiveness Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Mohammad; Hamzeh, Alireza

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, a novel protein-based superabsorbent hydrogel was synthesized through crosslinking graft copolymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) onto collagen, using ammonium persulfate (APS) as a free radical initiator in the presence of methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as a crosslinker. The hydrogel structure was confirmed using FTIR spectroscopy. We were systematically optimized the certain variables of the graft copolymerization (i.e. the monomer, the initiator, and the crosslinker concentration) to achieve a hydrogel with maximum swelling capacity. Under the optimized conditions concluded, maximum capacity of swelling in distilled water was found to be 415 g/g. The swelling kinetics of the synthesized hydrogels with various particle sizes was preliminarily investigated. Absorbency in aqueous chloride salt solutions indicated that the swelling capacity decreased with an increase in the ionic strength of the swelling medium. The swelling of superabsorbing hydrogels was also measured in solutions with pH ranged from 1 to 13. The synthesized hydrogel exhibited a pH-responsiveness character so that a swelling-collapsing pulsatile behavior was recorded at pHs 2 and 7. This behavior makes the synthesized hydrogels as an excellent candidate for controlled delivery of bioactive agents.

  17. Preparation of a novel pH optical sensor using orange (II) based on agarose membrane as support.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Rouhollah; Hosseini, Mohammad; Amraei, Ahmadreza; Mohammadzadeh, Ali

    2016-04-01

    A novel and cost effective optical pH sensor was prepared using covalent immobilization of orange (II) indicator on the agarose membrane as solid support. The fabricated optical sensor was fixed into a sample holder of a spectrophotometer instrument for pH monitoring. Variables affecting sensor performance including pH of dye bonding to agarose membrane and dye concentration were optimized. The sensor responds to the pH changes in the range of 3.0-10.0 with a response time of 2.0 min and appropriate reproducibility (RSD ≤ 0.9%). No significant variation was observed on sensor response after increasing the ionic strength in the range of 0.0-0.5M of sodium chloride. Determination of pH using the proposed optical sensor is quick, simple, inexpensive, selective and sensitive in the pH range of 3.0-10.0.

  18. Use of thiazole orange homodimer as an alternative to ethidium bromide for DNA detection in agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Wilke, W W; Heller, M J; Iakoubova, O K; Robinson, R A

    1994-04-01

    Detection of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA fragments is commonly accomplished by visualizing the products in electrophoretic agarose beds with the use of ethidium bromide under ultraviolet light. However, ethidium bromide is mutagenic, and special handling and disposal precautions must be used. We report the use of a nonmutagenic dye, thiazole orange dimer (TOTO), which can be substituted for ethidium bromide. The excitation maximum for TOTO under ultraviolet light is 488 nm, and the absorption maximum is 510 nm, necessitating photographic filters different from those used for ethidium bromide for optimal results. Of particular importance in TOTO's use is the quantity used for each gel lane, since excess TOTO will cause unacceptable product mobility retardation. TOTO is only slightly more expensive than ethidium bromide. Overall, this stain provides very good visualization of polymerase chain reaction--amplified DNA bands in agarose gels. We believe the use of this safer reagent will become more widespread with increased regulation of laboratory activities.

  19. Label-free hybridization detection of a single nucleotide mismatch by immobilization of molecular beacons on an agarose film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Li, Jiong; Liu, Heping; Liu, Quanjun; Mei, Qian; Wang, Yijin; Zhu, Jijun; He, Nongyue; Lu, Zuhong

    2002-06-15

    We developed a new technique to immobilize a set of molecular beacons on an agarose film-coated slide and found that it has the ability to identify a single nucleotide difference in label-free DNA targets. The annealing properties, specificity and hybridization dynamics of the present technique were compared with those of the conventional technique that directly immobilizes molecular beacons on a planar glass slide. It is demonstrated that the molecular beacon array on an agarose film has high quench efficiency, an excellent discrimination ratio for single nucleotide mismatches and a short detection time. We hypothesize that such a low fluorescence background and high specificity molecular beacon array will find practical applications in label-free, high-throughput mutation analysis and disease diagnosis.

  20. Inhibition of colony formation in agarose of metastatic human breast carcinoma and melanoma cells by synthetic glycoamine analogs.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, G V; Mossine, V V; Price, J E; Bielenberg, D; Glinsky, V V; Ananthaswamy, H N; Feather, M S

    1996-05-01

    We studied the influence of 10 synthetic glycoamine analogs on colony formation in 0.3 and 0.9% agarose by metastatic human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-435) and melanoma (TXM-13) cells. Nine synthetic analogs significantly inhibited the colony formation in 0.9% agarose of MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells; five compounds caused a 73-83% reduction of colony formation. Seven synthetic glycoamines caused a significant inhibition of colony formation in 0.9% agarose by TXM-13 melanoma cells with the inhibitory effect ranging from 71 to 87%. The 50% inhibition (I50) doses and relative activity rank of the compounds were similar for both breast carcinoma and melanoma cell lines. The murine B16 melanoma cell aggregation assay was employed to elucidate the potential mechanism(s) of the inhibitory activity of synthetic glycoamines. The relative activity ranks of the compounds based on the independently determined I50 doses for both cell aggregation and clonogenic growth assays were very similar for the four most active synthetic analogs and clearly indicated the importance of hydrophobic amino acid in mediating the bioactivity of synthetic glycoamines. In both experimental systems (clonogenic growth in agarose and cell aggregation assay) the leading compound was N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-D-leucine (Fru-D-Leu) and the least active analog was N-(l-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-glycine (Fru-Gly). These results show that synthetic glycoamines may act by competing for specific carbohydrate-lectin interactions, particularly those involving beta-galactoside-specific lectins expressed on metastatic cells. PMID:8674280

  1. A new agarose matrix for single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex (HTX), and gel shift analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Dumais, M.M.; White, H.W.; Rashid, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    Detection of mutation, by SSCP or heteroduplex analysis, is important in medical genetics and oncology. Analysis of DNA binding proteins is a powerful tool in molecular biology research. Traditionally, these methods are performed using nondenaturing gel electrophoresis on poly-acrylamide or polyacrylamide-type matrices. Here we report the development of a new agarose gel matrix that can be used for all three methods. SSCP analyses were performed using the prototype agarose gel matrix for wild-type, polymorphic, and mutant samples from c-Kras exon 12, p53 exons 8 and 9, and HOX2B. We performed SSCP analyses using both isotopic and nonisotopic methods. We also analyzed the samples by deliberate HTX formation and subsequent gel analysis. Using the prototype agarose matrix, we detected single and multiple DNA sequence variants in 150-350 bp fragments with an efficiency comparable to polyacrylamide gels run under similar conditions. For SSCP and HTX assays, we achieved optimal resolution in gels run in vertical formats. However, some HTX samples could be resolved in horizontal gel systems. In addition, based on our studies, we have developed a useful battery of controls and standards for quality control of SSCP and HTX assays. We analyzed several different DNA/protein complexes (SP1, AP2, and octamer binding protein) using the prototype agarose matrix. We obtained good resolution in both vertical and horizontal gel formats. The horizontal gel system is generally superior for this application, due to its ease of use and slightly better resolution. This new prototype gel matrix offers an alternative for researchers performing analyses that previously could only be done on polyacrylamide-type gel matrices. For some applications, this new matrix offers the ease of horizontal gel casting. For all applications, this matrix offers the safety of a nontoxic system and the reproducibility of a thermally gelling system.

  2. Design and synthesis of cyclic and linear peptide-agarose tools for baiting interacting protein partners of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Granier, Sébastien; Jean-Alphonse, Frédéric; Déméné, Hélène; Guillon, Gilles; Pascal, Robert; Mendre, Christiane

    2006-02-01

    A ligation strategy for the synthesis of cyclic and linear peptides covalently linked to agarose beads designed as baits to identify new interacting partners of intracellular loops of the V2 vasopressin receptor, a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family, is reported. The peptide-resin conjugates were subsequently shown to interact specifically with a fraction of proteins present in cellular lysates.

  3. Comparation of effectiveness of silicone hydrogel contact lens and hydrogel contact lens in patients after LASEK

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-Juan; Zeng, Jin; Cui, Ying; Li, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Liao, Wei-Xiong; Yang, Xiao-Hong

    2015-01-01

    AIM To conduct a comparative study of effectiveness of silicone hydrogel contact lens and hydrogel contact lens, which are used in patients after laser-assisted subepithelial keratomileusis (LASEK). METHODS Sixty-three patients (121 eyes) with a spherical equivalent ≤-5.0 D were chosen after undergoing LASEK in 2012 at Guangdong General Hospital. They were randomly divided into 2 groups. The silicone hydrogel group included 32 cases (61 eyes) that wore silicone hydrogel contact lenses for 4-6d after the operation, while the hydrogel group included 31 cases (60 eyes) who wore hydrogel contact lenses for 4-6d after the operation. Patients' self-reported postoperative symptoms (including pain, photophobia, tears, and foreign body sensation) were evaluated. The healing time of the corneal epithelium, the visual acuity of patients without contact lens after epithelial healing, and the incidence of delayed corneal epithelial shedding were also assessed. The follow-up time was 1mo. RESULTS Postoperative symptoms were milder in the silicone hydrogel group than in the hydrogel group. There were significant differences in pain, foreign body sensation, and photophobia between the 2 groups (P<0.05), although there was no significant difference in postoperative tearing (P>0.05). The healing time of the corneal epithelium in the silicone hydrogel lens group was markedly shorter than that in the hydrogel group (4.07±0.25 vs 4.33±0.82d, t=2.43, P=0.02). Visual acuity without contact lenses after healing of the corneal epithelium was better in the silicone hydrogel group compared with the hydrogel group (χ2=7.76, P=0.02). There was no significant difference in the occurrence of delayed corneal epithelial shedding between the 2 groups (P>0.05). CONCLUSION Patients with LASEK using silicon hydrogel contact lenses had less discomfort and shorter corneal epithelial healing time compared with those using hydrogel contact lenses, suggesting that silicon hydrogel contact lenses may

  4. In Situ Observations of Thermoreversible Gelation and Phase Separation of Agarose and Methylcellulose Solutions under High Pressure.

    PubMed

    Kometani, Noritsugu; Tanabe, Masahiro; Su, Lei; Yang, Kun; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Thermoreversible sol-gel transitions of agarose and methylcellulose (MC) aqueous solutions on isobaric cooling or heating under high pressure up to 400 MPa have been investigated by in situ observations of optical transmittance and falling-ball experiments. For agarose, which undergoes the gelation on cooling, the application of pressure caused a gradual rise in the cloud-point temperature over the whole pressure range examined, which is almost consistent with the pressure dependence of gelling temperature estimated by falling-ball experiments, suggesting that agarose gel is stabilized by compression and that the gelation occurs nearly in parallel with phase separation under ambient and high-pressure conditions. For MC, which undergoes the gelation on heating, the cloud-point temperature showed a slight rise with an initial elevation of pressure up to ∼150 MPa, whereas it showed a marked depression above 200 MPa. In contrast, the gelling temperature of MC, which is nearly identical to the cloud-point temperature at ambient pressure, showed a monotonous rise with increasing pressure up to 350 MPa, which means that MC undergoes phase separation prior to gelation on heating under high pressure above 200 MPa. Similar results were obtained for the melting process of MC gel on cooling. The unique behavior of the sol-gel transition of MC under high pressure has been interpreted in terms of the destruction of hydrophobic hydration by compression.

  5. Hollow agarose microneedle with silver coating for intradermal surface-enhanced Raman measurements: a skin-mimicking phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2015-06-01

    Human intradermal components contain important clinical information beneficial to the field of immunology and disease diagnosis. Although microneedles have shown great potential to act as probes to break the human skin barrier for the minimally invasive measurement of intradermal components, metal microneedles that include stainless steel could cause the following problems: (1) sharp waste production, and (2) contamination due to reuse of microneedles especially in developing regions. In this study, we fabricate agarose microneedles coated with a layer of silver (Ag) and demonstrate their use as a probe for the realization of intradermal surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements in a set of skin-mimicking phantoms. The Ag-coated agarose microneedle quantifies a range of glucose concentrations from 5 to 150 mM inside the skin phantoms with a root-mean-square error of 5.1 mM within 10 s. The needle is found enlarged by 53.9% after another 6 min inside the phantom. The shape-changing capability of this agarose microneedle ensures that the reuse of these microneedles is impossible, thus avoiding sharp waste production and preventing needle contamination, which shows the great potential for safe and effective needle-based measurements.

  6. Viability of hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methyl methacrylate-microencapsulated PC12 cells after omental pouch implantation within agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A J; Sefton, M V

    2003-10-01

    Hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methyl methacrylate (HEMA-MMA, 75 mol% HEMA). Microcapsules containing viable PC12 cells (as an allogeneic transplant model) were implanted into omental pouches in Wistar rats. Two different capsule preparations were tested, based on differences in polymer solutions during extrusion: 10% HEMA-MMA in TEG, and 9% HEMA-MMA in TEG with 30% poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). The omental pouch proved to be an ideal transplant site in terms of implantation, recovery, and blood vessel proximity (nutrient supply). To minimize the fibrous overgrowth and damaged capsules previously seen on implantation of individual capsules, agarose gels were used to embed the capsules before implantation. Cells proliferated within the microcapsule-agarose device during the first 7 days of implantation, but overall cell viability declined over the 3-week period, when compared with similar capsules maintained in vitro. Nonetheless, approximately 50% of the initial encapsulated cells were still viable after 3 weeks in vivo. This approach to HEMA-MMA microcapsule implantation improved cell viability and capsule integrity after 3 weeks in vivo, compared with capsules implanted without agarose.

  7. Reversible covalent immobilization of Trametes villosa laccase onto thiolsulfinate-agarose: An insoluble biocatalyst with potential for decoloring recalcitrant dyes.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Larissa; Rodríguez-Couto, Susana; Menéndez, María Del Pilar; Manta, Carmen; Ovsejevi, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The development of a solid-phase biocatalyst based on the reversible covalent immobilization of laccase onto thiol-reactive supports (thiolsulfinate-agarose [TSI-agarose]) was performed. To achieve this goal, laccase-producing strains isolated from Eucalyptus globulus were screened and white rot fungus Trametes villosa was selected as the best strain for enzyme production. Reduction of disulfide bonds and introduction of "de novo" thiol groups in partially purified laccase were assessed to perform its reversible covalent immobilization onto thiol-reactive supports (TSI-agarose). Only the thiolation process dramatically improved the immobilization yield, from 0% for the native and reduced enzyme to 60% for the thiolated enzyme. Mild conditions for the immobilization process (pH 7.5 and 4°C) allowed the achievement of nearly 100% of coupling efficiency when low loads were applied. The kinetic parameters, pH, and thermal stabilities for the immobilized biocatalyst were similar to those for the native enzyme. After the first use and three consecutives reuses, the insoluble derivative kept more than 80% of its initial capacity for decolorizing Remazol Brilliant Blue R, showing its suitability for color removal from textile industrial effluents. The possibility of reusing the support was demonstrated by the reversibility of enzyme-support binding. PMID:25196324

  8. Viscosity of soft spherical micro-hydrogel suspensions.

    PubMed

    Shewan, Heather M; Stokes, Jason R

    2015-03-15

    The rheology of soft particle suspensions is considered to be a function of particle micromechanics and phase volume. However, soft particles such as microgels present a challenge because they typically contain solvent in their polymeric network structure, and their specific volume can alter in response to mechanical forces and physiochemical effects. We investigate how particle elasticity affects the viscosity of microgel suspensions as a function of effective phase volume (ϕ0) using non-colloidal hydrogel spheres that, unlike many colloidal-scale microgels, are not highly responsive to physiochemical effects. In our unique approach, we compare the viscosity of microgel suspensions to a theoretical hard sphere viscosity model that defines the maximum packing fraction using the geometric random close packing fraction (ϕrcp) obtained from the measured particle size distribution. We discover that our harder microgels follow the hard sphere model up to random close packing, but softer microgels deviate around ϕ0/ϕrcp∼50% which indicates that their specific volume is decreasing with increasing ϕ0. This effect arises because microgels at high phase volumes do not fully re-swell during their preparation. We conclude that particle elasticity does not directly affect the viscosity of soft sphere suspensions up to the random close packing fraction. We highlight a convenient method for analysing the viscosity of microgel suspensions with potential to be applied to a wide variety of soft sphere suspensions.

  9. Simple approach to reinforce hydrogels with cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Han, Chun-rui; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-cang

    2014-06-01

    The physical crosslinking of colloidal nanoparticles via dynamic and directional non-covalent interactions has led to significant advances in composite hydrogels. In this paper, we report a simple approach to fabricate tough, stretchable and hysteretic isotropic nanocomposite hydrogels, where rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are encapsulated by flexible polymer chains of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA). The CNC-PDMA colloidal clusters build a homogeneously cross-linked network and lead to significant reinforcing effect of the composites. Hierarchically structured CNC-PDMA clusters, from isolated particles to an interpenetrated network, are observed by transmission electron microscopy measurements. Dynamic shear oscillation measurements are applied to demystify the differences in network rheological behaviors, which were compared with network behaviors of chemically cross-linked PDMA counterparts. Tensile tests indicate that the hybrid hydrogels possess higher mechanical properties and a more efficient energy dissipation mechanism. In particular, with only 0.8 wt% of CNC loading, a 4.8-fold increase in Young's modulus, 9.2-fold increase in tensile strength, and 5.8-fold increase in fracture strain are achieved, which is ascribed to a combination of CNC reinforcement in the soft matrix and CNC-PDMA colloidal cluster conformational rearrangement under stretching. Physical interactions within networks serve as reversible sacrificial bonds that dissociate upon deformation, exhibiting large hysteresis as an energy dissipation mechanism via cluster mobility. This result contrasts with the case of chemically cross-linked PDMA counterparts where the stress relaxation is slow due to the permanent cross-links and low resistance against crack propagation within the covalent network.

  10. Simple approach to reinforce hydrogels with cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Han, Chun-rui; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-cang

    2014-06-01

    The physical crosslinking of colloidal nanoparticles via dynamic and directional non-covalent interactions has led to significant advances in composite hydrogels. In this paper, we report a simple approach to fabricate tough, stretchable and hysteretic isotropic nanocomposite hydrogels, where rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are encapsulated by flexible polymer chains of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA). The CNC-PDMA colloidal clusters build a homogeneously cross-linked network and lead to significant reinforcing effect of the composites. Hierarchically structured CNC-PDMA clusters, from isolated particles to an interpenetrated network, are observed by transmission electron microscopy measurements. Dynamic shear oscillation measurements are applied to demystify the differences in network rheological behaviors, which were compared with network behaviors of chemically cross-linked PDMA counterparts. Tensile tests indicate that the hybrid hydrogels possess higher mechanical properties and a more efficient energy dissipation mechanism. In particular, with only 0.8 wt% of CNC loading, a 4.8-fold increase in Young's modulus, 9.2-fold increase in tensile strength, and 5.8-fold increase in fracture strain are achieved, which is ascribed to a combination of CNC reinforcement in the soft matrix and CNC-PDMA colloidal cluster conformational rearrangement under stretching. Physical interactions within networks serve as reversible sacrificial bonds that dissociate upon deformation, exhibiting large hysteresis as an energy dissipation mechanism via cluster mobility. This result contrasts with the case of chemically cross-linked PDMA counterparts where the stress relaxation is slow due to the permanent cross-links and low resistance against crack propagation within the covalent network. PMID:24763379

  11. Facile preparation of photodegradable hydrogels by photopolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Chang Seok; Shih, Han; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Photodegradable hydrogels have emerged as a powerful material platform for studying and directing cell behaviors, as well as for delivering drugs. The premise of this technique is to use a cytocompatible light source to cleave linkers within a hydrogel, thus causing reduction of matrix stiffness or liberation of matrix-tethered biomolecules in a spatial-temporally controlled manner. The most commonly used photodegradable units are molecules containing nitrobenzyl moieties that absorb light in the ultraviolet (UV) to lower visible wavelengths (~280 to 450 nm). Because photodegradable linkers and hydrogels reported in the literature thus far are all sensitive to UV light, highly efficient UV-mediated photopolymerizations are less likely to be used as the method to prepare these hydrogels. As a result, currently available photodegradable hydrogels are formed by redox-mediated radical polymerizations, emulsion polymerizations, Michael-type addition reactions, or orthogonal click chemistries. Here, we report the first photodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel system prepared by step-growth photopolymerization. The model photolabile peptide cross-linkers, synthesized by conventional solid phase peptide synthesis, contained terminal cysteines for step-growth thiol-ene photo-click reactions and a UV-sensitive 2-nitrophenylalanine residue in the peptide backbone for photo-cleavage. Photolysis of this peptide was achieved through adjusting UV light exposure time and intensity. Photopolymerization of photodegradable hydrogels containing photolabile peptide cross-linkers was made possible via a highly efficient visible light-mediated thiol-ene photo-click reaction using a non-cleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y. Rapid gelation was confirmed by in situ photo-rheometry. Flood UV irradiation at controlled wavelength and intensity was used to demonstrate the photodegradability of these photopolymerized hydrogels. PMID:23894212

  12. A Hydrogel Derived From Decellularized Dermal Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Matthew T.; Daly, Kerry A.; Brennan-Pierce, Ellen P.; Johnson, Scott A.; Carruthers, Christopher; D’Amore, Antonio; Nagarkar, Shailesh P.; Velankar, Sachin S.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    The ECM of mammalian tissues has been used as a scaffold to facilitate the repair and reconstruction of numerous tissues. Such scaffolds are prepared in many forms including sheets, powders, and hydrogels. ECM hydrogels provide advantages such as injectability, the ability to fill an irregularly shaped space, and the inherent bioactivity of native matrix. However, material properties of ECM hydrogels and the effect of these properties upon cell behavior are neither well understood nor controlled. The objective of this study was to prepare and determine the structure, mechanics, and the cell response in vitro and in vivo of ECM hydrogels prepared from decellularized porcine dermis and urinary bladder tissues. Dermal ECM hydrogels were characterized by a more dense fiber architecture and greater mechanical integrity than urinary bladder ECM hydrogels, and showed a dose dependent increase in mechanical properties with ECM concentration. In vitro, dermal ECM hydrogels supported greater C2C12 myoblast fusion, and less fibroblast infiltration and less fibroblast mediated hydrogel contraction than urinary bladder ECM hydrogels. Both hydrogels were rapidly infiltrated by host cells, primarily macrophages, when implanted in a rat abdominal wall defect. Both ECM hydrogels degraded by 35 days in vivo, but UBM hydrogels degraded more quickly, and with greater amounts of myogenesis than dermal ECM. These results show that ECM hydrogel properties can be varied and partially controlled by the scaffold tissue source, and that these properties can markedly affect cell behavior. PMID:22789723

  13. Detection and mapping of homologous, repeated and amplified DNA sequences by DNA renaturation in agarose gels.

    PubMed Central

    Roninson, I B

    1983-01-01

    A new molecular hybridization approach to the analysis of complex genomes has been developed. Tracer and driver DNAs were digested with the same restriction enzyme(s), and tracer DNA was labeled with 32P using T4 DNA polymerase. Tracer DNA was mixed with an excess amount of driver, and the mixture was electrophoresed in an agarose gel. Following electrophoresis, DNA was alkali-denatured in situ and allowed to reanneal in the gel, so that tracer DNA fragments could hybridize to the driver only when homologous driver DNA sequences were present at the same place in the gel, i.e. within a restriction fragment of the same size. After reannealing, unhybridized single-stranded DNA was digested in situ with S1 nuclease. The hybridized tracer DNA was detected by autoradiography. The general applicability of this technique was demonstrated in the following experiments. The common EcoRI restriction fragments were identified in the genomes of E. coli and four other species of bacteria. Two of these fragments are conserved in all Enterobacteriaceae. In other experiments, repeated EcoRI fragments of eukaryotic DNA were visualized as bands of various intensity after reassociation of a total genomic restriction digest in the gel. The situation of gene amplification was modeled by the addition of varying amounts of lambda phage DNA to eukaryotic DNA prior to restriction enzyme digestion. Restriction fragments of lambda DNA were detectable at a ratio of 15 copies per chicken genome and 30 copies per human genome. This approach was used to detect amplified DNA fragments in methotrexate (MTX)-resistant mouse cells and to identify commonly amplified fragments in two independently derived MTX-resistant lines. Images PMID:6310499

  14. Hydrogel: Preparation, characterization, and applications: A review.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Enas M

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogel products constitute a group of polymeric materials, the hydrophilic structure of which renders them capable of holding large amounts of water in their three-dimensional networks. Extensive employment of these products in a number of industrial and environmental areas of application is considered to be of prime importance. As expected, natural hydrogels were gradually replaced by synthetic types due to their higher water absorption capacity, long service life, and wide varieties of raw chemical resources. Literature on this subject was found to be expanding, especially in the scientific areas of research. However, a number of publications and technical reports dealing with hydrogel products from the engineering points of view were examined to overview technological aspects covering this growing multidisciplinary field of research. The primary objective of this article is to review the literature concerning classification of hydrogels on different bases, physical and chemical characteristics of these products, and technical feasibility of their utilization. It also involved technologies adopted for hydrogel production together with process design implications, block diagrams, and optimized conditions of the preparation process. An innovated category of recent generations of hydrogel materials was also presented in some details. PMID:25750745

  15. Cell-laden microengineered gelatin methacrylate hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Nichol, Jason W.; Koshy, Sandeep; Bae, Hojae; Hwang, Chang Mo; Yamanlar, Seda; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    The cellular microenvironment plays an integral role in improving the function of microengineered tissues. Control of the microarchitecture in engineered tissues can be achieved through photopatterning of cell-laden hydrogels. However, despite high pattern fidelity of photopolymerizable hydrogels, many such materials are not cell-responsive and have limited biodegradability. Here we demonstrate gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) as an inexpensive, cell-responsive hydrogel platform for creating cell-laden microtissues and microfluidic devices. Cells readily bound to, proliferated, elongated and migrated both when seeded on micropatterned GelMA substrates as well as when encapsulated in microfabricated GelMA hydrogels. The hydration and mechanical properties of GelMA were demonstrated to be tunable for various applications through modification to the methacrylation degree and gel concentration. Pattern fidelity and resolution of GelMA was high and it could be patterned to create perfusable microfluidic channels. Furthermore, GelMA micropatterns could be used to create cellular micropatterns for in vitro cell studies or 3D microtissue fabrication. These data suggest that GelMA hydrogels could be useful for creating complex, cell-responsive microtissues, such as endothelialized microvasculature, or for other applications that requires cell-responsive microengineered hydrogels. PMID:20417964

  16. BIOMIMETIC GRADIENT HYDROGELS FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Shilpa; Hancock, Matthew J.; Donnelly, Joseph P.; Iyer, Dharini; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    During tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, cells experience various signals in their environments, including gradients of physical and chemical cues. Spatial and temporal gradients regulate various cell behaviours such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation during development, inflammation, wound healing, and cancer. One of the goals of functional tissue engineering is to create microenvironments that mimic the cellular and tissue complexity found in vivo by incorporating physical, chemical, temporal, and spatial gradients within engineered three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. Hydrogels are ideal materials for 3D tissue scaffolds that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). Various techniques from material science, microscale engineering, and microfluidics are used to synthesise biomimetic hydrogels with encapsulated cells and tailored microenvironments. In particular, a host of methods exist to incorporate micrometer to centimetre scale chemical and physical gradients within hydrogels to mimic the cellular cues found in vivo. In this review, we draw on specific biological examples to motivate hydrogel gradients as tools for studying cell–material interactions. We provide a brief overview of techniques to generate gradient hydrogels and showcase their use to study particular cell behaviours in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D environments. We conclude by summarizing the current and future trends in gradient hydrogels and cell–material interactions in context with the long-term goals of tissue engineering. PMID:21874065

  17. Hydrogel: Preparation, characterization, and applications: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Enas M.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogel products constitute a group of polymeric materials, the hydrophilic structure of which renders them capable of holding large amounts of water in their three-dimensional networks. Extensive employment of these products in a number of industrial and environmental areas of application is considered to be of prime importance. As expected, natural hydrogels were gradually replaced by synthetic types due to their higher water absorption capacity, long service life, and wide varieties of raw chemical resources. Literature on this subject was found to be expanding, especially in the scientific areas of research. However, a number of publications and technical reports dealing with hydrogel products from the engineering points of view were examined to overview technological aspects covering this growing multidisciplinary field of research. The primary objective of this article is to review the literature concerning classification of hydrogels on different bases, physical and chemical characteristics of these products, and technical feasibility of their utilization. It also involved technologies adopted for hydrogel production together with process design implications, block diagrams, and optimized conditions of the preparation process. An innovated category of recent generations of hydrogel materials was also presented in some details. PMID:25750745

  18. Cell-laden microengineered gelatin methacrylate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Jason W; Koshy, Sandeep T; Bae, Hojae; Hwang, Chang M; Yamanlar, Seda; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-07-01

    The cellular microenvironment plays an integral role in improving the function of microengineered tissues. Control of the microarchitecture in engineered tissues can be achieved through photopatterning of cell-laden hydrogels. However, despite high pattern fidelity of photopolymerizable hydrogels, many such materials are not cell-responsive and have limited biodegradability. Here, we demonstrate gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) as an inexpensive, cell-responsive hydrogel platform for creating cell-laden microtissues and microfluidic devices. Cells readily bound to, proliferated, elongated, and migrated both when seeded on micropatterned GelMA substrates as well as when encapsulated in microfabricated GelMA hydrogels. The hydration and mechanical properties of GelMA were demonstrated to be tunable for various applications through modification of the methacrylation degree and gel concentration. The pattern fidelity and resolution of GelMA were high and it could be patterned to create perfusable microfluidic channels. Furthermore, GelMA micropatterns could be used to create cellular micropatterns for in vitro cell studies or 3D microtissue fabrication. These data suggest that GelMA hydrogels could be useful for creating complex, cell-responsive microtissues, such as endothelialized microvasculature, or for other applications that require cell-responsive microengineered hydrogels.

  19. Drying of poloxamer hydrogel films.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhiyong; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2004-06-01

    The drying of hydrogel films formed by Poloxamer 407 poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) amphiphilic block copolymer was investigated at various air relative humidity (RH) conditions ranging from 11 to 97%. Initially, the amount of water lost increased linearly with the drying time. After this linear region (stage I), a nonlinear behavior was observed (stage II). The drying rate increased with decreasing RH, thus greatly shortening the drying time. A decrease of the film thickness also shortened the drying time; however, the drying mechanism did not change. Three models for one-dimensional water diffusion were used to fit the experimental results at different RH conditions and film thicknesses. Model 1 assumes semi-infinite medium and constant diffusion coefficient, and fits very well the data in stage I of the drying process. The fitted water diffusion coefficient (D) is 5 x 10(-10) m(2)/s, whereas the effects of the RH are captured by a proportionality constant (alpha) that appears in the boundary condition. Model 2 considers a finite (constant) film thickness and captures the experimental observations over the whole drying period for the same D and alpha as in Model 1. The analytical solutions available for Models 1 and 2, used together with the experimentally derived model parameters D and alpha, allow for easy estimation of drying time and water loss from Poloxamer hydrogel films of various compositions and thicknesses and at different relative humidities. Numerical solutions for water diffusion under conditions of decreasing film thickness and diffusion coefficient being a function of concentration are also presented (Model 3). It becomes apparent from the fit of the data to the different models that the drying rate is more sensitive to the boundary condition at the film-air interface (represented by alpha) than to the diffusion in the film. It is notable that the alpha values obtained from the fits of the Poloxamer hydrogel drying

  20. Agarose plating and a bead type culture technique enable and stimulate development of protoplast-derived colonies in a number of plant species.

    PubMed

    Shillito, R D; Paszkowski, J; Potrykus, I

    1983-10-01

    Two novel techniques improve division and colony formation from protoplasts: 1) Plating in agarose stimulates colony formation of protoplasts from a wide range of species. Protoplasts from Nicotiana tabacum developed to colonies from lower initial population densities in agarose than in agar or liquid. Protoplasts from Hyoscyamus muticus which do not divide in agar divided and formed colonies in agarose at higher efficiencies than in liquid medium. 2) Culture of gel embedded protoplasts in large volumes of liquid medium on a gyrotatory shaker ('bead culture') further improved plating efficiencies in some species (e.g. Lycopersicon esculentum and Crepis capillaris) and enabled sustained proliferation of protoplasts which had not previously developed beyond the few cell colony stage (Brassica rapa and a mutator gene variety of Petunia hybrida). The combination of 'agarose plating' and 'bead culture' dramatically improved plating efficiencies of protoplasts in all species tested.

  1. Tough Stretchable Physically-Cross-linked Electrospun Hydrogel Fiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiming; Wang, Chao; Wiener, Clinton G; Hao, Jinkun; Shatas, Sophia; Weiss, R A; Vogt, Bryan D

    2016-09-01

    Nature uses supramolecular interactions and hierarchical structures to produce water-rich materials with combinations of properties that are challenging to obtain in synthetic systems. Here, we demonstrate hierarchical supramolecular hydrogels from electrospun, self-associated copolymers with unprecedented elongation and toughness for high porosity hydrogels. Hydrophobic association of perfluoronated comonomers provides the physical cross-links for these hydrogels based on copolymers of dimethyl acrylamide and 2-(N-ethylperfluorooctane sulfonamido)ethyl methacrylate (FOSM). Intriguingly, the hydrogel fiber mats show an enhancement in toughness in comparison to compression molded bulk hydrogels. This difference is attributed to the size distribution of the hydrophobic aggregates where narrowing the distribution in the electrospun material enhances the toughness of the hydrogel. These hydrogel fiber mats exhibit extensibility more than double that of the bulk hydrogel and a comparable modulus despite the porosity of the fiber mat leading to >25 wt % increase in water content. PMID:27548013

  2. Fabrication of keratin-silica hydrogel for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Prachi; Madhan, Balaraman

    2016-09-01

    In the recent past, keratin has been fabricated into different forms of biomaterials like scaffold, gel, sponge, film etc. In lieu of the myriad advantages of the hydrogels for biomedical applications, a keratin-silica hydrogel was fabricated using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Textural analysis shed light on the physical properties of the fabricated hydrogel, inturn enabling the optimization of the hydrogel. The optimized keratin-silica hydrogel was found to exhibit instant springiness, optimum hardness, with ease of spreadability. Moreover, the hydrogel showed excellent swelling with highly porous microarchitecture. MTT assay and DAPI staining revealed that keratin-silica hydrogel was biocompatible with fibroblast cells. Collectively, these properties make the fabricated keratin-silica hydrogel, a suitable dressing material for biomedical applications.

  3. Hydrogels for Delivery of Bioactive Agents: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Cheon; Kwon, Il Keun; Park, Kinam

    2012-01-01

    Since 1960 when the history of modern hydrogels began significant progresses have been made in the field of controlled drug delivery. In particular, recent advances in the so-called smart hydrogels have made it possible to design highly sophisticated formulations, e.g., self-regulated drug delivery systems. Despite intensive efforts, clinical applications of smart hydrogels have been limited. Smart hydrogels need to be even smarter to execute functions necessary for achieving desired clinical functions. It is necessary to develop novel hydrogels that meet the requirements of the intended, specific applications, rather than finding applications of newly developed hydrogels. Furthermore, developing smarter hydrogels that can mimic natural systems is necessary, but the fundamental differences between natural and synthetic systems need to be understood. Such understanding will allow us to develop novel hydrogels with new, multiple functions we are looking for. PMID:22906864

  4. Injectable and responsively degradable hydrogel for personalized photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changping; Wang, Xinyu; Dong, Kunyu; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-10-01

    Near infrared-absorbing hydrogels are used for the repeated photothermal treatments of cancer. However, a long-term retention of hydrogel in the body leads to increased risk of toxicity. Here we developed an injectable and on-demand degradable hydrogel to conduct the repeated photothermal therapies (PTTs). Alginate-calcium hydrogel immobilized dendrimer-encapsulated platinum nanoparticles (DEPts) in its matrix represented excellent biocompatibility, and was degraded upon injecting chelates. Results from the in vivo studies reveal that the hydrogel/DEPts-mediated repeated PTTs suppressed tumor growth efficiently, and the hydrogel was degraded on-demand to allow renal secretion of DEPts out of the body. Furthermore, coating hydrogel/DEPts on the tumor instead of intratumoral injection could still ablate tumor efficiently. Our investigation provides a smart and safe hydrogel for photothermal cancer therapy.

  5. Injectable and responsively degradable hydrogel for personalized photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changping; Wang, Xinyu; Dong, Kunyu; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-10-01

    Near infrared-absorbing hydrogels are used for the repeated photothermal treatments of cancer. However, a long-term retention of hydrogel in the body leads to increased risk of toxicity. Here we developed an injectable and on-demand degradable hydrogel to conduct the repeated photothermal therapies (PTTs). Alginate-calcium hydrogel immobilized dendrimer-encapsulated platinum nanoparticles (DEPts) in its matrix represented excellent biocompatibility, and was degraded upon injecting chelates. Results from the in vivo studies reveal that the hydrogel/DEPts-mediated repeated PTTs suppressed tumor growth efficiently, and the hydrogel was degraded on-demand to allow renal secretion of DEPts out of the body. Furthermore, coating hydrogel/DEPts on the tumor instead of intratumoral injection could still ablate tumor efficiently. Our investigation provides a smart and safe hydrogel for photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:27449949

  6. Designing a bio-inspired self-propelling hydrogel micro-swimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Yeh, Peter; Alexeev, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Artificial micro-swimmers have found numerous applications in microfluidics, drug delivery systems, and nanotechnology. In our current research we use dissipative particle dynamics to design and optimize a self-propelling hydrogel micro-swimmer with an X-shaped flat geometry and bi-layered hydrogel structure. The two polymeric layers that bind to each other have identical material properties but distinctive chemical responses to external stimuli. In the presence of outside stimuli one of the layers swells where the other remains passive resulting in hydrogel bending. Our simulations demonstrate that under periodic applications of an external stimulus this actuation routine is capable of creating time-irreversible motion in a low Reynolds number environment. Initially, when the external stimulus is introduced a forward stroke is initiated, as the swimmer first expands and then bends. When the outside stimulus is removed the forward stroke is terminated and a backward stroke begins, as the swimmer contracts and then straightens. Propulsion results due to the difference in momentum exchange between the forward and backward strokes. We use our simulations to probe how alterations in the material properties of the bi-layered hydrogel can affect swimming performance. Support from NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255288) is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Revealing strong nanocomposite hydrogels reinforced by cellulose nanocrystals: insight into morphologies and interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-12-26

    Understanding the reinforcement mechanism by dispersing nanoscale particles into a polymer matrix is a critical challenge toward refining control of the composite properties. In this paper, the morphologies and interactions of cellulose nanocrystal/poly(acrylic acid) (CNC/PAA) nanocomposite hydrogels are demystified based on a facile synthetic platform. Two sources of CNCs with different aspect ratios are applied to model the reinforcement process, and the uniaxial tensile measurements indicate that the CNC aspect ratio and the nanocomposite mechanical behaviors are coupled, where the values of aspect ratios and nonpermanent interactions between the fillers and matrix dominate the reinforcement. Dynamic mechanical analysis is performed to examine the nature of the constrained polymer as the semicrystalline fractions, and the results indicate that polymer chain mobility in the vicinity of CNC surfaces is significantly reduced, providing new insight into the origin of the reinforcement mechanism. Rheological analysis and transmission electron microscopy observations show that both stepwise dissociation and polymer chain rearrangements contribute to the viscoelastic behaviors of the nanocomposite hydrogels. The increased modulus of the hydrogels is correlated to the volume of the constrained polymer, where the CNCs impart significant enhancement to the entanglement network. This study of the structure-property relationship deepens the understanding of the filler reinforcement mechanism and provides valuable knowledge for designing high performance nanocomposite hydrogels from cellulose as a raw material.

  8. Fabrication of hydrogel-encapsulated silica core bound with chitosan chains for efficient drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeol Bae, Saet; Lee, Sang Wha

    2016-06-01

    In this study, hydrogel-encapsulated silica nanoparticles were facilely prepared through the following three consecutive steps: i) silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were synthesized via a sol–gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) with ammonium hydroxide, ii) the resulting SNPs were functionalized with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propylmethacrylate (TPM) ligand with an olefin group, and iii) the TPM-functionalized SNPs were encapsulated with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid), NIPAM-co-AAc hydrogels by using a radical polymerization reaction of the co-monomers at the following ratio: \\text{NIPAM}:\\text{AAc} = 91:9 wt %. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the encapsulated hydrogels with a moiety of carboxylic groups was slightly above physiological temperature and they demonstrated a thermo-sensitive variation of particle size. The hydrogel-encapsulated SNPs (SNPs@Hyd) were finally bound with chitosan chains, which are bio-friendly and non-toxic polymers. When compared to SNPs@Hyd, chitosan-coated SNPs@Hyd (SNPs@Hyd@Chi) exhibited prolonged drug (ibuprofen) release and stable structural integrity during the release test.

  9. Microparticles Produced by the Hydrogel Template Method for Sustained Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying; Sturek, Michael; Park, Kinam

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric microparticles have been used widely for sustained drug delivery. Current methods of microparticle production can be improved by making homogeneous particles in size and shape, increasing the drug loading, and controlling the initial burst release. In the current study, the hydrogel template method was used to produce homogeneous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles and to examine formulation and process-related parameters. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was used to make hydrogel templates. The parameters examined include PVA molecular weight, type of PLGA (as characterized by lactide content, inherent viscosity), polymer concentration, drug concentration and composition of solvent system. Three model compounds studied were risperidone, methylprednisolone acetate and paclitaxel. The ability of the hydrogel template method to produce microparticles with good conformity to template was dependent on molecular weight of PVA and viscosity of the PLGA solution. Drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were found to be influenced by PLGA lactide content, polymer concentration and composition of the solvent system. The drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were 28.7% and 82% for risperidone, 31.5% and 90% for methylprednisolone acetate, and 32.2 % and 92 % for paclitaxel, respectively. For all three drugs, release was sustained for weeks, and the in vitro release profile of risperidone was comparable to that of microparticles prepared using the conventional emulsion method. The hydrogel template method provides a new approach of manipulating microparticles. PMID:24333903

  10. Microwave-assisted fabrication of chitosan-hydroxyapatite superporous hydrogel composites as bone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Beşkardeş, Işıl Gerçek; Demirtaş, Tuğrul Tolga; Durukan, Müge Dağlı; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel scaffold fabrication method was developed by combining microwave irradiation and gas foaming. Chitosan superporous hydrogels (SPHs) and chitosan-hydroxyapatite (HA) superporous hydrogel composites (SPHCs) were prepared by using this method in the presence of crosslinking agent, glyoxal, and a gas-blowing agent, NaHCO3. In order to examine the effect of HA on composite structure and cellular behaviour, two types of HA particles, i.e. spherical beads in 45-80 µm diameter and powder form, were used. While rapid heating with microwave irradiation enhances gas blowing, pH increment, which is accelerated by NaHCO3 decomposition, provides better crosslinking. Thus, interconnected and well-established macroporous hydrogels/hydrogel composites were produced easily and rapidly (~1 min). Cell culture studies, which were carried out under static and dynamic conditions with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells, indicated that chitosan-HA bead SPHCs supported cellular proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation better than chitosan SPHs and chitosan-HA powder SPHCs. In conclusion, simultaneous gas foaming and microwave crosslinking can be evaluated for the preparation of composite scaffolds which have superior properties for bone tissue engineering.

  11. Fabrication of hydrogel-encapsulated silica core bound with chitosan chains for efficient drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeol Bae, Saet; Lee, Sang Wha

    2016-06-01

    In this study, hydrogel-encapsulated silica nanoparticles were facilely prepared through the following three consecutive steps: i) silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were synthesized via a sol-gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) with ammonium hydroxide, ii) the resulting SNPs were functionalized with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propylmethacrylate (TPM) ligand with an olefin group, and iii) the TPM-functionalized SNPs were encapsulated with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid), NIPAM-co-AAc hydrogels by using a radical polymerization reaction of the co-monomers at the following ratio: \\text{NIPAM}:\\text{AAc} = 91:9 wt %. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the encapsulated hydrogels with a moiety of carboxylic groups was slightly above physiological temperature and they demonstrated a thermo-sensitive variation of particle size. The hydrogel-encapsulated SNPs (SNPs@Hyd) were finally bound with chitosan chains, which are bio-friendly and non-toxic polymers. When compared to SNPs@Hyd, chitosan-coated SNPs@Hyd (SNPs@Hyd@Chi) exhibited prolonged drug (ibuprofen) release and stable structural integrity during the release test.

  12. Silver-doped self-assembling di-phenylalanine hydrogels as wound dressing biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Paladini, Federica; Meikle, S T; Cooper, I R; Lacey, J; Perugini, V; Santin, M

    2013-10-01

    Chronic and acute wounds can be quickly contaminated and infected by microorganisms such as bacteria, multi-resistant organisms or fungi. The introduction of silver as anti-microbial agent into wound management has widely been demonstrated to be effective and contribute to wound healing. As a consequence, many approaches and different materials have been employed to synthesize antibacterial silver-hydrogels. In this work the introduction of silver particles into the fibrillar structure of self-assembling aromatic di-phenylalanine derivatives modified with aromatic groups such as 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl is proposed to produce antibacterial wound dressings. Hydrogels doped with increasing amounts of silver were tested and adopted to modify flax textiles. The influence of silver on the structure of hydrogels was studied using light and confocal microscopy, while SEM-EDX allowed the characterization of the hydrogel coating on the surface of the textile substrates as well as the identification and distribution of silver nanoparticles. The antibacterial potential of the treated flax was demonstrated through microbiological tests on Staphylococcus aureus. The combination of the physico-chemical and anti-bacterial properties, together with the ease of preparation of these biomaterials, fulfils the requirement of clinically-effective wound dressings.

  13. Intracellular Degradable Hydrogel Cubes and Spheres for Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bing; Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Liu, Fei; Chen, Jun; Williams, J Fox; Campos-Gomez, Javier; Saeed, Mohammad; Kharlampieva, Eugenia

    2015-06-24

    Shape and responsiveness of nanoengineered delivery carriers are crucial characteristics for rapid and efficient delivery of therapeutics. We report on a novel type of micrometer-sized hydrogel particles of controlled shape with dual pH- and redox-sensitivity for intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs. The cubical and spherical poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) networks with disulfide links are obtained by cross-linking PMAA with cystamine within hydrogen-bonded multilayers of PMAA/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PMAA/PVPON) on sacrificial mesoporous templates. The pH-triggered hydrogel swelling/shrinkage not only affords effective doxorubicin entrapment but also efficient endosomal/lysosomal escape, and redox-triggered degradation provides drug release into the cytosolic space. The hydrogels degrade rapidly to low molecular weight chains in the presence of the typical intracellular concentration of glutathione, which should ensure a rapid renal clearance in vivo. Particle shape is found to affect internalization at the initial step of cell-particle interactions. Drug-loaded spherical particles are found to be 12% more cytotoxic than the corresponding cubes within the first 10 h of cell incubation suggesting more rapid internalization of spheres. Both doxorubicin-loaded hydrogel cubes and spheres demonstrate 50% and 90% cytotoxicity when incubated with HeLa cancer cells for 24 and 48 h, respectively. The presented approach integrates the advantages of pH-sensitivity, enzymatic degradation, and shape-regulated internalization for novel types of "intelligent" three-dimensional networks with programmable behavior for use in controlled delivery of therapeutics.

  14. Sulfiding of hydrogel derived catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, R.A.

    1991-11-05

    This patent describes a process for hydrotreating hydrocarbon feeds. It comprises contacting the feeds at a temperature in the range of from about 400{degrees} F. to about 850{degrees} F. and a pressure in the range of from about 400 psig to about 2500 psig with a catalyst having improved desulfurization activity prepared by incorporating an element selected from the group consisting of nickel, cobalt and mixtures thereof, and a heavy metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten and mixtures thereof, into an alumina hydrogel containing a phosphorous-containing compound, and sulfiding the catalyst with a gaseous sulfur compound at a temperature of at least about 900{degrees} F. for at least one hour.

  15. Biocompatible polyurethane-based hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Braatz, J A

    1994-07-01

    A polyurethane polymer developed at W. R. Grace has been evaluated for a variety of biomedical applications. The primary property of the polymer exploited for these applications is its ability to prevent protein adsorption when coated on a surface. The prepolymer consists of a trifunctional poly(ethyleneoxide-propylene oxide) triol end capped with isophorone diisocyanate. The prepolymer is reactive with water and can be converted to a hydrogel, a thin coating, or a soluble conjugate with another compound. Each category lends itself to separate biomedical applications which are described in detail. The non-toxic nature of the polymer was demonstrated in a number of systems and suggests its utility in biomedical applications. PMID:7983587

  16. New in situ crosslinking chemistries for hydrogelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Meredith Colleen

    Over the last half century, hydrogels have found immense value as biomaterials in a vast number of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. One subset of hydrogels receiving increased attention is in situ forming gels. Gelling by either bioresponsive self-assembly or mixing of binary crosslinking systems, these technologies are useful in minimally invasive applications as well as drug delivery systems in which the sol-to-gel transition aids the formulation's performance. Thus far, the field of in situ crosslinking hydrogels has received limited attention in the development of new crosslinking chemistries. Moreover, not only does the chemical nature of the crosslinking moieties allow these systems to perform in situ, but they contribute dramatically to the mechanical properties of the hydrogel networks. For example, reversible crosslinks with finite lifetimes generate dynamic viscoelastic gels with time-dependent properties, whereas irreversible crosslinks form highly elastic networks. The aim of this dissertation is to explore two new covalent chemistries for their ability to crosslink hydrogels in situ under physiological conditions. First, reversible phenylboronate-salicylhydroxamate crosslinking was implemented in a binary, multivalent polymeric system. These gels formed rapidly and generated hydrogel networks with frequency-dependent dynamic rheological properties. Analysis of the composition-structure-property relationships of these hydrogels---specifically considering the effects of pH, degree of polymer functionality, charge of the polymer backbone and polymer concentration on dynamic theological properties---was performed. These gels demonstrate diverse mechanical properties, due to adjustments in the binding equilibrium of the pH-sensitive crosslinks, and thus have the potential to perform in a range of dynamic or bioresponsive applications. Second, irreversible catalyst-free "click" chemistry was employed in the hydrogelation of multivalent azide

  17. [Properties of Hydrogel and Its Applications in Biomedicine].

    PubMed

    Ge, Li; Liu, Liwei; Jiang, Lina; Song, Wengang

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogel is a creative polymeric biomaterial which can resemble extracellular matrix (ECM) in vitro. Hydrogel is also a material with intrinsic bioinert, but it can offer mechanical support and developmental guide for cell growth and new tissue organization by designing physicochemical and biological properties of hydrogels precisely. This review mainly introduces design of hydrogels, properties and applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, drug delivery, stem cell culture and cell therapy.

  18. Synthesis and degradation test of hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Sei Kwang; Park, Jung Kyu; Tomimatsu, Takashi; Shimoboji, Tsuyoshi

    2007-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels prepared with three different crosslinking reagents were assessed by in vitro and in vivo degradation tests for various tissue engineering applications. Adipic acid dihydrazide grafted HA (HA-ADH) was synthesized and used for the preparation of methacrylated HA (HA-MA) with methacrylic anhydride and thiolated HA (HA-SH) with Traut's reagent (imminothiolane). (1)H NMR analysis showed that the degrees of HA-ADH, HA-MA, and HA-SH modification were 69, 29, and 56 mol%, respectively. HA-ADH hydrogel was prepared by the crosslinking with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS(3)), HA-MA hydrogel with dithiothreitol (DTT) by Michael addition, and HA-SH hydrogel with sodium tetrathionate by disulfide bond formation. According to in vitro degradation tests, HA-SH hydrogel was degraded very fast, compared to HA-ADH and HA-MA hydrogels. HA-ADH hydrogel was degraded slightly faster than HA-MA hydrogel. Based on these results, HA-MA hydrogels and HA-SH hydrogels were implanted in the back of SD rats and their degradation was assessed according to the pre-determined time schedule. As expected from the in vitro degradation test results, HA-SH hydrogel was in vivo degraded completely only in 2 weeks, whereas HA-MA hydrogels were degraded only partially even in 29 days. The degradation rate of HA hydrogels were thought to be controlled by changing the crosslinking reagents and the functional group of HA derivatives. In addition, the state of HA hydrogel was another factor in controlling the degradation rate. Dried HA hydrogel at 37 degrees C for a day resulted in relatively slow degradation compared to the bulk HA hydrogel. There was no adverse effect during the in vivo tests. PMID:17101173

  19. Rapid self-integrating, injectable hydrogel for tissue complex regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sen; Wang, Xuefei; Park, Sean; Jin, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    A novel rapid self-integrating, injectable, and bio-erodible hydrogel is developed for tissue complex regeneration. The figure shows the self-integration of the hydrogel pieces to form various structures. In the figure, some hydrogel disks were dyed pink with rodamine and the others were left with the original light yellow color to visualize the interfaces (scale bar=5mm). This hydrogel is demonstrated to engineer cartilage-bone complex. PMID:25946414

  20. Controlled Transdermal Iontophoresis by Polypyrrole/Poly(Acrylic Acid) Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chansai, Phithupha; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2008-03-01

    Transdermal drug delivery system delivers a drug into a body at desired site and rate. The conductive polymer-hydrogel blend between polypyrrole (PPy) doped with anionic drug and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were developed as a matrix/carrier of drug for the transdermal drug delivery in which the characteristic releases depend on the electrical field applied. The PAA films and their blend films were prepared by solution casting using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as a crosslinking agent. A mechanical blending of PPy particles and PAA matrix was then carried out. Drug diffusions in the blended PPy/PAA hydrogel and the non-blended one were investigated and determined by using a modified Franz-diffusion cell with an acetate buffer, pH 5.5, at 37 0C, for a period of 48 hours to determine the effects of crosslinking ratio and electric field strength. Amounts of the released drug were measured by UV-Visible spectrophotometry. The diffusion coefficient of drug was determined through the Higuchi equation via different conditions, with and without an electric field. Moreover, thermal properties and electrical conductivity of the polypyrrole and drug-loaded polypyrrole were investigated by means of the thermogravimetric analysis and by using a two-point probe meter, respectively.

  1. 4D Printing with Mechanically Robust, Thermally Actuating Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2015-06-01

    A smart valve is created by 4D printing of hydrogels that are both mechanically robust and thermally actuating. The printed hydrogels are made up of an interpenetrating network of alginate and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). 4D structures are created by printing the "dynamic" hydrogel ink alongside other static materials. PMID:25864515

  2. Hydrogels for ocular drug delivery and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Marzieh; Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Omidi, Yadollah

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels, as crosslinked polymeric three dimensional networks, possess unique structure and behavior in response to the internal and/or external stimuli. As a result, they offer great prospective applications in drug delivery, cell therapy and human tissue engineering. Here, we highlight the potential of hydrogels in prolonged intraocular drug delivery and ocular surface therapy using stem cells incorporated hydrogels. PMID:26929918

  3. 4D Printing with Mechanically Robust, Thermally Actuating Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2015-06-01

    A smart valve is created by 4D printing of hydrogels that are both mechanically robust and thermally actuating. The printed hydrogels are made up of an interpenetrating network of alginate and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). 4D structures are created by printing the "dynamic" hydrogel ink alongside other static materials.

  4. Molecular dynamic simulations of the water absorbency of hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ou, Xiang; Han, Qiang; Dai, Hui-Hui; Wang, Jiong

    2015-09-01

    A polymer gel can imbibe solvent molecules through surface tension effect. When the solvent happens to be water, the gel can swell to a large extent and forms an aggregate called hydrogel. The large deformation caused by such swelling makes it difficult to study the behaviors of hydrogels. Currently, few molecular dynamic simulation works have been reported on the water absorbing mechanism of hydrogels. In this paper, we first use molecular dynamic simulation to study the water absorbing mechanism of hydrogels and propose a hydrogel-water interface model to study the water absorbency of the hydrogel surface. Also, the saturated water content and volume expansion rate of the hydrogel are investigated by building a hydrogel model with different cross-linking degree and by comparing the water absorption curves under different temperatures. The sample hydrogel model used consists of Polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE) as epoxy and the Jeffamine, poly-oxy-alkylene-amines, as curing agent. The conclusions obtained are useful for further investigation on PEGDGE/Jeffamine hydrogel. Moreover, the simulation methods, including hydrogel-water interface modeling, we first propose are also suitable to study the water absorbing mechanism of other hydrogels. PMID:26271733

  5. Crystalline colloidal array hydrogel materials: From synthesis to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei

    This dissertation is focused on the synthesis, characterization, and applications of crystalline colloidal array (CCA) hydrogel materials. CCA are three dimensional periodic structures formed by the electrostatic self-assembly of monodisperse macroionic colloidal spheres in an aqueous medium. CCA dispersions efficiently Bragg diffract light in the near UV to near IR spectral region, and are useful in areas of optical device fabrication, chemical sensing devices, and novel separation materials. We developed methodologies to synthesize monodisperse colloidal silica spheres via hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxysilane in nonionic reverse microemulsion systems. We examined the effects of reaction parameters and surfactant hydrophilic-lipophilic-balance (HLB) number on the final particle size and size distribution. We developed a unique multi-step growth technique by which the final particle diameter can be continuously selected with extremely narrow size distributions over a broad size range. We also developed methodologies to surface functionalize silica spheres to increase the particle surface charge density by two orders of magnitude. The resulting dispersions readily self-assemble into CCA and Bragg diffract light over a broad concentration range. In addition, we discovered an anomalously intense secondary diffraction phenomenon from CCA which occurs due to the superimposed Bragg diffraction from numerous lattice planes. This was quantitatively modeled by using dynamical diffraction and light scattering theory. We extended the microemulsion synthesis methodologies to fabricate monodisperse SiOsb2/CdS composite spheres with well-controlled and complex morphologies. By controlling the co-precipitation process, CdS could be incorporated into silica spheres as quantum dots, as large inclusions, as surface patches and welds, or as shells or cores. Further processing of these materials by selectively etching out CdS templates also generated a series of porous

  6. Alginate hydrogel protects encapsulated hepatic HuH-7 cells against hepatitis C virus and other viral infections.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nhu-Mai; Dufresne, Murielle; Helle, François; Hoffmann, Thomas Walter; François, Catherine; Brochot, Etienne; Paullier, Patrick; Legallais, Cécile; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation in alginate hydrogel has shown interesting applications in regenerative medicine and the biomedical field through implantation of encapsulated tissue or for bioartificial organ development. Although alginate solution is known to have low antiviral activity, the same property regarding alginate gel has not yet been studied. The aim of this work is to investigate the potential protective effect of alginate encapsulation against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection for a hepatic cell line (HuH-7) normally permissive to the virus. Our results showed that alginate hydrogel protects HuH-7 cells against HCV when the supernatant was loaded with HCV. In addition, alginate hydrogel blocked HCV particle release out of the beads when the HuH-7 cells were previously infected and encapsulated. There was evidence of interaction between the molecules of alginate hydrogel and HCV, which was dose- and incubation time-dependent. The protective efficiency of alginate hydrogel towards HCV infection was confirmed against a variety of viruses, whether or not they were enveloped. This promising interaction between an alginate matrix and viruses, whose chemical mechanisms are discussed, is of great interest for further medical therapeutic applications based on tissue engineering.

  7. Inverse opals of molecularly imprinted hydrogels for the detection of bisphenol A and pH sensing.

    PubMed

    Griffete, Nébéwia; Frederich, Hugo; Maître, Agnès; Ravaine, Serge; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Mangeney, Claire

    2012-01-10

    Inverse opal films of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) were elaborated using the colloidal crystal template method. The colloidal crystals of silica particles were built by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, allowing a perfect control of the film thickness. Polymerization in the interspaces of the colloidal crystal in the presence of bisphenol A (BPA) and removal of the used template provides 3D-ordered macroporous methacrylic acid-based hydrogel films in which nanocavities derived from bisphenol A are distributed within the thin walls of the inverse opal hydrogel. The equilibrium swelling properties of the nonimprinted (NIPs) and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were studied as a function of pH and bisphenol A concentration, while the molecular structures of the bulk hydrogels were analyzed using a cross-linked network structure theory. This study showed an increase in nanopore (mesh) size in the MIPs after BPA extraction as compared to NIPs, in agreement with the presence of nanocavities left by the molecular imprints of the template molecule. The resulting inverse opals were found to display large responses to external stimuli (pH or BPA) with Bragg diffraction peak shifts depending upon the hydrogel film thickness. The film thickness was therefore shown to be a critical parameter for improving the sensing capacities of inverse opal hydrogel films deposited on a substrate. PMID:22088132

  8. Design of Thermally Responsive Polymeric Hydrogels for Brackish Water Desalination: Effect of Architecture on Swelling, Deswelling, and Salt Rejection.

    PubMed

    Ali, Wael; Gebert, Beate; Hennecke, Tobias; Graf, Karlheinz; Ulbricht, Mathias; Gutmann, Jochen S

    2015-07-29

    In this work, we explore the ability of utilizing hydrogels synthesized from a temperature-sensitive polymer and a polyelectrolyte to desalinate salt water by means of reversible thermally induced absorption and desorption. Thus, the influence of the macromolecular architecture on the swelling/deswelling behavior for such hydrogels was investigated by tailor-made network structures. To this end, a series of chemically cross-linked polymeric hydrogels were synthesized via free radical-initiated copolymerization of sodium acrylate (SA) with the thermoresponsive comonomer N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) by realizing different structural types. In particular, two different polyNIPAAm macromonomers, either with one acrylate function at the chain end or with additional acrylate functions as side groups were synthesized by controlled polymerization and subsequent polymer-analogous reaction and then used as building blocks. The rheological behaviors of hydrogels and their estimated mesh sizes are discussed. The performance of the hydrogels in terms of swelling and deswelling in both deionized water (DI) and brackish water (2 g/L NaCl) was measured as a function of cross-linking degree and particle size. The salt content could be reduced by 23% in one cycle by using the best performing material.

  9. Intra-articular fate of degradable poly(ethyleneglycol)-hydrogel microspheres as carriers for sustained drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bédouet, Laurent; Pascale, Florentina; Moine, Laurence; Wassef, Michel; Ghegediban, Saïda H; Nguyen, Van-Nga; Bonneau, Michel; Labarre, Denis; Laurent, Alexandre

    2013-11-18

    A novel degradable microsphere (MS) for intra-articular drug delivery, composed of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) core containing degradable regions made of short poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) sequences - named PEG-hydrogel MS - was injected into the cavity of sheep shoulder joint, and compared to non-degradable MS devoid of hydrolysable crosslinker in terms of location, degradation and inflammation. One week after intra-articular injection both groups of MS were localized beneath the synovial lining of the synovial fringes located at bottom of the shoulder joint, while a fraction of particles remained in synovial fluid. Histological analyses made one and 4 weeks after intra-articular injection showed cell proliferation around the non-degradable MS entrapped within the synovium. By contrast, degradable PEG-hydrogel MS were surrounded by few cells. The degradation of degradable PEG-hydrogel MS within the synovium was slow and was not fully complete after four weeks. Our findings indicate that the tissue entrapment of MS below the synovial lining was independent of the material degradability, while degradable PEG-hydrogel MS are less inflammatory than the non-degradable one. Degradable PEG-hydrogel MS offer several advantages over the non-degradable MS as carriers for a sustained drug delivery in synovial tissue according to the low intensity of inflammatory reaction triggered in synovium.

  10. Alginate Hydrogel Protects Encapsulated Hepatic HuH-7 Cells against Hepatitis C Virus and Other Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nhu-Mai; Dufresne, Murielle; Helle, François; Hoffmann, Thomas Walter; François, Catherine; Brochot, Etienne; Paullier, Patrick; Legallais, Cécile; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation in alginate hydrogel has shown interesting applications in regenerative medicine and the biomedical field through implantation of encapsulated tissue or for bioartificial organ development. Although alginate solution is known to have low antiviral activity, the same property regarding alginate gel has not yet been studied. The aim of this work is to investigate the potential protective effect of alginate encapsulation against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection for a hepatic cell line (HuH-7) normally permissive to the virus. Our results showed that alginate hydrogel protects HuH-7 cells against HCV when the supernatant was loaded with HCV. In addition, alginate hydrogel blocked HCV particle release out of the beads when the HuH-7 cells were previously infected and encapsulated. There was evidence of interaction between the molecules of alginate hydrogel and HCV, which was dose- and incubation time-dependent. The protective efficiency of alginate hydrogel towards HCV infection was confirmed against a variety of viruses, whether or not they were enveloped. This promising interaction between an alginate matrix and viruses, whose chemical mechanisms are discussed, is of great interest for further medical therapeutic applications based on tissue engineering. PMID:25310111

  11. Inverse opals of molecularly imprinted hydrogels for the detection of bisphenol A and pH sensing.

    PubMed

    Griffete, Nébéwia; Frederich, Hugo; Maître, Agnès; Ravaine, Serge; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Mangeney, Claire

    2012-01-10

    Inverse opal films of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) were elaborated using the colloidal crystal template method. The colloidal crystals of silica particles were built by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, allowing a perfect control of the film thickness. Polymerization in the interspaces of the colloidal crystal in the presence of bisphenol A (BPA) and removal of the used template provides 3D-ordered macroporous methacrylic acid-based hydrogel films in which nanocavities derived from bisphenol A are distributed within the thin walls of the inverse opal hydrogel. The equilibrium swelling properties of the nonimprinted (NIPs) and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were studied as a function of pH and bisphenol A concentration, while the molecular structures of the bulk hydrogels were analyzed using a cross-linked network structure theory. This study showed an increase in nanopore (mesh) size in the MIPs after BPA extraction as compared to NIPs, in agreement with the presence of nanocavities left by the molecular imprints of the template molecule. The resulting inverse opals were found to display large responses to external stimuli (pH or BPA) with Bragg diffraction peak shifts depending upon the hydrogel film thickness. The film thickness was therefore shown to be a critical parameter for improving the sensing capacities of inverse opal hydrogel films deposited on a substrate.

  12. The synthesis of hydrogels with controlled distribution of polymer brushes in hydrogel network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, YuWei; Zhou, Chao; Zhang, AoKai; Xu, LiQun; Yao, Fang; Cen, Lian; Fu, Guo-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels with 3-dimensionally controlled well-defined poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm)) brushes were prepared by combined copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition ("Click Chemistry") and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The resulting hydrogels were presented as representatives with their detailed synthesis routes and characterization. HPEG-S-poly(NIPAAm) is a hydrogel with poly(NIPAAm) brushes mainly grafted on surface, whereas HPEG-G-poly(NIPAAm) has a gradiently decreased poly(NIPAAm) brushes in their chain length from surface to inside. On the other hand, poly(NIPAAm) brushes in HPEG-U-poly(NIPAAm) are uniformly dispersed throughout the whole hydrogel network. Successful preparation of HPEG-S-poly(NIPAAm), HPEG-G-poly(NIPAAm) and HPEG-U-poly(NIPAAm) were ascertained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurement. Optical properties and thermal behaviors of these hydrogels were evaluated by UV-visible transmittance spectra and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Hence, the flexibility and controllability of the synthetic strategy in varying the distribution of polymer brushes and hydrogel properties was demonstrated. Hydrogels with tunable and well-defined 3-dimensional poly(NIPAAm) polymer brushes could be tailor-designed to find potential applications in smart devices or skin dressing, such as for diabetics as they have special optical and thermal behaviors.

  13. Hydrophilic Organic Electrodes on Flexible Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Moser, Thierry; Celma, Coralie; Lebert, Audrey; Charrault, Eric; Brooke, Robert; Murphy, Peter J; Browne, Gareth; Young, Richard; Higgs, Timothy; Evans, Drew

    2016-01-13

    Prompted by the rapidly developing field of wearable electronics, research into biocompatible substrates and coatings is intensifying. Acrylate-based hydrogel polymers have gained widespread use as biocompatible articles in applications such as contact and intraocular lenses. Surface treatments and/or coatings present one strategy to further enhance the performance of these hydrogels or even realize novel functionality. In this study, the conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is deposited from the vapor phase onto hydrated hydrogel substrates and blended with biocompatibilizing coconstituents incorporating polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) moieties. Plasma pretreatment of the dehydrated hydrogel substrate modifies its surface topography and chemical composition to facilitate the attachment of conductive PEDOT-based surface layers. Manipulating the vapor phase polymerization process and constituent composition, the PEDOT-based coating is engineered to be both hydrophilic (i.e. to promote biocompatibility) and highly conductive. The fabrication of this conductively coated hydrogel has implications for the future of wearable electronic devices.

  14. Robust fluidic connections to freestanding microfluidic hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Bradly B.; Larsen, Taylor S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds approaching physiological scale, whose size and large cellular load far exceed the limits of diffusion, require incorporation of a fluidic means to achieve adequate nutrient/metabolite exchange. This need has driven the extension of microfluidic technologies into the area of biomaterials. While construction of perfusable scaffolds is essentially a problem of microfluidic device fabrication, functional implementation of free-standing, thick-tissue constructs depends upon successful integration of external pumping mechanisms through optimized connective assemblies. However, a critical analysis to identify optimal materials/assembly components for hydrogel substrates has received little focus to date. This investigation addresses this issue directly by evaluating the efficacy of a range of adhesive and mechanical fluidic connection methods to gelatin hydrogel constructs based upon both mechanical property analysis and cell compatibility. Results identify a novel bioadhesive, comprised of two enzymatically modified gelatin compounds, for connecting tubing to hydrogel constructs that is both structurally robust and non-cytotoxic. Furthermore, outcomes from this study provide clear evidence that fluidic interconnect success varies with substrate composition (specifically hydrogel versus polydimethylsiloxane), highlighting not only the importance of selecting the appropriately tailored components for fluidic hydrogel systems but also that of encouraging ongoing, targeted exploration of this issue. The optimization of such interconnect systems will ultimately promote exciting scientific and therapeutic developments provided by microfluidic, cell-laden scaffolds. PMID:26045731

  15. Hydrogels for combination delivery of antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Bouhadir, K H; Alsberg, E; Mooney, D J

    2001-10-01

    The systemic delivery of anticancer agents has been widely investigated during the past decade but localized delivery may offer a safer and more effective delivery approach. We have designed and synthesized a novel hydrogel to locally deliver antineoplastic agents, and demonstrate the different types of release that can be achieved from these hydrogels using three model drugs: methotrexate, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone. Alginate was chemically modified into low molecular weight oligomers and cross-linked with a biodegradable spacer (adipic dihydrazide) to form biodegradable hydrogels. The model antineoplastic agents were loaded into the hydrogel via three different mechanisms. Methotrexate was incorporated within the pores of the hydrogel and was released by diffusion into the surrounding medium. Doxorubicin was covalently attached to the polymer backbone via a hydrolytically labile linker and was released following the chemical hydrolysis of the linker. Mitoxantrone was ionically complexed to the polymer and was released after the dissociation of this complex. These three release mechanisms could potentially be used to deliver a wide selection of antineoplastic agents, based on their chemical structure. This novel delivery system allows for the release of single or combinations of antineoplastic agents, and may find utility in localized antineoplastic agent delivery. PMID:11519782

  16. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-01

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials.Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02324f

  17. Nucleus pulposus cells synthesize a functional extracellular matrix and respond to inflammatory cytokine challenge following long term agarose culture

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lachlan J.; Chiaro, Joseph A.; Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Cortes, Daniel H.; Horava, Sarena D.; Hebela, Nader M.; Mauck, Robert L.; Dodge, George R.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is characterized by a cascade of cellular, biochemical and structural changes that may lead to functional impairment and low back pain. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is strongly implicated in the etiology of disc degeneration, however there is currently no direct evidence linking IL-1β upregulation to downstream biomechanical changes. The objective of this study was to evaluate long-term agarose culture of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells as a potential in-vitro model system to investigate this. Bovine NP cells were cultured in agarose for 49 days in a defined medium containing transforming growth factor-beta 3, after which both mechanical properties and composition were evaluated and compared to native NP. The mRNA levels of NP cell markers were compared to those of freshly isolated NP cells. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, aggregate modulus and hydraulic permeability of mature constructs were similar to native NP, and aggrecan and SOX9 mRNA levels were not significantly different from freshly isolated cells. To investigate direct links between IL-1β and biomechanical changes, mature agarose constructs were treated with IL-1β, and effects on biomechanical properties, extracellular matrix composition and mRNA levels were quantified. IL-1β treatment resulted in upregulation of ADAMTS4, MMP13 and INOS, decreased GAG and modulus, and increased permeability. To evaluate the model as a test platform for therapeutic intervention, co-treatment with IL-1β and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) was evaluated. IL-1ra significantly attenuated degradative changes induced by IL-1β. These results suggest that this in vitro model represents a reliable and cost-effective platform for evaluating new therapies for disc degeneration. PMID:22102324

  18. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel microstructures encapsulating living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, Won-Gun; Revzin, Alexander; Pishko, Michael V.

    2002-01-01

    We present an easy and effective method for the encapsulation of cells inside PEG-based hydrogel microstructures fabricated using photolithography. High-density arrays of three-dimensional microstructures were created on substrates using this method. Mammalian cells were encapsulated in cylindrical hydrogel microstructures of 600 and 50 micrometers in diameter or in cubic hydrogel structures in microfluidic channels. Reducing lateral dimension of the individual hydrogel microstructure to 50 micrometers allowed us to isolate 1-3 cells per microstructure. Viability assays demonstrated that cells remained viable inside these hydrogels after encapsulation for up to 7 days.

  19. Retention and release of oil-in-water emulsions from filled hydrogel beads composed of calcium alginate: impact of emulsifier type and pH.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Saberi, Amir Hossein; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, David Julian

    2015-03-21

    Delivery systems based on filled hydrogel particles (microgels) can be fabricated from natural food-grade lipids and biopolymers. The potential for controlling release characteristics by modulating the electrostatic interactions between emulsifier-coated lipid droplets and the biopolymer matrix within hydrogel particles was investigated. A multistage procedure was used to fabricate calcium alginate beads filled with lipid droplets stabilized by non-ionic, cationic, anionic, or zwitterionic emulsifiers. Oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by Tween 60, DTAB, SDS, or whey protein were prepared by microfluidization, mixed with various alginate solutions, and then microgels were formed by simple extrusion into calcium solutions. The microgels were placed into a series of buffer solutions with different pH values (2 to 11). Lipid droplets remained encapsulated under acidic and neutral conditions, but were released under highly basic conditions (pH 11) due to hydrogel swelling when the alginate concentration was sufficiently high. Lipid droplet release increased with decreasing alginate concentration, which could be attributed to an increase in the pore size of the hydrogel matrix. These results have important implications for the design of delivery systems to entrap and control the release of lipophilic bioactive components within filled hydrogel particles. PMID:25646949

  20. Visualizing single rod-shaped fission yeast vertically in micro-sized holes on agarose pad made by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Tran, Phong T

    2014-01-01

    Fission yeast cells are rod-shaped unicellular organism that is normally imaged horizontally with its long axis parallel to image plane. This orientation, while practical, limits the imaging resolution of biological structures which are oriented perpendicular to the long axis of the cell. We present here a method to prepare agarose pads with micro-sized holes to load single fission yeast cell vertically and image cell with its long axis perpendicular to the image plane. As a demonstration, actomyosin ring contraction is shown with this new imaging device.

  1. Structure-property relationships in self-assembling peptide hydrogels, homopolypeptides and polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hule, Rohan A.

    the fractal dimensions at the network and the individual fibril lengthscales are substantiated in the real space by cryo-TEM. Additionally, a study of the gel microstructure by USANS indicates well-defined microporosity, an important characteristic for cellular substrate applications. Preliminary cell viability and anchorage studies at varying hydrogel stiffness confirm cell adhesion at early stages of cell culture within the window of stiffness investigated. The universal applicability of the fractal model to hydrogel networks is demonstrated by doubly crosslinked hyaluronic acid based gels consisting of highly crosslinked hydrogel particles embedded in and covalently bonded to a loosely connected secondary network. An increase in the high q mass fractal dimension of the secondary network compared to gels with no particles is ascribed to the increase in the density of network due to addition of the crosslinked hydrogel particles. A morphological investigation of peptide amphiphiles discloses the delicate balance of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids in these molecules leading to multiple, distinct nanostructures. Direct repercussions of the nanostructure on fibrillar aggregation, orientation, network and nematic behavior is seen. Finally, the dependence of molecular weight of a high molecular weight homopolypeptide, poly(L-lysine) on its secondary conformation in polypeptide-clay nanocomposites has been explored. The matrix polypeptide is found to fold into beta-sheets when cast as films irrespective of the initial secondary structure in solution, a tendency that is attributed to film casting conditions and high molecular weight.

  2. Modeling the rapid de-swelling of toroidal hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Chang, Ya-Wen; Alexeev, Alexander; Fernandez de Las Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The utilization of synthetic hydrogel networks as 3-D cell culture platforms has allowed researchers to more effectively study how epigenetic factors affect cell growth and physiology. As a whole, this has emphasized the biomechanical role of scaffold structures and led to a number of advances in tissue engineering. Our current research focuses on modeling temperature activated shape transformations of toroidal poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) pNIPAM gels. We use dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to simulate the steady (slow heating rates) and unsteady (fast heating rates) de-swelling behavior of these thermo-sensitive gels. Our simulations show that for slow heating rates the aspect ratio of the tori remains constant during de-swelling. For rapid heating rates we observe buckling instabilities. Our simulations agree with the experimental observations. Financial support by NSF CAREER Award DMR-1255288 is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Assembly of Microscale Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Wu, Chung-an Max; Rengarajan, Venkatakrishnan; Finley, Thomas Dylan; Keles, Hasan Onur; Sung, Yuree; Li, Baoqiang; Gurkan, Umut Atakan

    2012-01-01

    Directed assembly of nano and microscale particles is of great interest and has widespread applications in various fields including electronics, nanomaterials and tissue engineering. Bottom-up tissue engineering is motivated by the occurrence of repeating functional units in vivo. The bottom-up approach requires novel techniques to assemble engineered functional units as building blocks at a high speed with spatial control over three-dimensional (3D) micro-architecture. Here, we report a magnetic assembler that utilizes nanoparticles and microscale hydrogels as building blocks to create 3D complex multi-layer constructs via external magnetic fields using different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles. This approach holds potential for 3D assembly processes that could be utilized in various tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:21830240

  4. Biofunctionalized magnetic hydrogel nanospheres of magnetite and κ-carrageenan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel-da-Silva, Ana L.; Fateixa, Sara; Guiomar, António J.; Costa, Benilde F. O.; Silva, Nuno J. O.; Trindade, Tito; Goodfellow, Brian J.; Gil, Ana M.

    2009-09-01

    Magnetic hydrogel κ-carrageenan nanospheres were successfully prepared via water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions combined with thermally induced gelation of the polysaccharide. The size of the nanospheres (an average diameter (∅) of about 50 and 75 nm) was modulated by varying the concentration of surfactant. The nanospheres contained superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (∅8 nm), previously prepared by co-precipitation within the biopolymer. Carboxyl groups, at a concentration of about 4 mmol g-1, were successfully grafted at the surface of these magnetic nanospheres via carboxymethylation of the κ-carrageenan. The carboxylated nanospheres were shown to be thermo-sensitive in the 37-45 °C temperature range, indicating their potential as thermally controlled delivery systems for drugs and/or magnetic particles at physiological temperatures. Finally, preliminary results have been obtained for IgG antibody conjugation of the carboxylated nanospheres and the potential of these systems for bio-applications is discussed.

  5. Separation of Ionic Solutes Using Nanoparticle-Crosslinked Polymer Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Peter; Cipriano, Bani; Raghavan, Srinivasa

    2007-03-01

    Polymer hydrogels are usually made by crosslinking a monomer such as N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) with a multifunctional crosslinker. Recently, gels have been shown to be formed even in the absence of monomer by using clay nanoparticles as crosslinkers. These particle-crosslinked gels tend to have larger pore sizes and higher gel strengths compared to conventional NIPAAm gels. In this talk, we will show that particle-crosslinked gels are also suited for use as separation matrices. In particular, we will describe the extraordinary ability of these gels to soak up a cationic solute from a solution. We speculate that cationic molecules can be adsorbed on the anionic surface of the clay platelets inside the gel, akin to a process of ion exchange. An additional unique property of these gels is that they can be disassembled in the presence of organic solvents -- due to the non-covalent interaction between polymer and particles (there is no counterpart for this behavior in conventional covalently-linked gels). By exploiting this property, cationic solutes adsorbed on the particles within our gel can be released and recovered.

  6. MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells Form Differentiated Microtissues in Scaffold-Free Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Vantangoli, Marguerite M.; Madnick, Samantha J.; Huse, Susan M.; Weston, Paula; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures are increasing in use because of their ability to represent in vivo human physiology when compared to monolayer two-dimensional (2D) cultures. When grown in 3D using scaffold-free agarose hydrogels, MCF-7 human breast cancer cells self-organize to form directionally-oriented microtissues that contain a luminal space, reminiscent of the in vivo structure of the mammary gland. When compared to MCF-7 cells cultured in 2D monolayer culture, MCF-7 microtissues exhibit increased mRNA expression of luminal epithelial markers keratin 8 and keratin 19 and decreased expression of basal marker keratin 14 and the mesenchymal marker vimentin. These 3D MCF-7 microtissues remain responsive to estrogens, as demonstrated by induction of known estrogen target mRNAs following exposure to 17β-estradiol. Culture of MCF-7 cells in scaffold-free conditions allows for the formation of more differentiated, estrogen-responsive structures that are a more relevant system for evaluation of estrogenic compounds than traditional 2D models. PMID:26267486

  7. Directed, strong, and reversible immobilization of proteins tagged with a β-trefoil lectin domain: a simple method to immobilize biomolecules on plain agarose matrixes.

    PubMed

    López-Gallego, Fernando; Acebrón, Ivan; Mancheño, Jose Miguel; Raja, Sebastian; Lillo, M Pilar; Guisán Seijas, Jose Manuel

    2012-03-21

    A highly stable lipase from Geobacillus thermocatenolatus (BTL2) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein from Aquorea victoria (EGFP) were recombinantly produced N-terminally tagged to the lectin domain of the hemolytic pore-forming toxin LSLa from the mushroom Laetiporus sulphureus . Such a domain (LSL(150)), recently described as a novel fusion tag, is based on a β-trefoil scaffold with two operative binding sites for galactose or galactose-containing derivatives. The fusion proteins herein analyzed have enabled us to characterize the binding mode of LSL(150) to polymeric and solid substrates such as agarose beads. The lectin-fusion proteins are able to be quantitatively bound to both cross-linked and non-cross-linked agarose matrixes in a very rapid manner, resulting in a surprisingly dynamic protein distribution inside the porous beads that evolves from heterogeneous to homogeneous along the postimmobilization time. Such dynamic distribution can be related to the reversible nature of the LSL(150)-agarose interaction. Furthermore, this latter interaction is temperature dependent since it is 4-fold stronger when the immobilization takes place at 25 °C than when it does at 4 °C. The strongest lectin-agarose interaction is also quite stable under a survey of different conditions such as high temperatures (up to 60 °C) or high organic solvent concentrations (up to 60% of acetonitrile). Notably, the use of cross-linked agarose would endow the system with more robustness due to its better mechanical properties compared to the noncross-linked one. The stability of the LSL(150)-agarose interaction would prevent protein leaching during the operation process unless high pH media are used. In summary, we believe that the LSL(150) lectin domain exhibits interesting structural features as an immobilization domain that makes it suitable to reversibly immobilize industrially relevant enzymes in very simple carriers as agarose.

  8. Hydrogel microparticles from lithographic processes: novel materials for fundamental and applied colloid science

    PubMed Central

    Helgeson, Matthew E.; Chapin, Stephen C.; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been a surge in methods to synthesize geometrically and chemically complex microparticles. Analogous to atoms, the concept of a “periodic table” of particles has emerged and continues to be expanded upon. Complementing the natural intellectual curiosity that drives the creation of increasingly intricate particles is the pull from applications that take advantage of such high-value materials. Complex particles are now being used in fields ranging from diagnostics and catalysis to self-assembly and rheology, where material composition and microstructure are closely linked with particle function. This is especially true of polymer hydrogels, which offer an attractive and broad class of base materials for synthesis. Lithography affords the ability to engineer particle properties a priori and leads to the production of homogenous ensembles of particles. This review summarizes recent advances in synthesizing hydrogel microparticles using lithographic processes and highlight a number of emerging applications. We discuss advantages and limitations of current strategies, and conclude with an outlook on future trends in the field. PMID:21516212

  9. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-28

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials.

  10. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-28

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials. PMID:26035621

  11. Self-Activated Healable Hydrogels with Reversible Temperature Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ruixue; Wang, Xuemeng; Li, Xu; An, Heng; Qin, Jianglei

    2016-09-28

    The self-healable polymer hydrogel along with reversible temperature responsiveness was prepared through self-catalyzed dynamic acylhydrazone formation and exchange without any additional stimulus or catalyst. The hydrogel was prepared from a copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide and acylhydrazine P(NIPAM-co-AH) cross-linked by PEO dialdehyde. Besides self-healed under catalysis of acid and aniline, the hydrogel can also self-heal activated by excess of acylhydrazine groups. Without interference of catalyst during the hydrogel formation and self-healing, this kind of hydrogel prepared from biocompatible polymers can be used in more areas including biotechnology and be more persistent. The hydrogel with a large part of the PNIPAM segment also showed temperature responsiveness around body temperature influenced by the variation in group ratio. This self-healable hydrogel has great potential application in areas related to bioscience and biotechnology. PMID:27589014

  12. Reduction of postsurgical adhesion formation with hydrogels synthesized by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Young-Chang; Lee, Joon-Ho

    2005-07-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels based on carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and polyethyleneglycol (PEG) were prepared as physical barriers for preventing surgical adhesions. These interpolymeric hydrogels were synthesized by gamma irradiation crosslinking technique. A 1.5 cm × 1.5 cm of cecal serosa and an adjacent abdominal wall were abraded with bone burr until the serosal surface was disrupted and hemorrhagic but not perforated. The denuded cecum was covered with either CMC/PEG hydrogels or a solution from a CMC/PEG hydrogel. Control rat serosa was not covered. Two weeks later, the rats were sacrificed and the adhesion was scored on a 0-5 scale. Control rat showed a significantly higher incidence of adhesions than either the CMC/PEG hydrogels or a solution from the CMC/PEG hydrogel. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that CMC/PEG hydrogels have a function of the prevention for an intra abdominal adhesion in a rat model.

  13. Hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering: Progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2013-01-01

    Designing of biologically active scaffolds with optimal characteristics is one of the key factors for successful tissue engineering. Recently, hydrogels have received a considerable interest as leading candidates for engineered tissue scaffolds due to their unique compositional and structural similarities to the natural extracellular matrix, in addition to their desirable framework for cellular proliferation and survival. More recently, the ability to control the shape, porosity, surface morphology, and size of hydrogel scaffolds has created new opportunities to overcome various challenges in tissue engineering such as vascularization, tissue architecture and simultaneous seeding of multiple cells. This review provides an overview of the different types of hydrogels, the approaches that can be used to fabricate hydrogel matrices with specific features and the recent applications of hydrogels in tissue engineering. Special attention was given to the various design considerations for an efficient hydrogel scaffold in tissue engineering. Also, the challenges associated with the use of hydrogel scaffolds were described. PMID:24689032

  14. pH-Sensitive