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Sample records for agathosma crenulata dodonaea

  1. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF DODONAEA VISCOSE

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, N.; Venkatesh, Sama; Suresh, B.

    1998-01-01

    Dodonaea viscose, Linn is a widely grown plant of Nilgiris district of Tamil and is commonly used by the tribals of Nilgiris as a traditional medicine for done fracture and joint sprains. Since it is generally believed tat fractures are accompanied by either some degree of injury or inflammations, it was felt desirable to carry our anti inflammatory activity of Dodonaea viscose. Anti-inflammatory activity of the plant was carried out by carrageenin induced paw edema method in Wister albino rats. PMID:22556883

  2. ent-Labdane Diterpenoids from Dodonaea viscosa.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Wesley J; Kilah, Nathan L; Horne, James; Bissember, Alex C; Smith, Jason A

    2016-12-23

    Seven new and two known ent-labdane diterpenoids have been isolated from a single plant specimen of Dodonaea viscosa ssp. spatulata, found in Tasmania, Australia. Prior to this study, only seven different labdane diterpenoids had been isolated from D. viscosa. The structures of the natural products were assigned via 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and other standard spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of three ent-labdane diterpenoids was determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography of synthetic derivatives. Significantly, the results of this study suggest that the absolute configuration of some known labdane diterpenoids may have been misassigned.

  3. New Reports on Surface Flavonoids from Chamaebatiaria (Rosaceae), Dodonaea (Sapindaceae), Elsholtzia (Lamiaceae) and Silphium (Asteraceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipophilic exudates of one species each of Chamaebatiara and Elsholtzia, two species of Silphium and four Dodonaea species were analyzed for flavonoid aglycones. In addition to a number of well-known and widely distributed flavonoids, several very rare and one novel natural flavonol were isolated a...

  4. Rhodiola crenulata induces death and inhibits growth of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yifan; Roberts, Louis; Shetty, Kalidas; Schneider, Sallie Smith

    2008-09-01

    Diverse compounds from many different chemical classes are currently targeted in preclinical analyses for their ability to act as both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. Phenolic phytochemicals from Rhodiola crenulata has such potential. This Rhodiola species is a perennial plant that grows in the Tundra, Siberia, and high-elevation regions of Tibet. The phenolic secondary metabolites isolated from R. crenulata were recently analyzed in a preclinical setting for their ability to treat lymphosarcomas and superficial bladder cancers. However, the effects of R. crenulata have yet to be examined for its implications in breast cancer prevention or for its chemotherapeutic abilities. Therefore this study investigated the effects of R. crenulata on breast cancer both in vivo and in vitro. Experiments using aggressive human-derived MDA-MB-231 and mouse-derived V14 breast cancer cell lines demonstrated that phenolic-enriched R. crenulata extract was capable of inhibiting the proliferation, motility, and invasion of these cells. In addition, the extracts induced autophagic-like vesicles in all cell lines, eventually leading to death of the tumor cell lines but not the immortal or normal human mammary epithelial cells. Finally, an in vivo experiment showed that phenolic-enriched dietary R. crenulata is effective in preventing the initiation of tumors and slowing down the tumor growth in mice bearing tumor grafts, thereby further demonstrating its possible potential for treatment of breast cancer progression and metastasis.

  5. [Simultaneously preparation of grams of high purity tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside from Rhodiola crenulata].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Wang, Xue-jing; Li, Shi-ping; Zhang, Qiao; Zhao, Yi-wu; Huang Wen-zhe; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside are the main active constituents of Rhodiola crenulata, with extensive pharmacological activities. In the study, grams of high purity tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside were simultaneously separated from R. crenulata by the first time. Firstly, R. crenulata was extracted by 70% alcohol. Then, with the yields of three compounds as the index, the macroporous resin was optimized. At last, grams of high purity tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside were isolated by D-101 macroporousresin, purified by column chromatography. Detected by HPLC, the purity of three compounds were higher than 98%. This method has the advantages of simple process and operation, less dosage of organic solvent, highly yield and reproducibility, suitable for the simultaneously preparation of tyrosol, crenulatin and salidroside.

  6. Evaluation of Rhodiola crenulata and Rhodiola rosea for management of type II diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-In; Jang, Hae-Dong; Shetty, Kalidas

    2006-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated 2 species of the genus Rhodiola for the inhibition of alpha-amylase,alpha-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Water extracts of Rhodiola crenulata had the highest alpha-amylase inhibitory activity (IC50,98.1 microg total phenolic /ml) followed by ethanol extract of R.crenulata (IC50, 120.9 microg total phenolic/ml) and ethanol extract of R.rosea (IC50, 173.4 microg total phenolic /ml). Ethanol R.rosea (IC50, 44.7 microg total phenolic/ml), water extract of R.rosea (IC50, 52.3 microg total phenolic/ml), water extract of R.crenulata (IC50, 60.3 microg total phenolic /ml) and ethanol extract of R.crenulata (IC50, 60.2 microg total phenolic/ml) also showed significant alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity. The alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the extracts was compared to standard tyrosol, which was significantly detected in the extracts using HPLC. Tyrosol had strong alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50, 70.8 microg total phenolic/ml) but did not have any inhibitory effect on the alpha-amylase activity. Results suggested that alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities of both Rhodiola extracts correlated to the phenolic content, antioxidant activity and phenolic profile of the extracts. The ability of the above Rhodiola extracts to inhibit rabbit lung angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) was investigated. The ethanol extracts of R.rosea had the highest ACE inhibitory activity (38.5 %) followed by water extract of R.rosea (36.2 %) and R.crenulata (15.4 %).

  7. [Study on process and principle of lactose grinding modification to decrease hygroscopic of Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma extract].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Fang; Lin, Jun-Zhi; Han, Li; Wu, Zhen-Feng; Yang, Ying-Guang; Yang, Ming

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma extract,with high hygroscopic,was selected as research model, while lactose was selected as modifiers to study the effect of the grinding modification method on the hygroscopic. Subsequently, particle size distribution, scannin electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and surface properties were adopted for a phase analysis. The results showed that the modified extract, prepared by Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma extract grinding 5 min with the same amount of lactose UP2, which hygroscopic initial velocity, acceleration, and critical relative humidity moisture were less than that of Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma extract and the mixture dramatically. In addition, compared with the mixture, the size distribution of modified extract was much less, the microstructure was also difference, while the infrared spectroscopy and surface properties were similar with that of lactose. It is the main principle that lactose particle adhered to the surface of Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma extract after grinding mofication to decress the moisture obviously.

  8. Flavonoids from the leaves and stems of Dodonaea polyandra: a Northern Kaanju medicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Bradley S; Claudie, David J; Smith, Nick M; Gerber, Jacobus P; McKinnon, Ross A; Semple, Susan J

    2011-10-01

    Three prenylated flavonoids 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-3'(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-3-methoxy flavone, 5,7-dihydroxy-3'(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-3,4'-dimethoxy flavone and 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-3',5'(3-methylbuyt-2-enyl)-3-methoxy flavone together with three other known flavonoids were isolated from the medicinal plant Dodonaea polyandra. The plant is used in the traditional medicine system of Northern Kaanju people of Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, Australia. The extracts studied have previously been found to possess anti-inflammatory activity. Successive fractionation of leaf and stem extracts by column and high performance liquid chromatography led to the isolation of these compounds. Their structures were determined using a number of spectroscopic techniques including 1D and 2D NMR and high resolution mass spectroscopy. The structural elucidation is reported herein accompanied by full ¹H and ¹³C NMR spectroscopic data. Spectroscopic data of known compounds was in agreement with that previously reported in literature.

  9. Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia leaf: new source of polysaccharide and its anti-oxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Samavati, Vahid; Manoochehrizade, Amir

    2013-10-15

    Ultrasonic technology was applied for polysaccharide extraction from the leaves of Dodonaea viscosa and response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the effects of processing parameters on polysaccharide extraction yield. Three independent variables were extraction time (X1), extraction temperature (X2) and ultrasonic power (X3), respectively. The statistical analysis indicated the independent variables (X1, X2, X3), the quadratic terms (X11 and X33) and the interaction terms (X1X2, X1X3, X2X3) had significant effects on the yield of polysaccharides (P<0.05). The optimal extraction conditions of D. viscosa leaf were determined as follows: extraction time 50.54 min, extraction temperature 85 °C and ultrasonic power 400 W. Under these conditions, the experimental yield of polysaccharides was 9.455±0.24%, which was agreed closely with the predicted value (9.398%). The evaluation of anti-oxidant activity suggested that the polysaccharide exhibited significant protection against DPPH and hydroxyl radicals and could be explored as a nutraceutical agent.

  10. Rhodiola crenulata extract for prevention of acute mountain sickness: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhodiola crenulata (R. crenulata) is widely used to prevent acute mountain sickness in the Himalayan areas and in Tibet, but no scientific studies have previously examined its effectiveness. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study to investigate its efficacy in acute mountain sickness prevention. Methods Healthy adult volunteers were randomized to 2 treatment sequences, receiving either 800 mg R. crenulata extract or placebo daily for 7 days before ascent and 2 days during mountaineering, before crossing over to the alternate treatment after a 3-month wash-out period. Participants ascended rapidly from 250 m to 3421 m on two separate occasions: December 2010 and April 2011. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of acute mountain sickness, as defined by a Lake Louise score ≥ 3, with headache and at least one of the symptoms of nausea or vomiting, fatigue, dizziness, or difficulty sleeping. Results One hundred and two participants completed the trial. There were no demographic differences between individuals taking Rhodiola-placebo and those taking placebo-Rhodiola. No significant differences in the incidence of acute mountain sickness were found between R. crenulata extract and placebo groups (all 60.8%; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.69–1.52). The incidence of severe acute mountain sickness in Rhodiola extract vs. placebo groups was 35.3% vs. 29.4% (AOR = 1.42, 95% CI = 0.90–2.25). Conclusions R. crenulata extract was not effective in reducing the incidence or severity of acute mountain sickness as compared to placebo. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01536288. PMID:24176010

  11. Identification and characterization of the water gap in the physically dormant seeds of Dodonaea petiolaris: a first report for Sapindaceae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, S. R.; Cook, A.; Baskin, J. M.; Baskin, C. C.; Tuckett, R. E.; Steadman, K. J.; Dixon, K. W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The Sapindaceae is one of 17 plant families in which seed dormancy is caused by a water-impermeable seed or fruit coat (physical dormancy, PY). However, until now the water gap in Sapindaceae had not been identified. The primary aim of this study was to identify the water gap in Dodonaea petiolaris (Sapindaceae) seeds and to describe its basic morphology and anatomy. Methods Seed fill, viability, water-uptake (imbibition) and other characteristics were assessed for D. petiolaris seeds. The location and structure of the water gap were investigated using a blocking experiment, time series photography, scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. Dodonaea petiolaris seeds with PY also were assessed for loss of PY at four ecologically significant temperatures under moist and dry conditions. Seeds of three other species of Sapindaceae were examined for presence of a water gap. Key Results The water gap in D. petiolaris seeds was identified as a small plug in the seed coat adjacent to the hilum and opposite the area where the radicle emerges. The plug was dislodged (i.e. water gap opened = dormancy break) by dipping seeds in boiling water for 2·5 min or by incubating seeds on a moist substrate at 20/35 °C for 24 weeks. Layers of cells in the plug, including palisade and subpalisade, are similar to those in the rest of the seed coat. The same kind of water gap was found in three other species of Sapindaceae, Diplopeltis huegelii, Distichostemon hispidulus and Dodonaea aptera. Conclusions Following dormancy break (opening of water gap), initial uptake of water by the seed occurs only through the water gap. Thus, the plug must be dislodged before the otherwise intact seed can germinate. The anatomy of the plug is similar to water gaps in some of the other plant families with PY. PMID:19620135

  12. Effects of seed burial on germination, protein mobilisation and seedling survival in Dodonaea viscosa.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Rodríguez, L; Gamboa-deBuen, A; Sánchez-Coronado, M E; Alvarado-López, S; Soriano, D; Méndez, I; Vázquez-Santana, S; Carabias-Lillo, J; Mendoza, A; Orozco-Segovia, A

    2014-07-01

    Ecological restoration of disturbed areas requires substantial knowledge of the germination of native plants and the creation of novel methods to increase seedling establishment in the field. We studied the effects of soil matrix priming on the germination of Dodonaea viscosa seeds, which exhibit physical dormancy. To this end, we buried both pre-scarified (in H2SO4, 3 min) and non-pre-scarified seeds in the Parque Ecológico de la Ciudad de México. After seeds were unearthed, they were post-scarified for 0, 2, 6 and 10 min and their germination percentages compared to the germination of a control batch of laboratory-stored seeds. For both control and unearthed seeds, the protein pattern was determined in the enriched storage protein fraction in SDS-PAGE gels stained with Coomassie blue. Percentage germination increased as the scarification time increased. Pre-scarification significantly increased percentage germination of post-scarified seeds in relation to the control and non-pre-scarified seeds. In seeds unearthed from the forest site, the buried pre-scarified seeds had relatively high percentage germination, even in the absence of post-scarification treatment. A 48-kDa protein was not found in unearthed, pre-scarified seeds nor in the control germinated seeds, indicating that mobilisation of this protein occurred during soil priming. Burying seeds for a short period, including the beginning of the rainy season, promoted natural priming, which increased protein mobilisation. Functionally, priming effects were reflected in high percentage seedling survival in both the shade house and the field. Seed burial also reduced the requirement for acidic post-scarification.

  13. [Optimization of extraction technology for salidroside, tyrosol, crenulatin and gallic acid in Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma with orthogonal test].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Wang, Xue-jing; Zhao, Yi-wu; Huang, Wen-zhe; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    The extracting technology of salidroside, tyrosol, crenulatin and gallic acid from Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma was optimized. With extraction rate of salidroside, tyrosol, crenulatin and gallic acid as indexes, orthogonal test was used to evaluate effect of 4 factors on extracting technology, including concentration of solvent, the dosage of solvent, duration of extraction, and frequency of extraction. The results showed that, the best extracting technology was to extract in 70% alcohol with 8 times the weight of herbal medicine for 2 times, with 3 hours once. High extraction rate of salidroside, tyrosol, crenulatin and gallic acid were obtained with the present technology. The extracting technology was stable and feasible with high extraction rate of four compounds from Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma, it was suitable for industrial production.

  14. Biosynthesis of Cu, ZVI, and Ag nanoparticles using Dodonaea viscosa extract for antibacterial activity against human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiruba Daniel, S. C. G.; Vinothini, G.; Subramanian, N.; Nehru, K.; Sivakumar, M.

    2013-01-01

    Biosynthesis of copper, zero-valent iron (ZVI), and silver nanoparticles using leaf extract of Dodonaea viscosa has been investigated in this report. There are no additional surfactants/polymers used as capping or reducing agents for these syntheses. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The phase analysis was performed using selected area electron diffraction. The pH dependence of surface plasmon resonance and subsequent size variation has been determined. The synthesized nanoparticles showed spherical morphology and the average size of 29, 27, and 16 nm for Cu, ZVI, and Ag nanoparticles, respectively. Finally, biosynthesized Cu, ZVI, and Ag nanoparticles were tested against human pathogens viz. Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, and showed good antimicrobial activity.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Salidroside and p-Tyrosol in the Traditional Tibetan Medicine Rhodiola crenulata by Fourier Transform Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; He, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    A nondestructive, efficient, and rapid method for quantitative analysis of two bioactive components (salidroside and p-tyrosol) in Rhodiola crenulata, a traditional Tibetan medicine, by Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy was developed. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectra in the range of 4000 to 10000 cm(-1) of 50 samples of Rhodiola crenulata with different sources were measured. To get a satisfying result, partial least squares regression (PLSR) was used to establish NIR models for salidroside and p-tyrosol content determination. Different preprocessing methods, including smoothing, taking a second derivative, standard normal variate (SNV) transformation, and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), were investigated to improve the model accuracy of PLSR. The performance of the two final models (salidroside model and p-tyrosol model) was evaluated by factors such as the values of correlation coefficient (R(2)), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), and root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC). The optimal results of the PLSR model of salidroside showed that R(2), RMSEP and RMSEC were 0.99572, 0.0294 and 0.0309, respectively. Meanwhile, in the optimization model of p-tyrosol, the R(2), RMSEP and RMSEC were 0.99714, 0.0154 and 0.0168, respectively. These results demonstrate that FT-NIR spectroscopy not only provides a precise, rapid method for quantitative analysis of major effective constituents in Rhodiola crenulata, but can also be applied to the quality control of Rhodiola crenulata.

  16. Bioactive compound loaded stable silver nanoparticle synthesis from microwave irradiated aqueous extracellular leaf extracts of Naringi crenulata and its wound healing activity in experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswari, T; Thiyagarajan, M; Geetha, N; Venkatachalam, P

    2014-07-01

    An efficient and eco-friendly protocol for the synthesis of bioactive silver nanoparticles was developed using Naringi crenulata leaf extracts via microwave irradiation method. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by treating N. crenulata leaf extracts with 1mM of aqueous silver nitrate solution. An effective bioactive compound such as alkaloids, phenols, saponins and quinines present in the N. crenulata reduces the Ag(+) into Ag(0). The synthesized silver nanoparticles were monitored by UV-vis spectrophotometer and further characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). UV-vis spectroscopy showed maximum absorbance at 390nm due to surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs. From FESEM results, an average crystal size of the synthesized nanoparticle was 72-98nm. FT-IR results showed sharp absorption peaks and they were assigned to phosphine, alkyl halides and sulfonate groups. Silver nanoparticles synthesized were generally found to be spherical and cubic shape. Topical application of ointment prepared from silver nanoparticles of N. crenulata were formulated and evaluated in vivo using the excision wound healing model on Wistar albino rats. The measurement of the wound areas was performed on 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th and 15th days and the percentage of wound closures was calculated accordingly. By the 15th day, the ointment base containing 5% (w/w) of silver nanoparticles showed 100% wound healing activity compared with that of the reference as well as control bases. The results strongly suggested that the batch C ointment containing silver nanaoparticles synthesized from the leaf extracts of N. crenulata was found to be very effective in wound repair and encourages harnessing the potentials of the plant biomolecules loaded silver nanoparticle in the treatment of tropical diseases including wound healing.

  17. Effect of Hautriwaic Acid Isolated from Dodonaea viscosa in a Model of Kaolin/Carrageenan-Induced Monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Sánchez, David Osvaldo; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Pérez, Salud; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Tortoriello, Jaime; González-Cortazar, Manasés; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, the antiarthritic activity of hautriwaic acid is reported. This ent-clerodane diterpene isolated from Dodonaea viscosa was evaluated in mice using a kaolin/carrageenan-induced monoarthritis model. The inflammation observed in the joint (knee) on days 1-8 ranged from 50-70 %. After 10 days of treatment with different doses of hautriwaic acid (5, 10, 20 mg/kg), a decrease in knee inflammation was detected. This recovery was observed with both reference drugs, methotrexate (1 mg/kg) and diclofenac (0.75 mg/kg). In these groups of mice, the concentration of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha in the joint was significantly lower than that of the negative control group (animals with damage without any treatment). The negative control group presented a decrease in the concentration of interleukin-10, while the groups that received hautriwaic acid at different dose exhibited an increase in this interleukin. This anti-inflammatory cytokine was not modified in the joint of mice with diclofenac, but in mice that received methotrexate, a significant decrease was observed. Hautriwaic acid isolated from D. viscosa diminished the joint edema induced by this mixture of polysaccharides (carrageenan), possibly by acting as immunomodulator of the inflammatory response.

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia on the Virulence Properties of the Oral Pathogens Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Owotade, Foluso John

    2013-01-01

    Aim. This study investigated the effect of Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia (DVA) on the virulence properties of cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis implicated in periodontal diseases. Methods. S. mutans was cultured in tryptone broth containing a crude leaf extract of DVA for 16 hours, and the pH was measured after 10, 12, 14, and 16 h. Biofilms of S. mutans were grown on glass slides for 48 hours and exposed to plant extract for 30 minutes; the adherent cells were reincubated and the pH was measured at various time intervals. Minimum bactericidal concentration of the extracts against the four periodontal pathogens was determined. The effect of the subinhibitory concentration of plant extract on the production of proteinases by P. gingivalis was also evaluated. Results. DVA had no effect on acid production by S. mutans biofilms; however, it significantly inhibited acid production in planktonic cells. Periodontal pathogens were completely eliminated at low concentrations ranging from 0.09 to 0.02 mg/mL of crude plant extracts. At subinhibitory concentrations, DVA significantly reduced Arg-gingipain (24%) and Lys-gingipain (53%) production by P. gingivalis (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusions. These results suggest that DVA has the potential to be used to control oral infections including dental caries and periodontal diseases. PMID:24223061

  19. Behavioral thermoregulation and critical thermal limits of giant keyhole limpet Megathura crenulata(Sowerby 1825) (Mollusca; Vetigastropoda).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Fernando; Denisse Re, Ana; Salas, Alfredo; Galindo-Sanchez, Clara E; Gonzalez, Marco A; Sanchez, Adolfo; Rosas, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The thermoregulatory behavior of the giant keyhole limpet Megathura crenulata was determined in a horizontal thermal gradient during the day at 18.9 °C and 18.3 °C for the night. The final preferendum determined for giant keyhole limpets was of 18.6±1.2 °C. Limpets' displacement velocity was 10.0±3.9 cm h(-1) during the light phase and 8.4±1.6 cm h(-1) during the dark phase. The thermotolerance (measured as CTMax at 50%) was determined in a keyhole limpet in three acclimation temperatures 17, 20, and 23 °C. Limpets were subjected to water increasing temperatures at a rate of 1 °C every 30 min, until they detached from the substrate. The critical thermal maximum at 50% was 27.2, 27.9 and 28.3 °C respectively.

  20. Rhodiola crenulata- and Cordyceps sinensis-Based Supplement Boosts Aerobic Exercise Performance after Short-Term High Altitude Training

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chung-Yu; Hou, Chien-Wen; Bernard, Jeffrey R.; Chen, Chiu-Chou; Hung, Ta-Cheng; Cheng, Lu-Ling; Liao, Yi-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chen, Chung-Yu, Chien-Wen Hou, Jeffrey R. Bernard, Chiu-Chou Chen, Ta-Cheng Hung, Lu-Ling Cheng, Yi-Hung Liao, and Chia-Hua Kuo. Rhodiola crenulata- and Cordyceps sinensis-based supplement boosts aerobic exercise performance after short-term high altitude training. High Alt Med Biol 15:371–379, 2014.—High altitude training is a widely used strategy for improving aerobic exercise performance. Both Rhodiola crenulata (R) and Cordyceps sinensis (C) supplements have been reported to improve exercise performance. However, it is not clear whether the provision of R and C during high altitude training could further enhance aerobic endurance capacity. In this study, we examined the effect of R and C based supplementation on aerobic exercise capacity following 2-week high altitude training. Alterations to autonomic nervous system activity, circulatory hormonal, and hematological profiles were investigated. Eighteen male subjects were divided into two groups: Placebo (n=9) and R/C supplementation (RC, n=9). Both groups received either RC (R: 1400 mg+C: 600 mg per day) or the placebo during a 2-week training period at an altitude of 2200 m. After 2 weeks of altitude training, compared with Placebo group, the exhaustive run time was markedly longer (Placebo: +2.2% vs. RC: +5.7%; p<0.05) and the decline of parasympathetic (PNS) activity was significantly prevented in RC group (Placebo: −51% vs. RC: −41%; p<0.05). Red blood cell, hematocrit, and hemoglobin levels were elevated in both groups to a comparable extent after high altitude training (p<0.05), whereas the erythropoietin (EPO) level remained higher in the Placebo group (∼48% above RC values; p<0.05). The provision of an RC supplement during altitude training provides greater training benefits in improving aerobic performance. This beneficial effect of RC treatment may result from better maintenance of PNS activity and accelerated physiological adaptations during high altitude training. PMID

  1. Diversity and antioxidant activity of culturable endophytic fungi from alpine plants of Rhodiola crenulata, R. angusta, and R. sachalinensis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jin-Long; Guo, Ting-Ting; Ren, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Na-Sha; Wang, Meng-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Rhodiola spp. are rare and endangered alpine plants widely used as medicines and food additives by many civilizations since ancient times. Their main effective ingredients (such as salidroside and p-tyrosol) are praised to exhibit pharmacologic effects on high-altitude sickness and possess anti-aging and other adaptogenic capacities based on their antioxidant properties. In this study, 347 endophytic fungi were isolated from R. crenulata, R. angusta, and R. sachalinensis, and the molecular diversity and antioxidant activities of these fungi were investigated for the first time. These fungi were categorized into 180 morphotypes based on cultural characteristics, and their rRNA gene ITS sequences were analyzed by BLAST search in the GenBank database. Except for 12 unidentified fungi (6.67%), all others were affiliated to at least 57 genera in 20 orders of four phyla, namely, Ascomycota (88.89%), Basidiomycota (2.78%), Zygomycota (1.11%), and Glomeromycota (0.56%), which exhibited high abundance and diversity. Antioxidant assay showed that the DPPH radical-scavenging rates of 114 isolates (63.33%) were >50%, and those of five isolates (Rct45, Rct63, Rct64, Rac76, and Rsc57) were >90%. The EC50 values of five antioxidant assays suggested significant potential of these fungi on scavenging DPPH•, O2-•, and OH• radicals, as well as scavenging nitrite and chelating Fe2+, which showed preference and selection between endophytic fungi and their hosts. Further research also provided the first evidence that Rac12 could produce salidrosides and p-tyrosol. Results suggested that versatile endophytic fungi associated with Rhodiola known as antioxidants could be exploited as potential sources of novel antioxidant products.

  2. Rhodiola crenulata- and Cordyceps sinensis-based supplement boosts aerobic exercise performance after short-term high altitude training.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Yu; Hou, Chien-Wen; Bernard, Jeffrey R; Chen, Chiu-Chou; Hung, Ta-Cheng; Cheng, Lu-Ling; Liao, Yi-Hung; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2014-09-01

    High altitude training is a widely used strategy for improving aerobic exercise performance. Both Rhodiola crenulata (R) and Cordyceps sinensis (C) supplements have been reported to improve exercise performance. However, it is not clear whether the provision of R and C during high altitude training could further enhance aerobic endurance capacity. In this study, we examined the effect of R and C based supplementation on aerobic exercise capacity following 2-week high altitude training. Alterations to autonomic nervous system activity, circulatory hormonal, and hematological profiles were investigated. Eighteen male subjects were divided into two groups: Placebo (n=9) and R/C supplementation (RC, n=9). Both groups received either RC (R: 1400 mg+C: 600 mg per day) or the placebo during a 2-week training period at an altitude of 2200 m. After 2 weeks of altitude training, compared with Placebo group, the exhaustive run time was markedly longer (Placebo: +2.2% vs. RC: +5.7%; p<0.05) and the decline of parasympathetic (PNS) activity was significantly prevented in RC group (Placebo: -51% vs. RC: -41%; p<0.05). Red blood cell, hematocrit, and hemoglobin levels were elevated in both groups to a comparable extent after high altitude training (p<0.05), whereas the erythropoietin (EPO) level remained higher in the Placebo group (∼48% above RC values; p<0.05). The provision of an RC supplement during altitude training provides greater training benefits in improving aerobic performance. This beneficial effect of RC treatment may result from better maintenance of PNS activity and accelerated physiological adaptations during high altitude training.

  3. Polyandric acid A, a clerodane diterpenoid from the Australian medicinal plant Dodonaea polyandra, attenuates pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Bradley S; Luo, Xianling; Costabile, Maurizio; Caughey, Gillian E; Wang, Jiping; Claudie, David J; McKinnon, Ross A; Semple, Susan J

    2014-01-24

    Dodonaea polyandra is a medicinal plant used traditionally by the Kuuku I'yu (Northern Kaanju) indigenous people of Cape York Peninsula, Australia. The most potent of the diterpenoids previously identified from this plant, polyandric acid A (1), has been examined for inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and other inflammatory mediators using well-established acute and chronic mouse ear edema models and in vitro cellular models. Topical application of 1 significantly inhibited interleukin-1β production in mouse ear tissue in an acute model. In a chronic skin inflammation model, a marked reduction in ear thickness, associated with significant reduction in myeloperoxidase accumulation, was observed. Treatment of primary neonatal human keratinocytes with 1 followed by activation with phorbol ester/ionomycin showed a significant reduction in IL-6 secretion. The present study provides evidence that the anti-inflammatory properties of 1 are due to inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with skin inflammation and may be useful in applications for skin inflammatory conditions including psoriasis and dermatitis.

  4. A Programmatic Approach to Determine Eligibility of Prehistoric Sites in the San Diego Subregion, Southern Coast Archeological Region, California, for the National Register of Historic Places

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    six species of pinnipeds, including California sea lions ( Zalophus californianus ), northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), and Pacific...and H. rufescens), California mussel (Mytilus californianus ), wavy topshell (Astraea undosa), limpets (Megathura crenulata, Lottia spp., and Acmaea...mussel (Mytilus californianus ), wavy topshell (Astraea undosa), limpets (Megathura crenulata, Lottia spp., and Acmaea mitra), chitons (Mopalia ciliata

  5. Effects of Rhodiola on production, health and gut development of broilers reared at high altitude in Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Li, Long; Wang, Honghui; Zhao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Rhodiola has long been used as a traditional medicine to increase resistance to physical stress in humans in Tibet. The current study was designed to investigate whether Rhodiola crenulata (R. crenulata) could alleviate the negative effects of hypoxia on broiler chickens reared in Tibet Plateau. The effect of supplementing crushed roots of R. crenulata on production performance, health and intestinal morphology in commercial male broilers was investigated. Dietary treatments included CTL (basal diet), Low-R (basal diet + 0.5% R. crenulata) and High-R (basal diet + 1.5% R. crenulata). In comparison with broilers fed the control diet, Low-R had no effect on production performance while High-R significantly decreased average daily feed intake at d14, 28 and 42, body weight at d28 and 42 and gut development. Ascites induced mortality did not differ among treatments. Nevertheless Low-R significantly reduced non-ascites induced mortality and total mortality compared with broilers fed CTL and High-R diets. Broilers fed the High-R diet had significantly increased blood red blood cell counts and hemoglobin levels at 28d compared with other treatments. Our results suggest that supplementation with Rhodiola might reduce the effects of hypoxia on broilers and consequently decrease mortality rate. PMID:25418541

  6. Effects of Rhodiola on production, health and gut development of broilers reared at high altitude in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Wang, Honghui; Zhao, Xin

    2014-11-24

    Rhodiola has long been used as a traditional medicine to increase resistance to physical stress in humans in Tibet. The current study was designed to investigate whether Rhodiola crenulata (R. crenulata) could alleviate the negative effects of hypoxia on broiler chickens reared in Tibet Plateau. The effect of supplementing crushed roots of R. crenulata on production performance, health and intestinal morphology in commercial male broilers was investigated. Dietary treatments included CTL (basal diet), Low-R (basal diet + 0.5% R. crenulata) and High-R (basal diet + 1.5% R. crenulata). In comparison with broilers fed the control diet, Low-R had no effect on production performance while High-R significantly decreased average daily feed intake at d 14, 28 and 42, body weight at d 28 and 42 and gut development. Ascites induced mortality did not differ among treatments. Nevertheless Low-R significantly reduced non-ascites induced mortality and total mortality compared with broilers fed CTL and High-R diets. Broilers fed the High-R diet had significantly increased blood red blood cell counts and hemoglobin levels at 28 d compared with other treatments. Our results suggest that supplementation with Rhodiola might reduce the effects of hypoxia on broilers and consequently decrease mortality rate.

  7. New secondary metabolites isolated from dondonae viscosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay guided fractionation and chemical investigation of the ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Dodonaea viscosa Linn. from Egypt, resulted in the isolation and identification of three new compounds, including two new clerodane diterpenoids and a new myo-inositol derivative, along with nine...

  8. Occurrence of Physical Dormancy in Seeds of Australian Sapindaceae: A Survey of 14 Species in Nine Genera

    PubMed Central

    Cook, A.; Turner, S. R.; Baskin, J. M.; Baskin, C. C.; Steadman, K. J.; Dixon, K. W.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Sapindaceae is one of 16 angiosperm families whose seeds have physical dormancy (PY). However, the extent and nature of PY within this family is poorly known. The primary aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate seed characteristics and determine presence (or not) of PY within nine genera of Australian Sapindaceae; and (2) to compare the frequency of PY across the phylogenetic tree within Australian Sapindaceae. Methods Viability, imbibition and seed characteristics were assessed for 14 taxa from nine genera of Sapindaceae. For five species of Dodonaea, optimal conditions for germination and dormancy break were evaluated. An in situ burial experiment was performed on D. hackettiana seeds to identify the factor(s) responsible for overcoming PY. Classes of dormancy and of non-dormancy for 26 genera of Sapindaceae were mapped onto a phylogenetic tree for the family. Key Results Mean seed viability across all taxa was 69·7 %. Embryos were fully developed and folded (seven genera) or bent (two genera); no endosperm was present. Seeds of all five Dodonaea spp. and of Distichostemon hispidulus had PY. Hot-water treatment released PY in these six species. Optimal germination temperature for seeds of the four Dodonaea spp. that germinated was 15–20 °C. Following 5 months burial in soil, 36·4 % of D. hackettiana seeds had lost PY and germinated by the beginning of the winter wet season (May). Laboratory and field data indicate that dormancy was broken by warm, moist temperatures (≥50 °C) during summer. Conclusions PY occurs infrequently in genera of Sapindaceae native to Australia. Seeds of Dodonaea and Distichostemon had PY, whereas those of the other seven genera did not. Seeds of these two genera and of Diplopeltis (a previous study) are the only three of the 20 native Australian genera of Sapindaceae for which germination has been studied that have PY; all three belong to subfamily Dodonaeoideae. PMID:18369237

  9. The giant keyhole limpet radular teeth: A naturally-grown harvest machine.

    PubMed

    Ukmar-Godec, Tina; Kapun, Gregor; Zaslansky, Paul; Faivre, Damien

    2015-12-01

    The limpet radula is a feeding organ, which contains more than 100 rows of teeth. During their growth the teeth mature and advance in position along the radula. The simpler doccoglossan radulae operate by grinding rocky substrates, extracting the algae by rasping and scraping with the teeth functioning as shovels. Less is known about the rhipidoglossan radulae, used as rakes or brooms that brush and collect loose marine debris. This type of radula is found in the giant keyhole limpet (Megathura crenulata). The large size of this organism suggests that the rhipidoglossan radula entails a technological superiority for M. crenulata in its habitat. The structure and function of the radulae teeth have however not been reported in detail. Using a combination of 2D and 3D microscopy techniques coupled with amino acid analysis and X-ray scattering, we reveal the working components of M. crenulata's radula. It is characterized by numerous marginal teeth surrounding a pair of major hook-like lateral teeth, two pairs of minor lateral teeth and a large central tooth. The mature major lateral teeth show pronounced signs of wear, which gradually increase towards the very front end of the radula and are evidence for scraping. An abrupt change in the amino acid composition in the major lateral teeth and the concurrent formation of a chitinous fiber-network mark the onset of tooth maturation. In comparison to the simpler rock-scraping doccoglossate limpets, the radula of M. crenulata forms an elaborate feeding apparatus, which can be seen as a natural harvest machine.

  10. The giant keyhole limpet radular teeth: A naturally-grown harvest machine

    PubMed Central

    Ukmar-Godec, Tina; Kapun, Gregor; Zaslansky, Paul; Faivre, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The limpet radula is a feeding organ, which contains more than 100 rows of teeth. During their growth the teeth mature and advance in position along the radula. The simpler doccoglossan radulae operate by grinding rocky substrates, extracting the algae by rasping and scraping with the teeth functioning as shovels. Less is known about the rhipidoglossan radulae, used as rakes or brooms that brush and collect loose marine debris. This type of radula is found in the giant keyhole limpet (Megathura crenulata). The large size of this organism suggests that the rhipidoglossan radula entails a technological superiority for M. crenulata in its habitat. The structure and function of the radulae teeth have however not been reported in detail. Using a combination of 2D and 3D microscopy techniques coupled with amino acid analysis and X-ray scattering, we reveal the working components of M. crenulata’s radula. It is characterized by numerous marginal teeth surrounding a pair of major hook-like lateral teeth, two pairs of minor lateral teeth and a large central tooth. The mature major lateral teeth show pronounced signs of wear, which gradually increase towards the very front end of the radula and are evidence for scraping. An abrupt change in the amino acid composition in the major lateral teeth and the concurrent formation of a chitinous fiber-network mark the onset of tooth maturation. In comparison to the simpler rock-scraping doccoglossate limpets, the radula of M. crenulata forms an elaborate feeding apparatus, which can be seen as a natural harvest machine. PMID:26433029

  11. Pollen record from Ka'au Crater, Oahu, Hawaii: Evidence for a dry glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, S.C.; Juvik, J.O. Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo )

    1993-06-01

    Fossil pollen from a 3.5 m-long core from Ka'au Crater, Hawaii (elev. 460 m), yields a ca. 23,000-year record of regional vegetation history. Results indicate a full-glacial period drier and possibly cooler than present, a warmer and wetter early Holocene, and a somewhat drier late Holocene; this sequence agrees with earlier work by Selling (1948) on other islands. The oldest zone is donated by pollen of Chenopodium oahuense, Acacia koa, and Dodonaea viscosa; post-glacial pollen assemblages feature high percentages of Myrsine and Coprosma, followed by increases in Lycopodium cernuum Ilex anomala. Freycinetia arborea and Pritchardia. After about 8000 years ago, Chenopodium, Acacia, and Dodonaea increase, suggesting a return to drier conditions. Abundant pollen of Chenopodium oahuense, a plant of dry regions, during the last glacial maximum implies that neither the trade winds nor cyclonic storms were delivering as much moisture to the regional vegetation as they presently do. This suggests that the ocean surface temperature during the last glacial maximum may have been cooler than present, a finding contradictory to the reconstructions of the CLIMAP (1981) group, which show temperatures near Hawaii equal to or even warmer than present.

  12. Salidroside stimulates the accumulation of HIF-1α protein resulted in the induction of EPO expression: a signaling via blocking the degradation pathway in kidney and liver cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ken Yu-Zhong; Zhang, Zhen-Xia; Guo, Ava Jiang-Yang; Bi, Cathy Wen-Chuang; Zhu, Kevin Yue; Xu, Sherry Li; Zhan, Janis Ya-Xian; Lau, David Tai-Wei; Dong, Tina Ting-Xia; Choi, Roy Chi-Yan; Tsim, Karl Wah-Keung

    2012-03-15

    Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma (Rhodiola), the root and rhizome of Rhodiola crenulata (Hook. f. et Thoms.) H. Ohba, has been used as a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to increase the body resistance to mountain sickness in preventing hypoxia; however, the functional ingredient responsible for this adaptogenic effect has not been revealed. Here, we have identified salidroside, a glycoside predominantly found in Rhodiola, is the chemical in providing such anti-hypoxia effect. Cultured human embryonic kidney fibroblast (HEK293T) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) were used to reveal the mechanism of this hematopoietic function mediated by salidroside. The application of salidroside in cultures induced the expression of erythropoietin (EPO) mRNA from its transcription regulatory element hypoxia response element (HRE), located on EPO gene. The application of salidroside stimulated the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein, but not HIF-2α protein: the salidroside-induced HIF-1α protein was via the reduction of HIF-1α degradation but not the mRNA induction. The increased HIF-1α could account for the activation of EPO gene. These results supported the notion that hematopoietic function of Rhodiola was triggered, at least partially, by salidroside.

  13. Garra mondica, a new species from the Mond River drainage with remarks on the genus Garra from the Persian Gulf basin in Iran (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Sayyadzadeh, Golnaz; Esmaeili, Hamid Reza; Freyhof, Jörg

    2015-11-24

    Garra mondica, new species, from the Mond River drainage in Iran is distinguished from its congeners by having 7½ branched dorsal-fin rays; the breast, belly and back in front of the dorsal-fin origin naked and 9+8 branched caudal-fin rays. Garra mondica is also distinguished from all other congeners in the Persian Gulf basin, except an unidentified species from the Kol River, by having two fixed, diagnostic nucleotide substitutions in the mtDNA COI barcode region. The identity of G. gymnothorax, a nominal species from the Karun River drainage, and G. crenulata, a nominal species from Central Iran, are discussed. Garra populations examined from the Karun have a unique mtDNA COI barcode sequence, but their diagnostic characters are not consistent with the description and syntypes of G. gymnothorax. G. crenulata is considered as a synonym of G. rufa. Two populations of Garra from the Kol River have a sequence of the COI barcode region very similar to G. mondica, but cannot be identified as G. mondica and their identity cannot be resolved here.

  14. Survey of commercial Rhodiola products revealed species diversity and potential safety issues

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Tianyi; Li, Xiaojin; Yao, Hui; Lin, Yulin; Ma, Xiaochong; Cheng, Ruiyang; Song, Jingyuan; Ni, Lianghong; Fan, Congzhao; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    The adulteration of herbal products is a threat to consumer safety. Here we surveyed the species composition of commercial Rhodiola products using DNA barcoding as a supervisory method. A Rhodiola dietary supplement DNA barcode database was successfully constructed using 82 voucher samples from 10 Rhodiola species. Based on the DNA barcoding standard operating procedure (SOP), we used this database to identify 100 Rhodiolae Crenulatae Radix et Rhizoma decoction piece samples that were purchased from drug stores and hospitals. The results showed that only 36 decoction piece sequences (40%) were authentic R. crenulata, which is recorded in Chinese Pharmacopeia, whereas the other samples were all adulterants and may indicate a potential safety issue. Among the adulterants, 35 sequences (38.9%) were authenticated as R. serrata, nine sequences (10%) were authenticated as R. rosea, which is documented in the United States Pharmacopeia, and the remaining samples were authenticated as other three Rhodiola species. This result indicates decoction pieces that are available in the market have complex origins and DNA barcoding is a convenient tool for market supervision. PMID:25661009

  15. Role of mycorrhizal colonization in plant establishment on an alkaline gold mine tailing.

    PubMed

    Orłowska, Elzbieta; Orłowski, Dariusz; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta; Turnau, Katarzyna

    2011-02-01

    The potential role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the revegetation of an alkaline gold mine tailing was studied in Barberton, South Africa. The tailing, characterized by a slow spontaneous plant succession, is colonized by the shrub Dodonaea viscosa and the grasses, Andropogon eucomus and Imperata cylindrica, all colonized by AMF. The effectiveness of mycorrhizal colonization in grasses was tested under laboratory conditions using fungal isolates of various origins. Both grasses were highly mycorrhiza dependent, and the presence of mycorrhizal colonization significantly increased their biomass and survival rates. The fungi originating from the gold tailing were better adapted to the special conditions of the tailing than the control isolate. Although the total colonization rate found for native fungi was lower than for fungi from non-polluted sites, they were more vital and more effective in promoting plant growth. The results obtained might serve as a practical approach to the phytostabilization of alkaline gold tailings.

  16. Biological effects of some natural and chemical compounds on the potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea operculella Zell. (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sharaby, Aziza; Abdel-Rahman, H.; Moawad, S.

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory reaction of larvae and moths was investigated towards 18 oils (6 natural oils and 12 commercial chemical oils). Some of these oils such as peppermint and camphor (natural oils) and eugenol and camphene (commercial oils) were repellent to both larvae and moths. Other oils such as strawberry and d-limonene were attractive to both larvae and moths. Some of the repellent oils were, therefore, tested for their effect on certain biological aspects of the insects. Eugenol and peppermint oils, each at the 0.01% conc., caused a significant depression in the fecundity of moth and decreased the percentage of egg hatchability. Eugenol oil was much more effective than peppermint oil at 1%. Dried (leaves, fruits or seeds) powder of 14 different plants species were tested in different concentrations with talcum powder (carrier material) against egg deposition. The results indicated that dried powders of Allium cepa, Curcuma longa, Colocasia antiqurum, Ocimum basilicum. Dodonaea viscose and Thuja orientalis played a highly significant role in reducing egg deposition. The most impressive effect was displayed by powders of D. viscose and A. cepa, which caused the highest depression in egg deposition as well as in the emerging offsprings. Ethanolic extracts of 11 plants indicated that extracts of Pithuranthos tortosus and Iphiona scabra caused the maximum inhibition of egg hatchability, followed by C. longa, Citrullus colocynthia and T. orientalis. Ethanolic extracts of Schinus terebenthiflius (leaves) and I. scabra caused the highest depression in the deposited eggs, as they played a remarkable role as ovipositor deterrents. The majority of the plant extracts at 1% conc. could protect potato tubers at different intervals according to the calculated tuber damage index as follows: Iphiopna > Pithuranthos > Curcuma > Schinus (fruits) Thuja > Schinus (leaves) > Dodonaea > Citrullus. PMID:23961036

  17. Ophiostoma kryptum sp. nov. from Larix decidua and Picea abies in Europe, similar to O. minus.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Karin; Kirisits, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    An unknown species of Ophiostoma was isolated from European larch (Larix decidua) infested by Tetropium gabrieli (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) infested by Tetropium sp. in Austria. The fungus is similar to O. minus, but distinguished from it by the ecology, colony morphologies on OA and MEA, and phylogenetic analysis of aligned DNA sequences of the ITS region of the rDNA operon and the partial beta-tubulin gene. It is described here as O. kryptum sp. nov. The new species readily produces perithecia with short necks and reniform ascospores, and has Hyalorhinocladiella and Leptographium-like anamorphs. Circumstantial evidence suggests that Tetropium spp. act as vectors of O. kryptum. O. minus and O. kryptum represent additional examples of morphologically similar, yet genetically and ecologically distinct species in the genus Ophiostoma. The new combination, O. crenulatum comb. nov. (syn. CeratocYstiopsis crenulata), is also made.

  18. Comparison of cold resistance physiological and biochemical features of four Herba Rhodiola seedlings under low temperature

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuling; Zhao, Kentian; Ma, Lingfa; Yang, Jingjun; Chang, Yuwei; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the cold resistance performance of different Herba Rhodiolae and successfully transplant Herba Rhodiolae to the Gansu plateau area for nursing, domestication and planting, this paper systematically studies six physiological and biochemical features of Rhodiola kirilowii, Rhodiola algida, Rhodiola crenulata and Herba Rhodiolae that are closely associated with cold resistance features and concludes with the cold resistance capability of Rhodiola kirilowii. In the selected six main indexes of the Herba Rhodiolae, the POD, SOD and CAT activity and MDA and Pro content in the leaf are the main physiological and biochemical indexes to indicate the cold resistance performance of four Herba Rhodiolae seedlings and can be regarded as the preliminary indexes to assess the winter performance of Herba Rhodiolae. The research work will provide the theoretical basis for the wild variants of Herba Rhodiolae and GAPJ base construction. PMID:26981000

  19. Marine tumor vaccine carriers: structure of the molluscan hemocyanins KLH and htH.

    PubMed

    Markl, J; Lieb, B; Gebauer, W; Altenhein, B; Meissner, U; Harris, J R

    2001-10-01

    Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) is a well-established immune stimulant and hapten carrier, and Haliotis tuberculata hemocyanin (HtH) is a related product. Biologically, KLH and HtH are blue copper proteins which serve as oxygen carriers in the blood of the keyhole limpet Megathura crenulata and the abalone H. tuberculata, respectively, two marine gastropods. Both hemocyanins occur as two distinct isoforms, termed KLH1 KLH2, HtH1, and HtH2. Each of these molecules is based on a very large polypeptide chain, the subunit (molecular mass ca 400 kDa), which is folded into a series of eight globular functional units (molecular mass ca 50 kDa each). Twenty copies of this subunit form a cylindrical quaternary structure (molecular mass ca 8 MDa). This article reviews the recent data on the biosynthesis, quaternary structure, subunit architecture, amino acid sequence, gene structure, and recombinant production of KLH and HtH.

  20. Llandovery green/grey and black mudrock facies of the northern Holy Cross Mountains (Poland) and their relation to early Silurian sea-level changes and benthic oxygen level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trela, Wiesław; Podhalańska, Teresa; Smolarek, Justyna; Marynowski, Leszek

    2016-08-01

    The Llandovery mudrock facies in the northern Holy Cross Mountains reveal lithological variability allowing their interpretation in the context of post-Ordovician climate and sea-level changes in the Caledonian foredeep basin developed along the present SW margin of Baltica. They form a succession up to 50 m thick made up of grey and greenish clayey mudstones interrupted by black shales. The sedimentary and geochemical data (total organic carbon, pyrite framboids and trace metals) clearly show that the black shales document periods of the significant sediment starvation and oxygen- deficient conditions. Their occurrence is confined to the persculptus-acuminatus, vesiculosus, cyphus, convolutus-sedgwickii, turriculatus-crispus, crenulata and spiralis graptolite biozones and they can be correlated with post-glacial transgressions. In contrast, the grey and greenish mudstones are interpreted as lithofacies reflecting permanent benthic oxygenation driven by deep-water ventilation during the Aeronian and Telychian regressions supported by sedimentary and geochemical studies, and diameters of pyrite framboids

  1. New and little known Orthoptera (Ensifera and Caelifera) from the Ñambí River Natural Reserve, Nariño, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cadena-Castañeda, Oscar J; Gutiérrez, Yeisson; Bacca, Tito

    2016-09-09

    A preliminary checklist of the Orthopterans from the Ñambí River Natural reserve is presented. A total of 26 species were studied, five new species are herein described: Championica nambiensis n. sp., Cocconotus awa n. sp., Cocconotus levyi n. sp. (Tettigoniidae: Pseudophyllinae), Antillicharis kwaiker n. sp. (Gryllidae) and Brachybaenus nariniensis n. sp. (Gryllacrididae). Three species are recorded from Colombia for the first time (Legua crenulata, Uvaroviella (Holacla) nebulosa and Anabropsis alata) and seven species are new records for Nariño department (Allotettix peruvianus, Ripipteryx ecuadoriensis, Neoconocephalus affinis, Anaulacomera poculigera, Orophus conspersus, Orophus tessellatus and Neocurtilla hexadactyla). Further comments on species distribution and taxonomy are given.

  2. From Traditional Resource to Global Commodities:—A Comparison of Rhodiola Species Using NMR Spectroscopy—Metabolomics and HPTLC

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Anthony; Zhai, Lixiang; Gkouva, Christina; Li, Shuyuan; Heinrich, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The fast developing international trade of products based on traditional knowledge and their value chains has become an important aspect of the ethnopharmacological debate. The structure and diversity of value chains and their impact on the phytochemical composition of herbal medicinal products, as well as the underlying government policies and regulations, have been overlooked in the debate about quality problems in transnational trade. Rhodiola species, including Rhodiola rosea L. and Rhodiola crenulata (Hook. f. & Thomson) H. Ohba, are used as traditional herbal medicines. Faced with resource depletion and environment destruction, R. rosea and R. crenulata are becoming endangered, making them more economically valuable to collectors and middlemen, and also increasing the risk of adulteration and low quality. Rhodiola products have been subject to adulteration and we recently assessed 39 commercial products for their composition and quality. However, the range of Rhodiola species potentially implicated has not been assessed. Also, the ability of selected analytical techniques in differentiating these species is not known yet. Using a strategy previously developed by our group, we compare the phytochemical differences among Rhodiola raw materials available on the market to provide a practical method for the identification of different Rhodiola species from Europe and Asia and the detection of potential adulterants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis software and high performance thin layer chromatography techniques were used to analyse the samples. Rosavin and rosarin were mainly present in R. rosea but also in Rosea sachalinensis Borris. 30% of the Rhodiola samples purchased from the Chinese market were adulterated by other Rhodiola spp. The utilization of a combined platform based on 1H-NMR and HPTLC methods resulted in an integrated analysis of different Rhodiola species. We identified adulteration at the earliest stage

  3. Contrasting Geographical Distributions as a Result of Thermal Tolerance and Long-Distance Dispersal in Two Allegedly Widespread Tropical Brown Algae

    PubMed Central

    Tronholm, Ana; Leliaert, Frederik; Sansón, Marta; Afonso-Carrillo, Julio; Tyberghein, Lennert; Verbruggen, Heroen; De Clerck, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Background Many tropical marine macroalgae are reported from all three ocean basins, though these very wide distributions may simply be an artifact resulting from inadequate taxonomy that fails to take into account cryptic diversity. Alternatively, pantropical distributions challenge the belief of limited intrinsic dispersal capacity of marine seaweeds and the effectiveness of the north-south oriented continents as dispersal barriers. We aimed to re-assess the distribution of two allegedly circumtropical brown algae, Dictyota ciliolata and D. crenulata, and interpret the realized geographical range of the respective species in relation to their thermal tolerance and major tectonic and climatic events during the Cenozoic. Methodology/Principal Findings Species delimitation was based on 184 chloroplast encoded psbA sequences, using a Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent method. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred by analyzing a six-gene dataset. Divergence times were estimated using relaxed molecular clock methods and published calibration data. Distribution ranges of the species were inferred from DNA-confirmed records, complemented with credible literature data and herbarium vouchers. Temperature tolerances of the species were determined by correlating distribution records with local SST values. We found considerable conflict between traditional and DNA-based species definitions. Dictyota crenulata consists of several pseudocryptic species, which have restricted distributions in the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Central America. In contrast, the pantropical distribution of D. ciliolata is confirmed and linked to its significantly wider temperature tolerance. Conclusions/Significance Tectonically driven rearrangements of physical barriers left an unequivocal imprint on the current diversity patterns of marine macroalgae, as witnessed by the D. crenulata–complex. The nearly circumglobal tropical distribution of D. ciliolata, however, demonstrates that the north

  4. Screening of Uruguayan plants for deterrent activity against insects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Lucía; González-Coloma, Azucena; González, Andrés; Díaz, Martina; Santos, Estela; Alonso-Paz, Eduardo; Bassagoda, María Julia; Rossini, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the anti-insectan activity of extracts from different vegetative parts of ten plant species native to Uruguay. The selected plants belong to five families: Bignoniaceae: Clytostoma callistegioides, Dolichandra cynanchoides, Macfadyena unguis-cati; Sapindaceae: Dodonaea viscosa, Allophylus edulis, Serjania meridionalis; Lamiaceae: Salvia procurrens, Salvia guaranitica; Solanaceae: Lycium cestroides; and Phytolaccaceae: Phytolacca dioica. The extracts were evaluated in independent bioassays against four insect pests and one beneficial insect. Aphid settling inhibition was evaluated with a grass specialist, Rhopalosiphum padi, and a feeding generalist, Myzus persicae (both Hemiptera: Aphididae). Antifeedant activity was tested with adults of the specialist Epilachna paenulata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and larvae of the generalist Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Finally, contact toxicity was assessed with honey bees, Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Strong settling inhibition (SI) activity (expressed as %SI, where 100% means complete inhibition by the extract) was found only for the twig extracts of A. edulis (Sapindaceae) against M. persicae (% SI = 77 +/- 4). Antifeedant activity (expressed as % of feeding reduction (FR), where 100% means no consumption on extract-treated diet) against E. paenulata was significant for the leaf extracts of L. cestroides (Solanaceae) (% FR = 100 +/- 0) as well as of all Bignoniaceae and Sapindaceae species. No extracts were active against S. littoralis larvae, and most of them were innocuous to honey bees, with the exception of L. cestroides and S. meridionalis leaf extracts.

  5. Primary Succession on a Hawaiian Dryland Chronosequence

    DOE PAGES

    Kinney, Kealohanuiopuna M.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cordell, Susan; ...

    2015-06-12

    We used measurements from airborne imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR to quantify the biophysical structure and composition of vegetation on a dryland substrate age gradient in Hawaii. Both vertical stature and species composition changed during primary succession, and reveal a progressive increase in vertical stature on younger substrates followed by a collapse on Pleistocene-aged flows. Tall-stature Metrosideros polymorpha woodlands dominated on the youngest substrates (hundreds of years), and were replaced by the tall-stature endemic tree species Myoporum sandwicense and Sophora chrysophylla on intermediate-aged flows (thousands of years). The oldest substrates (tens of thousands of years) were dominated by the short-stature nativemore » shrub Dodonaea viscosa and endemic grass Eragrostis atropioides. We excavated 18 macroscopic charcoal fragments from Pleistocene-aged substrates. Mean radiocarbon age was 2,002 years and ranged from < 200 to 7,730. Genus identities from four fragments indicate that Osteomeles spp. or M. polymorpha once occupied the Pleistocene-aged substrates, but neither of these species is found there today. These findings indicate the existence of fires before humans are known to have occupied the Hawaiian archipelago, and demonstrate that a collapse in vertical stature is prevalent on the oldest substrates. In conclusion, this work contributes to our understanding of prehistoric fires in shaping the trajectory of primary succession in Hawaiian drylands.« less

  6. Primary Succession on a Hawaiian Dryland Chronosequence

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, Kealohanuiopuna M.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cordell, Susan; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Heckman, Katherine; Hotchkiss, Sara; Jeraj, Marjeta; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E.; Questad, Erin J.; Thaxton, Jarrod M.; Trusdell, Frank; Kellner, James R.

    2015-06-12

    We used measurements from airborne imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR to quantify the biophysical structure and composition of vegetation on a dryland substrate age gradient in Hawaii. Both vertical stature and species composition changed during primary succession, and reveal a progressive increase in vertical stature on younger substrates followed by a collapse on Pleistocene-aged flows. Tall-stature Metrosideros polymorpha woodlands dominated on the youngest substrates (hundreds of years), and were replaced by the tall-stature endemic tree species Myoporum sandwicense and Sophora chrysophylla on intermediate-aged flows (thousands of years). The oldest substrates (tens of thousands of years) were dominated by the short-stature native shrub Dodonaea viscosa and endemic grass Eragrostis atropioides. We excavated 18 macroscopic charcoal fragments from Pleistocene-aged substrates. Mean radiocarbon age was 2,002 years and ranged from < 200 to 7,730. Genus identities from four fragments indicate that Osteomeles spp. or M. polymorpha once occupied the Pleistocene-aged substrates, but neither of these species is found there today. These findings indicate the existence of fires before humans are known to have occupied the Hawaiian archipelago, and demonstrate that a collapse in vertical stature is prevalent on the oldest substrates. In conclusion, this work contributes to our understanding of prehistoric fires in shaping the trajectory of primary succession in Hawaiian drylands.

  7. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activities and Phytochemical Screening of Some Yemeni Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Salah A. A.; Hasson, Sidgi; Althawab, Faisal M. N.; Alaghbari, Sama A. Z.; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    The traditional medicine still plays an important role in the primary health care in Yemen. The current study represents the investigation of 16 selected plants, which were collected from different localities of Yemen. The plants were dried and extracted with two different solvents (methanol and hot water) to yield 34 crude extracts. The obtained extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity against three Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria, one yeast species and three multiresistant Staphylococcus strains using agar diffusion method, for their antioxidant activity using scavenging activity of DPPH radical method and for their cytotoxic activity using the neutral red uptake assay. In addition, a phytochemical screening of the methanolic extracts was done. Antibacterial activity was shown only against Gram-positive bacteria, among them multiresistant bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity was exhibited by the methanolic extracts of Acalypha fruticosa, Centaurea pseudosinaica, Dodonaea viscosa, Jatropha variegata, Lippia citriodora, Plectranthus hadiensis, Tragia pungens and Verbascum bottae. Six methanolic extracts especially those of A. fruticosa, Actiniopteris semiflabellata, D. viscosa, P. hadiensis, T. pungens and V. bottae showed high free radical scavenging activity. Moreover, remarkable cytotoxic activity against FL-cells was found for the methanolic extracts of A. fruticosa, Iris albicans, L. citriodora and T. pungens. The phytochemical screening demonstrated the presence of different types of compounds like flavonoids, terpenoids and others, which could be responsible for the obtained activities. PMID:18955315

  8. Screening of Uruguayan plants for deterrent activity against insects

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Lucía; González-Coloma, Azucena; González, Andrés; Díaz, Martina; Santos, Estela; Alonso-Paz, Eduardo; Bassagoda, María Julia; Rossini, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the anti-insectan activity of extracts from different vegetative parts of ten plant species native to Uruguay. The selected plants belong to five families: Bignoniaceae: Clytostoma callistegioides, Dolichandra cynanchoides, Macfadyena unguis-cati; Sapindaceae: Dodonaea viscosa, Allophylus edulis, Serjania meridionalis; Lamiaceae: Salvia procurrens, Salvia guaranitica; Solanaceae: Lycium cestroides; and Phytolaccaceae: Phytolacca dioica. The extracts were evaluated in independent bioassays against four insect pests and one beneficial insect. Aphid settling inhibition was evaluated with a grass specialist, Rhopalosiphum padi, and a feeding generalist, Myzus persicae (both Hemiptera: Aphididae). Antifeedant activity was tested with adults of the specialist Epilachna paenulata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and larvae of the generalist Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Finally, contact toxicity was assessed with honey bees, Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Strong settling inhibition (SI) activity (expressed as %SI, where 100% means complete inhibition by the extract) was found only for the twig extracts of A. edulis (Sapindaceae) against M. persicae (% SI = 77 ± 4). Antifeedant activity (expressed as % of feeding reduction (FR), where 100% means no consumption on extract-treated diet) against E. paenulata was significant for the leaf extracts of L. cestroides (Solanaceae) (% FR = 100 ± 0) as well as of all Bignoniaceae and Sapindaceae species. No extracts were active against S. littoralis larvae, and most of them were innocuous to honey bees, with the exception of L. cestroides and S. meridionalis leaf extracts. PMID:20046902

  9. Targeted capture to assess neutral genomic variation in the narrow-leaf hopbush across a continental biodiversity refugium

    PubMed Central

    Christmas, Matthew J.; Biffin, Ed; Breed, Martin F.; Lowe, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    The Adelaide geosyncline, a mountainous region in central southern Australia, is purported to be an important continental refugium for Mediterranean and semi-arid Australian biota, yet few population genetic studies have been conducted to test this theory. Here, we focus on a plant species distributed widely throughout the region, the narrow-leaf hopbush, Dodonaea viscosa ssp. angustissima, and examine its genetic diversity and population structure. We used a hybrid-capture target enrichment technique to selectively sequence over 700 genes from 89 individuals across 17 sampling locations. We compared 815 single nucleotide polymorphisms among individuals and populations to investigate population genetic structure. Three distinct genetic clusters were identified; a Flinders/Gammon ranges cluster, an Eastern cluster, and a Kangaroo Island cluster. Higher genetic diversity was identified in the Flinders/Gammon Ranges cluster, indicating that this area is likely to have acted as a refugium during past climate oscillations. We discuss these findings and consider the historical range dynamics of these populations. We also provide methodological considerations for population genomics studies that aim to use novel genomic approaches (such as target capture methods) on non-model systems. The application of our findings to restoration of this species across the region are also considered. PMID:28145488

  10. Primary Succession on a Hawaiian Dryland Chronosequence

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Kealohanuiopuna M.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cordell, Susan; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Heckman, Katherine; Hotchkiss, Sara; Jeraj, Marjeta; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E.; Questad, Erin J.; Thaxton, Jarrod M.; Trusdell, Frank; Kellner, James R.

    2015-01-01

    We used measurements from airborne imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR to quantify the biophysical structure and composition of vegetation on a dryland substrate age gradient in Hawaii. Both vertical stature and species composition changed during primary succession, and reveal a progressive increase in vertical stature on younger substrates followed by a collapse on Pleistocene-aged flows. Tall-stature Metrosideros polymorpha woodlands dominated on the youngest substrates (hundreds of years), and were replaced by the tall-stature endemic tree species Myoporum sandwicense and Sophora chrysophylla on intermediate-aged flows (thousands of years). The oldest substrates (tens of thousands of years) were dominated by the short-stature native shrub Dodonaea viscosa and endemic grass Eragrostis atropioides. We excavated 18 macroscopic charcoal fragments from Pleistocene-aged substrates. Mean radiocarbon age was 2,002 years and ranged from < 200 to 7,730. Genus identities from four fragments indicate that Osteomeles spp. or M. polymorpha once occupied the Pleistocene-aged substrates, but neither of these species is found there today. These findings indicate the existence of fires before humans are known to have occupied the Hawaiian archipelago, and demonstrate that a collapse in vertical stature is prevalent on the oldest substrates. This work contributes to our understanding of prehistoric fires in shaping the trajectory of primary succession in Hawaiian drylands. PMID:26066334

  11. Egg parasitoids of Sophonia rufofascia (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.T.; Yang, P.; Huber, J.T.; Jones, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    Parasitism of the leafhopper Sophonia rufofascia (Kuoh and Kuoh), a recent immigrant that has become a widespread pest in Hawaii, was examined in a 1-year survey in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Samples of young leaves of four plant species infested with eggs of S. rufofascia were collected at five sites ranging from 880 to 1190 m in elevation. Leafhopper eggs were parasitized principally by three species of Mymaridae (Hymenoptera): Polynema sp., Schizophragma sp. probably bicolor (Dozier), and Chaetomymar sp. Although parasitism by each species fluctuated at levels usually below 10%, all three were detected consistently across most host plants, sites, and sample periods. Total parasitism differed at a marginally significant level among host plants and sites, but not among sample periods. Total parasitism averaged 14.3% (maximum: 26.3%) on Dodonaea viscosa Jacquin, 10.6% (maximum: 17.5%) on Myrica faya Aiton, 8.7% (maximum: 29.5%) on Metrosideros polymorpha Gaudich-Beaupre, and 1.6% (maximum: 4.3%) on Vaccinium reticulatum Smith. Parasitism was generally higher at sites lower in elevation. Further monitoring is recommended to determine whether parasitism will increase to levels that can effectively suppress S. rufofascia populations. The efficacy of natural enemies already present in Hawaii is important because concern over nontarget impacts on endemic leafhoppers makes introduction of new biological control agents difficult. ?? 2001 Academic Press.

  12. A revision of the lysianassid genus Waldeckia with the description of four new species (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Lysianassidae, Waldeckiinae subfam. nov.).

    PubMed

    Lowry, J K; Kilgallen, N M

    2014-03-31

    Waldeckia Chevreux is a genus of scavenging lysianassoid amphipods with distribution records from Antarctica, Australia, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, the Philippines, Vietnam, China and Japan. The genus is revised and diagnosed against all other genera of the Lysianassidae and the subfamily Waldeckiinae is established. All known species are redescribed and a key is provided. Three new species of Waldeckia (W. dempseyae sp. nov., W. tangaroa sp. nov., W. warreen sp. nov.) are described from Australian waters, and one (W. selayarensis sp. nov.) from Indonesia and Australia. Waldeckia crenulata Pirlot, 1936, from the Philippines and Indonesia, is described in detail for the first time. Waldeckia chevreuxi Stebbing, 1910 is placed in the synonymy of W. nitens, and W. elephas is placed in the synonymy of W. nudum. Orchomene orchospina Hirayama, 1986 and O. tomiokaensis Hirayama, 1986 are transferred to Waldeckia. Waldeckia scrupulosa Mateus & Mateus, 1986 cannot be placed in a genus based on the original description. This revision brings the number of species in the genus to 14.

  13. Negative Stains Containing Trehalose: Application to Tubular and Filamentous Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. Robin; Gerber, Max; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Wernicke, Wolfgang; Markl, Jürgen

    1996-02-01

    Several examples are presented that show the successful application of uranyl acetate and ammonium molybdate negative staining in the presence of trehalose for TEM studies of filamentous and tubular structures. The principal benefit to be gained from the inclusion of trehalose stems from the considerably reduced flattening of the large tubular structures and the greater orientational freedom of single molecules due to an increased depth of the negative stain in the presence of trehalose. Trehalose is likely to provide considerable protection to protein molecules and their assemblies during the drying of negatively stained specimens. Some reduction in the excessive density imparted by uranyl acetate around large assemblies is also achieved. Nevertheless, in the presence of 1% (w/v) trehalose, it is desirable to increase the concentration of negative stain to 5% (w/v) for ammonium molybdate and to 4% for uranyl acetate to produce satisfactory image contrast. In general, the ammonium molybdate-trehalose negative stain is more satisfactory than the uranyl acetate-trehalose combination, because of the greater electron beam sensitivity of the uranyl negative stain. Reassembled taxol-stabilized pig brain microtubules, together with collagen fibrils, sperm tails, helical filaments, and reassociated hemocyanin (KLH2), all from the giant keyhole limpet Megathura crenulata, have been studied by negative staining in the presence of trehalose. In all cases satisfactory TEM imaging conditions were readily obtained on the specimens, as long as regions of excessively deep stain were avoided.

  14. Occurrence and significance of Silurian K-bentonite beds at Arisaig, Nova Scotia, eastern Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstrom, Stig M.; Huff, W.D.; Kolata, Dennis R.; Melchin, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    The most extensive succession of K-bentonite beds known in the Silurian of North America occurs at Arisaig on the northern coast of Nova Scotia. At least 40 ash beds are present in the Llandoverian Ross Brook Formation and at least four in the early Ludlovian McAdam Brook Formation. Most of the beds are thin (<5 cm), but one bed (the Smith Brook K-bentonite bed) in the late Llandoverian crenulata Zone and another (the McAdam Brook K-bentonite bed) in the early Ludlovian nilssoni Zone each reach a thickness of 20 cm. New graptolite collections provide critical information on the biostratigraphic position of the K-bentonite beds in the Ross Brook Formation. Geochemical data show that the Arisaig ash beds represent calc-alkaline magmas from plate margin, subduction-related volcanic vents. Differences in K-bentonite stratigraphie distribution, combined with paleogeographic considerations, suggest that the volcanoes were located much farther to the south in the Iapetus than the source volcanoes of the British - Baltoscandian Llandoverian K-bentonites.

  15. Neuroprotective effects of salidroside on focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury involve the nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Xiao, Qing; Lin, Yan-hua; Zheng, Zhen-zhu; He, Zhao-dong; Hu, Juan; Chen, Li-dian

    2015-01-01

    Salidroside, the main active ingredient extracted from Rhodiola crenulata, has been shown to be neuroprotective in ischemic cerebral injury, but the underlying mechanism for this neuroprotection is poorly understood. In the current study, the neuroprotective effect of salidroside on cerebral ischemia-induced oxidative stress and the role of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway was investigated in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. Salidroside (30 mg/kg) reduced infarct size, improved neurological function and histological changes, increased activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase, and reduced malon-dialdehyde levels after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. Furthermore, salidroside apparently increased Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 expression. These results suggest that salidroside exerts its neuroprotective effect against cerebral ischemia through anti-oxidant mechanisms and that activation of the Nrf2 pathway is involved. The Nrf2/antioxidant response element pathway may become a new therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:26889188

  16. Rhodiola-induced inhibition of adipogenesis involves antioxidant enzyme response associated with pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ok-Hwan; Kwon, Young-In; Apostolidis, Emmanouil; Shetty, Kalidas; Kim, Young-Cheul

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether Rhodiola crenulata extract and tyrosol, a major bioactive phenolic compound present in Rhodiola, change the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzyme response (AER) and energy pathways linked to proline-mediated pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) during adipogenesis. Treatment with Rhodiola extracts inhibited the activities of proline dehydrogenase (PDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) as well as lipid accumulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The inhibition of PDH and G6PDH activities by Rhodiola likely prevented proline oxidation required for critical ATP generation that is coupled to AER via the PPP, leading to inhibition of adipogenesis. Rhodiola extracts dose-dependently increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, resulting in a reduced ROS level during adipogenesis. Moreover, the effects of tyrosol, a major bioactive compound in Rhodiola species, were directly correlated with all observed effects by Rhodiola extracts. These results indicate that the antiadipogenic effects of Rhodiola extracts can be attributed to a phenolic tyrosol that may potentially disrupt proline-mediated energy generation and AER via PPP, resulting in the suppression of adipogenesis and lipid accumulation. This further provides a biochemical rationale to identify the roles of phenolics that modulate the cellular redox environment and therefore have relevance for obesity management.

  17. Isolation and spectroscopic characterization of the structural subunits of keyhole limpet hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Schütz, J; Dolashka-Angelova, P; Abrashev, R; Nicolov, P; Voelter, W

    2001-04-07

    Keyhole limpet hemocyanin is a respiratory glycoprotein of high molecular weight from the gastropod mollusc Megathura crenulata. Two subunits, KLH1 and KLH2, were isolated using ion exchange chromatography and their physical properties are compared with the parent molecule. The various proteins are characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence quenching studies, using acrylamide, cesium chloride and potassium iodide as tryptophan quenchers. The conformational stability of the native aggregate and its isolated structural subunits are also studied by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy as a function of temperature, as well as in the presence of guanidinium hydrochloride and urea. The associated subunits in the hemocyanin aggregates increase considerably the melting temperature to 67 degrees C and the free energy of stabilization in water, DeltaG(H(2)O)(D), towards guanidinium hydrochloride is higher for the decamer as compared to the isolated subunits; this difference can be accounted for by the stabilizing effects of intra-subunit interactions exerted within the oligomer. The copper-dioxygen complex at the active site additionally stabilizes the molecule, and removing of the copper ions increases the tryptophan emission and the quantum yield of the fluorescence.

  18. Foliar phosphite application has minor phytotoxic impacts across a diverse range of conifers and woody angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Scott, Peter; Bader, Martin Karl-Friedrich; Williams, Nari Michelle

    2016-10-01

    Phytophthora plant pathogens cause tremendous damage in planted and natural systems worldwide. Phosphite is one of the only effective chemicals to control broad-scale Phytophthora disease. Little work has been done on the phytotoxic effects of phosphite application on plant communities especially in combination with plant physiological impacts. Here, we tested the phytotoxic impact of phosphite applied as foliar spray at 0, 12, 24 and 48 kg a.i. ha(-1) . Eighteen-month-old saplings of 13 conifer and angiosperm species native to New Zealand, and two exotic coniferous species were treated and the development of necrotic tissue and chlorophyll-a-fluorescence parameters (optimal quantum yield, Fv /Fm ; effective quantum yield of photosystem II, ΦPSII ) were assessed. In addition, stomatal conductance (gs ) was measured on a subset of six species. Significant necrosis assessed by digital image analysis occurred in only three species: in the lauraceous canopy tree Beilschmiedia tawa (8-14%) and the understory shrub Dodonaea viscosa (5-7%) across phosphite concentrations and solely at the highest concentration in the myrtaceous pioneer shrub Leptospermum scoparium (66%). In non-necrotic tissue, Fv /Fm , ΦPSII and gs remained unaffected by the phosphite treatment. Overall, our findings suggest minor phytotoxic effects resulting from foliar phosphite application across diverse taxa and regardless of concentration. This study supports the large-scale use of phosphite as a management tool to control plant diseases caused by Phytophthora pathogens in plantations and natural ecosystems. Long-term studies are required to ascertain potential ecological impacts of repeated phosphite applications.

  19. Evaluating nurse plants for restoring native woody species to degraded subtropical woodlands

    PubMed Central

    Yelenik, Stephanie G; DiManno, Nicole; D'Antonio, Carla M

    2015-01-01

    Harsh habitats dominated by invasive species are difficult to restore. Invasive grasses in arid environments slow succession toward more desired composition, yet grass removal exacerbates high light and temperature, making the use of “nurse plants” an appealing strategy. In this study of degraded subtropical woodlands dominated by alien grasses in Hawai'i, we evaluated whether individuals of two native (Dodonaea viscosa, Leptocophylla tameiameia) and one non-native (Morella faya) woody species (1) act as natural nodes of recruitment for native woody species and (2) can be used to enhance survivorship of outplanted native woody species. To address these questions, we quantified the presence and persistence of seedlings naturally recruiting beneath adult nurse shrubs and compared survival and growth of experimentally outplanted seedlings of seven native woody species under the nurse species compared to intact and cleared alien-grass plots. We found that the two native nurse shrubs recruit their own offspring, but do not act as establishment nodes for other species. Morella faya recruited even fewer seedlings than native shrubs. Thus, outplanting will be necessary to increase abundance and diversity of native woody species. Outplant survival was the highest under shrubs compared to away from them with few differences between nurse species. The worst habitat for native seedling survival and growth was within the unmanaged invasive grass matrix. Although the two native nurse species did not differentially affect outplant survival, D. viscosa is the most widespread and easily propagated and is thus more likely to be useful as an initial nurse species. The outplanted species showed variable responses to nurse habitats that we attribute to resource requirements resulting from their typical successional stage and nitrogen fixation capability. PMID:25709807

  20. Evaluating nurse plants for restoring native woody species to degraded subtropical woodlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yelenik, Stephanie G.; DiManno, Nicole; D’Antonio, Carla M.

    2015-01-01

    Harsh habitats dominated by invasive species are difficult to restore. Invasive grasses in arid environments slow succession toward more desired composition, yet grass removal exacerbates high light and temperature, making the use of “nurse plants” an appealing strategy. In this study of degraded subtropical woodlands dominated by alien grasses in Hawai'i, we evaluated whether individuals of two native (Dodonaea viscosa, Leptocophylla tameiameia) and one non-native (Morella faya) woody species (1) act as natural nodes of recruitment for native woody species and (2) can be used to enhance survivorship of outplanted native woody species. To address these questions, we quantified the presence and persistence of seedlings naturally recruiting beneath adult nurse shrubs and compared survival and growth of experimentally outplanted seedlings of seven native woody species under the nurse species compared to intact and cleared alien-grass plots. We found that the two native nurse shrubs recruit their own offspring, but do not act as establishment nodes for other species. Morella faya recruited even fewer seedlings than native shrubs. Thus, outplanting will be necessary to increase abundance and diversity of native woody species. Outplant survival was the highest under shrubs compared to away from them with few differences between nurse species. The worst habitat for native seedling survival and growth was within the unmanaged invasive grass matrix. Although the two native nurse species did not differentially affect outplant survival, D. viscosa is the most widespread and easily propagated and is thus more likely to be useful as an initial nurse species. The outplanted species showed variable responses to nurse habitats that we attribute to resource requirements resulting from their typical successional stage and nitrogen fixation capability.

  1. A Late-Quaternary Pollen Record from Ka'au Crater, O'ahu, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchkiss, Sara; Juvik, James O.

    1999-07-01

    A pollen record from Ka'au Crater, O'ahu, Hawai'i contains evidence for changes in vegetation and climate since about 28,000 14C yr B.P. Zone 1 (ca. 28,100-ca. 22,800 14C yr B.P.) has pollen of dry to mesic forest species, including Pipturus-type, Dodonaea viscosa, Acacia koa, Chenopodium oahuense, Claoxylon sandwicense, Myrsine, and Metrosideros-type. In zone 2 (ca. 22,800-ca. 16,200 14C yr B.P.) Myrsine and Coprosma increase, with herbs, fern allies, and Grammitidaceae suggesting open canopies. Zone 3 (ca. 16,200-ca. 9700 14C yr B.P.) has pollen of wet forest species, including Freycinetia arborea, abundant Pritchardia, and Metrosideros-type. Zone 4 (ca. 9700-ca. 7000 14C yr B.P.) is similar, with less Pritchardia and more Metrosideros-type. Climate reconstruction was based on modern climatic ranges of flowering plants and an index derived from abundance of pollen in surface samples. Both methods agree on a qualitative reconstruction, although the ages are poorly constrained: 28,000-25,000 14C yr B.P. cool and dry; 25,000-23,000 14C yr B.P. dry and warmer; 23,000-20,000 14C yr B.P. moderately dry with declining temperature; 20,000-16,000 14C yr B.P. moderately dry and cool; 16,000-9000 14C yr B.P. warm and wet; 9000-7000 14C yr B.P. warm and possibly drier. Lower precipitation at Ka'au Crater during the late glacial period and last glacial maximum is consistent with the interpretation that the North Pacific subtropical anticyclone was south of its present position. The pollen-derived temperature index yields an estimate of 3°-5°C temperature depression during the last glacial maximum.

  2. Evaluating nurse plants for restoring native woody species to degraded subtropical woodlands.

    PubMed

    Yelenik, Stephanie G; DiManno, Nicole; D'Antonio, Carla M

    2015-01-01

    Harsh habitats dominated by invasive species are difficult to restore. Invasive grasses in arid environments slow succession toward more desired composition, yet grass removal exacerbates high light and temperature, making the use of "nurse plants" an appealing strategy. In this study of degraded subtropical woodlands dominated by alien grasses in Hawai'i, we evaluated whether individuals of two native (Dodonaea viscosa, Leptocophylla tameiameia) and one non-native (Morella faya) woody species (1) act as natural nodes of recruitment for native woody species and (2) can be used to enhance survivorship of outplanted native woody species. To address these questions, we quantified the presence and persistence of seedlings naturally recruiting beneath adult nurse shrubs and compared survival and growth of experimentally outplanted seedlings of seven native woody species under the nurse species compared to intact and cleared alien-grass plots. We found that the two native nurse shrubs recruit their own offspring, but do not act as establishment nodes for other species. Morella faya recruited even fewer seedlings than native shrubs. Thus, outplanting will be necessary to increase abundance and diversity of native woody species. Outplant survival was the highest under shrubs compared to away from them with few differences between nurse species. The worst habitat for native seedling survival and growth was within the unmanaged invasive grass matrix. Although the two native nurse species did not differentially affect outplant survival, D. viscosa is the most widespread and easily propagated and is thus more likely to be useful as an initial nurse species. The outplanted species showed variable responses to nurse habitats that we attribute to resource requirements resulting from their typical successional stage and nitrogen fixation capability.

  3. Volcanism, sedimentation, K/Ar and palynology studies, Yayu and Delbi-Moye Basins, Southwestern Plateau of Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A.

    2014-05-01

    Major element, K/Ar, sedimentation and palynology data are reported on Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks from the Yayu and Delbi-Moye Basins, SW Ethiopia. In the Yayu and Delbi-Moye Basins, pre-rift volcanic (basalts) and post-rift volcanic (basalts) are separated by coal and oil shale-bearing sedimentary rocks. The basalts are tholeiitic in composition. The K/Ar data on the volcanic rocks range from 10.98 ± 0.55 Ma (Lower Miocene i.e. Tortonian) to 111.19 ± 2.83 Ma (Early Cretaceous i.e. Aptian). Inter-Trappean coal and oil shale-bearing sedimentary rocks are widely distributed in the Yayu and Delbi-Moye Basins. The NNW-SSE fault system developed grabens and half-grabens for the deposition of coal and oil shale-bearing sedimentary rocks. The sedimentary successions are dominated by fine to medium-grained sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, carbonaceous shales, carbonaceous claystones, coal and oil shale seams, and are characterized by meandering river and lacustrine depositional environments. Fresh water algae Botryococcus brauni, Pediastrum sp., Polypodii sporites favus and Polypodii sporites afavus and Pachydermites diederixi, are common palynomorphs in the studied coal and oil shales, and are indicators of lacustrine environment. The presence of Peregrinipollis nigericus is consistent with Oligocene to Miocene. The presence of Euphorbiaceae, Papilionacae, Melastomtaceae sp., Dodonaea, Martretia quadricornis, Rubiaceae sp. (pollen derived from tropical shrubs), Sapotaceae spp. and Meliaceae spp. are indicative of humid, tropical rainforest conditions. Extensive bio-assemblages confirm that the age of coal and oil shale-bearing sedimentary rocks to be Oligocene to Miocene.

  4. Dry forest restoration and unassisted native tree seedling recruitment at Auwahi, Maui

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medeiros, Arthur C.; von Allmen, E. I.; Chimera, C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to restore highly degraded but biologically significant forests draw from a limited toolbox. With less than 10% of their former distribution remaining, Hawaiian dry forests, though critically endangered, remain important biological and cultural refugia. At restoration onset (1997), vegetation of restoration and control areas of degraded Auwahi dry forest, Maui Island, was similar, dominated by nonnative graminoids (restoration 78.3%; control 75.4%), especially Cenchrus (Pennisetum) clandestinus. In 2012, unrestored control area vegetation was basically unchanged. In contrast, in the restoration area in 2012, native shrub cover increased from 3.1% to 81.9%, and cover of nonnative graminoids declined from 75.4% to 3.3%. In 2012, nonplanted seedlings of 14 of 22 native tree species and six of seven native shrub species were observed in restoration plots; the majority (99%) were five native (Dodonaea viscosa, Coprosma foliosa, Osteomeles anthyllidifolia, Chamaesyce celastoides, Nestegis sandwicensis) and one nonnative species (Bocconia frutescens). By 2012, stem counts of native woody plants had increased from 12.4 to 135.0/100 m2, and native species diversity increased from 2.4 to 6.6/100 m2. By 2012, seven rare dry forest tree species, Charpentiera obovata, Nothocestrum latifolium, Ochrosia haleakalae, Pleomele auwahiensis, Santalum ellipticum, S. haleakalae, and Streblus pendulinus, had established seedlings and/or saplings within the restoration site, especially notable because natural reproduction is largely lacking elsewhere. Without development and implementation of appropriate management strategies, remaining Hawaiian dry forest will likely disappear within the next century. Multicomponent restoration incorporating ungulate exclusion, weed control, and outplanting as described here offers one strategy to conserve and restore tracts of high-value but degraded forests.

  5. A Comparative study of Volatile Organic Compounds from two desert plant species growing in Southern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paasche, K. M.; Meyers, K.; Jardine, K.

    2012-12-01

    Throughout their lives, plants are subjected to a multitude of stressors, ranging from herbivory to changes in weather. In order to survive, plants have created an arsenal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including green leaf volatiles (GLVs) and aromatic compounds, to combat these stressors. In this study, two plant species, Baccharis salicifolia (Seep willow) and Dodonaea viscosa (Hopbush) were examined for isoprenoids, GLVs, and aromatic compound emissions. Although, the species are not related, they should share some emitted compounds as they can be seen growing in the same environment, though the majority of the emitted compounds should remain unique to each species type. Both the Seep willow, sampled in Catalina State Park, and the Hopbush, sampled at Biosphere 2, were sampled using a Teflon bag enclosure connected to an apex lite air-sampling device and a thermal desorption (TD) tube, which was used to collect the emitted compounds. TD tube samples were analyzed using a Unity 2 thermal desorption system, which was directly connected to a 5975C series gas chromatograph/electron impact mass spectrometer with a triple-axis detector. The major compounds emitted from the Seep willow were GLVs (Octanal, Decanal, and Nonanal) and aromatics (Benzoic acid, Benzaldehyde, 1,2,3-Trifluorobenzene, and Acetophenone). The major compounds emitted from the Hopbush were isoprene and monoterpenes (1R-α-Pinene, Limonene, and α-Phellandrene.) Our results show the two species emit completely different compounds from each other, which could indicate adaptive differences. The Hopbush may be a hardier species better adapted to the Arizona environment as isoprene and monoterpenes have been indicated in thermo tolerance. GLVs on the other hand indicate the Seep willow is under severe stress.

  6. Traditional botanical knowledge of artisanal fishers in southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study characterized the botanical knowledge of artisanal fishers of the Lami community, Porto Alegre, southern Brazil based on answers to the following question: Is the local botanical knowledge of the artisanal fishers of the rural-urban district of Lami still active, even since the district’s insertion into the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre? Methods This region, which contains a mosaic of urban and rural areas, hosts the Lami Biological Reserve (LBR) and a community of 13 artisanal fisher families. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 fishers, complemented by participatory observation techniques and free-lists; in these interviews, the species of plants used by the community and their indicated uses were identified. Results A total of 111 species belonging to 50 families were identified. No significant differences between the diversities of native and exotic species were found. Seven use categories were reported: medicinal (49%), human food (23.2%), fishing (12.3%), condiments (8%), firewood (5%), mystical purposes (1.45%), and animal food (0.72%). The medicinal species with the highest level of agreement regarding their main uses (AMUs) were Aloe arborescens Mill., Plectranthus barbatus Andrews, Dodonaea viscosa Jacq., Plectranthus ornatus Codd, Eugenia uniflora L., and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. For illness and diseases, most plants were used for problems with the digestive system (20 species), followed by the respiratory system (16 species). This community possesses a wide botanical knowledge, especially of medicinal plants, comparable to observations made in other studies with fishing communities in coastal areas of the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. Conclusions Ethnobotanical studies in rural-urban areas contribute to preserving local knowledge and provide information that aids in conserving the remaining ecosystems in the region. PMID:23898973

  7. Facilitating adaptation in montane plants to changing precipitation along an elevation gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Steve; Leopold, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Montane plant communities throughout the world have responded to changes in precipitation and temperature regimes by shifting ranges upward in elevation. Continued warmer, drier climate conditions have been documented and are projected to increase in high-elevation areas in Hawai‘i, consistent with climate change effects reported in other environments throughout the world. Organisms that cannot disperse or adapt biologically to projected climate scenarios in situ may decrease in distributional range and abundance over time. Restoration efforts will need to accommodate future climate change and account for the interactive effects of existing invasive species to ensure long-term persistence. As part of a larger, ongoing restoration effort, we hypothesized that plants from a lower-elevation forest ecotype would have higher rates of survival and growth compared to high-elevation forest conspecifics when grown in common plots along an elevation gradient. We monitored climate conditions at planting sites to identify whether temperature or rainfall influenced survival and growth after 20 weeks. We found that origin significantly affected survival in only one of three native montane species, Dodonaea viscosa. Contrary to our hypothesis, 75.2% of seedlings from high-elevation origin survived in comparison to 58.7% of seedlings from low elevation across the entire elevation gradient. Origin also influenced survival in linearized mixed models that controlled for temperature, precipitation, and elevation in D. viscosa and Chenopodium oahuense. Only C. oahuense seedlings had similar predictors of growth and survival. There were no common patterns of growth or survival between species, indicating that responses to changing precipitation and emperature regimes varied between montane plant species. Results also suggest that locally sourced seed is important to ensure highest survival at restoration sites. Further experimentation on larger spatial and temporal scales is necessary

  8. Subunit organization of the abalone Haliotis tuberculata hemocyanin type 2 (HtH2), and the cDNA sequence encoding its functional units d, e, f, g and h.

    PubMed

    Lieb, B; Altenhein, B; Lehnert, R; Gebauer, W; Markl, J

    1999-10-01

    We have developed a HPLC procedure to isolate the two different hemocyanin types (HtH1 and HtH2) of the European abalone Haliotis tuberculata. On the basis of limited proteolytic cleavage, two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis, PAGE, N-terminal protein sequencing and cDNA sequencing, we have identified eight different 40-60-kDa functional units (FUs) in HtH2, termed HtH2-a to HtH2-h, and determined their linear arrangement within the elongated 400-kDa subunit. From a Haliotis cDNA library, we have isolated and sequenced a cDNA clone which encodes the five C-terminal FUs d, e, f, g and h of HtH2. As shown by multiple sequence alignments, defg of HtH2 correspond structurally to defg from Octopus dofleini hemocyanin. HtH2-e is the first FU of a gastropod hemocyanin to be sequenced. The new Haliotis hemocyanin sequences are compared to their counterparts in Octopus, Helix pomatia and HtH1 (from the latter, the sequences of FU-f, FU-g and FU-h have recently been determined) and discussed in relation to the recent 2.3 A X-ray structure of FU-g from Octopus hemocyanin and the 15 A three-dimensional reconstruction of the Megathura crenulata hemocyanin didecamer from electron micrographs. This data allows, for the first time, an insight into the evolution of the two functionally different hemocyanin isoforms found in marine gastropods. It appears that they evolved several hundred million years ago within the Prosobranchia, after separation of the latter from the branch leading to the Pulmonata. Moreover, as a structural explanation for the inefficiency of the type 1 hemocyanin to form multidecamers in vivo, the additional N-glycosylation sites in HtH1 compared to HtH2 are discussed.

  9. A revision of the Chinese Trigonalyidae (Hymenoptera, Trigonalyoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-yan; van Achterberg, Cornelis; He, Jun-hua; Xu, Zai-fu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Chinese fauna of the family Trigonalyidae Cresson, 1887, is revised, keyed and fully illustrated for the first time. Eight genera of this family (Bakeronymus Rohwer, 1922, Bareogonalos Schulz, 1907, Jezonogonalos Tsuneki, 1991, re-instated, Lycogaster Shuckard, 1841, Orthogonalys Schulz, 1905, Pseudogonalos Schulz, 1906, Taeniogonalos Schulz, 1906 and Teranishia Tsuneki, 1991) are recorded from China. The genus Ischnogonalos Schulz, 1907, is synonymized with Taeniogonalos Schulz, 1906. In total 40 valid species are recognized. Twenty species are new for science: Jezonogonalos elliptifera sp. n., J. jiangliae sp. n., J. luteata sp. n., J. nigrata sp. n., Lycogaster angustula sp. n., L. flavonigrata sp. n., L. nigralva sp. n., Orthogonalys cheni sp. n., O. clypeata sp. n., O. robusta sp. n., Pseudogonalos angusta sp. n., Taeniogonalos bucarinata sp. n., T. cordata sp. n., T. geminata sp. n., T. sculpturata sp. n., T. triangulata sp. n., T. tricolorisoma sp. n., T. uncifera sp. n., Teranishia crenulata sp. n. and T. glabrata sp. n. Two species are reported new for China: Orthogonalys elongata Teranishi, 1929 and Nanogonalos flavocincta Teranishi, 1929 (renamed to Taeniogonalos subtruncata nom. n.). Seven new synonyms are proposed: Poecilogonalos yuasai Teranishi, 1938, and P. maga taiwana Tsuneki, 1991, of Taeniogonalos taihorina (Bischoff, 1914); Taiwanogonalos minima Tsuneki, 1991, and T. similis Tsuneki, 1991, of Taeniogonalos alticola (Tsuneki, 1991); P. intermedia Chen, 1949, and P. unifasciata Chen, 1949, of Taeniogonalos formosana (Bischoff, 1913). Six taxa are recognised as valid species: Bakeronymus seidakka Yamane & Terayama, 1983, Jezonogonalos laeviceps (Tsuneki, 1991), J. satoi (Tsuneki, 1991), Taeniogonalos alticola (Tsuneki, 1991), T. flavoscutellata (Chen, 1949) and T. gestroi (Schulz, 1908). Five new combinations are made: Jezonogonalos laeviceps (Tsuneki, 1991), comb. n., J. satoi (Tsuneki, 1991), comb. n., Taeniogonalos flavoscutellata

  10. Soft-bottom crustacean assemblages in Mediterranean marine caves: the cave of Cerro Gordo (Granada, Spain) as case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Barranco, C.; Guerra-García, J. M.; Sánchez-Tocino, L.; García-Gómez, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Although marine caves are priority conservation areas according to the Directive 92/43/CEE of the European Community, there is a lack of studies dealing with their soft-bottom communities. For a case study, we selected the Cerro Gordo cave at 15 m depth. Three different zones were defined: a semi-dark 25-m long entrance area, a dark intermediate area of 35 m, and the final zone at 90 m from the entrance. Sediment samples were taken from these zones as well as from outside the cave (control) by SCUBA diving. Six rectangular cores of 10 × 250 cm2 were collected in each site for macrofaunal study, and three more replicates were taken to analyze physico-chemical parameters. The granulometry showed a clear gradient from medium sands outside the cave to silt and clay in the inner zone. Measurements of the crustacean assemblages showed that the number of species and abundance were significantly higher outside the cave (30-40 species, >4,000 ind m-2) than inside (5-10 species, <1,000 ind m-2). Multivariate analyses showed a clear difference in species composition between outside and inside the cave. Caprellids, tanaids, cumaceans, and decapods were only found outside the cave, while gammarids and isopods were present both outside and inside the cave. The gammarid Siphonoecetes sabatieri and the tanaid Apseudes latreilli were the dominant species outside the cave, while the gammarids Harpinia pectinata, Harpinia crenulata, and Harpinia ala were dominant inside. The present study represents an increase in depth range and geographic distribution for Kupellonura mediterranea and Monoculodes packardi. This is the first description of soft-bottom crustacean communities from submarine caves of southern Spain.

  11. The genus Cephaloleia Chevrolat, 1836 (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae)

    PubMed Central

    Staines, Charles L.; García-Robledo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The species of the Neotropical genus Cephaloleia Chevrolat, 1836 are revised. We present a key to the known larvae of Cephaloleia (8 species), a key to the 95 species known to occur in Mexico, Central America and the West Indies, and a key to the 138 species known to occur in South America. All identification keys were translated to Spanish. Descriptions for the 214 known species of Cephaloleia as well as illustrations for 212 species are presented. The following species are removed from Cephaloleia: C. bipartita Pic, 1926c is transferred to Hybosispa Weise, 1910; C. minasensis Pic, 1931 and C. viridis Pic, 1931 are transferred to Stenispa Baly, 1858. The following species are described as new: C. abdita sp. n. from Brazil; C. amba sp. n. from Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru; C. angustacollis sp. n. from Ecuador; C. brevis sp. n. from French Guiana; C. calathae sp. n. from Costa Rica; C. chica sp. n. from Peru; C. conforma sp. n. from Costa Rica; C. crenulata sp. n. from Ecuador; C. gemma sp. n. from Bolivia and Brazil; C. horvitzae sp. n. from French Guiana; C. interrupta sp. n. from Costa Rica; C. kressi sp. n. from Costa Rica; C. lenticula sp. n. from Ecuador, French Guiana, Peru, and Suriname; C. nana sp. n. from Ecuador; C. ochra sp. n. from Ecuador; C. stainesi sp. n. from Costa Rica; and C. susanae sp. n. from Brazil and Ecuador. Cephaloleia simoni Pic, 1934 is treated as Incertae sedis. The larvae of C. erichsonii Baly, 1858 and C. puncticollis Baly, 1885 are described and illustrated. PMID:25197208

  12. Hemocyanins Stimulate Innate Immunity by Inducing Different Temporal Patterns of Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ta-Ying; Arancibia, Sergio; Born, Raimundo; Tampe, Ricardo; Villar, Javiera; Del Campo, Miguel; Manubens, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Hemocyanins induce a potent Th1-dominant immune response with beneficial clinical outcomes when used as a carrier/adjuvant in vaccines and nonspecific immunostimulant in cancer. However, the mechanisms by which hemocyanins trigger innate immune responses, leading to beneficial adaptive immune responses, are unknown. This response is triggered by a proinflammatory signal from various components, of which macrophages are an essential part. To understand how these proteins influence macrophage response, we investigated the effects of mollusks hemocyanins with varying structural and immunological properties, including hemocyanins from Concholepas concholepas, Fissurella latimarginata, and Megathura crenulata (keyhole limpet hemocyanin), on cultures of peritoneal macrophages. Hemocyanins were phagocytosed and slowly processed. Analysis of this process showed differential gene expression along with protein levels of proinflammatory markers, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40, and TNF-α. An extended expression analysis of 84 cytokines during a 24-h period showed a robust proinflammatory response for F. latimarginata hemocyanin in comparison with keyhole limpet hemocyanin and C. concholepas hemocyanin, which was characterized by an increase in the transcript levels of M1 cytokines involved in leukocyte recruitment. These cytokine genes included chemokines (Cxcl1, Cxcl3, Cxcl5, Ccl2, and Ccl3), ILs (Il1b and Ifng), growth factors (Csf2 and Csf3), and TNF family members (Cd40lg). The protein levels of certain cytokines were increased. However, every hemocyanin maintains downregulated key M2 cytokine genes, including Il4 and Il5. Collectively, our data demonstrate that hemocyanins are able to trigger the release of proinflammatory factors with different patterns of cytokine expression, suggesting differential signaling pathways and transcriptional network mechanisms that lead to the activation of M1-polarized macrophages. PMID:27183578

  13. Distribution of benthic marine invertebrates at northern latitudes ― An evaluation applying multi-algorithm species distribution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meißner, Karin; Fiorentino, Dario; Schnurr, Sarah; Martinez Arbizu, Pedro; Huettmann, Falk; Holst, Sabine; Brix, Saskia; Svavarsson, Jörundur

    2014-01-01

    Different techniques of species distribution modeling were applied to evaluate the distribution of eight benthic marine species in Icelandic waters. The species examined were Symplectoscyphus tricuspidatus, Stegopoma plicatile (both Hydrozoa), Prionospio cirrifera, Amphicteis gunneri (both Polychaeta), Desmosoma strombergi, Eurycope producta (both Isopoda), Andaniella pectinata and Harpinia crenulata (both Amphipoda). Information on 13 environmental variables (temperature mean, temperature mean SD, temperature minimum, temperature maximum, salinity mean, salinity mean SD, oxygen content, particulate organic carbon, seasonal variation index, bottom roughness, sediment thickness, acidification) and records of occurrences of these eight species was collated in an ArcGIS project. Modeling methods applied were MARS, TreeNet, and MaxENT. According to area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) model assessment values, models with moderate to outstanding discriminatory power were found for all species. There was a good overlap in the overall pattern of prediction for most species independent on the modeling technique. Among the three applied techniques MARS seemed to generalize most whereas TreeNet predictions very precisely reflected information from the training data set. The distribution of the selected benthic invertebrate species in Icelandic waters could be linked to a variety of environmental factors related to oceanography, seabed topography and human impact. Their multivariate interactions acted as a structuring force of species distribution, instead of just their one by one individual influence. The selected predictors varied between the different models for the same species. They substituted each other in different models. The expected distribution of the examined species was mapped for a seascape of known environmental settings. Such maps will serve as excellent references in future impact studies and enable the detection of changes in the distribution of

  14. Potentiation of Photosynthetic Oxygen Evolution in Red Light by Small Quantities of Monochromatic Blue Light 1

    PubMed Central

    Terborgh, John

    1966-01-01

    Growth of the giant unicellular green alga, Acetabularia crenulata, stops in red light of broad spectral composition, but can be restored by the addition of small quantities of blue light. Long-term records of O2 evolution indicate that the photosynthesis of Acetabularia responds in a parallel manner to blue light. Cells photosynthesizing at a light-limited rate in white light were given red light at an intensity that served to match or somewhat increase the instantaneous rate of O2 production. A rapid decline in the rate commenced within 15 minutes and continued for 2 hours or more until it had fallen to 20 to 40% of the initial level. Very small doses of violet or blue radiation (<10−8 Einstein/cm2) then affected a complete, though temporary, restoration of the original rate of photosynthesis. Responses began after a lag of 4 to 5 minutes, regardless of their magnitude, and in the most favorable instances persisted 4 to 6 hours after the stimulus. Blue light treatments were effective as flashes as brief as 2.5 seconds, given simultaneously or in sequence with the red measuring light, or as low-intensity continuous irradiations. Blue-light induction of the response was stable over at least 5 minutes of darkness. After a suitable red-light pretreatment, 2 other algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardi and Fucus vesiculosus, were shown to respond similarly to low-intensity irradiations with blue or blue-green light. Crude action spectra were determined for the response of Acetabularia to short wavelength irradiations given simultaneously or sequentially with the red measuring light. Two peaks of effectiveness were found, one near 450 mμ, and another, as yet ill defined, in the near UV. The data suggest a shoulder around 490 mμ. All wavelengths above 540 mμ were entirely ineffective. PMID:16656414

  15. Biodiversity of benthic microbial communities in bioturbated coastal sediments is controlled by geochemical microniches.

    PubMed

    Bertics, Victoria J; Ziebis, Wiebke

    2009-11-01

    We used a combination of field and laboratory approaches to address how the bioturbation activity of two crustaceans, the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and the fiddler crab Uca crenulata, affects the microbial diversity in the seabed of a coastal lagoon (Catalina Harbor, Santa Catalina Island, CA, USA). Detailed geochemical analyses, including oxygen microsensor measurements, were performed to characterize environmental parameters. We used a whole-assemblage fingerprinting approach (ARISA: amplified ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) to compare bacterial diversity along geochemical gradients and in relation to subsurface microniches. The two crustaceans have different burrowing behaviors. The ghost shrimp maintains complex, deep-reaching burrows and permanently lives subterranean, supplying its burrow with oxygen-rich water. In contrast, the fiddler crab constructs simpler, J-shaped burrows, which it does not inhabit permanently and does not actively ventilate. Our goal was to address how varying environmental parameters affect benthic microbial communities. An important question in benthic microbial ecology has been whether burrows support similar or unique communities compared with the sediment surface. Our results showed that sediment surface microbial communities are distinct from subsurface assemblages and that different burrow types support diverse bacterial taxa. Statistical comparisons by canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the availability of oxidants (oxygen, nitrate, ferric iron) play a key role in determining the presence and abundance of different taxa. When geochemical parameters were alike, microbial communities associated with burrows showed significant similarity to sediment surface communities. Our study provides implications on the community structure of microbial communities in marine sediments and the factors controlling their distribution.

  16. Molluskan Hemocyanins Activate the Classical Pathway of the Human Complement System through Natural Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Sosoniuk-Roche, Eduardo; Vallejos, Gerardo; López, Mercedes N.; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; Aguilar-Guzmán, Lorena; Valck, Carolina; Ferreira, Arturo; Becker, María Inés

    2017-01-01

    Molluskan hemocyanins are enormous oxygen-carrier glycoproteins that show remarkable immunostimulatory properties when inoculated in mammals, such as the generation of high levels of antibodies, a strong cellular reaction, and generation of non-specific antitumor immune responses in some types of cancer, particularly for superficial bladder cancer. These proteins have the ability to bias the immune response toward a Th1 phenotype. However, despite all their current uses with beneficial clinical outcomes, a clear mechanism explaining these properties is not available. Taking into account reports of natural antibodies against the hemocyanin of the gastropod Megathura crenulata [keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)] in humans as well as other vertebrate species, we report here for the first time, the presence, in sera from unimmunized healthy donors, of antibodies recognizing, in addition to KLH, two other hemocyanins from gastropods with documented immunomodulatory capacities: Fisurella latimarginata hemocyanin (FLH) and Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). Through an ELISA screening, we found IgM and IgG antibodies reactive with these hemocyanins. When the capacity of these antibodies to bind deglycosylated hemocyanins was studied, no decreased interaction was detected. Moreover, in the case of FLH, deglycosylation increased antibody binding. We evaluated through an in vitro complement deposition assay whether these antibodies activated the classical pathway of the human complement system. The results showed that all three hemocyanins and their deglycosylated counterparts elicited this activation, mediated by C1 binding to immunoglobulins. Thus, this work contributes to the understanding on how the complement system could participate in the immunostimulatory properties of hemocyanins, through natural, complement-activating antibodies reacting with these proteins. Although a role for carbohydrates cannot be completely ruled out, in our experimental setting

  17. First contribution of mites (Acari) to the forensic analysis of hanged corpses: a case study from Spain.

    PubMed

    Saloña-Bordas, Marta I; Perotti, M Alejandra

    2014-11-01

    This case study from North Spain, highlights the importance of the collection of mites in addition to insects, from crime scenes or corpses subjected to environmental constraints that reduce or minimise insect activity, such as hanged corpses. In addition, this analysis highlights the relevance of arthropods' collection in the field, even after the corpse has been moved away for autopsy. Four species of mites, phoretic on carrion (Silphidae) and rove (Staphylinidae) beetles, complemented and reinforced the autopsy analysis as well as the scarce information provided by insect activity. Poecilochirus carabi Canestrini & Canestrini, 1882 and Poecilochirus (Physoparasitus) davydovae Hyatt, 1980 (Mesostigmata: Parasitidae) were found in association with two Silphidae, Nicrophorus Fabricius, 1775 and Necrodes Leach, 1815, only when sampled in the autopsy room; this is suggestive of host-switching of mites and was likely due to the lack of availability of specific carriers in the field. The interpretation of the activity of Parasitidae mites both in the field and the autopsy room allows a better understanding of the timing and circumstances of decomposition. Phoretic deutonymphs of Pelzneria Scheucher 1957 (Astigmata: Histiostomatidae) were highly abundant, mostly P. crenulata Oudemans, 1909 and are reported for the first time on a Staphylinidae rove beetle, Creophilus maxillosus (L., 1758). Surprisingly, in this case study no Pelzneria were associated with the Silphidae found, which are their most common hosts, such as Necrodes littoralis (L., 1758) and Nicrophorus interruptus (Stephens, 1830). All histiostomatids were removed from the staphylinid (rove beetle) collected from the soil, at the scene of death, suggesting a recent arrival of the beetle. The occurrence of Staphylinidae beetles and their associated mites, such as Parasitidae and Pelzneria, and the information they provided would have been easily overlooked or lost if only the autopsy sampling would have been

  18. Shrub encroachment is linked to extirpation of an apex predator.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher E; Eldridge, David J; Ripple, William J; Crowther, Mathew S; Moore, Ben D; Letnic, Mike

    2017-01-01

    The abundance of shrubs has increased throughout Earth's arid lands. This 'shrub encroachment' has been linked to livestock grazing, fire-suppression and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations facilitating shrub recruitment. Apex predators initiate trophic cascades which can influence the abundance of many species across multiple trophic levels within ecosystems. Extirpation of apex predators is linked inextricably to pastoralism, but has not been considered as a factor contributing to shrub encroachment. Here, we ask if trophic cascades triggered by the extirpation of Australia's largest terrestrial predator, the dingo (Canis dingo), could be a driver of shrub encroachment in the Strzelecki Desert, Australia. We use aerial photographs spanning a 51-year period to compare shrub cover between areas where dingoes are historically rare and common. We then quantify contemporary patterns of shrub, shrub seedling and mammal abundances, and use structural equation modelling to compare competing trophic cascade hypotheses to explain how dingoes could influence shrub recruitment. Finally, we track the fate of seedlings of an encroaching shrub, hopbush (Dodonaea viscosa angustissima), during a period optimal for seedling recruitment, and quantify removal rates of hopbush seeds by rodents from enriched seed patches. Shrub cover was 26-48% greater in areas where dingoes were rare than common. Our structural equation modelling supported the hypothesis that dingo removal facilitates shrub encroachment by triggering a four level trophic cascade. According to this model, increased mesopredator abundance in the absence of dingoes results in suppressed abundance of consumers of shrub seeds and seedlings, rodents and rabbits respectively. In turn, suppressed abundances of rodents and rabbits in the absence of dingoes relaxed a recruitment bottleneck for shrubs. The results of our SEM were supported by results showing that rates of hopbush seedling survival and seed removal were 1

  19. Preference of goats (Capra hircus L.) for tanniniferous browse species available in semi-arid areas in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mengistu, G; Bezabih, M; Hendriks, W H; Pellikaan, W F

    2016-11-29

    The objectives were to determine browse species preference of goats using dry matter intake (DMI) as a proxy, to compare preference when offered in combination with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and to establish relationships between browse species intake and chemical compositional data. Air-dried leaves of Acacia etbaica, Cadaba farinosa, Capparis tomentosa, Dichrostachys cinerea, Dodonaea angustifolia, Euclea racemosa, Maerua angolensis, Maytenus senegalensis, Rhus natalensis and Senna singueana were used. Two cafeteria trials, each lasting 10 days, were conducted using four local mature male goats of 2-2.5 years receiving a daily ration of grass hay (4% of body weight) and 200 g wheat bran. In trial 1, goats were offered 25 g of each browse species for a total of 30 min with intake, time spent on consumption and the number of visits to specific browse species recorded at 10-min intervals. In trial 2, the same procedure was followed except that 25 g of PEG 4000 was added to the daily wheat bran ration. Crude protein and neutral detergent fibre in browse species ranged from 69.0-245.5 to 159.8-560.6 g/kg dry matter (DM) respectively. Total phenols and total tannins contents ranged between 3.7-70.6 and 2.5-68.1 mg tannic acid equivalent/g DM, respectively, and condensed tannins 1.7-18.4 Abs550 nm /g DM. Preference indicators measured in the first 10 min of browse species intake differed significantly among browse species and with PEG (p < 0.0001). Principal components explained 69.9% of the total variation in browse species DMI. Despite the high tannin levels, D. cinerea, R. natalensis and A. etbaica were the most preferred species regardless of PEG presence. Tannin levels at the observed browse species DMI did not determine preference, instead, preference appeared to be based on hemicellulose. Determining browse species preference is essential to exploit them to improve nutrient utilization and control parasites in goats.