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Sample records for agb carbon stars

  1. The carbon star adventure: modelling atmospheres of a set of C-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Gioia; Paladini, Claudia; Hron, Josef; Aringer, Bernard; Erikssonn, Kjell; Groenewegen, Martin

    2015-08-01

    We study the atmospheres of a set of carbon rich AGB stars to improve our understanding of the dynamic processes happening in there.For the first time we compare in a systematic way spectrometric, photometric and mid-infrared (VLTI/MIDI) interferometric measurements with different type of model atmospheres: (1) hydrostatic models + MOD-dusty models (Groenewegen, 2012) added a posteriori; (2) self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres (Eriksson et al. 2014). These allow to interpret in a coherent way the dynamic behavior of gas and dust. In addition, the geometric model fitting tool for interferometric data GEM-FIND is applied to carry out a first interpretation of the structural environment of the stars.The results underline that the joint use of different kind of observations, as photometry, spectroscopy and interferometry, is essential for understanding and modeling the atmosphere of pulsating C-rich AGB stars. For our first target, the carbon-rich Mira star RU Vir, the dynamic model atmospheres fit well the ISO/SWS spectra in the wavelength range λ = [2.9, 13.0] μm. However, the object turned out to be “peculiar”: we notice a discrepancy in the visible part of the SED, and in the visibilities. Possible causes are intra/inter-cycle variations in the dynamic model atmospheres, and an eventual presence of a companion star and/or disk or clumps in the atmosphere of RU Vir (Rau et al. subm.). Results on further targets will also be presented.The increased sample of C-rich stars of this work provides crucial constraints for the atmospheric structure and the formation of SiC. Moreover the second generation VLTI instrument MATISSE will be a perfect tool to detect and study asymmetries, as it will allow interferometric imaging in the L, M, and N bands.

  2. INFRARED TWO-COLOR DIAGRAMS FOR AGB STARS, POST-AGB STARS, AND PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Kyung-Won

    2015-08-01

    We present various infrared two-color diagrams (2CDs) for asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, post-AGB stars, and Planetary Nebulae (PNe) and investigate possible evolutionary tracks. We use catalogs from the available literature for the sample of 4903 AGB stars (3373 O-rich; 1168 C-rich; 362 S-type), 660 post-AGB stars (326 post-AGB; 334 pre-PN), and 1510 PNe in our Galaxy. For each object in the catalog, we cross-identify the IRAS, AKARI, Midcourse Space Experiment, and 2MASS counterparts. The IR 2CDs can provide useful information about the structure and evolution of the dust envelopes as well as the central stars. To find possible evolutionary tracks from AGB stars to PNe on the 2CDs, we investigate spectral evolution of post-AGB stars by making simple but reasonable assumptions on the evolution of the central star and dust shell. We perform radiative transfer model calculations for the detached dust shells around evolving central stars in the post-AGB phase. We find that the theoretical dust shell model tracks using dust opacity functions of amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon roughly coincide with the densely populated observed points of AGB stars, post-AGB stars, and PNe on various IR 2CDs. Even though some discrepancies are inevitable, the end points of the theoretical post-AGB model tracks generally converge in the region of the observed points of PNe on most 2CDs.

  3. AGB stars and presolar grains

    SciTech Connect

    Busso, M.; Trippella, O.; Maiorca, E.; Palmerini, S.

    2014-05-09

    Among presolar materials recovered in meteorites, abundant SiC and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains of AGB origins were found. They showed records of C, N, O, {sup 26}Al and s-element isotopic ratios that proved invaluable in constraining the nucleosynthesis models for AGB stars [1, 2]. In particular, when these ratios are measured in SiC grains, they clearly reveal their prevalent origin in cool AGB circumstellar envelopes and provide information on both the local physics and the conditions at the nucleosynthesis site (the H- and He-burning layers deep inside the structure). Among the properties ascertained for the main part of the SiC data (the so-called mainstream ones), we mention a large range of {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratios, extending below the solar value [3], and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios ≳ 30. Other classes of grains, instead, display low carbon isotopic ratios (≳ 10) and a huge dispersion for N isotopes, with cases of large {sup 15}N excess. In the same grains, isotopes currently feeded by slow neutron captures reveal the characteristic pattern expected from this process at an efficiency slightly lower than necessary to explain the solar main s-process component. Complementary constraints can be found in oxide grains, especially Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals. Here, the oxygen isotopes and the content in {sup 26}Al are of a special importance for clarifying the partial mixing processes that are known to affect evolved low-mass stars. Successes in modeling the data, as well as problems in explaining some of the mentioned isotopic ratios through current nucleosynthesis models are briefly outlined.

  4. Presenting Optical Spectra of AGB Stars in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamren, K.; Guhathakurta, P.; Toloba, E.; Dorman, C. E.; Seth, A. C.; Splash Collaboration; Phat Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We present optical spectra of oxygen- and carbon-rich AGB stars in the disk of the Andromeda spiral galaxy (M31). Our AGB sample is drawn from the ˜10 000 stars covered by both the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey and the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey. This dual coverage means that we have moderate resolution optical spectra taken with the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II 10-m telescope, as well as six-filter HST photometry spanning the ultraviolet, optical and infrared. Our full AGB sample contains 143 carbon-rich AGB stars (C stars) and ˜1700 oxygen-rich AGB stars (M giants). We explore the spatial and kinematic distribution of these stars, the C/M ratio, spectral trends as a function of physical properties, and the fit to synthetic photometry.

  5. The adventure of carbon stars. Observations and modeling of a set of C-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G.; Hron, J.; Paladini, C.; Aringer, B.; Eriksson, K.; Marigo, P.; Nowotny, W.; Grellmann, R.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Modeling stellar atmospheres is a complex and intriguing task in modern astronomy. A systematic comparison of models with multi-technique observations is the only efficient way to constrain the models. Aims: We intend to perform self-consistent modeling of the atmospheres of six carbon-rich AGB stars (R Lep, R Vol, Y Pav, AQ Sgr, U Hya, and X TrA) with the aim of enlarging the knowledge of the dynamic processes occurring in their atmospheres. Methods: We used VLTI/MIDI interferometric observations, in combination with spectro-photometric data, and compared them with self-consistent, dynamic model atmospheres. Results: We found that the models can reproduce spectral energy distribution (SED) data well at wavelengths longer than 1 μm, and the interferometric observations between 8 μm and 10 μm. Discrepancies observed at wavelengths shorter than 1 μm in the SED, and longer than 10 μm in the visibilities, could be due to a combination of data- and model-related effects. The models best fitting the Miras are significantly extended, and have a prominent shell-like structure. On the contrary, the models best fitting the non-Miras are more compact, showing lower average mass loss. The mass loss is of episodic or multi-periodic nature but causes the visual amplitudes to be notably larger than the observed ones. A number of stellar parameters were derived from the model fitting: TRoss, LRoss, M, C/O, and Ṁ. Our findings agree well with literature values within the uncertainties. TRoss, and LRoss are also in good agreement with the temperature derived from the angular diameter T(θ(V-K)) and the bolometric luminosity from the SED fitting Lbol, except for AQ Sgr. The possible reasons are discussed in the text. Finally, θRoss and θ(V-K) agree with one another better for the Miras than for the non-Miras targets, which is probably connected to the episodic nature of the latter models. We also located the stars in the H-R diagram, comparing them with evolutionary

  6. Hot Post-AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.; Gauba, G.; Fujii, T.; Nakada, Y.

    2001-08-01

    From the study of IRAS sources with far-IR colors similar to planetary nebulae (PNe), several proto-planetary nebulae with hot (OB) post-AGB central stars have been detected. These stars form an evolutionary link between the cooler G,F,A supergiant stars that have evolved off the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) and the hot (OB) central stars of PNe. The optical spectra of these objects show strong Balmer emission lines and in some cases low excitation nebular emission lines such as [NII] and [SII] superposed on the OB stellar continuum. The absence of of [OIII] 5007Å line and the presence of low excitation nebular emission lines indicate that photoionisation has just started. The UV(IUE) spectra of some of these objects revealed violet shifted stellar wind P-Cygni profiles of CIV, SiIV and NV, indicating hot and fast stellar wind and post-AGB mass loss. These objects appear to be rapildy evolving into the early stages of PNe similar to that observed in the case of Hen1357 IRAS 17119-5926 (Stingray Nebula) and IRAS 18062+2410 SAO85766.

  7. The Rb problem in massive AGB stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mesa, V.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Zamora, O.; Plez, B.; Manchado, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Lugaro, M.

    2017-03-01

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) is formed by low- and intermediate-mass stars (0.8 M_{⊙} < M < 8 M_{⊙}) in their last nuclear-burning phase, when they develop thermal pulses (TP) and suffer extreme mass loss. AGB stars are the main contributor to the enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM) and thus to the chemical evolution of galaxies. In particular, the more massive AGB stars (M > 4 M_{⊙}) are expected to produce light (e.g., Li, N) and heavy neutron-rich s-process elements (such as Rb, Zr, Ba, Y, etc.), which are not formed in lower mass AGB stars and Supernova explosions. Classical chemical analyses using hydrostatic atmospheres revealed strong Rb overabundances and high [Rb/Zr] ratios in massive AGB stars of our Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds (MC), confirming for the first time that the ^{22}Ne neutron source dominates the production of s-process elements in these stars. The extremely high Rb abundances and [Rb/Zr] ratios observed in the most massive stars (specially in the low-metallicity MC stars) uncovered a Rb problem; such extreme Rb and [Rb/Zr] values are not predicted by the s-process AGB models, suggesting fundamental problems in our present understanding of their atmospheres. We present more realistic dynamical model atmospheres that consider a gaseous circumstellar envelope with a radial wind and we re-derive the Rb (and Zr) abundances in massive Galactic AGB stars. The new Rb abundances and [Rb/Zr] ratios derived with these dynamical models significantly resolve the problem of the mismatch between the observations and the theoretical predictions of the more massive AGB stars.

  8. Constraints on the H2O formation mechanism in the wind of carbon-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombaert, R.; Decin, L.; Royer, P.; de Koter, A.; Cox, N. L. J.; González-Alfonso, E.; Neufeld, D.; De Ridder, J.; Agúndez, M.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Khouri, T.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Kerschbaum, F.; Cernicharo, J.; Vandenbussche, B.; Waelkens, C.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The recent detection of warm H2O vapor emission from the outflows of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars challenges the current understanding of circumstellar chemistry. Two mechanisms have been invoked to explain warm H2O vapor formation. In the first, periodic shocks passing through the medium immediately above the stellar surface lead to H2O formation. In the second, penetration of ultraviolet interstellar radiation through a clumpy circumstellar medium leads to the formation of H2O molecules in the intermediate wind. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of H2O emission for a sample of 18 carbon-rich AGB stars and subsequently constrain which of the above mechanisms provides the most likely warm H2O formation pathway. Methods: Using far-infrared spectra taken with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel telescope, we combined two methods to identify H2O emission trends and interpreted these in terms of theoretically expected patterns in the H2O abundance. Through the use of line-strength ratios, we analyzed the correlation between the strength of H2O emission and the mass-loss rate of the objects, as well as the radial dependence of the H2O abundance in the circumstellar outflow per individual source. We computed a model grid to account for radiative-transfer effects in the line strengths. Results: We detect warm H2O emission close to or inside the wind acceleration zone of all sample stars, irrespective of their stellar or circumstellar properties. The predicted H2O abundances in carbon-rich environments are in the range of 10-6 up to 10-4 for Miras and semiregular-a objects, and cluster around 10-6 for semiregular-b objects. These predictions are up to three orders of magnitude greater than what is predicted by state-of-the-art chemical models. We find a negative correlation between the H2O/CO line-strength ratio and gas mass-loss rate for Ṁg> 5 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1, regardless of the upper-level energy of the relevant transitions

  9. CEMP-s Stars: AGB Yield Predictions and Thermohaline Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisterzo, S.; Gallino, R.; Straniero, O.; Ivans, I. I.; Preston, G. W.; Aoki, W.

    2008-03-01

    CS 29497-030 and CS 31062-050 belong to a sample of C-rich, s-process rich and extremely metal-poor stars (CEMP-s+r). To explain the s-process enrichment, we considered these stars to be extrinsic asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, belonging to binary systems where the more massive AGB companion polluted the observed star (of ~0.8 Msolar) with efficient stellar winds. To explain the r-process enrichment, we assumed that the parental cloud was already enriched in r-process elements. For the main sequence CS 29497-030 we hypothesize that the primary AGB had an initial mass of ~1.3 Msolar and underwent a very limited number of third dredge up episodes. A very small dilution between AGB winds and envelope mass of the observed star is derived by comparing AGB nucleosynthesis yields and observed abundances, consistent with the fact that dwarf stars of ~0.8 Msolar are characterized by a limited subphotospheric convective zone. This is compatible with moderate thermohaline mixing (e.g., [l]). AGB models of higher initial mass undergo an increasing number of third dredge up (TDU) episodes and produce larger carbon and s-process abundances at the surface. For AGB models of 1.5 Msolar and 2 Msolar a good match with the observed s-process abundance distribution can still be found, provided a dilution factor of 0.5 dex or 0.8 dex is applied. The predicted yields of Na and Mg, which are extremely sensitive to the number of thermal pulses, however, would be much higher than observed. CS 31062-050 is a red subgiant that has likely undergone the first dredge up episode, where the convective envelope extends over about 80% of the stellar mass, erasing any effect of thermohaline mixing. The ~1.3 Msolar AGB model will fit the observed elemental distribution, but will only be compatible with a quite large amount of mass accreted by the AGB donor. For this star, AGB models of 1.5 Msolar to 2 Msolar and dilution factors of 1.0 dex to 1.3 dex may be more appropriate, including the

  10. Thermohaline Mixing and Isotopic Ratios in AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancliffe, R. J.

    2015-08-01

    I investigate the effects of thermohaline mixing on the isotopic ratios of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. While thermohaline mixing has been shown to be an effective means of changing the surface composition of low-mass stars while they ascend the upper part of the giant branch, the effect of this mechanism on the AGB is almost negligible. The carbon isotopic ratio is barely affected during the earliest pulses, and as the 12C content increases due to third dredge-up this effect becomes seriously curtailed. This is because structural changes affect the relative locations of 3He-burning and the CNO cycle. While the isotopic ratios are barely affected by thermohaline mixing on the AGB, there is a substantial increase in the surface lithium abundance due to the action of this mechanism.

  11. Models of AGB Stars and their Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Piersanti, L.

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of recursive thermonuclear runaways makes the computation of AGB evolutionary sequences and the related nucleosynthesis a challenging task for stellar modelers. In the last 20 years many efforts have been made to improve the physical description of the interiors of these stars. Nevertheless, the majority of the extant nucleosynthesis results are based on post-process calculations, in which the evolution of the nuclear network and that of the stellar structure are treated separately and, hence, decoupled. In this paper, we review the latest attempts made to obtain more reliable nucleosynthesis calculations based on the physical processes expected to be at work in AGB stars, such as the mixing induced by convection and rotation.

  12. Establishing the Synthetic Contingencies for Life: Following the Carbon from AGB Stars to Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Halfen, D. T.; Woolf, N. J.

    2009-12-01

    The biochemistry of living systems is remarkably selective, utilizing certain chemical compounds and not other, closely related molecules. This selectivity might be a result of interstellar chemistry. Organic synthesis in space is remarkably active. It begins with the carbon-rich chemistry of circumstellar envelopes, which appears to survive in part as these objects evolve into planetary nebula and then into diffuse clouds. Diffuse clouds subsequently collapse into dense clouds, carrying along the chemical imprint of previous syntheses. This cycling of molecular gas provides dense clouds with C-rich starting material, which accelerates organic chemistry in these objects. The low temperature environment of interstellar space restricts available chemical pathways, resulting in molecule formation that is non-combinatorial. Comets, meteorites, and perhaps interplanetary dust particles then bring these select organic compounds to planetary surfaces. Thus, the â??synthetic contingenciesâ?? that led to life on Earth may have been established by interstellar chemistry.

  13. HIRAS images of fossil dust shells around AGB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.; Kester, Do J. M.; Bontekoe, Tj. Romke; Loup, C.

    1994-01-01

    We present high resolution HIRAS 60 and 100 micron images of AGB stars surrounded by fossil dust shells. Resolving the extended emission of the circumstellar dust allows a determination of the mass loss history of the star. We show that the geometry of the 60 micron emission surrounding HR 3126 agrees well with that of the optical reflection nebula. The emission around the carbon star U Hya is resolved into a central point source and a ring of dust, and the mass loss rate in the detached shell is 70 times higher than the current mass loss rate.

  14. AGB star intershell abundances inferred from UV spectra of extremely hot post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Reiff, E.; Kruk, J. W.

    2009-04-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  15. AGB stars in the disk, satellites, and halo of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamren, Katherine M.

    2016-08-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are simultaneously one of the most important and least well understood phases of stellar evolution. Luminous, red, AGB stars are excellent tracers of kinematical and morphological structure, and track the presence of intermediate age populations. In addition, they contribute significantly to the near-infrared flux and gas/dust budgets of galaxies. As a result, they are essential for studying galaxies in both the local and distance universe. However, their observable properties depend on complicated physical processes, including dredge-up, dust production, and stellar pulsations. As a result, they are difficult to model on both the individual and population-level scales. Homogenous samples of AGB stars are necessary to calibrate ever improving models. In this thesis I use data from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo survey to identify and characterize clean, homogenous samples of carbon- and oxygen-rich AGB stars (carbon stars and M-stars, respectively) in the disk, satellites and halo of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). Using these stars, I constrain the ratio (C/M) of carbon- to oxygen-rich in fields throughout the M31 system, compare the AGB stars to their observationally similar contaminants (extrinsic carbon stars and oxygen-rich red giant branch stars), and discuss major physical properties (color, temperature, metallicity, dust production, and variability).

  16. AGB Stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portman, Matthew; Sargent, Benjamin A.; Held, Leander; Kastner, Joel; SAGE Team

    2016-01-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are evolved, pulsating variable stars that generate massive outflows of gas and dust, thereby enriching the interstellar medium (ISM) in the products of stellar nucleosynthesis. Recent studies find the dustiest, most extreme AGB stars contribute a disproportionately large amount of matter to their host galaxies; these extreme AGB stars are also the most variable, and they emit most of their energy at mid-infrared wavelengths. Therefore, using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have imaged several target AGB stars identified in previous surveys of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Our aim is to obtain light curves at 3.6 and 4.5 microns wavelength for these extreme AGB stars. Using multiple epochs of data taken within the last 3 years by our survey and then further comparing this data to past surveys of the SMC and LMC with Spitzer, we were able to generate preliminary light curves for a sample of 30 extreme AGB stars, as well as for other stars found within the image fields. This research project was made possible by the Rochester Institute of Technology Center for Imaging Science Research Experience for Undergraduates program, funded by National Science Foundation grant PHY-1359361 to RIT.

  17. TP-AGB Stars in M31: Results from PHAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, L.; Beerman, L. C.; Boyer, M. L.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Dolphin, A.; Fouesnaeu, M.; Hamren, K.; Johnson, L. C.; Lang, D.; Lewis, A.; Marigo, P.; Rosenfield, P.; Senchyna, P.; Seth, A. C.; Veyette, M.; Weisz, D. R.; Williams, B. F.

    2015-08-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is an HST multi-cycle treasury program that mapped one-third of M31 from the UV through the near-IR. It provides photometry in up to 6 filters for about 117 million stars distributed across ˜20 kpc of the M31 disk, with a spatial resolution comparable to that routinely attained for the Magellanic Clouds from the ground. These data are revolutionising our view of the spatial distribution of stars and dust across M31. Here we present an overview of PHAT data and results, with a focus on the thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars. We comment on (1) the overall spatial distribution of TP-AGB stars as compared to stars of the red giant branch (RGB); (2) the detection of a dramatic drop in the C/M ratio toward the inner M31 disk; (3) the large population of TP-AGB stars in star clusters; (4) an improved view of the planetary nebula population; and (5) the unusual populations of UV-bright stars in the M31 bulge, which correspond to either post-AGB or "failed-AGB” stars. These rich datasets allow us to test the evolution of TP-AGB stars in a metal-rich and star-forming environment, avoiding the incompleteness and distance uncertainties that severely limit similar studies in the Milky Way.

  18. Spectroscopic survey of post-AGB star candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, C. B.; Miranda, L. F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims:Our goal is to establish the true nature of post-AGB star candidates and to identify new post-AGB stars. Methods: We used low resolution optical spectroscopy and we compared the spectra of the candidate post-AGB stars with those of stars in the library specta available in the literature and with spectra of "standard" post-AGB stars, and direct imaging in narrow-band filters. Results: Spectra were obtained for 16 objects: 14 objects have not been observed previously and 2 objects are already known post-AGB stars used as "standards" for identification. From the spectra we identify: six new post-AGB stars with spectral types between G5 and F5, two H ii regions the morphology of which is revealed in the direct images for the first time, a G giant with infrared emission, a young stellar object, a probable post-AGB star with emission lines and three objects for which the classification is still unclear. As a whole, our results provide new, reliable identifications for 10 objects among listed post-AGB star candidates. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), and at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada, which is operated by the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas through the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Granada, Spain). Appendices A-D are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. From AGBs to PNe: understanding the observations of evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, Flavia

    2015-08-01

    Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars represent one of the main stellar sources for dust production in the Universe. We provide a description of the formation and growth of dust particles in the circumstellar envelope of AGBs, based on detailed calculations of the AGB evolutionary phase. We use stellar population synthesis to interpret the Spitzer observations of dusty AGBs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Our results show that carbon-rich and oxygen-rich stars evolve into different and separated regions of the observational diagrams obtained with the Spitzer bands. This allows a straight comparison with the spectroscopically confirmed samples of AGBs in the LMC present in the literature. The overall impact of AGBs on the dust production rate in the LMC is also discussed.The interpretation of the AGB population of the LMC is used to describe the observed chemical abundances of the Planetary Nebulae in the same galaxy. This analysis outlines a clear distinction between stars which experience Hot Bottom Burning and those the Third Dredge Up.

  20. Observational evidence for composite grains in an AGB outflow. MgS in the extreme carbon star LL Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombaert, R.; de Vries, B. L.; de Koter, A.; Decin, L.; Min, M.; Smolders, K.; Mutschke, H.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2012-08-01

    The broad 30 μm feature in carbon stars is commonly attributed to MgS dust particles. However, reproducing the 30 μm feature with homogeneous MgS grains would require much more sulfur relative to the solar abundance. Direct gas-phase condensation of MgS occurs at a low efficiency. Precipitation of MgS on SiC precursor grains provides a more efficient formation mechanism, such that the assumption of homogeneous MgS grains may not be correct. Using a Monte Carlo-based radiative transfer code, we aim to model the 30 μm feature of the extreme carbon star LL Peg with MgS dust particles. We find that for LL Peg this modeling is insensitive to the unknown MgS optical properties at λ < 10 μm. When MgS is allowed to be in thermal contact with amorphous carbon and SiC, the amount of MgS required to reproduce the strength of 30 μm feature agrees with the solar abundance of sulfur, thereby resolving the reported MgS mass problem. We conclude that MgS is a valid candidate to be the carrier of the 30 μm feature when it is part of a composite grain population that has optical properties representative of an ensemble of particle shapes.

  1. Ultraviolet emission from main-sequence companions of AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Roberto; Guerrero, Martín A.

    2016-09-01

    Although the majority of known binary asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are symbiotic systems (i.e. with a white dwarf as a secondary star), main-sequence companions of AGB stars can be more numerous, even though they are more difficult to find because the primary high luminosity hampers the detection of the companion at visual wavelengths. However, in the ultraviolet the flux emitted by a secondary with Teff > 5500 ˜ 6000 K may prevail over that of the primary, and then it can be used to search for candidates to binary AGB stars. In this work, theoretical atmosphere models are used to calculate the UV excess in the GALEX near- and far-UV bands due to a main-sequence companion. After analysing a sample of confirmed binary AGB stars, we propose as a criterium for binarity: (1) the detection of the AGB star in the GALEX far-UV band and/or (2) a GALEX near-UV observed-to-predicted flux ratio >20. These criteria have been applied to a volume-limited sample of AGB stars within 500 pc of the Sun; 34 out of the sample of 58 AGB stars (˜60 per cent) fulfill them, implying to have a main-sequence companion of spectral type earlier than K0. The excess in the GALEX near- and far-UV bands cannot be attributed to a single temperature companion star, thus suggesting that the UV emission of the secondary might be absorbed by the extended atmosphere and circumstellar envelope of the primary or that UV emission is produced in accretion flows.

  2. Dust production in supernovae and AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Mikako

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, the role of supernovae on dust has changed; it has been long proposed that supernovae are dust destroyers, but now recent observations show that core-collapse supernovae can become dust factories. Theoretical models of dust evolution in galaxies have predicted that core-collapse supernovae can be an important source of dust in galaxies, if these supernovae can form a significant mass of dust (0.1-1 solar masses). The Herschel Space Observatory and ALMA detected dust in the ejecta of Supernova 1987A. They revealed an estimated 0.5 solar masses of dust. Herschel also found nearly 0.1 solar masses of dust in historical supernovae remnants, namely Cassiopeia A and the Crab Nebula. If dust grains can survive future interaction with the supernova winds and ambient interstellar medium, core-collapse supernovae can be an important source of dust in the interstellar media of galaxies. We further discuss the total dust mass injected by AGB stars and SNe into the interstellar medium of the Magellanic Clouds.

  3. Stellar Evolution with Rotation: Mixing Processes in AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driebe, T.; Blöcker, T.

    We included diffusive angular momentum transport and rotationally induced mixing processes in our stellar evolution code and studied the influence of rotation on the evolution of intermediate mass stars (M*=2dots6 Msolar) towards and along the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). The calculations start in the fully convective pre-main sequence phase and the initial angular momentu m was adjusted such that on the zero-age main sequence vrot=200 km/ s is achieved. The diffusion coefficients for the five rotational instabilities considered (dynamical shear, secular shear, Eddington-Sweet (ES) circulation, Solberg-Høiland-instability and Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke (GSF) instability) were adopted from Heger et al. (2000, ApJ 528, 368). Mixing efficiency and sensitivity of these processes against molecular weight gradients have been determined by calibration of the main sequence width. In this study we focus on the abundance evolution of carbon. On the one hand, the surface abundance ratios of 12C/13C a nd 12C/16O at the base of the AGB were found to be ≈ 7dots 10 and ≈ 0.1, resp., being a factor of two lower than in non-rotating models. This results from the slow but continuously operating rotationally induced mixing due to the ES-circulation and the GSF-instability during the long main sequence phase. On the other hand, 13C serves as neutron source for interior s-process nucleosynthesis in AGB stars vi a 13C(α,n)16O. Herwig et al. (1997, A&A 324, L81) found that a 13C pocket is forme d in the intershell region of 3 Msolar AGB star if diffusive overshoot is considered. Our calculations show, that mixing processes due to rotation open an alternative channel for the formation of a 13C pocket as found by Langer et al. (1999, A&A 346, L37). Again, ES-circulation and GSF-instability are the predominant rotational mixing processes.

  4. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of southern post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, D. J.; Cottrell, P. L.; Pollard, K. R.; Albrow, M. D.

    2004-05-01

    We present the results of contemporaneous photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 20 post-AGB stars from Mt John University Observatory. Photometric measures were carried our suing Johnson BV and Cousins RI filters, and the radial velocity measurements were acquired using spectra from an echelle spectrograph. Our program spanned five years and the stars covered a range of spectral types from B to K in order to investigate the behavior of post-AGB stars as they evolve away from the AGB. A number of stars proved to be variable inways incompatible with post-AGB models and are reclassified. Periodicities are presented for a number of stars. Photometrically, HD 70379 was found to be pulsating in two modes with periods of 85 and 97 d. The radial velocities also varied, with the peak amplitude occurring when the photometry was also changing most. AI CMi presented three different types of spectra associated with photometric brightness, with varying strengths of narrow emission lines and molecular bandheads. The Hα profiles in almost all of the stars show evidence of emission which varies on time scales of days to months. The Na D line profiles are generally complex showing between 4 and 7 components due to both circumstellar and interstellar material.

  5. Winds of Binary AGB Stars as Observed by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Mečina, M.; Paladini, C.; Cox, N. L. J.; Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Pourbaix, D.; Mohamed, S.; Siopis, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present Herschel/PACS observations of the large-scale environments of binary AGB stars as part of the Mass-loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample. From the literature we found 18 of the objects to be members of physically bound multiple systems. Several show a large-scale far-IR emission which differs significantly from spherical symmetry. A probable cause is the gravitational force of the companion on the stellar AGB wind and the mass-losing star itself. A spiral pattern is thereby imprinted in the dusty stellar wind. The most remarkable structures are found around o Ceti, W Aquilæ, R Aquarii, and π1 Gruis. The environments of o Cet and W Aql show a spiral pattern while the symbiotic nature of R Aqr is revealed as two opposing arms which reflect a nova outburst. The emission around π1 Gru is dominated by two structures, a disk and an arc, which are presumably not caused by the same companion. We found evidence that π1 Gru is a hierarchical triple system in which a close companion attracts the AGB wind onto the orbital plane and the outer companion forms a spiral arm. These far-IR observations underline the role of a companion as a major external influence in creating asymmetric winds in the AGB phase, even before the star becomes a planetary nebula (PN).

  6. On the nature of the most obscured C-rich AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; Karakas, A. I.; Dell'Agli, F.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Boyer, M. L.; Di Criscienzo, M.

    2016-04-01

    The stars in the Magellanic Clouds with the largest degree of obscuration are used to probe the highly uncertain physics of stars in the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase of evolution. Carbon stars in particular provide key information on the amount of third dredge-up and mass-loss. We use two independent stellar evolution codes to test how a different treatment of the physics affects the evolution on the AGB. The output from the two codes is used to determine the rates of dust formation in the circumstellar envelope, where the method used to determine the dust is the same for each case. The stars with the largest degree of obscuration in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are identified as the progeny of objects of initial mass 2.5-3 M⊙ and ˜1.5 M⊙, respectively. This difference in mass is motivated by the difference in the star formation histories of the two galaxies, and offers a simple explanation of the redder infrared colours of C-stars in the LMC compared to their counterparts in the SMC. The comparison with the Spitzer colours of C-rich AGB stars in the SMC shows that a minimum surface carbon mass fraction X(C) ˜ 5 × 10-3 must have been reached by stars of initial mass around 1.5 M⊙. Our results confirm the necessity of adopting low-temperature opacities in stellar evolutionary models of AGB stars. These opacities allow the stars to obtain mass-loss rates high enough (≳10-4 M⊙ yr-1) to produce the amount of dust needed to reproduce the Spitzer colours.

  7. Evolved stars in the Local Group galaxies - I. AGB evolution and dust production in IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Boyer, M. L.; García-Hernández, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    We used models of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, which also describe the dust-formation process in the wind, to interpret the combination of near- and mid-infrared photometric data of the dwarf galaxy IC 1613. This is the first time that this approach is extended to an environment different from the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). Our analysis, based on synthetic population techniques, shows nice agreement between the observations and the expected distribution of stars in the colour-magnitude diagrams obtained with JHK and Spitzer bands. This allows a characterization of the individual stars in the AGB sample in terms of mass, chemical composition and formation epoch of the progenitors. We identify the stars exhibiting the largest degree of obscuration as carbon stars evolving through the final AGB phases, descending from 1-1.25 M⊙ objects of metallicity Z = 10-3 and from 1.5-2.5 M⊙ stars with Z = 2 × 10-3. Oxygen-rich stars constitute the majority of the sample (˜65 per cent), mainly low-mass stars (<2 M⊙) that produce a negligible amount of dust (≤10-7 M⊙ yr-1). We predict the overall dust-production rate from IC 1613, mostly determined by carbon stars, to be ˜6 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1 with an uncertainty of 30 per cent. The capability of the current generation of models to interpret the AGB population in an environment different from the MCs opens the possibility to extend this kind of analysis to other Local Group galaxies.

  8. A Spitzer/IRAC characterization of Galactic AGB and RSG stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Marengo, Massimo; Hora, Joseph L.; Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2015-03-01

    We present new Spitzer/InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) observations of 55 dusty long-period variables (48 asymptotic giant branch, AGB, and 6 red supergiant stars) in the Galaxy that have different chemistry, variability type, and mass-loss rate. O-rich AGB stars (including intrinsic S-type) tend to have redder [3.6]-[8.0] colours than carbon stars for a given [3.6]-[4.5] colour due to silicate features increasing the flux in the 8.0-μm IRAC band. For colours including the 5.8 μm band, carbon stars separate into two distinct sequences, likely due to a variable photospheric C3 feature that is only visible in relatively unobscured, low mass-loss rate sources. Semiregular variables tend to have smaller infrared (IR) excess in [3.6]-[8.0] colour than Miras, consistent with the hypothesis that semiregular variables lose mass discontinuously. Miras have redder colours for longer periods while semiregular variables do not. Galactic AGB stars follow the period-luminosity sequences found for the Magellanic Clouds. Mira variables fall along the fundamental pulsation sequence, while semiregular variables are mostly on overtone sequences. We also derive a relationship between mass-loss rate and [3.6]-[8.0] colour. The fits are similar in shape to those found by other authors for AGBs in the Large Magellanic Cloud, but discrepant in overall normalization, likely due to different assumptions in the models used to derive mass-loss rates. We find that IR colours are not unique discriminators of chemical type, suggesting caution when using colour selection techniques to infer the chemical composition of AGB dust returned to the interstellar medium.

  9. Is CO radio line emission a reliable mass-loss-rate estimator for AGB stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstedt, Sofia; Scḧier, Frederik; Olofsson, Hans

    The final evolutionary stage of low- to intermediate-mass stars, as they evolve along the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), is characterized by mass loss so intense (10-8-10-4 Msol yr-1) that eventually the AGB life time is determined by it. The material lost by the star is enriched in nucleo-synthesized material and thus AGB stars play an important role in the chemical evolution of galaxies. A reliable mass-loss-rate estimator is of utmost importance in order to increase our understanding of late stellar evolution and to reach conclusions about the amount of enriched material recycled by AGB stars. For low-mass-loss-rate AGB stars, modelling of observed rotational CO radio line emission has proven to be a good tool for estimating mass-loss rates [Olofsson et al. (2002) for M-type stars and Schöier & Olofsson (2001) for carbon stars], but several lines are needed to get good constraints. For high-mass-loss-rate objects the situation is more complicated, the main reason being saturation of the optically thick CO lines. Moreover, Kemper et al. (2003) introduced temporal changes in the mass-loss rate, or alternatively, spatially varying turbulent motions, in order to explain observed line-intensity ratios. This puts into question whether it is possible to model the circumstellar envelope using a constant mass-loss rate, or whether the physical structure of the outflow is more complex than normally assumed. We present observations of CO radio line emission for a sample of intermediate- to high-mass-loss-rate AGB stars. The lowest rotational transition line (J =1-0) was observed at OSO and the higher-frequency lines (J =2-1, 3-2, 4-3 and in some cases 6-5) were observed at the JCMT. Using a detailed, non-LTE, radiative transfer model we are able to reproduce observed line ratios (Figure 1) and constrain the mass-loss rates for the whole sample, using a constant mass-loss rate and a "standard" circumstellar envelope model. However, for some objects only a lower limit to

  10. Surprising detection of an equatorial dust lane on the AGB star IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, S. V.; Min, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Canovas, H.; Pols, O. R.; Rodenhuis, M.; de Juan Ovelar, M.; Keller, C. U.; Decin, L.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Understanding the formation of planetary nebulae remains elusive because in the preceding asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase these stars are heavily enshrouded in an optically thick dusty envelope. Methods: To further understand the morphology of the circumstellar environments of AGB stars we observe the closest carbon-rich AGB star IRC+10216 in scattered light. Results: When imaged in scattered light at optical wavelengths, IRC+10216 surprisingly shows a narrow equatorial density enhancement, in contrast to the large-scale spherical rings that have been imaged much further out. We use radiative transfer models to interpret this structure in terms of two models: firstly, an equatorial density enhancement, commonly observed in the more evolved post-AGB stars, and secondly, in terms of a dust rings model, where a local enhancement of mass-loss creates a spiral ring as the star rotates. Conclusions: We conclude that both models can be used to reproduce the dark lane in the scattered light images, which is caused by an equatorially density enhancement formed by dense dust rather than a bipolar outflow as previously thought. We are unable to place constraints on the formation of the equatorial density enhancement by a binary system. Final reduced images (FITS) are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A3Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  11. SMA Spectral Line Imaging Survey at 279 - 355 GHz of the Oxygen-rich AGB Star IK Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beck, E.; Kamiński, T.; Menten, K. M.; Patel, N. A.; Young, K. H.; Gottlieb, C. A.

    2015-08-01

    Dedicated, unbiased spectral scans of asymptotic giant branch stars have so far been published only for a few carbon-rich stars, with a strong focus on the nearby and bright IRC +10216. We present results from a spectral survey of the circumstellar envelope of the oxygen-rich AGB star IK Tau obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at ~ 0'.9 angular resolution in the frequency range 279-355 GHz, expanding the molecular inventory for M-type evolved stars and filling an observational gap. The survey shows over 140 emission lines, belonging to more than 30 species. The emission of AlO and of several vibrationally excited species traces the acceleration of the wind. Isotopic ratios for carbon, silicon, and sulfur will be derived from the observed emission of isotopologues of CO, SiO, SiS, HCN, SO, and SO2. This will allow us to constrain the AGB nucleosynthesis of IK Tau. We highlight the first detection of PO and PN around an oxygen-rich AGB star, detected at unexpectedly high abundances, and emphasise the importance of unbiased spectral surveys of AGB stars and the need for updated chemical models.

  12. The role of AGB stars feedback in sustaining galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, A.; van Loon, J. Th.; Khosroshahi, H.

    We have conducted a near-infrared monitoring campaign at the UK InfraRed Telescope, of the Local Group spiral galaxy M 33. The main aim was to identify stars in the very final stage of their evolution, and for which the luminosity is more directly related to the birth mass than the more numerous less-evolved giant stars that continue to increase in luminosity. In first instance, only the central square kiloparsec were monitored and analysed, with the UIST camera. Photometry was obtained for 18,398 stars; of these 812 stars were found to be variable, most of which are asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We constructed the birth mass function and hence derived the star formation history. These stars are also important dust factories. We measure their dust production rates from a combination of our data with Spitzer Space Telescope mid-IR photometry. The mass loss rates are seen to increase with increasing strength of pulsation and with increasing bolometric luminosity. We construct a 2D map of the mass return rate, showing a radial decline but also local enhancements due to the concentration of red supergiants. We conclude that star formation in the central region of M 33 can only be sustained if gas is accreted from further out in the disc or from circum-galactic regions. By using data of the wide-field camera (WFCAM), the campaign was expanded to cover two orders of magnitude larger area, comprising the disc of M 33 and its spiral arms. Photometry was obtained for 403,734 stars; of these 4643 stars were found to be variable. We here present the star formation history across the disc of M 33.

  13. Out on a Limb: Updates on the Search for X-ray Emission from AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montez, Rodolfo; Ramstedt, Sofia; Santiago-Boyd, Andrea; Kastner, Joel; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    X-rays from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are rarely detected, however, few modern X-ray observatories have targeted AGB stars. In 2012, we searched a list of 480 galactic AGB stars and found a total of 13 targeted or serendipitous observations with few detections (Ramstedt et al. 2012). Since this initial search new programs have successfully targeted and detected X-ray emission from a handful of AGB stars. The X-ray emission, when detected, reveals high temperature plasma (>= 10 MK). This plasma might be heated by a large-scale magnetic field or indicate the presence of accretion onto a compact companion. In this poster, we update our search for X-ray emission from AGB stars with a review of their characteristics, potential origins, and impact of X-ray emission in this late stage of stellar evolution.

  14. Understanding AGB evolution in Galactic bulge stars from high-resolution infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenthaler, S.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Wood, P. R.; Lebzelter, T.; Aringer, B.; Schultheis, M.; Ryde, N.

    2015-08-01

    An analysis of high-resolution near-infrared spectra of a sample of 45 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars towards the Galactic bulge is presented. The sample consists of two subsamples, a larger one in the inner and intermediate bulge, and a smaller one in the outer bulge. The data are analysed with the help of hydrostatic model atmospheres and spectral synthesis. We derive the radial velocity of all stars, and the atmospheric chemical mix ([Fe/H], C/O, 12C/13C, Al, Si, Ti, and Y) where possible. Our ability to model the spectra is mainly limited by the (in)completeness of atomic and molecular line lists, at least for temperatures down to Teff ≈ 3100 K. We find that the subsample in the inner and intermediate bulge is quite homogeneous, with a slightly subsolar mean metallicity and only few stars with supersolar metallicity, in agreement with previous studies of non-variable M-type giants in the bulge. All sample stars are oxygen-rich, C/O < 1.0. The C/O and carbon isotopic ratios suggest that third dredge-up (3DUP) is absent among the sample stars, except for two stars in the outer bulge that are known to contain technetium. These stars are also more metal-poor than the stars in the intermediate or inner bulge. Current stellar masses are determined from linear pulsation models. The masses, metallicities and 3DUP behaviour are compared to AGB evolutionary models. We conclude that these models are partly in conflict with our observations. Furthermore, we conclude that the stars in the inner and intermediate bulge belong to a more metal-rich population that follows bar-like kinematics, whereas the stars in the outer bulge belong to the metal-poor, spheroidal bulge population.

  15. Detailed abundance study of four s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aarle, E.; Van Winckel, H.; De Smedt, K.; Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The photospheric abundances of evolved solar-type stars of different metallicities serve as probes into stellar evolution theory. Aims: Stellar photospheres of post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars bear witness to the internal chemical enrichment processes, integrated over their entire stellar evolution. Here we study post-AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). With their known distances, these rare objects are ideal tracers of AGB nucleosynthesis and dredge-up phenomena. Methods: We used the UVES spectrograph mounted on the Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory, to obtain high-resolution spectra with high signal-to-noise of a sample of four post-AGB stars. The objects display a spectral energy distribution that indicates the presence of circumstellar dust. We perform a detailed abundance analysis on the basis of these spectra. Results: All objects are C-rich, and strongly enhanced in s-process elements. We deduced abundances of heavy s-process elements for all stars in the sample, and even found an indication of the presence of Hg in the spectrum of one object. The metallicity of all stars except J053253.51-695915.1 is considerably lower than the average value that is observed for the LMC. The derived luminosities show that we witness the late evolution of low-mass stars with initial masses close to 1 M⊙. An exception is J053253.51-695915.1 and we argue that this object is likely a binary. Conclusions: We confirmed the correlation between the efficiency of the third-dredge up and the neutron exposure that is detected in Galactic post-AGB stars. The non-existence of a correlation between metallicity and neutron irradiation is also confirmed and expanded to smaller metallicities. We confirm the status of 21 μm stars as post-carbon stars. Current theoretical AGB models overestimate the observed C/O ratios and fail to reproduce the variety of s-process abundance patterns that is observed in otherwise very similar objects

  16. Transitory O-rich chemistry in heavily obscured C-rich post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; García-Lario, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Engels, D.; Perea-Calderón, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    Spitzer/IRS spectra of eleven heavily obscured C-rich sources rapidly evolving from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to Planetary Nebulae are presented. IRAM 30m observations for three of these post-AGBs are also reported. A few (3) of these sources are known to exhibit strongly variable maser emission of O-bearing molecules such as OH and H2 O, suggesting a transitory O-rich chemistry because of the quickly changing physical and chemical conditions in this short evolutionary phase. Interestingly, the Spitzer/IRS spectra show a rich circumstellar carbon chemistry, as revealed by the detection of small hydrocarbon molecules such as C2H2, C4H2, C6H2, C6H6, and HCN. Benzene is detected towards two sources, bringing up to three the total number of Galactic post-AGBs where this molecule has been detected. In addition, we report evidence for the possible detection of other hydrocarbon molecules like HC3N, CH3C2H, and CH3 in several of these sources. The available IRAM 30m data confirm that the central stars are C-rich - in despite of the presence of O-rich masers - and the presence of high velocity molecular outflows together with extreme AGB mass-loss rates (∼⃒10-4 Mʘ /yr). Our observations confirm the polymerization model of Cernicharo [1] that predicts a rich photochemistry in the neutral regions of these objects on timescales shorter than the dynamical evolution of the central HII region, leading to the formation of small C-rich molecules and a transitory O-rich chemistry.

  17. Discovery of a Metal-poor, Luminous Post-AGB Star that Failed the Third Dredge-up.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Van Winckel, H.; Wood, P. R.; Asplund, M.; Karakas, A. I.; Lattanzio, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    Post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars are known to be chemically diverse. In this paper we present the first observational evidence of a star that has failed the third dredge-up (TDU). J005252.87-722842.9 is an A-type (T eff = 8250 ± 250 K) luminous (8200 ± 700 L ⊙) metal-poor ([Fe/H] = ‑1.18 ± 0.10) low-mass (M initial ≈ 1.5–2.0 M ⊙) post-AGB star in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Through a systematic abundance study, using high-resolution optical spectra from UVES, we found that this likely post-AGB object shows an intriguing photospheric composition with no confirmed carbon-enhancement (upper limit of [C/Fe] < 0.50) nor enrichment of s-process elements. We derived an oxygen abundance of [O/Fe] = 0.29 ± 0.1. For Fe and O, we took the effects of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium into account. We could not derive an upper limit for the nitrogen abundance as there are no useful nitrogen lines within our spectral coverage. The chemical pattern displayed by this object has not been observed in single or binary post-AGBs. Based on its derived stellar parameters and inferred evolutionary state, single-star nucleosynthesis models predict that this star should have undergone TDU episodes while on the AGB, and it should be carbon enriched. However, our observations are in contrast with these predictions. We identify two possible Galactic analogs that are likely to be post-AGB stars, but the lack of accurate distances (hence luminosities) to these objects does not allow us to confirm their post-AGB status. If they have low luminosities, then they are likely to be dusty post-RGB stars. The discovery of J005252.87-722842.9 reveals a new stellar evolutionary channel whereby a star evolves without any TDU episodes.

  18. Binarity and Accretion: X-Ray Emission from AGB stars with FUV Excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    2012-10-01

    We propose a pilot survey for X-ray emission from AGB stars that are candidates for having binary companions with active accretion. These objects were identified via our innovative technique to search for FUV/NUV excesses in AGB stars using GALEX. The detection (or non-detection) of X-rays from this sample will enable us to begin testing models for the origin of the UV-excesses, leading to vital breakthroughs in our understanding of accretion-related phenomena and binarity in AGB stars. A larger survey, optimised using results fron this study, will be proposed in future cycles.

  19. The ALMA detection of CO rotational line emission in AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Marigo, P.; Sloan, G. C.; Decin, L.; Feast, M. W.; Goldman, S. R.; Justtanont, K.; Kerschbaum, F.; Matsuura, M.; McDonald, I.; Olofsson, H.; Sahai, R.; van Loon, J. Th.; Wood, P. R.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Boyer, M. L.; Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Jones, O. C.; Lagadec, E.; Meixner, M.; Rawlings, M. G.; Srinivasan, S.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Low- and intermediate-mass stars lose most of their stellar mass at the end of their lives on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Determining gas and dust mass-loss rates (MLRs) is important in quantifying the contribution of evolved stars to the enrichment of the interstellar medium. Aims: This study attempts to spectrally resolve CO thermal line emission in a small sample of AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Methods: The Atacama Large Millimeter Array was used to observe two OH/IR stars and four carbon stars in the LMC in the CO J = 2-1 line. Results: We present the first measurement of expansion velocities in extragalactic carbon stars. All four C stars are detected and wind expansion velocities and stellar velocities are directly measured. Mass-loss rates are derived from modelling the spectral energy distribution and Spitzer/IRS spectrum with the DUSTY code. The derived gas-to-dust ratios allow the predicted velocities to agree with the observed gas-to-dust ratios. The expansion velocities and MLRs are compared to a Galactic sample of well-studied relatively low MLRs stars supplemented with extreme C stars with properties that are more similar to the LMC targets. Gas MLRs derived from a simple formula are significantly smaller than those derived from dust modelling, indicating an order of magnitude underestimate of the estimated CO abundance, time-variable mass loss, or that the CO intensities in LMC stars are lower than predicted by the formula derived for Galactic objects. This could be related to a stronger interstellar radiation field in the LMC. Conclusions: Although the LMC sample is small and the comparison to Galactic stars is non-trivial because of uncertainties in their distances (hence luminosities), it appears that for C stars the wind expansion velocities in the LMC are lower than in the solar neighbourhood, while the MLRs appear to be similar. This is in agreement with dynamical dust-driven wind models.

  20. On the missing second generation AGB stars in NGC 6752

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, Santi; Salaris, Maurizio; Pietrinferni, Adriano; Vink, Jorick S.; Monelli, Matteo

    2014-11-01

    In recent years the view of Galactic globular clusters as simple stellar populations has changed dramatically, it is now thought that basically all globular clusters host multiple stellar populations, each with its own chemical abundance pattern and colour-magnitude diagram sequence. Recent spectroscopic observations of asymptotic giant branch stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752 have disclosed a low [Na/Fe] abundance for the whole sample, suggesting that they are all first generation stars, and that all second generation stars fail to reach the AGB in this cluster. A scenario proposed to explain these observations invokes strong mass loss in second generation horizontal branch stars - all located at the hot side of the blue and extended horizontal branch of this cluster - possibly induced by the metal enhancement associated to radiative levitation. This enhanced mass loss would prevent second generation stars from reaching the asymptotic giant branch phase, thus explaining at the same time the low value of the ratio between horizontal branch and asymptotic giant branch stars (the R2 parameter) observed in NGC 6752. We have critically discussed this mass-loss scenario, finding that the required mass-loss rates are of the order of 10-9 M⊙ yr-1, significantly higher than current theoretical and empirical constraints. By making use of synthetic horizontal branch simulations, we demonstrate that our modelling correctly predicts the R2 parameter for NGC 6752, without the need to invoke very efficient mass loss during the core He-burning stage. As a test of our stellar models we show that we can reproduce the observed value of R2 for both M 3, a cluster of approximately the same metallicity and with a redder horizontal branch morphology, and M 13, a cluster with a horizontal branch very similar to NGC 6752. However, our simulations for the NGC 6752 horizontal branch predict however the presence of a significant fraction of second generation stars (about 50%) along

  1. A Complete Sample of Hot Post-AGB Stars in Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, W.; Moehler, S.; Napiwotzki, R.; Heber, U.; Sweigart, A.; Catelan, M.; Stecher, T.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet images of globular clusters are often dominated by one or two "UV-bright" stars. The most luminous of these are believed to be post-AGB stars, which go through a luminous UV-bright phase as they leave the AGB and move rapidly across the HR diagram toward their final white dwarf state. During the two flights of the ASTRO observatory in 1990 and 1995, the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT, Stecher 1997, PASP, 109, 584) was used to obtained ultraviolet (1600 A) images of 14 globular clusters. These images provide a complete census of hot (> 8000 K) post-AGB stars in the observed globular clusters, because the 40' field of view of UIT is large enough to image the entire population of most Galactic globulars, and because the dominant cool star population is suppressed in ultraviolet images, allowing UV-bright stars to be detected into the cluster core. We have begun a program of optical and STIS ultraviolet spectroscopy to determine the fundamental stellar parameters (\\log L, T_eff, \\log g) of all the hot post-AGB candidates discovered on the UIT images. Among the goals of our program are to test theoretical post-AGB lifetimes across the HR diagram, and to estimate the mass of the currently forming white dwarfs in globular clusters. Two trends are already apparent in our survey. First, the UV-selected sample has removed a bias against the detection of the hottest post-AGB stars, and resulted in the discovery of five cluster post-AGB stars with Teff > 50,000 K. Second, most of the new discoveries have been lower luminosity (2.5 $<$\\log L $<$ 3.0) than expected for stars which leave the AGB during the thermally pulsating phase.

  2. Constraints of the Physics of Low-mass AGB Stars from CH and CEMP Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallo, S.; Karinkuzhi, D.; Goswami, A.; Piersanti, L.; Gobrecht, D.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze a set of published elemental abundances from a sample of CH stars which are based on high resolution spectral analysis of ELODIE and SUBARU/HDS spectra. All the elemental abundances were derived from local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis using model atmospheres, and thus they represent the largest homogeneous abundance data available for CH stars to date. For this reason, we can use the set to constrain the physics and the nucleosynthesis occurring in low mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) s.tars. CH stars have been polluted in the past from an already extinct AGB companion and thus show s-process enriched surfaces. We discuss the effects induced on the surface AGB s-process distributions by different prescriptions for convection and rotation. Our reference theoretical FRUITY set fits only part of the observations. Moreover, the s-process observational spread for a fixed metallicity cannot be reproduced. At [Fe/H] > -1, a good fit is found when rotation and a different treatment of the inner border of the convective envelope are simultaneously taken into account. In order to increase the statistics at low metallicities, we include in our analysis a selected number of CEMP stars and, therefore, we compute additional AGB models down to [Fe/H] = -2.85. Our theoretical models are unable to attain the large [hs/ls] ratios characterizing the surfaces of those objects. We speculate on the reasons for such a discrepancy, discussing the possibility that the observed distribution is a result of a proton mixing episode leading to a very high neutron density (the so-called i-process).

  3. ÔøºA VLTI survey of dusty envelopes of AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, C.; Klotz, D.; Sacuto, S.; Lagadec, E.; Wittkowski, M.; Hron, J.; Jorissen, A.; Groenewegen, M.; Kerschbaum, F.; Verhoelst, T.; Richichi, A.; Olofsson, H.

    2014-04-01

    Taking advantage of the results from the Herschel Mass-Loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) program we initiated a coordinated effort to study the same sample of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars with different techniques. The aim is to characterise the geometry of the mass-loss process in AGB stars at different spatial scales. Being able to understand the shaping-mechanism on this evolutionary stage is crucial also for the successors. In this contribution we present the results of the VLTI/MIDI Large Program on AGB stars. While MESS probes the interface between the stellar atmosphere and the interstellar medium with MIDI we probe the onset of the stellar wind and of the dust formation. Our sample of 15 AGB stars cover different chemistry and variability type, spanning ideally the all AGB evolution. In our study we report spectral variability but not interferometric variability. This fact has implications on the size of the structures involved in the dust formation process. We detect asymmetric structures and elongation in a few cases, and we make an attempt to connect this with the evolution on the AGB.

  4. High resolution spectroscopy of the high latitude rapidly evolving post-AGB star SAO 85766 (= IRAS 18062+2410)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.; García-Lario, P.; Sivarani, T.; Manchado, A.; Sanz Fernández de Córdoba, L.

    2000-05-01

    SAO 85766 (b = +20o) is an IRAS source with far-infrared colours similar to planetary nebulae. According to the HDE catalogue, its spectrum in 1940 was that of an A5 star. The UV fluxes and colours derived from data obtained by the TD1 satellite in 1972 also indicate that SAO 85766 was an A-type supergiant at that epoch. However, high resolution spectra of SAO 85766 obtained in 1993 in the wavelength interval 4350Ä to 8820Ä shows that now it is similar to that of an early B type post-AGB supergiant. In addition to the absorptions lines typical of a B1I type star, the spectrum of SAO 85766 is found to show numerous permitted and forbidden emission lines of several elements, typically observed in the spectra of young high density low excitation planetary nebulae. From an analysis of the absorption lines we have estimated Teff=22000+/-500 K, log g=3.0+/-0.5, xi t=15+/-2km s-1 and [M/H]=-0.6. Carbon is found to be strongly underabundant ([C/Fe] = -1.0), similarly to what has been observed in other high galactic latitude hot post-AGB stars. The underabundance of carbon and metals, high galactic latitude, high radial velocity (46 km s-1), the presence of planetary nebula type detached cold circumstellar dust shell and also the presence of low excitation nebular emission lines in the spectrum indicate that SAO 85766 is a low mass star in the post-AGB stage of evolution. The above mentioned characteristics and the variations observed in the spectrum of SAO 85766 suggest that it has rapidly evolved during the past 50 years and it is now in the early stages of the planetary nebula phase. The central star may just have become hot enough to photoionize the circumstellar envelope ejected during the previous AGB phase. >From an analysis of the nebular emission lines we find Te=10000+/- 500K and Ne=2.5 104 cm-3. The nebula also shows an abundance pattern similar to that of the central star. The rapid post-AGB evolution of SAO 85766 appears to be similar to that observed in the

  5. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTiNGS). II. DISCOVERY OF METAL-POOR DUSTY AGB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan; Barmby, Pauline; Bonanos, Alceste Z.; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Lagadec, Eric; Lennon, Daniel; Marengo, Massimo; McDonald, Iain; Zijlstra, Albert; Sloan, G. C.; Van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2015-02-10

    The DUSTiNGS survey (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer) is a 3.6 and 4.5 μm imaging survey of 50 nearby dwarf galaxies designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. Using two epochs, spaced approximately six months apart, we identify a total of 526 dusty variable AGB stars (sometimes called ''extreme'' or x-AGB stars; [3.6]-[4.5] > 0.1 mag). Of these, 111 are in galaxies with [Fe/H] < –1.5 and 12 are in galaxies with [Fe/H] < –2.0, making them the most metal-poor dust-producing AGB stars known. We compare these identifications to those in the literature and find that most are newly discovered large-amplitude variables, with the exception of ≈30 stars in NGC 185 and NGC 147, 1 star in IC 1613, and 1 star in Phoenix. The chemical abundances of the x-AGB variables are unknown, but the low metallicities suggest that they are more likely to be carbon-rich than oxygen-rich and comparisons with existing optical and near-IR photometry confirm that 70 of the x-AGB variables are confirmed or likely carbon stars. We see an increase in the pulsation amplitude with increased dust production, supporting previous studies suggesting that dust production and pulsation are linked. We find no strong evidence linking dust production with metallicity, indicating that dust can form in very metal-poor environments.

  6. Evolution of massive AGB stars. II. model properties at non-solar metallicity and the fate of Super-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siess, L.

    2007-12-01

    Context: Massive AGB (hereafter super-AGB or SAGB) stars ignite carbon off-center and have initial masses ranging between Mup, the minimum initial mass for carbon ignition, and M_mas the minimum mass for the formation of an iron core collapse supernova. In this mass interval, stars more massive than Mn will undergo an electron capture supernova (EC-SN). Aims: We study the fate and selected evolutionary properties of SAGB stars up to the end of the carbon burning phase as a function of metallicity and core overshooting. Methods: The method is based on the analysis of a large set of stellar models covering the mass range 5-13 M⊙ and calculated for 7 different metallicities between Z=10-5 and twice solar. Core overshooting was considered in two subsets for Z=10-4 and 0.02. The models are available online at http://www-astro.ulb.ac.be/ siess/database.html. The fate of SAGB stars is investigated through a parametric model which allows us to assess the role of mass loss and of the third dredge-up. Results: Our main results can be summarized as follows: a) prior to C-burning, the evolution of SAGB stars is very similar to that of intermediate-mass stars, being more luminous, b) SAGB stars suffer a large He enrichment at the end of the second dredge-up, c) the limiting masses Mup, Mn and M_mas present a nonlinear behavior with Z, characterized by a minimum around Z=10-4, d) the values of Mup, Mn and M_mas are decreased by 2 M⊙ when core overshooting is considered, e) our models predict a minimum oxygen-neon white dwarf mass of 1.05 M⊙, f) the determination of Mn is highly dependent on the mass loss and core growth rates, g) the evolutionary channel for EC-SN is limited to a very narrow mass range of ⪉1-1.5 M⊙ width and this mass window can be further decreased if some metallicity scaling factor is applied to the mass loss rate, h) the final fate of SAGB stars is connected to the second dredge-up and this property allowed us to refine the initial mass range for

  7. Luminosities and mass-loss rates of SMC and LMC AGB stars and red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Sloan, G. C.; Soszyński, I.; Petersen, E. A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Mass loss is one of the fundamental properties of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, and through the enrichment of the interstellar medium, AGB stars are key players in the life cycle of dust and gas in the universe. However, a quantitative understanding of the mass-loss process is still largely lacking, particularly its dependence on metallicity. Aims: To investigate the relation between mass loss, luminosity and pulsation period for a large sample of evolved stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods: Dust radiative transfer models are presented for 101 carbon stars and 86 oxygen-rich evolved stars in the Magellanic Clouds for which 5-35 μm Spitzer IRS spectra are available. The spectra are complemented with available optical and infrared photometry to construct the spectral energy distribution. A minimisation procedure is used to fit luminosity, mass-loss rate and dust temperature at the inner radius. Different effective temperatures and dust content are also considered. Periods from the literature and from new OGLE-III data are compiled and derived. Results: We derive (dust) mass-loss rates and luminosities for the entire sample. Based on luminosities, periods and amplitudes and colours, the O-rich stars are classified as foreground objects, AGB stars and Red Super Giants. For the O-rich stars silicates based on laboratory optical constants are compared to “astronomical silicates”. Overall, the grain type by Volk & Kwok (1988, ApJ, 331, 435) fits the data best. However, the fit based on laboratory optical constants for the grains can be improved by abandoning the small-particle limit. The influence of grain size, core-mantle grains and porosity are explored. A computationally convenient method that seems to describe the observed properties in the 10 μm window are a distribution of hollow spheres with a large vacuum fraction (typically 70%), and grain size of about 1 μm. Relations between mass-loss rates and luminosity and pulsation

  8. Presolar Graphite from AGB Stars: Microstructure and s-Process Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, Thomas K.; Stadermann, Frank J.; Bernatowicz, Thomas J.

    2005-10-01

    Correlated transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry with submicron spatial resolution (NanoSIMS) investigations of the same presolar graphites spherules from the Murchison meteorite were conducted, to link the isotopic anomalies with the mineralogy and chemical composition of the graphite and its internal grains. Refractory carbide grains (especially titanium carbide) are commonly found within the graphite spherules, and most have significant concentrations of Zr, Mo, and Ru in solid solution, elements primarily produced by s-process nucleosynthesis. The effect of chemical fractionation on the Mo/Ti ratio in these carbides is limited, and therefore from this ratio one can infer the degree of s-process enrichment in the gas from which the graphite condensed. The resulting s-process enrichments within carbides are large (~200 times solar on average), showing that most of the carbide-containing graphites formed in the mass outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. NanoSIMS measurements of these graphites also show isotopically light carbon (mostly in the 100<12C/13C<400 range). The enrichment of these presolar graphites in both s-process elements and 12C considerably exceeds that astronomically observed around carbon stars. However, a natural correlation exists between 12C and s-process elements, as both form in the He intershell region of thermally pulsing AGB stars and are dredged up together to the surface. Their observation together suggests that these graphites may have formed in chemically and isotopically inhomogeneous regions around AGB stars, such as high-density knots or jets. As shown in the companion paper, a gas density exceeding that expected for smooth mass outflows is required for graphite of the observed size to condense at all in circumstellar environments, and the spatially inhomogeneous, high-density regions from which they condense may also be incompletely mixed with the surrounding gas. We have greatly expanded

  9. A census of AGB stars in Local Group galaxies. II. NGC 185 and NGC 147

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, W.; Kerschbaum, F.; Olofsson, H.; Schwarz, H. E.

    2003-05-01

    We present results of our ongoing photometric survey of Local Group galaxies, using a four filter technique based on the method of Wing (\\cite{Wing71}) to identify and characterise the late-type stellar content. Two narrow band filters centred on spectral features of TiO and CN allow us to distinguish between AGB stars of different chemistries [M-type (O-rich) and C-type (C-rich)]. The major parts of two dwarf galaxies of the M 31 subgroup - NGC 185 and NGC 147 - were observed. From photometry in V and i we estimate the tip of the RGB, and derive distance moduli respectively. With additional photometric data in the narrow band filters TiO and CN we identify 154 new AGB carbon stars in NGC 185 and 146 in NGC 147. C/M ratios are derived, as well as mean absolute magnitudes , bolometric magnitudes M_bol, luminosity functions, and the spatial/radial distributions of the C stars in both galaxies. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Table A.1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strabg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/403/93

  10. Galactic mass-losing AGB stars probed with the IRTS. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bertre, T.; Tanaka, M.; Yamamura, I.; Murakami, H.

    2003-06-01

    We are using the 2002 data-release from the Japanese space experiment IRTS to investigate the spatial distribution of galactic mass-losing (>2x 10-8 Msund) AGB stars and the relative contribution of C-rich and O-rich ones to the replenishment of the ISM. Our sample contains 126 C-rich and 563 O-rich sources which are sorted on the basis of the molecular bands observed in the range 1.4-4.0 mu m, and for which we estimate distances and mass loss rates from near-infrared photometry (K and L'). There is a clear dependence on galactocentric distance, with O-rich sources outnumbering C-rich ones for rGC< 8 kpc, and the reverse for rGC> 10 kpc. The contribution to the replenishment of the ISM by O-rich AGB stars relative to C-rich ones follows the same trend. Although they are rare ( ~ 10% in our sample), sources with 10-6 Msund < dot {M} < 10-5 Msund dominate the replenishment of the ISM by contributing to ~ 50% of the total of the complete sample. We find 2 carbon stars at more than 1 kpc from the Galactic Plane, that probably belong to the halo of our Galaxy. The complete Tables \\ref{tab_C-rich} and \\ref{tab_O-rich} are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/403/943}

  11. Optical Properties of Amorphous Alumina Dust in the Envelopes around O-Rich AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Kyung-Won

    2016-08-01

    We investigate optical properties of amorphous alumina (Al_2O_3) dust grains in the envelopes around O-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars using laboratory measured optical data. We derive the optical constants of amorphous alumina over a wide wavelength range that satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relation and reproduce the laboratory data. Using the amorphous alumina and silicate dust, we compare the radiative transfer model results with the observed spectral energy distributions. Comparing the theoretical models with observations on various IR two-color diagrams for a large sample of O-rich AGB stars, we find that the amorphous alumina dust (about 10-40%) mixed with amorphous silicate better models the observed points for the O-rich AGB stars with thin dust envelopes.

  12. Sodium abundances of AGB and RGB stars in Galactic globular clusters. I. Analysis and results of NGC 2808

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Primas, F.; Charbonnel, C.; Van der Swaelmen, M.; Bono, G.; Chantereau, W.; Zhao, G.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Galactic globular clusters (GC) are known to have multiple stellar populations and be characterised by similar chemical features, e.g. O-Na anti-correlation. While second-population stars, identified by their Na overabundance, have been found from the main sequence turn-off up to the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) in various Galactic GCs, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars have rarely been targeted. The recent finding that NGC 6752 lacks an Na-rich AGB star has thus triggered new studies on AGB stars in GCs, since this result questions our basic understanding of GC formation and stellar evolution theory. Aims: We aim to compare the Na abundance distributions of AGB and RGB stars in Galactic GCs and investigate whether the presence of Na-rich stars on the AGB is metallicity-dependent. Methods: With high-resolution spectra obtained with the multi-object high-resolution spectrograph FLAMES on ESO/VLT, we derived accurate Na abundances for 31 AGB and 40 RGB stars in the Galactic GC NGC 2808. Results: We find that NGC 2808 has a mean metallicity of -1.11 ± 0.08 dex, in good agreement with earlier analyses. Comparable Na abundance dispersions are derived for our AGB and RGB samples, with the AGB stars being slightly more concentrated than the RGB stars. The ratios of Na-poor first-population to Na-rich second-population stars are 45:55 in the AGB sample and 48:52 in the RGB sample. Conclusions: NGC 2808 has Na-rich second-population AGB stars, which turn out to be even more numerous - in relative terms - than their Na-poor AGB counterparts and the Na-rich stars on the RGB. Our findings are well reproduced by the fast rotating massive stars scenario and they do not contradict the recent results that there is not an Na-rich AGB star in NGC 6752. NGC 2808 thus joins the larger group of Galactic GCs for which Na-rich second-population stars on the AGB have recently been found. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory

  13. THE CONTRIBUTION OF TP-AGB STARS TO THE MID-INFRARED COLORS OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chisari, Nora E.; Kelson, Daniel D.

    2012-07-10

    We study the mid-infrared color space of 30 galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) survey for which Sloan Digital Sky Survey data are also available. We construct two-color maps for each galaxy and compare them to results obtained from combining Maraston evolutionary synthesis models, galactic thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) colors, and smooth star formation histories. For most of the SINGS sample, the spatially extended mid-IR emission seen by Spitzer in normal galaxies is consistent with our simple model in which circumstellar dust from TP-AGB stars dominates at 8 and 24 {mu}m. There is a handful of exceptions that we identify as galaxies that have high star formation rates presumably with star formation histories that cannot be assumed to be smooth, or anemic galaxies, which were depleted of their H I at some point during their evolution and have very low ongoing star formation rates.

  14. The Contribution of TP-AGB Stars to the Mid-infrared Colors of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, Nora E.; Kelson, Daniel D.

    2012-07-01

    We study the mid-infrared color space of 30 galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) survey for which Sloan Digital Sky Survey data are also available. We construct two-color maps for each galaxy and compare them to results obtained from combining Maraston evolutionary synthesis models, galactic thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) colors, and smooth star formation histories. For most of the SINGS sample, the spatially extended mid-IR emission seen by Spitzer in normal galaxies is consistent with our simple model in which circumstellar dust from TP-AGB stars dominates at 8 and 24 μm. There is a handful of exceptions that we identify as galaxies that have high star formation rates presumably with star formation histories that cannot be assumed to be smooth, or anemic galaxies, which were depleted of their H I at some point during their evolution and have very low ongoing star formation rates.

  15. AGB and RGB stars as tracers of the early and intermediate star-formation history.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, A.; Gallart, C.

    The Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies are the largest members of the Local Group, and their evolution is affected by the evolution of their host as a whole. At the same time, they themselves play an important role in the evolution of the Local Group. Considerable information can be obtained for the Local Group, but little is known about the distances and the full star-formation history of its galaxies. RGB and AGB stars are the keys to trace the full star-formation history of nearby galaxies. These stars are usually the most prominent population of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, but it has been shown (Gallart et al. 1994; Aparicio & Gallart 1994) that they are also observable in dwarf irregular galaxies. This will open the door to the study of the earliest star-formation processes taking place in these galaxies. The star-formation history of the Local Group galaxies is a crucial piece of information for answering basic questions about the evolutionary history of the group.

  16. Iron and Nickel Isotopic Compositions of Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from AGB Stars Measured with CHILI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappitsch, R.; Stephan, T.; Davis, A. M.; Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.; Gyngard, F.; Bisterzo, S.; Gallino, R.; Dauphas, N.

    2016-08-01

    Simultaneous iron and nickel isotopic studies in presolar SiC mainstream grains measured on CHILI show the expected AGB star anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes. Neutron-poor isotopes are dominated by GCE and show clear correlations with silicon.

  17. FUV and Optical Spectroscopy of Hot Post-AGB Stars in Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, William V.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the atmospheric parameters (effective temperature and surface gravity) and abundances of the hot, post-AGB (PAGB) stars in globular clusters observed with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) on the Astro-l and 2 missions.

  18. Detailed homogeneous abundance studies of 14 Galactic s-process enriched post-AGB stars: In search of lead (Pb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Siess, L.; Goriely, S.; Karakas, A. I.; Manick, R.

    2016-03-01

    Context. This paper is part of a larger project in which we systematically study the chemical abundances of Galactic and extragalactic post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. The goal at large is to provide improved observational constraints to the models of the complex interplay between the AGB s-process nucleosynthesis and the associated mixing processes. Aims: Lead (Pb) is the final product of the s-process nucleosynthesis and is predicted to have large overabundances with respect to other s-process elements in AGB stars of low metallicities. However, Pb abundance studies of s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds show a discrepancy between observed and predicted Pb abundances. The determined upper limits based on spectral studies are much lower than what is predicted. In this paper, we focus specifically on the Pb abundance of 14 Galactic s-process enhanced post-AGB stars to check whether the same discrepancy is present in the Galaxy as well. Among these 14 objects, two were not yet subject to a detailed abundance study in the literature. We apply the same method to obtain accurate abundances for the 12 others. Our homogeneous abundance results provide the input of detailed spectral synthesis computations in the spectral regions where Pb lines are located. Methods: We used high-resolution UVES and HERMES spectra for detailed spectral abundance studies of our sample of Galactic post-AGB stars. None of the sample stars display clear Pb lines, and we only deduced upper limits of the Pb abundance by using spectrum synthesis in the spectral ranges of the strongest Pb lines. Results: We do not find any clear evidence of Pb overabundances in our sample. The derived upper limits are strongly correlated with the effective temperature of the stars with increasing upper limits for increasing effective temperatures. We obtain stronger Pb constraints on the cooler objects. Moreover, we confirm the s-process enrichment and carbon enhancement of two

  19. RELICS OF ANCIENT POST-AGB STARS IN A PRIMITIVE METEORITE

    SciTech Connect

    Jadhav, M.; Huss, G. R.; Pignatari, M.; Herwig, F.; Zinner, E.; Gallino, R.

    2013-11-10

    Graphite is one of the many presolar circumstellar condensate species found in primitive meteorites. While the isotopic compositions of low-density graphite grains indicate an origin in core-collapse supernovae, some high-density grains have extreme isotopic anomalies in C, Ca, and Ti, which cannot be explained by envelope predictions of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars or theoretical supernova models. The Ca and Ti isotopic anomalies, however, match the predictions of He-shell abundances in AGB stars. In this study, we show that the C, Ca, and Ti isotopic anomalies are consistent with nucleosynthesis predictions of the H-ingestion phase during a very late thermal pulse (VLTP) event in post-AGB stars. The low {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotopic ratios in these grains are a result of abundant {sup 12}C efficiently capturing the protons that are being ingested during the VLTP. Very high neutron densities of ∼10{sup 15} cm{sup –3}, typical of the i-process, are achieved during this phase in post-AGB stars. The large {sup 42,43,44}Ca excesses in some graphite grains are indicative of neutron capture nucleosynthesis during VLTP. The comparison of VLTP nucleosynthesis calculations to the graphite data also indicate that apparent anomalies in the Ti isotopic ratios are due to large contributions from {sup 46,48}Ca, which cannot be resolved from the isobars {sup 46,48}Ti during the measurements. We conclude that presolar graphite grains with moderate to extreme Ca and Ti isotopic anomalies originate in post-AGB stars that suffer a VLTP.

  20. Abundances of presolar graphite and SiC from supernovae and AGB stars in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst; Gallino, Roberto

    2014-05-02

    Pesolar graphite grains exhibit a range of densities (1.65 – 2.20 g/cm{sup 3}). We investigated abundances of presolar graphite grains formed in supernovae and in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the four density fractions KE3, KFA1, KFB1 and KFC1 extracted from the Murchison meteorite to probe dust productions in these stellar sources. Seventy-six and 50% of the grains in the low-density fractions KE3 and KFA1, respectively, are supernova grains, while only 7.2% and 0.9% of the grains in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1 have a supernova origin. Grains of AGB star origin are concentrated in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1. From the C isotopic distributions of these fractions and the presence of s-process Kr with {sup 86}Kr/{sup 82}Kr = 4.43±0.46 in KFC1, we estimate that 76% and 80% of the grains in KFB1 and KFC1, respectively, formed in AGB stars. From the abundance of graphite grains in the Murchison meteorite, 0.88 ppm, the abundances of graphite from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.24 ppm and 0.44 ppm, respectively: the abundances of graphite in supernovae and AGB stars are comparable. In contrast, it has been known that 1% of SiC grains formed in supernovae and 95% formed in AGB stars in meteorites. Since the abundance of SiC grains is 5.85 ppm in the Murchison meteorite, the abundances of SiC from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.063 ppm and 5.6 ppm, respectively: the dominant source of SiC grains is AGB stars. Since SiC grains are harder and likely to survive better in space than graphite grains, the abundance of supernova graphite grains, which is higher than that of supernova SiC grains, indicates that supernovae proficiently produce graphite grains. Graphite grains from AGB stars are, in contrast, less abundant that SiC grains from AGB stars (0.44 ppm vs. 5.6 ppm). It is difficult to derive firm conclusions for graphite and SiC formation in AGB stars due to the difference in susceptibility to grain destruction. Metallicity of

  1. AGB stars as a source of short-lived radioactive nuclei in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Gallino, R.; Busso, M.; Raiteri, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to estimate the possible contribution of some short-lived nuclei to the early solar nebula from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) sources. Low mass (1 to 3 solar mass) AGB stars appear to provide a site for synthesis of the main s process component for solar system material with an exponential distribution of neutron irradiations varies as exp(-tau/tau(sub 0)) (where tau is the time integrated neutron flux with a mean neutron exposure tau(sub 0)) for solar abundances with tau(sub 0) = 0.28 mb(sup -1). Previous workers estimated the synthesis of key short-lived nuclei which might be produced in AGB stars. While these calculations exhibit the basic characteristics of nuclei production by neutron exposure, there is need for a self-consistent calculation that follows AGB evolution and takes into account the net production from a star and dilution with the cloud medium. Many of the general approaches and the conclusions arrived at were presented earlier by Cameron. The production of nuclei for a star of 1.5 solar mass during the thermal pulsing of the AGB phase was evaluated. Calculations were done for a series of thermal pulses with tau(sub 0) = 0.12 and 0.28 mb(sup -1). These pulses involve s nucleosynthesis in the burning shell at the base of the He zone followed by the ignition of the H burning shell at the top of the He zone. After about 10-15 cycles the abundances of the various nuclei in the He zone become constant. Computations of the abundances of all nuclei in the He zone were made following Gallino. The mass of the solar nebula was considered to consist of some initial material of approximately solar composition plus some contributions from AGB stars. The ratios of the masses required from the AGB He burning zone to the ISM necessary to produce the observed value of Pd-107/Pd-108 in the early solar system were calculated and this dilution factor was applied to all other relevant nuclei.

  2. The Nearby AGB Star L2 Puppis: The Birth Of a Planetary Nebula?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Montargès, M.; Lagadec, E.

    2015-12-01

    Adaptive optics observations in the infrared (VLT/NACO, Kervella et al. [6]) and visible (VLT/SPHERE, Kervella et al. [7]) domains revealed that the nearby AGB star L2 Pup (d = 64 pc) is surrounded by a dust disk seen almost edge-on. Thermal emission from a large dust "loop" is detected at 4 μm up to more than 10 AU from the star. We also detect a secondary source at a separation of 32 mas, whose nature is uncertain. L2 Pup is currently a relatively "young" AGB star, so we may witness the formation of a planetary nebula. The mechanism that breaks the spherical symmetry of mass loss is currently uncertain, but we propose that the dust disk and companion are key elements in the shaping of the bipolar structure. L2 Pup emerges as an important system to test this hypothesis.

  3. METAL-POOR STARS OBSERVED WITH THE MAGELLAN TELESCOPE. I. CONSTRAINTS ON PROGENITOR MASS AND METALLICITY OF AGB STARS UNDERGOING s-PROCESS NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Placco, Vinicius M.; Rossi, Silvia; Frebel, Anna; Beers, Timothy C.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Kennedy, Catherine R.; Christlieb, Norbert; Stancliffe, Richard J.

    2013-06-20

    We present a comprehensive abundance analysis of two newly discovered carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars. HE 2138-3336 is a s-process-rich star with [Fe/H] = -2.79, and has the highest [Pb/Fe] abundance ratio measured thus far, if non-local thermodynamic equilibrium corrections are included ([Pb/Fe] = +3.84). HE 2258-6358, with [Fe/H] = -2.67, exhibits enrichments in both s- and r-process elements. These stars were selected from a sample of candidate metal-poor stars from the Hamburg/ESO objective-prism survey, and followed up with medium-resolution (R {approx} 2000) spectroscopy with GEMINI/GMOS. We report here on derived abundances (or limits) for a total of 34 elements in each star, based on high-resolution (R {approx} 30, 000) spectroscopy obtained with Magellan-Clay/MIKE. Our results are compared to predictions from new theoretical asymptotic giant branch (AGB) nucleosynthesis models of 1.3 M{sub Sun} with [Fe/H] = -2.5 and -2.8, as well as to a set of AGB models of 1.0 to 6.0 M{sub Sun} at [Fe/H] = -2.3. The agreement with the model predictions suggests that the neutron-capture material in HE 2138-3336 originated from mass transfer from a binary companion star that previously went through the AGB phase, whereas for HE 2258-6358, an additional process has to be taken into account to explain its abundance pattern. We find that a narrow range of progenitor masses (1.0 {<=} M(M{sub Sun }) {<=} 1.3) and metallicities (-2.8 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=}-2.5) yield the best agreement with our observed elemental abundance patterns.

  4. A PILOT DEEP SURVEY FOR X-RAY EMISSION FROM fuvAGB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, R.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Stute, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in three of six fuvAGB stars observed—the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long timescales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ∼(0.002–0.2) L{sub ⊙} and the X-ray-emitting plasma temperatures are ∼(35–160) × 10{sup 6} K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively cool (<20,000 K). In addition, the high X-ray luminosities specifically argue against emission originating in the coronae of main-sequence companions. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  5. VLT/NACO Imaging of the Nearest AGB Star, L2 Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montargès, M.; Kervella, P.; Ridgway, S. T.; Perrin, G.; Chesneau, O.

    2015-08-01

    AGB stars are the most important contributors to the chemical enrichment of the Galaxy. During their later evolutionary stages they experience intense pulsations and eject most of their layers as they become planetary nebulae (PNe). The process leading to the formation of bipolar PNe remains poorly understood. It is assumed that the circumstellar disk of an AGB star could collimate the stellar wind to form a bipolar PN, yet very few of these disks have been observed. Using the adaptive-optics system of the VLT/NACO instrument at the Paranal Observatory and a "lucky imaging" technique, our team obtained near-infrared diffraction-limited images of the nearest AGB star, L2 Puppis. The deconvolved images reveal a dark structure in front of the star whose morphology and photometry match a dusty edge-on disk of olivine and pyroxene modeled with a Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. The L band images also show a loop structure, possibly the signature of an interacting hidden companion.

  6. Using a Weak CN Spectral Feature as a Marker for Massive AGB Stars in the Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kamath, Anika; Sales, Alyssa; Sarukkai, Atmika; Hays, Jon; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey has produced six-filter photometry at near-ultraviolet, optical and nearly infrared wavelengths (F275W, F336W, F475W, F814W, F110W and F160W) for over 100 million stars in the disk of the of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). As part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey, medium resolution (R ~ 2000) spectra covering the wavelength range 4500-9500A were obtained for over 5000 relatively bright stars from the PHAT source catalog using the Keck II 10-meter telescope and DEIMOS spectrograph. While searching for carbon stars in the spectroscopic data set, we discovered a rare population of stars that show a weak CN spectral absorption feature at ~7900A (much weaker than the CN feature in typical carbon stars) along with other spectral absorption features like TiO and the Ca triplet that are generally not present/visible in carbon star spectra but that are typical for normal stars with oxygen rich atmospheres. These 150 or so "weak CN" stars appear to be fairly localized in six-filter space (i.e., in various color-color and color-magnitude diagrams) but are generally offset from carbon stars. Comparison to PARSEC model stellar tracks indicates that these weak CN stars are probably massive (5-10 Msun) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in a relatively short-lived core helium burning phase of their evolution. Careful spectroscopic analysis indicates that the details of the CN spectral feature are about 3-4x weaker in weak CN stars than in carbon stars. The kinematics of weak CN stars are similar to those of other young stars (e.g., massive main sequence stars) and reflect the well ordered rotation of M31's disk.This research project is funded in part by NASA/STScI and the National Science Foundation. Much of this work was carried out by high school students and undergraduates under the auspices of the Science Internship Program and LAMAT program at the University of

  7. Short-lived radioactivity in the early solar system: The Super-AGB star hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaro, Maria; Doherty, Carolyn L.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Maddison, Sarah T.; Liffman, Kurt; García-Hernández, D. A.; Siess, Lionel; Lattanzio, John C.

    2012-12-01

    The composition of the most primitive solar system condensates, such as calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) and micron-sized corundum grains, show that short-lived radionuclides (SLR), e.g., 26Al, were present in the early solar system. Their abundances require a local or stellar origin, which, however, is far from being understood. We present for the first time the abundances of several SLR up to 60Fe predicted from stars with initial mass in the range approximately 7-11 M⊙. These stars evolve through core H, He, and C burning. After core C burning they go through a "Super"-asymptotic giant branch (Super-AGB) phase, with the H and He shells activated alternately, episodic thermal pulses in the He shell, a very hot temperature at the base of the convective envelope (approximately 108 K), and strong stellar winds driving the H-rich envelope into the surrounding interstellar medium. The final remnants of the evolution of Super-AGB stars are mostly O-Ne white dwarfs. Our Super-AGB models produce 26Al/27Al yield ratios approximately 0.02-0.26. These models can account for the canonical value of the 26Al/27Al ratio using dilutions with the solar nebula of the order of 1 part of Super-AGB mass per several 102 to several 103 of solar nebula mass, resulting in associated changes in the O-isotope composition in the range Δ17O from 3 to 20‰. This is in agreement with observations of the O isotopic ratios in primitive solar system condensates, which do not carry the signature of a stellar polluter. The radionuclides 41Ca and 60Fe are produced by neutron captures in Super-AGB stars and their meteoritic abundances are also matched by some of our models, depending on the nuclear and stellar physics uncertainties as well as the meteoritic experimental data. We also expect and are currently investigating Super-AGB production of SLR heavier than iron, such as 107Pd.

  8. Evolution of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars. IV. Constraining mass loss and lifetimes of low mass, low metallicity AGB stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, Philip; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel; Williams, Benjamin F.; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Gullieuszik, Marco; Bressan, Alessandro; Dolphin, Andrew; Aringer, Bernhard

    2014-07-20

    The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. In this work, we analyze the numbers and luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars in six quiescent, low metallicity ([Fe/H] ≲ –0.86) galaxies taken from the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury sample, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry in both optical and near-infrared filters. The galaxies contain over 1000 TP-AGB stars (at least 60 per field). We compare the observed TP-AGB luminosity functions and relative numbers of TP-AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars, N{sub TP-AGB}/N{sub RGB}, to models generated from different suites of TP-AGB evolutionary tracks after adopting star formation histories derived from the HST deep optical observations. We test various mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). These comparisons confirm that pre-dust mass loss is important, since models that neglect pre-dust mass loss fail to explain the observed N{sub TP-AGB}/N{sub RGB} ratio or the luminosity functions. In contrast, models with more efficient pre-dust mass loss produce results consistent with observations. We find that for [Fe/H] ≲ –0.86, lower mass TP-AGB stars (M ≲ 1 M{sub ☉}) must have lifetimes of ∼0.5 Myr and higher masses (M ≲ 3 M{sub ☉}) must have lifetimes ≲ 1.2 Myr. In addition, assuming our best-fitting mass-loss prescription, we show that the third dredge-up has no significant effect on TP-AGB lifetimes in this mass and metallicity range.

  9. Is the 21-micron Feature Observed in Some Post-AGB Stars Caused by the Interaction Between Ti Atoms and Fullerenes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A. III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    Recent measurements of fullerenes and Ti atoms recorded in our laboratory have demonstrated the presence of an infrared feature near 21 pm. The feature observed has nearly the same shape and position as is observed for one of the most enigmatic features in post-asymptotic giant blanch (AGB) stars. In our experimental system large cage carbon particles, such as large fullerenes, were produced from CO gas by the Boudouard reaction. Large-cage carbon particles intermixed with Ti atoms were produced by the evaporation of a Ti metal wrapped carbon electrode in CO gas. The infrared spectra of large fullerenes interacting with Ti atoms show a characteristic feature at 20.3 micron that closely corresponds to the 20.1 micron feature observed in post-AGB stars. Both the lab- oratory and stellar spectra also show a small but significant peak at 19.0 micron, which is attributed to fullerenes. Here, we propose that the interaction between fullerenes and Ti atoms may be a plausible explanation for the 21-micron feature seen in some post-AGB stars.

  10. An Analytical Approach to the Evolution and Death of AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, Henry Alexander; Willson, Lee Anne M.; Marengo, Massimo; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.

    2017-01-01

    Pop. I and II stars have a significant amount of metals throughout their structure, In the final stages of their evolution, intermediate mass stars (between 0.7 and 2 solar masses) ascend the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). During their last few hundred thousand years on the AGB, these stars quickly lose their envelopes, recycling their metals as dust into the interstellar medium. The rate at which this happens consequently impacts the formation rate of stars, stellar systems, and the wider distribution of s-process isotopes.At the end of their life cycles, AGB stars experience a steep increase in mass loss rate. We can define the death line in two steps. First we define the critical mass loss rate to be where the mass loss rate equals the initial mass divided by the evolution time. Then the death line is where the rate of change of logMdot equals the rate of change of logL. Most of the stars we observe to be rapidly losing mass appear in the death zone between 0.1 and 10 times the critical mass loss rate.Assuming the mass loss rate increases exponentially with time, or, equivalently, the luminosity increases as a power of a characteristic exponent b, then the width of the death zone is the change in logL. This directly implies time is inversely proportional to b. This can be found for any mass-loss rate formula near the death line. By combining this with what we know about the initial-final mass relation and the core mass-luminosity relation, we can test for b with three observables — duration (width) of the death zone, the amplitude of mass loss variations (when L varies on an observable time scale such as a shell flash), and distributions of luminosity and pulsation period.By applying the initial mass function (IMF) and star formation rate (SFR) of an observed region, we can relate these observables to the characteristic exponent. We will need to look at nearby regions where we can see large numbers of AGB stars, such as the Magellanic clouds. We will show that

  11. The 13C Neutron Source and s-Processing in AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippella, Oscar; Busso, Maurizio; Palmerini, Sara; La Cognata, Marco

    The main component of the s-process accounts for about 50% of elements heavier than Kr, through n-captures occurring in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, where the 13C(α, n)16O reaction is the main neutron source. Its activation below the convective envelope at third dredge-up (TDU) and its efficiency are still matters of debate, as: (i) the astrophysical factor is affected by a broad resonance near the reaction threshold and (ii) mixing mechanisms to locally produce 13C were so far mimicked mainly parametrically. We discuss both problems and, in particular, we adopt one of the recent model proposed for producing 13C and based on an exact multi-D analytical solution of MHD equations, where magnetic buoyancy induces partial mixing at the envelope border. The resulting distribution of 13C is used, together with our upgraded prescription for the reaction rate, to reproduce solar abundances through AGB models. It can account for the chemical evolution of s-elements and for the s/(C/O) ratios in low-metallicity post-AGB stars.

  12. Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars. V. Constraining the Mass Loss and Lifetimes of Intermediate-mass, Low-metallicity AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Bressan, Alessandro; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars are relatively short lived (less than a few Myr), yet their cool effective temperatures, high luminosities, efficient mass loss, and dust production can dramatically affect the chemical enrichment histories and the spectral energy distributions of their host galaxies. The ability to accurately model TP-AGB stars is critical to the interpretation of the integrated light of distant galaxies, especially in redder wavelengths. We continue previous efforts to constrain the evolution and lifetimes of TP-AGB stars by modeling their underlying stellar populations. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-infrared photometry taken of 12 fields of 10 nearby galaxies imaged via the Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury and the near-infrared HST/SNAP follow-up campaign, we compare the model and observed TP-AGB luminosity functions as well as the ratio of TP-AGB to red giant branch stars. We confirm the best-fitting mass-loss prescription, introduced by Rosenfield et al., in which two different wind regimes are active during the TP-AGB, significantly improves models of many galaxies that show evidence of recent star formation. This study extends previous efforts to constrain TP-AGB lifetimes to metallicities ranging -1.59 ≲ {{[Fe/H]}} ≲ -0.56 and initial TP-AGB masses up to ˜4 M ⊙, which include TP-AGB stars that undergo hot-bottom burning. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  13. SiO Observations of Mass-Losing AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aringer, B.; Wiedemann, G.; Käufl, H. U.; Hron, J.

    1995-02-01

    We have observed the first overtone rotation-vibration absorption bands of SiO near λ = 4µm for a sample of 23 oxygen-rich Mira and Semiregular variables using the ESO NTT and IRSPEC. We discuss the strength of the SiO absorption in terms of the near infrared, IRAS and pulsational properties of the stars. Especially among the Miras there are big differences in the strength of the SiO bands between individual objects, which are probably due to pulsational variability.

  14. The lead discrepancy in intrinsically s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Karakas, A. I.; Siess, L.; Goriely, S.; Wood, P.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Our understanding of the s-process nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is incomplete. AGB models predict, for example, large overabundances of lead (Pb) compared to other s-process elements in metal-poor low-mass AGB stars. This is indeed observed in some extrinsically enhanced metal-poor stars, but not in all. An extensive study of intrinsically s-process enriched objects is essential for improving our knowledge of the AGB third dredge-up and associated s-process nucleosynthesis. Aims: We compare the spectral abundance analysis of the SMC post-AGB star J004441.04-732136.4 with state-of-the-art AGB model predictions with a main focus on Pb. The low signal-to-noise (S/N) in the Pb line region made the result of our previous study inconclusive. We acquired additional data covering the region of the strongest Pb line. Methods: By carefully complementing re-reduced previous data, with newly acquired UVES optical spectra, we improve the S/N of the spectrum around the strongest Pb line. Therefore, an upper limit for the Pb abundance is estimated from a merged weighted mean spectrum using synthetic spectral modeling. We then compare the abundance results from the combined spectra to predictions of tailored AGB evolutionary models from two independent evolution codes. In addition, we determine upper limits for Pb abundances for three previously studied LMC post-AGB objects. Results: Although theoretical predictions for J004441.04-732136.4 match the s-process distribution up to tungsten (W), the predicted very high Pb abundance is clearly not detected. The three additional LMC post-AGB stars show a similar lack of a very high Pb abundance. Conclusions: From our study, we conclude that none of these low-mass, low-metallicity post-AGB stars of the LMC and SMC are strong Pb producers. This conflicts with current theoretical predictions. Based on observations collected with the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chili) of programme

  15. Nucleosynthesis Predictions for Intermediate-Mass AGB Stars: Comparison to Observations of Type I Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakas, Amanda I.; vanRaai, Mark A.; Lugaro, Maria; Sterling, Nicholas C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.

    2008-01-01

    Type I planetary nebulae (PNe) have high He/H and N/O ratios and are thought to be descendants of stars with initial masses of approx. 3-8 Stellar Mass. These characteristics indicate that the progenitor stars experienced proton-capture nucleosynthesis at the base of the convective envelope, in addition to the slow neutron capture process operating in the He-shell (the s-process). We compare the predicted abundances of elements up to Sr from models of intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to measured abundances in Type I PNe. In particular, we compare predictions and observations for the light trans-iron elements Se and Kr, in order to constrain convective mixing and the s-process in these stars. A partial mixing zone is included in selected models to explore the effect of a C-13 pocket on the s-process yields. The solar-metallicity models produce enrichments of [(Se, Kr)/Fe] less than or approx. 0.6, consistent with Galactic Type I PNe where the observed enhancements are typically less than or approx. 0.3 dex, while lower metallicity models predict larger enrichments of C, N, Se, and Kr. O destruction occurs in the most massive models but it is not efficient enough to account for the greater than or approx. 0.3 dex O depletions observed in some Type I PNe. It is not possible to reach firm conclusions regarding the neutron source operating in massive AGB stars from Se and Kr abundances in Type I PNe; abundances for more s-process elements may help to distinguish between the two neutron sources. We predict that only the most massive (M grester than or approx.5 Stellar Mass) models would evolve into Type I PNe, indicating that extra-mixing processes are active in lower-mass stars (3-4 Stellar Mass), if these stars are to evolve into Type I PNe.

  16. IS THE POST-AGB STAR SAO 40039 MILDLY HYDROGEN-DEFICIENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S. Sumangala; Pandey, Gajendra; Giridhar, Sunetra; Lambert, David L. E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2011-08-10

    We have conducted an LTE abundance analysis for SAO 40039, a warm post-AGB star whose spectrum is known to show surprisingly strong He I lines for its effective temperature and has been suspected of being H-deficient and He-rich. High-resolution optical spectra are analyzed using a family of model atmospheres with different He/H ratios. Atmospheric parameters are estimated from the ionization equilibrium set by neutral and singly ionized species of Fe and Mg, the excitation of Fe I and Fe II lines, and the wings of the Paschen lines. On the assumption that the He I lines are of photospheric and not chromospheric origin, a He/H ratio of approximately unity is found by imposing the condition that the adopted He/H ratio of the model atmosphere must equal the ratio derived from the observed He I triplet lines at 5876, 4471, and 4713 A, and singlet lines at 4922 and 5015 A. Using the model with the best-fitting atmospheric parameters for this He/H ratio, SAO 40039 is confirmed to exhibit mild dust-gas depletion, i.e., the star has an atmosphere deficient in elements of high condensation temperature. The star appears to be moderately metal-deficient with [Fe/H] = -0.4 dex. But the star's intrinsic metallicity as estimated from Na, S, and Zn, elements of a low condensation temperature, is [Fe/H]{sub o} {approx_equal} -0.2 ([Fe/H]{sub o} refers to the star's intrinsic metallicity). The star is enriched in N and perhaps O as well, changes reflecting the star's AGB past and the event that led to He enrichment.

  17. Monitoring Observatinos of H2O and SiO Masers Toward Post-AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeheon; Cho, Se-Hyung; Yoon, Dong-Hwan

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of simultaneous monitoring observations of H_2O 6_{1,6}-5_{2,3} (22 GHz) and SiO J=1-0, 2-1, 3-2 maser lines (43, 86, 129 GHz) toward five post-AGB (candidate) stars, using the 21-m single-dish telescopes of the Korean VLBI Network. Depending on the target objects, 7 - 11 epochs of data were obtained. We detected both H_2O and SiO maser lines from four sources: OH16.1-0.3, OH38.10-0.13, OH65.5+1.3, and IRAS 19312+1950. We could not detect H_2O maser emission toward OH13.1+5.1 between the late OH/IR and post-AGB stage. The detected H_2O masers show typical double-peaked line profiles. The SiO masers from four sources, except IRAS 19312+1950, show the peaks around the stellar velocity as a single peak, whereas the SiO masers from IRAS 19312+1950 occur above the red peak of the H_2O maser. We analyzed the properties of detected maser lines, and investigated their evolutionary state through comparison with the full widths at zero power. The distribution of observed target sources was also investigated in the IRAS two-color diagram in relation with the evolutionary stage of post-AGB stars. From our analyses, the evolutionary sequence of observed sources is suggested as OH65.5+1.3 → OH13.1+5.1 → OH16.1-0.3 → OH38.10-0.13, except for IRAS 19312+1950. In addition, OH13.1+5.1 from which the H_2O maser has not been detected is suggested to be on the gateway toward the post-AGB stage. With respect to the enigmatic object, IRAS 19312+1950, we could not clearly figure out its nature. To properly explain the unusual phenomena of SiO and H_2O masers, it is essential to establish the relative locations and spatial distributions of two masers using VLBI technique. We also include the 1.2 - 160 μm spectral energy distribution using photometric data from the following surveys: 2MASS, WISE, MSX, IRAS, and AKARI (IRC and FIS). In addition, from the IRAS LRS spectra, we found that the depth of silicate absorption features shows significant variations

  18. Duplicity: Its Part in the AGB's Downfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Keller, D.

    2015-08-01

    Half or more of stars more massive than our Sun are orbited by a companion star in a binary system. Many binaries have short enough orbits that the evolution of both stars is greatly altered by an exchange of mass and angular momentum between the stars. Such mass transfer is highly likely on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) because this is when a star is both very large and has strong wind mass loss. Direct mass transfer truncates the AGB, and its associated nucleosynthesis, prematurely compared to the case of a single star. In wide binaries we can probe nucleosynthesis in the long-dead AGB primary star by today observing its initially lower-mass companion. The star we see now may be polluted by ejecta from the primary either through a wind or Roche-lobe overflow. We highlight recent quantitative work on nucleosynthesis in (ex-)AGB mass-transfer systems, such as carbon and barium stars, and the link between binary stars and planetary nebulae; finally, we suggest AGB stars as a possible source of the enigmatic element, lithium.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC 2808 AGB and RGB stars Na abundance (Wang+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Primas, F.; Charbonnel, C.; van der Swaelmen, M.; Bono, G.; Chantereau, W.; Zhao, G.

    2016-05-01

    The high-resolution spectra of our sample of AGB and RGB stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808 were obtained with the high-resolution multi-object spectrograph FLAMES, mounted on ESO/VLT-UT2. A combined mode was used where the brightest five objects was observed with UVES-fibre and the remaining targets with GIRAFFE/Medusa. The basic information of our sample stars are listed in Table 2, including the evolutionary phase, instrument used for observation, coordinates, photometry and barycentric radial velocity. Our Fe abundances were derived from the equivalent widths of Fe lines, while the Na abundances were determined with spectra synthesis. Both FeI and Na abundances have been corrected for the non-LTE effect. In Table 4 we show the derived stellar parameters of our sample stars, and the Na abundances are shown in Table 6. (3 data files).

  20. Post-AGB Stars in Nearby Galaxies as Calibrators for HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes activities carried out with support from the NASA Ultraviolet, Visible, and Gravitational Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program under Grant NAG 5-6821. The Principal Investigator is Howard E. Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute). STScI Postdoctoral Associates Laura K. Fullton (1998), David Alves (1998-2001), and Michael Siegel (2001) were partially supported by this grant. The aim of the program is to calibrate the absolute magnitudes of post-asymptotic- giant-branch (post-AGB or PAGB) stars, which we believe will be an excellent new "standard candle" for measuring extragalactic distances. The argument is that, in old populations, the stars that are evolving through the PAGB region of the HR diagram arise from only a single main-sequence turnoff mass. In addition, theoretical PAGB evolutionary tracks show that they evolve through this region at constant luminosity; hence the PAGB stars should have an extremely narrow luminosity function. Moreover, as the PAGB stars evolve through spectral types F and A (en route from the AGB to hot stellar remnants and white dwarfs), they have the highest luminosities attained by old stars (both bolometrically and in the visual band). Finally, PAGB stars of these spectral types are very easily identified. because of their large Balmer jumps, which are due to their very low surface gravities. Our approach is first to identify PAGB stars in Milky Way globular clusters and in other Local Group galaxies, which are at known distances, and thus to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for the PAGB stars. With this Milky Way and Local Group luminosity calibration, we will then be in a position to find PAGB stars in more distant galaxies from the ground, and ultimately from the Hubble Space Telescope. and thus derive distances. These PAGB stars are, as noted above, the visually brightest members of Population II, and hence will allow distance measurements to galaxies that do not contain Cepheids, such as

  1. Abundance Anomalies in NGC6752 - Do AGB Stars Have a Role?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. W.; Fenner, Y.; Karakas, A. I.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Gibson, B. K.

    2005-07-01

    We are in the process of testing a popular theory that the observed abundance anomalies in the Globular Cluster NGC 6752 are due to `internal pollution' from intermediate mass asymptotic giant branch stars. To this end we are using a chemical evolution model incorporating custom-made stellar evolution yields calculated using a detailed stellar evolution code. By tracing the chemical evolution of the intracluster gas, which is polluted by two generations of stars, we are able to test the internal pollution scenario in which the Na- and Al-enhanced ejecta from intermediate mass stars is either accreted onto the surfaces of other stars, or goes toward forming new stars. In this paper we focus mainly on the nucleosynthetic yields of the AGB stars and discuss whether these stars are the source of the observed Na-O anticorrelation. Comparing our preliminary results with observational data suggests that the qualitative theory is not supported by this quantitative study.This study has recently been completed and published in [Fenner, Y., Campbell, S.W., Karakas, A.I., Lattanzio, J.C, Gibson, B.K., 2004, MNRAS, 353, 789]. Details of the stellar models will be in a forthcoming paper [Campbell, S. W., et al. 2004, in prep.].

  2. A Luminous Yellow Post-AGB Star in the Galactic Globular Cluster M79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Siegel, Michael H.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of a luminous F-type post-asymptotic-giant-branch (PAGB) star in the Galactic globular cluster (GC) M79 (NGC 1904). At visual apparent and absolute magnitudes of V=12.20 and {M}V=-3.46, this “yellow” PAGB star is by a small margin the visually brightest star known in any GC. It was identified using CCD observations in the uBVI photometric system, which is optimized to detect stars with large Balmer discontinuities, indicative of very low surface gravities. Follow-up observations with the SMARTS 1.3 and 1.5 m telescopes show that the star is not variable in light or radial velocity, and that its velocity is consistent with cluster membership. Near- and mid-infrared observations with 2MASS and WISE show no evidence for circumstellar dust. We argue that a sharp upper limit to the luminosity function exists for yellow PAGB stars in old populations, making them excellent candidates for Population II standard candles, which are four magnitudes brighter than RR Lyrae variables. Their luminosities are consistent with the stars being in a PAGB evolutionary phase, with core masses of ˜ 0.53 {M}⊙ . We also detected four very hot stars lying above the horizontal branch (“AGB-manqué” stars); along with the PAGB star, they are the brightest objects in M79 in the near-ultraviolet. In the Appendix, we give periods and light curves for five variables in M79: three RR Lyrae stars, a Type II Cepheid, and a semiregular variable. Based in part on observations with the 1.3 and 1.5 m telescopes operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory.

  3. EVOLUTION, NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND YIELDS OF AGB STARS AT DIFFERENT METALLICITIES. III. INTERMEDIATE-MASS MODELS, REVISED LOW-MASS MODELS, AND THE pH-FRUITY INTERFACE

    SciTech Connect

    Cristallo, S.; Straniero, O.; Piersanti, L.; Gobrecht, D.

    2015-08-15

    We present a new set of models for intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars (4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 M{sub ⊙}) at different metallicities (−2.15 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.15). This set integrates the existing models for low-mass AGB stars (1.3 ≤ M/M{sub ⊙} ≤ 3.0) already included in the FRUITY database. We describe the physical and chemical evolution of the computed models from the main sequence up to the end of the AGB phase. Due to less efficient third dredge up episodes, models with large core masses show modest surface enhancements. This effect is due to the fact that the interpulse phases are short and, therefore, thermal pulses (TPs) are weak. Moreover, the high temperature at the base of the convective envelope prevents it from deeply penetrating the underlying radiative layers. Depending on the initial stellar mass, the heavy element nucleosynthesis is dominated by different neutron sources. In particular, the s-process distributions of the more massive models are dominated by the {sup 22}Ne(α,n){sup 25}Mg reaction, which is efficiently activated during TPs. At low metallicities, our models undergo hot bottom burning and hot third dredge up. We compare our theoretical final core masses to available white dwarf observations. Moreover, we quantify the influence intermediate-mass models have on the carbon star luminosity function. Finally, we present the upgrade of the FRUITY web interface, which now also includes the physical quantities of the TP-AGB phase for all of the models included in the database (ph-FRUITY)

  4. Evolution, Nucleosynthesis, and Yields of AGB Stars at Different Metallicities. III. Intermediate-mass Models, Revised Low-mass Models, and the ph-FRUITY Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallo, S.; Straniero, O.; Piersanti, L.; Gobrecht, D.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new set of models for intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars (4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 M⊙) at different metallicities (-2.15 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.15). This set integrates the existing models for low-mass AGB stars (1.3 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 3.0) already included in the FRUITY database. We describe the physical and chemical evolution of the computed models from the main sequence up to the end of the AGB phase. Due to less efficient third dredge up episodes, models with large core masses show modest surface enhancements. This effect is due to the fact that the interpulse phases are short and, therefore, thermal pulses (TPs) are weak. Moreover, the high temperature at the base of the convective envelope prevents it from deeply penetrating the underlying radiative layers. Depending on the initial stellar mass, the heavy element nucleosynthesis is dominated by different neutron sources. In particular, the s-process distributions of the more massive models are dominated by the 22Ne(α,n)25Mg reaction, which is efficiently activated during TPs. At low metallicities, our models undergo hot bottom burning and hot third dredge up. We compare our theoretical final core masses to available white dwarf observations. Moreover, we quantify the influence intermediate-mass models have on the carbon star luminosity function. Finally, we present the upgrade of the FRUITY web interface, which now also includes the physical quantities of the TP-AGB phase for all of the models included in the database (ph-FRUITY).

  5. Chemistry and distribution of daughter species in the circumstellar envelopes of O-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohu; Millar, Tom J.; Heays, Alan N.; Walsh, Catherine; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    Context. Thanks to the advent of Herschel and ALMA, new high-quality observations of molecules present in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are being reported that reveal large differences from the existing chemical models. New molecular data and more comprehensive models of the chemistry in circumstellar envelopes are now available. Aims: The aims are to determine and study the important formation and destruction pathways in the envelopes of O-rich AGB stars and to provide more reliable predictions of abundances, column densities, and radial distributions for potentially detectable species with physical conditions applicable to the envelope surrounding IK Tau. Methods: We use a large gas-phase chemical model of an AGB envelope including the effects of CO and N2 self-shielding in a spherical geometry and a newly compiled list of inner-circumstellar envelope parent species derived from detailed modeling and observations. We trace the dominant chemistry in the expanding envelope and investigate the chemistry as a probe for the physics of the AGB phase by studying variations of abundances with mass-loss rates and expansion velocities. Results: We find a pattern of daughter molecules forming from the photodissociation products of parent species with contributions from ion-neutral abstraction and dissociative recombination. The chemistry in the outer zones differs from that in traditional PDRs in that photoionization of daughter species plays a significant role. With the proper treatment of self-shielding, the N → N2 and C+→ CO transitions are shifted outward by factors of 7 and 2, respectively, compared with earlier models. An upper limit on the abundance of CH4 as a parent species of (≲2.5 × 10-6 with respect to H2) is found for IK Tau, and several potentially observable molecules with relatively simple chemical links to other parent species are determined. The assumed stellar mass-loss rate, in particular, has an impact on the

  6. Fluorine in carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: a binary scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaro, M.; de Mink, S. E.; Izzard, R. G.; Campbell, S. W.; Karakas, A. I.; Cristallo, S.; Pols, O. R.; Lattanzio, J. C.; Straniero, O.; Gallino, R.; Beers, T. C.

    2008-06-01

    Aims: A super-solar fluorine abundance was observed in the carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) star HE 1305+0132 ([F/Fe] = +2.90, [Fe/H] = -2.5). We propose that this observation can be explained using a binary model that involve mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star companion and, based on this model, we predict F abundances in CEMP stars in general. We discuss wether F can be used to discriminate between the formation histories of most CEMP stars: via binary mass transfer or from the ejecta of fast-rotating massive stars. Methods: We compute AGB yields using different stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis codes to evaluate stellar model uncertainties. We use a simple dilution model to determine the factor by which the AGB yields should be diluted to match the abundances observed in HE 1305+0132. We further employ a binary population synthesis tool to estimate the probability of F-rich CEMP stars. Results: The abundances observed in HE 1305+0132 can be explained if this star accreted 3-11% of the mass lost by its former AGB companion. The primary AGB star should have dredged-up at least 0.2 {M}⊙ of material from its He-rich region into the convective envelope via third dredge-up, which corresponds to AGB models of Z ≃ 0.0001 and mass ≃2 {M}⊙. Many AGB model uncertainties, such as the treatment of convective borders and mass loss, require further investigation. We find that in the binary scenario most CEMP stars should also be FEMP stars, that is, have [F/Fe] > +1, while fast-rotating massive stars do not appear to produce fluorine. We conclude that fluorine is a signature of low-mass AGB pollution in CEMP stars, together with elements associated with the slow neutron-capture process.

  7. Innocent Bystanders and Smoking Guns: Dwarf Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    As far as we know, most carbon throughout the Universe is created and dispersed by AGB stars. So it was at first surprising to find that the carbon stars most prevalent in the Galaxy are in fact dwarfs. We suspect that dC stars are most likely innocent bystanders in post-mass transfer binaries, and may be predominantly metal-poor. Among 1200 C stars found in the SDSS (Green 2013), we confirm 724 dCs, of which a dozen are DA/dC stars in composite spectrum binaries, quadrupling the total sample of these "smoking guns" for AGB binary mass transfer. The dCs likely span absolute magnitudes M_i from about 6.5 to 10.5. G-type dC stars with weak CN and relatively blue colors are probably the most massive dCs still cool enough to show C_2 bands. Eleven very red C stars with strong red CN bands appear to be N-type AGB stars at large Galactocentric distances, one likely a new discovery in the dIrr galaxy Le A. Two such stars within 30arcmin of each other may trace a previously unidentified dwarf galaxy or tidal stream at ~40 kpc. We describe follow-up projects to study the spatial, kinematic, and binary properties of these C-enriched dwarfs.

  8. Sulphur molecules in the circumstellar envelopes of M-type AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovich, T.; De Beck, E.; Black, J. H.; Olofsson, H.; Justtanont, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: The sulphur compounds SO and SO2 have not been widely studied in the circumstellar envelopes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. By presenting and modelling a large number of SO and SO2 lines in the low mass-loss rate M-type AGB star R Dor, and modelling the available lines of those molecules in a further four M-type AGB stars, we aim to determine their circumstellar abundances and distributions. Methods: We use a detailed radiative transfer analysis based on the accelerated lambda iteration method to model circumstellar SO and SO2 line emission. We use molecular data files for both SO and SO2 that are more extensive than those previously available. Results: Using 17 SO lines and 98 SO2 lines to constrain our models for R Dor, we find an SO abundance of (6.7 ± 0.9) × 10-6 and an SO2 abundance of 5 × 10-6 with both species having high abundances close to the star. We also modelled 34SO and found an abundance of (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10-7, giving an 32SO/34SO ratio of 21.6 ± 8.5. We derive similar results for the circumstellar SO and SO2 abundances and their distributions for the low mass-loss rate object W Hya. For the higher mass-loss rate stars, we find shell-like SO distributions with peak abundances that decrease and peak abundance radii that increase with increasing mass-loss rate. The positions of the peak SO abundance agree very well with the photodissociation radii of H2O. We also modelled SO2 in two higher mass-loss rate stars but our models for these were less conclusive. Conclusions: We conclude that for the low mass-loss rate stars, the circumstellar SO and SO2 abundances are much higher than predicted by chemical models of the extended stellar atmosphere. These two species may also account for all the available sulphur. For the higher mass-loss rate stars we find evidence that SO is most efficiently formed in the circumstellar envelope, most likely through the photodissociation of H2O and the subsequent reaction between S and OH. The S

  9. THE FIRST FLUORINE ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN EXTRAGALACTIC ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Abia, C.; Cristallo, S.; Dominguez, I.; Cunha, K.; Smith, V. V.; De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Straniero, O.

    2011-08-10

    Fluorine ({sup 19}F) abundances (or upper limits) are derived in six extragalactic asymptotic giant branch (AGB) carbon stars from the HF(1-0) R9 line at 2.3358 {mu}m in high-resolution spectra. The stars belong to the Local Group galaxies, Large Magellanic Cloud, Small Magellanic Cloud, and Carina dwarf spheroidal, spanning more than a factor of 50 in metallicity. This is the first study to probe the behavior of F with metallicity in intrinsic extragalactic C-rich AGB stars. Fluorine could be measured only in four of the target stars, showing a wide range in F enhancements. Our F abundance measurements together with those recently derived in Galactic AGB carbon stars show a correlation with the observed carbon and s-element enhancements. The observed correlations, however, display a different dependence on the stellar metallicity with respect to theoretical predictions in low-mass, low-metallicity AGB models. We briefly discuss the possible reasons for this discrepancy. If our findings are confirmed in a larger number of metal-poor AGBs, the issue of F production in AGB stars will need to be revisited.

  10. VLTI/MIDI Large Program: AGB Stars at Different Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, C.; Klotz, D.; Wittkowski, M.; Hron, J.; Richichi, A.; Lagadec, E.; Verhoelst, T.; Rau, G.; Sacuto, S.; Jorissen, A.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Olofsson, H.; Kerschbaum, F.

    2015-08-01

    We have observed a sample of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars from the Herschel Mass-loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) program with the VLTI MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (MIDI). The program aims at providing insight to the atmospheres of those stars, to be able to understand the role of the mass-loss process at different spatial scales. We obtained visibilities and spectra of fourteen objects with different chemistries and variability classes. These observations, together with data we retrieved from the archive, allow us to characterize not only the geometry of the dust-forming region, but in some cases also the time variability in the N band. As previously reported in the literature, we confirm the detection of spectroscopic but not interferometric variability. This result has implications on the size of the structures involved in the dust-formation process. We also report two cases of asymmetric structures; the nature of these structures will be clearly identified only with the second generation VLTI instrument MATISSE.

  11. Radial-Velocity Analysis of the Post-AGB Star, HD101584

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, F.; Hearnshaw, J.; Rosenzweig, P.; Guzman, E.; Sivarani, T.; Parthasarathy, M.

    2007-08-01

    This project concerns the analysis of the periodicity of the radial velocity of the peculiar emission-line supergiant star HD 101584 (F0 Ia), and also we propose a physical model to account for the observations. From its peculiarities, HD 101584 is a star that is in the post-AGB phase. This study is considered as a key to clarify the multiple aspects related with the evolution of the circum-stellar layer associated with this star's last phase. The star shows many lines with P Cygni profiles, including H-alpha, Na D lines in the IR Ca triplet, indicating a mass outflow. For HD 101584 we have performed a detailed study of its radial-velocity variations, using both emission and absorption lines over a wide range of wavelength. We have analyzed the variability and found a periodicity for all types of lines of 144 days, which must arise from the star's membership in a binary system. The data span a period of five consecutive years and were obtained using the 1-m telescope of Mt John Observatory, in New Zealand., with the echelle and Hercules high resolution spectrographs and CCD camera. HD101584 is known to be an IRAS source, and our model suggests it is a proto-planetary nebula, probably with a bipolar outflow and surrounded by a dusty disk as part of a binary system. We have found no evidence for HD101584 to contain a B9 star as found by Bakker et al (1996). A low resolution IUE spectrum shows the absence of any strong UV continuum that would be expected for a B star to be in this system.

  12. Studies of circumstellar shells in AGB stars by multifrequency (sub)mm-VLBI observations of maser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, F.; Desmurs, J. F.; Bujarrabal, V.; Baudry, A.; de Vicente, P.; Soria-Ruiz, R.; Alcolea, J.; Diaz-Pulido, A.; Gómez, M.

    2017-03-01

    VLBI observations of maser emission are a basic tool to study the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around evolved stars, mainly around AGB and post-AGB stars. The maser lines of water and silicon monoxide are particularly intense. They provide us with high spatial resolution data on the very inner CSEs around AGB stars, including the pulsating layers previous to grain formation and outer regions where the fast expansion characteristic of such envelopes is already present. The analysis of the pumping mechanism of SiO masers and of the physical conditions in the emitting clumps requires accurate maps of the various lines, which show different excitation requirements. A large observational effort is being done to obtain (quasi-)simultaneous multiline data at the highest spatial resolution, using VLBI techniques, which makes possible to compare the relative distribution of the maser lines. We present the state-of-the-art in the field, and discuss preliminary results of SiO masers observed with the Global Millimeter VLBI Array (GMVA) which provide a new view into the physics of these AGB envelopes. The participation of ALMA in these VLBI arrays will boost the study of these masers, at higher frequencies.

  13. Millimeter and some near infra-red observations of short-period Miras and other AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Baas, F.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Stehle, R.; Josselin, E.; Tilanus, R. P. J.

    1999-12-01

    Millimeter observations of 48 oxygen- and 20 carbon-rich AGB Miras with periods shorter than 400 days are presented. In addition, observations of 14 O-rich and 15 C-stars with longer, or no known, periods have also been obtained. The detection statistics is as follows: in 12CO J=1-0 and 2-1 we observed 97 stars, and detected 66 in at least one line. We find 24 new detections in the 1-0 line, 38 new detections in the 2-1 line, and 29 stars have been detected for the first time in one or both lines. In 12CO J=3-2 we observed 14 stars and detected 11, with 4 new detections. In 13CO J=2-1, 3-2 we observed 2 stars and had one new detection. In HCN(1-0) we observed 5 carbon stars and detected 3, one new. In SO(6_5-5_4) we observed the same 5 stars and detected none. In CS(3-2) we observed 8 carbon stars and detected 3, all new. In SiO(3-2, v=0) we observed 34 O-rich stars and detected 25, all new except one. Near-infrared JHK photometry is presented for seven stars. For four stars it is the first NIR data published. The luminosity and dust mass loss rate are obtained for seven very red stars with unknown pulsation period from modelling the spectral energy distribution (SED) and IRAS LRS spectra. Thereby, a new IR supergiant is confirmed (AFGL 2968). For the rest of the sample, luminosity and distance are obtained in a variety of ways: using hipparcos parallaxes, period-luminosity and period-M_K-relations combined with apparent K magnitudes, and kinematic distances. The dust mass loss rate is obtained from model fitting of the SED (either from the literature, or presented in the present paper), or from the observed IRAS 60 mu m flux, corrected for the photospheric contribution. The gas mass loss rate is derived from the observed CO line intensities, as presented here, combined with existing literature data, if any. This allows the derivation of the dust-to-gas ratio. Our and literature CO J = 3-2 data has been used to calibrate the relation between mass loss rate and peak

  14. Large-scale asymmetries in the winds of (binary) AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Paladini, C.; Mecina, M.; Pourbaix, D.; Groenewegen, M.; Mohamed, S.

    2014-04-01

    Observations of 78 Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars and Red Supergiants were carried out with the PACS photometer on-board Herschel as part of the MESS (Mass loss of Evolved StarS) program. For about 60% of these objects, the dusty wind differs from spherically symmetric and reveals a complex morphology. The majority of these asymmetries are caused by a rather simple incident, the interaction of the stellar wind with the interstellar medium. A bow shock is formed in direction of the stellar motion where the two media interact. However, also much more irregular shapes are encountered in the sample. These structures are often related to the binarity of the stellar system. Accreted material by the companion can cause nova outbursts or bipolar outflows which are relatively common. A rather rare encounter are Archimedean spirals that are imprinted in the wind which are now found for a handful of objects, among W Aquilae observed with Herschel and R Sculptoris with ALMA. The most complicated structures in the MESS sample indicate the interplay of multiple interacting influences. A prominent case is o Ceti (Mira). Its exceptionally high space motion produces a strong bow shock and its white dwarf companion drags an Archimedean spiral into the deformed stellar wind bubble and pierces it with a fast bipolar outflow.

  15. Broad-band and multi-band polarimetric observations of post-AGB and RV Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akras, S.; Ramirez-Velez, J.; Hiriart, D.; Lopez, M.; Bonanos, A.

    2013-02-01

    We present optical broad-band (UBVRI) aperture polarimetry of 52 post-AGB stars, selected from De Ruyter et al. (2006) and the Torun Catalog, based on the shape of their SED and near-infrared excess. We find 10 (19%) of the stars in our sample to have high polarization (P > 5%), 30 (56%) intermediate/low polarization (1% < P < 5%) and 13 (25%) very low (or non-polarized) polarization (P < 1%). Our observations show clear evidence of asymmetric circumstellar envelopes or equatorial density enhancement around post-AGB stars, probably formed at the beginning of the AGB phase. Some stars exhibit wavelength-independent polarization suggesting scattered light by large dust grains or free electrons (Thomson scattering), while others show wavelength-dependent polarization originated from scattering by small dust grains (Rayleigh scattering). Finally, we conclude that highly polarized sources (P > 3%), show systematically [12] - [25] > 1.5, J - H > 0.5 and J - K > 0.5, clearly separated from the group of RV Tauri stars, which are found to have very low polarization (P < 3%).

  16. Revealing the transition from post-AGB stars to planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, Indra; Chapman, Jessica M.; Cohen, Martin; Redman, Matt

    2009-04-01

    In 2005, we used ATCA at 3- & 6-cm to detect the onset of ionizing winds in a biased sub-sample of post-AGB stars selected from an OH maser survey. The evolutionary status of the objects was indicated by 2-colour plots of IRAS and MSX data as well as OH maser profile characteristics. We detected 7/28 sources in radio continuum and found that 2 had non-thermal spectral indices, consistent with wind shock interactions rather than photoionization by an evolving progenitor (Bains et al, 2008, MNRAS submitted). Furthermore, SED modelling of some of the radio-detected sources revealed central star temperatures << 30,000 K, the threshold for significant photoionization. To refine the diagnostic capabilities of the infrared colours and maser characteristics in predicting both the evolutionary phase of these objects and the presence of ionizing winds within them, we now propose to complete the ATCA survey of the remainder of the sample (57 targets) at 3 & 6 cm. This ATCA detection experiment provides an excellent showcase for the unprecedented sensitivity of the CABB.

  17. Is There a Metallicity Ceiling to Form Carbon Stars? - A Novel Technique Reveals a Scarcity of C-Stars in the Inner M31 Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Girardi, L.; Marigo, P.; Williams, B. F.; Aringer, B.; Nowotny, W.; Rosenfield, P.; Dorman, C. E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Melbourne, J. L.; Olsen, K. A. G.; Weisz, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    We use medium-band near-infrared (NIR) Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 photometry with model NIR spectra of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to develop a new tool for efficiently distinguish- ing carbon-rich (C-type) AGB stars from oxygen-rich (M-type) AGB stars in galaxies at the edge of and outside the Local Group. We present the results of a test of this method on a region of the inner disk of M31, where we nd a surprising lack of C stars, contrary to the ndings of previous C star searches in other regions of M31. We nd only 1 candidate C star (plus up to 6 additional, less certain C stars candidates), resulting in an extremely low ratio of C to M stars (C=M = (3.3(sup +20)(sub - 0.1) x 10(sup -4)) that is 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than other C/M estimates in M31. The low C/M ratio is likely due to the high metallicity in this region which impedes stars from achieving C/O > 1 in their atmospheres. These observations provide stringent constraints to evolutionary models of metal-rich AGB stars and suggest that there is a metallicity threshold above which M stars are unable to make the transition to C stars, dramatically affecting AGB mass loss and dust production and, consequently, the observed global properties of metal-rich galaxies.

  18. IS THERE A METALLICITY CEILING TO FORM CARBON STARS?-A NOVEL TECHNIQUE REVEALS A SCARCITY OF C STARS IN THE INNER M31 DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, M. L.; Girardi, L.; Marigo, P.; Williams, B. F.; Rosenfield, P.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Weisz, D. R.; Aringer, B.; Nowotny, W.; Dorman, C. E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Olsen, K. A. G.

    2013-09-01

    We use medium-band near-infrared (NIR) Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 photometry with model NIR spectra of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to develop a new tool for efficiently distinguishing carbon-rich (C-type) AGB stars from oxygen-rich (M-type) AGB stars in galaxies at the edge of and outside the Local Group. We present the results of a test of this method on a region of the inner disk of M31, where we find a surprising lack of C stars, contrary to the findings of previous C star searches in other regions of M31. We find only one candidate C star (plus up to six additional, less certain C star candidates), resulting in an extremely low ratio of C to M stars (C/M= (3.3{sup +20}{sub -0.1}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}) that is one to two orders of magnitude lower than other C/M estimates in M31. The low C/M ratio is likely due to the high metallicity in this region which impedes stars from achieving C/O > 1 in their atmospheres. These observations provide stringent constraints to evolutionary models of metal-rich AGB stars and suggest that there is a metallicity threshold above which M stars are unable to make the transition to C stars, dramatically affecting AGB mass loss and dust production and, consequently, the observed global properties of metal-rich galaxies.

  19. The chemical composition of carbon stars. The R-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, O.; Abia, C.; Plez, B.; Domínguez, I.; Cristallo, S.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. The aim of this work is to shed some light on the problem of the formation of carbon stars of R-type from a detailed study of their chemical composition. Methods: We use high-resolution and high signal-to-noise optical spectra of 23 R-type stars (both early- and late-types) selected from the Hipparcos catalogue. The chemical analysis is made using spectral synthesis in LTE and state-of-the-art carbon-rich spherical model atmospheres. We derive their CNO content (including the 12C/13C ratio), average metallicity, lithium, and light (Sr, Y, Zr) and heavy (Ba, La, Nd, Sm) s-element abundances. The observed properties of the stars (galactic distribution, kinematics, binarity, photometry and luminosity) are also discussed. Results: Our analysis shows that late-R stars are carbon stars with identical chemical and observational characteristics as the normal (N-type) AGB carbon stars. The s-element abundance pattern derived can be reproduced by low-mass AGB nucleosynthesis models where the 13C(α, n)16O reaction is the main neutron donor. We confirm the results of the sole previous abundance analysis of early-R stars, namely that they are carbon stars with near solar metallicity showing enhanced nitrogen, low 12C/13C ratios and no s-element enhancements. In addition, we have found that early-R stars have Li abundances larger than expected for post RGB tip giants. We also find that a significant number (~40%) of the early-R stars in our sample are wrongly classified, probably being classical CH stars and normal K giants. Conclusions: On the basis of the chemical analysis, we confirm the previous suggestion that late-R stars are just misclassified N-type carbon stars in the AGB phase of evolution. Their photometric, kinematic, variability and luminosity properties are also compatible with this. In consequence, we suggest that the number of true R stars is considerably lower than previously believed. This alleviates the problem of considering R stars as a frequent stage

  20. Tidal Distortion of the Envelope of an AGB Star IRS 3 near Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Wardle, M.; Cotton, W.; Schödel, R.; Royster, M. J.; Roberts, D. A.; Kunneriath, D.

    2017-03-01

    We present radio and millimeter continuum observations of the Galactic center taken with the Very Large Array (VLA) and ALMA at 44 and 226 GHz, respectively. We detect radio and millimeter emission from IRS 3, lying ∼4.″5 NW of Sgr A*, with a spectrum that is consistent with the photospheric emission from an AGB star at the Galactic center. Millimeter images reveal that the envelope of IRS 3, the brightest and most extended 3.8 μm Galactic center stellar source, consists of two semicircular dust shells facing the direction of Sgr A*. The outer circumstellar shell, at a distance of 1.6 × 104 au, appears to break up into “fingers” of dust directed toward Sgr A*. These features coincide with molecular CS (5–4) emission and a near-IR extinction cloud distributed between IRS 3 and Sgr A*. The NE–SW asymmetric shapes of the IRS 3 shells seen at 3.8 μm and radio are interpreted as structures that are tidally distorted by Sgr A*. Using the kinematics of CS emission and the proper motion of IRS 3, the tidally distorted outflowing material from the envelope after 5000 yr constrains the distance of IRS 3 to ∼0.7 pc in front of or ∼0.5 pc behind Sgr A*. This suggests that the mass loss by stars near Sgr A* can supply a reservoir of molecular material near Sgr A*. We also present dark features in radio continuum images coincident with the envelope of IRS 3. These dusty stars provide examples in which high-resolution radio continuum images can identify dust-enshrouded stellar sources embedded in an ionized medium.

  1. ALMA observations of the vibrationally excited rotational CO transition v = 1, J = 3 - 2 towards five AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouri, T.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Ramstedt, S.; Lombaert, R.; Maercker, M.; De Beck, E.

    2016-11-01

    We report the serendipitous detection with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of the vibrationally excited pure-rotational CO transition v = 1, J = 3 - 2 towards five asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, o Cet, R Aqr, R Scl, W Aql, and π1 Gru. The observed lines are formed in the poorly understood region located between the stellar surface and the region where the wind starts, the so-called warm molecular layer. We successfully reproduce the observed lines profiles using a simple model. We constrain the extents, densities, and kinematics of the region where the lines are produced. R Aqr and R Scl show inverse P-Cygni line profiles which indicate infall of material on to the stars. The line profiles of o Cet and R Scl show variability. The serendipitous detection towards these five sources shows that vibrationally excited rotational lines can be observed towards a large number of nearby AGB stars using ALMA. This opens a new possibility for the study of the innermost regions of AGB circumstellar envelopes.

  2. Detection of HCN and C2H2 in ISO Spectra of Oxygen-Rich AGB Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbon, Duane F.; Chiar, Jean; Goorvitch, David; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Cool oxygen-rich AGB stars were not expected to have organic molecules like HCN in either their photospheres or circumstellar envelopes (CSEs). The discovery of HCN and CS microwave emission from the shallowest CSE layers of these stars was a considerable surprise and much theoretical effort has been expended in explaining the presence of such organics. To further explore this problem, we have undertaken a systematic search of oxygen-rich AGB stellar spectra in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) data archive. Our purposes are to find evidence regarding critical molecular species that could be of value in choosing among the proposed theoretical models, to locate spectral features which might give clues to conditions deeper in the CSEs, and to lay the groundwork for future SIRTF (Space Infrared Telescope Facility) and SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) observations. Using carefully reduced observations, we have detected weak absorption features arising from HCN and possibly C2H2 in a small number of oxygen-rich AGB stars. The most compelling case is NML Cyg which shows both HCN (14 microns) and CO2 (15 microns). VY CMa, a similar star, shows evidence for HCN, but not CO2. Two S-type stars show evidence for the C-H bending transitions: W Aql at 14 microns (HCN) and both W Aql and S Cas at 13.7 microns (C2H2). Both W Aql and S Cas as well as S Lyr, a SC-type star, show 3 micron absorption which may arise from the C-H stretch of HCN and C2H2. In the case of NML Cyg, we show that the HCN and CO2 spectral features are formed in the CSE at temperatures well above those of the outermost CSE layers and derive approximate column densities. In the case of the S-stars, we discuss the evidence for the organic features and their photospheric origin.

  3. CEN 34 - high-mass YSO in M 17 or background post-AGB star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Liu, Yao; Fang, Min; Jiang, Zhibo

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the proposed high-mass young stellar object (YSO) candidate CEN 34, thought to be associated with the star-forming region M 17. Its optical to near-infrared (550-2500 nm) spectrum reveals several photospheric absorption features, such as Hα, the Ca ii triplet, and the CO bandhead, but lacks emission lines. The spectral features in the range 8375-8770 Å are used to constrain an effective temperature Teff = 5250 ± 250 K (early-/mid-G) and a log g = 2.0 ± 0.3 (supergiant). The spectral energy distribution (SED) displays a faint infrared excess that resembles that of a high-mass YSO or an evolved star of intermediate mass. Moreover, the observed temperature and surface gravity are identical for high-mass YSOs and evolved stars. The radial velocity of CEN 34 relative to the local standard of rest (VLSR) as obtained from various photospheric lines is of the order of -60 km s-1 and thus distinct from the +25 km s-1 found for several OB stars in the cluster and for the associated molecular cloud. The SED modeling yields 10-4 M⊙ of circumstellar material, which contributes only a tiny fraction to the total visual extinction (11 mag). The distance of CEN 34 is between 2.0 kpc and 4.5 kpc. In the case of a YSO, a dynamical ejection process is proposed to explain the VLSR difference between CEN 34 and M 17. Additionally, to match the temperature and luminosity, we speculate that CEN 34 had accumulated the bulk of its mass with an accretion rate >4 × 10-3M⊙/yr over a very short time span (~103 yrs), and it is currently undergoing a phase of gravitational contraction without any further mass gain. However, all the aforementioned characteristics of CEN 34 are compatible with an evolved star of 5-7 M⊙ and an age of 50-100 Myr, so it is most likely a background post-AGB star with a distance between 2.0 kpc and 4.5 kpc. We consider the latter classification as the more likely interpretation. Further discrimination of the two possible scenarios should come

  4. Breaking news from the HST: the central star of the Stingray Nebula is now returning towards the AGB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reindl, Nicole; Rauch, T.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Todt, H.; Werner, K.

    2017-01-01

    SAO 244567 is a rare example of a star that allows us to witness stellar evolution in real time. Between 1971 and 1990, it changed from a B-type star into the hot central star of the Stingray Nebula. This observed rapid heating has been a mystery for decades, since it is in strong contradiction with the low mass of the star and canonical post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution. We speculated that SAO 244567 might have suffered from a late thermal pulse (LTP) and obtained new observations with Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/COS to follow the evolution of the surface properties of SAO 244567 and to verify the LTP hypothesis. Our non-LTE spectral analysis reveals that the star cooled significantly since 2002 and that its envelope is now expanding. Therefore, we conclude that SAO 244567 is currently on its way back towards the AGB, which strongly supports the LTP hypothesis. A comparison with state-of-the-art LTP evolutionary calculations shows that these models cannot fully reproduce the evolution of all surface parameters simultaneously, pointing out possible shortcomings of stellar evolution models. Thereby, SAO 244567 keeps on challenging stellar evolution theory and we highly encourage further investigations.

  5. The puzzle of the CNO isotope ratios in asymptotic giant branch carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abia, C.; Hedrosa, R. P.; Domínguez, I.; Straniero, O.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The abundance ratios of the main isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are modified by the CNO-cycle in the stellar interiors. When the different dredge-up events mix the burning material with the envelope, valuable information on the nucleosynthesis and mixing processes can be extracted by measuring these isotope ratios. Aims: Previous determinations of the oxygen isotopic ratios in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) carbon stars were at odds with the existing theoretical predictions. We aim to redetermine the oxygen ratios in these stars using new spectral analysis tools and further develop discussions on the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios in order to elucidate this problem. Methods: Oxygen isotopic ratios were derived from spectra in the K-band in a sample of galactic AGB carbon stars of different spectral types and near solar metallicity. Synthetic spectra calculated in local thermodynamic equillibrium (LTE) with spherical carbon-rich atmosphere models and updated molecular line lists were used. The CNO isotope ratios derived in a homogeneous way, were compared with theoretical predictions for low-mass (1.5-3 M⊙) AGB stars computed with the FUNS code assuming extra mixing both during the RGB and AGB phases. Results: For most of the stars the 16O/17O/18O ratios derived are in good agreement with theoretical predictions confirming that, for AGB stars, are established using the values reached after the first dredge-up (FDU) according to the initial stellar mass. This fact, as far as the oxygen isotopic ratios are concerned, leaves little space for the operation of any extra mixing mechanism during the AGB phase. Nevertheless, for a few stars with large 16O/17O/18O, the operation of such a mechanism might be required, although their observed 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios would be difficult to reconcile within this scenario. Furthermore, J-type stars tend to have lower 16O/17O ratios than the normal carbon stars, as already indicated in previous studies

  6. IRAS colors of carbon stars - An optical spectroscopic test

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.; Wainscoat, R.J.; Walker, H.J.; Volk, K.; Schwartz, D.E.; Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute, Los Altos, CA )

    1989-06-01

    Optical spectra are obtained of 57 photographic counterparts to IRAS sources not previously studied spectroscopically, and expected on the basis of their IRAS colors to be M or C type stars. Confirmed carbon stars are found only in a restricted range of 12-25 index, and constitute a striking vertical sequence in the 12-25-60 micron color-color diagram. This sequence is in accord with evolutionary models for AGB stars that convert M into C stars by dredge-up, and follow loops in the color-color plane. Optically visible and optically invisible carbon stars occupy different color-color locations consistent with their representations of different evolutionary states in the life of relatively low-mass stars. 16 refs.

  7. IRAS colors of carbon stars - An optical spectroscopic test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Walker, Helen J.; Volk, Kevin; Schwartz, Deborah E.

    1989-01-01

    Optical spectra are obtained of 57 photographic counterparts to IRAS sources not previously studied spectroscopically, and expected on the basis of their IRAS colors to be M or C type stars. Confirmed carbon stars are found only in a restricted range of 12-25 index, and constitute a striking 'vertical' sequence in the 12-25-60 micron color-color diagram. This sequence is in accord with evolutionary models for AGB stars that convert M into C stars by dredge-up, and follow loops in the color-color plane. Optically visible and optically invisible carbon stars occupy different color-color locations consistent with their representations of different evolutionary states in the life of relatively low-mass stars.

  8. Dust formation and mass loss around intermediate-mass AGB stars with initial metallicity Zini ≤ 10-4 in the early Universe - I. Effect of surface opacity on stellar evolution and the dust-driven wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashibu, Shohei; Yasuda, Yuki; Kozasa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    Dust formation and the resulting mass loss around asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with initial metallicity in the range 0 ≤ Zini ≤ 10-4 and initial mass 2 ≤ Mini/M⊙ ≤ 5 are explored by hydrodynamical calculations of the dust-driven wind (DDW) along the AGB evolutionary tracks. We employ the MESA code to simulate the evolution of stars, assuming an empirical mass-loss rate in the post-main-sequence phase and considering three types of low-temperature opacity (scaled-solar, CO-enhanced and CNO-enhanced opacity) to elucidate the effect on stellar evolution and the DDW. We find that the treatment of low-temperature opacity strongly affects dust formation and the resulting DDW; in the carbon-rich AGB phase, the maximum dot{M} of Mini ≥ 3 M⊙ stars with the CO-enhanced opacity is at least one order of magnitude smaller than that with the CNO-enhanced opacity. A wide range of stellar parameters being covered, the necessary condition for driving efficient DDW with dot{M} ≥ 10^{-6} M⊙ yr-1 is expressed as effective temperature Teff ≲ 3850 K and log (δCL/κRM) ≳ 10.43log Teff - 32.33, with the carbon excess δC defined as εC - εO, the Rosseland mean opacity κR in units of cm2 g-1 in the surface layer and the stellar mass (luminosity) M(L) in solar units. The fitting formulae derived for gas and dust mass-loss rates in terms of input stellar parameters could be useful for investigating the dust yield from AGB stars in the early Universe being consistent with stellar evolution calculations.

  9. Hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction between an AGB star and a main-sequence companion in eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; De Marco, Orsola; Macdonald, Daniel; Galaviz, Pablo; Passy, Jean-Claude; Iaconi, Roberto; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2016-02-01

    The Rotten Egg Nebula has at its core a binary composed of a Mira star and an A-type companion at a separation >10 au. It has been hypothesized to have formed by strong binary interactions between the Mira and a companion in an eccentric orbit during periastron passage ˜800 yr ago. We have performed hydrodynamic simulations of an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star interacting with companions with a range of masses in orbits with a range of initial eccentricities and periastron separations. For reasonable values of the eccentricity, we find that Roche lobe overflow can take place only if the periods are ≪100 yr. Moreover, mass transfer causes the system to enter a common envelope phase within several orbits. Since the central star of the Rotten Egg nebula is an AGB star, we conclude that such a common envelope phase must have lead to a merger, so the observed companion must have been a tertiary companion of a binary that merged at the time of nebula ejection. Based on the mass and time-scale of the simulated disc formed around the companion before the common envelope phase, we analytically estimate the properties of jets that could be launched. Allowing for super-Eddington accretion rates, we find that jets similar to those observed are plausible, provided that the putative lost companion was relatively massive.

  10. The wind speeds, dust content, and mass-loss rates of evolved AGB and RSG stars at varying metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Steven R.; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Zijlstra, Albert A.; Green, James A.; Wood, Peter R.; Nanni, Ambra; Imai, Hiroshi; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Matsuura, Mikako; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Gómez, José F.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of our survey of 1612-MHz circumstellar OH maser emission from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and red supergiants (RSGs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We have discovered four new circumstellar maser sources in the LMC, and increased the number of reliable wind speeds from infrared (IR) stars in the LMC from 5 to 13. Using our new wind speeds, as well as those from Galactic sources, we have derived an updated relation for dust-driven winds: vexp ∝ ZL0.4. We compare the subsolar metallicity LMC OH/IR stars with carefully selected samples of more metal-rich OH/IR stars, also at known distances, in the Galactic Centre and Galactic bulge. We derive pulsation periods for eight of the bulge stars for the first time by using near-IR photometry from the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea survey. We have modelled our LMC OH/IR stars and developed an empirical method of deriving gas-to-dust ratios and mass-loss rates by scaling the models to the results from maser profiles. We have done this also for samples in the Galactic Centre and bulge and derived a new mass-loss prescription which includes luminosity, pulsation period, and gas-to-dust ratio dot{M} = 1.06^{+3.5}_{-0.8} × }10^{-5 (L/10^4 L_{⊙})^{0.9± 0.1}(P/500 {d})^{0.75± 0.3} (r_gd/200)^{-0.03± 0.07} M⊙ yr-1. The tightest correlation is found between mass-loss rate and luminosity. We find that the gas-to-dust ratio has little effect on the mass-loss of oxygen-rich AGB stars and RSGs within the Galaxy and the LMC. This suggests that the mass-loss of oxygen-rich AGB stars and RSGs is (nearly) independent of metallicity between a half and twice solar.

  11. Rejuvenation of the Innocent Bystander: Testing Spin-Up in a Dwarf Carbon Star Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Carbon stars (C>O) were long assumed to all be giants, because only AGB stars dredge up significant carbon into their atmospheres. We now know that dwarf carbon (dC) stars are actually far more common than C giants. These dC stars are hypothesized to have accreted C-rich envelope material from an AGB companion, in systems that have likely undergone a planetary nebula phase, eventually yielding a white dwarf and a dC star that has gained both significant mass and angular momentum. To test whether the X-ray emission strength and spectral properties are consistent with a rejuvenated dynamo, we propose a Chandra pilot study of dCs selected from the SDSS; some have hot white dwarf companions (indicating more recent mass transfer), and all show Balmer emission lines (a sign of activity).

  12. The Carbon Star Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Robert F.

    2000-06-01

    The atmospheres of many stars have chemical compositions that are significantly different from that of the interstellar medium from which they are formed. This symposium considered all kinds of late-type stars showing altered compositions, the carbon stars being simply the best-known of these. All stages of stellar evolution from the main sequence to the ejection of a planetary nebula were considered, with emphasis on the changes that occur on the asymptotic giant branch. The spectroscopic properties of the photospheres and circumstellar envelopes of chemically-peculiar red giant stars, their origins via single-star evolution or mass transfer in binary systems, and the methods currently used to study them were all discussed in detail. This volume includes the full texts of papers given orally at the symposium and abstracts of the posters. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/book.htm/0-7923-6347-7

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LMC post-AGB, post-RGB star and YSOs (Kamath+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.; van Winckel, H.

    2015-06-01

    To obtain an initial sample selection for our spectroscopic survey, we adopted the sample selected by van Aarle et al. (2011A&A...530A..90V, Cat. J/A+A/530/A90), who identified optically visible post-AGB star candidates in the LMC based on photometry. We obtained low-resolution spectra of stars selected from the initial sample of objects. The spectra were taken using the AAOmega double-beam multi-fibre spectrograph mounted on the 3.9m Anglo Australian Telescope (AAT) at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO). AAOmega allows for the simultaneous observation of 392 targets (including science objects, sky-positions, and fiducial guide stars) over a 2 degree field using the 2dF fibre positioner. (11 data files).

  14. ALMA observations of the nearby AGB star L2 Puppis. I. Mass of the central star and detection of a candidate planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Homan, W.; Richards, A. M. S.; Decin, L.; McDonald, I.; Montargès, M.; Ohnaka, K.

    2016-12-01

    Six billion years from now, while evolving on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), the Sun will metamorphose from a red giant into a beautiful planetary nebula. This spectacular evolution will impact the solar system planets, but observational confirmations of the predictions of evolution models are still elusive as no planet orbiting an AGB star has yet been discovered. The nearby AGB red giant L2 Puppis (d = 64 pc) is surrounded by an almost edge-on circumstellar dust disk. We report new observations with ALMA at very high angular resolution (18 × 15 mas) in band 7 (ν ≈ 350 GHz) that allow us to resolve the velocity profile of the molecular disk. We establish that the gas velocity profile is Keplerian within the central cavity of the dust disk, allowing us to derive the mass of the central star L2 Pup A, mA = 0.659 ± 0.011 ± 0.041 M⊙ (± 6.6%). From evolutionary models, we determine that L2 Pup A had a near-solar main-sequence mass, and is therefore a close analog of the future Sun in 5 to 6 Gyr. The continuum map reveals a secondary source (B) at a radius of 2 AU contributing fB/fA = 1.3 ± 0.1% of the flux of the AGB star. L2 Pup B is also detected in CO emission lines at a radial velocity of vB = 12.2 ± 1.0 km s-1. The close coincidence of the center of rotation of the gaseous disk with the position of the continuum emission from the AGB star allows us to constrain the mass of the companion to mB = 12 ± 16 MJup. L2 Pup B is most likely a planet or low-mass brown dwarf with an orbital period of about five years. Its continuum brightness and molecular emission suggest that it may be surrounded by an extended molecular atmosphere or an accretion disk. L2 Pup therefore emerges as a promising vantage point on the distant future of our solar system.

  15. The LF of TP-AGB stars in the LMC/SMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruzual, Gustavo; Charlot, Stephane; GonzalezLopezlira, Rosa; Srinivasan, Sundar; Boyer, Martha L.

    2013-01-01

    We show that Monte Carlo simulations of the TP-AGB stellar population in the LMC and SMC galaxies using the CB. models produce LF and color distributions that are in closer agreement with observations than those obtained with the BC03 and CB07 models. This is a progress report of work that will be published elsewhere.

  16. Morphological effects on IR band profiles. Experimental spectroscopic analysis with application to observed spectra of oxygen-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanai, A.; Mutschke, H.; Blum, J.; Posch, Th.; Koike, C.; Ferguson, J. W.

    2009-07-01

    Aims: To trace the source of the unique 13, 19.5, and 28 μm emission features in the spectra of oxygen-rich circumstellar shells around AGB stars, we have compared dust extinction spectra obtained by aerosol measurements. Methods: We have measured the extinction spectra for 19 oxide powder samples of eight different types, such as Ti-compounds (TiO, TiO2, Ti2O3, Ti3O5, Al2TiO5, CaTiO3), α-, γ-, χ-δ-κ-Al2O3, and MgAl2O4 in the infrared region (10-50 μm) paying special attention to the morphological (size, shape, and agglomeration) effects and the differences in crystal structure. Results: Anatase (TiO2) particles with rounded edges are the possible 13, 19.5 and 28 μm band carriers as the main contributor in the spectra of AGB stars, and spherically shaped nano-sized spinel and Al2TiO5 dust grains are possibly associated with the anatase, enhancing the prominence of the 13 μm feature and providing additional features at 28 μm. The extinction data sets obtained by the aerosol and CsI pellet measurements have been made available for public use at http://elbe.astro.uni-jena.de.

  17. The pathways of C: from AGB stars, to the Interstellar Medium, and finally into the protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.

    2011-05-01

    The origin, and role of C in the formation of first solar system aggregates is described. Stellar grains evidence demonstrates that Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars were nearby to the solar nebula at the time of solar system formation. Such stars continue to burn H and He in shells that surround the C-O core. During their evolution, flashes occur in the He shell and the C, and O produced are eventually dredged up into the star's envelop and then to the stellar surface, and finally masively ejected to the interstellar medium (IM). Once in a molecular cloud, the electrophilicity of C makes this element reactable with the surrounding gas to produce different molecular species. Primitive meteorites, particularly these known as chondrites, preserved primeval materials of the disk. The abundances of short-lived radionuclides (SLN), inferred to have been present in the early solar system (ESS), are a constraint on the birth and early evolution of the solar system as their relatively short half lives do not allow the observed abundances to be explained by galactic chemical evolution processes. We present a model of a 6.5 solar masses star of solar metallicity that simultaneously match the abundances of SLNs inferred to have been present in the ESS by using a dilution factor of 1 part of AGB material per 300 parts of original solar nebula material, and taking into account a time interval between injection of SLNs and consolidation of chondrites equal to 0.53 Myr [2]. Such a polluting source does not overproduce 53Mn, as supernova models do, and only marginally affects isotopic ratios of stable elements. The AGB stars released O- and C-rich gas with important oxidizing implications to first solar system materials as recently detected in circumstellar environments [3]. REF: [1] Lada C.J. and Lada E.A. 2003. Ann. Rev. A&A. 41: 57; [2] Trigo-Rodriguez J.M. et al. 2009. MAPS 44: 627; [3] Decin L. et al. 2010. Nature 467: 64.

  18. SPITZER DETECTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND SILICATE FEATURES IN POST-AGB STARS AND YOUNG PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrigone, Luciano; Hora, Joseph L.; Umana, Grazia; Trigilio, Corrado

    2009-09-20

    We have observed a small sample of hot post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The stars were selected from the literature on the basis of their far-infrared (IR) excess (i.e., post-AGB candidates) and B spectral type (i.e., close to the ionization of the envelope). The combination of our IRAC observations with Two Micron All Sky Survey and IRAS catalog data, along with previous radio observations in the cm range (where available) allowed us to model the spectral energy distributions of our targets and find that in almost all of them at least two shells of dust at different temperatures must be present, the hot dust component ranging up to 10{sup 3} K. In several targets, grains larger than 1 {mu}m are needed to match the far-IR data points. In particular, in IRAS 17423-1755 grains up to 100 {mu}m must be introduced to match the emission in the millimeter range. We obtained IRS spectra to identify the chemistry of the envelopes and found that more than one-third of the sources in our sample have mixed chemistry, showing both mid-IR bands attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and silicate features. The analysis of the PAH features indicates that these molecules are located in the outflows, far away from the central stars. We consider the larger than expected percentage of mixed-chemistry targets as a selection bias toward stars with a disk or torus around them. Our results strengthen the current picture of mixed chemistry being due to the spatial segregation of different dust populations in the envelopes.

  19. Is There a Metallicity Ceiling to Form Carbon Stars?—A Novel Technique Reveals a Scarcity of C stars in the Inner M31 Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, M. L.; Girardi, L.; Marigo, P.; Williams, B. F.; Aringer, B.; Nowotny, W.; Rosenfield, P.; Dorman, C. E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Melbourne, J. L.; Olsen, K. A. G.; Weisz, D. R.

    2013-09-01

    We use medium-band near-infrared (NIR) Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 photometry with model NIR spectra of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to develop a new tool for efficiently distinguishing carbon-rich (C-type) AGB stars from oxygen-rich (M-type) AGB stars in galaxies at the edge of and outside the Local Group. We present the results of a test of this method on a region of the inner disk of M31, where we find a surprising lack of C stars, contrary to the findings of previous C star searches in other regions of M31. We find only one candidate C star (plus up to six additional, less certain C star candidates), resulting in an extremely low ratio of C to M stars (C/M = (3.3^{+20}_{-0.1})\\times 10^{-4}) that is one to two orders of magnitude lower than other C/M estimates in M31. The low C/M ratio is likely due to the high metallicity in this region which impedes stars from achieving C/O > 1 in their atmospheres. These observations provide stringent constraints to evolutionary models of metal-rich AGB stars and suggest that there is a metallicity threshold above which M stars are unable to make the transition to C stars, dramatically affecting AGB mass loss and dust production and, consequently, the observed global properties of metal-rich galaxies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the STScI, which is operated by the AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  20. Amorphous carbon in the disk around the post-AGB binary HR 4049. Discerning dust species with featureless opacity curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acke, B.; Degroote, P.; Lombaert, R.; de Vries, B. L.; Smolders, K.; Verhoelst, T.; Lagadec, E.; Gielen, C.; Van Winckel, H.; Waelkens, C.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Infrared spectroscopy has been extensively used to determine the mineralogy of circumstellar dust. The identification of dust species with featureless opacities, however, is still ambiguous. Here we present a method to lift the degeneracy using the combination of infrared spectroscopy and interferometry. Aims: The binary post-AGB star HR 4049 is surrounded by a circumbinary disk viewed at a high inclination angle. Apart from gaseous emission lines and molecular emission bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), diamonds, and fullerenes, the 2-25 μm infrared spectrum is featureless. The goal of the paper is to identify the dust species responsible for the smooth spectrum. Methods: We gathered high-angular-resolution measurements in the near- and mid-infrared with the VLTI interferometric instruments AMBER and MIDI. The data set is expanded with archival Geneva optical photometry, ISO-SWS and Spitzer-IRS infrared spectroscopy, and VISIR N-band images and spectroscopy. We computed a grid of radiative-transfer models of the circumbinary disk of HR 4049 using the radiative-transfer code MCMax. We searched for models that provide good fits simultaneously to all available observations. Results: We find that the variable optical extinction towards the primary star is consistent with the presence of very small (0.01 μm) iron-bearing dust grains or amorphous carbon grains. The combination of the interferometric constraint on the disk extent and the shape of the infrared spectrum points to amorphous carbon as the dominant source of opacity in the circumbinary disk of HR 4049. The disk is optically thick to the stellar radiation in the radial direction. At infrared wavelengths it is optically thin. The PAH emission is spatially resolved in the VISIR data and emanates from a region with an extent of several hundreds of AU, with a projected photocenter displacement of several tens of AU from the disk center. The PAHs most likely reside in a bipolar outflow

  1. Application of a Theory and Simulation-based Convective Boundary Mixing Model for AGB Star Evolution and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battino, U.; Pignatari, M.; Ritter, C.; Herwig, F.; Denisenkov, P.; Den Hartogh, J. W.; Trappitsch, R.; Hirschi, R.; Freytag, B.; Thielemann, F.; Paxton, B.

    2016-08-01

    The s-process nucleosynthesis in Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars depends on the modeling of convective boundaries. We present models and s-process simulations that adopt a treatment of convective boundaries based on the results of hydrodynamic simulations and on the theory of mixing due to gravity waves in the vicinity of convective boundaries. Hydrodynamics simulations suggest the presence of convective boundary mixing (CBM) at the bottom of the thermal pulse-driven convective zone. Similarly, convection-induced mixing processes are proposed for the mixing below the convective envelope during third dredge-up (TDU), where the {}13{{C}} pocket for the s process in AGB stars forms. In this work, we apply a CBM model motivated by simulations and theory to models with initial mass M = 2 and M=3 {M}⊙ , and with initial metal content Z = 0.01 and Z = 0.02. As reported previously, the He-intershell abundances of {}12{{C}} and {}16{{O}} are increased by CBM at the bottom of the pulse-driven convection zone. This mixing is affecting the {}22{Ne}(α, n){}25{Mg} activation and the s-process efficiency in the {}13{{C}}-pocket. In our model, CBM at the bottom of the convective envelope during the TDU represents gravity wave mixing. Furthermore, we take into account the fact that hydrodynamic simulations indicate a declining mixing efficiency that is already about a pressure scale height from the convective boundaries, compared to mixing-length theory. We obtain the formation of the {}13{{C}}-pocket with a mass of ≈ {10}-4 {M}⊙ . The final s-process abundances are characterized by 0.36\\lt [{{s}}/{Fe}]\\lt 0.78 and the heavy-to-light s-process ratio is -0.23\\lt [{hs}/{ls}]\\lt 0.45. Finally, we compare our results with stellar observations, presolar grain measurements and previous work.

  2. Study of the inner dust envelope and stellar photosphere of the AGB star R Doradus using SPHERE/ZIMPOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouri, T.; Maercker, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Kervella, P.; de Koter, A.; Ginski, C.; De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Min, M.; Dominik, C.; O'Gorman, E.; Schmid, H.-M.; Lombaert, R.; Lagadec, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. On the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) low- and intermediate-mass stars eject a large fraction of their envelope, but the mechanism driving these outflows is still poorly understood. For oxygen-rich AGB stars, the wind is thought to be driven by radiation pressure caused by scattering of radiation off dust grains. Aims: We study the photosphere, the warm molecular layer, and the inner wind of the close-by oxygen-rich AGB star R Doradus. We focus on investigating the spatial distribution of the dust grains that scatter light and whether these grains can be responsible for driving the outflow of this star. Methods: We use high-angular-resolution images obtained with SPHERE/ZIMPOL to study R Dor and its inner envelope in a novel way. We present observations in filters V, cntHα, and cnt820 and investigate the surface brightness distribution of the star and of the polarised light produced in the inner envelope. Thanks to second-epoch observations in cntHα, we are able to see variability on the stellar photosphere. We study the polarised-light data using a continuum-radiative-transfer code that accounts for direction-dependent scattering of photons off dust grains. Results: We find that in the first epoch the surface brightness of R Dor is asymmetric in V and cntHα, the filters where molecular opacity is stronger, while in cnt820 the surface brightness is closer to being axisymmetric. The second-epoch observations in cntHα show that the morphology of R Dor has changed completely in a timespan of 48 days to a more axisymmetric and compact configuration. This variable morphology is probably linked to changes in the opacity provided by TiO molecules in the extended atmosphere. The observations show polarised light coming from a region around the central star. The inner radius of the region from where polarised light is seen varies only by a small amount with azimuth. The value of the polarised intensity, however, varies by between a factor of 2.3 and 3.7 with

  3. INNOCENT BYSTANDERS: CARBON STARS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Among stars showing carbon molecular bands (C stars), the main-sequence dwarfs, likely in post-mass transfer binaries, are numerically dominant in the Galaxy. Via spectroscopic selection from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we retrieve 1220 high galactic latitude C stars, {approx}5 times more than previously known, including a wider variety than past techniques such as color or grism selection have netted, and additionally yielding 167 DQ white dwarfs. Of the C stars with proper motion measurements, we identify 69% clearly as dwarfs (dCs), while {approx}7% are giants. The dCs likely span absolute magnitudes M{sub i} from {approx}6.5 to 10.5. 'G-type' dC stars with weak CN and relatively blue colors are probably the most massive dCs still cool enough to show C{sub 2} bands. We report Balmer emission in 22 dCs, none of which are G-types. We find 8 new DA/dC stars in composite spectrum binaries, quadrupling the total sample of these 'smoking guns' for AGB binary mass transfer. Eleven very red C stars with strong red CN bands appear to be 'N'-type AGB stars at large Galactocentric distances, one likely a new discovery in the dIrr galaxy Leo A. Two such stars within 30' of each other may trace a previously unidentified dwarf galaxy or tidal stream at {approx}40 kpc. We explore the multiwavelength properties of the sample and report the first X-ray detection of a dC star, which shows strong Balmer emission. Our own spectroscopic survey additionally provides the dC surface density from a complete sample of dwarfs limited by magnitude, color, and proper motion.

  4. Sublimating comets as the source of nucleation seeds for grain condensation in the gas outflow from AGB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmire, D. P.; Matese, John J.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    A growing amount of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that most main sequence stars are surrounded by disks of cometary material. The dust production by comets in such disks is investigated when the central stars evolve up the red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Once released, the dust is ablated and accelerated by the gas outflow and the fragments become the seeds necessary for condensation of the gas. The origin of the requisite seeds has presented a well known problem for classical nucleation theory. This model is consistent with the dust production observed in M giants and supergiants (which have increasing luminosities) and the fact that earlier supergiants and most WR stars (whose luminosities are unchanging) do not have significant dust clouds even though they have significant stellar winds. Another consequence of the model is that the spatial distribution of the dust does not, in general, coincide with that of the gas outflow, in contrast to the conventional condensation model. A further prediction is that the condensation radius is greater that that predicted by conventional theory which is in agreement with IR interferometry measurements of alpha-Ori.

  5. The AGB star nucleosynthesis in the light of the recent 17O ( p ,α)14N and 18O ( p ,α)15N reaction rate determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-02-01

    Presolar grains form in the cold and dusty envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. These solides, once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of low temeperature H-burning in stars. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the 17O ( p ,α)14N and 18O ( p ,α)15N reactions. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O ( p ,α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. The new estimates of the reaction rates have been introduced into calculations of AGB star nucleosynthesis and the results have been compared with geochemical analysis of "presolar" grains to determine their impact on astrophysical environments.

  6. (Re)Solving Mysteries Of Convection And Mass Loss Of AGB Stars: What New Models And Observations Tell Us About Long-Standing Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfner, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    The recent progress in high-spatial-resolution techniques, spanning wavelengths from the visual to the radio regime, is leading to new valuable insights into the complex dynamical atmospheres of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars and their wind forming regions. Striking examples are images of asymmetries and inhomogeneities in the photospheric and dust-forming layers which vary on time-scales of months. These features are probably related to large-scale convective flows predicted by 3D 'star-in-a-box' models. Furthermore, high-resolution observations make it possible to measure dust condensation distances, and they give information about the chemical composition and sizes of dust grains in the close vicinity of cool giants. These are essential constraints for building realistic models of wind acceleration and developing a predictive theory of mass loss for AGB stars, which is a crucial ingredient of stellar and galactic chemical evolution models.

  7. Large-scale environments of binary AGB stars probed by Herschel. II. Two companions interacting with the wind of π1 Gruis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Paladini, C.; Kerschbaum, F.; Pourbaix, D.; Siopis, C.; Ottensamer, R.; Mečina, M.; Cox, N. L. J.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Klotz, D.; Sadowski, G.; Spang, A.; Cruzalèbes, P.; Waelkens, C.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The Mass loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample observed with PACS on board the Herschel Space Observatory revealed that several asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are surrounded by an asymmetric circumstellar envelope (CSE) whose morphology is most likely caused by the interaction with a stellar companion. The evolution of AGB stars in binary systems plays a crucial role in understanding the formation of asymmetries in planetary nebulæ (PNe), but at present, only a handful of cases are known where the interaction of a companion with the stellar AGB wind is observed. Aims: We probe the environment of the very evolved AGB star π1 Gruis on large and small scales to identify the triggers of the observed asymmetries. Methods: Observations made with Herschel/PACS at 70 μm and 160 μm picture the large-scale environment of π1 Gru. The close surroundings of the star are probed by interferometric observations from the VLTI/AMBER archive. An analysis of the proper motion data of Hipparcos and Tycho-2 together with the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data help identify the possible cause for the observed asymmetry. Results: The Herschel/PACS images of π1 Gru show an elliptical CSE whose properties agree with those derived from a CO map published in the literature. In addition, an arc east of the star is visible at a distance of 38″ from the primary. This arc is most likely part of an Archimedean spiral caused by an already known G0V companion that is orbiting the primary at a projected distance of 460 au with a period of more than 6200 yr. However, the presence of the elliptical CSE, proper motion variations, and geometric modelling of the VLTI/AMBER observations point towards a third component in the system, with an orbital period shorter than 10 yr, orbiting much closer to the primary than the G0V star. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation

  8. Nucleosynthesis in AGB stars: Observation of Mg-25 and Mg-26 in IRC+10216 and possible detection of Al-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelin, M.; Forestini, M.; Valiron, P.; Ziurys, L. M.; Anderson, M. A.; Cernicharo, J.; Kahane, C.

    1995-01-01

    We report the detection in the circumstellar envelope IRC+10216 of millimeter lines of the rare isotopomers (25)MgNC and (26)MgNC, as well as of a line at 234433 MHz, which could be the J= 7-6 transition of (26)AlF (an alternate, although less likely identified would be the J= 9-8 transition of NaF). The derived Mg-24:Mg-25:Mg-26 isotopic abundance ratios (78 : 11+/- 1 : 11 +/-1) are consistent with the solar system values (79.0:10.0:11.0), following Anders & Grevesse 1989). According to new calculations of evolutionary models of 3 solar mass and 5 solar mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, these ratios and the previously measured N, O and Si isotopic ratios imply that the central star had an initial mass 3 solar mass (less than or equal to M(sub *, ini) less than 5 solar mass and has already experienced many 3rd dredge-up events. From this, it can be predicted that the Al-26/Al-27 isotopics ratio lies between 0.01 and 0.08; in fact, the value derived in the case that U234433 arises from (26)AlF is Al-26/Al-27 = 0.04. The identification of the (25)MgNC and (26)MgNC lines was made possible by ab-initio quantum mechanical calculations of the molecule geometrical structure. It was confirmed through millimeter-wave laboratory measurements. The quantum mechanical calculations are briefly described and the laboratory results presented in some detail. The rotation constants B, D, H and the spin-rotation constant gamma of (25)MgNC and (26)MgNC are determined from a fit of laboratory and astronomical data.

  9. s-Processing in AGB Stars Revisited. II. Enhanced 13C Production through MHD-induced Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; Palmerini, S.; Maiorca, E.; Nucci, M. C.

    2016-02-01

    Slow neutron captures are responsible for the production of about 50% of elements heavier than iron, mainly occurring during the asymptotic giant branch phase of low-mass stars (1 ≲ M/M⊙ ≲ 3), where the main neutron source is the 13C(α, n)16O reaction. This last reaction is activated from locally produced 13C, formed by partial mixing of hydrogen into the He-rich layers. We present here the first attempt to describe a physical mechanism for the formation of the 13C reservoir, studying the mass circulation induced by magnetic buoyancy without adding new free parameters to those already involved in stellar modeling. Our approach represents the application to the stellar layers relevant for s-processing of recent exact analytical 2D and 3D models for magneto-hydrodynamic processes at the base of convective envelopes in evolved stars in order to promote downflows of envelope material for mass conservation during the occurrence of a dredge-up phenomenon. We find that the proton penetration is characterized by small concentrations, but is extended over a large fractional mass of the He-layers, thus producing 13C reservoirs of several 10-3 M⊙. The ensuing 13C-enriched zone has an almost flat profile, while only a limited production of 14N occurs. In order to verify the effects of our new findings we show how the abundances of the main s-component nuclei can be accounted for in solar proportions and how our large 13C-reservoir allows us to solve a few so far unexplained features in the abundance distribution of post-AGB objects.

  10. s-PROCESSING IN AGB STARS REVISITED. II. ENHANCED {sup 13}C PRODUCTION THROUGH MHD-INDUCED MIXING

    SciTech Connect

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; Palmerini, S.; Maiorca, E.; Nucci, M. C.

    2016-02-20

    Slow neutron captures are responsible for the production of about 50% of elements heavier than iron, mainly occurring during the asymptotic giant branch phase of low-mass stars (1 ≲ M/M{sub ⊙} ≲ 3), where the main neutron source is the {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O reaction. This last reaction is activated from locally produced {sup 13}C, formed by partial mixing of hydrogen into the He-rich layers. We present here the first attempt to describe a physical mechanism for the formation of the {sup 13}C reservoir, studying the mass circulation induced by magnetic buoyancy without adding new free parameters to those already involved in stellar modeling. Our approach represents the application to the stellar layers relevant for s-processing of recent exact analytical 2D and 3D models for magneto-hydrodynamic processes at the base of convective envelopes in evolved stars in order to promote downflows of envelope material for mass conservation during the occurrence of a dredge-up phenomenon. We find that the proton penetration is characterized by small concentrations, but is extended over a large fractional mass of the He-layers, thus producing {sup 13}C reservoirs of several 10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙}. The ensuing {sup 13}C-enriched zone has an almost flat profile, while only a limited production of {sup 14}N occurs. In order to verify the effects of our new findings we show how the abundances of the main s-component nuclei can be accounted for in solar proportions and how our large {sup 13}C-reservoir allows us to solve a few so far unexplained features in the abundance distribution of post-AGB objects.

  11. Constraints on Grain Formation Around Carbon Stars from Laboratory Studies of Presolar Graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Akande, O. W.; Croat, T. K.; Cowsik, R.

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation into the physical conditions in the mass outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) carbon stars that are required for the formation of micron-sized presolar graphite grains, either with or without internal crystals of titanium carbide (TiC). In addition to providing detailed information about stellar nucleosynthesis, the structure and composition of presolar grains give unique information about the conditions of grain formation. In the present work we use laboratory observations of presolar graphite to gain insight into the physical conditions in circumstellar outflows from carbon AGB stars. The periodic pulsation of AGB stars enhances the gas density through shocks in the stellar atmosphere above the photosphere, promoting the condensation of dust grains. Copious mass outflow occurs largely because grains are coupled to the radiation field of the star, which accelerates them by radiation pressure; momentum is in turn transferred to gas molecules by collisions with grains. The dust/gas mixture is effectively a two-component fluid whose motion depends on atmospheric structure and which, in turn, influences that structure. In particular, the radiation pressure on the grains determines the velocity field of the outflow and thus the density distribution, while the density distribution itself determines the conditions of radiative transfer within the outflow and thus the effective radiation pressure.

  12. Search for aluminium monoxide in the winds of oxygen-rich AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, H.; Menten, K. M.; Patel, N. A.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Aluminium monoxide (AlO) is likely efficiently depleted from the gas around oxygen-rich evolved stars to form alumina (Al2O3) clusters and dust seeds. The presence of AlO gas in the extended atmospheres of evolved stars has been derived from optical spectroscopy. More recently, AlO gas was also detected at long wavelengths around the supergiant VY CMa and the oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch star o Cet (Mira A). The central role aluminium might play in dust formation and wind driving, in combination with these first detections of AlO at long wavelengths, shows the need for a wider search for this molecule in the winds of evolved stars. Aims: The detection at long wavelengths of emission in rotational transitions of AlO towards asymptotic giant branch stars can help constrain the presence and location of AlO gas in the outflows and ultimately also the efficiency of the depletion process. Methods: In search of AlO, we mined data obtained with APEX, the IRAM 30 m telescope, Herschel/HIFI, SMA, and ALMA, which were primarily aimed at studying other species around asymptotic giant branch stars. We report here on observations of AlO towards a sample of eight oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch stars in different rotational transitions, up to seven for some stars. Results: We present definite detections of one rotational transition of AlO for o Cet and R Aqr, and tentative detections of one transition for R Dor and o Cet and two transitions for IK Tau and W Hya. The presented spectra of WX Psc, R Cas, and TX Cam show no signature of AlO. For o Cet, R Aqr, and IK Tau, we find that the AlO (N = 9-8) emission likely traces the inner parts of the wind, out to only a few tens of AU, where the gas has not yet been accelerated to its terminal velocity. This is in agreement with recently published results from a detailed study on o Cet. Conclusions: The conclusive detections of AlO emission in the case of o Cet and R Aqr confirm the presence of AlO in the gas phase in

  13. Search for Carbon-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in Milky Way Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indahl, Briana; Pessev, P.

    2014-01-01

    From our current understanding of stellar evolution, it would not be expected to find carbon rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in Milky Way globular clusters. Due to the low metallicity of the population II stars making up the globular clusters and their age, stars large enough to fuse carbon should have already evolved off of the asymptotic giant branch. Recently, however, there have been serendipitous discoveries of these types of stars. Matsunaga et al. (2006) discovered a Mira variable in the globular cluster Lynga 7. It was later confirmed by Feast et al. (2012) that the star is a member of the cluster and must be a product of a stellar merger. In the same year, Sharina et al. (2012) discovered a carbon star in the low metallicity globular cluster NGC6426 and reports it to be a CH star. Five more of these types of stars have been made as serendipitous discoveries and have been reported by Harding (1962), Dickens (1972), Cote et al. (1997), and Van Loon (2007). The abundance of these types of carbon stars in Milky Way globular clusters has been unknown because the discovery of these types of objects has only ever been a serendipitous discovery. These stars could have been easily overlooked in the past as they are outside the typical parameter space of galactic globular clusters. Also advances in near-infrared instruments and observing techniques have made it possible to detect the fainter carbon stars in binary systems. Having an understanding of the abundances of carbon stars in galactic globular clusters will aid in the modeling of globular cluster and galaxy formation leading to a better understanding of these processes. To get an understanding of the abundances of these stars we conducted the first comprehensive search for AGB carbon stars into all Milky Way globular clusters listed in the Harris Catalog (expect for Pyxis). I have found 128 carbon star candidates using methods of comparing color magnitude diagrams of the clusters with the carbon

  14. Carbon Abundance Plateaus among Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jinmi; He, Siyu; Placco, Vinicius; Carollo, Daniela; Beers, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of low-metallicity stars in the Milky Way, the Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor (CEMP) stars, exhibit enhancements of their carbon-to-iron relative to the solar value ([C/Fe] > +0.7). They can be divided into several sub-classes, depending on the nature and degree of the observed enhancements of their neutron-capture elements, providing information on their likely progenitors. CEMP-s stars (which exhibit enhanced s-process elements) are thought to be enhanced by mass transfer from an evolved AGB companion, while CEMP-no stars (which exhibit no over-abundances of neutron-capture elements) appear to be associated with explosions of the very first generations of stars. High-resolution spectroscopic analyses are generally required in order to make these sub-classifications.Several recent studies have suggested the existence of bimodality in the distribution of absolute carbon abundances among CEMP stars -- most CEMP-no stars belong to a low-C band ((A(C) ˜ 6.5), while most CEMP-s stars reside on a high-C band (A(C) ˜ 8.25). The number of CEMP stars considered by individual studies is, however, quite small, so we have compiled all available high-resolution spectroscopic data for CEMP stars, in order to further investigate the existence of the claimed carbon bi-modality, and to consider what can be learned about the progenitors of CEMP-s and CEMP-no stars based on the observed distribution of A(C) on the individual plateaus.We acknowledge partial support from the grant PHY 14-30152; Physics Frontier Center/JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE), awarded by the US National Science Foundation.

  15. NEW DETERMINATION OF THE {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O REACTION RATE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE s-PROCESS NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN AGB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, B.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Y. J.; Su, J.; Yan, S. Q.; Bai, X. X.; Chen, Y. S.; Fan, Q. W.; Jin, S. J.; Li, E. T.; Li, Z. C.; Lian, G.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, X.; Shu, N. C.; Lugaro, M.; Buntain, J.; Pang, D. Y.; Karakas, A. I.; Shi, J. R. E-mail: guobing@ciae.ac.cn; and others

    2012-09-10

    We present a new measurement of the {alpha}-spectroscopic factor (S{sub {alpha}}) and the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the 6.356 MeV 1/2{sup +} subthreshold state of {sup 17}O through the {sup 13}C({sup 11}B, {sup 7}Li){sup 17}O transfer reaction and we determine the {alpha}-width of this state. This is believed to have a strong effect on the rate of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction, the main neutron source for slow neutron captures (the s-process) in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Based on the new width we derive the astrophysical S-factor and the stellar rate of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction. At a temperature of 100 MK, our rate is roughly two times larger than that by Caughlan and Fowler and two times smaller than that recommended by the NACRE compilation. We use the new rate and different rates available in the literature as input in simulations of AGB stars to study their influence on the abundances of selected s-process elements and isotopic ratios. There are no changes in the final results using the different rates for the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O reaction when the {sup 13}C burns completely in radiative conditions. When the {sup 13}C burns in convective conditions, as in stars of initial mass lower than {approx}2 M{sub Sun} and in post-AGB stars, some changes are to be expected, e.g., of up to 25% for Pb in our models. These variations will have to be carefully analyzed when more accurate stellar mixing models and more precise observational constraints are available.

  16. Exploring wind-driving dust species in cool luminous giants. III. Wind models for M-type AGB stars: dynamic and photometric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bladh, S.; Höfner, S.; Aringer, B.; Eriksson, K.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Stellar winds observed in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are usually attributed to a combination of stellar pulsations and radiation pressure on dust. Shock waves triggered by pulsations propagate through the atmosphere, compressing the gas and lifting it to cooler regions which creates favourable conditions for grain growth. If sufficient radiative acceleration is exerted on the newly formed grains through absorption or scattering of stellar photons, an outflow can be triggered. Strong candidates for wind-driving dust species in M-type AGB stars are magnesium silicates (Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3). Such grains can form close to the stellar surface, they consist of abundant materials and, if they grow to sizes comparable to the wavelength of the stellar flux maximum, they experience strong acceleration by photon scattering. Aims: The purpose of this study is to investigate if photon scattering on Mg2SiO4 grains can produce realistic outflows for a wide range of stellar parameters in M-type AGB stars. Methods: We use a frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamics code with a detailed description for the growth of Mg2SiO4 grains to calculate the first extensive set of time-dependent wind models for M-type AGB stars. This set includes 139 solar-mass models, with three different luminosities (5000 L⊙, 7000 L⊙, and 10 000 L⊙) and effective temperatures ranging from 2600 K to 3200 K. The resulting wind properties, visual and near-IR photometry and mid-IR spectra are compared with observations. Results: We show that the models can produce outflows for a wide range of stellar parameters. We also demonstrate that they reproduce observed mass-loss rates and wind velocities, as well as visual and near-IR photometry. However, the current models do not show the characteristic silicate features at 10 and 18 μm as a result of the cool temperature of Mg2SiO4 grains in the wind. Including a small amount of Fe in the grains further out in the circumstellar envelope will

  17. Morphology and kinematics of the gas envelope of the variable AGB star π1 Gruis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhung, Pham Tuyet; Hoai, Do Thi; Diep, Pham Ngoc; Phuong, Nguyen Thi; Thao, Nguyen Thi; Anh, Pham Tuan; Darriulat, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Observations of the 12CO(3-2) emission from the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of the variable star π1 Gru using the compact array of the ALMA observatory have been recently made accessible to the public. An analysis of the morphology and kinematics of the CSE is presented with a result very similar to that obtained earlier for 12CO(2-1) emission using the Submillimeter Array. A quantitative comparison is made using their flared disk model. A new model is presented that provides a significantly better description of the data, using radial winds and smooth evolutions of the radio emission and wind velocity from the stellar equator to the poles. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA# <2012.1.00524.S>. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA) and NINS (Japan), together with NRC (Canada) and NSC and ASIAA (Taiwan), and KASI (Republic of Korea) in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. The Joint ALMA Observatory is operated by ESO, AUI/NRAO and NAOJ. The data are retrieved from the JVO portal (http://jvo.nao.ac.jp/portal) operated by the NAOJ.

  18. The s-Process Nucleosynthesis in Extremely Metal-Poor Stars as the Generating Mechanism of Carbon Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Takuma; Yamada, Shimako; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    The origin of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars plays a key role in characterising the formation and evolution of the first stars and the Galaxy since the extremely-metal-poor (EMP) stars with [Fe/H] ≤ -2.5 share the common features of carbon enhancement in their surface chemical compositions. The origin of these stars is not yet established due to the controversy of the origin of CEMP stars without the enhancement of s-process element abundances, i.e., so called CEMP-no stars. In this paper, we elaborate the s-process nucleosynthesis in the EMP AGB stars and explore the origin of CEMP stars. We find that the efficiency of the s-process is controlled by O rather than Fe at [Fe/H] ≲ -2. We demonstrate that the relative abundances of Sr, Ba, Pb to C are explained in terms of the wind accretion from AGB stars in binary systems.

  19. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars in SDSS/Segue. II. Comparison of CEMP-star frequencies with binary population-synthesis models

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sun; Suda, Takuma; Beers, Timothy C.; Stancliffe, Richard J.

    2014-06-20

    We present a comparison of the frequencies of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) giant and main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) stars with predictions from binary population-synthesis models involving asymptotic giant-branch (AGB) mass transfer. The giant and MSTO stars are selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration. We consider two initial mass functions (IMFs)—a Salpeter IMF, and a mass function with a characteristic mass of 10 M {sub ☉}. For giant stars, the comparison indicates a good agreement between the observed CEMP frequencies and the AGB binary model using a Salpeter IMF for [Fe/H] > – 1.5, and a characteristic mass of 10 M {sub ☉} for [Fe/H] < – 2.5. This result suggests that the IMF shifted from high- to low-mass dominated in the early history of the Milky Way, which appears to have occurred at a 'chemical time' between [Fe/H] =–2.5 and [Fe/H] =–1.5. The CEMP frequency for the turnoff stars with [Fe/H] < – 3.0 is much higher than the AGB model prediction from the high-mass IMF, supporting the previous assertion that one or more additional mechanisms, not associated with AGB stars, are required for the production of carbon-rich material below [Fe/H] =–3.0. We also discuss possible effects of first dredge-up and extra mixing in red giants and internal mixing in turnoff stars on the derived CEMP frequencies.

  20. Post-AGB stars in the SMC as tracers of stellar evolution: the extreme s-process enrichment of the 21 μm star J004441.04-732136.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Karakas, A. I.; Siess, L.; Goriely, S.; Wood, P. R.

    2012-05-01

    Context. This paper is part of a larger project in which we want to focus on the still poorly understood asymptotic giant branch (AGB) third dredge-up processes and associated s-process nucleosynthesis. Aims: We confront accurate spectral abundance analyses of post-AGB stars in both the Magellanic Clouds, to state-of-the-art AGB model predictions. With this comparison we aim at improving our understanding of the 3rd dredge-up phenomena and their dependencies on initial mass and metallicity. Methods: Because of the well constrained distance with respect to Galactic post-AGB stars, we choose an extra-galactic post-AGB star for this contribution, namely the only known 21 μm object of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC): J004441.04-732136.4. We used optical UVES spectra to perform an accurate spectral abundance analysis. With photometric data of multiple catalogues we construct a spectral energy distribution (SED) and perform a variability analysis. The results are then compared to predictions of tailored theoretical chemical AGB evolutionary models for which we used two evolution codes. Results: Spectral abundance results reveal J004441.04-732136.4 to be one of the most s-process enriched objects found up to date, while the photospheric C/O ratio of 1.9 ± 0.7, shows the star is only modestly C-rich. J004441.04-732136.4 also displays a low [Fe/H] = -1.34 ± 0.32, which is significantly lower than the mean metallicity of the SMC. From the SED, a luminosity of 7600 ± 200 L⊙ is found, together with E(B - V) = 0.64 ± 0.02. According to evolutionary post-AGB tracks, the initial mass should be ≈1.3 M⊙. The photometric variability shows a clear period of 97.6 ± 0.3 days. The detected C/O as well as the high s-process overabundances (e.g. [Y/Fe] = 2.15, [La/Fe] = 2.84) are hard to reconcile with the predictions. The chemical models also predict a high Pb abundance, which is not compatible with the detected spectrum, and a very high 12C/13C, which is not yet constrained

  1. Nucleosynthesis in AGB stars traced by oxygen isotopic ratios. I. Determining the stellar initial mass by means of the 17O/18O ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nutte, R.; Decin, L.; Olofsson, H.; Lombaert, R.; de Koter, A.; Karakas, A.; Milam, S.; Ramstedt, S.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Homan, W.; Van de Sande, M.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: We seek to investigate the 17O/18O ratio for a sample of AGB stars containing M-, S-, and C-type stars. These ratios are evaluated in relation to fundamental stellar evolution parameters: the stellar initial mass and pulsation period. Methods: Circumstellar 13C16O, 12C17O, and 12C18O line observations were obtained for a sample of nine stars with various single-dish long-wavelength facilities. Line intensity ratios are shown to relate directly to the surface 17O/18O abundance ratio. Results: Stellar evolution models predict the 17O/18O ratio to be a sensitive function of initial mass and to remain constant throughout the entire TP-AGB phase for stars initially less massive than 5 M⊙. This makes the measured ratio a probe of the initial stellar mass. Conclusions: Observed 17O/18O ratios are found to be well in the range predicted by stellar evolution models that do not consider convective overshooting. From this, accurate initial mass estimates are calculated for seven sources. For the remaining two sources, there are two mass solutions, although there is a larger probability that the low-mass solution is correct. Finally, we present hints at a possible separation between M/S- and C-type stars when comparing the 17O/18O ratio to the stellar pulsation period. The reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A71

  2. Large-scale environments of binary AGB stars probed by Herschel. I. Morphology statistics and case studies of R Aquarii and W Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Nowotny, W.; Cox, N. L. J.; Aringer, B.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Decin, L.; van Eck, S.; Gail, H.-P.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Kornfeld, K.; Mecina, M.; Posch, Thomas; Vandenbussche, B.; Waelkens, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mass loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample offers a selection of 78 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and red supergiants (RSGs) observed with the PACS photometer on-board Herschel at 70 μm and 160 μm. For most of these objects, the dusty AGB wind is not spherically symmetric and the wind shape can be subdivided into four classes. In the present paper we concentrate on the influence of a companion on the morphology of the stellar wind. Literature was searched to find binaries in the MESS sample, which were subsequently linked to their wind-morphology class to assert that the binaries are not distributed equally among the classes. In the second part of the paper we concentrate on the circumstellar environment of the two prominent objects R Aqr and W Aql. Each shows a characteristic signature of a companion interaction with the stellar wind. For the symbiotic star R Aqr, PACS revealed two perfectly opposing arms that in part reflect the previously observed ring-shaped nebula in the optical. However, from the far-IR there is evidence that the emitting region is elliptical rather than circular. The outline of the wind of W Aql seems to follow a large Archimedean spiral formed by the orbit of the companion but also shows strong indications of an interaction with the interstellar medium. We investigated the nature of the companion of W Aql and found that the magnitude of the orbital period supports the size of the spiral outline. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  3. Spectral Analysis of the O(He)-Type Central Stars of the Planetary Nebulae K 1-27 and LoTr 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reindl, N.; Ringat, E.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Kruk, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The four known O(He) stars are the only amongst the hottest post-AGB stars whose atmospheres are composed of almost pure helium. Thus, their evolution deviates from the hydrogen-defiCient post-AGB evolutionary sequence of carbon-dominated stars like e.g. PG 1159 stars. The origin of the O(He) stars is still not explained. They might be either post-early AGB stars or the progeny of R Coronae Borealis stars. We present preliminary results of a non-LTE spectral analysis based on FUSE and HST/COS observations.

  4. s-processing in AGB stars revisited. I. Does the main component constrain the neutron source in the {sup 13}C pocket?

    SciTech Connect

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; Maiorca, E.; Käppeler, F.; Palmerini, S. E-mail: maurizio.busso@fisica.unipg.it

    2014-05-20

    Slow neutron captures at A ≳ 85 are mainly guaranteed by the reaction {sup 13}C(α,n){sup 16}O in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, requiring proton injections from the envelope. These were so far assumed to involve a small mass (≲ 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}), but models with rotation suggest that in such tiny layers excessive {sup 14}N hampers s-processing. Furthermore, s-element abundances in galaxies require {sup 13}C-rich layers substantially extended in mass (≳ 4 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}). We therefore present new calculations aimed at clarifying those issues and at understanding whether the solar composition helps to constrain the {sup 13}C 'pocket' extension. We show that: (1) mixing 'from bottom to top' (as in magnetic buoyancy or other forced mechanisms) can form a {sup 13}C reservoir substantially larger than assumed so far, covering most of the He-rich layers; (2) on the basis of this idea, stellar models at a fixed metallicity reproduce the main s-component as accurately as before; and (3) they make nuclear contributions from unknown nucleosynthesis processes (LEPP) unnecessary, against common assumptions. These models also avoid problems of mixing at the envelope border and fulfil requirements from C-star luminosities. They yield a large production of nuclei below A = 100, so that {sup 86,} {sup 87}Sr may be fully synthesized by AGB stars, while {sup 88}Sr, {sup 89}Y, and {sup 94}Zr are contributed more efficiently than before. Finally, we suggest tests suitable for providing a final answer regarding the extension of the {sup 13}C pocket.

  5. DDT_yamamura_1: Herschel photometry of WISE J180956.27-330500.2; a newly discovered AGB star undergoing episodic mass ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, I.

    2012-05-01

    We propose to carry out imaging photometry of WISE J180956.27-330500.2 (hereafter WISE J1810) using PACS (at 70, 110, 160 micron) and SPIRE (at 250, 350, 500 micron) in order to obtain the latest far-IR and sub-mm fluxes of the object and constrain the nature of its mass-loss history. WISE J1810 was discovered very recently by us (Gandhi et al. 2012) as an object with a peculiar 2MASS--WISE spectral energy distribution (SED). We propose that the object is an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star presently experiencing an episodic mass-loss event following a thermal pulse. If this is the case, it is the first opportunity of real-time observation of AGB mass ejection at thermal pulse. The infrared SED of this object is rapidly evolving over the past 15 years and updated observations over a broad wavelength range are essential. Herschel is the only available facility with the capability of high-sensitivity, high-spatial resolution observations at far-infrared and sub-mm wavelengths, and can provide indispensable information of the rapidly expanding dust shell of this object. The unique nature of this source, its recent bright appearance and rapid evolution prompt us to request a DDT observation while Herschel is still operating. The requested observing time is 1414 sec, which is the minimum operation time for the observing modes that will be used.

  6. FIRST DETECTION OF ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM A DETACHED DUST SHELL: GALAXY EVOLUTION EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE CARBON ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR U Hya

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Enmanuel; Montez, Rodolfo Jr.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Ramstedt, Sofia

    2015-01-10

    We present the discovery of an extended ring of ultraviolet (UV) emission surrounding the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star U Hya in archival observations performed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. This is the third discovery of extended UV emission from a carbon AGB star and the first from an AGB star with a detached shell. From imaging and photometric analysis of the FUV and NUV images, we determined that the UV ring has a radius of ∼110'', thus indicating that the emitting material is likely associated with the detached shell seen in the infrared. We find that scattering of the central point source of NUV and FUV emission by the dust shell is negligible. Moreover, we find that scattering of the interstellar radiation field by the dust shell can contribute at most ∼10% of the FUV flux. Morphological and photometric evidence suggests that shocks caused by the star's motion through space and, possibly, shock-excited H{sub 2} molecules are the most likely origins of the UV flux. In contrast to previous examples of extended UV emission from AGB stars, the extended UV emission from U Hya does not show a bow-shock-like structure, which is consistent with a lower space velocity and lower interstellar medium density. This suggests the detached dust shell is the source of the UV-emitting material and can be used to better understand the formation of detached shells.

  7. Do C/O > 1 main-sequence stars build carbon planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfors, Carolina; Farihi, Jay

    2015-12-01

    The existence of rocky yet carbon-dominated planets is predicated on a C-dominated (rather than O-dominated) nebular birthplace. Planet-forming stars with unusually high C/O > 0.8 could provide such a favourable environment. Therefore the highest C/O ratios in potential host stars is of interest, as it has a direct impact on the frequency of C-dominated planetary systems.Interestingly, C/O > 1 main-sequence stars are relatively common, and have distinctive optical spectra dominated by strong molecular carbon features. These dwarf carbon (dC) stars are even more numerous than carbon giants, but their origins may be fundamentally tied to binarity -- where the C/O ratio is increased by C-rich material accreted from an AGB star (now a white dwarf). We are undertaking a survey of dC stars to measure their binary fraction, and to ascertain if any C/O > 1 stars are single and thus favourable to C-rich planet formation.We present first results from our ongoing search for radial velocity companions to dC stars. Multi-epoch observations of 22 systems show clear RV variability for > 70% of targets, suggesting that most, if not all, dC stars are in binary systems. The presence of a formerly more massive companion suggests their C/O > 1 is an enhancement via mass transfer, and not primordial. If correct, C/O > 1 stars may host oxygen-dominated (possibly circumbinary) planets, significantly reducing the Galactic real estate available for carbon planets.

  8. Abundances of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars as constraints on their formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Nordström, B.; Hansen, T. T.; Kennedy, C. R.; Placco, V. M.; Beers, T. C.; Andersen, J.; Cescutti, G.; Chiappini, C.

    2016-04-01

    Context. An increasing fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars is found as their iron abundance, [Fe/H], decreases below [Fe/H] =-2.0. The CEMP-s stars have the highest absolute carbon abundances, [C/H], and are thought to owe their enrichment in carbon and the slow neutron-capture (s-process) elements to mass transfer from a former asymptotic giant branch (AGB) binary companion. The most Fe-poor CEMP stars are normally single, exhibit somewhat lower [C/H] than CEMP-s stars, but show no s-process element enhancement (CEMP-no stars). Abundance determinations of CNO offer clues to their formation sites. Aims: Our aim is to use the medium-resolution spectrograph X-Shooter/VLT to determine stellar parameters and abundances for C, N, Sr, and Ba in several classes of CEMP stars in order to further classify and constrain the astrophysical formation sites of these stars. Methods: Atmospheric parameters for our programme stars were estimated from a combination of V-K photometry, model isochrone fits, and estimates from a modified version of the SDSS/SEGUE spectroscopic pipeline. We then used X-Shooter spectra in conjunction with the 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium spectrum synthesis code MOOG, 1D ATLAS9 atmosphere models to derive stellar abundances, and, where possible, isotopic 12C/13C ratios. Results: Abundances (or limits) of C, N, Sr, and Ba are derived for a sample of 27 faint metal-poor stars for which the X-Shooter spectra have sufficient signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). These moderate resolution, low S/N (~10-40) spectra prove sufficient to perform limited chemical tagging and enable assignment of these stars into the CEMP subclasses (CEMP-s and CEMP-no). According to the derived abundances, 17 of our sample stars are CEMP-s and 3 are CEMP-no, while the remaining 7 are carbon-normal. For four CEMP stars, the subclassification remains uncertain, and two of them may be pulsating AGB stars. Conclusions: The derived stellar abundances trace the formation

  9. The composition of freshly-formed dust in recent (post-)AGB thermal pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Poshak

    2013-01-01

    We recently discovered a candidate Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) star undergoing a thermal pulse (TP). WISE J1810--3305 is one of only two sources in the WISE sky survey which show very red WISE colors but a very blue 2MASS [K] vs. WISE [W1 (3.4 mu m)] color, and drastic brightening at 12 mu m since IRAS observation. This favours a scenario in which we have caught a massive dust ejection event during a TP that began only ~15 years ago. The other source is Sakurai's object, which also underwent a massive dust expulsion around the same time, but is in a later evolutionary (post-AGB) phase. Few firm constraints exist on the TP stage because of its brevity. These objects provide a unique opportunity for understanding TP evolution and dust production in real-time. Here we propose COMICS spectroscopy of WISE J1810--3305 in order to study the composition of the circumstellar dust. We will search for molecular bands, and identify whether the central object is an Oxygen or Carbon rich AGB star. We also propose identical spectroscopy of Sakurai's object in order to compare AGB with post-AGB evolution. These objects are presently brightest in the mid-IR, and COMICS is the only ground-based mid-IR camera with the requisite capability for observation.

  10. Dynamic atmospheres and winds of cool luminous giants. I. Al2O3 and silicate dust in the close vicinity of M-type AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfner, S.; Bladh, S.; Aringer, B.; Ahuja, R.

    2016-10-01

    Context. In recent years, high spatial resolution techniques have given valuable insights into the complex atmospheres of AGB stars and their wind-forming regions. They make it possible to trace the dynamics of molecular layers and shock waves, to estimate dust condensation distances, and to obtain information on the chemical composition and size of dust grains close to the star. These are essential constraints for understanding the mass loss mechanism, which presumably involves a combination of atmospheric levitation by pulsation-induced shock waves and radiation pressure on dust, forming in the cool upper layers of the atmospheres. Aims: Spectro-interferometric observations indicate that Al2O3 condenses at distances of about 2 stellar radii or less, prior to the formation of silicates. Al2O3 grains are therefore prime candidates for producing the scattered light observed in the close vicinity of several M-type AGB stars, and they may be seed particles for the condensation of silicates at lower temperatures. The purpose of this paper is to study the necessary conditions for the formation of Al2O3 and the potential effects on mass loss, using detailed atmosphere and wind models. Methods: We have constructed a new generation of Dynamic Atmosphere and Radiation-driven Wind models based on Implicit Numerics (DARWIN), including a time-dependent treatment of grain growth and evaporation for both Al2O3 and Fe-free silicates (Mg2SiO4). The equations describing these dust species are solved in the framework of a frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamical model for the atmosphere and wind structure, taking pulsation-induced shock waves and periodic luminosity variations into account. Results: Condensation of Al2O3 at the close distances and in the high concentrations implied by observations requires high transparency of the grains in the visual and near-IR region to avoid destruction by radiative heating. We derive an upper limit for the imaginary part of the refractive

  11. The Chemistry of Extragalactic Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Paul; Walsh, C.; Cordiner, M. A.; Kemper, F.

    2013-01-01

    Prompted by the ongoing interest in Spitzer Infrared Spectrometer spectra of carbon stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, we have investigated the circumstellar chemistry of carbon stars in low-metallicity environments. Consistent with observations, our models show that acetylene is particularly abundant in the inner regions of low metallicity carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars - more abundant than carbon monoxide. As a consequence, larger hydrocarbons have higher abundances at the metallicities of the Magellanic Clouds than in stars with solar metallicity. We also find that the oxygen and nitrogen chemistry is suppressed at lower metallicity, as expected. Finally, we calculate molecular line emission from carbon stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud and find that several molecules should be readily detectable with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array at Full Science operations.

  12. The role of binaries in the enrichment of the early Galactic halo. III. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars - CEMP-s stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. T.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Beers, T. C.; Placco, V. M.; Yoon, J.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Detailed spectroscopic studies of metal-poor halo stars have highlighted the important role of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in understanding the early production and ejection of carbon in the Galaxy and in identifying the progenitors of the CEMP stars among the first stars formed after the Big Bang. Recent work has also classified the CEMP stars by absolute carbon abundance, A(C), into high- and low-C bands, mostly populated by binary and single stars, respectively. Aims: Our aim is to determine the frequency and orbital parameters of binary systems among the CEMP-s stars, which exhibit strong enhancements of neutron-capture elements associated with the s-process. This allows us to test whether local mass transfer from a binary companion is necessary and sufficient to explain their dramatic carbon excesses. Methods: We have systematically monitored the radial velocities of a sample of 22 CEMP-s stars for several years with ~monthly, high-resolution, low S/N échelle spectra obtained at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) at La Palma, Spain. From these spectra, radial velocities with an accuracy of ≈100 m s-1 were determined by cross-correlation with optimised templates. Results: Eighteen of the 22 stars exhibit clear orbital motion, yielding a binary frequency of 82 ± 10%, while four stars appear to be single (18 ± 10%). We thus confirm that the binary frequency of CEMP-s stars is much higher than for normal metal-poor giants, but not 100% as previously claimed. Secure orbits are determined for eleven of the binaries and provisional orbits for six long-period systems (P > 3000 days), and orbital circularisation timescales are discussed. Conclusions: The conventional scenario of local mass transfer from a former asymptotic giant branch (AGB) binary companion does appear to account for the chemical composition of most CEMP-s stars. However, the excess of C and s-process elements in some single CEMP-s stars was apparently transferred to their

  13. Grain formation around carbon stars. 1: Stationary outflow models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, Michael P.; Leung, Chun Ming

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are known to be sites of dust formation and undergo significant mass loss. The outflow is believed to be driven by radiation pressure on grains and momentum coupling between the grains and gas. While the physics of shell dynamics and grain formation are closely coupled, most previous models of circumstellar shells have treated the problem separately. Studies of shell dynamics typically assume the existence of grains needed to drive the outflow, while most grain formation models assume a constant veolcity wind in which grains form. Furthermore, models of grain formation have relied primarily on classical nucleation theory instead of using a more realistic approach based on chemical kinetics. To model grain formation in carbon-rich AGB stars, we have coupled the kinetic equations governing small cluster growth to moment equations which determine the growth of large particles. Phenomenological models assuming stationary outflow are presented to demonstrate the differences between the classical nucleation approach and the kinetic equation method. It is found that classical nucleation theory predicts nucleation at a lower supersaturation ratio than is predicted by the kinetic equations, resulting in significant differences in grain properties. Coagulation of clusters larger than monomers is unimportant for grain formation in high mass-loss models but becomes more important to grain growth in low mass-loss situations. The properties of the dust grains are altered considerably if differential drift velocities are ignored in modeling grain formation. The effect of stellar temperature, stellar luminosity, and different outflow velocities are investigated. The models indicate that changing the stellar temperature while keeping the stellar luminosity constant has little effect on the physical parameters of the dust shell formed. Increasing the stellar luminosity while keeping the stellar temperature constant results in large differences in

  14. OT1_dneufeld_2: The puzzle of water vapour in carbon-rich stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, D.

    2010-07-01

    Using the HIFI instrument, we will address the puzzling - but widespread - appearance of water vapour in carbon-rich stars. Following up on detections of water in ALL SIX carbon-rich AGB stars observed to date in a pilot study performed in the HIFISTARS Key Program, we will target additional water transitions in four stars already observed or expected to show the most luminous water emissions. The target stars are CIT6, IRAC 15194-5155, V Cygni, and S Cep, and the additional transitions are the 4(22)-3(31) and 3(12) - 2(21) transitions at 916 GHz and 1153 GHz. Combined with spectra already obtained for the low-lying water transitions, and interpreted in the context of water excitation models, the proposed observations will place strong constraints upon the location of the emitting water. We will therefore be able to distinguish between various hypotheses that have been proposed for the origin of the observed water: the vaporization of orbiting comets or dwarf planets; catalytic formation on dust grains; or chemical processes initiated by the photodissociation of CO. In addition, we will carry out deep integrations to observe the lowest 1(11) - 0(00) transition of para-water at 1113 GHz in two carbon-rich AGB stars: IRAS+40540 and V Hya; here, ortho-water has been securely detected but existing observations of the 1113 GHz para-water line yield weak detections that lack the signal-to-noise ratio needed to constrain the ortho-to-para ratio.

  15. The rotation of the halo of NGC 6822 from the radial velocities of carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Graham P.; Ryan, Sean G.; Sibbons, Lisette F.

    2016-11-01

    Using spectra taken with the AAOmega spectrograph, we measure the radial velocities of over 100 stars, many of which are intermediate age carbon stars, in the direction of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Kinematic analysis suggests that the carbon stars in the sample are associated with NGC 6822, and estimates of its radial velocity and galactic rotation are made from a star-by-star analysis of its carbon star population. We calculate a heliocentric radial velocity for NGC 6822 of -51 ± 3 km s-1 and show that the population rotates with a mean rotation speed of 11.2 ± 2.1 km s-1 at a mean distance of 1.1 kpc from the galactic centre, about a rotation axis with a position angle of 26° ± 13°, as projected on the sky. This is close to the rotation axis of the H I gas disc and suggests that NGC 6822 is not a polar ring galaxy, but is dynamically closer to a late-type galaxy. However, the rotation axis is not aligned with the minor axis of the AGB isodensity profiles and this remains a mystery.

  16. Dust Production and Mass Loss in Cool Evolved Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Following the red giant branch phase and the subsequent core He-burning phase, the low- to intermediate-mass stars (0.8AGB). Pulsations levitate material from the stellar surface and provide density enhancements and shocks, which can encourage dust formation and re-processing. The dust composition depends on the atmospheric chemistry (abundance of carbon relative to oxygen), which is altered by dredging up newly formed carbon to the surface of the star. I will briefly review the current status of models that include AGB mass loss and relate them to recent observations of AGB stars from the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) Spitzer surveys of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, including measures of the total dust input to the interstellar medium from AGB stars.

  17. Isotopic zirconium as a probe of AGB nucleosynthesis theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaney, R. A.

    Nuclear reaction network calculations of the zirconium relative isotope abundances in AGB stars are presented. It is shown how these isotopic abundances depend on the AGB stellar mass and on the uncertain neutron absorption cross section for Zr-96. With regard to observations of the zirconium isotopes in S stars, it is shown how the many neutron exposure mechanisms associated with AGB thermal pulses cannot be operating in these stars. A less predictable scheme in which only a few neutron exposures take place appears to be more consistent with the reported S star observations.

  18. Radiative levitation in carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars with s-process enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrozis, E.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2016-07-01

    A significant fraction of all metal-poor stars are carbon-rich. Most of these carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars also show enhancement in elements produced mainly by the s-process (CEMP-s stars), and evidence suggests that the origin of these non-standard abundances can be traced to mass transfer from a binary asymptotic giant branch (AGB) companion. Thus, observations of CEMP-s stars are commonly used to infer the nucleosynthesis output of low-metallicity AGB stars. A crucial step in this exercise is understanding what happens to the accreted material after mass transfer ceases. Here we present models of the post-mass-transfer evolution of CEMP-s stars considering the physics of thermohaline mixing and atomic diffusion, including radiative levitation. We find that stars with typical CEMP-s star masses, M ≈ 0.85 M⊙, have very shallow convective envelopes (Menv ≲ 10-7 M⊙). Hence, the surface abundance variations arising from the competition between gravitational settling and radiative levitation should be orders of magnitude larger than observed (e.g. [C/Fe] < -1 or [C/Fe] > +4). Lower-mass stars (M ≈ 0.80 M⊙) retain thicker convective envelopes and thus show variations more in line with observations, but are generally too unevolved (log g > 4) when they reach the age of the Universe. We are therefore unable to reproduce the spread in the observed abundances with these models and conclude that some other physical process must largely suppress atomic diffusion in the outer layers of CEMP-s stars. We demonstrate that this could be achieved by some additional (turbulent) mixing process operating at the base of the convective envelope, as found by other authors. Alternatively, mass-loss rates around 10-13 M⊙yr-1 could also negate most of the abundance variations by eroding the surface layers and forcing the base of the convective envelope to move inwards in mass. Since atomic diffusion cannot have a substantial effect on the surface abundances of CEMP

  19. Faint High-Latitude Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul J.

    1992-10-01

    Since carbon giants are ideal for study of the structure and kinematics of the outer galactic halo, we have undertaken a wide-area survey to search for faint high-latitude carbon (FHLC) stars. We use two-color photometric selection with large format CCDs to cover 52 deg^2 of sky to a depth of about V=18. Below this limit, we find good (< 20%) agreement between our object counts as a function of magnitude and the galactic models of Bahcall and Coneira (1984) at a variety of latitudes and longitudes. Our spectroscopic followup began with low-resolution spectra of 19 unconfirmed C-star candidates from the Case objective-prism photographic survey of Sanduleak and Pesch (1988). Four of these we find to be M stars. The 15 C stars we classify on the two-parameter Keenan-Morgan (1941) system as warm (color class < 4), with moderate to weak carbon band strengths (C class < 3). Of 94 faint C-star candidates from our own CCD survey, one highly ranked V=17 candidate was found to have strong carbon and CN bands. We estimate that to a depth of V=18, the surface density of FHLC stars is 0.019^0.044_-0.016 deg^-2. We identify two FHLC stars with previously cataloged high-proper-motion objects. These objects are thus inferred to be dwarf carbon (dC) stars, supplementing the one previously known case, G 77-61. Not all dC stars will have detectable proper motions, so other luminosity/distance indicators are needed: we find that C dwarfs all have similar JHK colors, and possibly an unusually strong lambda-6191 bandhead of carbon. By comparing positions of the HST Guide Star Catalog and the original Palomar Observatory Sky Survey, we detect proper motions in two additional FHLC stars. Our proper-motion survey, spanning a 30-yr base line, thus identifies four new dC's, and provides proper-motion upper limits for another 44 FHLC stars. Kinematic simulations suggest that virtually all Population II dCs will have detectable proper motions in a survey as sensitive as our own, and that to a

  20. A cost effective and operational methodology for wall to wall Above Ground Biomass (AGB) and carbon stocks estimation and mapping: Nepal REDD+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilani, H., Sr.; Ganguly, S.; Zhang, G.; Koju, U. A.; Murthy, M. S. R.; Nemani, R. R.; Manandhar, U.; Thapa, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nepal is a landlocked country with 39% forest cover of the total land area (147,181 km2). Under the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) and implemented by the World Bank (WB), Nepal chosen as one of four countries best suitable for results-based payment system for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD and REDD+) scheme. At the national level Landsat based, from 1990 to 2000 the forest area has declined by 2%, i.e. by 1467 km2, whereas from 2000 to 2010 it has declined only by 0.12% i.e. 176 km2. A cost effective monitoring and evaluation system for REDD+ requires a balanced approach of remote sensing and ground measurements. This paper provides, for Nepal a cost effective and operational 30 m Above Ground Biomass (AGB) estimation and mapping methodology using freely available satellite data integrated with field inventory. Leaf Area Index (LAI) generated based on propose methodology by Ganguly et al. (2012) using Landsat-8 the OLI cloud free images. To generate tree canopy height map, a density scatter graph between the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) estimated maximum height and Landsat LAI nearest to the center coordinates of the GLAS shots show a moderate but significant exponential correlation (31.211*LAI0.4593, R2= 0.33, RMSE=13.25 m). From the field well distributed circular (750m2 and 500m2), 1124 field plots (0.001% representation of forest cover) measured which were used for estimation AGB (ton/ha) using Sharma et al. (1990) proposed equations for all tree species of Nepal. A satisfactory linear relationship (AGB = 8.7018*Hmax-101.24, R2=0.67, RMSE=7.2 ton/ha) achieved between maximum canopy height (Hmax) and AGB (ton/ha). This cost effective and operational methodology is replicable, over 5-10 years with minimum ground samples through integration of satellite images. Developed AGB used to produce optimum fuel wood scenarios using population and road

  1. Faint high-latitude carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul Jonathan

    We have undertaken a wide area survey to search for faint high latitude carbon (FHLC) stars. Carbon giants are ideal for study of the structure and kinematics of the outer galactic halo. We use two color photometric selection with large format charge-coupled devices (CCD's) to cover 52 deg2 of sky to a depth of about V = 18. Below this limit, we find good (approximately less than 20 percent) agreement between our object counts as a function of magnitude and the galactic models of Bahcall and Soneira at a variety of latitudes and longitudes. Our spectroscopic followup began with low-resolution spectra of 19 unconfirmed C star candidates from the Case objective-prism photographic survey of Sanduleak and Pesch. Four of these we find to be M stars. The 15 C stars we classify on the two-parameter Keenan-Morgan system as warm (color class less than 3). Of 94 faint C star candidates from our own CCD survey, one highly ranked V = 17 candidate was found to have strong carbon and CN bands. We estimate that to a depth of V = 18, the surface density FHLC stars is 0.019+0.044-.016 deg-2. We identify two FHLC stars with previously catalogued high proper motion objects. These objects are thus inferred to be dwarf carbon (dC) stars, supplementing the one previously known case, G77-61. Not all dC stars will have detectable proper motions, so other luminosity/distance indicators are needed: we find that C dwarfs all have similar JHK colors, and possibly an unusually strong lambda-6191 bandhead of carbon. By comparing positions in the HST Guide Star Catalog and the original Palomar Observatory Sky Survey, we detect proper motions in two additional FHLC stars. Our proper motion survey, spanning a 30 year baseline, thus identifies two new dC's, and provides proper motion upper limits for another 44 FHLC stars. Kinematic simulations suggest that virtually all Population 2 dC's will have detectable proper motions in a survey as sensitive as our own, and that to a limit of V approximately

  2. Investigation of Faint Galactic Carbon Stars from the First Byurakan Spectral Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostandyan, G. R.; Gigoyan, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the optical variability study of the comparatively faint carbon (C) stars which have been discovered by searching the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) low-resolution (lr) spectral plates at high Galactic latitudes using a recent wide-area variability databases. The light curves from the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS) databases were exploited to study the variability nature of them. From the 120 detected objects 54 are N-type Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) C stars. 9 stars belongs to the group of Mira-type, 43 are Semi-Regular (SR), and 2 stars are Irregular (Irr) - type variables. The variability types of 27 objects has been established for the first time. From 66 objects showing early-type spectra 57 are CH-type stars, 4 objects are R-type stars and 5 are dC candidates. K-band absolute magnitudes, distances, and height from the Galactic plane were estimated for all of them. We aim to better understand the nature of the selected C stars through spectroscopy, 2MASS photometric colours, and variability data.

  3. Approaching a Physical Calibration of the AGB Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, Paola

    2015-08-01

    The widespread impact of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars on the observed properties of galaxies is universally accepted. Despite their importance, severe uncertainties plague AGB models and propagate through to current population synthesis studies of galaxies, undermining the interpretation of a galaxy's basic properties (mass, age, chemical evolution, dust budget). The only reliable path forward is to apply a physically-sound calibration of AGB stellar models in which all main physical processes and their interplay are taken into account (e.g., mixing, mass loss, nucleosynthesis, pulsation, molecular chemistry, dust formation). In this context, I will review recent and ongoing efforts to calibrate the evolution of AGB stars, which combine an all-round theoretical approach anchored by stellar physics with exceptionally high quality data of resolved AGB stars in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies.

  4. The dusty AGB star RS CrB: first mid-infrared interferometric observations with the Keck telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, B.; Koresko, C.; Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Serabyn, E.; Colavita, M. M; Akeson, R.; Appleby, E.; Bell, J.; Booth, A.; Crawford, S.; Dahl, W.; Fanson, J.; Felizardo, C.; Garcia, J.; Gathright, J.; Herstein, J.; Hovland, E.; Hrynevych, M.; Johansson, E.; Le Mignant, D.; Ligon, R.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Moore, J.; Neyman, C.; Palmer, D.

    2005-01-01

    We report interferometric observations of the semiregular variable star RS CrB, a red giant with strong silicate emission features. The data were among the first long-baseline mid-infrared stellar fringes obtained between the Keck telescopes, using parts of the new nulling beam combiner.

  5. Cool Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we report current status of search and study for Faint High Latitude Carbon Stars (FHLCs). Data for more than 1800 spectroscopically confirmed FHLCs are known, which are found thanks to objective prism surveys and photometric selections. More than half of the detected objects belongs to group of dwarf Carbon (dC) stars. Many-sided investigations based on modern astrophysical databases are necessary to study the space distribution of different groups of the FHLC stars and their possible origin in the Halo of our Galaxy. We report about the selection of FHLCs by the spectroscopic surveys: First Byurakan Survey (FBS), Hamburg/ESO Survey (HES), LAMOST Pilot Survey and SDSS, as well as by photometric selection: APM Survey for Cool Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo, SDSS and 2MASS JHK colours.

  6. Using JVLA Observations of SiO Masers to Probe the Extended Atmosphere of an AGB Star: W Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamieneski, Patrick S.; Matthews, Lynn D.

    2015-01-01

    The Asymptotic Giant Branch star W Hydrae (W Hya) is known to be a strong source of silicon monoxide (SiO) masers in its extended atmosphere. Jansky Very Large Array imaging observations obtained in February 2014 were used to target eleven SiO J=1-0 rotational transitions near 43 GHz. The vibrational ground state (v=0) lines for the 28SiO, 29SiO, and 30SiO isotopologues were successfully detected, as were the v=1,2,3 lines for 28SiO. Non-detections included the v=1,2 transitions for 29SiO and 30SiO, and the v=4 line for 28SiO. We will summarize the relative shape, size, and intensity of the emission regions of the detected transitions. We have discovered spatially extended ground-state 28SiO emission in a region located approximately 300 to 600 milliarcseconds (projected distance of 34 to 69 AU) from the star. We will discuss a saddle-like distribution and a small gradient in the velocity field for the 28SiO v=1 line, which may help to confirm the existence of a bipolar outflow in W Hya. Additionally, our results indicate that the observed transitions have differing spatial distributions. Peak 28SiO v=1,2,3 emission primarily occupies a region 12 - 42 mas (projected distance of 1.4 - 4.8 AU) west of the star, while the 29SiO and 30SiO isotopologues are located in disparate regions around 45 - 70 mas (5.2 - 8.1 AU) to the northwest of the star.This work was sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate program to MIT Haystack Observatory.

  7. Chemical abundance study of two strongly s-process enriched post-AGB stars in the LMC: J051213.81-693537.1 and J051848.86-700246.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smedt, K.; Van Winckel, H.; Kamath, D.; Wood, P. R.

    2015-11-01

    Context. This paper is part of a larger project in which we systematically study the chemical abundances of extra-galactic post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars. The aim of our programme is to derive chemical abundances of stars covering a large range in luminosity and metallicity with the ultimate goal of testing, constraining, and improving our knowledge of the poorly understood AGB phase, especially the third dredge-up mixing processes and associated s-process nucleosynthesis. Aims: Post-AGB photospheres are dominated by atomic lines and indicate the effects of internal chemical enrichment processes over the entire stellar lifetime. In this paper, we study two carefully selected post-AGB stars: J051213.81-693537.1 and J051848.86-700246.9 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Both objects show signs of s-process enhancement. The combination of favourable atmospheric parameters for detailed abundance studies and their known distances (and hence luminosities and initial masses) make these objects ideal probes of the AGB third dredge-up and s-process nucleosynthesis in that they provide observational constraints for theoretical AGB models. Methods: We use high-resolution optical UVES spectra to determine accurate stellar parameters and subsequently perform detailed elemental abundance studies of post-AGB stars. Additionally, we use available photometric data covering optical and IR bands to construct spectral energy distributions for reddening and luminosity determinations. We then estimate initial masses from theoretical post-AGB tracks. Results: We obtained accurate atmospheric parameters for J051213.81-693537.1 (Teff = 5875 ± 125 K, log g = 1.00 ± 0.25 dex, [Fe/H] = -0.56 ± 0.16 dex) and J051848.86-700246.9 (Teff = 6000 ± 125 K, log g = 0.50 ± 0.25 dex, [Fe/H] = -1.06 ± 0.17 dex). Both stars show extreme s-process enrichment associated with relatively low C/O ratios of 1.26 ± 0.40 and 1.29 ± 0.30 for J051213-693537.1 and J051848

  8. The complex environment of the bright carbon star TX Piscium as probed by spectro-astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hron, J.; Uttenthaler, S.; Aringer, B.; Klotz, D.; Lebzelter, T.; Paladini, C.; Wiedemann, G.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) show broad evidence of inhomogeneous atmospheres and circumstellar envelopes. These have been studied by a variety of methods on various angular scales. In this paper we explore the envelope of the well-studied carbon star TX Psc by the technique of spectro-astrometry. Aims: We explore the potential of this method for detecting asymmetries around AGB stars. Methods: We obtained CRIRES observations of several CO Δv = 1 lines near 4.6 μm and HCN lines near 3 μm in 2010 and 2013. These were then searched for spectro-astrometric signatures. For the interpretation of the results, we used simple simulated observations. Results: Several lines show significant photocentre shifts with a clear dependence on position angle. In all cases, tilde-shaped signatures are found where the positive and negative shifts (at PA 0°) are associated with blue and weaker red components of the lines. The shifts can be modelled with a bright blob 70 mas to 210 mas south of the star with a flux of several percent of the photospheric flux. We estimate a lower limit of the blob temperature of 1000 K. The blob may be related to a mass ejection as found for AGB stars or red supergiants. We also consider the scenario of a companion object. Conclusions: Although there is clear spectro-astrometric evidence of a rather prominent structure near TX Psc, it does not seem to relate to the other evidence of asymmetries, so no definite explanation can be given. Our data thus underline the very complex structure of the environment of this star, but further observations that sample the angular scales out to a few hundred milli-arcseconds are needed to get a clearer picture. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 386.D-0091 and 091.D-0094.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. The Chemical Abundances of Stars in the Halo (CASH) Project. III. A New Classification Scheme for Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Stars with s-process Element Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollek, Julie K.; Frebel, Anna; Placco, Vinicius M.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Shetrone, Matthew; Sneden, Christopher; Christlieb, Norbert

    2015-12-01

    We present a detailed abundance analysis of 23 elements for a newly discovered carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) star, HE 0414-0343, from the Chemical Abundances of Stars in the Halo Project. Its spectroscopic stellar parameters are Teff = 4863 K, {log}g=1.25,\\ξ = 2.20 km s-1, and [Fe/H] = -2.24. Radial velocity measurements covering seven years indicate HE 0414-0343 to be a binary. HE 0414-0343 has {{[C/Fe]}}=1.44 and is strongly enhanced in neutron-capture elements but its abundances cannot be reproduced by a solar-type s-process pattern alone. Traditionally, it could be classified as a “CEMP-r/s” star. Based on abundance comparisons with asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star nucleosynthesis models, we suggest a new physically motivated origin and classification scheme for CEMP-s stars and the still poorly understood CEMP-r/s. The new scheme describes a continuous transition between these two so-far distinctly treated subgroups: CEMP-sA, CEMP-sB, and CEMP-sC. Possible causes for a continuous transition include the number of thermal pulses the AGB companion underwent, the effect of different AGB star masses on their nucleosynthetic yields, and physics that is not well approximated in 1D stellar models such as proton ingestion episodes and rotation. Based on a set of detailed AGB models, we suggest the abundance signature of HE 0414-0343 to have arisen from a >1.3 M⊙ mass AGB star and a late-time mass transfer that transformed HE 0414-0343 into a CEMP-sC star. We also find that the [Y/Ba] ratio well parametrizes the classification and can thus be used to easily classify any future such stars. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  10. Circumstellar water vapour in M-type AGB stars: constraints from H{2}O(1{10}-1{01}) lines obtained with Odin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maercker, M.; Schöier, F. L.; Olofsson, H.; Bergman, P.; Frisk, U.; . Hjalmarson, Å.; Justtanont, K.; Kwok, S.; Larsson, B.; Olberg, M.; Sandqvist, Aa.

    2009-01-01

    Context: A detailed radiative transfer code has been previously used to model circumstellar ortho-{H_2O} line emission towards six M-type asymptotic giant branch stars using Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer data. Collisional and radiative excitation, including the {ν_2=1} state, was considered. Aims: Spectrally resolved circumstellar {H_2O}(1{10}-1{01}) lines have been obtained towards three M-type AGB stars using the Odin satellite. This provides additional strong constraints on the properties of circumstellar {H_2O}, in particular on the chemistry in the stellar atmosphere, and the photodissociation in the outer envelope. Methods: Infrared Space Observatory and Odin satellite {H_2O} line data are used as constraints for radiative transfer models. Special consideration is taken to the spectrally resolved Odin line profiles, and the effect of excitation to the first excited vibrational states of the stretching modes ({ν_1=1} and {ν_3=1}) on the derived abundances is estimated. A non-local, radiative transfer code based on the accelerated lambda iteration formalism is used. A statistical analysis is performed to determine the best-fit models. Results: The {H_2O} abundance estimates are in agreement with previous estimates. The inclusion of the Odin data sets stronger constraints on the size of the {H_2O} envelope. The {H_2O}(1{10}-1{01}) line profiles require a significant reduction in expansion velocity compared to the terminal gas expansion velocity determined in models of CO radio line emission, indicating that the {H_2O} emission lines probe a region where the wind is still being accelerated. Including the {ν_3=1} state significantly lowers the estimated abundances for the low-mass-loss-rate objects. This shows the importance of detailed modelling, in particular the details of the infrared spectrum in the range 3 to 6 μm, to estimate accurate circumstellar {H_2O} abundances. Conclusions: Spectrally resolved circumstellar {H_2O

  11. SiO rotation-vibration bands in cool giants II. The behaviour of SiO bands in AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aringer, B.; Höfner, S.; Wiedemann, G.; Hron, J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Käufl, H. U.; Windsteig, W.

    1999-02-01

    The first overtone rotation-vibration transitions of SiO give rise to prominent bandheads in the wavelength range between 4.0 and 4.5 mu m. In order to study the behaviour of these features in AGB stars we observed the 3.94 to 4.12 mu m spectra for a sample of 23 oxygen-rich late-type variables. In contrast to the SRb objects, the Miras show a very large scatter of the equivalent widths of the SiO bands. Despite their cool temperatures some of them have only weak or no SiO absorption, which seems to be related to their strong pulsations producing a large variability of the features. When comparing the band intensities with photometric data, we found a general decrease with bluer IRAS (12-25) colors. However, this trend may only reflect the different behaviour of the Miras and SRb stars in our sample. We did not discover any correlation of the equivalent widths with the effective temperatures derived from (J-K), or with the (K-12) color and the IRAS-LRS class, both of which can be regarded as a rough measure for the thickness of the circumstellar shell. In Paper I of this series (Aringer et al. \\cite{siop}) we have shown that synthetic spectra calculated from hydrostatic MARCS atmospheres are successful in reproducing the observed band intensities of giants with spectral types earlier than about M5 III and M2 II\\@. However, they generally predict too strong features for very cool and extended objects, as they are discussed in this work. And they fail completely when it comes to Miras with weak or no SiO absorption. These stars are dominated by dynamical phenomena and, not surprisingly, they can therefore not be described by hydrostatic structures. Thus, we have also computed synthetic spectra based on experimental dynamical models. Although they still have some shortcomings, we demonstrate that, in principle, they are able to explain the whole range of equivalent widths of the observed SiO bandheads and their variations. Based on observations made at the European

  12. A new tool for post-AGB SED classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendjoya, P.; Suarez, O.; Galluccio, L.; Michel, O.

    We present the results of an unsupervised classification method applied on a set of 344 spectral energy distributions (SED) of post-AGB stars extracted from the Torun catalogue of Galactic post-AGB stars. This method aims to find a new unbiased method for post-AGB star classification based on the information contained in the IR region of the SED (fluxes, IR excess, colours). We used the data from IRAS and MSX satellites, and from the 2MASS survey. We applied a classification method based on the construction of the dataset of a minimal spanning tree (MST) with the Prim's algorithm. In order to build this tree, different metrics have been tested on both flux and color indices. Our method is able to classify the set of 344 post-AGB stars in 9 distinct groups according to their SEDs.

  13. Carbon Atmosphere Discovered On Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Evidence for a thin veil of carbon has been found on the neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, resolves a ten-year mystery surrounding this object. "The compact star at the center of this famous supernova remnant has been an enigma since its discovery," said Wynn Ho of the University of Southampton and lead author of a paper that appears in the latest issue of Nature. "Now we finally understand that it can be produced by a hot neutron star with a carbon atmosphere." By analyzing Chandra's X-ray spectrum - akin to a fingerprint of energy - and applying it to theoretical models, Ho and his colleague Craig Heinke, from the University of Alberta, determined that the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, has an ultra-thin coating of carbon. This is the first time the composition of an atmosphere of an isolated neutron star has been confirmed. The Chandra "First Light" image of Cas A in 1999 revealed a previously undetected point-like source of X-rays at the center. This object was presumed to be a neutron star, the typical remnant of an exploded star, but researchers were unable to understand its properties. Defying astronomers' expectations, this object did not show any X-ray or radio pulsations or any signs of radio pulsar activity. By applying a model of a neutron star with a carbon atmosphere to this object, Ho and Heinke found that the region emitting X-rays would uniformly cover a typical neutron star. This would explain the lack of X-ray pulsations because -- like a lightbulb that shines consistently in all directions -- this neutron star would be unlikely to display any changes in its intensity as it rotates. Scientists previously have used a neutron star model with a hydrogen atmosphere giving a much smaller emission area, corresponding to a hot spot on a typical neutron star, which should produce X-ray pulsations as it rotates. Interpreting the hydrogen atmosphere model

  14. The effect of the recent 17O(p,α)14N and 18O(p,α)15N fusion cross section measurements in the nucleosynthesis of AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the 17O(p,α)14N and 18O(p,α)15N fusion reactions and to extract the strengths of the resonances that more contribute to the reaction rates at astrophysical energies. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the 17O(p,α)14N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the 17O + p radiative capture channel. Since, proton-induced fusion reactions on 17O and 18O belong to the CNO cycle network for H-burning in stars, the new estimates of the cross sections have been introduced into calculations of Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star nucleosynthesis to determine their impact on astrophysical environments. Results of nucleosynthesis calculations have been compared with geochemical analysis of "presolar" grains. These solids form in the cold and dusty envelopes that surround AGB stars and once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of fusion reactions in astrophysical environments.

  15. The AGB star nucleosynthesis in the light of the recent {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reaction rate determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.

    2015-02-24

    Presolar grains form in the cold and dusty envelopes of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. These solides, once that have been ejected by stellar winds, come to us as inclusions in meteorites providing invaluable benchmarks and constraints for our knowledge of low temeperature H-burning in stars. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N and {sup 18}O(p,α){sup 15}N reactions. Moreover, the strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel. The new estimates of the reaction rates have been introduced into calculations of AGB star nucleosynthesis and the results have been compared with geochemical analysis of 'presolar' grains to determine their impact on astrophysical environments.

  16. Challenging the Carbon Star Dust Condensation Sequence: Anarchist C Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Grant D.; Corman, Adrian B.; Speck, Angela K.; Dijkstra, Catharinus

    2006-12-01

    There have been several investigations of the evolution of the mid-infrared (IR) dust features in carbon star spectra based on IRAS LRS data, but these studies are somewhat contradictory. In order to understand these differences in interpretations and to develop an understanding of the carbon star dust sequence, we have reexamined 26 IRAS LRS spectra of carbon stars that have also been observed spectroscopically by ISO SWS. The low resolution and narrow wavelength coverage of the IRAS LRS data hinder determination of the effect of molecular absorptions in these spectra. This has led to incorrect estimations of the continuum levels in these spectra, which has a huge effect on the continuum-divided and continuum-subtracted spectra used to analyze trends in the shape, strength, and position of the mid-IR features. The higher resolution and broader wavelength coverage of the ISO data allow more accurate fitting of the underlying continuum. We have reassessed the trends in shape, strength, and position of the ~11 μm silicon carbide (SiC) feature and the apparent emergence of the ~9 μm feature. We find that there are no correlations between the spectral parameters. We also investigate whether any of these parameters correlate with the strength of the molecular bands; no correlation was found. Moreover, we show that the apparent 9 μm feature is probably an artifact. We discuss the implications of this study in terms of both a carbon star condensation sequence and the application of this study to the larger IRAS data set.

  17. White dwarf stars with carbon atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Dufour, P; Liebert, J; Fontaine, G; Behara, N

    2007-11-22

    White dwarfs represent the endpoint of stellar evolution for stars with initial masses between approximately 0.07 and 8-10, where is the mass of the Sun (more massive stars end their life as either black holes or neutron stars). The theory of stellar evolution predicts that the majority of white dwarfs have a core made of carbon and oxygen, which itself is surrounded by a helium layer and, for approximately 80 per cent of known white dwarfs, by an additional hydrogen layer. All white dwarfs therefore have been traditionally found to belong to one of two categories: those with a hydrogen-rich atmosphere (the DA spectral type) and those with a helium-rich atmosphere (the non-DAs). Here we report the discovery of several white dwarfs with atmospheres primarily composed of carbon, with little or no trace of hydrogen or helium. Our analysis shows that the atmospheric parameters found for these stars do not fit satisfactorily in any of the currently known theories of post-asymptotic giant branch evolution, although these objects might be the cooler counterpart of the unique and extensively studied PG 1159 star H1504+65 (refs 4-7). These stars, together with H1504+65, might accordingly form a new evolutionary sequence that follows the asymptotic giant branch.

  18. New carbon stars found in the Digitized First Byurakan Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.; Russeil, D.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Sarkissian, A.; Avtandilyan, M. G.

    2012-08-01

    Faint high-latitude carbon stars (FHLCs) are distant, luminous giants. For this reason, they are often used to study the dynamical and chemical properties of the Galactic Halo. However, a more accurate investigation of photometric and spectroscopic surveys has revealed an increasing number of such objects with luminosities of main sequence stars. We report the first results of a systematic search of FHLCs using the Digitized First Byurakan Survey (DFBS) low-resolution spectral database. The DFBS low-resolution spectral plates are analysed to find new faint early and late-type carbon star candidates. Twenty new faint high-latitude carbon star candidates have been detected in an area of ~4030 sq. deg. Moderate-resolution slit spectroscopy was carried out for all candidates, confirming the carbon star nature for thirteen of them (nine are new discoveries), while the remaining objects are M-type stars. The carbon star sample consists of five N-type carbon stars, for which the estimated mass-loss rates agree well with the typical ones found for such carbon stars; five comparatively bright CH-type carbon stars; and three are probably dwarf carbon (dC) stars. The distance determination indicates that the dC stars belong to the thin disk, while the other stars belong the Galactic halo. These results demonstrate that one can efficiently find new faint high-latitude carbon stars in the DFBS database.

  19. Carbon Stars in the IRTS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bertre, T.; Tanaka, M.; Yamamura, I.; Murakami, H.; MacConnell, D.; Guertin, A.

    The near-infrared spectro-photometric survey of the Japanese experiment IRTS (Infrared Telescope in Space) has revealed 139 carbon stars from the presence of characteristic molecular absorption bands, in particular the 3.1 μm band due to a blend of C2H2 and HCN. For the IRTS carbon stars, we find a trend relating the 3.1 μm band strength to the K -L color index, which is known to correlate with mass-loss rate. This relation shows that the mass-loss intensity of cool giants is related to their stellar atmosphere extension. The IRTS experiment demonstrates that an extensive spectro-photometric survey in the near-infrared range (1-5 μm) would be extremely fruitful to identify late-type stars, giants as well as dwarfs, including brown dwarfs of the solar neighborhood, and to simultaneously characterize their properties.

  20. Nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    El Eid, Mounib F.

    2014-05-09

    The nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars (briefly: AGB)is a challenging and fascinating subject in the theory of stellar evolution and important for observations as well. This is because about of half the heavy elements beyond iron are synthesized during thermal pulsation phases of these stars. Furthermore, the understanding of the production of the heavy elements and some light elements like carbon and fluorine represent a powerful tool to get more insight into the internal structure of these stars. The diversity of nuclear processing during the AGB phases may also motivate experimental activities in measuring important nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we emphasize several interesting feature of the nucleosynthesis in AGB stars which still needs further elaboration especially from theoretical point of view.

  1. Nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Eid, Mounib F.

    2014-05-01

    The nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars (briefly: AGB)is a challenging and fascinating subject in the theory of stellar evolution and important for observations as well. This is because about of half the heavy elements beyond iron are synthesized during thermal pulsation phases of these stars. Furthermore, the understanding of the production of the heavy elements and some light elements like carbon and fluorine represent a powerful tool to get more insight into the internal structure of these stars. The diversity of nuclear processing during the AGB phases may also motivate experimental activities in measuring important nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we emphasize several interesting feature of the nucleosynthesis in AGB stars which still needs further elaboration especially from theoretical point of view.

  2. On the relation between carbon star spectral types and colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honeycutt, R. K.; Fay, T. D., Jr.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of 32 carbon stars are listed in a table, taking into account the spectral classes given by Yamashita (1966) and Richer (1971). The relations between spectral type and color for carbon stars appear consistent with the differences between Yamashita's and Richer's types if carbon star groups I-III lie on a decreasing boundary temperature sequence.

  3. The creation of AGB fallback shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The possibility that mass ejected during Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stellar evolution phases falls back towards the star has been suggested in applications ranging from the formation of accretion discs to the powering of late-thermal pulses. In this paper, we seek to explicate the properties of fallback flow trajectories from mass-loss events. We focus on a transient phase of mass ejection with sub-escape speeds, followed by a phase of a typical AGB wind. We solve the problem using both hydrodynamic simulations and a simplified one-dimensional analytic model that matches the simulations. For a given set of initial wind characteristics, we find a critical shell velocity that distinguishes between `shell fallback' and `shell escape'. We discuss the relevance of our results for both single and binary AGB stars. In particular, we discuss how our results help to frame further studies of fallback as a mechanism for forming the substantial population of observed post-AGB stars with dusty discs.

  4. Spectroscopic analysis of four post-AGB candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, R. E.; Giridhar, S.; Pereira, C. B.; Arellano Ferro, A.; Muneer, S.

    2014-10-01

    We have done a detailed abundance analysis of four unexplored candidate post- Asymptotic Giant Branch(AGB) stars IRAS 13110 - 6629, IRAS 17579 - 3121, IRAS 18321 - 1401 and IRAS 18489 - 0629 using high resolution spectra. We have constructed Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) for these objects using the existing photometric data combined with infrared (IR) fluxes. For all sample stars, the SEDs exhibit double peaked energy distribution with well separated IR peaks showing the presence of dusty circumstellar material. The CNO abundances indicate the production of N via CN cycling, but observed [C/Fe] indicates the mixing of carbon produced by He burning by third dredge up although C/O ratio remains less that 1. A moderate DG-effect is clearly seen for IRAS 18489 - 0629 and IRAS 17579 - 3121 while a large scatter observed in depletion plots for IRAS 18321 - 1401 and IRAS 13110 - 6629 indicate the presence of other processes affecting the observed abundance pattern.

  5. Trace Element Condensation in Circumstellar Envelopes of Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodders, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1992-07-01

    It is now well established that meteorites contain reduced presolar grains, such as graphite and silicon carbide (SiC), which are probably formed by condensation of dust in the circumstellar envelopes of carbon-rich AGB stars. Here we model condensation in envelopes of carbon stars, with an emphasis on trace elements. Since absolute elemental abundances in stellar atmospheres are generally not known, we assume solar abundances (Anders and Grevesse 1989), except for carbon. A C/O ratio of 2, consistent with the mean and median values of 2.1 and 1.8 respectively, for 61 carbon stars (Gow 1977) was used. The C/O ratio was increased by adding carbon because astrophysicists believe that carbon produced in helium-burning zones may be mixed to the surfaces of C stars (e.g. Lucy 1976). We used physical parameters for the circumstellar shell of the high mass-loss rate, prototypical carbon star IRC +10216 (e.g. Keady et al. 1988, Dominik et al. 1990) and theoretical considerations by Salpeter (1974a,b) to construct a P-T-model of the envelope (see Fig. 1). Thermodynamic equilibrium condensation calculations for a reduced gas include ~600 gaseous and solid compounds of the elements H, C, N, O, S, P, F, Cl, Fe, Mg, Al, Ti, Si, Ca, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and REE. Refractory oxides, sulfides, nitrides, and carbides were considered as condensates. The calculations were done from T = 800 to 2500 K, and P= 10^-5 to 10^-13 bars. The effects of nucleation on condensation temperatures were calculated using the nucleation model discussed by Salpeter (1974a,b) and Cameron and Fegley (1982). The temperature drop required for condensation depends on (P,T, density) in the expanding envelope and also on the abundance, density, and surface energy (Es) of the nucleating compound. The range of E(sub)s values for NaCl-type carbides are about 800-1700 erg/cm^2 (Livey & Murray 1956); however, these data are generally poorly known. Another important variable is the sticking coefficient (s

  6. The 11 Micron Emissions of Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Cheeseman, P.; Gerbault, F.

    1995-01-01

    A new classification scheme of the IRAS LRS carbon stars is presented. It comprises the separation of 718 probable carbon stars into 12 distinct self-similar spectral groupings. Continuum temperatures are assigned and range from 470 to 5000 K. Three distinct dust species are identifiable: SiC, alpha:C-H, and MgS. In addition to the narrow 11 + micron emission feature that is commonly attributed to SiC, a broad 11 + micron emission feature, that is correlated with the 8.5 and 7.7 micron features, is found and attributed to alpha:C-H. SiC and alpha:C-H band strengths are found to correlate with the temperature progression among the Classes. We find a spectral sequence of Classes that reflects the carbon star evolutionary sequence of spectral types, or alternatively developmental sequences of grain condensation in carbon-rich circumstellar shells. If decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing evolution, then decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing C/O resulting in increasing amounts of carbon rich dust, namely alpha:C-H. If decreasing the temperature corresponds to a grain condensation sequence, then heterogeneous, or induced nucleation scenarios are supported. SiC grains precede alpha:C-H and form the nuclei for the condensation of the latter material. At still lower temperatures, MgS appears to be quite prevalent. No 11.3 micron PAH features are identified in any of the 718 carbon stars. However, one of the coldest objects, IRAS 15048-5702, and a few others, displays an 11.9 micron emission feature characteristic of laboratory samples of coronene. That feature corresponds to the C-H out of plane deformation mode of aromatic hydrocarbon. This band indicates the presence of unsaturated, sp(sup 3), hydrocarbon bonds that may subsequently evolve into saturated bonds, sp(sup 2), if, and when, the star enters the planetary nebulae phase of stellar evolution. The effusion of hydrogen from the hydrocarbon grain results in the evolution in wavelength of this

  7. Pulsational variability in proto-planetary nebulae and other post-AGB objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    2016-07-01

    Light and velocity curves of several classes of pulsating stars have been successfully modeled to determine physical properties of the stars. In this observational study, we review briefly the pulsational variability of the main classes of post-AGB stars. Our attention is focused in particular on proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe), those in the short-lived phase from AGB stars to the planetary nebulae. New light curves and period analyses have been used to determine the following general properties of the PPNe variability: (a) periods range from 35 to 160 days for those of F—G spectral types, with much shorter periods (< 1 day) found for those of early-B spectral type; (b) there is a correlation between the pulsation period, maximum amplitude, and temperature of the star, with cooler stars pulsating with longer periods and larger amplitudes; (c) similar correlations are found for carbon-rich, oxygen-rich, and lower-metalicity PPNe; and (d) multiple periods are found for all of them, with P2/P1 = 1.0±0.1. New models are needed to exploit these results.

  8. The TP-AGB phase: a new model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, P.; Bressan, A.; Chiosi, C.

    1996-09-01

    This study deals with the TP-AGB phase of low and intermediate-mass stars (0.7<=M/Msun_<=5). To this aim, a semi-analytical model is constructed. A representative set of TP-AGB evolutionary models is calculated for two classes of initial metallicity (Z=0.02 and Z=0.008). A detailed analysis is performed to estimate the changes in the surface chemical composition caused by (1) the inter-shell nucleosynthesis and convective dredge-up; (2) nuclear burning in the deepest layers of the convective envelope; and (3) mass loss by stellar wind. The evolution of the abundances of 13 chemical elements (H, ^3^He, ^4^He, ^12^C, ^13^C, ^14^N, ^15^N, ^16^O, ^17^O,^18^O, ^20^Ne, ^22^Ne, ^25^Mg) is followed. In particular, the formation of carbon stars is investigated. We use the observed luminosity function of carbon stars in the LMC as the constraint whose fulfillment determines the values of the parameters adopted in the model, namely: the minimum core mass for dredge-up M_c_^min^ and the efficiency of the third dredge-up λ. In this way, we derive a proper calibration which the reliability of the chemical analysis stands on. We calculate the stellar yields for both metallicities to provide new data for these key-ingredients in the process of chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. The chemical composition of PNe is derived and compared to the latest experimental data both in the Galaxy and in the LMC, which leads to a partial agreement. Observed information on the correlation between luminosity and pulsational period of Mira and OH/IR variables is used to test further our results. Finally, we predict the initial-final mass relation and we compare it to the semi-empirically determined one for the solar neighbourhood. The agreement turns out to be satisfactory.

  9. Coordinates and RI photometry of Large Magellanic Cloud carbon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, E. )

    1990-07-01

    Coordinates and photoelectric RI magnitudes are given for 86 carbon stars discovered by Blanco et al. in four selected 0.12 deg sq areas of the LMC. A comparison with the photometry of Blanco et al. for carbon stars in three different fields of the LMC suggests that the luminosity distribution of the carbon stars may change from center to center in the LMC. This possibility is supported by the differences in the mean I magnitude of the carbon stars detected between the four areas studied. 16 refs.

  10. Identification of Nearby Dwarf Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrance, P. J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Reid, I. N.

    2004-12-01

    The comparison of optical and 2MASS near-infrared photometry for large samples of cataloged proper motion stars has the potential to discover previously unrecognized nearby objects of rare type. We have obtained classification spectra for carbon dwarf candidates which lie in a sparsely populated part of optical/near-IR color-color space within a cross-reference of the New Luytens Two-Tenths (NLTT) catalogue and 2MASS 2nd Release. We present the discovery of nine of the coolest and nearest carbon dwarfs, whose optical spectra, exhibiting absorptions by C2 and/or CN is displayed. The only known discriminator between carbon giants and dwarfs is luminosity, which can be gained through distance or inferred from proper motion. Therefore, we have also observed most known dwarfs and giants to fully explore spectroscopic diagnostics that can be used to differentiate between carbon dwarfs and giants including many published in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey papers. We also plan to continue to merge the NLTT with the 2MASS ALL-Sky Release and obtain classification spectra for candidates for the rest of the sky not covered in the first merge.

  11. A survey of carbon stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. H.; Hatzidimitriou, D.

    1995-11-01

    A survey of carbon stars in the outer parts of the Small Magellanic Cloud has been completed; the candidate objects were identified by inspecting UK Schmidt Telescope objective-prism plates which cover a total area of ~220sq.deg on the sky, including the inter-Cloud region. Co-ordinates, accurate to =~2arcsec, are given for 1185 newly identified carbon stars. The spatial distribution of the SMC carbon stars appears to be identical to that of red, horizontal-branch/clump stars found by Gardiner & Hatzidimitriou (1992).

  12. Detection of Lead in the Carbon-rich, Very Metal-poor Star LP 625-44: A Strong Constraint on s-Process Nucleosynthesis at Low Metallicity.

    PubMed

    Aoki; Norris; Ryan; Beers; Ando

    2000-06-20

    We report the detection of the Pb i lambda4057.8 line in the very metal-poor (&sqbl0;Fe&solm0;H&sqbr0;=-2.7), carbon-rich star, LP 625-44. We determine the abundance of Pb (&sqbl0;Pb&solm0;Fe&sqbr0;=2.65) and 15 other neutron-capture elements. The abundance pattern between Ba and Pb agrees well with a scaled solar system s-process component, while the lighter elements (Sr-Zr) are less abundant than Ba. The enhancement of s-process elements is interpreted as a result of mass transfer in a binary system from a previous asymptotic giant branch (AGB) companion, an interpretation strongly supported by radial velocity variations of this system. The detection of Pb makes it possible, for the first time, to compare model predictions of s-process nucleosynthesis in AGB stars with observations of elements between Sr and Pb. The Pb abundance is significantly lower than the prediction of recent models (e.g., Gallino et al.), which succeeded in explaining the metallicity dependence of the abundance ratios of light s-elements (Sr-Zr) to heavy ones (Ba-Dy) found in previously observed s-process-enhanced stars. This suggests that one should either (1) reconsider the underlying assumptions concerning the (13)C-rich s-processing site ((13)C pocket) in the present models or (2) investigate alternative sites of s-process nucleosynthesis in very metal-poor AGB stars.

  13. AGB sodium abundances in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian I.; McDonald, Iain; Zijlstra, Albert A. E-mail: iain.mcdonald-2@manchester.ac.uk; and others

    2015-02-01

    A recent analysis comparing the [Na/Fe] distributions of red giant branch (RGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6752 found that the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars changes from 30:70 on the RGB to 100:0 on the AGB. The surprising paucity of Na-rich stars on the AGB in NGC 6752 warrants additional investigations to determine if the failure of a significant fraction of stars to ascend the AGB is an attribute common to all globular clusters. Therefore, we present radial velocities, [Fe/H], and [Na/Fe] abundances for 35 AGB stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc; NGC 104), and compare the AGB [Na/Fe] distribution with a similar RGB sample published previously. The abundances and velocities were derived from high-resolution spectra obtained with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System and MSpec spectrograph on the Magellan–Clay 6.5 m telescope. We find the average heliocentric radial velocity and [Fe/H] values to be 〈RV{sub helio.}〉 = −18.56 km s{sup −1} (σ = 10.21 km s{sup −1}) and 〈[Fe/H]〉 = −0.68 (σ = 0.08), respectively, in agreement with previous literature estimates. The average [Na/Fe] abundance is 0.12 dex lower in the 47 Tuc AGB sample compared to the RGB sample, and the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars is 63:37 on the AGB and 45:55 on the RGB. However, in contrast to NGC 6752, the two 47 Tuc populations have nearly identical [Na/Fe] dispersion and interquartile range values. The data presented here suggest that only a small fraction (≲20%) of Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc may fail to ascend the AGB, which is a similar result to that observed in M13. Regardless of the cause for the lower average [Na/Fe] abundance in AGB stars, we find that Na-poor stars and at least some Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc evolve through the early AGB phase. The contrasting behavior of Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc and NGC 6752 suggests that the RGB [Na/Fe] abundance alone is insufficient for predicting if a star will

  14. Evolution and CNO yields of Z = 10-5 stars and possible effects on carbon-enhanced metal-poor production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Pons, P.; Doherty, C. L.; Lau, H.; Campbell, S. W.; Suda, T.; Guilani, S.; Gutiérrez, J.; Lattanzio, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: Our main goals are to get a deeper insight into the evolution and final fates of intermediate-mass, extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. We also aim to investigate the C, N, and O yields of these stars. Methods: Using the Monash University Stellar Evolution code MONSTAR we computed and analysed the evolution of stars of metallicity Z = 10-5 and masses between 4 and 9 M⊙, from their main sequence until the late thermally pulsing (super) asymptotic giant branch, TP-(S)AGB phase. Results: Our model stars experience a strong C, N, and O envelope enrichment either due to the second dredge-up process, the dredge-out phenomenon, or the third dredge-up early during the TP-(S)AGB phase. Their late evolution is therefore similar to that of higher metallicity objects. When using a standard prescription for the mass loss rates during the TP-(S)AGB phase, the computed stars are able to lose most of their envelopes before their cores reach the Chandrasekhar mass (mCh), so our standard models do not predict the occurrence of SNI1/2 for Z = 10-5 stars. However, we find that the reduction of only one order of magnitude in the mass-loss rates, which are particularly uncertain at this metallicity, would prevent the complete ejection of the envelope, allowing the stars to either explode as an SNI1/2 or become an electron-capture SN. Our calculations stop due to an instability near the base of the convective envelope that hampers further convergence and leaves remnant envelope masses between 0.25 M⊙ for our 4 M⊙ model and 1.5 M⊙ for our 9 M⊙ model. We present two sets of C, N, and O yields derived from our full calculations and computed under two different assumptions, namely, that the instability causes a practically instant loss of the remnant envelope or that the stars recover and proceed with further thermal pulses. Conclusions: Our results have implications for the early chemical evolution of the Universe and might provide another piece for the puzzle of the carbon

  15. Hot Companions and Warm Disks Around Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    Almost all stars in the Universe end their lives quietly, evolving through the Red Giant Branch (RGB), Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), and planetary nebula (PN) evolutionary phases. Single-star evolutionary models tell us that most stars that leave the main sequence in less than a Hubble time will end their lives in this way, but will induce profound effects on their environment. The heavy mass loss which they experience at the end of their lives fundamentally affect their evolution, and makes them the main suppliers of dust and gas enriched by nucleosynthesis to the general interstellar medium (ISM). But our overall understanding of the late evolution of these stars are based on single-star models, when it is well-known that most stars begin their lives in binary systems, and binarity can drastically affect both mass-loss and late stellar evolution. The study of binarity in systems with low and intermediate-mass evolved stars can yield crucial information regarding the initial mass function near the bottom of the main-sequence and below, and the long-term stability and suvivability of low-mass objects in orbit around post-AGB stars.We propose a 3-year study which investigates binarity in two important classes of stars: AGB stars and dwarf carbon (dC) stars (and CH star: the immediate post-main sequence counterparts of dC stars), primarily using the GALEX and WISE databases. Direct observational evidence for binarity in AGB stars is of fundamental importance, but a huge challenge because of their high luminosities compared to their companions; only in the UV bands (observed with GALEX) there is a strong potential for finding the companions. The existence of dC stars has long been a mystery as carbon can only be produced in AGB stars -- it is believed that dC stars are normal dwarfs stars that became C-rich due to mass-transfer from a companion when it was a C-rich AGB star (but is now a white dwarf). The detection of a statistical sample of such objects in the UV

  16. New Magellanic Cloud R Coronae Borealis and DY Persei type stars from the EROS-2 database: the connection between RCBs, DYPers, and ordinary carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisserand, P.; Wood, P. R.; Marquette, J. B.; Afonso, C.; Albert, J. N.; Andersen, J.; Ansari, R.; Aubourg, É.; Bareyre, P.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Charlot, X.; Coutures, C.; Ferlet, R.; Fouqué, P.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Goldman, B.; Gould, A.; Gros, M.; de Kat, J.; Lesquoy, É.; Loup, C.; Magneville, C.; Maurice, É.; Maury, A.; Milsztajn, A.; Moniez, M.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perdereau, O.; Rich, J.; Schwemling, P.; Spiro, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    2009-07-01

    Context: R Coronae Borealis stars (RCB) are a rare type of evolved carbon-rich supergiant stars that are increasingly thought to result from the merger of two white dwarfs, called the Double degenerate scenario. This scenario is also studied as a source, at higher mass, of type Ia Supernovae (SnIa) explosions. Therefore a better understanding of RCBs composition would help to constrain simulations of such events. Aims: We searched for and studied RCB stars in the EROS Magellanic Clouds database. We also extended our research to DY Per type stars (DYPers) that are expected to be cooler RCBs (T ˜ 3500 K) and much more numerous than their hotter counterparts. With the aim of studying possible evolutionary connections between RCBs and DYPers, and also ordinary carbon stars, we compared their publically available broad band photometry in the optical, near, and mid-infrared. Methods: The light curves of ~70 millions stars, monitored for 6.7 years (from July 1996 to February 2003), have been analysed to search for the main signature of RCBs and DYPers: a large (up to 9 mag) drop in luminosity. Carbon stars with fading episodes were also found by inspecting numerous light curves of objects that presented an infrared excess in the 2MASS and Spitzer- SAGE and S^3MC databases. Follow-up optical spectroscopy was used to confirm each photometric candidate found. Results: We have discovered and confirmed 6 new Magellanic Cloud RCB stars and 7 new DYPers, but also listed new candidates: 3 RCBs and 14 DYPers. Optical and infrared colour magnitude diagrams that give new insights into these two sets of stars are discussed. We estimated a range of Magellanic RCB shell temperatures between 360 and 600 K. Conclusions: We confirm the wide range of absolute luminosity known for RCB stars, MV ˜ -5.2 to -2.6. Our study further shows that mid-infrared surveys are ideal to search for RCB stars, since they have thinner and cooler circumstellar shells than classical post-AGB stars. In

  17. THE WIDESPREAD OCCURRENCE OF WATER VAPOR IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPES OF CARBON-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS: FIRST RESULTS FROM A SURVEY WITH HERSCHEL /HIFI

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, D. A.; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E.; Melnick, G.; Szczerba, R.; Schmidt, M.; Decin, L.; Alcolea, J.; De Koter, A.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Schoeier, F. L.; Justtanont, K.; Olofsson, H.; Bujarrabal, V.; Planesas, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Teyssier, D.; Marston, A. P.; Menten, K.

    2011-02-01

    We report the preliminary results of a survey for water vapor in a sample of eight C stars with large mid-IR continuum fluxes: V384 Per, CIT 6, V Hya, Y CVn, IRAS 15194-5115, V Cyg, S Cep, and IRC+40540. This survey, performed using the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory, entailed observations of the lowest transitions of both ortho- and para-water: the 556.936 GHz 1{sub 10}-1{sub 01} and 1113.343 GHz 1{sub 11}-0{sub 00} transitions, respectively. Water vapor was unequivocally detected in all eight of the target stars. Prior to this survey, IRC+10216 was the only carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star from which thermal water emissions had been discovered, in that case with the use of the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). Our results indicate that IRC+10216 is not unusual, except insofar as its proximity to Earth leads to a large line flux that was detectable with SWAS. The water spectral line widths are typically similar to those of CO rotational lines, arguing against the vaporization of a Kuiper Belt analog being the general explanation for water vapor in carbon-rich AGB stars. There is no apparent correlation between the ratio of the integrated water line fluxes to the 6.3 {mu}m continuum flux-a ratio which measures the water outflow rate-and the total mass-loss rate for the stars in our sample.

  18. SUPER-AGB-AGB EVOLUTION AND THE CHEMICAL INVENTORY IN NGC 2419

    SciTech Connect

    Ventura, Paolo; D'Antona, Francesca; Carini, Roberta; Di Criscienzo, Marcella; D'Ercole, Annibale; Vesperini, Enrico

    2012-12-20

    We follow the scenario of formation of second-generation stars in globular clusters by matter processed by hot bottom burning (HBB) in massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and super-AGB stars (SAGB). In the cluster NGC 2419 we assume the presence of an extreme population directly formed from the AGB and SAGB ejecta, so we can directly compare the yields for a metallicity Z = 0.0003 with the chemical inventory of the cluster NGC 2419. At such a low metallicity, the HBB temperatures (well above 10{sup 8} K) allow a very advanced nucleosynthesis. Masses {approx}6 M{sub Sun} deplete Mg and synthesize Si, going beyond Al, so this latter element is only moderately enhanced; sodium cannot be enhanced. The models are consistent with the observations, although the predicted Mg depletion is not as strong as in the observed stars. We predict that the oxygen abundance must be depleted by a huge factor (>50) in the Mg-poor stars. The HBB temperatures are close to the region where other p-capture reactions on heavier nuclei become possible. We show that high potassium abundance found in Mg-poor stars can be achieved during HBB by p-captures on the argon nuclei, if the relevant cross section(s) are larger than listed in the literature or if the HBB temperature is higher. Finally, we speculate that some calcium production is occurring owing to proton capture on potassium. We emphasize the importance of a strong effort to measure a larger sample of abundances in this cluster.

  19. Cool Bottom Processing on the AGB and Presolar Grain Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nollett, Kenneth M.; Busso, M.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2002-01-01

    We describe results from a model of cool bottom processing (CBP) in AGB (asymptotic giant branch) stars. We predict O, Al, C and N isotopic compositions of circumstellar grains. Measured compositions of mainstream SiC grains and many oxide grains are consistent with CBP. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Modeling the Carbon Dust Around Evolved Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, John; Chiar, Jean E.; Povich, Matthew S.; Egan, Michael P.; Jones, Anthony P.; Tielens, Xander

    2015-01-01

    We used a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to model the dust emission around the evolved carbon star, IRAS 07134+1005. We assume the axially symmetric superwind dust shell model as defined by Meixner et al. 1997 (ApJ, 482, 897). IRAS 07134+1005 is a '21 mm' object and is, thus, a carbon-rich, low metallicity star with a large infrared excess. In order to determine the characteristics of the circumstellar carbonaceous dust, we use a set of optical constants for carbonaceous materials computed over a range of H/C and band-gaps. This is the first study to use a set of known hydrocarbon types that covered a range of hydrogen atom fractions and thus a span of aromatic rich (low hydrogen atom fraction) to aliphatic rich (high hydrogen atom fraction) hydrocarbon materials. Our observational data (photometry and spectroscopy from the literature) cover the wavelength range from 0.352-100 mm. We compare our model spectrum and simulated mid-IR images to the observed spectral energy distribution and images to draw conclusions about the nature of the hydrocarbon dust around IRAS 07134+1005.Support for this work came from National Science Foundation under Award No. AST-1322432, a PAARE Grant for the California-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE) and AST-1359346, an REU Site Grant at the SETI Institute, and by the John Templeton Foundation through its New Frontiers in Astronomy and Cosmology, administered by Don York of the University of Chicago.

  1. An edge-on translucent dust disk around the nearest AGB star, L2 Puppis. VLT/NACO spectro-imaging from 1.04 to 4.05 μm and VLTI interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Montargès, M.; Ridgway, S. T.; Perrin, G.; Chesneau, O.; Lacour, S.; Chiavassa, A.; Haubois, X.; Gallenne, A.

    2014-04-01

    As the nearest known AGB star (d = 64 pc) and one of the brightest (mK ≈ -2), L2 Pup is a particularly interesting benchmark object to monitor the final stages of stellar evolution. We report new serendipitous imaging observations of this star with the VLT/NACO adaptive optics system in twelve narrow-band filters covering the 1.0-4.0 μm wavelength range. These diffraction-limited images reveal an extended circumstellar dust lane in front of the star that exhibits a high opacity in the J band and becomes translucent in the H and K bands. In the L band, extended thermal emission from the dust is detected. We reproduced these observations using Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling of a dust disk with the RADMC-3D code. We also present new interferometric observations with the VLTI/VINCI and MIDI instruments. We measured in the K band an upper limit to the limb-darkened angular diameter of θLD = 17.9 ± 1.6 mas, converting to a maximum linear radius of R = 123 ± 14 R⊙. Considering the geometry of the extended K band emission in the NACO images, this upper limit is probably close to the actual angular diameter of the star. The position of L2 Pup in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram indicates that this star has a mass of about 2 M⊙ and is probably experiencing an early stage of the asymptotic giant branch. We did not detect any stellar companion of L2 Pup in our adaptive optics and interferometric observations, and we attribute its apparent astrometric wobble in the Hipparcos data to variable lighting effects on its circumstellar material. However, we do not exclude the presence of a binary companion, because the large loop structure extending to more than 10 AU to the northeast of the disk in our L-band images may be the result of interaction between the stellar wind of L2 Pup and a hidden secondary object. The geometric configuration that we propose, with a large dust disk seen almost edge-on, appears particularly favorable to test and develop our

  2. LITHIUM ABUNDANCES IN CARBON-ENHANCED METAL-POOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Masseron, Thomas; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Lucatello, Sara; Karakas, Amanda; Plez, Bertrand; Beers, Timothy C.; Christlieb, Norbert E-mail: jaj@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2012-05-20

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars are believed to show the chemical imprints of more massive stars (M {approx}> 0.8 M{sub Sun }) that are now extinct. In particular, it is expected that the observed abundance of Li should deviate in these stars from the standard Spite lithium plateau. We study here a sample of 11 metal-poor stars and a double-lined spectroscopic binary with -1.8 < [Fe/H] < -3.3 observed with the Very Large Telescope/UVES spectrograph. Among these 12 metal-poor stars, there are 8 CEMP stars for which we measure or constrain the Li abundance. In contrast to previous arguments, we demonstrate that an appropriate regime of dilution permits the existence of 'Li-Spite plateau and C-rich' stars, whereas some of the 'Li-depleted and C-rich' stars call for an unidentified additional depletion mechanism that cannot be explained by dilution alone. We find evidence that rotation is related to the Li depletion in some CEMP stars. Additionally, we report on a newly recognized double-lined spectroscopic binary star in our sample. For this star, we develop a new technique from which estimates of stellar parameters and luminosity ratios can be derived based on a high-resolution spectrum alone, without the need for input from evolutionary models.

  3. Tip-AGB stellar evolution in the presence of a pulsating, dust-induced ``superwind"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, K.-P.; Winters, J. M.; Sedlmayr, E.

    1999-09-01

    We present selected ``superwind" mass-loss histories and the related tip-AGB stellar evolution models, which have been computed according to the characteristics of a dust-induced, carbon-rich wind, and which include several recent improvements as compared to Schröder et al. (1998). We discuss the (initial) stellar mass-range of 1 to 2.5 Msun, with a nearly solar composition (X=0.28, Y=0.70, Z=0.02). In each time-step, mass-loss rates are used, which are consistent with the actual stellar parameters, and which are based on our pulsating, dust-induced wind models for carbon-rich stars (Fleischer et al. 1992), including a detailed and consistent treatment of dust formation, radiative transfer and radiative wind acceleration. The resulting ``superwind" mass-loss rates reach 2 to 3* 10(-5) Msun yr(-1) . For this reason, they become an influential factor of tip-AGB stellar evolution - but also vice versa, since our mass-loss rates vary strongly with effective temperature (dot {M} ~ T_eff(-8) (roughly), see Arndt et al. 1997), reflecting the temperature sensitivity of the dust formation process on a macroscopic scale. With all tip-AGB models of an initial stellar mass Mi >~ 1.3 Msun we find superwinds with a total mass outflow of 0.26 to >~ 0.55 Msun during their final 3* 10(4) yrs, just as required for PN-formation. Furthermore, a thermal pulse leads to a very short (100 to 200 yrs) interruption of the ``superwind" of these models. A critical (Eddington-like) luminosity Lc is required for the radiation driven wind models, which our evolution models fail to reach for Mi <~ 1.1 Msun. With slightly larger stellar masses, L_tAGB is near Lc and thermal pulses can trigger very short ``superwind" bursts, as already pointed out by Schröder et al. (1998). We find good agreement between our improved models and the mass-loss characteristics of the thin CO shells found by Olofsson et al. (1990, 1993, 1996, 1998) around some carbon-rich Mira stars.

  4. The 13C(α,n)16O reaction as a neutron source for the s-process in AGB low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Maiorca, E.; Palmerini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Spartà, R.

    2014-05-01

    The 13C(α,n)16O reaction is considered to be the most important neutron source for producing the main component of the s-process in low mass stars. In this paper we focus our attention on two of the main open problems concerning its operation as a driver for the slow neutron captures. Recently, a new measurement of the 13C(α,n)16O reaction rate was performed via the Trojan Horse Method greatly increasing the accuracy. Contemporarily, on the modelling side, magnetic mechanisms were suggested to justify the production of the 13C pocket, thus putting the s-process in stars on safe physical ground. These inputs allow us to reproduce satisfactorily the solar distribution of elements.

  5. AGB Connection and Ultraviolet Luminosity Excess in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, Alberto; González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.

    2008-10-01

    Relying on infrared surface brightness fluctuactions to trace AGB properties in a sample of elliptical galaxies in the Virgo and Fornax Clusters, we assess the puzzling origin of the ``UV upturn'' phenomenon, recently traced to the presence of a hot horizontal branch (HB) stellar component. The UV upturn actually signals a profound change in the galaxy stellar populations, involving both the hot stellar component and red giant evolution. In particular, the strengthening of the UV rising branch is always seen to correspond to a shortening in AGB deployment; this trend can be readily interpreted as an age effect, perhaps mildly modulated by metal abundance. Brightest stars in ellipticals are all found to be genuine AGB members, all the way, and with the AGB tip exceeding the RGB tip by some 0.5-1.5 mag. The inferred core mass of these stars is found to be lesssim0.57 M⊙ among giant ellipticals. This value accounts for the recognized deficiency of planetary nebulae in these galaxies, as a result of a lengthy transition time for the post-AGB stellar core to become a hard UV emitter and eventually ``fire up'' the nebula. The combined study of galaxy (1550 - V)0 color and integrated Hβ index points to a a bimodal temperature distribution for the HB with both a red clump and an extremely blue component, in a relative proportion [N(RHB) : N(BHB)] ~ [80 : 20]. For the BHB stellar population, [Fe/H] values of either simeq-0.7 or gtrsim+0.5 dex may provide the optimum ranges to feed the needed low-mass stars (M*ll 0.58 M⊙) that at some stage begin to join the standard red clump stars.

  6. Carbon Stars in the Satellites and Halo of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamren, Katherine; Beaton, Rachael L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Tollerud, Erik J.; Boyer, Martha L.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Smith, Graeme H.; Majewski, Steven R.; Howley, Kirsten

    2016-09-01

    We spectroscopically identify a sample of carbon stars in the satellites and halo of M31 using moderate-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda’s Stellar Halo survey. We present the photometric properties of our sample of 41 stars, including their brightness with respect to the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) and their distributions in various color-color spaces. This analysis reveals a bluer population of carbon stars fainter than the TRGB and a redder population of carbon stars brighter than the TRGB. We then apply principal component analysis to determine the sample’s eigenspectra and eigencoefficients. Correlating the eigencoefficients with various observable properties reveals the spectral features that trace effective temperature and metallicity. Putting the spectroscopic and photometric information together, we find the carbon stars in the satellites and halo of M31 to be minimally impacted by dust and internal dynamics. We also find that while there is evidence to suggest that the sub-TRGB stars are extrinsic in origin, it is also possible that they are are particularly faint members of the asymptotic giant branch.

  7. A window on the efficiency of the s-process in AGB stars: chemical abundances of n-capture elements in the planetary nebula NGC 3918

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, S.; García-Rojas, J.; Luridiana, V.; Sterling, N. C.; Morisset, C.

    The chemical content of the planetary nebula NGC 3918 is investigated through deep, high-resolution (R˜40,000) UVES at VLT spectrophotometric data. We identify and measure more than 750 emission lines, making ours one of the deepest spectra ever taken for a planetary nebula. Among these lines we detect very faint lines of several neutron-capture elements (Se, Kr, Rb, and Xe), which enable us to compute their chemical abundances with unprecedented accuracy, thus constraining the efficiency of the ph s-process and convective dredge-up in the progenitor star of NGC 3918.

  8. Post-AGB Binaries and Their Connection to the B[e] Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Winckel, H.

    2017-02-01

    We argue in this contribution that secondary stable disks around evolved stars can be found over a wide range in luminosity all over the HR-diagram. The disks around B[e] supergiants form the high luminosity end of similar structures found around post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (post-AGB) stars as well as the recently discovered post-Red Giant Branch (post-RGB) stars. We focus here on the observational properties of disks around binary post-AGB stars and end with a link to the B[e] phenomenon.

  9. Carbon Stars In Andromeda. II. Demographics and Photometric Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hamren, K.; Dorman, C.; Toloba, E.; Seth, A.; Dalcanton, J.; Nayak, A.; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This is the second of two talks about a sample of newly-discovered carbon stars in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). As explained in the first talk, these stars were identified on the basis of their spectroscopic characteristics using Keck/DEIMOS spectra obtained as part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey. We explore the physical properties of strong and weak carbon stars using photometric data from a Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury program: Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). The PHAT data set includes deep photometry in six filters: two in the ultraviolet, two in the optical, and two in the near infrared. The carbon stars appear to be in the asymptotic giant branch stage of their evolution as evidenced by the fact that they lie above the tip of the red giant branch and are cleanly separated from normal (i.e., oxygen-rich) giants in color-magnitude diagrams. We study the spatial distribution of carbon stars in M31 and use kinematics to determine whether they belong to M31's thin disk, thick disk, or spheroid. These carbon stars serve as highly visible tracers of the intermediate-mass, intermediate-age stellar population in M31; they are important markers in the study of the star-formation history of the galaxy. This research was part of the SPLASH and PHAT collaboration. We are grateful to the National Science Foundation and NASA for funding support. AN's participation was under the auspices of UCSC's Science Internship Program.

  10. The evolution of carbon stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerlund, B. E.; Azzopardi, M.; Rebeirot, E.; Breysacher, J.

    1991-12-01

    This study presents JHK photometric data for over 100 field stars in the SMC and for 10 in the Large Cloud together with spectroscopic results for about half of them. In the Small Cloud carbon stars were found at higher temperatures and lower luminosities than previously observed. The faintest are below the top of the red giant branch. The medium- and low-luminosity C stars in the M-C transition zone have a low C2 content. At these luminosities, most of the J-type stars are found close to the C2-poor stars in the HR diagram. Their C2 content is about as high as in the coolest, most evolved C stars. The present observations of carbon stars in the SMC show that they cover a range in M(bo) from -3 to 5.9 mag. The transitions from M to C via S appear to occur in both Clouds at a rather well-defined range in M(bol) for SWB and classes IV and V.

  11. High-resolution CO Observation of the Carbon Star CIT 6 Revealing the Spiral Structure and a Nascent Bipolar Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyosun; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi; Zhao-Geisler, Ronny; Trejo, Alfonso; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Taam, Ronald E.; Kemper, Francisca; Kim, Jongsoo; Byun, Do-Young; Liu, Tie

    2015-11-01

    CIT 6 is a carbon star in the transitional phase from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the protoplanetary nebulae (pPNs). Observational evidences of two point sources in the optical, circumstellar arc segments in an HC3N line emission, and a bipolar nebula in near-infrared provide strong support for the presence of a binary companion. Hence, CIT 6 is very attractive for studying the role of companions in the AGB-pPN transition. We have carried out high-resolution 12CO J = 2-1 and 13CO J = 2-1 observations of CIT 6 with the Submillimeter Array combined with the Submillimeter Telescope (single-dish) data. The 12CO channel maps reveal a spiral-shell pattern connecting the HC3N segments in a continuous form and an asymmetric outflow corresponding to the near-infrared bipolar nebula. Rotation of the 12CO channel peak position may be related to the inner spiral winding and/or the bipolar outflow. An eccentric orbit binary is suggested for the presence of an anisotropic mass loss to the west and a double spiral pattern. The lack of interarm emission to the west may indicate a feature corresponding to the periastron passage of a highly eccentric orbit of the binary. Spatially averaged radial and spectral profiles of 12CO J = 2-1 and 13CO J = 2-1 are compared with simple spherical radiative transfer models, suggesting a change of 12CO/13CO abundance ratio from ˜30 to ˜50 inward in the CSE of CIT 6. The millimeter continuum emission is decomposed into extended dust thermal emission (spectral index ˜ -2.4) and compact emission from radio photosphere (spectral index ˜ -2.0).

  12. Blue metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, George W.; Sneden, Christopher

    2004-12-01

    We review the discovery of blue metal-poor (BMP) stars and the resolution of this population into blue stragglers and intermediate-age Main-Sequence stars by use of binary fractions. We show that the specific frequencies of blue stragglers in the halo field and in globular clusters differ by an order of magnitude. We attribute this difference to the different modes of production of these two populations. We report carbon and s-process enrichment among very metal-poor field blue stragglers and discuss how this result can be used to further resolve field blue stragglers into groups formed during RGB and AGB evolution of their erstwhile primary companions.

  13. Southern Milky Way carbon stars - New candidates, JHK photometry, and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, V.M.; Cook, K.H.; Schechter, P.L.; Aaronson, M.; Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ; Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1989-07-01

    Data are presented for low-latitude southern Milky Way carbon stars. Coordinates and cross identifications are given for carbon stars (67 of which are confirmed new discoveries) in seven fields deemed to be unusually transparent. JHK photometry is presented for 520 stars. Velocities are presented for 393 stars. Improved coordinates are presented for selected stars in Westerlund's catalog. Averaged photometry and velocities are presented for a sample of 336 stars. 26 refs.

  14. Northern Milky Way carbon stars - New candidates, JHK photometry, and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, V.M.; Cook, K.H.; Olszewski, E.W.; Schechter, P.L.; Aaronson, M. Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA MIT, Cambridge, MA )

    1990-08-01

    Data are presented for low-latitude northern Milky Way carbon stars. Coordinates and cross identifications are given for carbon stars in nine fields thought to be unusually transparent. Of these, 142 are confirmed new discoveries. Five hundred thirty-eight JHK photometric observations are reported for 480 stars. Six hundred twenty velocity measurements are presented for 424 stars. Improved coordinates are given for many previously discovered stars. Averaged JHK photometry and velocities are summarized for a sample of 400 stars. 25 refs.

  15. Interferometric observations of non-maser SiO emission from circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars - Acceleration regions and SiO depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Bieging, John H.

    1993-01-01

    High- and medium-resolution images of SiO J = 2-1(V = 0) from the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of three oxygen-rich stars, Chi Cyg, RX Boo, and IK Tau, were obtained. The SIO images were found to be roughly circular, implying that the CSEs are spherically symmetric on angular-size scales of about 3-9 arcsec. The observed angular half-maximum intensity source radius is nearly independent of the LSR velocity for all three CSEs. Chi Cyg and RX Boo are argued to be less than 450 pc distant, and have mass-loss rates larger than about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr. In Chi Cyg and RX Boo, the line profiles at the peak of the brightness distribution are rounded, typical of optically-thick emission from a spherical envelope expanding with a constant velocity. In the IK Tau line profiles, an additional narrower central component is present, probably a result of emission from an inner circumstellar shell with a significantly smaller expansion velocity than the extended envelope.

  16. Post-AGB Evolution Much Faster Than Previously Phought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesicki, K.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    For 32 central stars of PNe we present their parameters interpolated among new evolutionary sequences. The derived stellar final masses are confined between 0.53 and 0.58 M⊙ in good agreement with the peak in the white dwarf mass distribution. Consequently, the inferred star formation history of the Galactic bulge is well restricted between 3 and 11 Gyr and is compatible with other published studies. The new evolutionary tracks proved very good as a tool for analysis of late stages of stars life. The results provide a compelling confirmation of the accelerated post-AGB evolution.

  17. The optically bright post-AGB population of the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aarle, E.; van Winckel, H.; Lloyd Evans, T.; Ueta, T.; Wood, P. R.; Ginsburg, A. G.

    2011-06-01

    Context. The detected variety in chemistry and circumstellar shell morphology of the limited sample of Galactic post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is so large that there is no consensus yet on how the different objects are linked by evolutionary channels. The evaluation is complicated by the fact that their distances and hence luminosities remain largely unknown. Aims: We construct a catalogue of the optically bright post-AGB stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The sample forms an ideal testbed for stellar evolution theory predictions of the final phase of low- and intermediate-mass stars, because the distance and hence luminosity and also the current and initial mass of these objects is well constrained. Methods: Via cross-correlation of the Spitzer SAGE catalogue with optical catalogues we selected a sample of LMC post-AGB candidates based on their [8] - [24] colour index and estimated luminosity. We determined the fundamental properties of the central stars of 105 of these objects using low-resolution, optical spectra that we obtained at Siding Spring Observatory and SAAO. Results: We constructed a catalogue of 70 high probability and 1337 candidate post-AGB stars that is available at the CDS. About half of the objects in our sample of post-AGB candidates show a spectral energy distribution (SED) that is indicative of a disc rather than an expanding and cooling AGB remnant. Like in the Galaxy, the disc sources are likely associated with binary evolution. Important side products of this research are catalogues of candidate young stellar objects, candidate supergiants with circumstellar dust, and discarded objects for which a spectrum was obtained. These too are available at the CDS. Appendices A-D are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgCatalogues are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/530/A90

  18. The chemical composition of TS 01, the most oxygen-deficient planetary nebula. AGB nucleosynthesis in a metal-poor binary star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasińska, G.; Morisset, C.; Tovmassian, G.; Rauch, T.; Richer, M. G.; Peña, M.; Szczerba, R.; Decressin, T.; Charbonnel, C.; Yungelson, L.; Napiwotzki, R.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Jamet, L.

    2010-02-01

    The planetary nebula TS 01 (also called PN G 135.9+55.9 or SBS 1150+599A) with its record-holding low oxygen abundance and its double degenerate close binary core (period 3.9 h) is an exceptional object located in the Galactic halo. We have secured observational data in a complete wavelength range to pin down the abundances of half a dozen elements in the nebula. The abundances are obtained via detailed photoionization modelling which takes into account all the observational constraints (including geometry and aperture effects) using the pseudo-3D photoionization code Cloudy_3D. The spectral energy distribution of the ionizing radiation is taken from appropriate model atmospheres. Incidentally we find from the new observational constraints that both stellar components contribute to the ionization: the “cool” one provides the bulk of hydrogen ionization, while the “hot” one is responsible for the presence of the most highly charged ions, which explains why previous attempts to model the nebula experienced difficulties. The nebular abundances of C, N, O, and Ne are found to be 1/3.5, 1/4.2, 1/70, and 1/11 of the solar value respectively, with uncertainties of a factor 2. Thus the extreme O deficiency of this object is confirmed. The abundances of S and Ar are less than 1/30 of solar. The abundance of He relative to H is 0.089 ± 0.009. Standard models of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis cannot explain the abundance pattern observed in the nebula. To obtain an extreme oxygen deficiency in a star whose progenitor has an initial mass of about 1 M⊙ requires an additional mixing process, which can be induced by stellar rotation and/or by the presence of the close companion. We have computed a stellar model with an initial mass of 1 M⊙, appropriate metallicity, and initial rotation of 100 km s-1, and find that rotation greatly improves the agreement between the predicted and observed abundances. Based on observations obtained at the Canada

  19. On the Relation between the Mysterious 21 μm Emission Feature of Post-asymptotic Giant Branch Stars and Their Mass-loss Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ajay; Li, Aigen; Jiang, B. W.

    2016-07-01

    Over two decades ago, a prominent, mysterious emission band peaking at ˜20.1 μm was serendipitously detected in four preplanetary nebulae (PPNe; also known as “protoplanetary nebulae”). To date, this spectral feature, designated as the “21 μm” feature, has been seen in 27 carbon-rich PPNe in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. The nature of its carriers remains unknown although many candidate materials have been proposed. The 21 μm sources also exhibit an equally mysterious, unidentified emission feature peaking at 30 μm. While the 21 μm feature is exclusively seen in PPNe, a short-lived evolutionary stage between the end of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and planetary nebula (PN) phases, the 30 μm feature is more commonly observed in all stages of stellar evolution from the AGB through PPN to PN phases. We derive the stellar mass-loss rates (\\dot{M}) of these sources from their infrared (IR) emission, using the “2-DUST” radiative transfer code for axisymmetric dusty systems which allows one to distinguish the mass-loss rates of the AGB phase ({\\dot{M}}{AGB}) from that of the superwind ({\\dot{M}}{SW}) phase. We examine the correlation between {\\dot{M}}{AGB} or {\\dot{M}}{SW} and the fluxes emitted from the 21 and 30 μm features. We find that both features tend to correlate with {\\dot{M}}{AGB}, suggesting that their carriers are probably formed in the AGB phase. The nondetection of the 21 μm feature in AGB stars suggests that, unlike the 30 μm feature, the excitation of the carriers of the 21 μm feature may require ultraviolet photons which are available in PPNe but not in AGB stars.

  20. SURVEYING THE AGENTS OF GALAXY EVOLUTION IN THE TIDALLY STRIPPED, LOW METALLICITY SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD (SAGE-SMC). II. COOL EVOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Martha L.; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D.; Shiao, Bernie; Srinivasan, Sundar; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; McDonald, Iain; Kemper, F.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Misselt, Karl; Babler, Brian; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Whitney, Barbara; Hora, Joe; Robitaille, Thomas; Indebetouw, Remy; Sewilo, Marta

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the infrared (IR) properties of cool, evolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), including the red giant branch (RGB) stars and the dust-producing red supergiant (RSG) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars using observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy program entitled 'Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally Stripped, Low Metallicity SMC', or SAGE-SMC. The survey includes, for the first time, full spatial coverage of the SMC bar, wing, and tail regions at IR wavelengths (3.6-160 {mu}m). We identify evolved stars using a combination of near-IR and mid-IR photometry and point out a new feature in the mid-IR color-magnitude diagram that may be due to particularly dusty O-rich AGB stars. We find that the RSG and AGB stars each contribute {approx}20% of the global SMC flux (extended + point-source) at 3.6 {mu}m, which emphasizes the importance of both stellar types to the integrated flux of distant metal-poor galaxies. The equivalent SAGE survey of the higher-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-LMC) allows us to explore the influence of metallicity on dust production. We find that the SMC RSG stars are less likely to produce a large amount of dust (as indicated by the [3.6] - [8] color). There is a higher fraction of carbon-rich stars in the SMC, and these stars appear to reach colors as red as their LMC counterparts, indicating that C-rich dust forms efficiently in both galaxies. A preliminary estimate of the dust production in AGB and RSG stars reveals that the extreme C-rich AGB stars dominate the dust input in both galaxies, and that the O-rich stars may play a larger role in the LMC than in the SMC.

  1. Hydrogen-deficient atmospheres for cool carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Bower, C. D.; Lemke, D. A.; Luttermoser, D. G.; Petrakis, J. P.; Reinhart, M. D.; Welch, K. A.; Alexander, D. R.; Goebel, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Motivated by recent work which hints at a possible deficiency of hydrogen in non-Mira N-type carbon stars and to further explore the parameter space of chemical composition, computations have been made of a series of hydrogen-deficient models for carbon stars. For these models Teff = 3000 K, and log g = 0.0. Solar abundances are used for all elements except for carbon (which is enhanced to give C/O = 1.05), hydrogen, and helium. As the fractional abundance of hydrogen is decreased, being replaced by helium, the temperature-optical depth relation is affected only slightly, but the temperature-pressure relation is changed. The most striking change in the emergent flux is the decrease of the H(-) peak at 1.65 micron compared with the blackbody peak at 1.00 micron.

  2. Clumpy dust clouds and extended atmosphere of the AGB star W Hydrae revealed with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL and VLTI/AMBER. II. Time variations between pre-maximum and minimum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Our recent visible polarimetric images of the well-studied AGB star W Hya taken at pre-maximum light (phase 0.92) with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL have revealed clumpy dust clouds close to the star at 2 R⋆. We present second-epoch SPHERE-ZIMPOL observations of W Hya at minimum light (phase 0.54) as well as high-spectral resolution long-baseline interferometric observations with the AMBER instrument at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Methods: We observed W Hya with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL at three wavelengths in the continuum (645, 748, and 820 nm), in the Hα line at 656.3 nm, and in the TiO band at 717 nm. The VLTI/AMBER observations were carried out in the wavelength region of the CO first overtone lines near 2.3 μm with a spectral resolution of 12 000. Results: The high-spatial resolution polarimetric images obtained with SPHERE-ZIMPOL have allowed us to detect clear time variations in the clumpy dust clouds as close as 34-50 mas (1.4-2.0 R⋆) to the star. We detected the formation of a new dust cloud as well as the disappearance of one of the dust clouds detected at the first epoch. The Hα and TiO emission extends to 150 mas ( 6 R⋆), and the Hα images obtained at two epochs reveal time variations. The degree of linear polarization measured at minimum light, which ranges from 13 to 18%, is higher than that observed at pre-maximum light. The power-law-type limb-darkened disk fit to the AMBER data in the continuum results in a limb-darkened disk diameter of 49.1 ± 1.5 mas and a limb-darkening parameter of 1.16 ± 0.49, indicating that the atmosphere is more extended with weaker limb-darkening compared to pre-maximum light. Our Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling shows that the second-epoch SPHERE-ZIMPOL data can be explained by a shell of 0.1 μm grains of Al2O3, Mg2SiO4, and MgSiO3 with a 550 nm optical depth of 0.6 ± 0.2 and an inner and outer radii of 1.3 R⋆ and 10 ± 2R⋆, respectively. Our modeling suggests the predominance of small (0

  3. Neutron-star formation in the carbon-detonation supernova.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, J. C.; Buchler, J.-R.; Barkat, Z. K.

    1973-01-01

    Neutrino losses, such as those driven by the convective Urca process, may affect the evolution of stars in the mass range from 4 to 8 solar masses so as to lead to collapse of their degenerate carbon/oxygen cores. A corresponding hydrodynamic model is computed which leads to the formation of a 1.3 to 1.4 solar mass neutron star with the expulsion of a small fraction of the mass, about 0.l solar mass at about 20,000 km/sec into the overlying hydrogen envelope. This sets the stage for the Ostriker-Gunn mechanism in which Type II supernovae and pulsars are formed.

  4. Carbon stars with oxygen-rich circumstellar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, Michael; Hawkins, I.

    1991-01-01

    The IUE satellite was used to search for companions to two carbon-rich stars with oxygen-rich circumstellar envelopes, EU And and V778 Cyg. Depending upon the amount of interstellar extinction and distances (probably between 1 and 2 kpc from the Sun) to these two stars, upper limits were placed between approx. 1.5 and 6 solar mass to the mass of any main sequence companions. For the 'near' distance of 1 kpc, it seems unlikely that there are white dwarf companions because the detection would be expected of ultraviolet emission from accretion of red giant wind material onto the white dwarf. A new model is proposed to explain the oxygen-rich envelopes. If these stars have a high nitrogen abundance, the carbon that is in excess of the oxygen may be carried in the circumstellar envelopes in HCN rather than C2H2 which is a likely key seed molecule for the formation of carbon grains. Consequently, carbon particles may not form; instead, oxygen-rich silicate dust may nucleate from the SiO present in the outflow.

  5. Future Directions In The Study Of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars With The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, Adam; Zackrisson, Erik; Eriksson, Kjell

    2016-10-01

    In this study we present photometric predictions for C-type Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars (AGB) stars from Eriks- son et al. (2014) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the Wide- eld Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) instruments. The photometric predictions we have done are for JWST's general purpose wide-band lters on NIR- Cam and MIRI covering wavelengths of 0.7 — 21 microns. AGB stars contribute substantially to the integrated light of intermediate-age stellar popula- tions and is a substantial source of the metals (especially carbon) in galaxies. Studies of AGB stars are (among other reasons) important for the understanding of the chemical evolution and dust cycle of galaxies. Since the JWST is scheduled for launch in 2018 it should be a high priority to prepare observing strategies. With these predictions we hope it will be possible to optimize observing strategies of AGB stars and max- imize the science return of JWST. By testing our method on Whitelock et al. (2006) objects from the WISE catalog and comparing them with our photometric results based on Eriksson et al. (2014) we have been able to fit 20 objects with models. The photometric data set can be accessed at: http://www.astro.uu.se/AGBmodels/ABmags/

  6. THE MASS LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: EMPIRICAL RELATIONS FOR EXCESS EMISSION AT 8 AND 24 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Sundar; Meixner, Margaret; Leitherer, Claus; Vijh, Uma; Gordon, Karl D.; Sewilo, Marta; Volk, Kevin; Blum, Robert D.; Harris, Jason; Babler, Brian L.; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles W.; For, Bi-Qing; Misselt, Karl A.; Cohen, Martin; Hora, Joseph L.; Indebetouw, Remy; Markwick-Kemper, Francisca

    2009-06-15

    We present empirical relations describing excess emission from evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) survey which includes the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m and Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) 24, 70, and 160 {mu}m bands. We combine the SAGE data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS; J, H, and K {sub s}) and the optical Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS; U, B, V, and I) point source catalogs in order to create complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star candidates in the LMC. AGB star outflows are among the main producers of dust in a galaxy, and this mass loss results in an excess in the fluxes observed in the 8 and 24 {mu}m bands. The aim of this work is to investigate the mass loss return by AGB stars to the interstellar medium of the LMC by studying the dependence of the infrared excess flux on the total luminosity. We identify oxygen-rich, carbon-rich, and extreme AGB star populations in our sample based on their 2MASS and IRAC colors. The SEDs of oxygen- and carbon-rich AGB stars are compared with appropriate stellar photosphere models to obtain the excess flux in all the IRAC bands and the MIPS 24 {mu}m band. Extreme AGB stars are dominated by circumstellar emission at 8 and 24 {mu}m; thus we approximate their excesses with the flux observed in these bands. We find about 16,000 O-rich, 6300 C-rich, and 1000 extreme sources with reliable 8 {mu}m excesses, and about 4500 O-rich, 5300 C-rich, and 960 extreme sources with reliable 24 {mu}m excesses. The excesses are in the range 0.1 mJy to 5 Jy. The 8 and 24 {mu}m excesses for all three types of AGB candidates show a general increasing trend with luminosity. The color temperature of the circumstellar dust derived from the ratio of the 8 and 24 {mu}m excesses decreases with an increase in excess, while the 24 {mu

  7. Kinematics and chemistry of faint high latitude dwarf carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jinmi; Beers, Timothy C.; Dietz, Sarah; Lee, Young Sun; Placco, Vinicius M.

    2017-01-01

    The diffuse halo system of the Milky Way is complex, and has been shown to comprise at least two main components: a near-zero net rotation inner-halo and a more rapidly rotating outer-halo component. Studies of the ancient, very metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo system are crucial for understanding its early formation history. The so-called carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars are an important subset of the stars in the halo system, which exhibit distinctive kinematic and chemical signatures that can be used to constrain the star-formation histories and assembly of the various Galactic components.We have examined the sample of main-sequence dwarf and other faint high Galactic latitude carbon-enhanced stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey studied by Green (2013). As noted by Green, many of these starsexhibit high proper motions, which have been later claimed to be related to possible binary ejection models Plant et al. (2016). By use of the CEMP sub-classification approach of Yoon et al. (2016), we investigate whether the kinematics of these stars might instead result from their membership in the inner/outer halo populations of the Galaxy.ReferencesGreen, P. 2013, ApJ, 765, 12Plant, K. et al. 2016, AAS 227.34115Yoon, J. et al. 2016, ApJ, in pressAcknowledgementThis work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1430152 (JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements).

  8. Enanas blancas post-AGB deficientes en Hidrógeno: su evolución espectral PG1159-DB-DQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panei, J. A.; Althaus, L. G.; Córsico, A. H.; Serenelli, A. M.; Scóccola, C. G.; García-Berro, E.

    This work explore the formation and evolution of hydrogen-deficient post-AGB white dwarfs. To this end, we compute the complete evolution of an initially 2.7 M sun star from the ZAMS through the thermally pulsing and mass-loss phases to the white dwarf stage. Particular attention is given to the chemical abundance changes during the whole evolution. The evolution is extended to the domain of the helium-rich, carbon-contaminated DQ white dwarfs to exploring the possible evolutionary connection PG1159-DB-DQ.

  9. Crystallization of carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C J; Schneider, A S; Berry, D K

    2010-06-11

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and from Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction to S(300)≤170  keV b.

  10. Crystallization of Carbon-Oxygen Mixtures in White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.

    2010-06-01

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and from Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the C12(α,γ)O16 reaction to S300≤170keVb.

  11. On the violet flux of N type carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Danny R.; Honeycutt, R. Kent; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1988-01-01

    New six-color violet photometry of 26 carbon stars is presented. These observations reveal the shape of the spectrum between 3400 and 4500 A and provide a measurement of the violet flux deficiency. The strength of the 11.5-micron SiC emission feature was also measured using ground-based infrared spectrophotometry and the IRAS low-resolution spectral catalog. The lack of correlation between the 11.5-micron emission and the violet flux deficiency leads to the conclusion that SiC is not the predominant violet opacity source in N type carbon stars. The violet photometry presented here does not quantitatively agree with previous spectrophotometry that supported C3 as the opacity source. The observations alone do not rule out the C3 opacity, but when they are combined with IUE data, the C3 opacity appears less plausible.

  12. Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Stars in SDSS/SEGUE. I. Carbon Abundance Estimation and Frequency of CEMP Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Sun; Beers, Timothy C.; Masseron, Thomas; Plez, Bertrand; Rockosi, Constance M.; Sobeck, Jennifer; Yanny, Brian; Lucatello, Sara; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Placco, Vinicius M.; Carollo, Daniela

    2013-11-01

    We describe a method for the determination of stellar [C/Fe] abundance ratios using low-resolution (R = 2000) stellar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its Galactic sub-survey, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). By means of a star-by-star comparison with a set of SDSS/SEGUE spectra with available estimates of [C/Fe] based on published high-resolution analyses, we demonstrate that we can measure [C/Fe] from SDSS/SEGUE spectra with S/N >= 15 Å-1 to a precision better than 0.35 dex for stars with atmospheric parameters in the range T eff = [4400, 6700] K, log g = [1.0, 5.0], [Fe/H] = [-4.0, +0.5], and [C/Fe] = [-0.25, +3.5]. Using the measured carbon-to-iron abundance ratios obtained by this technique, we derive the frequency of carbon-enhanced stars ([C/Fe] >= +0.7) as a function of [Fe/H], for both the SDSS/SEGUE stars and other samples from the literature. We find that the differential frequency slowly rises from almost zero to about 14% at [Fe/H] ~ -2.4, followed by a sudden increase, by about a factor of three, to 39% from [Fe/H] ~ -2.4 to [Fe/H] ~ -3.7. Although the number of stars known with [Fe/H] < -4.0 remains small, the frequency of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars below this value is around 75%. We also examine how the cumulative frequency of CEMP stars varies across different luminosity classes. The giant sample exhibits a cumulative CEMP frequency of 32% for [Fe/H] <= -2.5, 31% for [Fe/H] <= -3.0, and 33% for [Fe/H] <= -3.5 a roughly constant value. For the main-sequence turnoff stars, we obtain a lower cumulative CEMP frequency, around 10% for [Fe/H] <= -2.5, presumably due to the difficulty of identifying CEMP stars among warmer turnoff stars with weak CH G-bands. The dwarf population displays a large change in the cumulative frequency for CEMP stars below [Fe/H] = -2.5, jumping from 15% for [Fe/H] <= -2.5 to about 75% for [Fe/H] <= -3.0. When we impose a restriction with respect to

  13. High-luminosity single carbon stars in stellar and galactic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1991-01-01

    In the solar neighborhood, approximately half of all intermediate mass main sequence stars with initially between 1 solar mass and about 5 solar masses become carbon stars with luminosities near 10,000 lunar luminosities for typically less than 1 million years. These high luminosity carbon stars lose mass at rates nearly always in excess of 10 to the -7th solar mass/yr and sometimes in excess of 0.00001 solar mass/yr. Locally, close to half of the mass returned into the interstellar medium by intermediate mass stars before they become white dwarfs is during the carbon star phase. A much greater fraction of lower metallicity stars become carbon-rich before they evolve into planetary nebulae, than do higher-metallicity stars; therefore, carbon stars are much more important in the outer than in the inner Galaxy.

  14. On the Evolution of O(He)-Type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Reindl, N.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.

    2012-01-01

    O(He) stars represent a small group of four very hot post-AGB stars whose atmospheres are composed of almost pure helium. Their evolution deviates from the hydrogen-deficient post-AGO evolutionary sequence of carbon-dominated stars like e.g. PG 1159 or Wolf- Rayet stars. While (very) late thermal pulse evolutionary models can explain the observed He/C/O abundances in these objects, they do not reproduce He-dominated surface abundances. Currently it seems most likely that the O(He) stars originate from a double helium white dwarf merger and so they could be the successors of the luminous helium-rich sdO-stars. An other possibility is that O(He)-stars could be successors of RCB or EHe stars.

  15. The 11 micron Silicon Carbide Feature in Carbon Star Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speck, A. K.; Barlow, M. J.; Skinner, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is known to form in circumstellar shells around carbon stars. SiC can come in two basic types - hexagonal alpha-SiC or cubic beta-SiC. Laboratory studies have shown that both types of SiC exhibit an emission feature in the 11-11.5 micron region, the size and shape of the feature varying with type, size and shape of the SiC grains. Such a feature can be seen in the spectra of carbon stars. Silicon carbide grains have also been found in meteorites. The aim of the current work is to identity the type(s) of SiC found in circumstellar shells and how they might relate to meteoritic SiC samples. We have used the CGS3 spectrometer at the 3.8 m UKIRT to obtain 7.5-13.5 micron spectra of 31 definite or proposed carbon stars. After flux-calibration, each spectrum was fitted using a chi(exp 2)-minimisation routine equipped with the published laboratory optical constants of six different samples of small SiC particles, together with the ability to fit the underlying continuum using a range of grain emissivity laws. It was found that the majority of observed SiC emission features could only be fitted by alpha-SiC grains. The lack of beta-SiC is surprising, as this is the form most commonly found in meteorites. Included in the sample were four sources, all of which have been proposed to be carbon stars, that appear to show the SiC feature in absorption.

  16. Time Dependent Models of Grain Formation Around Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, M. P.; Shipman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are sites of dust formation and undergo mass loss at rates ranging from 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr. The state-of-the-art in modeling these processes is time-dependent models which simultaneously solve the grain formation and gas dynamics problem. We present results from such a model, which also includes an exact solution of the radiative transfer within the system.

  17. CARBON STARS WITH INFRARED SPECTRA IN GROUP P OF THE IRAS/LRS DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.

    2012-10-01

    Sources with infrared spectra in Group P of the IRAS/LRS database all show polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. They are often planetary nebulae, H II regions, reflection/dark nebulae, Wolf-Rayet stars, or external galaxies. However, we noted that some carbon stars are also included in this group. We searched for and investigated all infrared spectra in Group P of the IRAS/LRS database. Finally, we found 11 previously known carbon stars and identified 8 new candidate carbon stars in Group P. Infrared spectra of these stars may present the 11.2 {mu}m SiC emission features indicative of their carbon-rich properties.

  18. Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Stars in SDSS/SEGUE. I. Carbon Abundance Estimation and Frequency of CEMP Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sun; Beers, Timothy C.; Masseron, Thomas; Plez, Bertrand; Rockosi, Constance M.; Sobeck, Jennifer; Yanny, Brian; Lucatello, Sara; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Placco, Vinicius M.; Carollo, Daniela

    2013-10-17

    We describe a method for the determination of stellar [C/Fe] abundance ratios using low-resolution (R = 2000) stellar spectra from the SDSS and SEGUE. By means of a star-by-star comparison with a set of SDSS/SEGUE spectra with available estimates of [C/Fe] based on published high-resolution analyses, we demonstrate that we can measure [C/Fe] from SDSS/SEGUE spectra with S/N > 15 to a precision better than 0.35 dex. Using the measured carbon-to-iron abundance ratios obtained by this technique, we derive the frequency of carbon-enhanced stars ([C/Fe] > +0.7) as a function of [Fe/H], for both the SDSS/SEGUE stars and other samples from the literature. We find that the differential frequency slowly rises from almost zero to about 14% at [Fe/H] ~ -2.4, followed by a sudden increase, by about a factor of three, to 39% from [Fe/H] ~ -2.4 to [Fe/H] ~ -3.7. We also examine how the cumulative frequency of CEMP stars varies across different luminosity classes. The giant sample exhibits a cumulative CEMP frequency of 32% for [Fe/H] < -2.5, 31% for [Fe/H] < -3.0, and 33% for [Fe/H] < -3.5. For the main-sequence turnoff stars, we obtain a lower cumulative CEMP frequency, around 10% for [Fe/H] < -2.5. The dwarf population displays a large change in the cumulative frequency for CEMP stars below [Fe/H] = -2.5, jumping from 15% for [Fe/H] < -2.5 to about 75% for [Fe/H] < -3.0. When we impose a restriction with respect to distance from the Galactic mid-plane (|Z| < 5 kpc), the frequency of the CEMP giants does not increase at low metallicity ([Fe/H] < -2.5), but rather, decreases, due to the dilution of C-rich material in stars that have undergone mixing with CNO-processed material from their interiors. The frequency of CEMP stars near the main-sequence turnoff, which are not expected to have experienced mixing, increases for [Fe/H] < -3.0. [abridged

  19. Nuclear fusion and carbon flashes on neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, R. E.; Picklum, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports on detailed calculations of the thermal evolution of the carbon-burning shells in the envelopes of accreting neutron stars for mass-accretion rates of 1 hundred-billionth to 2 billionths of a solar mass per yr and neutron-star masses of 0.56 and 1.41 solar masses. The work of Hansen and Van Horn (1975) is extended to higher densities, and a more detailed treatment of nuclear processing in the hydrogen- and helium-burning regions is included. Results of steady-state calculations are presented, and results of time-dependent computations are examined for accretion rates of 3 ten-billionths and 1 billionth of solar mass per yr. It is found that two evolutionary sequences lead to carbon flashes and that the carbon abundance at the base of the helium shell is a strong function of accretion rate. Upper limits are placed on the accretion rates at which carbon flashes will be important.

  20. THE DUST BUDGET OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD: ARE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS THE PRIMARY DUST SOURCE AT LOW METALLICITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, M. L.; Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Sargent, B. A.; Srinivasan, S.; Riebel, D.; McDonald, I.; Van Loon, J. Th.; Clayton, G. C.; Sloan, G. C.

    2012-03-20

    We estimate the total dust input from the cool evolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using the 8 {mu}m excess emission as a proxy for the dust-production rate (DPR). We find that asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars produce (8.6-9.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} of dust, depending on the fraction of far-infrared sources that belong to the evolved star population (with 10%-50% uncertainty in individual DPRs). RSGs contribute the least (<4%), while carbon-rich AGB stars (especially the so-called extreme AGB stars) account for 87%-89% of the total dust input from cool evolved stars. We also estimate the dust input from hot stars and supernovae (SNe), and find that if SNe produce 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} of dust each, then the total SN dust input and AGB input are roughly equivalent. We consider several scenarios of SN dust production and destruction and find that the interstellar medium (ISM) dust can be accounted for solely by stellar sources if all SNe produce dust in the quantities seen around the dustiest examples and if most SNe explode in dense regions where much of the ISM dust is shielded from the shocks. We find that AGB stars contribute only 2.1% of the ISM dust. Without a net positive contribution from SNe to the dust budget, this suggests that dust must grow in the ISM or be formed by another unknown mechanism.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Torun catalog of post-AGB and related objects (Szczerba+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, R.; Siodmiak, N.; Stasinska, G.; Borkowski, J.

    2007-09-01

    With the ongoing AKARI infrared sky survey, of much greater sensitivity than IRAS, a wealth of post-AGB objects may be discovered. It is thus time to organize our present knowledge of known post-AGB stars in the galaxy with a view to using it to search for new post-AGB objects among AKARI sources. We searched the literature available on the NASA Astrophysics Data System up to 1 October 2006, and defined criteria for classifying sources into three categories: very likely, possible and disqualified post-AGB objects. The category of very likely post-AGB objects is made up of several classes. We have created an evolutionary, on-line catalogue of Galactic post-AGB objects, to be referred to as the Torun catalogue of Galactic post-AGB and related objects. The present version of the catalogue contains 326 very likely, 107 possible and 64 disqualified objects. For the very likely post-AGB objects, the catalogue gives the available optical and infrared photometry, infrared spectroscopy and spectral types, and links to finding charts and bibliography. (3 data files).

  2. UBVR POLARIMETRY OF EVOLVED CARBON STARS NEAR THE GALACTIC EQUATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, J. M.; Hiriart, D. E-mail: hiriart@astrosen.unam.mx

    2011-07-15

    We present polarimetry and photometry in the UBVR bands of nine low Galactic latitude carbon stars (|b{sup II} | {<=} 15{sup 0}) over a period of one year: V384 Per, ST Cam, S Aur, CL Mon, HV Cas, Y Tau, TT Cyg, U Cyg, and V1426 Cyg. We have corrected the observed values for the effects of extinction and polarization by the interstellar medium to obtain the intrinsic polarization and photometry of the stars. All the observed objects present polarization in at least two bands. There is a statistical correlation between the temporal mean polarization (p) at each filter band and the IR color K - [12] with the redder stars tending to be more polarized. A related trend is found between polarization and mass-loss rate in gas. The degree of polarization increases with the mass-loss rate at around M-dot{sub gas}{approx}3.6x10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We found two stars-TT Cyg and ST Cam-that increase polarization with decreasing mass-loss rate below this value. Multiple observations of TT Cyg, U Cyg, and V1426 Cyg during the campaign show no correlation between polarization and luminosity in any of the UBVR bands. Therefore, the distribution of the scatterers shall vary with time in a very irregular way.

  3. FORMATION OF SiC GRAINS IN PULSATION-ENHANCED DUST-DRIVEN WIND AROUND CARBON-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Yuki; Kozasa, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (C-rich AGB) stars to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process: one is the local thermal equilibrium (LTE) case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters T{sub v} is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which T{sub v} is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of the hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass M{sub *} = 1.0 M{sub Sun }, luminosity L{sub *} = 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }, effective temperature T{sub eff} = 2600 K, C/O ratio = 1.4, and pulsation period P = 650 days show the following: in the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains, and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of {approx}10{sup -8} is too small to reproduce the value of 0.01-0.3, which is inferred from the radiative transfer models. On the other hand, in the non-LTE case, the formation region of the SiC grains is more internal and/or almost identical to that of the carbon grains due to the so-called inverse greenhouse effect. The mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains averaged at the outer boundary ranges from 0.098 to 0.23 for the sticking probability {alpha}{sub s} = 0.1-1.0. The size distributions with the peak at {approx}0.2-0.3 {mu}m in radius cover the range of size derived from the analysis of the presolar SiC grains. Thus, the difference between the temperatures of the small cluster and gas plays a crucial role in the formation process of SiC grains around C-rich AGB stars, and this aspect should be explored for the formation process of dust grains in astrophysical environments.

  4. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Ratios for Nearby Miras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Lebzelter, Thomas; Straniero, Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios are reported for a sample of 46 Mira and SRa-type variable asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Vibration-rotation first and second-overtone CO lines in 1.5-2.5 μm spectra were measured to derive isotopic ratios for 12C/13C, 16O/17O, and 16O/18O. Comparisons with previous measurements for individual stars and with various samples of evolved stars, as available in the extant literature, are discussed. Models for solar composition AGB stars of different initial masses are used to interpret our results. We find that the majority of M-stars have main sequence masses ≤2 M ⊙ and have not experienced sizable third dredge-up (TDU) episodes. The progenitors of the four S-type stars in our sample are slightly more massive. Of the six C-stars in the sample three have clear evidence relating their origin to the occurrence of TDU. Comparisons with O-rich presolar grains from AGB stars that lived before the formation of the solar system reveal variations in the interstellar medium chemical composition. The present generation of low-mass AGB stars, as represented by our sample of long period variables (LPVs), shows a large spread of 16O/17O ratios, similar to that of group 1 presolar grains and in agreement with theoretical expectations for the composition of mass 1.2-2 M ⊙ stars after the first dredge-up. In contrast, the 16O/18O ratios of present-day LPVs are definitely smaller than those of group 1 grains. This is most probably a consequence of the the decrease with time of the 16O/18O ratio in the interstellar medium due to the chemical evolution of the Milky Way. One star in our sample has an O composition similar to that of group 2 presolar grains originating in an AGB star undergoing extra-mixing. This may indicate that the extra-mixing process is hampered at high metallicity, or, equivalently, favored at low metallicity. Similarly to O-rich grains, no star in our sample shows evidence of hot bottom burning, which is expected for

  5. Carbon stars in the X-Shooter Spectral Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonneau, A.; Lançon, A.; Trager, S. C.; Aringer, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Nowotny, W.; Peletier, R. F.; Prugniel, P.; Chen, Y.-P.; Dries, M.; Choudhury, O. S.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Koleva, M.; Meneses-Goytia, S.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Vazdekis, A.

    2016-05-01

    We provide a new collection of spectra of 35 carbon stars obtained with the ESO/VLT X-Shooter instrument as part of the X-Shooter Spectral Library project. The spectra extend from 0.3 μm to 2.4 μm with a resolving power above ~8000. The sample contains stars with a broad range of (J - K) color and pulsation properties located in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. We show that the distribution of spectral properties of carbon stars at a given (J - K) color becomes bimodal (in our sample) when (J - K) is larger than about 1.5. We describe the two families of spectra that emerge, characterized by the presence or absence of the absorption feature at 1.53 μm, generally associated with HCN and C2H2. This feature appears essentially only in large-amplitude variables, though not in all observations. Associated spectral signatures that we interpret as the result of veiling by circumstellar matter, indicate that the 1.53 μm feature might point to episodes of dust production in carbon-rich Miras. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, Prog. ID 084.B-0869(A/B), 085.B-0751(A/B), 189.B-0925(A/B/C/D).Tables 1, B.1, E.1, E.2 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/589/A36The reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/589/A36

  6. A New Generation of PARSEC-COLIBRI Stellar Isochrones Including the TP-AGB Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Bressan, Alessandro; Rosenfield, Philip; Aringer, Bernhard; Chen, Yang; Dussin, Marco; Nanni, Ambra; Pastorelli, Giada; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Trabucchi, Michele; Bladh, Sara; Dalcanton, Julianne; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Montalbán, Josefina; Wood, Peter R.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new generation of PARSEC–COLIBRI stellar isochrones that includes a detailed treatment of the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase, covering a wide range of initial metallicities (0.0001 < Zi < 0.06). Compared to previous releases, the main novelties and improvements are use of new TP-AGB tracks and related atmosphere models and spectra for M and C-type stars; inclusion of the surface H+He+CNO abundances in the isochrone tables, accounting for the effects of diffusion, dredge-up episodes and hot-bottom burning; inclusion of complete thermal pulse cycles, with a complete description of the in-cycle changes in the stellar parameters; new pulsation models to describe the long-period variability in the fundamental and first-overtone modes; and new dust models that follow the growth of the grains during the AGB evolution, in combination with radiative transfer calculations for the reprocessing of the photospheric emission. Overall, these improvements are expected to lead to a more consistent and detailed description of properties of TP-AGB stars expected in resolved stellar populations, especially in regard to their mean photometric properties from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths. We illustrate the expected numbers of TP-AGB stars of different types in stellar populations covering a wide range of ages and initial metallicities, providing further details on the “C-star island” that appears at intermediate values of age and metallicity, and about the AGB-boosting effect that occurs at ages close to 1.6-Gyr for populations of all metallicities. The isochrones are available through a new dedicated web server.

  7. Clues to Stellar Evolution from Microscopy of Star Dust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    grains from O-rich asymp- totic giant branch (AGB) stars, SiC from C-rich AGB stars, SiC from type-II supernovae , and silicates from O-rich AGB stars...oxidizing, O-rich plasma of the early solar system, without sublimation of the C to form CO gas. On Earth , SiC is extremely rare except as a...rich AGB star atmospheres. SUPERNOVA SiC Type-II supernovae are among the most extreme environments known. They are literally the rapid explosion of

  8. Abundances in red giant stars - Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Sahai, R.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter-wave observations have been made of isotopically substituted CO toward the envelopes of 11 carbon-rich stars. In every case, C-13O was detected and model calculations were used to estimate the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio. C-17O was detected toward three, and possibly four, envelopes, with sensitive upper limits for two others. The CO-18 variant was detected in two envelopes. New results include determinations of oxygen isotopic ratios in the two carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae CRL 26688 and CRL 618. As with other classes of red giant stars, the carbon-rich giants seem to be significantly, though variably, enriched in O-17. These results, in combination with observations in interstellar molecular clouds, indicate that current knowledge of stellar production of the CNO nuclides is far from satisfactory.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SagDIG carbon and oxygen stars (Momany+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momany, Y.; Clemens, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Gullieuszik, M.; Held, E. V.; Saviane, I.; Zaggia, S.; Monaco, L.; Montalto, M.; Rich, R. M.; Rizzi, L.

    2014-08-01

    The Sagittarius dwarf irregular (also known as SagDIG or UKS 1927-177) is a gas-rich, low-metallicity and star-forming galaxy, at the outskirts (D~1.1Mpc) of the Local Group. Projected relatively close to the Galactic center [(l,b)=(21.06,-16.29)] the resolved stellar populations of this galaxy reflects a strong Galactic foreground contamination, attributed to the thin and thick disk and the halo. This has so far hampered the reconstruction of its star formation and chemical enrichment history, and studies of individual stars. We have analyzed two ACS@HST data-sets (GO-9820 and GO-10472) that were collected in August 2003 and June 2005, having a ~1.85 years epoch separation. The data has allowed the derivation of the relative proper-motion for the SagDIG stellar population and reduction of the heavy foreground contamination. This provides a much clearer view of the red stellar populations (young RSG and intermediate-age AGB as well as the old RGB and AGB). The ACS/WFC data was collected in the F475W, F606W and F814W HST filters, and the published table provides a photometric calibration of the ACS/WFC filters that follows Bedin et al. (2003AJ....126..247B). This is based on the Vega spectrum and follows the recipes given by Holtzmann et al. (1995PASP..107..156H) for WFPC2, using the most updated in-flight characterization of the camera (Sirianni et al. 2005PASP..117.1049S). Besides the reported magnitudes and their relative errors, we also provide the pixel-based offset between the two F814W epochs, which is used to separate the SagDIG stellar population from the Galactic foreground (see Sec.3 of the paper for details). (1 data file).

  10. THE CONTRIBUTION OF THERMALLY-PULSING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND RED SUPERGIANT STARS TO THE LUMINOSITIES OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS AT 1-24 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Melbourne, J.; Boyer, Martha L. E-mail: martha.l.boyer@nasa.gov

    2013-02-10

    We present the near-through mid-infrared flux contribution of thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) and massive red supergiant (RSG) stars to the luminosities of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). Combined, the peak contribution from these cool evolved stars occurs at {approx}3-4 {mu}m, where they produce 32% of the SMC light, and 25% of the LMC flux. The TP-AGB star contribution also peaks at {approx}3-4 {mu}m and amounts to 21% in both galaxies. The contribution from RSG stars peaks at shorter wavelengths, 2.2 {mu}m, where they provide 11% of the SMC flux, and 7% for the LMC. Both TP-AGB and RSG stars are short lived, and thus potentially impose a large stochastic scatter on the near-IR derived mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxies at rest-frame 1-4 {mu}m. To minimize their impact on stellar mass estimates, one can use the M/L ratio at shorter wavelengths (e.g., at 0.8-1 {mu}m). At longer wavelengths ({>=}8 {mu}m), emission from dust in the interstellar medium dominates the flux. In the LMC, which shows strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 8 {mu}m, TP-AGB and RSG contribute less than 4% of the 8 {mu}m flux. However, 19% of the SMC 8 {mu}m flux is from evolved stars, nearly half of which is produced by the rarest, dustiest, carbon-rich TP-AGB stars. Thus, star formation rates of galaxies, based on an 8 {mu}m flux (e.g., observed-frame 24 {mu}m at z = 2), may be biased modestly high, especially for galaxies with little PAH emission.

  11. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances in main-sequence stars. II 20 F and G stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, R. E. S.; Tomkin, J.; Lambert, D. L.

    1981-11-01

    High-resolution Reticon spectra of red and near-infrared C I, N I, and O I lines have been analyzed to determine C, N, and O abundances in a sample of 20 F and G main-sequence stars. Their iron abundances, which have been determined from analysis of additional Reticon spectra of red Fe I lines, cover the Fe/H range from -0.9 to 0.4. Sulfur abundances have also been obtained. It is found that the variations of the carbon and sulfur abundances closely follow those of iron. The oxygen abundance varies much more slowly than iron (O/Fe = 0.48 (+ or - 0.07) Fe/H). This result confirms an earlier conclusion that oxygen is overabundant in more metal-deficient stars. The behavior of the nitrogen abundance appears to be similar to that of iron (N/Fe = 0.0 + or - 0.2). However, the unavailability of nitrogen abundances for the most metal-deficient stars in the sample makes this result less certain than the results for the other elements. These results are discussed in the light of current theories of stellar nucleosynthesis of the elements.

  12. Fluorine in a Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun

    2007-09-01

    The fluorine abundance of the carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) star HE 1305+0132 has been derived by analysis of the molecular HF (1-0) R9 line at 2.3357 μm in a high-resolution (R=50,000) spectrum obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer and Gemini-South telescope. Our abundance analysis makes use of a CNO-enhanced ATLAS12 model atmosphere characterized by a metallicity and CNO enhancements determined utilizing medium-resolution (R=3000) optical and near-IR spectra. The effective iron abundance is found to be [Fe/H]=-2.5, making HE 1305+0132 the most Fe-deficient star, by more than an order of magnitude, for which the abundance of fluorine has been measured. Using spectral synthesis, we derive a supersolar fluorine abundance of A(19F)=4.96+/-0.21, corresponding to a relative abundance of [F/Fe]=+2.90. A single line of the Phillips C2 system is identified in our Phoenix spectrum, and along with multiple lines of the first-overtone vibration-rotation CO (3-1) band head, C and O abundances of A(12C)=8.57+/-0.11 and A(16O)=7.04+/-0.14 are derived. We consider the striking fluorine overabundance in the framework of the nucleosynthetic processes thought to be responsible for the C-enhancement of CEMP stars and conclude that the atmosphere of HE 1305+0132 was polluted via mass transfer by a primary companion during its asymptotic giant branch phase. This is the first study of fluorine in a CEMP star, and it demonstrates that this rare nuclide can be a key diagnostic of nucleosynthetic processes in the early Galaxy.

  13. A SEARCH FOR UNRECOGNIZED CARBON-ENHANCED METAL-POOR STARS IN THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Placco, Vinicius M.; Rossi, Silvia; Kennedy, Catherine R.; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Christlieb, Norbert; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Reimers, Dieter; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2010-03-15

    We have developed a new procedure to search for carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars from the Hamburg/ESO (HES) prism-survey plates. This method employs an extended line index for the CH G band, which we demonstrate to have superior performance when compared to the narrower G-band index formerly employed to estimate G-band strengths for these spectra. Although CEMP stars have been found previously among candidate metal-poor stars selected from the HES, the selection on metallicity undersamples the population of intermediate-metallicity CEMP stars (-2.5 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=} -1.0); such stars are of importance for constraining the onset of the s-process in metal-deficient asymptotic giant branch stars (thought to be associated with the origin of carbon for roughly 80% of CEMP stars). The new candidates also include substantial numbers of warmer carbon-enhanced stars, which were missed in previous HES searches for carbon stars due to selection criteria that emphasized cooler stars. A first subsample, biased toward brighter stars (B< 15.5), has been extracted from the scanned HES plates. After visual inspection (to eliminate spectra compromised by plate defects, overlapping spectra, etc., and to carry out rough spectral classifications), a list of 669 previously unidentified candidate CEMP stars was compiled. Follow-up spectroscopy for a pilot sample of 132 candidates was obtained with the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR 4.1 m telescope. Our results show that most of the observed stars lie in the targeted metallicity range, and possess prominent carbon absorption features at 4300 A. The success rate for the identification of new CEMP stars is 43% (13 out of 30) for [Fe/H] < -2.0. For stars with [Fe/H] < -2.5, the ratio increases to 80% (four out of five objects), including one star with [Fe/H] < -3.0.

  14. Carbonaceous compounds in carbon stars and planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryter, C.

    A recent count of the stars leaving the main sequence and the method to estimate the return of matter to the interstellar medium due to mass-loss is summarized. Stars of (1 - 5) M? would replenish the interstellar medium in (6 - 12) x 109 years. Carbonaceous compounds of the interstellar dust are believed to be formed in the atmosphere of carbon stars, but I bring evidences that the fraction of it made of very small particles and most frequently referred to as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which on average are believed to accommodate > 15% of the interstellar carbon, are not formed as soon as the dust condenses in the atmosphere of red giants. Some kind of processing seems to be required, very likely induced by the exposition of the dust to the ultraviolet radiation of the central star when the red giant becomes a planetary nebula. Heating of small grains by hard photons is believed to heat them to high enough a temperature to produce some morphological or crystallographic evolution, roughly from aliphatic to aromatic stucture. Further processing of the interstellar medium along the same line is suggested by observations of reflection nebulae, which display properties of the dust and gas at the site of star formation. Les résultats de comptages récents d'étoiles quittant la séquence principale et la méthode permettant d'évaluer le taux de perte de masse sont brièvement présentés. On trouve que les étoiles de 1 à 5 M⊙ reconstituent la masse du milieu interstellaire en (6 -12) x 109 années. Il est plausible que les géantes rouges forment d'abord les composants sHicés, puis lorsqu'elles atteignent la phase à carbone, qu'elles produisent la composante carbonée de la poussière interstellaire. Cette dernière comporte une importante fractions de très petites particules, le plus souvent considérées comme formées de grosses molécules polycycliques aromatiques (PAH), et qui contiennent au moins 15 % du carbone interstellaire. Bien qu

  15. Calibrating the Luminosity of Carbon Stars: An Archival Study of Galaxies in the Nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocholski, Aaron J.; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.; Geha, Marla C.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon stars are a luminous but poorly constrained end stage of stellar evolution for stars with masses a few times the mass of the Sun. These stars may account for up to 40% of the luminosity in distant, unresolved galaxies. Recent studies have shown that the uncertainty in the contribution of carbon stars to a galaxy’s total luminosity can cause galactic mass and age estimates to vary by a factor of 2. Using archival HST data for ~ 40 galaxies in the Local Group we explore how the carbon star luminosities correlate with the properties (e.g. age, chemical abundance) of the underlying stellar populations in each galaxy. Our study will place much needed constraints on stellar evolution models of carbon stars. This will in turn greatly improve estimates of masses and ages of distant galaxies, which are critical to our understanding of galaxy evolution.

  16. CNO behaviour in planet-harbouring stars. II. Carbon abundances in stars with and without planets using the CH band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Andrés, L.; Israelian, G.; González Hernández, J. I.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Delgado Mena, E.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S. G.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Carbon, oxygen and nitrogen (CNO) are key elements in stellar formation and evolution, and their abundances should also have a significant impact on planetary formation and evolution. Aims: We aim to present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 1110 solar-type stars, 143 of which are known to have planetary companions. We have determined the carbon abundances of these stars and investigate a possible connection between C and the presence of planetary companions. Methods: We used the HARPS spectrograph to obtain high-resolution optical spectra of our targets. Spectral synthesis of the CH band at 4300 Å was performed with the spectral synthesis codes MOOG and FITTING. Results: We have studied carbon in several reliable spectral windows and have obtained abundances and distributions that show that planet host stars are carbon rich when compared to single stars, a signature caused by the known metal-rich nature of stars with planets. We find no different behaviour when separating the stars by the mass of the planetary companion Conclusions: We conclude that reliable carbon abundances can be derived for solar-type stars from the CH band at 4300 Å. We confirm two different slope trends for [C/Fe] with [Fe/H] because the behaviour is opposite for stars above and below solar values. We observe a flat distribution of the [C/Fe] ratio for all planetary masses, a finding that apparently excludes any clear connection between the [C/Fe] abundance ratio and planetary mass. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Paranal Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m telescope (ESO runs ID 72.C-0488, 082.C-0212, and 085.C-0063).Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A96

  17. Examining the infrared variable star population discovered in the Small Magellanic Cloud using the SAGE-SMC survey

    SciTech Connect

    Polsdofer, Elizabeth; Marengo, M.; Seale, J.; Sewiło, M.; Vijh, U. P.; Terrazas, M.; Meixner, M.

    2015-02-01

    We present our study on the infrared variability of point sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We use the data from the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Program “Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally Stripped, Low Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud” (SAGE-SMC) and the “Spitzer Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud” (S{sup 3}MC) survey, over three different epochs, separated by several months to 3 years. Variability in the thermal infrared is identified using a combination of Spitzer’s InfraRed Array Camera 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bands, and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 μm band. An error-weighted flux difference between each pair of three epochs (“variability index”) is used to assess the variability of each source. A visual source inspection is used to validate the photometry and image quality. Out of ∼2 million sources in the SAGE-SMC catalog, 814 meet our variability criteria. We matched the list of variable star candidates to the catalogs of SMC sources classified with other methods, available in the literature. Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars make up the majority (61%) of our variable sources, with about a third of all of our sources being classified as extreme AGB stars. We find a small, but significant population of oxygen-rich (O-rich) AGB (8.6%), Red Supergiant (2.8%), and Red Giant Branch (<1%) stars. Other matches to the literature include Cepheid variable stars (8.6%), early type stars (2.8%), Young-stellar objects (5.8%), and background galaxies (1.2%). We found a candidate OH maser star, SSTISAGE1C J005212.88-730852.8, which is a variable O-rich AGB star, and would be the first OH/IR star in the SMC, if confirmed. We measured the infrared variability of a rare RV Tau variable (a post-AGB star) that has recently left the AGB phase. 59 variable stars from our list remain unclassified.

  18. Improving the distances of post-AGB objects in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, Shane B.; Frew, David J.; Owers, Matt S.; Parker, Quentin A.; Bojičič, Ivan S.

    2016-07-01

    Post-AGB (PAGB) stars are short-lived, low-intermediate mass objects transitioning from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the white dwarf (WD) phase. These objects are characterised by a constant, core-mass dependent luminosity and a large infrared excess from the dusty envelope ejected at the top of the AGB. PAGB stars provide insights into the evolution of their direct descendants, planetary nebulae (PNe). Calculation of physical characteristics of PAGB are dependent on accurately determined distances scarcely available in the literature. Using the Torun catalogue for PAGB objects, supplemented with archival data, we have determined distances to the known population of Galactic PAGB stars. This is by modelling their spectral energy distributions (SED) with black bodies and numerically integrating over the entire wavelength range to determine the total integrated object flux. For most PAGB stars we assumed their luminosities are based on their positional characteristics and stellar evolution models. RV Tauri stars however are known to follow a period-luminosity relation (PLR) reminiscent of type-2 Cepheids. For these variable PAGB stars we determined their luminosities via the PLR and hence their distances. This allows us to overcome the biggest obstacle to characterising these poorly understood objects that play a vital part in Galactic chemical enrichment.

  19. A flux-limited sample of Galactic carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claussen, M. J.; Kleinmann, S. G.; Joyce, R. R.; Jura, M.

    1987-01-01

    Published observational data (including IRAS observations) for a flux-limited sample of 215 Galactic carbon stars (CSs) selected from the 2-micron sky survey of Neugebauer and Leighton (1969) are compiled in extensive tables and graphs and analyzed statistically. The sample is found to penetrate a volume of radius 1.5 kpc, and the local CS space density and surface density are calculated as log rho0 (per cu kpc) = 2.0 + or - 0.4 and log N (per sq kpc) = 1.6 + or - 0.2, respectively. The total Galactic mass-return rate from these CSs is estimated as 0.013 solar mass/yr, implying a time scale of 0.1-1 Myr for the CS evolutionary phase and a mass of 1.2-1.6 solar mass for the (probably F-type) main-seqence progenitors of CSs.

  20. The outer layers of cool, non-Mira carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    The outer layers and near circumstellar envelope (CSE) of a typical carbon star have been studied using available data from theoretical and empirical models. An attempt is made to match the density-velocity structure of the photosphere-chromosphere region to values from the radio CO observations, which arise from the outer CSE. It is concluded that the stellar atmosphere includes a relatively thin high-temperature region close to hydrostatic equilibrium and a much more extended cooler region of outflowing gas and dust. To extend the outer photosphere and chromosphere to match the mass loss density appears to require an injection of energy and momentum by some mechanism rather close to the stellar surface.

  1. HIGH-RESOLUTION CO OBSERVATION OF THE CARBON STAR CIT 6 REVEALING THE SPIRAL STRUCTURE AND A NASCENT BIPOLAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyosun; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi; Zhao-Geisler, Ronny; Trejo, Alfonso; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Taam, Ronald E.; Kemper, Francisca; Kim, Jongsoo; Byun, Do-Young; Liu, Tie

    2015-11-20

    CIT 6 is a carbon star in the transitional phase from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the protoplanetary nebulae (pPNs). Observational evidences of two point sources in the optical, circumstellar arc segments in an HC{sub 3}N line emission, and a bipolar nebula in near-infrared provide strong support for the presence of a binary companion. Hence, CIT 6 is very attractive for studying the role of companions in the AGB–pPN transition. We have carried out high-resolution {sup 12}CO J = 2–1 and {sup 13}CO J = 2–1 observations of CIT 6 with the Submillimeter Array combined with the Submillimeter Telescope (single-dish) data. The {sup 12}CO channel maps reveal a spiral-shell pattern connecting the HC{sub 3}N segments in a continuous form and an asymmetric outflow corresponding to the near-infrared bipolar nebula. Rotation of the {sup 12}CO channel peak position may be related to the inner spiral winding and/or the bipolar outflow. An eccentric orbit binary is suggested for the presence of an anisotropic mass loss to the west and a double spiral pattern. The lack of interarm emission to the west may indicate a feature corresponding to the periastron passage of a highly eccentric orbit of the binary. Spatially averaged radial and spectral profiles of {sup 12}CO J = 2–1 and {sup 13}CO J = 2–1 are compared with simple spherical radiative transfer models, suggesting a change of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO abundance ratio from ∼30 to ∼50 inward in the CSE of CIT 6. The millimeter continuum emission is decomposed into extended dust thermal emission (spectral index ∼ −2.4) and compact emission from radio photosphere (spectral index ∼ −2.0)

  2. Probing the collimation of pristine post-AGB jets with STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2009-07-01

    The shaping of planetary and protoplanetary nebulae {PNe and PPNe} is probably the most exciting yet least understood problem in the late evolution of 1-8 solar mass stars. An increasing number of astronomers believe that fast jet-like winds ejected in the PPN phase are responsible for carving out the diverse shapes in the dense envelopes of the Asymptotic Giant Branch {AGB} stars. To date, the properties of these post-AGB jets have not been characterized and, indeed, their launching/collimation mechanism is still subject to controversial debate. This is due to the lack of the direct observations probing the spatio-kinematic structure of post-AGB winds in the stellar vicinity { 10e16cm}, which is only possible with HST+STIS. Recently, STIS observations have allowed us for the first time the DIRECT study of the structure and kinematics of the elusive post-AGB winds in one PPN, He3-1475 {Sanchez Contreras & Sahai 2001}. Those winds have been discovered through H-alpha blue-shifted absorption features in the inner 0.3"-0.7" of the nebula. These STIS observations have revealed an ultra-fast collimated outflow relatively unaffected by the interaction with the AGB wind that is totally hidden in ground-based spectroscopic observations and HST images. The discovery of the pristine ultra-fast { 2300km/s} jet in He3-1475 is the first observational confirmation of the presence of collimated outflows as close as 10e16cm from the central star. Most importantly, the spatio-kinematic structure of the ultra-fast jet clearly rules out hydrodynamical collimation alone and favors magnetic wind collimation. Therefore, STIS observations provide a unique method of probing the structure, kinematics, and collimation mechanism of the elusive post-AGB winds. We now propose similar observations for a sample of bipolar PPNe with ongoing post-AGB ejections in order to investigate the frequency of jets like those in He3-1475 in other PPNe and elucidate their nature and collimation mechanism

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars (Placco+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placco, V. M.; Frebel, A.; Beers, T. C.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the observed frequencies of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars as a function of the metallicity in the Galaxy, using data from the literature with available high-resolution spectroscopy. Our analysis excludes stars exhibiting clear overabundances of neutron-capture elements and takes into account the expected depletion of surface carbon abundance that occurs due to CN processing on the upper red giant branch. This allows for the recovery of the initial carbon abundance of these stars, and thus for an accurate assessment of the frequencies of carbon-enhanced stars. The correction procedure we develop is based on stellar-evolution models and depends on the surface gravity, log g, of a given star. (2 data files).

  4. Carbon recombination line observations of the sharpless 140 region. [of early stars in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, G. R.; Brown, R. L.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Kakar, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon recombination-line emission has been detected at two frequencies from a dark cloud contiguous with the small H II region Sharpless 140. The observations show the dark cloud to be of unusually low temperature and to have a markedly inhomogeneous density distribution, with localized region of high density surrounding one or more embedded stars. The carbon is probably ionized by photons from both the exciting star of S140 and the embedded stars. The dark cloud and S140 apparently represent two stages of star formation which have occurred over a period of at least 500,000 years in adjacent regions of the same dark cloud.

  5. GALACTIC S STARS: INVESTIGATIONS OF COLOR, MOTION, AND SPECTRAL FEATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, Elizabeth; Green, Paul J.; Gray, Richard O.

    2011-09-01

    Known bright S stars, recognized as such by their enhanced s-process abundances and C/O ratio, are typically members of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) or the red giant branch. Few modern digital spectra for these objects have been published, from which intermediate resolution spectral indices and classifications could be derived. For published S stars, we find accurate positions using the Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and use the FAST spectrograph of the Tillinghast reflector on Mt. Hopkins to obtain the spectra of 57 objects. We make available a digital S star spectral atlas consisting of 14 spectra of S stars with diverse spectral features. We define and derive basic spectral indices that can help distinguish S stars from late-type (M) giants and carbon stars. We convolve all our spectra with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey bandpasses, and employ the resulting gri magnitudes together with 2MASS JHK{sub s} mags to investigate S star colors. These objects have colors similar to carbon and M stars, and are therefore difficult to distinguish by color alone. Using near- and mid-infrared colors from IRAS and Akari, we identify some of the stars as intrinsic (AGB) or extrinsic (with abundances enhanced by past mass transfer). We also use V band and 2MASS magnitudes to calculate a temperature index for stars in the sample. We analyze the proper motions and parallaxes of our sample stars to determine upper and lower limit absolute magnitudes and distances, and confirm that most are probably giants.

  6. The mass-loss return from evolved stars to the Large Magellanic Cloud. III. Dust properties for carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Sargent, B. A.; Matsuura, M.; Meixner, M.; Kemper, F.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Volk, K.; Speck, A. K.; Woods, P. M.; Gordon, K.; Marengo, M.; Sloan, G. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present a radiative transfer model for the circumstellar dust shell around a Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) long-period variable (LPV) previously studied as part of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) survey of the LMC. OGLE LMC LPV 28579 (SAGE J051306.40-690946.3) is a carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star for which we have Spitzer broadband photometry and spectra from the SAGE and SAGE-Spec programs along with broadband UBVIJHKs photometry. By modeling this source, we obtain a baseline set of dust properties to be used in the construction of a grid of models for carbon stars. We reproduce the spectral energy distribution of the source using a mixture of amorphous carbon and silicon carbide with 15% SiC by mass. The grain sizes are distributed according to the KMH model, with γ = 3.5, amin = 0.01 μm and a0 = 1.0 μm. The best-fit model produces an optical depth of 0.28 for the dust shell at the peak of the SiC feature (11.3 μm), with an inner radius of about 1430 R_⊙ or 4.4 times the stellar radius. The temperature at this inner radius is 1310 K. Assuming an expansion velocity of 10 km s-1, we obtain a dust mass-loss rate of 2.5 × 10-9 M_⊙ yr-1. We calculate a 15% variation in this mass-loss rate by testing the sensitivity of the fit to variation in the input parameters. We also present a simple model for the molecular gas in the extended atmosphere that could give rise to the 13.7 μm feature seen in the spectrum. We find that a combination of CO and C2H2 gas at an excitation temperature of about 1000 K and column densities of 3 × 1021 cm-2 and 1019 cm-2 respectively are able to reproduce the observations. Given that the excitation temperature is close to the temperature of the dust at the inner radius, most of the molecular contribution probably arises from this region. The luminosity corresponding to the first epoch of SAGE observations is 6580 L_⊙. For an effective temperature of about 3000 K, this implies a stellar mass of

  7. R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS ARE VIABLE FACTORIES OF PRE-SOLAR GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas, Amanda I.; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Hampel, Melanie

    2015-08-20

    We present a new theoretical estimate for the birthrate of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars that is in agreement with recent observational data. We find the current Galactic birthrate of RCB stars to be ≈25% of the Galactic rate of Type Ia supernovae, assuming that RCB stars are formed through the merger of carbon–oxygen and helium-rich white dwarfs. Our new RCB birthrate (1.8 × 10{sup −3} yr{sup −1}) is a factor of 10 lower than previous theoretical estimates. This results in roughly 180–540 RCB stars in the Galaxy, depending on the RCB lifetime. From the theoretical and observational estimates, we calculate the total dust production from RCB stars and compare this rate to dust production from novae and born-again asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We find that the amount of dust produced by RCB stars is comparable to the amounts produced by novae or born-again post-AGB stars, indicating that these merger objects are a viable source of carbonaceous pre-solar grains in the Galaxy. There are graphite grains with carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios consistent with the observed composition of RCB stars, adding weight to the suggestion that these rare objects are a source of stardust grains.

  8. Carbon enrichment of the evolved stars in the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, I.; White, J. R.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Guzman Ramirez, L.; Szyszka, C.; van Loon, J. Th.; Lagadec, E.; Jones, O. C.

    2012-12-01

    We present spectra of 1142 colour-selected stars in the direction of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal (Sgr dSph) galaxy, of which 1058 were taken with VLT/FLAMES multi-object spectrograph and 84 were taken with the SAAO Radcliffe 1.9-m telescope grating spectrograph. Spectroscopic membership is confirmed (at >99 per cent confidence) for 592 stars on the basis of their radial velocity, and spectral types are given. Very slow rotation is marginally detected around the galaxy's major axis. We identify five S stars and 23 carbon stars, of which all but four carbon stars are newly determined and all but one (PQ Sgr) are likely Sgr dSph members. We examine the onset of carbon richness in this metal-poor galaxy in the context of stellar models. We compare the stellar death rate (one star per 1000-1700 yr) with the known planetary nebula dynamical ages and find that the bulk population produce the observed (carbon-rich) planetary nebulae. We compute average lifetimes of S and carbon stars as 60-250 and 130-500 kyr, compared to a total thermal-pulsing asymptotic giant branch lifetime of 530-1330 kyr. We conclude by discussing the return of carbon-rich material to the interstellar medium.

  9. CEMP stars: possible hosts to carbon planets in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-08-01

    We explore the possibility of planet formation in the carbon-rich protoplanetary discs of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, possible relics of the early Universe. The chemically anomalous abundance patterns ([C/Fe] ≥ 0.7) in this subset of low-mass stars suggest pollution by primordial core-collapsing supernovae ejecta that are particularly rich in carbon dust grains. By comparing the dust-settling time-scale in the protoplanetary discs of CEMP stars to the expected disc lifetime (assuming dissipation via photoevaporation), we determine the maximum distance rmax from the host CEMP star at which carbon-rich planetesimal formation is possible, as a function of the host star's [C/H] abundance. We then use our linear relation between rmax and [C/H], along with the theoretical mass-radius relation derived for a solid, pure carbon planet, to characterize potential planetary transits across host CEMP stars. Given that the related transits are detectable with current and upcoming space-based transit surveys, we suggest initiating an observational programme to search for carbon planets around CEMP stars in hopes of shedding light on the question of how early planetary systems may have formed after the big bang.

  10. Star-like superalkali cations featuring planar pentacoordinate carbon.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Chang; Tian, Wen-Juan; Wang, Ying-Jin; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Wu, Yan-Bo; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2016-06-28

    Superalkali cations, known to possess low vertical electron affinities (VEAs), high vertical detachment energies, and large highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy gaps, are intriguing chemical species. Thermodynamically, such species need to be the global minima in order to serve as the promising targets for experimental realization. In this work, we propose the strategies of polyhalogenation and polyalkalination for designing the superalkali cations. By applying these strategies, the local-minimum planar pentacoordinate carbon (ppC) cluster CBe5 can be modified to form a series of star-like superalkali ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5 (+) (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) cations containing a CBe5 moiety. Polyhalogenation and polyalkalination on the CBe5 unit may help eliminate the high reactivity of bare CBe5 molecule by covering the reactive Be atoms with noble halogen anions and alkali cations. Computational exploration of the potential energy surfaces reveals that the star-like ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5 (+) (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) clusters are the true global minima of the systems. The predicted VEAs for CBe5X5 (+) range from 3.01 to 3.71 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 2.12-2.51 eV for X = Li, Na, K, being below the lower bound of the atomic ionization potential of 3.89 eV in the periodic table. Large HOMO-LUMO energy gaps are also revealed for the species: 10.76-11.07 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 4.99-6.91 eV for X = Li, Na, K. These designer clusters represent the first series of superalkali cations with a ppC center. Bonding analyses show five Be-X-Be three-center two-electron (3c-2e) σ bonds for the peripheral bonding, whereas the central C atom is associated with one 6c-2e π bond and three 6c-2e σ bonds, rendering (π and σ) double aromaticity. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the CBe5 motif is robust in the clusters. As planar hypercoordination carbon species are often thermodynamically

  11. Star-like superalkali cations featuring planar pentacoordinate carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin-Chang; Tian, Wen-Juan; Wang, Ying-Jin; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Wu, Yan-Bo; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2016-06-01

    Superalkali cations, known to possess low vertical electron affinities (VEAs), high vertical detachment energies, and large highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy gaps, are intriguing chemical species. Thermodynamically, such species need to be the global minima in order to serve as the promising targets for experimental realization. In this work, we propose the strategies of polyhalogenation and polyalkalination for designing the superalkali cations. By applying these strategies, the local-minimum planar pentacoordinate carbon (ppC) cluster CBe5 can be modified to form a series of star-like superalkali ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5+ (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) cations containing a CBe5 moiety. Polyhalogenation and polyalkalination on the CBe5 unit may help eliminate the high reactivity of bare CBe5 molecule by covering the reactive Be atoms with noble halogen anions and alkali cations. Computational exploration of the potential energy surfaces reveals that the star-like ppC or quasi-ppC CBe5X5+ (X = F, Cl, Br, Li, Na, K) clusters are the true global minima of the systems. The predicted VEAs for CBe5X5+ range from 3.01 to 3.71 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 2.12-2.51 eV for X = Li, Na, K, being below the lower bound of the atomic ionization potential of 3.89 eV in the periodic table. Large HOMO-LUMO energy gaps are also revealed for the species: 10.76-11.07 eV for X = F, Cl, Br and 4.99-6.91 eV for X = Li, Na, K. These designer clusters represent the first series of superalkali cations with a ppC center. Bonding analyses show five Be-X-Be three-center two-electron (3c-2e) σ bonds for the peripheral bonding, whereas the central C atom is associated with one 6c-2e π bond and three 6c-2e σ bonds, rendering (π and σ) double aromaticity. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the CBe5 motif is robust in the clusters. As planar hypercoordination carbon species are often thermodynamically unstable and

  12. Mass return to the interstellar medium from highly-evolved carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latter, W. B.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Hacking, P.; Bally, J.; Black, J.

    1986-01-01

    Data produced by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) was surveyed at the mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. Visually-identified carbon stars in the 12/25/60 micron color-color diagram were plotted, along with the location of a number of mass-losing stars that lie near the location of the carbon stars, but are not carbon rich. The final sample consisted of 619 objects, which were estimated to be contaminated by 7 % noncarbon-rich objects. The mass return rate was estimated for all evolved circumstellar envelopes. The IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC) was also searched for the entire class of stars with excess emission. Mass-loss rates, lifetimes, and birthrates for evolved stars were also estimated.

  13. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    2011-03-01

    in the halo; 32. Baade-Wesselink analyses of field vs. cluster RR lyrae variables; 33. The rotation of population II A stars; 34. Horizontal branch stars and possibly related objects; 35. A new group of post-AGB objects - the hot carbon-poor stars; 36. MK classifications of hot stars in the halo 37. Photometry of XX Virginis and V716 Ophiuchi and the period luminosity relations of type II cepheids; 38. Rotation and oxygen line strengths in blue horizontal branch stars; Part V. Miscellaneous: 39. UBV CCd photometry of the halo of M31; 40. Can stars still form in the galactic halo?; 41. The ultraviolet imaging telescope on the Astro -1 and Astro -2 missions; 42. Are analogues of hot subdwarf stars responsible for the UVX phenomenon in galaxy nucleli; 43. A survey for field BHB stars outside the solar circle; 44. Post-AGB A and F supergiants as standard candles; 45. The extended horizontal-branch: a challenge for stellar evolution theory; 46. Astronomical patterns in fractals: the work of A. G. Davis Philip on the Mandelbrot Set; Part VI. Summary: 47. Final remarks; Author index; Subject index.

  14. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    1994-08-01

    in the halo; 32. Baade-Wesselink analyses of field vs. cluster RR lyrae variables; 33. The rotation of population II A stars; 34. Horizontal branch stars and possibly related objects; 35. A new group of post-AGB objects - the hot carbon-poor stars; 36. MK classifications of hot stars in the halo 37. Photometry of XX Virginis and V716 Ophiuchi and the period luminosity relations of type II cepheids; 38. Rotation and oxygen line strengths in blue horizontal branch stars; Part V. Miscellaneous: 39. UBV CCd photometry of the halo of M31; 40. Can stars still form in the galactic halo?; 41. The ultraviolet imaging telescope on the Astro -1 and Astro -2 missions; 42. Are analogues of hot subdwarf stars responsible for the UVX phenomenon in galaxy nucleli; 43. A survey for field BHB stars outside the solar circle; 44. Post-AGB A and F supergiants as standard candles; 45. The extended horizontal-branch: a challenge for stellar evolution theory; 46. Astronomical patterns in fractals: the work of A. G. Davis Philip on the Mandelbrot Set; Part VI. Summary: 47. Final remarks; Author index; Subject index.

  15. Carbon Stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud: Luminosities, Colors, and Implications for the History of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Edgardo; Frogel, Jay A.

    1996-12-01

    We present RI and JHK photometry for 888 and 204 carbon (C) stars, respectively, of the 1035 C stars found by Blanco and his collaborators in 52 fields of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The results of our analysis of the data fall into two categories: (1) Derivation of the physical properties of the stars and a comparison with models. (2) The variation in C star properties with position in the LMC and implications for the history of star formation. For the 197 stars with data in all 5 photometric bands, we derive an equation that gives m_bol_(+/-0.34 mag) from the R_0_ and I_0_ data alone. With m_bol_ for 895 LMC C stars we derive a luminosity function that is closely similar to those for previous (but an order of magnitude smaller) samples of both field and cluster LMC C stars. We find only two C stars brighter than m_bol_ = 12.5 and fewer than 10 fainter than 15.5. A comparison of our derived bolometric magnitudes and effective temperatures for the LMC C stars with the models of Lattanzio [ApJ, 311,708(1986); ApJS, 76,215 (1991)] leads us to conclude that ~1 M_sun_ is the minimum mass required to produce a Population II C star. In addition, the observed lower limit we find to the C star luminosities corresponds to the luminosity at which a 1 M_sun_ Pop II star is predicted to have its first major thermal pulse. From a comparison of field and cluster C star color-magnitude diagrams, we conclude that the range in age and metallicity of the LMC field C stars is at least as great as those from LMC clusters. The metallicity range of the field C stars, though, appears to extend to a significantly higher value based on our finding that red C stars with (J - K)_0_ > 1.9 are three to four times more common in the field sample than in cluster stars and a similar difference previously noted between field and cluster M giants [Frogel & Blanco, ApJ, 365, 168 (1990)]. For each field observed we derive a luminosity m_bol_(t) that should be related to the transition

  16. Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen Abundances of Selected Stars in the Hertzsprung Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanture, Andrew D.; Wallerstein, George

    1999-01-01

    The iron, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances for several stars whose characteristics place them in the Hertzsprung gap have been derived from high-resolution spectra. These stars were selected based on the fact that previous studies have shown them to have peculiar carbon, nitrogen, or lithium abundances considering their position in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. When combined with the lithium abundances derived by Wallerstein and coworkers, the carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen abundances indicate that the sample of stars can generally be broken into two categories-lower luminosity dwarfs or subgiants that are unmixed and higher luminosity mixed giants. Among the sample are two stars, HR 7606 and HR 8626, which previously have been identified by Bidelman as ``low-velocity CH stars.'' These stars show metallicities of [Fe/H]~-0.5 and solar abundances of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The strength of the CH band in these stars is probably an artifact of a mild metal deficiency and the absence of substantial mixing of CN processed materials to the surface of the star rather than an unusual nucleosynthetic history.

  17. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of Carbon Stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-10

    using the bandpasses for the IRAC 8 /am and MIPS 24 pim filters on the carbon stars in our sample from the SMC. All of these sources Spitzer Space...curves. spectra using the bandpasses for the IRAC 8 /m and the MIPS These stars all show evidence of pulsation, with a typical period 24/zm filters

  18. Webinar Presentations: STAR Black Carbon Webinar Series (11/21 and 12/9)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These presentations were given at the STAR Black Carbon Webinar Series held on Nov. 21, 2016 (Topic: Interactions with Water) and on Dec. 9, 2016 (Topic: Representation at Different Geographic Scales).

  19. Thermal Energy Corporation in Houston, Texas Earns ENERGY STAR Award for Carbon Pollution Reductions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (June 29, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently recognized Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO) of Houston, Texas with the ENERGY STAR Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Award. TECO substantially reduced emissions of carbon

  20. Spacially-resolved STIS spectroscopy of young H-deficient central stars of PN.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, O.; Cohen, M.; Barlow, M. J.

    2000-12-01

    Hydrogen-deficient central stars of planetary nebula (PN) present a mystery and a challenge in the evolution of low mass stars after they ascend the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). This class represents about 20% of all known central stars and seems to evolve as a result of an outburst event early in the life of the post-AGB star. During this event, which is thought to be similar to a helium shell outburst, ALL the hydrogen is burned or ejected, leaving a central star made of helium and carbon, which can later develop strong mass-loss. SwSt1 is one such star. It has a very young PN, with high density and a very small apparent radius. Its star is hot (35000K) and has a substantial mass-loss. Because of its youth, this object, together with a handful of central stars, can be used to trace the evolution of this class back to their AGB ancestry and to the event that made them different from H-rich central stars. Recently-acquired spacially-resolved STIS observations, show density and abundance layering in the PN gas, which can be used to trace the object's history. In this paper, the HST observations are analyzed with stellar non-LTE codes, to determine the stellar parameters and hence the stellar evolutionary status (effective temperature and radius). Nebular photo-ionization codes, which use the synthetic stellar atmosphere as input, are then used to model the nebular emission as a function of radius. Probing into as little as the last 500 years in the life of this class of objects using their young PN, can characterize the event that is responsible for their hydrogen-deficient nature. Mass-loss on and after the AGB is still one of the least understood events in stellar astrophysics. Progress in understanding the super-efficient mass-loss that leads to central stars stripped of hydrogen would constitute a significant advance in characterizing AGB mass-loss in general.

  1. THE PTI CARBON STAR ANGULAR SIZE SURVEY: EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES AND NON-SPHERICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Van Belle, Gerard T.; Paladini, Claudia; Hron, Josef; Aringer, Bernhard; Ciardi, David E-mail: claudia.paladini@univie.ac.at E-mail: bernhard.aringer@oapd.inaf.it

    2013-09-20

    We report new interferometric angular diameter observations of 41 carbon stars observed with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer. Two of these stars are CH carbon stars and represent the first such measurements of this subtype. Of these, 39 have Yamashita spectral classes and are of sufficiently high quality that we can determine the dependence of effective temperature on spectral type. We find that there is a tendency for the effective temperature to increase with increasing temperature index by ∼120 K per step, starting at T{sub EFF} ≅ 2500 K for C3, y, although there is a large amount of scatter in this relationship. Overall, the median effective temperature of the carbon star sample is 2800 ± 270 K and the median linear radius is 360 ± 100 R{sub ☉}. We also find agreement, on average within 15 K, with the T{sub EFF} determinations of Bergeat et al. and a refinement of the carbon star angular size prediction based on V and K magnitudes is presented that is good to an rms of 12%. A subsample of our stars have sufficient (u, v) coverage to permit non-spherical modeling of their photospheres, and a general tendency for detection of statistically significant departures from sphericity with increasing interferometric signal-to-noise is seen. The implications of most—and potentially all—carbon stars being non-spherical is considered in the context of surface inhomogeneities and a rotation-mass-loss connection.

  2. Outer layers of a carbon star: The view from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Ensman, Lisa M.; Alexander, D. R.; Avrett, E. H.; Brown, A.; Carpenter, K. G.; Eriksson, K.; Gustafsson, B.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Judge, Philip D.

    1995-01-01

    To advance our understanding of the relationship between stellar chromospheres and mass loss, which is a common property of carbon stars and other asymptotic giant branch stars, we have obtained ultraviolet spectra of the nearby N-type carbon star UU Aur using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In this paper we describe the HST observations, identify spectral features in both absorption and emission, and attempt to infer the velocity field in the chromosphere, upper troposphere, and circumstellar envelope from spectral line shifts. A mechanism for producing fluoresced emission to explain a previously unobserved emission line is proposed. Some related ground-based observations are also described.

  3. Binary properties of CH and carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, A.; Van Eck, S.; Van Winckel, H.; Merle, T.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Udry, S.; Masseron, T.; Lenaerts, L.; Waelkens, C.

    2016-02-01

    The HERMES spectrograph installed on the 1.2-m Mercator telescope has been used to monitor the radial velocity of 13 low-metallicity carbon stars, among which seven carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars and six CH stars (including HIP 53522, a new member of the family, as revealed by a detailed abundance study). All stars but one show clear evidence for binarity. New orbits are obtained for eight systems. The sample covers an extended range in orbital periods, extending from 3.4 d (for the dwarf carbon star HE 0024-2523) to about 54 yr (for the CH star HD 26, the longest known among barium, CH, and extrinsic S stars). Three systems exhibit low-amplitude velocity variations with periods close to 1 yr superimposed on a long-term trend. In the absence of an accurate photometric monitoring of these systems, it is not clear yet whether these variations are the signature of a very low-mass companion or of regular envelope pulsations. The period - eccentricity (P - e) diagram for the 40 low-metallicity carbon stars with orbits now available shows no difference between CH and CEMP-s stars (the latter corresponding to those CEMP stars enriched in s-process elements, as are CH stars). We suggest that they must be considered as one and the same family and that their different names only stem from historical reasons. Indeed, these two families have as well very similar mass-function distributions, corresponding to companions with masses in the range 0.5-0.7 M⊙, indicative of white-dwarf companions, adopting 0.8-0.9 M⊙ for the primary component. This result confirms that CH and CEMP-s stars obey the same mass-transfer scenario as their higher-metallicity analogues, barium stars. The P - e diagrams of barium, CH, and CEMP-s stars are indeed very similar. They reveal two different groups of systems: one with short orbital periods (P< 1000 d) and mostly circular or almost circular orbits, and another with longer period and eccentric (e> 0.1) orbits. These two groups either

  4. Studying evolved stars with Herschel observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Santos, João Manuel

    2016-07-01

    A systematic inspection of the far-infrared (FIR) properties of evolved stars allows not only to constrain physical models, but also to understand the chemical evolution that takes place in the end of their lives. In this work we intend to study the circumstellar envelopes (CSE) on a sample of stars in the THROES catalogue from AGB/post-AGB stars to planetary nebulae using photometry and spectroscopy provided by the PACS instrument on-board Herschel telescope. In the first part we are interested in obtaining an estimate of the size of FIR emitting region and to sort our targets in two classes: point-like and extended. Secondly, we focus on the molecular component of the envelope traced by carbon monoxide (CO) rotational lines. We conduct a line survey on a sample of evolved stars by identifying and measuring flux of both 12CO and 13CO isotopologues in the PACS range, while looking at the overall properties of the sample. Lastly, we will be interested in obtaining physical parameters of the CSE, namely gas temperature, mass and mass-loss rate on a sample of carbon stars. For that, we make use of PACS large wavelength coverage, which enables the simultaneous study of a large number of CO transitions, to perform the rotational diagram analysis. We report the detection of CO emission in a high number of stars from the catalogue, which were mostly classified as point-like targets with a few exceptions of planetary nebulae. High J rotational number transitions were detected in a number of targets, revealing the presence of a significant amount of hot gas (T ˜ 400-900 K) and high mass-loss rates. We conclude that Herschel/PACS is in a privileged position to detect a new population of warmer gas, typically missed in sub-mm/mm observations.

  5. On Helium-Dominated Stellar Evolution: The Mysterious Role of the O(He)-Type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reindl, N.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Kruk, J. W.; Todt, H.

    2014-01-01

    Context. About a quarter of all post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are hydrogen-deficient. Stellar evolutionary models explain the carbon-dominated H-deficient stars by a (very) late thermal pulse scenario where the hydrogen-rich envelope is mixed with the helium-rich intershell layer. Depending on the particular time at which the final flash occurs, the entire hydrogen envelope may be burned. In contrast, helium-dominated post-AGB stars and their evolution are not yet understood. Aims. A small group of very hot, helium-dominated stars is formed by O(He)-type stars. A precise analysis of their photospheric abundances will establish constraints to their evolution. Methods. We performed a detailed spectral analysis of ultraviolet and optical spectra of four O(He) stars by means of state-of-the-art non-LTE model-atmosphere techniques. Results. We determined effective temperatures, surface gravities, and the abundances of H, He, C, N, O, F, Ne, Si, P, S, Ar, and Fe. By deriving upper limits for the mass-loss rates of the O(He) stars, we found that they do not exhibit enhanced mass-loss. The comparison with evolutionary models shows that the status of the O(He) stars remains uncertain. Their abundances match predictions of a double helium white dwarf (WD) merger scenario, suggesting that they might be the progeny of the compact and of the luminous helium-rich sdO-type stars. The existence of planetary nebulae that do not show helium enrichment around every other O(He) star precludes a merger origin for these stars. These stars must have formed in a different way, for instance via enhanced mass-loss during their post-AGB evolution or a merger within a common-envelope (CE) of a CO-WD and a red giant or AGB star. Conclusions. A helium-dominated stellar evolutionary sequence exists that may be fed by different types of mergers or CE scenarios. It appears likely that all these pass through the O(He) phase just before they become WDs.

  6. A neutron star with a carbon atmosphere in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wynn C G; Heinke, Craig O

    2009-11-05

    The surface of hot neutron stars is covered by a thin atmosphere. If there is accretion after neutron-star formation, the atmosphere could be composed of light elements (H or He); if no accretion takes place or if thermonuclear reactions occur after accretion, heavy elements (for example, Fe) are expected. Despite detailed searches, observations have been unable to confirm the atmospheric composition of isolated neutron stars. Here we report an analysis of archival observations of the compact X-ray source in the centre of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. We show that a carbon atmosphere neutron star (with low magnetic field) produces a good fit to the spectrum. Our emission model, in contrast with others, implies an emission size consistent with theoretical predictions for the radius of neutron stars. This result suggests that there is nuclear burning in the surface layers and also identifies the compact source as a very young ( approximately 330-year-old) neutron star.

  7. OT2_dneufeld_6: Probing the mystery of water vapour in carbon-rich stars: a search for the H2-17O and H2-18O isotopologues of water toward IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, D.

    2011-09-01

    Using the HIFI instrument, we propose to investigate further the puzzling - but widespread appearance of water vapour in carbon-rich stars. Following up on our discovery that water vapour is present in the warm inner envelope of the carbon rich AGB star IRC+10216, we will carry out a sensitive search for the minor isotopologues, H2-17O and H2-18O. The abundances of these species will provide a critical test of competing models for the origin of the water vapour present in the inner envelope. If the production of water vapor is initiated by the photodissociation of CO by UV radiation, as proposed by Decin et al. (2010) and Agndez et al. (2010), then enhancements in the H2-17O/H2-16O and H2-18O/H2-16O ratios are expected; however, if non-equilibrium chemistry initiated by pulsationally-driven shock waves is responsible - an alternative mechanism proposed recently by Cherchneff (2011) - then no such enhancement will be observed.

  8. The low Sr/Ba ratio on some extremely metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spite, M.; Spite, F.; Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; François, P.; Sbordone, L.

    2014-11-01

    Context. It has been noted that, in classical extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars, the abundance ratio of two well-observed neutron-capture elements, Sr and Ba, is always higher than [Sr/Ba] = -0.5, which is the value of the solar r-only process; however, a handful of EMP stars have recently been found with a very low Sr/Ba ratio. Aims: We try to understand the origin of this anomaly by comparing the abundance pattern of the elements in these stars and in the classical EMP stars. Methods: For a rigorous comparison with previous data, four stars with very low Sr/Ba ratios were observed and analyzed in the same way as in the First Stars program: analysis within LTE approximation through 1D (hydrostatic) model atmosphere, providing homogeneous abundances of nine neutron-capture elements. Results: In CS 22950-173, the only turnoff star of the sample, the Sr/Ba ratio is, in fact, found to be higher than the r-only solar ratio, so the star is discarded. The remaining stars (CS 29493-090, CS 30322-023, HE 305-4520) are cool evolved giants. They do not present a clear carbon enrichment, but in evolved giants C is partly burned into N, and owing to their high N abundance, they could still have initially been carbon-rich EMP stars (CEMP). The abundances of Na to Mg present similar anomalies to those in CEMP stars. The abundance patterns of the neutron-capture elements in the three stars are strikingly similar to a theoretical s-process pattern. This pattern could at first be attributed to pollution by a nearby AGB, but none of the stars presents a clear variation in the radial velocity indicating the presence of a companion. The stellar parameters seem to exclude any internal pollution in a TP-AGB phase for at least two of these stars. The possibility that the stars are early-AGB stars polluted during the core He flash does not seem compatible with the theory. Based on observations obtained with the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory, Chile (ID 077.D-0299(A) PI

  9. An Explosive End to Intermediate-Mass Zero-Metallicity Stars and Early Universe Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Herbert H.B.; Stancliffe, Richard J.; Tout, Christopher A.

    2008-03-11

    We use the Cambridge stellar evolution code STARS to model the evolution of 5 M{sub {center_dot}} and 7 M{sub {center_dot}} zero-metallicity stars. With enhanced resolution at the hydrogen and helium burning shell in the AGB phases, we are able to model the entire thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase. The helium luminosities of the thermal pulses are significantly lower than in higher metallicity stars so there is no third dredge-up. The envelope is enriched in nitrogen by hot-bottom burning of carbon that was previously mixed in during second dredge-up. There is no s-process enrichment owing to the lack of third dredge up. The thermal pulses grow weaker as the core mass increases and they eventually cease. From then on the star enters a quiescent burning phase which lasts until carbon ignites at the centre of the star when the CO core mass is 1.36 M{sub {center_dot}}. With such a high degeneracy and a core mass so close to the Chandrasekhar mass, we expect these stars to explode as type 1.5 supernovae, very similar to Type Ia supernovae but inside a hydrogen rich envelope.

  10. Evidence of AGB Pollution in Galactic Globular Clusters from the Mg-Al Anticorrelations Observed by the APOGEE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Dell'Agli, F.; D'Antona, F.; Mészáros, Sz.; Lucatello, S.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Shetrone, M.; Tailo, M.; Tang, Baitian; Zamora, O.

    2016-11-01

    We study the formation of multiple populations in globular clusters (GCs), under the hypothesis that stars in the second generation formed from the winds of intermediate-mass stars, ejected during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase, possibly diluted with pristine gas, sharing the same chemical composition of first-generation stars. To this aim, we use the recent Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) data, which provide the surface chemistry of a large sample of giant stars, belonging to clusters that span a wide metallicity range. The APOGEE data set is particularly suitable to discriminate among the various pollution scenarios proposed so far, as it provides the surface abundances of Mg and Al, the two elements involved in a nuclear channel extremely sensitive to the temperature, hence to the metallicity of the polluters. The present analysis shows a remarkable agreement between the observations and the theoretical yields from massive AGB stars. In particular, the observed extension of the depletion of Mg and O and the increase in Al is well reproduced by the models and the trend with the metallicity is also fully accounted for. This study further supports the idea that AGB stars were the key players in the pollution of the intra-cluster medium, from which additional generations of stars formed in GCs.

  11. S-process nucleosynthesis in AGB models with the FST prescription for convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagüe, A.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Ventura, P.; Lugaro, M.

    The chemical evolution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars depends greatly on the input physics (e.g., mass loss recipe, convective model). Variations in the hot bottom burning (HBB) strength, third dredge-up (TDU) efficiency and AGB evolutionary timescale are among the main consequences of adopting different input physics. The ATON evolutionary code stands apart from others in that it uses the Blöcker mass loss prescription and the Full Spectrum of Turbulence (FST) convective model. We have developed an s-process module for ATON by extending the element network from 30 to 320 elements, which uses the physical inputs (such as temperature or density) calculated by ATON. Here we present the first preliminary results of s-process nucleosynthesis for ATON AGB models with different progenitor masses. These preliminary results are compared with predictions from other AGB nucleosynthesis models that use different input physics. We also outline our future tasks to improve the current s-process ATON simulations.

  12. Heavy Metal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    particular to "resolve" it among the many absorption lines from other elements, present in the stellar spectrum in this wavelength region. Moreover, a fairly large telescope is needed as the stars to be observed are relatively rare, hence distant and faint for this kind of demanding observations. The Belgian and French astronomers decided to use the Coude Echelle Spectrometer (CES) at the ESO 3.6-m telescope on La Silla, a telescope/instrument combination offering some hope of success for these difficult observations. Spectra of three southern stars, HD 187861, HD 196944 and HD 224959 , were obtained during two nights in September 2000 and found to be of excellent quality. The scientists were very pleased to find that the Lead absorption line was clearly present and very strong in the spectra of all three stars . A subsequent, detailed analysis demonstrated that the three stars all have a substantial overabundance of Lead. Moreover, from the measured abundances of other elements in these spectra, it is also clear that this Lead has been formed in the s-process . The astronomers were able to prove that the Lead cannot originate from the competing "r-process" that occurs in other environments like supernova explosions. " This is the first detection of a Lead-star ", explains Sophie Van Eck from the Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique of the Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). " These stars are almost exclusively enriched with Lead. Moreover, the abundances in all three stars show a remarkable similarity ." How does the s-process operate? The high abundance of Lead in these otherwise low-metallicity stars also provides detailed clues on how the s-process operates inside the AGB stars. When a Carbon-13 nucleus (i.e. a nucleus with 6 protons and 7 neutrons [2]) is hit by a Helium-4 nucleus (2 protons and 2 neutrons), they fuse to form Oxygen-16 (8 protons and 8 neutrons). In this process - as can be seen by adding the numbers - one neutron is released. It is exactly

  13. The Investment Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an AGB series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices included in this text support the objectives of board committees:…

  14. The Compensation Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  15. The Audit Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staisloff, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  16. The Executive Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legon, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  17. 2011 AGB Survey of Higher Education Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report, the second of AGB's studies of higher education governance, documents the extent to which college and university boards are following good-governance practices. In addition, it takes a focused look at board engagement to determine the degree to which governing boards are actively, intellectually, and strategically involved with their…

  18. The Facilities Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Harvey H.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  19. Binary Blue Metal-poor Stars: Evidence for Asymptotic Giant Branch Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Christopher; Preston, George W.; Cowan, John J.

    2003-07-01

    We present new abundance analyses of six blue metal-poor (BMP) stars with very low iron abundances ([Fe/H]<-2), based on new high-resolution echelle spectra. Three are spectroscopic binaries, and three have constant radial velocities. The chemical compositions of these two groups are very different, as the binary BMP stars have large enhancements of carbon and neutron-capture elements that are products of s-process nucleosynthesis. One star, CS 29497-030, has an extreme enhancement of lead, [Pb/Fe]=+3.7, the largest abundance in any star yet discovered. It probably also has an oxygen overabundance compared to the other BMP stars of our sample. The binary BMP stars must have attained their status via mass transfer during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolutions of their companion stars, which are now unseen and most likely are compact objects. We have not found any examples of AGB mass transfer among BMP binaries with [Fe/H]>-2.

  20. Barium isotopic composition of mainstream silicon carbides from Murchison: Constraints for s-process nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nan; Davis, Andrew M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Savina, Michael R.; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Straniero, Oscar; Cristallo, Sergio; Gyngard, Frank; Willingham, David G.; Pignatari, Marco; Herwig, Falk

    2014-05-01

    We present barium, carbon, and silicon isotopic compositions of 38 acid-cleaned presolar SiC grains from Murchison. Comparison with previous data shows that acid washing is highly effective in removing barium contamination. Strong depletions in δ({sup 138}Ba/{sup 136}Ba) values are found, down to –400‰, which can only be modeled with a flatter {sup 13}C profile within the {sup 13}C pocket than is normally used. The dependence of δ({sup 138}Ba/{sup 136}Ba) predictions on the distribution of {sup 13}C within the pocket in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models allows us to probe the {sup 13}C profile within the {sup 13}C pocket and the pocket mass in AGB stars. In addition, we provide constraints on the {sup 22}Ne(α, n){sup 25}Mg rate in the stellar temperature regime relevant to AGB stars, based on δ({sup 134}Ba/{sup 136}Ba) values of mainstream grains. We found two nominally mainstream grains with strongly negative δ({sup 134}Ba/{sup 136}Ba) values that cannot be explained by any of the current AGB model calculations. Instead, such negative values are consistent with the intermediate neutron capture process (i process), which is activated by the very late thermal pulse during the post-AGB phase and characterized by a neutron density much higher than the s process. These two grains may have condensed around post-AGB stars. Finally, we report abundances of two p-process isotopes, {sup 130}Ba and {sup 132}Ba, in single SiC grains. These isotopes are destroyed in the s process in AGB stars. By comparing their abundances with respect to that of {sup 135}Ba, we conclude that there is no measurable decay of {sup 135}Cs (t {sub 1/2} = 2.3 Ma) to {sup 135}Ba in individual SiC grains, indicating condensation of barium, but not cesium into SiC grains before {sup 135}Cs decayed.

  1. Polarization maser observations of late-type stars at OH 1665 and 1667 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonidakis, I.; Chapman, J. M.; Deacon, R. M.; Green, A. J.

    2014-10-01

    We present full-polarization observations, taken with the Parkes radio telescope, of the OH masers at 1665 and 1667 MHz in 34 evolved stars comprising 25 post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (post-AGB) stars and nine high-mass AGB stars (known as LI sources). The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the OH mainline polarization properties of post-AGB stars and high-mass AGB stars and to determine whether there is an association between polarization properties and evolutionary age. Circular and/or linear polarization was detected from 21 of the 34 observed stars. Linear polarization was detected as often as circular polarization, and was relatively more common in the 1667 MHz line. Circular polarization is stronger at 1665 MHz. The massive AGB stars appear to have the strongest magnetic fields. For the post-AGB stars there is a trend for increasing magnetic field strength at the location of the OH mainline masers with increasing post-AGB age. We infer that changes to the stellar magnetic fields play a significant role in the emergence of non-spherical morphologies in post-AGB stars. Six sources show narrow linearly polarized features at 1667 MHz with no corresponding circular polarization at 1667 MHz, that are interpreted as candidate π-components. In one source, a candidate π-component is identified through a Zeeman triplet.

  2. Evolution models from the AGB to the PNe and the rapid evolution of SAO 244567

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawlor, Timothy M.; Sebzda, Steven; Peterson, Zach

    2015-08-01

    We present evolution calculations from the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) to the Planetary Nebula (PNe) phase for models of mass 1 M⊙ over a range of metallicities from primordial, Z = 10-14, through near solar, Z = 0.02. Using our grid of models, we determine a central star mass dependence on initial metallicity. We also present a range of low masses for our low to very low metal models. The understanding of these objects is an important part of galactic evolution and the evolution of the composition of the universe over a broad range of red shits. For our low Z models, we find key differences in how they cross the HR diagram to the PNe phase, compared with models with higher initial Z. Some of our models experience the so called AGB Final Thermal Pulse (AFTP), which is a helium pulse that occurs while leaving the AGB and causes a rapid looping evolution while evolving between the AGB and PN phase. We use these models to make comparisons to the central star of the Stingray Nebula, SAO 244567. This object has been observed to be rapidly evolving (heating) over more than the last 50 years and is the central star of the youngest known planetary nebula. These two characteristics are similar to what is expected for AFTP models. It is a short lived phase that is related to, but different than, very late thermal pulse objects such as Sakurai’s Object, FG Sge, and V605 Aql. These objects experienced a similar thermal pulse, but later on the white dwarf cooling track.

  3. DEEP MIXING IN EVOLVED STARS. II. INTERPRETING Li ABUNDANCES IN RED GIANT BRANCH AND ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Palmerini, S.; Busso, M.; Maiorca, E.; Cristallo, S.; Abia, C.; Uttenthaler, S.; Gialanella, L.

    2011-11-01

    We reanalyze the problem of Li abundances in red giants of nearly solar metallicity. After outlining the problems affecting our knowledge of the Li content in low-mass stars (M {<=} 3 M{sub sun}), we discuss deep-mixing models for the red giant branch stages suitable to account for the observed trends and for the correlated variations of the carbon isotope ratio; we find that Li destruction in these phases is limited to masses below about 2.3 M{sub sun}. Subsequently, we concentrate on the final stages of evolution for both O-rich and C-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Here, the constraints on extra-mixing phenomena previously derived from heavier nuclei (from C to Al), coupled to recent updates in stellar structure models (including both the input physics and the set of reaction rates used), are suitable to account for the observations of Li abundances below A(Li) {identical_to} log {epsilon}(Li) {approx_equal} 1.5 (and sometimes more). Also, their relations with other nucleosynthesis signatures of AGB phases (like the abundance of F, and the C/O and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios) can be explained. This requires generally moderate efficiencies (M-dot < or approx. 0.3-0.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) for non-convective mass transport. At such rates, slow extra mixing does not remarkably modify Li abundances in early AGB phases; on the other hand, faster mixing encounters a physical limit in destroying Li, set by the mixing velocity. Beyond this limit, Li starts to be produced; therefore, its destruction on the AGB is modest. Li is then significantly produced by the third dredge up. We also show that effective circulation episodes, while not destroying Li, would easily bring the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios to equilibrium, contrary to the evidence in most AGB stars, and would burn F beyond the limits shown by C(N) giants. Hence, we do not confirm the common idea that efficient extra mixing drastically reduces the Li content of C stars with respect to K

  4. Carbon star survey in the Local Group. VII. NGC 3109 a galaxy without a stellar halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, S.; Battinelli, P.; Letarte, B.

    2003-11-01

    We present a CFH12K wide field survey of the carbon star population in and around NGC 3109. Carbon stars, the brightest members of the intermediate-age population, were found nearly exclusively in and near the disk of NGC 3109, ruling out the existence of an extensive intermediate-age halo like the one found in NGC 6822. Over 400 carbon stars identified have = -4.71, confirming the nearly universality of mean magnitude of C star populations in Local Group galaxies. Star counts over the field reveal that NGC 3109 is a truncated disk shaped galaxy without an extensive stellar halo. The minor axis star counts reach the foreground density between 4' and 5', a distance that can be explained by an inclined disk rather than a spheroidal halo. We calculate a global C/M ratio of 1.75 +/- 0.20, a value expected for such a metal poor galaxy. The complete Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/410/795

  5. Compact reflection nebulae, a transit phase of evolution from post-AGB to planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Slijkhuis, S.

    1989-01-01

    In a search of the optical counter-part of candidates of protoplanetary nebulae on the plates of UK Schmidt, ESO Schmidt, and POSS, five compact reflection nebulae associated with post-AGB stars were found. A simplified model (dust shell is spherical symmetric, expansion velocity of dust shell is constant, Q(sub sca)(lambda) is isotropic, and the dust grain properties are uniform) is used to estimate the visible condition of the dust shell due to the scattering of the core star's light. Under certain conditions the compact reflection nebulae can be seen of the POSS or ESO/SRC survey plates.

  6. Trigonometric Parallaxes of Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    TRIGONOMETRIC PARALLAXES OF CENTRAL STARS OF PLANETARY NEBULAE Hugh C. Harris,1 Conard C. Dahn, Blaise Canzian, Harry H. Guetter, S. K. Leggett,2...parallaxes of 16 nearby planetary nebulae are presented, including reduced errors for seven objects with previous initial results and results for six new...unresolved close companions are detected. Key words: astrometry — planetary nebulae: general — stars: AGB and post-AGBstars: distances 1. INTRODUCTION

  7. Following the Interstellar History of Carbon: From the Interiors of Stars to the Surfaces of Planets.

    PubMed

    Ziurys, L M; Halfen, D T; Geppert, W; Aikawa, Y

    2016-12-01

    The chemical history of carbon is traced from its origin in stellar nucleosynthesis to its delivery to planet surfaces. The molecular carriers of this element are examined at each stage in the cycling of interstellar organic material and their eventual incorporation into solar system bodies. The connection between the various interstellar carbon reservoirs is also examined. Carbon has two stellar sources: supernova explosions and mass loss from evolved stars. In the latter case, the carbon is dredged up from the interior and then ejected into a circumstellar envelope, where a rich and unusual C-based chemistry occurs. This molecular material is eventually released into the general interstellar medium through planetary nebulae. It is first incorporated into diffuse clouds, where carbon is found in polyatomic molecules such as H2CO, HCN, HNC, c-C3H2, and even C60(+). These objects then collapse into dense clouds, the sites of star and planet formation. Such clouds foster an active organic chemistry, producing compounds with a wide range of functional groups with both gas-phase and surface mechanisms. As stars and planets form, the chemical composition is altered by increasing stellar radiation, as well as possibly by reactions in the presolar nebula. Some molecular, carbon-rich material remains pristine, however, encapsulated in comets, meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles, and is delivered to planet surfaces. Key Words: Carbon isotopes-Prebiotic evolution-Interstellar molecules-Comets-Meteorites. Astrobiology 16, 997-1012.

  8. UV Excess and AGB Evolution in Elliptical-Galaxy Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Buzzoni, A.

    2009-03-01

    The puzzling origin of the ``UV-upturn'' phenomenon, observed in some elliptical galaxies, has recently been settled by identifying hot HB stars as main contributors to galaxy ultraviolet luminosity excess. While a blue HB morphology seems a natural characteristic of metal-poor stellar populations, its appearance in metal-rich systems, often coupled with a poorer rate of planetary nebulae per unit galaxy luminosity, might be calling for an intimate connection between UV excess and AGB properties in early-type galaxies. In this work, we want to briefly assess this issue relying on infrared surface brightness fluctuations as a powerful tool to trace AGB properties in external galaxies with unresolved stellar populations.

  9. Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Stars: Relics from the Dark Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Madau, Piero

    2014-08-01

    We use detailed nucleosynthesis calculations and a realistic prescription for the environment of the first stars to explore the first episodes of chemical enrichment that occurred during the dark ages. Based on these calculations, we propose a novel explanation for the increased prevalence of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with decreasing Fe abundance: the observed chemistry for the most metal-poor Galactic halo stars is the result of an intimate link between the explosions of the first stars and their host minihalo's ability to retain its gas. Specifically, high-energy supernovae produce a near solar ratio of C/Fe, but are effective in evacuating the gas from their host minihalo, thereby suppressing the formation of a second generation of stars. On the other hand, minihalos that host low-energy supernovae are able to retain their gas and form a second stellar generation, but, as a result, the second stars are born with a supersolar ratio of C/Fe. Our models are able to accurately reproduce the observed distributions of [C/Fe] and [Fe/H], as well as the fraction of CEMP stars relative to non-CEMP stars as a function of [Fe/H] without any free parameters. We propose that the present lack of chemical evidence for very massive stars (gsim 140 M ⊙) that ended their lives as a highly energetic pair-instability supernova does not imply that such stars were rare or did not exist; the chemical products of these very massive first stars may have been evacuated from their host minihalos and were never incorporated into subsequent generations of stars. Finally, our models suggest that the most Fe-poor stars currently known may have seen the enrichment from a small multiple of metal-free stars, and need not have been exclusively enriched by a solitary first star. These calculations also add further support to the possibility that some of the surviving dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are the relics of the first galaxies.

  10. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: relics from the dark ages

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Madau, Piero

    2014-08-20

    We use detailed nucleosynthesis calculations and a realistic prescription for the environment of the first stars to explore the first episodes of chemical enrichment that occurred during the dark ages. Based on these calculations, we propose a novel explanation for the increased prevalence of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with decreasing Fe abundance: the observed chemistry for the most metal-poor Galactic halo stars is the result of an intimate link between the explosions of the first stars and their host minihalo's ability to retain its gas. Specifically, high-energy supernovae produce a near solar ratio of C/Fe, but are effective in evacuating the gas from their host minihalo, thereby suppressing the formation of a second generation of stars. On the other hand, minihalos that host low-energy supernovae are able to retain their gas and form a second stellar generation, but, as a result, the second stars are born with a supersolar ratio of C/Fe. Our models are able to accurately reproduce the observed distributions of [C/Fe] and [Fe/H], as well as the fraction of CEMP stars relative to non-CEMP stars as a function of [Fe/H] without any free parameters. We propose that the present lack of chemical evidence for very massive stars (≳ 140 M {sub ☉}) that ended their lives as a highly energetic pair-instability supernova does not imply that such stars were rare or did not exist; the chemical products of these very massive first stars may have been evacuated from their host minihalos and were never incorporated into subsequent generations of stars. Finally, our models suggest that the most Fe-poor stars currently known may have seen the enrichment from a small multiple of metal-free stars, and need not have been exclusively enriched by a solitary first star. These calculations also add further support to the possibility that some of the surviving dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are the relics of the first galaxies.

  11. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor star frequencies in the galaxy: corrections for the effect of evolutionary status on carbon abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Placco, Vinicius M.; Frebel, Anna; Beers, Timothy C.; Stancliffe, Richard J.

    2014-12-10

    We revisit the observed frequencies of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars as a function of the metallicity in the Galaxy, using data from the literature with available high-resolution spectroscopy. Our analysis excludes stars exhibiting clear overabundances of neutron-capture elements and takes into account the expected depletion of surface carbon abundance that occurs due to CN processing on the upper red giant branch. This allows for the recovery of the initial carbon abundance of these stars, and thus for an accurate assessment of the frequencies of carbon-enhanced stars. The correction procedure we develop is based on stellar-evolution models and depends on the surface gravity, log g, of a given star. Our analysis indicates that for stars with [Fe/H] ≤–2.0, 20% exhibit [C/Fe] ≥+0.7. This fraction increases to 43% for [Fe/H] ≤–3.0 and 81% for [Fe/H] ≤–4.0, which is higher than have been previously inferred without taking the carbon abundance correction into account. These CEMP star frequencies provide important inputs for Galactic and stellar chemical evolution models, as they constrain the evolution of carbon at early times and the possible formation channels for the CEMP-no stars. We also have developed a public online tool with which carbon corrections using our procedure can be easily obtained.

  12. Concurrent Application of ANC and THM to assess the 13C(α, n)16O Absolute Cross Section at Astrophysical Energies and Possible Consequences for Neutron Production in Low-mass AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippella, O.; La Cognata, M.

    2017-03-01

    The {}13{{C}}{(α ,n)}16{{O}} reaction is considered to be the main neutron source responsible for the production of heavy nuclides (from {Sr} to {Bi}) through slow n-capture nucleosynthesis (s-process) at low temperatures during the asymptotic giant branch phase of low-mass stars (≲ 3{--}4 {M}ȯ , or LMSs). In recent years, several direct and indirect measurements have been carried out to determine the cross section at the energies of astrophysical interest (around 190+/- 40 {keV}). However, they yield inconsistent results that cause a highly uncertain reaction rate and affect the neutron release in LMSs. In this work we have combined two indirect approaches, the asymptotic normalization coefficient and the Trojan horse method, to unambiguously determine the absolute value of the {}13{{C}}{(α ,n)}16{{O}} astrophysical factor. With these, we have determined a very accurate reaction rate to be introduced into astrophysical models of s-process nucleosynthesis in LMSs. Calculations using this recommended rate have shown limited variations in the production of those neutron-rich nuclei (with 86≤slant A≤slant 209) that receive contribution only by slow neutron captures.

  13. The s-process in low-metallicity stars - II. Interpretation of high-resolution spectroscopic observations with asymptotic giant branch models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisterzo, S.; Gallino, R.; Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Käppeler, F.

    2011-11-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic observations of 100 metal-poor carbon and s-rich stars (CEMP-s) collected from the literature are compared with the theoretical nucleosynthesis models of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) presented in Paper I (MAGBini= 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 2 M⊙, - 3.6 ≲ [ Fe/H ] ≲- 1.5). The s-process enhancement detected in these objects is associated with binary systems: the more massive companion evolved faster through the thermally pulsing AGB phase (TP-AGB), synthesizing s-elements in the inner He intershell, which are partly dredged up to the surface during the third dredge-up (TDU) episode. The secondary observed low-mass companion became CEMP-s by the mass transfer of C- and s-rich material from the primary AGB. We analyse the light elements C, N, O, Na and Mg, as well as the two s-process indicators, [hs/ls] (where ls = is the the light-s peak at N = 50 and hs = the heavy-s peak at N = 82) and [Pb/hs]. We distinguish between CEMP-s with high s-process enhancement, [hs/Fe] >rsim 1.5 (CEMP-sII), and mild s-process enhanced stars, [hs/Fe] < 1.5 (CEMP-sI). To interpret the observations, a range of s-process efficiencies at any given metallicity is necessary. This is confirmed by the high spread observed in [Pb/hs] (˜2 dex). A degeneration of solutions is found with some exceptions: most main-sequence CEMP-sII stars with low [Na/Fe] can only be interpreted with MAGBini= 1.3-1.4 M⊙. Giants having suffered the first dredge-up (FDU) need a dilution >rsim1 dex (dil is defined as the mass of the convective envelope of the observed star, Mobs★, over the material transferred from the AGB to the companion, MtransAGB). Then AGB models with higher AGB initial masses (MAGBini= 1.5-2 M⊙) are adopted to interpret CEMP-sII giants. In general, solutions with AGB models in the mass range MAGBini= 1.3-2 M⊙ and different dilution factors are found for CEMP-sI stars. About half of the CEMP-s stars with europium measurements show a high r

  14. Cool carbon stars in the halo and in dwarf galaxies: Hα, colours, and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauron, N.; Gigoyan, K. S.; Berlioz-Arthaud, P.; Klotz, A.

    2014-02-01

    The population of cool carbon (C) stars located far from the galactic plane is probably made of debris of small galaxies such as the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr), which are disrupted by the gravitational field of the Galaxy. We aim to know this population better through spectroscopy, 2MASS photometric colours, and variability data. When possible, we compared the halo results to C star populations in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy, Sgr, and the solar neighbourhood. We first present a few new discoveries of C stars in the halo and in Fornax. The number of spectra of halo C stars is now 125. Forty percent show Hα in emission. The narrow location in the JHK diagram of the halo C stars is found to differ from that of similar C stars in the above galaxies. The light curves of the Catalina and LINEAR variability databases were exploited to derive the pulsation periods of 66 halo C stars. A few supplementary periods were obtained with the TAROT telescopes. We confirm that the period distribution of the halo strongly resembles that of Fornax, and we found that it is very different from the C stars in the solar neighbourhood. There is a larger proportion of short-period Mira/SRa variables in the halo than in Sgr, but the survey for C stars in this dwarf galaxy is not complete, and the study of their variability needs to be continued to investigate the link between Sgr and the cool halo C stars. Based on observations made with the NTT and 3.6 m telescope at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile; programs 084.D-0302 and 070.D-0203), with the TAROT telescopes at La Silla and at Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (France), and on the exploitation of the Catalina Sky Survey and the LINEAR variability databases.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Following the Interstellar History of Carbon: From the Interiors of Stars to the Surfaces of Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Halfen, D. T.; Geppert, W.; Aikawa, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The chemical history of carbon is traced from its origin in stellar nucleosynthesis to its delivery to planet surfaces. The molecular carriers of this element are examined at each stage in the cycling of interstellar organic material and their eventual incorporation into solar system bodies. The connection between the various interstellar carbon reservoirs is also examined. Carbon has two stellar sources: supernova explosions and mass loss from evolved stars. In the latter case, the carbon is dredged up from the interior and then ejected into a circumstellar envelope, where a rich and unusual C-based chemistry occurs. This molecular material is eventually released into the general interstellar medium through planetary nebulae. It is first incorporated into diffuse clouds, where carbon is found in polyatomic molecules such as H2CO, HCN, HNC, c-C3H2, and even C60+. These objects then collapse into dense clouds, the sites of star and planet formation. Such clouds foster an active organic chemistry, producing compounds with a wide range of functional groups with both gas-phase and surface mechanisms. As stars and planets form, the chemical composition is altered by increasing stellar radiation, as well as possibly by reactions in the presolar nebula. Some molecular, carbon-rich material remains pristine, however, encapsulated in comets, meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles, and is delivered to planet surfaces.

  16. IR photometry and models for the dust envelopes of two carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, M. B.; Taranova, O. G.

    2016-12-01

    The results of JHKLM photometry of two carbon stars are presented: the irregular variable NQ Cas and the Mira star BD Vul. Data on the mean fluxes supplemented with mid-IR observations with the IRAS, AKARI, andWISE satellites are used to compute spherically symmetrical model dust envelopes for the stars, consisting of particles of amorphous carbon and silicon carbide. The optical depth in the visible for the comparatively cool dust envelope of BD Vul, with a dust temperature at its inner boundary T 1 = 610 K, is fairly low: τ V = 0.13. The dust envelope of NQ Cas is appreciably hotter ( T 1 = 1550 K), and has τ V = 0.32. The estimated mass-loss rates are 1.5 × 10-7 M ⊙/yr for NQ Cas and 5.9 × 10-7 M ⊙/yr for BD Vul.

  17. Supernova SN 2011fe from an exploding carbon-oxygen white dwarf star.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Peter E; Sullivan, Mark; Cenko, S Bradley; Thomas, Rollin C; Kasen, Daniel; Howell, D Andrew; Bersier, David; Bloom, Joshua S; Kulkarni, S R; Kandrashoff, Michael T; Filippenko, Alexei V; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Howard, Andrew W; Isaacson, Howard T; Maguire, Kate; Suzuki, Nao; Tarlton, James E; Pan, Yen-Chen; Bildsten, Lars; Fulton, Benjamin J; Parrent, Jerod T; Sand, David; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Bianco, Federica B; Dilday, Benjamin; Graham, Melissa L; Lyman, Joe; James, Phil; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Law, Nicholas M; Quimby, Robert M; Hook, Isobel M; Walker, Emma S; Mazzali, Paolo; Pian, Elena; Ofek, Eran O; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Poznanski, Dovi

    2011-12-14

    Type Ia supernovae have been used empirically as 'standard candles' to demonstrate the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe even though fundamental details, such as the nature of their progenitor systems and how the stars explode, remain a mystery. There is consensus that a white dwarf star explodes after accreting matter in a binary system, but the secondary body could be anything from a main-sequence star to a red giant, or even another white dwarf. This uncertainty stems from the fact that no recent type Ia supernova has been discovered close enough to Earth to detect the stars before explosion. Here we report early observations of supernova SN 2011fe in the galaxy M101 at a distance from Earth of 6.4 megaparsecs. We find that the exploding star was probably a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, and from the lack of an early shock we conclude that the companion was probably a main-sequence star. Early spectroscopy shows high-velocity oxygen that slows rapidly, on a timescale of hours, and extensive mixing of newly synthesized intermediate-mass elements in the outermost layers of the supernova. A companion paper uses pre-explosion images to rule out luminous red giants and most helium stars as companions to the progenitor.

  18. Exploring the origin of lithium, carbon, strontium, and barium with four new ultra metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T.; Hansen, C. J.; Christlieb, N. E-mail: cjhansen@lsw.uni-heidelberg.de; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present an elemental abundance analysis for four newly discovered ultra metal-poor stars from the Hamburg/ESO survey, with [Fe/H] ≤ –4. Based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra, we derive abundances for 17 elements in the range from Li to Ba. Three of the four stars exhibit moderate to large overabundances of carbon, but have no enhancements in their neutron-capture elements. The most metal-poor star in the sample, HE 0233–0343 ([Fe/H] = –4.68), is a subgiant with a carbon enhancement of [C/Fe] = +3.5, slightly above the carbon-enhancement plateau suggested by Spite et al. No carbon is detected in the spectrum of the fourth star, but the quality of its spectrum only allows for the determination of an upper limit on the carbon abundance ratio of [C/Fe] < +1.7. We detect lithium in the spectra of two of the carbon-enhanced stars, including HE 0233–0343. Both stars with Li detections are Li-depleted, with respect to the Li plateau for metal-poor dwarfs found by Spite and Spite. This suggests that whatever site(s) produced C either do not completely destroy lithium, or that Li has been astrated by early-generation stars and mixed with primordial Li in the gas that formed the stars observed at present. The derived abundances for the α elements and iron-peak elements of the four stars are similar to those found in previous large samples of extremely and ultra metal-poor stars. Finally, a large spread is found in the abundances of Sr and Ba for these stars, possibly influenced by enrichment from fast rotating stars in the early universe.

  19. VLA survey of 22 GHz H2O masers toward ten silicate carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Boboltz, D. A.; Mulitz-Schimel, G.; Izumiura, H.; Wittkowski, M.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Despite their carbon-rich photospheres, silicate carbon stars show evidence of oxygen-rich circumstellar material, which is thought to exist in disks. Silicate carbon stars represent interesting cases that allow us to study the possible effects of binarity on stellar evolution and mass loss accompanied by the formation of disks. Aims: We present a small survey of 22 GHz H2O masers toward ten silicate carbon stars with much better sensitivity than is the case for previous observations. Methods: We observed our sample with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) using the most expanded configuration (A-configuration) with a maximum baseline of 36 km. For some of our program stars with noisy Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Low Resolution Spectra (LRS), we present new mid-IR spectra obtained with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Results: We detected H2O masers toward five out of ten silicate carbon stars (EU And, V778 Cyg, IRAS 06017+1011, V1415 Cyg, and NC83 = V1945 Cyg), with NC83 being a new detection. No H2O masers were detected toward BM Gem, IRAS 07221-0431, IRAS 08002-3803, IRAS 18006-3213, and HD 189605. The velocity separation between the most blue- and red-shifted maser features is 10-14 km s-1. If we assume that the masers originate in circum-companion disks, the measured velocity separations translate into a lower limit of the rotational velocity of 5-7 km s-1, and the upper limit of the radius of the maser emitting region is estimated to be 10-68 AU for a companion mass of 0.5-1.7 M⊙. The new mid-IR spectra of NC83, IRAS 06017+1011, and HD 189605 confirm the 10 μm silicate emission. The latter two stars show a bump at ~11.5 μm, which is presumably due to SiC originating in the ongoing mass loss from the carbon-rich primary star, not due to crystalline silicate. We also report on the detection of the UV flux at 2271 Å toward HD 189605. Based on MIDI observations made with the Very Large

  20. Mineral formation in stellar winds. V. Formation of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarotti, A. S.; Gail, H.-P.

    2005-02-01

    An emission band around 92 μm found in a few IR spectra from highly evolved stars was proposed to be due to the presence of carbonate dust grains in the circumstellar material (Kemper et al. \\cite{Kem02a}, Nature, 415, 295). This contribution presents the results of a model calculation for the condensation of calcite (CaCO_3) in the stellar wind of AGB stars. It is shown that the quantities of carbonate dust formed relative to the quantities of silicate dust are negligibly small. This results from the fact that carbonates form at a much lower temperature than the silicate dust components. Carbonate dust formation then is suppressed by the strong acceleration of the wind material by radiation pressure on the silicate dust and the subsequent rapid dilution of the wind material. This makes it highly improbable that carbonate dust can be formed in stellar outflows.

  1. Molecular column densities in selected model atmospheres. [chemical analysis of carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Beebe, R. F.; Sneden, C.

    1974-01-01

    From an examination of predicted column densities, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) The SiO ought to be visible in carbon stars which were generated from triple alpha burning, but absent from carbon stars generated from the CNO bi-cycle. (2) Variation in the observed relative strengths of TiO and ZrO is indicative of real differences in the ratio Ti/Zr. (3) The TiO/ZrO ratio shows a small variation as C/O and effective temperature is changed. (4) Column density of silicon dicarbide (SiC2) is sensitive to abundance, temperature, and gravity; hence all relationships between the strength of SiC2 and other stellar parameters will show appreciable scatter. There is however, a substantial luminosity effect present in the SiC2 column densities. (5) Unexpectedly, SiC2 is anti-correlated with C2. (6) The presence of SiC2 in a carbon star eliminates the possibility of these stars having temperatures greater than or equal to 3000 K, or being produced through the CNO bi-cycle.

  2. The 2014 AGB Survey of Higher Education Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge-Clark, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    "The 2014 AGB Survey of Higher Education Governance" is the fourth in AGB's studies of college and university governance. This report, based on survey responses from 592 public and independent boards, addresses a range of important governance topics that are receiving attention from boards and the news media, including presidential…

  3. New models for the evolution of post-asymptotic giant branch stars and central stars of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller Bertolami, Marcelo Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Context. The post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase is arguably one of the least understood phases of the evolution of low- and intermediate- mass stars. The two grids of models presently available are based on outdated micro- and macrophysics and do not agree with each other. Studies of the central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) and post-AGB stars in different stellar populations point to significant discrepancies with the theoretical predictions of post-AGB models. Aims: We study the timescales of post-AGB and CSPNe in the context of our present understanding of the micro- and macrophysics of stars. We want to assess whether new post-AGB models, based on the latter improvements in TP-AGB modeling, can help us to understand the discrepancies between observation and theory and within theory itself. In addition, we aim to understand the impact of the previous AGB evolution for post-AGB phases. Methods: We computed a grid of post-AGB full evolutionary sequences that include all previous evolutionary stages from the zero age main sequence to the white dwarf phase. We computed models for initial masses between 0.8 and 4 M⊙ and for a wide range of initial metallicities (Z0 = 0.02, 0.01, 0.001, 0.0001). This allowed us to provide post-AGB timescales and properties for H-burning post-AGB objects with masses in the relevant range for the formation of planetary nebulae (~0.5-0.8 M⊙). We included an updated treatment of the constitutive microphysics and included an updated description of the mixing processes and winds that play a key role during the thermal pulses (TP) on the AGB phase. Results: We present a new grid of models for post-AGB stars that take into account the improvements in the modeling of AGB stars in recent decades. These new models are particularly suited to be inputs in studies of the formation of planetary nebulae and for the determination of the properties of CSPNe from their observational parameters. We find post-AGB timescales that are at

  4. Chemical Analysis of a Carbon-enhanced Very Metal-poor Star: CD-27 14351

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karinkuzhi, Drisya; Goswami, Aruna; Masseron, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We present, for the first time, an abundance analysis of a very metal-poor carbon-enhanced star CD-27 14351 based on a high-resolution (R ∼ 48,000) FEROS spectrum. Our abundance analysis performed using local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres shows that the object is a cool star with stellar atmospheric parameters, effective temperature Teff = 4335 K, surface gravity log g = 0.5, microturbulence ξ = 2.42 km s‑1, and metallicity [Fe/H] = ‑2.6. The star exhibits high carbon and nitrogen abundances with [C/Fe] = 2.89 and [N/Fe] = 1.89. Overabundances of neutron-capture elements are evident in Ba, La, Ce, and Nd, with estimated [X/Fe] > 1, the largest enhancement being seen in Ce with [Ce/Fe] = 2.63. While the first peak s-process elements Sr and Y are found to be enhanced with respect to Fe, ([Sr/Fe] = 1.73 and [Y/Fe] = 1.91), the third peak s-process element Pb could not be detected in our spectrum at the given resolution. Europium, primarily an r-process element also shows an enhancement with [Eu/Fe] = 1.65. With [Ba/Eu] = 0.12, the object CD-27 14351 satisfies the classification criterion for a CEMP-r/s star. The elemental abundance distributions observed in this star are discussed in light of the chemical abundances observed in other CEMP stars in the literature.

  5. Kinematics of Hα Emitting Stars in Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilango, Megha; Ilango, Anita; Damon, Gabriel; Prichard, Laura; Guhathakurta, Puragra; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Studying emission line stars helps improve our understanding of stellar evolution, types of stars, and their environments. In this study, we analyzed stars exhibiting Hα emission (Hα stars) in the Andromeda Galaxy. We used a combination of spectroscopic and photometric diagnostic methods to remove a population of foreground Milky Way (MW) star contaminants from our data set. The Hα stars were selected from a sample of 5295 spectra from the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda’s Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey and accompanying photometric data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey. Velocities of two classes of Hα stars, main sequence (MS) stars and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, were analyzed through a novel Age-Velocity Difference Correlation (AVDC) method, which utilizes line-of-sight velocity differences (LOSVDs) in order to estimate the age of a rare stellar population. Histograms, weighted means, and weighted standard deviations of the LOSVDs were used to conclude that MS stars are more kinematically coherent than AGB stars, and that Hα stars are kinematically comparable and thus close in age to their non-Hα counterparts. With these results, it can definitively be inferred that mass loss is important in two stages of stellar evolution: massive MS and intermediate mass AGB. We hypothesized that this mass loss could either occur as a normal part of MS and AGB evolution, or that it could be emitted by only a subpopulation of MS and AGB stars throughout their life cycle. Our use of the novel AVDC method sets a precedent for the use of similar methods in predicting the ages of rare stellar subgroups.This research was supported by NASA and the National Science Foundation. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of the Science Internship Program at UC Santa Cruz.

  6. Multiwavelength Diffraction-limited Imaging of the Evolved Carbon Star IRC +10216. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, P. G.; Monnier, J. D.; Danchi, W. C.

    2005-05-01

    High angular resolution images of IRC +10216 taken at various bandpasses within the near-infrared H, K, and L bands are presented. The maps have the highest angular resolution yet recovered and were reconstructed from interferometric measurements obtained at the Keck I telescope in 1997 December and 1998 April, forming a subset of a seven-epoch monitoring program presented earlier by Tuthill and coworkers in Paper I. Systematic changes with observing wavelength are found and discussed in the context of present geometrical models for the circumstellar envelope. With these new high-resolution, multiwavelength data and contemporaneous photometry, we also revisit the hypothesis that the bright compact core of the nebula (component ``A'') marks the location of the central carbon star. We find that directly measured properties of the core (angular size, flux density, color temperature) are consistent with a reddened carbon star photosphere (line-of-sight τ2.2=5.3).

  7. Abundances in red giant stars - Nitrogen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Andersson, B.-G.; Olofsson, H.; Ukita, N.; Young, K.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of millimeter- and submillimeter-wave observations of HCN and HCCCN that were made of the circmustellar envelopes of eight carbon stars, including the two protoplanetary nebulae CRL 618 and CRL 2688. The observations yield a measure of the double ratio (N-14)(C-13)/(N-15)(C-12). Measured C-12/C-13 ratios are used to estimate the N-14/N-15 abundance ratio, with the resulting lower limits in all eight envelopes and possible direct determinations in two envelopes. The two determinations and four of the remaining six lower limits are found to be in excess of the terrestrial value of N-14/N-15 = 272, indicating an evolution of the nitrogen isotope ratio, which is consistent with stellar CNO processing. Observations of thermal SiO (v = 0, J = 2-1) emission show that the Si-29/Si-28 ratio can be determined in carbon stars, and further observations are indicated.

  8. On the nature of the excess 100 micron flux associated with carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, Michael P.; Leung, Chun M.

    1991-01-01

    The emission from carbon stars with circumstellar dust shells of different structure, composition, opacity, and age was modeled with the purpose of determining the origin of the excess flux in the FIR and testing the detached shell hypotheses of Willems (1987) and Olofsson et al. (1990). Three possible sources for the excess flux were identified: (1) cool dust in a single extended shell; (2) emission from dust in the intervening interstellar medium; or (3) emission from a two-shell system in which the additional shell is a remnant from an earlier mass-loss episode. It was found that only the two-shell model with a remnant shell which is at least 1 pc thick could explain the 60- and 100-micron flux excesses seen in carbon stars with dust shells of a given opacity. Calculations of time scales for the production of the detached shells and of the carbon star lifetime were found to be consistent with the evolutionary scenario proposed by Willems.

  9. Abundances in Hot Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2009-05-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  10. Parameters and Kinematics of Carbon Enhanced Metal Poor (CEMP) Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirupathi, Sivarani; Beers, T. C.; Lee, Y. S.; Kennedy, C.; Carollo, D.; Masseron, T.; Plez, B.; Norris, J. E.; Bessell, M.; Rossi, S.

    2007-12-01

    Several hundred CEMP stars have been selected from the Christlieb et al (2001, A&A 375, 366) catalog of carbon-rich stars, which is based on the Hamburg/ESO objective prism survey. Medium resolution (R = 2000) optical spectra were obtained for these stars covering a wavelength range of 3800-4800 A. The estimates of Teff, [Fe/H], and [C/Fe] for this sample is already available, based on application of the Rossi et al. (2005, AJ 130, 2804 ), which uses the strength of the CaII K line, the CH G-band, and J-K colors. Here we present an automated method to estimate the full set of atmospheric parameters for these data (including logg) based on synthetic spectra and photometry. For this purpose, we have generated a set of synthetic grids with carbon enhanced atmospheres with the MARCS code (Plez et al. 1992, A&A 256,551; Asplund et al. 1997, A&A 318, 521; Gustafsson et al. 2003, ASP Conf. Ser. 288, 331), which is particularly important for cool CEMP stars (for which the atmospheric structure changes with increasing carbon abundance (Masseron et al. 2006 A&A 455, 1059). More than one hundred stars of our prpogram stars have already been observed at high spectral resolution (R = 20000-25000), during the course of the HERES survey (Barklem et al. 2005, A&A 439,129; Lucatello et al. 2006 ApJ 652, 37L), which allow us to calibrate our methods. Here we describe our new methods for estimation and validation of Teff, logg, [Fe/H], [C/Fe]. We also comment on the possible origin of CEMP stars in this sample based on these derived parameters and on the inferred kinematics. TS, TCB, YSL, and CK acknowledge support from grant PHY 02-16783; Physics Frontier Center/Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA), awarded by the U.S. National Science Foundation and NSF grant AST 07-07776

  11. CXOGBS J173620.2-293338: A candidate symbiotic X-ray binary associated with a bulge carbon star

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, C. T.; Johnson, C. B.; Torres, M. A. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Maccarone, T. J.; Mikles, V. J.; Knigge, C.; Greiss, S.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a wide but shallow X-ray survey of regions above and below the Plane in the Galactic Bulge. It was performed using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's ACIS camera. The survey is primarily designed to find and classify low luminosity X-ray binaries. The combination of the X-ray depth of the survey and the accessibility of optical and infrared counterparts makes this survey ideally suited to identification of new symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs) in the Bulge. We consider the specific case of the X-ray source CXOGBS J173620.2-293338. It is coincident to within 1 arcsec with a very red star, showing a carbon star spectrum and irregular variability in the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment data. We classify the star as a late C-R type carbon star based on its spectral features, photometric properties, and variability characteristics, although a low-luminosity C-N type cannot be ruled out. The brightness of the star implies it is located in the Bulge, and its photometric properties are overall consistent with the Bulge carbon star population. Given the rarity of carbon stars in the Bulge, we estimate the probability of such a close chance alignment of any GBS source with a carbon star to be ≲ 10{sup –3}, suggesting that this is likely to be a real match. If the X-ray source is indeed associated with the carbon star, then the X-ray luminosity is around 9 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}. Its characteristics are consistent with a low luminosity SyXB, or possibly a low accretion rate white dwarf symbiotic.

  12. Photospheric carbon and oxygen abundances of F-G type stars in the Pleiades cluster*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoichi; Hashimoto, Osamu; Honda, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    In order to investigate the carbon-to-oxygen ratio of the young open cluster M 45 (Pleiades), the C and O abundances of 32 selected F-G type dwarfs (in the effective temperature range of Teff ˜ 5800-7600 K and projected rotational velocity range of vesin i ˜ 10-110 km s-1) belonging to this cluster were determined by applying the synthetic spectrum-fitting technique to C I 5380 and O I 6156-8 lines. The non-local thermodynamical equilibrium corrections for these C I and O I lines were found to be practically negligible (less than a few hundredths dex).The resulting C and O abundances (along with the Fe abundance) turned out nearly uniform without any systematic dependence upon Teff or vesin i. We found, however, in spite of almost solar Fe abundance ([Fe/H] ˜ 0), carbon turned out to be slightly subsolar ([C/H] ˜ -0.1) while that of oxygen was slightly supersolar ([O/H] ˜ +0.1). This leads to a conclusion that the [C/O] ratio was moderately subsolar (˜ -0.2) in the primordial gas from which these Pleiades stars were formed ˜ 120-130 Myr ago. Interestingly, similarly young B-type stars are reported to show just the same result ([C/O] ˜ -0.2), while rather aged (˜ 1-10 Gyr) field F-G stars of near-solar metallicity yield almost the solar value ([C/O] ˜ 0) on average. Such a difference in the C/O ratio between two star groups of distinctly different ages may be explained as a consequence of the orbit migration mechanism which Galactic stars may undergo over a long time.

  13. Characterizing uncertainties of the national-scale forest gross aboveground biomass (AGB) loss estimate: a case study of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Stehman, S.; Potapov, P.; Turubanova, S.; Baccini, A.; Goetz, S. J.; Laporte, N. T.; Houghton, R. A.; Hansen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Modern remote sensing techniques enable the mapping and monitoring of aboveground biomass (AGB) carbon stocks without relying on extensive in situ measurements. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is among the countries where a national forest inventory (NFI) has yet to be established due to a lack of infrastructure and political instability. We demonstrate a method for producing national-scale gross AGB loss estimates and quantifying uncertainty of the estimates using remotely sensed-derived forest cover loss and biomass carbon density data. Forest cover type and loss were characterized using published Landsat-based data sets and related to LIDAR-derived biomass data from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). We produced two gross AGB loss estimates for the DRC for the last decade (2000-2010): a conservative estimate accounting for classification errors in the 60-m resolution FACET forest cover change product, and a maximal estimate that also took into consideration omitted change at the 30m spatial resolution. Omitted disturbances were largely related to smallholder agriculture, the detection of which is scale-dependent. The use of LIDAR data as a substitute for NFI data to estimate AGB loss based on Landsat-derived activity data was demonstrated. Comparisons of our forest cover loss and AGB estimates with published studies raise the issue of scale in forest cover change mapping and its impact on carbon stock change estimation using remotely sensed data.

  14. Abundance correlations in mildly metal-poor stars. II. Light elements (C to Ca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decauwer, H.; Jehin, E.; Parmentier, G.; Magain, P.

    2005-04-01

    Accurate relative abundances have been obtained for carbon, oxygen, sodium, aluminium, silicon, and calcium in a sample of mildly metal-poor stars. This analysis complements a previous study carried out by Jehin et al. ([CITE], A&A, 341, 241), which provided the basis for the EASE scenario. This scenario postulates that field metal-poor stars were born in self-enriched proto-globular cluster clouds. By further investigating the correlations between the different α-element abundances, we propose a modified scenario for the formation of intermediate metallicity stars, in which the stars exhibiting lower than average α/Fe abundance ratios would form in low mass clouds, unable to sustain the formation of very massive stars (M ⪆ 30~M_⊙). Moreover, the carbon-to-iron ratio is found to decrease as one climbs the so-called Population IIb branch, i.e. when the s-element abundance increases. In the framework of the EASE scenario, we interpret this anticorrelation between the carbon and the s-element abundances as a signature of a hot bottom burning process in the metal-poor AGB stars which expelled the matter subsequently accreted by our Population IIb stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (ESO Programmes 56.E-0384, 57.E-0400 and 59.E-0257).

  15. Molecular and Dusty Layers of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars Studied with the VLT Interferometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    the evolution of low to intermediate mass stars towards planetary nebulae . It is also one of the most important sources of chemical enrichment of...planetary nebula (PN) phases, and is thus the most important driver for the further stellar evolution (e.g., Habing & Olofsson, 2003). Mass loss from AGB...branch (AGB) stars is the most important driver for the evolution of low to intermediate mass stars towards planetary nebulae . It is also one of the

  16. PRODUCTION OF CARBON-RICH PRESOLAR GRAINS FROM MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatari, M.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Wiescher, M.; De Boer, R. J.; Timmes, F. X.; Herwig, F.; Fryer, C.; Heger, A.; Hirschi, R.

    2013-04-20

    About a year after core-collapse supernova, dust starts to condense in the ejecta. In meteorites, a fraction of C-rich presolar grains (e.g., silicon carbide (SiC) grains of Type-X and low density graphites) are identified as relics of these events, according to the anomalous isotopic abundances. Several features of these abundances remain unexplained and challenge the understanding of core-collapse supernovae explosions and nucleosynthesis. We show, for the first time, that most of the measured C-rich grain abundances can be accounted for in the C-rich material from explosive He burning in core-collapse supernovae with high shock velocities and consequent high temperatures. The inefficiency of the {sup 12}C({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 16}O reaction relative to the rest of the {alpha}-capture chain at T > 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} K causes the deepest He-shell material to be carbon-rich and silicon-rich, and depleted in oxygen. The isotopic ratio predictions in part of this material, defined here as the C/Si zone, are in agreement with the grain data. The high-temperature explosive conditions that our models reach at the bottom of the He shell can also be representative of the nucleosynthesis in hypernovae or in the high-temperature tail of a distribution of conditions in asymmetric supernovae. Finally, our predictions are consistent with the observation of large {sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca observed in the grains. This is due to the production of {sup 44}Ti together with {sup 40}Ca in the C/Si zone and/or to the strong depletion of {sup 40}Ca by neutron captures.

  17. The Intermediate Neutron-capture Process and Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Melanie; Stancliffe, Richard J.; Lugaro, Maria; Meyer, Bradley S.

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in the Galactic Halo display enrichments in heavy elements associated with either the s (slow) or the r (rapid) neutron-capture process (e.g., barium and europium, respectively), and in some cases they display evidence of both. The abundance patterns of these CEMP-s/r stars, which show both Ba and Eu enrichment, are particularly puzzling, since the s and the r processes require neutron densities that are more than ten orders of magnitude apart and, hence, are thought to occur in very different stellar sites with very different physical conditions. We investigate whether the abundance patterns of CEMP-s/r stars can arise from the nucleosynthesis of the intermediate neutron-capture process (the i process), which is characterized by neutron densities between those of the s and the r processes. Using nuclear network calculations, we study neutron capture nucleosynthesis at different constant neutron densities n ranging from 107-1015 cm-3. With respect to the classical s process resulting from neutron densities on the lowest side of this range, neutron densities on the highest side result in abundance patterns, which show an increased production of heavy s-process and r-process elements, but similar abundances of the light s-process elements. Such high values of n may occur in the thermal pulses of asymptotic giant branch stars due to proton ingestion episodes. Comparison to the surface abundances of 20 CEMP-s/r stars shows that our modeled i-process abundances successfully reproduce observed abundance patterns, which could not be previously explained by s-process nucleosynthesis. Because the i-process models fit the abundances of CEMP-s/r stars so well, we propose that this class should be renamed as CEMP-i.

  18. CARBON AND OXYGEN IN NEARBY STARS: KEYS TO PROTOPLANETARY DISK CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Petigura, Erik A.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2011-07-01

    We present carbon and oxygen abundances for 941 FGK stars-the largest such catalog to date. We find that planet-bearing systems are enriched in these elements. We self-consistently measure N{sub C} /N{sub O} , which is thought to play a key role in planet formation. We identify 46 stars with N{sub C} /N{sub O} {>=} 1.00 as potential hosts of carbon-dominated exoplanets. We measure a downward trend in [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] and find distinct trends in the thin and thick disks, supporting the work of Bensby et al. Finally, we measure sub-solar N{sub C} /N{sub O} = 0.40{sup +0.11}{sub -0.07}, for WASP-12, a surprising result as this star is host to a transiting hot Jupiter whose dayside atmosphere was recently reported to have N{sub C} /N{sub O} {>=} 1 by Madhusudhan et al. Our measurements are based on 15,000 high signal-to-noise spectra taken with the Keck 1 telescope as part of the California Planet Search. We derive abundances from the [O I] and C I absorption lines at {lambda} = 6300 and 6587 A using the SME spectral synthesizer.

  19. Carbon and nitrogen abundances in F- and G-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, R. E. S.

    1977-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen abundances have been obtained for a sample of 11-F- and G-type dwarfs covering a range in Fe/H abundance ratio from -0.8 to +0.3. Model atmospheres, which included the effects of convection and line blanketing, were used to calculate synthetic spectra of the CH, CN, and NH molecular bands. Effective oscillator strengths for the bands studied were found by matching synthetic spectra calculated from a model solar atmosphere with the observed solar bands. Many of the metal-poor stars, and particularly the high-velocity stars, were found to have substantial nitrogen over-deficiencies, suggesting that N is manufactured mostly in a secondary manner. The carbon-to-iron ratios were similar to the solar ratio, although there may be slight C over-deficiencies in metal-poor stars. However, the variation in C/Fe is not as marked as that found recently by Hearnshaw (1974). A comprehensive discussion of the theoretical errors is given, and some applications to Galactic evolution are noted.

  20. Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars and the Need for an Intermediate Neutron Capture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancliffe, Richard J.; Hampel, Melanie; Lugaro, Maria; Meyer, Bradley S.

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in the Galactic Halo display enrichments in heavy elements associated with either the s (slow) or the r (rapid) neutron-capture process (e.g., barium and europium respectively), and in some cases they display evidence of both. The abundance patterns of these CEMP-s/r stars, which show both Ba and Eu enrichment, are particularly puzzling since the s and the r processes require neutron densities that are more than ten orders of magnitude apart, and hence are thought to occur in very different stellar sites. We investigate whether the abundance patterns of CEMP-s/r stars can arise from the nucleosynthesis of the intermediate neutron-capture process (the i process), which is characterised by neutron densities between those of the s and the r processes. Using nuclear network calculations, we study neutron capture nucleosynthesis at different constant neutron densities n ranging from 107 to 1015 cm-3. Neutron densities on the highest side of this range result in abundance patterns that show an increased production of heavy s- and r-process elements but similar levels of the light s-process elements. With our i-process model, we are able to reproduce the abundance patterns of 20 CEMP-s/r stars that could not be explained by s-process nucleosynthesis.

  1. G64-12 and G64-37 Are Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placco, Vinicius M.; Beers, Timothy C.; Reggiani, Henrique; Meléndez, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    We present new high-resolution chemical-abundance analyses for the well-known high proper-motion subdwarfs G64-12 and G64-37, based on very high signal-to-noise ratio spectra ({{S}}/{{N}}˜ 700/1) with resolving power R ˜ 95,000. These high-quality data enable the first reliable determination of the carbon abundances for these two stars; we classify them as carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars based on their carboni cities, which both exceed [C/Fe] = +1.0. They are sub-classified as CEMP-no Group-II stars, based on their location in the Yoon-Beers diagram of absolute carbon abundance, A(C) versus [Fe/H], as well as on the conventional diagnostic [Ba/Fe]. The relatively low absolute carbon abundances of CEMP-no stars, in combination with the high effective temperatures of these two stars ({T}{eff}˜ 6500 {{K}}), weakens their CH molecular features to the point that accurate carbon abundances can only be estimated from spectra with very high S/N. A comparison of the observed abundance patterns with the predicted yields from massive, metal-free supernova models reduces the inferred progenitor masses by factors of ˜2-3, and explosion energies by factors of ˜10-15, compared to those derived using previously claimed carbon-abundance estimates. There are certainly many more warm CEMP-no stars near the halo main-sequence turnoff that have been overlooked in past studies, directly impacting the derived frequencies of CEMP-no stars as a function of metallicity, a probe that provides important constraints on Galactic chemical evolution models, the initial mass function in the early universe, and first-star nucleosynthesis.

  2. EUROPIUM s-PROCESS SIGNATURE AT CLOSE-TO-SOLAR METALLICITY IN STARDUST SiC GRAINS FROM ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, Janaina N.; Ireland, Trevor R.; Holden, Peter; Lugaro, Maria; Gyngard, Frank; Zinner, Ernst; Cristallo, Sergio; Rauscher, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Individual mainstream stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains and a SiC-enriched bulk sample from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite have been analyzed by the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe-Reverse Geometry for Eu isotopes. The mainstream grains are believed to have condensed in the outflows of {approx}1.5-3 M{sub Sun} carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The {sup 151}Eu fractions [fr({sup 151}Eu) = {sup 151}Eu/({sup 151}Eu+{sup 153}Eu)] derived from our measurements are compared with previous astronomical observations of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars enriched in elements made by slow neutron captures (the s-process). Despite the difference in metallicity between the parent stars of the grains and the metal-poor stars, the fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from our measurements agree well with fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from astronomical observations. We have also compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of Eu isotopic ratios in the envelope of AGB stars. Because of the low Eu abundances in the SiC grains, the fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from our measurements show large uncertainties, in most cases being larger than the difference between solar and predicted fr({sup 151}Eu) values. The SiC aggregate yields a fr({sup 151}Eu) value within the range observed in the single grains and provides a more precise result (fr({sup 151}Eu) = 0.54 {+-} 0.03, 95% conf.), but is approximately 12% higher than current s-process predictions. The AGB models can match the SiC data if we use an improved formalism to evaluate the contribution of excited nuclear states in the calculation of the {sup 151}Sm(n, {gamma}) stellar reaction rate.

  3. Identifying Bright Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars in the RAVE Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placco, Vinicius; Beers, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Bright metal-poor stars are of great importance for high-resolution spectroscopic follow-up, since their brightness allows for detailed studies of the chemical compositions of their atmospheres, obtainable with short integration times on 4m-8m class telescopes. We have carried out a medium-resolution spectroscopic follow-up survey of very metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -2.0) stars selected from the RAVE catalog.Over the course of four semesters we observed over 1,200 stars with the Gemini North, Gemini South, SOAR, KPNO/Mayall, and ESO/NTT telescopes. These spectra are used to confirm the estimated atmospheric parameters from RAVE, as well as to determine [C/Fe], using our spectroscopic analysis pipeline. This information has already enabled the identification of many new carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, including representatives of the inner- and outer-halo populations of the Milky Way, for which high-resolution spectroscopy is in progress from the ground with the Magellan/Clay Telescope and with the South African Large Telescope (SALT). The most interesting stars from the high-resolution follow-up will be observed from space with HST/STIS or COS. In this talk I will present the results of the medium-resolution follow-up, and preliminary results from the high-resolution effort.We acknowledge partial support from the grant PHY 14-30152; Physics Frontier Center/JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE), awarded by the US National Science Foundation.

  4. A search for SiO, OH, CO and HCN radio emission from silicate-carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, I. R.; Sahai, R.; Wannier, P. G.; Benson, P. J.; Gaylard, M.; Omont, A.

    1994-01-01

    We report upper limits for radio emission of SiO at 86 and 43 GHz, of OH at 1612 and 1665/1667 MHz, of CO at 115 GHz and HCN at 88.6 GHz in the silicate-carbon stars. These upper limits of SiO imply that oxygen-rich material has not been detected within 2R(sub star) of a central star even though the detected emission from silicate dust grains, H2O and OH maser establishes the presence of oxygen-rich material from about tens to thousands of AU of a central star. The upper limit of the SiO abundance is consistent with that found in oxygen-rich envelopes. Upper limits of the mass loss rate (based on the CO data) are estimated to be between 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr assuming a distance of 1.5 kpc for these stars. The absence of HCN microwave emission implies that no carbon-rich material can be detected at large distances (thousands of AU) from a central star. The lack of detections of SiO, CO, and HCN emission is most likely due to the large distances of these stars. A number of C stars were detected in CO and HCN, but only the M supergiant VX Sgr was detected in CO.

  5. Molecular Astrophysics from Space: the Physical and Chemical Effects of Star Formation and the Destruction of Planetary Systems around Evolved Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David

    2005-01-01

    The research conducted during the reporting period is grouped into three sections: 1) Warm molecular gas in the interstellar medium (ISM); 2) Absorption line studies of "cold" molecular clouds; 3) Vaporization of comets around the AGB star IRC+10216.

  6. Carbon synthesis in steady-state hydrogen and helium burning on accreting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Jeremy; Brown, Edward F.; Cyburt, Richard; Schatz, Hendrik; Cumming, Andrew

    2014-08-20

    Superbursts from accreting neutron stars probe nuclear reactions at extreme densities (ρ ≈ 10{sup 9} g cm{sup –3}) and temperatures (T > 10{sup 9} K). These bursts (∼1000 times more energetic than type I X-ray bursts) are most likely triggered by unstable ignition of carbon in a sea of heavy nuclei made during the rapid proton capture process (rp-process) of regular type I X-ray bursts (where the accumulated hydrogen and helium are burned). An open question is the origin of sufficient amounts of carbon, which is largely destroyed during the rp-process in X-ray bursts. We explore carbon production in steady-state burning via the rp-process, which might occur together with unstable burning in systems showing superbursts. We find that for a wide range of accretion rates and accreted helium mass fractions large amounts of carbon are produced, even for systems that accrete solar composition. This makes stable hydrogen and helium burning a viable source of carbon to trigger superbursts. We also investigate the sensitivity of the results to nuclear reactions. We find that the {sup 14}O(α, p){sup 17}F reaction rate introduces by far the largest uncertainties in the {sup 12}C yield.

  7. The pulsation modes and masses of carbon-rich long period variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeat, J.; Knapik, A.; Rutily, B.

    2002-08-01

    Following our study of the carbon-rich giants in the HR diagram and of their luminosity function (Paper III), we investigate the pulsation data of the long period variables (LPVs) included in our sample. Pulsation modes (fundamental, overtone(s)) for carbon LPVs are identified in the period-radius diagram, making use of observed bi-periodicity in a small subsample of those stars, and of comparison to models. Mean pulsation masses are then deduced from theoretical PMR-relations, with due attention paid to a possible bias while averaging. Mean (present) pulsation masses (0.6 - 4.0 Msun) are found to increase along the group sequence HC5 to CV6, with still larger masses possibly associated with cool extreme CV7-objects with strong mass loss and thick circumstellar shells. This is consistent with the 0.8-4 Msun range of initial masses found in Paper III for the majority of carbon-rich giants affected by mass loss during their evolution. The pulsation masses found for a few HC-stars (Mle0 .8 Msun) are consistent with their low initial masses (Mi<~ 1.1 Msun), as inferred from their thick disk membership (age =~ 11 Gyr?) and locus in the HR diagram. A mean pulsation mass of =~ 0.6 Msun is found for the three population II Cepheids in the sample. A mass-luminosity diagram is proposed for the Galactic carbon giants. The data from observations is found consistent with theoretical predictions from AGB modeling, specially the third dredge-up (TDU) through thermal pulses (TP) with a carbon star formation line (CSFL) for TP-AGB stars. It appears that the CV-giants are close to the tip and end of their evolutionary tracks in the TP-AGB of the HR diagram. It is confirmed that this end shifts toward lower effective temperatures and higher luminosities, with increasing masses. It is shown that the C/O abundance ratios do correlate with effective temperatures, according to three distinct distributions (halo CH stars, thick disk HC-stars, and thin disk CV-stars). The mean stellar

  8. Emission-line stars in M31 from the SPLASH and PHAT surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prichard, Laura J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hamren, Katherine M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Dorman, Claire E.; Seth, Anil C.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Damon, Gabriel A.; Ilango, Anita; Ilango, Megha

    2017-03-01

    We present a sample of 224 stars that emit Hα (Hα stars) in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). The stars were selected from ∼5000 spectra, collected as part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo survey using Keck II/DEIMOS. We used six-filter Hubble Space Telescope photometry from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey to classify and investigate the properties of the Hα stars. We identified five distinct categories of Hα star: B-type main-sequence (MS) stars, 'transitioning'-MS (T-MS) stars, red core He burning (RHeB) stars, non-C-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and C-rich AGB stars. We found that ∼12 per cent of B-type stars exhibit Hα emission (Be stars). The frequency of Be to all B stars is known to vary with the metallicity of their environment. Comparing this proportion of Be stars with other environments around the Local Group, the result could indicate that M31 is more metal-rich than the Milky Way. We predict that the 17 T-MS Hα stars are Be stars evolving off the MS with fading Hα emission. We separated RHeB from AGBstars. We conclude that the 61 RHeB and AGB stars are likely to be long-period variables. We found that ∼14 per cent of C-rich AGB stars (C stars) emit Hα, which is an upper limit for the ratio of C-rich Miras to C stars. This catalogue of Hα stars will be useful to constrain stellar evolutionary models, calibrate distance indicators for intermediate-age populations, and investigate the properties of M31.

  9. Simulating the onset of grazing envelope evolution of binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiber, Sagiv; Kashi, Amit; Soker, Noam

    2017-02-01

    We present the first three-dimensional gas-dynamical simulations of the grazing envelope evolution (GEE) of stars, with the goal of exploring the basic flow properties and the role of jets at the onset of the GEE. In the simulated runs, a secondary main-sequence star grazes the envelope of the primary asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star. The orbit is circular at the radius of the AGB primary star on its equator. We inject two opposite jets perpendicular to the equatorial plane from the location of the secondary star, and follow the evolution for several orbital periods. We explore the flow pattern by which the jets eject the outskirts of the AGB envelope. After one orbit, the jets start to interact with gas ejected in previous orbits and inflate hot low-density bubbles.

  10. Production and Recycling of Carbon in the Early Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Johannes; Thidemann Hansen, Terese; Nordström, Birgitta

    2015-08-01

    Extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars - [Fe/H] below ~ -3 - are fossil records of the conditions in the early halo. High-resolution 8m-class spectroscopy has shown that the detailed abundance pattern of EMP giant stars is surprisingly uniform and essentially Solar (e.g. Bonifacio+ 2012), apart from the usual α-enhancement in the halo. In the simplest picture, iron is a proxy for both overall metallicity and time, so the EMP stars should form before the oldest and most metal-poor Galactic globular clusters, notably at the lowest metallicities ([Fe/H] ≲ -3.5).It is thus striking that 20-40% of the EMP giants are strongly enhanced in carbon - the CEMP stars (Lucatello+ 2006). This is conventionally ascribed to mass transfer from a former AGB binary companion, and from a limited compilation of data, Lucatello+ (2005) concluded that most or all CEMP stars are indeed binaries, similar to the classical Ba and CH stars (e.g. Jorissen+ 1998). However, most of the sample was of the inner-halo CEMP-s variety (C and s-process elements both enhanced), while CEMP-no stars dominate the outer halo (Carollo+ 2014). Our precise radial velocity monitoring for CEMP stars over 8 years shed light on this issue.Our data suggest a normal binary frequency for the CEMP-no stars; i.e. the C was not produced in a binary companion, but in sites at interstellar distances, e.g. ‘faint’ SNe, and imprinted on the natal clouds of the low-mass stars we observe. This has immediate implications for the formation of dust in primitive, high-redshift galaxies (Watson+ 2015) and the origin of C-enhanced DLAs (Cooke+ 2011, 2012). The CEMP-s binary orbits are also revealing, with periods up to several decades and generally low amplitudes and eccentricities, suggesting that EMP AGB stars have very large radii, facilitating extensive mass loss. More work on faint SNe and EMP AGB envelopes is needed!

  11. Carbon and helium abundances in Wolf-Rayet WC stars determined from optical recombination lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Ana V.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon to helium ratios and ionization fractions are derived for 74 WC stars in the Galaxy and the LMC from optically thin recombination lines at visual wavelengths. The range of C/He ratios is 0.13 to 0.79 by number, similar to the ratios calculated by Nugis (1975) and about 20 times greater than the ratios of Smith and Willis (1982). These ratios also agree with the abundances determined in the most recent evolutionary models of massive stars, which include mass loss, convective dredge-up, and new nuclear reaction rates. The range of values found for the C/He ratios implies that the convective cores of WC stars do not occupy a very large mass fraction. The C/He ratio differs within a subtype by a factor of three or less, but the mean tends to increase toward earlier subtypes, although the standard deviation from the mean is large enough to allow the interpretation that the C/He ratio is constant for all WC subtypes.

  12. Gradients in the Abundance of SiS in Obscured Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Keady, J. J.; Hirsch, K. L.; Wiedemann, G. R.

    1993-12-01

    We report observations of the 13.5 microns fundamental band of SiS in the spectrum of the heavily obscured carbon stars IRC +10216 and CIT 6. We have carried out a detailed model of the observed line profiles in IRC +10216, the brighter of the two sources. The lines in this source are formed in the inner region of the circumstellar envelope where the gas is accelerating and where the temperature ranges from 500-800degK. Our observations of IRC +10216 are best fit by a gradient in the abundance of SiS; we derive an abundance relative to molecular hydrogen of x(SiS) = 4.3 x 10(-6) at a distance of twelve stellar radii from the central star rising to x(SiS) = 4.3 x 10(-5) a few stellar radii from the star's surface. We interpret this gradient in terms of a depletion of Si onto grains in the acceleration region of the circumstellar envelope. The relative line strengths in CIT 6 are quite similar to those in IRC +10216. Although the data on this source are of lesser quality, they are consistent with an abundance level and distribution similar to that found in IRC +10216.

  13. The high-redshift star formation history from carbon-monoxide intensity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breysse, Patrick C.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate how cosmic star formation history can be measured with one-point statistics of carbon-monoxide intensity maps. Using a P(D) analysis, the luminosity function of CO-emitting sources can be inferred from the measured one-point intensity PDF. The star formation rate density (SFRD) can then be obtained, at several redshifts, from the CO luminosity density. We study the effects of instrumental noise, line foregrounds, and target redshift, and obtain constraints on the CO luminosity density of the order of 10 per cent. We show that the SFRD uncertainty is dominated by that of the model connecting CO luminosity and star formation. For pessimistic estimates of this model uncertainty, we obtain an error of the order of 50 per cent on SFRD for surveys targeting redshifts between two and seven with reasonable noise and foregrounds included. However, comparisons between intensity maps and galaxies could substantially reduce this model uncertainty. In this case, our constraints on SFRD at these redshifts improve to roughly 5 - 10 per cent, which is highly competitive with current measurements.

  14. The Final Fate of Stars that Ignite Neon and Oxygen Off-center: Electron Capture or Iron Core-collapse Supernova?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Samuel; Hirschi, Raphael; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-12-01

    In the ONeMg cores of 8.8-9.5 M ⊙ stars, neon and oxygen burning is ignited off-center. Whether or not the neon-oxygen flame propagates to the center is critical for determining whether these stars undergo Fe core collapse or electron-capture-induced ONeMg core collapse. We present more details of stars that ignite neon and oxygen burning off-center. The neon flame is established in a manner similar to the carbon flame of super-AGB stars, albeit with a narrower flame width. The criteria for establishing a flame can be met if the strict Schwarzschild criterion for convective instability is adopted. Mixing across the interface of the convective shell disrupts the conditions for the propagation of the burning front, and instead the shell burns as a series of inward-moving flashes. While this may not directly affect whether or not the burning will reach the center (as in super-AGB stars), the core is allowed to contract between each shell flash. Reduction of the electron fraction in the shell reduces the Chandrasekhar mass and the center reaches the threshold density for the URCA process to activate and steer the remaining evolution of the core. This highlights the importance of a more accurate treatment of mixing in the stellar interior for yet another important question in stellar astrophysics—determining the properties of stellar evolution and supernova progenitors at the boundary between electron capture supernova and iron core-collapse supernova.

  15. A MODEL FOR THE DUST ENVELOPE OF THE SILICATE CARBON STAR IRAS 09425-6040

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Kyung-Won

    2016-03-01

    IRAS 09425-6040 (I09425) is a silicate carbon star with conspicuous crystalline silicate and water-ice features and emission excesses in the far-infrared and millimeter (mm) wavelength ranges. To understand properties of the dust envelope of I09425, we propose a physical model based on the observations and known properties of asymptotic giant branch stars and dust. We perform radiative transfer model calculations using multiple dust shells and disks with various dust species. We compare the model results with the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) acquired with different telescopes. We find that the physical model for I09425 using multiple shells of carbon and silicate dust and multiple disks of amorphous and crystalline silicates reproduces the observed SED fairly well. This object looks to have detached cold O-rich (silicate and water-ice) dust shells, which could be remnants of the recent chemical transition from O to C and an inner C-rich dust shell. A long-lived thin disk of very large silicate grains can reproduce the emission excess in the mm wavelength band and a recently formed thick disk of crystalline silicates can reproduce the prominent emission features in the spectral range 8–45 μm. The highly crystallized silicates could be recently formed by high temperature annealing due to the last O-rich superwind just before the chemical transition of the central star. I09425 could be a rare object that has the remnants of past O-rich stellar winds in the outer shells as well as in the circumbinary disks.

  16. Fluorine in the Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Star HE 1305+0132

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun

    2008-03-01

    The fluorine abundance of the Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor (CEMP) star HE 1305+0132 has been derived by analysis of the molecular HF (1-0) R9 line at 2.3357 μm in a high-resolution (R = 50,000) spectrum obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer and Gemini-South telescope. Our abundance analysis makes use of a CNO-enhanced ATLAS12 model atmosphere characterized by a metallicity and CNO enhancements determined utilizing medium-resolution (R = 3,000) optical and near-IR spectra. The effective iron abundance is found to be [Fe/H] = -2.5, making HE 1305+0132 the most Fe-deficient star, by more than an order of magnitude, for which the abundance of fluorine has been measured. Using spectral synthesis, we derive a super-solar fluorine abundance of A(19F) = 4.96+/-0.21, corresponding to a relative abundance of [F/Fe] = +2.90. A single line of the Phillips C2 system is identified in our Phoenix spectrum, and along with multiple lines of the first-overtone vibration-rotation CO (3-1) band head, C and O abundances of A(12C) = 8.57+/-0.11 and A(16O) = 7.04+/-0.14 are derived. We consider the striking fluorine overabundance in the framework of the nucleosynthetic processes thought to be responsible for the C-enhancement of CEMP stars and conclude that the atmosphere of HE 1305+0132 was polluted via mass transfer by a primary companion during its asymptotic giant branch phase. This is the first study of fluorine in a CEMP star, and it demonstrates that this rare nuclide can be a key diagnostic of nucleosynthetic processes in the early Galaxy.

  17. The first stars: CEMP-no stars and signatures of spinstars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges; Chiappini, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Aims: The CEMP-no stars are "carbon-enhanced-metal-poor" stars that in principle show no evidence of s- and r-elements from neutron captures. We try to understand the origin and nucleosynthetic site of their peculiar CNO, Ne-Na, and Mg-Al abundances. Methods: We compare the observed abundances to the nucleosynthetic predictions of AGB models and of models of rotating massive stars with internal mixing and mass loss. We also analyze the different behaviors of α- and CNO-elements, as well the abundances of elements involved in the Ne-Na and Mg-Al cycles. Results: We show that CEMP-no stars exhibit products of He-burning that have gone through partial mixing and processing by the CNO cycle, producing low 12C/13C and a broad variety of [C/N] and [O/N] ratios. From a 12C/13C vs. [C/N] diagram, we conclude that neither the yields of AGB stars (in binaries or not) nor the yields of classic supernovae can fully account for the observed CNO abundances in CEMP-no stars. Better agreement is obtained once the chemical contribution by stellar winds of fast-rotating massive stars is taken into account, where partial mixing takes place, leading to various amounts of CNO being ejected. The [(C+N+O)/H] ratios of CEMP-no stars vary linearly with [Fe/H] above [Fe/H] = -4.0 indicating primary behavior by (C+N+O). Below [Fe/H] = -4.0, [(C+N+O)/H] is almost constant as a function of [Fe/H], implying very high [(C+N+O)/Fe] ratios up to 4 dex. In view of the timescales, such abundance ratios reflect more individual nucleosynthetic properties, rather than an average chemical evolution. The high [(C+N+O)/Fe] ratios (as well as the high [(C+N+O)/α-elements]) imply that stellar winds from partially mixed stars were the main source of these excesses of heavy elements now observed in CEMP-no stars. The ranges covered by the variations of [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe], and [Al/Fe] are much broader than for the α-elements (with an atomic mass number above 24) and are comparable to the wide ranges covered

  18. Stellar yields of rotating first stars. I. Yields of weak supernovae and abundances of carbon-enhanced hyper-metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi

    2014-10-10

    We perform a stellar evolution simulation of first stars and calculate stellar yields from the first supernovae. The initial masses are taken from 12 to 140 M {sub ☉} to cover the whole range of core-collapse supernova progenitors, and stellar rotation is included, which results in efficient internal mixing. A weak explosion is assumed in supernova yield calculations, thus only outer distributed matter, which is not affected by the explosive nucleosynthesis, is ejected in the models. We show that the initial mass and the rotation affect the explosion yield. All the weak explosion models have abundances of [C/O] larger than unity. Stellar yields from massive progenitors of >40-60 M {sub ☉} show enhancement of Mg and Si. Rotating models yield abundant Na and Al, and Ca is synthesized in nonrotating heavy massive models of >80 M {sub ☉}. We fit the stellar yields to the three most iron-deficient stars and constrain the initial parameters of the mother progenitor stars. The abundance pattern in SMSS 0313–6708 is well explained by 50-80 M {sub ☉} nonrotating models, rotating 30-40 M {sub ☉} models well fit the abundance of HE 0107-5240, and both nonrotating and rotating 15-40 M {sub ☉} models explain HE 1327-2326. The presented analysis will be applicable to other carbon-enhanced hyper-metal-poor stars observed in the future. The abundance analyses will give valuable information about the characteristics of the first stars.

  19. Age Dating Merger Events in Early Type Galaxies via the Detection of AGB Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thorough statistical analysis of the J-H vs. H-K color plane of all detected early type galaxies in the 2MASS catalog with velocities less than 5000 km/s has been performed. This all sky survey is not sensitive to one particular galactic environment and therefore a representative range of early type galaxy environments have been sampled. Virtually all N-body simulation so major mergers produces a central starburst due to rapid collection of gas. This central starburst is of sufficient amplitude to change the stellar population in the central regions of the galaxy. Intermediate age populations are given away by the presence of AGB stars which will drive the central colors redder in H-K relative to the J- H baseline. This color anomaly has a lifetime of 2-5 billion years depending on the amplitude of the initial starburst Employing this technique on the entire 2MASS sample (several hundred galaxies) reveals that the AGB signature occurs less than 1% of the time. This is a straightforward indication that virtually all nearby early type galaxies have not had a major merger occur within the last few billion years.

  20. The circumstellar environment of evolved stars as traced by molecules and dust. The diagnostic power of Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombaert, Robin

    2013-12-01

    Low-to-intermediate mass stars end their life on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), an evolutionary phase in which the star sheds most of its mantle into the circumstellar environment through a stellar wind. This stellar wind expands at relatively low velocities and enriches the interstellar medium with elements newly made in the stellar interior. The physical processes controlling the gas and dust chemistry in the outflow, as well as the driving mechanism of the wind itself, are poorly understood and constitute the broader context of this thesis work. In a first chapter, we consider the thermodynamics of the high-density wind of the oxygen-rich star oh, using observations obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Telescope. Being one of the most abundant molecules, water vapor can be dominant in the energy balance of the inner wind of these types of stars, but to date, its cooling contribution is poorly understood. We aim to improve the constraints on water properties by careful combination of both dust and gas radiative-transfer models. This unified treatment is needed due to the high sensitivity of water excitation to dust properties. A combination of three types of diagnostics reveals a positive radial gradient of the dust-to-gas ratio in oh. The second chapter deals with the dust chemistry of carbon-rich winds. The 30-mic dust emission feature is commonly identified as due to magnesium sulfide (MgS). However, the lack of short-wavelength measurements of the optical properties of this dust species prohibits the determination of the temperature profile of MgS, and hence its feature strength and shape, questioning whether this species is responsible for the 30-mic feature. By considering the very optically thick wind of the extreme carbon star LL Peg, this problem can be circumvented because in this case the short-wavelength optical properties are not important for the radial temperature distribution. We attribute the 30-mic feature to MgS, but

  1. Star-to-Star Abundance Variations among Bright Giants in the Mildly Metal-poor Globular Cluster M4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivans, Inese I.; Sneden, Christopher; Kraft, Robert P.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Smith, Verne V.; Langer, G. Edward; Fulbright, Jon P.

    1999-09-01

    We present a chemical composition analysis of 36 giants in the nearby mildly metal-poor (<[Fe/H]>=-1.18) ``CN-bimodal'' globular cluster M4. The stars were observed at the Lick and McDonald Observatories using high-resolution échelle spectrographs and at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory using the multiobject spectrometer. Confronted with a cluster having interstellar extinction that is large and variable across the cluster face, we combined traditional spectroscopic abundance methods with modifications to the line depth ratio technique pioneered by Gray to determine the atmospheric parameters of our stars. We derive a total-to-selective extinction ratio of 3.4+/-0.4 and an average reddening of 0.33+/-0.01, which is significantly lower than that estimated by using the dust maps made by Schlegel and coworkers. We determine abundance ratios typical of halo field and cluster stars for scandium, titanium, vanadium, nickel, and europium with star-to-star variations in these elements of less than +/-0.1. Silicon, aluminum, barium, and lanthanum are overabundant with respect to what is seen in other globular clusters of similar metallicity. These overabundances confirm the results of an earlier study by Brown & Wallerstein based on a much smaller sample of M4 giants. Superposed on the primordial abundance distribution is evidence for the existence of proton capture synthesis of carbon, oxygen, neon, and magnesium. We recover some of the C, N, O, Na, Mg, and Al abundance swings and correlations found in other more metal-poor globular clusters, but the range of variation is muted. In the case of Mg and Al, this is compatible with the idea that the Al enhancements are derived from the destruction of ^25,26Mg, not ^24Mg. We determine that the C+N+O abundance sum is constant to within the observational errors and agrees with the C+N+O total that might be expected for M4 stars at birth. The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in M4 have C, N, and O

  2. Element Abundance Determination in Hot Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  3. Footprints of the weak s-process in the carbon-enhanced metal-poor star ET0097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guochao; Li, Hongjie; Liu, Nian; Cui, Wenyuan; Liang, Yanchun; Zhang, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Historically, the weak s-process contribution to metal-poor stars is thought to be extremely small, due to the effect of the secondary-like nature of the neutron source 22Ne(α , n)25Mg in massive stars, which means that metal-poor "weak s-process stars" could not be found. ET0097 is the first observed carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) star in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Because C is enriched and the elements heavier than Ba are not overabundant, ET0097 can be classified as a CEMP-no star. However, this star shows overabundances of lighter n-capture elements (i.e., Sr, Y and Zr). In this work, having adopted the abundance decomposition approach, we investigate the astrophysical origins of the elements in ET0097. We find that the light elements and iron-peak elements (from O to Zn) of the star mainly originate from the primary process of massive stars and the heavier n-capture elements (heavier than Ba) mainly come from the main r-process. However, the lighter n-capture elements such as Sr, Y and Zr should mainly come from the primary weak s-process. The contributed fractions of the primary weak s-process to the Sr, Y and Zr abundances of ET0097 are about 82 %, 84 % and 58 % respectively, suggesting that the CEMP star ET0097 should have the footprints of the weak s-process. The derived result should be a significant evidence that the weak s-process elements can be produced in metal-poor massive stars.

  4. AN EXTREMELY CARBON-RICH, EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STAR IN THE SEGUE 1 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Frebel, Anna

    2010-10-10

    We report the analysis of high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio, spectra of an extremely metal-poor, extremely C-rich red giant, Seg 1-7, in Segue 1-described in the literature alternatively as an unusually extended globular cluster or an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. The radial velocity of Seg 1-7 coincides precisely with the systemic velocity of Segue 1, and its chemical abundance signature of [Fe/H] = -3.52, [C/Fe] = +2.3, [N/Fe] = +0.8, [Na/Fe] = +0.53, [Mg/Fe] = +0.94, [Al/Fe] = +0.23, and [Ba/Fe] < -1.0 is similar to that of the rare and enigmatic class of Galactic halo objects designated CEMP-no (carbon-rich, extremely metal-poor with no enhancement (over solar ratios) of heavy neutron-capture elements). This is the first star in a Milky Way 'satellite' that unambiguously lies on the metal-poor, C-rich branch of the Aoki et al. bimodal distribution of field halo stars in the ([C/Fe], [Fe/H])-plane. Available data permit us only to identify Seg 1-7 as a member of an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy or as debris from the Sgr dwarf spheroidal galaxy. In either case, this demonstrates that at extremely low abundance, [Fe/H ] <-3.0, star formation and associated chemical evolution proceeded similarly in the progenitors of both the field halo and satellite systems. By extension, this is consistent with other recent suggestions that the most metal-poor dwarf spheroidal and ultra-faint dwarf satellites were the building blocks of the Galaxy's outer halo.

  5. The C2H, C2, and CN electronic absorption bands in the carbon star HD 19557

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Bregman, J. D.; Cooper, D. M.; Goorvitch, D.; Langhoff, S. R.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared spectrophotometry of the R-type carbon star HD 19557 is presented. Two unusual spectroscopic features are seen: a 3.1 micron band is lacking and a 2.8 micron band is present. Identifications are proposed for three previously unreported stellar absorption bands with electronic sequences of C2, CN, and C2H. The latter is proposed to be responsible for the 2.8 micron feature. The atmospheric structure of the star is studied with synthetic spectra, and an effective temperature between 2600 K and 3000 K is suggested. No SiC emission is seen at 11.3 microns, indicating that grain formation is not a viable process around the star. The lack of dust in R stars may suggest a salient difference between R and N types.

  6. Sodium content as a predictor of the advanced evolution of globular cluster stars.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Simon W; D'Orazi, Valentina; Yong, David; Constantino, Thomas N; Lattanzio, John C; Stancliffe, Richard J; Angelou, George C; Wylie-de Boer, Elizabeth C; Grundahl, Frank

    2013-06-13

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase is the final stage of nuclear burning for low-mass stars. Although Milky Way globular clusters are now known to harbour (at least) two generations of stars, they still provide relatively homogeneous samples of stars that are used to constrain stellar evolution theory. It is predicted by stellar models that the majority of cluster stars with masses around the current turn-off mass (that is, the mass of the stars that are currently leaving the main sequence phase) will evolve through the AGB phase. Here we report that all of the second-generation stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752--70 per cent of the cluster population--fail to reach the AGB phase. Through spectroscopic abundance measurements, we found that every AGB star in our sample has a low sodium abundance, indicating that they are exclusively first-generation stars. This implies that many clusters cannot reliably be used for star counts to test stellar evolution timescales if the AGB population is included. We have no clear explanation for this observation.

  7. Sodium content as a predictor of the advanced evolution of globular cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Simon W.; D'Orazi, Valentina; Yong, David; Constantino, Thomas N.; Lattanzio, John C.; Stancliffe, Richard J.; Angelou, George C.; Wylie-de Boer, Elizabeth C.; Grundahl, Frank

    2013-06-01

    The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase is the final stage of nuclear burning for low-mass stars. Although Milky Way globular clusters are now known to harbour (at least) two generations of stars, they still provide relatively homogeneous samples of stars that are used to constrain stellar evolution theory. It is predicted by stellar models that the majority of cluster stars with masses around the current turn-off mass (that is, the mass of the stars that are currently leaving the main sequence phase) will evolve through the AGB phase. Here we report that all of the second-generation stars in the globular cluster NGC 6752--70 per cent of the cluster population--fail to reach the AGB phase. Through spectroscopic abundance measurements, we found that every AGB star in our sample has a low sodium abundance, indicating that they are exclusively first-generation stars. This implies that many clusters cannot reliably be used for star counts to test stellar evolution timescales if the AGB population is included. We have no clear explanation for this observation.

  8. Rubidium-rich asymptotic giant branch stars.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, D A; García-Lario, P; Plez, B; D'Antona, F; Manchado, A; Trigo-Rodríguez, J M

    2006-12-15

    A long-debated issue concerning the nucleosynthesis of neutron-rich elements in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is the identification of the neutron source. We report intermediate-mass (4 to 8 solar masses) AGB stars in our Galaxy that are rubidium-rich as a result of overproduction of the long-lived radioactive isotope (87)Rb, as predicted theoretically 40 years ago. This finding represents direct observational evidence that the (22)Ne(alpha,n)(25)Mg reaction must be the dominant neutron source in these stars. These stars challenge our understanding of the late stages of the evolution of intermediate-mass stars and would have promoted a highly variable Rb/Sr environment in the early solar nebula.

  9. CARBON AND OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN THE HOT JUPITER EXOPLANET HOST STAR XO-2B AND ITS BINARY COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, Johanna K.; Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    2013-05-01

    With the aim of connecting the compositions of stars and planets, we present the abundances of carbon and oxygen, as well as iron and nickel, for the transiting exoplanet host star XO-2N and its wide-separation binary companion XO-2S. Stellar parameters are derived from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra, and the two stars are found to be similar in their T{sub eff}, log g, iron ([Fe/H]), and nickel ([Ni/H]) abundances. Their carbon ([C/H]) and oxygen ([O/H]) abundances also overlap within errors, although XO-2N may be slightly more C-rich and O-rich than XO-2S. The C/O ratios of both stars ({approx}0.60 {+-} 0.20) may also be somewhat larger than solar (C/O {approx} 0.50). The XO-2 system has a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting one binary component but not the other, allowing us to probe the potential effects planet formation might have on the host star composition. Additionally, with multiple observations of its atmosphere the transiting exoplanet XO-2b lends itself to compositional analysis, which can be compared to the natal chemical environment established by our binary star elemental abundances. This work sets the stage for determining how similar or different exoplanet and host star compositions are, and the implications for planet formation, by discussing the C/O ratio measurements in the unique environment of a visual binary system with one star hosting a transiting hot Jupiter.

  10. The Mass Loss Return from Evolved Stars to the Large Magellanic Cloud: Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, S.; Meixner, M.; Kemper, F.; Tielens, X.; Speck, A.; Matsuura, M.; Bernard, J.; Hony, S.; Gordon, K.; Indebetouw, R.; Marengo, M.; Sloan, G.; Woods, P.; Vijh, U. P.

    2010-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy program Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE; PI: M. Meixner) has observed over 6 million stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud with both the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) instruments to explore the life-cycle of matter in a galaxy. Over 17000 of these stars were found to be candidate Oxygen-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (O-rich AGB) stars. We combine photometry from Spitzer and elsewhere in constructing Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) for the SAGE candidate O-rich AGB stars. These SEDs are then modeled using the radiative transfer program 2Dust, with the goal of determining the O-rich AGB star candidates' mass-loss rates. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra are available as part of the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) for a number of SAGE O-rich AGB star candidates; for two of these, IRS spectra in addition to the photometry are modeled with 2Dust to determine reasonable dust grain parameters to use for the candidate O-rich AGB stars in the rest of the SAGE sample. Using these dust grain properties, a grid of radiative transfer models was computed using 2Dust, varying stellar effective temperature and luminosity, dust shell inner radius, and dust shell optical depth at 10 microns wavelength. Synthetic photometry from models and observed photometry are plotted on color-color and color-magnitude diagrams, and model SEDs are directly compared to observed SEDs. The mass-loss rates from all O-rich AGB stars, especially those with the highest mass-loss rates, in the LMC are estimated and compared to its mass budget. Dust composition is also discussed in light of the results of the model grids.

  11. CH Stars and Barium Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, H.; Sion, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The classical barium (or `Ba II') stars are RED GIANT STARS whose spectra show strong absorption lines of barium, strontium and certain other heavy elements, as well as strong features due to carbon molecules. Together with the related class of CH stars, the Ba II stars were crucial in establishing the existence of neutron-capture reactions in stellar interiors that are responsible for the synt...

  12. STRONG VARIABLE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM Y GEM: ACCRETION ACTIVITY IN AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR WITH A BINARY COMPANION?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Neill, James D.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2011-10-20

    Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late-AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few x L{sub sun} at its peak. We also find weak CO J = 2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km s{sup -1}). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.

  13. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. I. BRIGHT UV STARS IN THE BULGE OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, Philip; Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Girardi, Leo; Bressan, Alessandro; Lang, Dustin; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Dorman, Claire E.; Lauer, Tod R.; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Bell, Eric F.; Bianchi, Luciana; Caldwell, Nelson; Dolphin, Andrew; Kalirai, Jason; Larsen, Soren S.; Rix, Hans-Walter; and others

    2012-08-20

    As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury multi-cycle program, we observed a 12' Multiplication-Sign 6.'5 area of the bulge of M31 with the WFC3/UVIS filters F275W and F336W. From these data we have assembled a sample of {approx}4000 UV-bright, old stars, vastly larger than previously available. We use updated Padova stellar evolutionary tracks to classify these hot stars into three classes: Post-AGB stars (P-AGB), Post-Early AGB (PE-AGB) stars, and AGB-manque stars. P-AGB stars are the end result of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and are expected in a wide range of stellar populations, whereas PE-AGB and AGB-manque (together referred to as the hot post-horizontal branch; HP-HB) stars are the result of insufficient envelope masses to allow a full AGB phase, and are expected to be particularly prominent at high helium or {alpha} abundances when the mass loss on the red giant branch is high. Our data support previous claims that most UV-bright sources in the bulge are likely hot (extreme) horizontal branch (EHB) stars and their progeny. We construct the first radial profiles of these stellar populations and show that they are highly centrally concentrated, even more so than the integrated UV or optical light. However, we find that this UV-bright population does not dominate the total UV luminosity at any radius, as we are detecting only the progeny of the EHB stars that are the likely source of the UV excess. We calculate that only a few percent of main-sequence stars in the central bulge can have gone through the HP-HB phase and that this percentage decreases strongly with distance from the center. We also find that the surface density of hot UV-bright stars has the same radial variation as that of low-mass X-ray binaries. We discuss age, metallicity, and abundance variations as possible explanations for the observed radial variation in the UV-bright population.

  14. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR OUTFLOWS OF CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, Cesar S.; Salama, Farid E-mail: Farid.Salama@nasa.gov

    2013-09-15

    The formation and destruction mechanisms of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and hydrocarbon molecular precursors are studied in the laboratory. We used the newly developed facility COSmIC, which simulates interstellar and circumstellar environments, to investigate both PAHs and species that include the cosmically abundant atoms O, N, and S. The species generated in a discharge plasma are detected, monitored, and characterized in situ using highly sensitive techniques that provide both spectral and ion mass information. We report here the first series of measurements obtained in these experiments which focus on the characterization of the most efficient molecular precursors in the chemical pathways that eventually lead to the formation of carbonaceous grains in the stellar envelopes of carbon stars. We compare and discuss the relative efficiencies of the various molecular precursors that lead to the formation of the building blocks of carbon grains. We discuss the most probable molecular precursors in terms of size and structure and the implications for the expected growth and destruction processes of interstellar carbonaceous dust.

  15. The Governance Committee: Independent Institutions. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, E. B.; Lanier, James L.

    2013-01-01

    This publication is part of an AGB series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimal committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices outlined in this publication support the objectives of board…

  16. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN M62

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Dalessandro, E.

    2015-11-10

    We have collected UVES-FLAMES high-resolution spectra for a sample of 6 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and 13 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster (GC) M62 (NGC 6266). Here we present the detailed abundance analysis of iron, titanium, and light elements (O, Na, Mg, and Al). For the majority (five out of six) of the AGB targets, we find that the abundances of both iron and titanium determined from neutral lines are significantly underestimated with respect to those obtained from ionized features, the latter being, instead, in agreement with those measured for the RGB targets. This is similar to recent findings in other clusters and may suggest the presence of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects. In the O–Na, Al–Mg, and Na–Al planes, the RGB stars show the typical correlations observed for GC stars. Instead, all the AGB targets are clumped in the regions where first-generation stars are expected to lie, similar to what was recently found for the AGB population of NGC 6752. While the sodium and aluminum abundances could be underestimated as a consequence of the NLTE bias affecting iron and titanium, the oxygen line used does not suffer from the same effects, and the lack of O-poor AGB stars therefore is a solid result. We can thus conclude that none of the investigated AGB stars belongs to the second stellar generation of M62. We also find an RGB star with extremely high sodium abundance ([Na/Fe] = +1.08 dex)

  17. Chemical Analysis of Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in M62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Origlia, L.; Lanzoni, B.; Massari, D.; Dalessandro, E.

    2015-11-01

    We have collected UVES-FLAMES high-resolution spectra for a sample of 6 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and 13 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster (GC) M62 (NGC 6266). Here we present the detailed abundance analysis of iron, titanium, and light elements (O, Na, Mg, and Al). For the majority (five out of six) of the AGB targets, we find that the abundances of both iron and titanium determined from neutral lines are significantly underestimated with respect to those obtained from ionized features, the latter being, instead, in agreement with those measured for the RGB targets. This is similar to recent findings in other clusters and may suggest the presence of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects. In the O-Na, Al-Mg, and Na-Al planes, the RGB stars show the typical correlations observed for GC stars. Instead, all the AGB targets are clumped in the regions where first-generation stars are expected to lie, similar to what was recently found for the AGB population of NGC 6752. While the sodium and aluminum abundances could be underestimated as a consequence of the NLTE bias affecting iron and titanium, the oxygen line used does not suffer from the same effects, and the lack of O-poor AGB stars therefore is a solid result. We can thus conclude that none of the investigated AGB stars belongs to the second stellar generation of M62. We also find an RGB star with extremely high sodium abundance ([Na/Fe] = +1.08 dex). Based on observations collected at the ESO-VLT (Cerro Paranal, Chile) under program 193.D-0232. Also based on observations (GO10120 and GO11609) with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  18. Exceptional Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hansen, B.; van Kerkwijk, M.; Phinney, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    As part of our Interdisciplinary Scientist effort (PI, Kulkarni) for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) we proposed an investigation with SIM of a number of exceptional stars. With SIM we plan to observe dozens of nearby white dwarfs and search for planets surviving the evolution away from the main sequence as well as (newly formed) planets formed in the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or as a result of white dwarf mergers. We propose to measure the proper motion of a sample of X-ray binaries and Be star binaries with the view of understanding the originof high latitude objects and inferring natal kicks and pre-supernova orbits. We plan to observe several compact object binaries to determine the mass of the compact star. Of particular importance is the proposed observation of SS 433 (for which we propose to use the spectrometer on SIM to measure the proper motion of the emission line clumps embedded in the relativistic jets). Separately we are investigating the issue of frame tie between SIM and the ecliptic frame (by observing binary millisecond pulsars with SIM; the position of these objects is very well determined by pulsar timing) and the degree to which highly precise visibility amplitude measurements can be inverted to infer binary parameters.

  19. THE INFRARED TELESCOPE FACILITY (IRTF) SPECTRAL LIBRARY: COOL STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, John T.; Cushing, Michael C.; Vacca, William D. E-mail: michael.cushing@gmail.com

    2009-12-01

    We present a 0.8-5 {mu}m spectral library of 210 cool stars observed at a resolving power of R {identical_to} {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} {approx} 2000 with the medium-resolution infrared spectrograph, SpeX, at the 3.0 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The stars have well-established MK spectral classifications and are mostly restricted to near-solar metallicities. The sample not only contains the F, G, K, and M spectral types with luminosity classes between I and V, but also includes some AGB, carbon, and S stars. In contrast to some other spectral libraries, the continuum shape of the spectra is measured and preserved in the data reduction process. The spectra are absolutely flux calibrated using the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Potential uses of the library include studying the physics of cool stars, classifying and studying embedded young clusters and optically obscured regions of the Galaxy, evolutionary population synthesis to study unresolved stellar populations in optically obscured regions of galaxies and synthetic photometry. The library is available in digital form from the IRTF Web site.

  20. PROBING THE '30 {mu}m' FEATURE: LESSONS FROM EXTREME CARBON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, Stephen J.; Speck, Angela; Volk, Kevin E-mail: speckan@missouri.edu

    2013-02-20

    Some carbon-rich evolved stars exhibit a very prominent spectral feature at {approx}{sup 3}0 {mu}m''. The C-rich nature of these objects suggests that the carrier is a sulfide, carbide, or other substance apt to form in a reducing environment. However, the carrier of this spectral feature remains disputed, with magnesium sulfide (MgS) as the most favored candidate. In order to investigate the carrier of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature further, we have taken a dual approach, studying both laboratory and observational data. In order to obtain a homogeneous sample, we studied the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature observed in the spectra of galactic extreme carbon stars that exhibit the 11 {mu}m SiC absorption feature. Thus, we avoid potential differences in the target objects that could contribute to the observed differences in the shape, position, and strength of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature. In addition, we analyzed the shape and position of the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' features for a range of sulfide minerals for which laboratory data exist. Our study of observed astronomical features shows a range of shapes and positions for the {sup 3}0 {mu}m'' feature despite similarities in the source objects. The nature of our sample argues against grain processing or temperature differences due to hardening of the stellar radiation field with evolution. While there are very few correlations between spectral parameters for our sample, the peak positions of the {approx}11 {mu}m absorption and 30 {mu}m emission features do correlate, and these peak positions correlate with the modeled optical depth. These correlations suggest that the carriers of the observable spectral features are closely related to one another and to the density/pressure in the dust formation zone. Furthermore, we suggest that the blue-broadening of the 11 {mu}m feature cannot be attributed to SiS{sub 2} based on existing laboratory spectra, but further lab work is needed to investigate the effect of increasing oxidation.

  1. Companions to bright S and MS stars - Technetium deficiency and binarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hollis R.; Ake, Thomas B.; Ameen, Mudhaffer M.

    1993-01-01

    To test the popular hypothesis that technetium-deficient stars of spectral types S and MS are mass-transfer binaries, we have searched for ultraviolet light from the putative hot secondaries in spectra taken with the SWP spectrograph of IUE. Although most S and MS stars are apparently thermally pulsing AGB (asymptotic giant branch) stars whose surfaces have been enriched with s-process elements and carbon dredged up from the interior, those stars whose spectra show enhanced s-process elements but no Tc are widely believed to be cooler analogs of the Ba II stars, which apparently owe their unusual abundances to prior mass transfer, the Tc from which has decayed away. We report IUE observations of 15 S and MS stars with the SWP, including the identification of six hot companions. Assembling all the IUE observations made to date, we find clear support for the mass-transfer hypothesis, confirming evidence from other lines of research. We further discuss the ages of the companions and the implications of these discoveries for stellar evolution.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Water maser emission toward post-AGB and PN (Gomez+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J. F.; Rizzo, J. R.; Suarez, O.; Palau, A.; Miranda, L. F.; Guerrero, M. A.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Torrelles, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The observed sources are listed in Table 1. They comprise most of the sources in Ramos-Larios et al. (2009A&A...501.1207R). They are post-AGB stars and PN candidates with the IRAS color criteria of Suarez et al. (2006A&A...458..173S) and with signs of strong optical obscuration. We have also included some optically visible post-AGB stars from Suarez et al. (2006A&A...458..173S) that were not included in our previous water maser observations of Suarez et al. (2007A&A...467.1085S, 2009A&A...505..217S) or for which those observations had poor sensitivity. We observed the 616-523 transition of H2O (rest frequency = 22235.08MHz) using three different telescopes: the DSS-63 antenna (70m diameter) at the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex (MDSCC) near Robledo de Chavela (Spain), the 64m antenna at the Parkes Observatory of the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), and the 100m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The observed positions, rms noise per spectral channel, and observing dates are listed in Table 1. (3 data files).

  3. CNO abundances and carbon isotope ratios in evolved stars of the open clusters NGC 2324, NGC 2477, and NGC 3960

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautvaišienė, Gražina; Drazdauskas, Arnas; Bragaglia, Angela; Randich, Sofia; Ženovienė, Renata

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Our main aim is to determine carbon-to-nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios for evolved giants in the open clusters NGC 2324, NGC 2477, and NGC 3960, which have turn-off masses of about 2 M⊙, and to compare them with predictions of theoretical models. Methods: High-resolution spectra were analysed using a differential synthetic spectrum method. Abundances of carbon were derived using the C2 Swan (0, 1) band heads at 5135 and 5635.5 Å. The wavelength interval 7940-8130 Å with strong CN features was analysed to determine nitrogen abundances and carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen abundances were determined from the [O i] line at 6300 Å. Results: The mean values of the CNO abundances are [C/Fe] = -0.35 ± 0.06 (s.d.), [N/Fe] = 0.28 ± 0.05, and [O/Fe] = -0.02 ± 0.10 in seven stars of NGC 2324; [C/Fe] = -0.26 ± 0.02, [N/Fe] = 0.39 ± 0.04, and [O/Fe] = -0.11 ± 0.06 in six stars of NGC 2477; and [C/Fe] = -0.39 ± 0.04, [N/Fe] = 0.32 ± 0.05, and [O/Fe] = -0.19 ± 0.06 in six stars of NGC 3960. The mean C/N ratio is equal to 0.92 ± 0.12, 0.91 ± 0.09, and 0.80 ± 0.13, respectively. The mean 12C /13C ratio is equal to 21 ± 1, 20 ± 1, and 16 ± 4, respectively. The 12C /13C and C/N ratios of stars in the investigated open clusters were compared with the ratios predicted by stellar evolution models. Conclusions: The mean values of the 12C /13C and C/N ratios in NGC 2324 and NGC 2477 agree well with the first dredge-up and thermohaline-induced extra-mixing models, which are similar for intermediate turn-off mass stars. The 12C /13C ratios in the investigated clump stars of NGC 3960 span from 10 to 20. The mean carbon isotope and C/N ratios in NGC 3960 are close to predictions of the model in which the thermohaline- and rotation-induced (if rotation velocity at the zero-age main sequence was 30% of the critical velocity) extra-mixing act together. Based on observations collected at ESO telescopes under programmes 072.D-0550 and 074.D-0571.

  4. HST/COS Observations of the UV-Bright Star Y453 in the Globular Cluster M4 (NGC 6121)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, William V. D.; Chayer, Pierre; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Post-AGB stars represent a short-lived phase of stellar evolution during which stars cross the optical color-magnitude diagram from the cool, red tip of the assymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the hot, blue tip of the white-dwarf cooling curve. Their surface chemistry reflects the nuclear-shell burning, mixing, and mass-loss processes characteristic of AGB stars, and their high effective temperatures allow the detection of elements that are unobservable in cool giants. Post-AGB stars in globular clusters offer the additional advantages of known distance, age, and initial chemistry. To better understand the AGB evolution of low-mass stars, we have observed the post-AGB star Y453 in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The star, which has an effective temperature of at least 60,000 K, shows absorption from He, C, N, O, Ne, Si, S, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Ga. While the star's C and O abundances are consistent with those measured in a sample of nitrogen-poor RGB stars in M4, its N abundance is considerably enhanced. The star's low C abundance suggests that it left the AGB before the onset of third dredge-up.This work was supported by NASA grant HST-GO-13721.001-A to the University of Wisconsin, Whitewater. P.C. is supported by the Canadian Space Agency under a contract with NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics.

  5. ALMA observations of atomic carbon in z ∼ 4 dusty star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, M. S.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aravena, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bisbas, T. G.; Chapman, S. C.; De Breuck, C.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Greve, T. R.; Hezaveh, Y.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Murphy, E. J.; Spilker, J. S.; Strandet, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiß, A.

    2017-04-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array [C I](1 - 0) (rest frequency 492 GHz) observations for a sample of 13 strongly lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) originally discovered at 1.4 mm in a blank-field survey by the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We compare these new data with available [C I] observations from the literature, allowing a study of the interstellar medium (ISM) properties of ∼30 extreme DSFGs spanning a redshift range 2 < z < 5. Using the [C I] line as a tracer of the molecular ISM, we find a mean molecular gas mass for SPT-DSFGs of 6.6 × 1010 M⊙. This is in tension with gas masses derived via low-J 12CO and dust masses; bringing the estimates into accordance requires either (a) an elevated CO-to-H2 conversion factor for our sample of αCO ∼ 2.5 and a gas-to-dust ratio ∼200, or (b) an high carbon abundance X_{C I} ˜ 7× 10^{-5}. Using observations of a range of additional atomic and molecular lines (including [C I], [C II]and multiple transitions of CO), we use a modern photodissociation region code (3D-PDR) to assess the physical conditions (including the density, UV radiation field strength and gas temperature) within the ISM of the DSFGs in our sample. We find that the ISM within our DSFGs is characterized by dense gas permeated by strong UV fields. We note that previous efforts to characterize photodissociation region regions in DSFGs may have significantly under-estimated the density of the ISM. Combined, our analysis suggests that the ISM of extreme dusty starbursts at high redshift consists of dense, carbon-rich gas not directly comparable to the ISM of starbursts in the local Universe.

  6. Theoretical spectra of circumstellar dust shells around carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, J. M.; Dominik, C.; Sedlmayr, E.

    1994-01-01

    Realistic modeling of circumstellar dust shells around evolved stars has to include a physical treatment of the interaction among hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, radiative transfer, chemistry and dust formation and -growth. A self-consistent solution of this problem is presented in the case of stationary, spherical symmetric dust-driven winds. The resulting shell structure and the mass-loss rate are completely determined by the three fundamental stellar parameters stellar mass M(stellar), stellar luminosity L(stellar) and effective temperature T(sub eff) and by the element abundances epsilon(sub i). A detailed calculation of the transport coefficients of the dust component by means of the particle size distribution function and the solution of the non-grey radiative transfer problem provide realistic synthetic spectra of the dust shell models. We discuss the dependence of the resulting spectra on the stellar parameters in terms of infrared two color diagrams. Application of these model calculations to the prominent infrared object IRC +10216 yields best agreement with the observed spectrum and the visibility data at maximum light for the stellar parameters M(stellar) = 0.7 solar mass, L(stellar) = 2.4 x 10(exp 4) solar luminosity, T(stellar) = 2010K and a carbon to oxygen ratio of epsilon(sub c)/epsilon(sub o) = 1.40, which corresponds to a mass-loss rate of M-dot = 8 x 10(exp -5) solar mass/yr. In this model only amorphous carbon grains are considered as the main opacity source. From this model a distance to IRC +10216 of d = 170pc is deduced. The total mass contained in the circumstellar dust shell implies and initial main sequence mass of M(sub ZAMS) greater than or = 1.3 solar mass for IRC +10216.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars (Masseron+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masseron, T.; Johnson, J. A.; Plez, B.; van Eck, S.; Primas, F.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.

    2010-04-01

    We compiled abundances from analyses of high-resolution spectra (R>40000) of CEMP stars (Tables 1 and 2), Ba stars, and non-C-enhanced metal-poor stars (Tables 3 and 4). C-rich stars are defined as stars with [C/Fe]>0.9. In this paper, all plots are compiled exclusively of data from these tables, including our own data from Paper II (Masseron et al., in prep.). All these data are renormalised by the Asplund (2005ARA&A..43..481A) solar abundances. (5 data files).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cool carbon stars in the halo and Fornax dSph (Mauron+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauron, N.; Gigoyan, K. S.; Berlioz-Arthaud, P.; Klotz, A.

    2014-03-01

    Spectroscopy of halo candidate C stars was achieved at ESO (La Silla) on 17-18 October 2009 at the NTT telescope equipped with the EFOSC2 instrument in the spectral range 5200-9300Å. We were able to secure the spectra of 25 candidates with exposure times of generally a few minutes, and eventually, eight were found to be C-rich. We also observed three carbon stars in the Carina dwarf galaxy because they were erroneously believed to be in the halo, and for comparison APM 2225-1401, a C star from the list of Totten and Irwin (1998MNRAS.294....1T). We found spectra that covered the Hα region for four halo stars in the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory archive. They were obtained with the BAO 2.6m telescope and the ByuFOSC2 spectrograph. These spectra were taken on 28 March 1999, 12 June 2002, 11 May 2000, and 11 June 2000 with a resolution ~8Å. Concerning Fornax, spectra of C stars were found in the ESO Archive (program 70.D-0203, P.I. Marc Azzopardi). They were obtained on 5 November 2002 with the ESO 3.6m telescope and the EFOSC instrument with a resolution ~23Å and a spectral coverage from 4000Å to 7950Å. Sixteen C stars were monitored with the ground-based 25cm diameter TAROT telescopes. This monitoring took place irregularly at ESO La Silla and Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur (France) beginning in 2010. Thanks to the recently released Catalina and LINEAR databases, we were able to examine the light curves of 143 halo C stars and found 66 new periodic (Mira or SRa-type) variables among them. (5 data files).

  9. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: CEMP-s and CEMP-no subclasses in the halo system of the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Carollo, Daniela; Freeman, Ken; Beers, Timothy C.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Martell, Sarah L. E-mail: kcf@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: vplacco@gemini.edu E-mail: smartell@aao.gov.au

    2014-06-20

    We explore the kinematics and orbital properties of a sample of 323 very metal-poor stars in the halo system of the Milky Way, selected from the high-resolution spectroscopic follow-up studies of Aoki et al. and Yong et al. The combined sample contains a significant fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars (22% or 29%, depending on whether a strict or relaxed criterion is applied for this definition). Barium abundances (or upper limits) are available for the great majority of the CEMP stars, allowing for their separation into the CEMP-s and CEMP-no subclasses. A new method to assign membership to the inner- and outer-halo populations of the Milky Way is developed, making use of the integrals of motion, and applied to determine the relative fractions of CEMP stars in these two subclasses for each halo component. Although limited by small-number statistics, the data suggest that the inner halo of the Milky Way exhibits a somewhat higher relative number of CEMP-s stars than CEMP-no stars (57% versus 43%), while the outer halo possesses a clearly higher fraction of CEMP-no stars than CEMP-s stars (70% versus 30%). Although larger samples of CEMP stars with known Ba abundances are required, this result suggests that the dominant progenitors of CEMP stars in the two halo components were different; massive stars for the outer halo, and intermediate-mass stars in the case of the inner halo.

  10. Molecules and dust in the Large Magellanic Cloud: new colour classifications for post-Main-Sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwick-Kemper, Ciska; Leisenring, Jarron; Meixner, Margaret; van Dyk, Schuyler; Szczerba, Ryszard

    In the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), as in the Milky Way, dust formation predominantly occurs in the circumstellar environments of evolved stars. The process of dust condensation is not fully understood, and investigating the dust condensation sequence in the low metallicity environment of the LMC (about half of the solar metallicity), may yield additional insights in the dust condensation process. Topics to be studied include the final condensation products, the correlation of the condensation sequence with evolutionary status of the star, degree of crystallinity of the silicates and ratio of carbon-rich dust producing stars. The composition and properties of dust are most easily studied using infrared spectroscopy, and using the high sensitivity of the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board of Spitzer, we were able to observe the thermal emission from circumstellar dust of these stars individually. A sample of 63 post-Main-Sequence stars were selected, using their 2MASS/MSX colours (Egan et al. 2001). We aimed to cover all post-Main-Sequence evolutionary stages, to make an inventory of the dust condensation products, while we placed a certain emphasis on oxygen-rich AGB stars with a intermediate mass-loss rate, to study the existence of a threshold mass-loss rate above which crystalline silicates are observed (Kemper et al. 2001). Here we will present the observed spectra, along with their spectral classification. We find that a large fraction of the stars we observed exhibit spectral features of carbon-rich dust and molecules, such as SiC, C2H2 and MgS. In fact we find that many of these stars are previously classified as oxygen-rich AGB stars, or as OH/IR stars based on their NIR/MIR colours (Egan et al. 2001). These colours are determined for Galactic samples, while in the LMC sample, stars with a carbon-rich chemistry in their outflows occupy a much larger region of the various colour-colour diagrams. In addition, a large fraction of the sample show amorphous

  11. DUST PRODUCTION FACTORIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: FORMATION OF CARBON GRAINS IN RED-SUPERGIANT WINDS OF VERY MASSIVE POPULATION III STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, Takaya; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Maeda, Keiichi; Kozasa, Takashi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Langer, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the formation of dust in a stellar wind during the red-supergiant (RSG) phase of a very massive Population III star with a zero-age main sequence mass of 500 M {sub ☉}. We show that, in a carbon-rich wind with a constant velocity, carbon grains can form with a lognormal-like size distribution, and that all of the carbon available for dust formation finally condenses into dust for wide ranges of the mass-loss rate ((0.1-3) × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) and wind velocity (1-100 km s{sup –1}). We also find that the acceleration of the wind, driven by newly formed dust, suppresses the grain growth but still allows more than half of the gas-phase carbon to finally be locked up in dust grains. These results indicate that, at most, 1.7 M {sub ☉} of carbon grains can form during the RSG phase of 500 M {sub ☉} Population III stars. Such a high dust yield could place very massive primordial stars as important sources of dust at the very early epoch of the universe if the initial mass function of Population III stars was top-heavy. We also briefly discuss a new formation scenario of carbon-rich ultra-metal-poor stars, considering feedback from very massive Population III stars.

  12. Expanding the Catalog: Considering the Importance of Carbon, Magnesium, and Neon in the Evolution of Stars and Habitable Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truitt, Amanda; Young, Patrick A.

    2017-01-01

    Building on previous work, we have expanded our catalog of evolutionary models for stars with variable composition; here we present models for stars of mass 0.5–1.2 M⊙, at scaled metallicities of 0.1–1.5 Z⊙, and specific C/Fe, Mg/Fe, and Ne/Fe values of 0.58–1.72 C/Fe⊙, 0.54–1.84 Mg/Fe⊙, and 0.5–2.0 Ne/Fe⊙, respectively. We include a spread in abundance values for carbon and magnesium based on observations of their variability in nearby stars; we choose an arbitrary spread in neon abundance values commensurate with the range seen in other low Z elements due to the difficult nature of obtaining precise measurements of neon abundances in stars. As indicated by the results of Truitt et al., it is essential that we understand how differences in individual elemental abundances, and not just the total scaled metallicity, can measurably impact a star’s evolutionary lifetime and other physical characteristics. In that work, we found that oxygen abundances significantly impacted the stellar evolution; carbon, magnesium, and neon are potentially important elements to individually consider due to their relatively high (but also variable) abundances in stars. We present 528 new stellar main-sequence models, and we calculate the time-dependent evolution of the associated habitable zone boundaries for each based on mass, temperature, and luminosity. We also reintroduce the 2 Gyr “Continuously Habitable Zone” (CHZ2) as a useful tool to help gauge the habitability potential for a given planetary system.

  13. Evidence for two discrete epochs of star formation in the large magellanic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Frogel, J.A.; Blanco, V.M.

    1983-11-15

    An infrared color-magnitude diagram for an unbiased sample of M giants in a 0.12 deg/sup 2/ field of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) shows the existence of two distinct asymptotic giant branches (AGBs), one of which is 1.5 mag brighter than the other. Stars on the bright AGB are quite similar in color and luminosity to giants in LMC clusters which have ages of about 10/sup 8/ yr; those on the faint AGB look like giants in clusters with ages of a few Gyr. The faint AGB is identified with the star-forming episode found by Butcher and Stryker. The bright AGB is taken to be evidence for a second, discrete episode of star formation corresponding in age to the blue globular clusters in the LMC. At least for main-sequence stars near the turnoff, this recent episode has been only one-tenth as efficient at making stars as was the older episode. The rate of star formation between these two episodes appears to have been significantly lower than in either.

  14. Evidence for two discrete epochs of star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frogel, J. A.; Blanco, V. M.

    1983-11-01

    An infrared color-magnitude diagram for an unbiased sample of M giants in a 0.12 sq deg field of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) shows the existence of two distinct asymptotic giant branches (AGBs), one of which is 1.5 mag brighter than the other. Stars on the bright AGB are quite similar in color and luminosity to giants in LMC clusters which have ages of about 10 to the 8th yr; those on the faint AGB look like giants in clusters with ages of a few Gyr. The faint AGB is identified with the star-forming episode found by Butcher and Stryker (1981). The bright AGB is taken to be evidence for a second, discrete episode of star formation corresponding in age to the blue globular clusters in the LMC. At least for main-sequence stars near the turnoff, this recent episode has been only one-tenth as efficient at making stars as was the older episode. The rate of star formation between these two episodes appears to have been significantly lower than in either.

  15. THE S{sup 4}G PERSPECTIVE ON CIRCUMSTELLAR DUST EXTINCTION OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN M100

    SciTech Connect

    Meidt, Sharon E.; Schinnerer, Eva; Holwerda, Benne; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Sheth, Kartik; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Seibert, Mark; Knapen, Johan H.; Bosma, Albert; Athanassoula, E.; Hinz, Joannah L.; Regan, Michael; De Paz, Armando Gil; Mizusawa, Trisha; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; and others

    2012-04-01

    We examine the effect of circumstellar dust extinction on the near-IR (NIR) contribution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in intermediate-age clusters throughout the disk of M100. For our sample of 17 AGB-dominated clusters we extract optical-to-mid-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and find that NIR brightness is coupled to the mid-IR dust emission in such a way that a significant reduction of AGB light, of up to 1 mag in the K band, follows from extinction by the dust shell formed during this stage. Since the dust optical depth varies with AGB chemistry (C-rich or O-rich), our results suggest that the contribution of AGB stars to the flux from their host clusters will be closely linked to the metallicity and the progenitor mass of the AGB star, to which dust chemistry and mass-loss rate are sensitive. Our sample of clusters-each the analogue of a {approx}1 Gyr old post-starburst galaxy-has implications within the context of mass and age estimation via SED modeling at high-z: we find that the average {approx}0.5 mag extinction estimated here may be sufficient to reduce the AGB contribution in the (rest-frame) K band from {approx}70%, as predicted in the latest generation of synthesis models, to {approx}35%. Our technique for selecting AGB-dominated clusters in nearby galaxies promises to be effective for discriminating the uncertainties associated with AGB stars in intermediate-age populations that plague age and mass estimation in high-z galaxies.

  16. Constraining Models of Evolved UV-Bright Stars in the M31 Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, Philip

    2014-10-01

    We aim to use HST observations of M31 to generate the definitive data set for modeling the population of the UV-bright stars that contribute to the UV flux in old stellar populations (i.e., the "UV excess" seen in some elliptical galaxies and spiral bulges).We propose to place stringent observational constraints on the post-AGB (P-AGB) and post-early AGB (PE-AGB) phases of stellar evolution using a UV survey of M31's bulge. M31 is a critical laboratory for testing these models, as it hosts an old, metal-rich stellar population with high stellar densities such that even rare evolutionary phases are well-represented.We will (1) assemble a catalog of UV-bright stars in the center of M31 in F336W and F225W, extending out to ~0.7 kpc, to sample stellar populations with different metallicities; and (2) image a smaller 0.9 sqr-arcmin strip with ACS/SBC in F140LP, to image the regions with the highest density of rapidly-evolving P-AGB stars. The FUV imaging will allow us to separate the P-AGB from the PE-AGB. These observations will include thousands of UV-bright stars, increasing the size of existing samples by orders of magnitude.These new observations will drive revisions in models for post-HB evolution, which we will merge into new isochrone libraries and stellar population synthesis codes. The revisions will have important implications for AGB evolution, spectral evolution models of galaxies, and for mass loss on the RGB. The observations will also have a direct impact on interpreting (1) the UV flux from old stellar populations; (2) the emission line flux from M31's nuclear spiral; and (3) models of dust heating by old stellar populations.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spitzer/IRS obs. of Magellanic carbon stars (Sloan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, G. C.; Kraemer, K. E.; McDonald, I.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Wood, P. R.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Lagadec, E.; Boyer, M. L.; Kemper, F.; Matsuura, M.; Sahai, R.; Sargent, B. A.; Srinivasan, S.; van Loon, J. T.; Volk, K.

    2016-09-01

    Table 1 lists the 144 objects in the LMC and 40 in the SMC observed with the IRS (spectral coverage at 5-14um and 14-37um, respectively, with a resolution R~80-120) and identified as carbon stars. A variety of Spitzer observing programs contributed to the present sample of carbon stars (see Note 2 in table 1). We adopt distance moduli for the LMC and SMC of 18.5 and 18.9, respectively. For all of our targets, we have constructed SEDs based on multi-epoch photometry in the optical, near-IR, and mid-IR from several surveys. The mid-IR data come from the SAGE survey of the LMC (Meixner et al. 2006, J/AJ/132/2268) and the SAGE-SMC survey for the SMC (Gordon et al. 2011AJ....142..102G)). The SAGE-VAR survey adds four epochs from the Warm Spitzer Mission at 3.6 and 4.5um for portions of the LMC and SMC (Riebel et al. 2015ApJ...807....1R). We also used additional epochs at 3.4 and 4.6um from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Experiment (WISE; Wright et al. 2010AJ....140.1868W) and the NEOWISE reactivation mission (Mainzer et al. 2014ApJ...792...30M). Near-IR photometry comes from the 2MASS survey, and the deeper 2MASS-6X survey provides a second epoch at J, H, and Ks (Cutri et al. 2012, II/281; Skrutskie et al. 2006, VII/233). Additional epochs come from the Deep Near-IR Survey of the Southern Sky (DENIS) at J and Ks (Cioni et al. 2000, II/228) and the IR Survey Facility (IRSF) at J, H, and Ks (Kato et al. 2007, II/288). In the optical, we relied on the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS) at U, B, V, and I (Zaritsky et al. 2002, J/AJ/123/855; 2004, J/AJ/128/1606). DENIS adds data at I. Additional mean magnitudes at V and I in the LMC come from the OGLE-III Shallow Survey (Ulaczyk et al. 2013, J/AcA/63/1). Where possible, we replaced the V and I data with mean magnitudes from the OGLE-III surveys of the Magellanic Clouds, which also give pulsation periods and amplitudes (Soszynski et al. 2009, J/AcA/59/335; 2011, J/AcA/61/217). We also consider a Galactic control

  18. CARBON CHEMISTRY IN THE ENVELOPE OF VY CANIS MAJORIS: IMPLICATIONS FOR OXYGEN-RICH EVOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ziurys, L. M.; Tenenbaum, E. D.; Pulliam, R. L.; Woolf, N. J.; Milam, S. N. E-mail: emilyt@as.arizona.edu E-mail: nwoolf@as.arizona.edu

    2009-04-20

    Observations of the carbon-bearing molecules CO, HCN, CS, HNC, CN, and HCO{sup +} have been conducted toward the circumstellar envelope of the oxygen-rich red supergiant star, VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa), using the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). CO and HCN were also observed toward the O-rich shells of NML Cyg, TX Cam, IK Tau, and W Hya. Rotational transitions of these species at 1 mm, 0.8 mm, and 0.4 mm were measured with the ARO Submillimeter Telescope, including the J = 6 {yields} 5 line of CO at 691 GHz toward TX Cam and W Hya. The ARO 12 m was used for 2 mm and 3 mm observations. Four transitions were observed for HCO{sup +} in VY CMa, the first definitive identification of this ion in a circumstellar envelope. Molecular line profiles from VY CMa are complex, indicating three separate outflows: a roughly spherical flow and separate red- and blueshifted winds, as suggested by earlier observations. Spectra from the other sources appear to trace a single outflow component. The line data were modeled with a radiative transfer code to establish molecular abundances relative to H{sub 2} and source distributions. Abundances for CO derived for these objects vary over an order of magnitude, f {approx} 0.4-5 x 10{sup -4}, with the lower values corresponding to the supergiants. For HCN, a similar range in abundance is found (f {approx} 0.9-9 x 10{sup -6}), with no obvious dependence on the mass-loss rate. In VY CMa, HCO{sup +} is present in all three outflows with f {approx} 0.4-1.6 x 10{sup -8} and a spatial extent similar to that of CO. HNC is found only in the red- and blueshifted components with [HCN]/[HNC] {approx} 150-190, while [CN]/[HCN] {approx} 0.01 in the spherical flow. All three velocity components are traced in CS, which has a confined spatial distribution and f {approx} 2-6 x 10{sup -7}. These observations suggest that carbon-bearing molecules in O-rich shells are produced by a combination of photospheric shocks and photochemistry. Shocks may play a more

  19. Quantitative Spectral Analysis of Evolved Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2009-09-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  20. Mass Loss from Low- and Intermediate-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, P. R.

    2007-11-01

    Low- and intermediate-mass single stars (LIMS) have initial masses M<~6-7 Msolar. They end up as white dwarfs of ~0.6-1.4 Msolar, the rest of their mass being lost during their nuclear-burning lifetimes. Stellar pulsation theory can be used to estimate current (as opposed to initial) stellar masses and can be used to trace accumulated mass loss when the initial mass is known. Some examples are given for RR Lyrae stars, first giant branch (FGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and Cepheid variables. Most of the mass loss from LIMS is thought to occur on the FGB and AGB, although it has been argued that pulsation masses derived for Cepheids suggest that there is significant mass loss in earlier evolutionary phases. Direct estimates of mass loss rates can also be used to estimate the amounts of mass lost from LIMS. Some recent Spitzer-based estimates of mass loss rates for AGB stars in the Magellanic Clouds are discussed. Finally, binary and variable AGB stars that may be related to asymmetic mass loss such as that seen in elliptical and bipolar planetary nebulae are discussed.

  1. Fullerenes and fullerene-related molecules in the circumstellar environment of evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Luis, J. J.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Kameswara Rao, N.; Manchado, A.; Cataldo, F.

    2017-03-01

    Fullerenes, highly resistant and stable tridimensional carbon molecules, have attracted much attention since their discovery at laboratory by Kroto and collaborators; e.g., fullerenes and fullerene-related molecules may explain several phenomena in Astrophysics such as the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and the UV bump. The recent detection of the most common fullerenes (C_{60} and C_{70}) in the circumstellar environment of evolved stars like planetary nebulae (PNe) has raised the idea that other forms of carbon such as hydrogenated fullerenes, buckyonions, and carbon nanotubes may be widespread in the Universe and it has permitted to study the DIBs towards fullerene-rich space environments for the first time. In particular, here we present: i) the first possible detection of two diffuse bands of circumstellar origin (diffuse circumstellar bands, DCBs) at 4428 and 5780 Å around PN Tc1; and ii) the non-detection of fullerene-related molecules such as hydrogenated fullerenes(fulleranes like C_{60}H_{36} and C_{60}H_{18}) in the 3-5 μm spectral range in C_{60}-rich PNe. Our non-detections together with the (tentative) fulleranes detection in a proto-PN suggests that fulleranes may be formed in the short transition phase between asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and PNe but they are quickly destroyed by the UV radiation field from the central star.

  2. THE INSIDIOUS BOOSTING OF THERMALLY PULSING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN INTERMEDIATE-AGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Girardi, Léo; Marigo, Paola; Bressan, Alessandro; Rosenfield, Philip

    2013-11-10

    In the recent controversy about the role of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars in evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models of galaxies, one particular aspect is puzzling: TP-AGB models aimed at reproducing the lifetimes and integrated fluxes of the TP-AGB phase in Magellanic Cloud (MC) clusters, when incorporated into EPS models, are found to overestimate, to various extents, the TP-AGB contribution in resolved star counts and integrated spectra of galaxies. In this paper, we call attention to a particular evolutionary aspect, linked to the physics of stellar interiors, that in all probability is the main cause of this conundrum. As soon as stellar populations intercept the ages at which red giant branch stars first appear, a sudden and abrupt change in the lifetime of the core He-burning phase causes a temporary 'boost' in the production rate of subsequent evolutionary phases, including the TP-AGB. For a timespan of about 0.1 Gyr, triple TP-AGB branches develop at slightly different initial masses, causing their frequency and contribution to the integrated luminosity of the stellar population to increase by a factor of ∼2. The boost occurs for turn-off masses of ∼1.75 M{sub ☉}, just in the proximity of the expected peak in the TP-AGB lifetimes (for MC metallicities), and for ages of ∼1.6 Gyr. Coincidently, this relatively narrow age interval happens to contain the few very massive MC clusters that host most of the TP-AGB stars used to constrain stellar evolution and EPS models. This concomitance makes the AGB-boosting particularly insidious in the context of present EPS models. As we discuss in this paper, the identification of this evolutionary effect brings about three main consequences. First, we claim that present estimates of the TP-AGB contribution to the integrated light of galaxies derived from MC clusters are biased toward too large values. Second, the relative TP-AGB contribution of single-burst populations falling in

  3. Investigation of Variability of Faint Galactic Early-Type Carbon Stars from the First Byurakan Spectral Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.; Kostandyan, G. R.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this poster, we discuss the nature of 66 faint carbon (C) stars which have been discovered by scrutinizing the plates of the First Byurakan Survey (FBS). These plates display low-resolution spectra of objects located at high Galactic latitudes and have a limiting magnitude of about V=16. Our sample of 66 confirmed spectroscopically to be C stars. These 66 objects are those which show early-type spectra. To better characterize these objects, medium-resolution CCD spectra were obtained and are exploited for them all, together with consideration of their 2MASS near-infrared (NIR) colors and their optical variability. We derive effective temperatures from photometry. Finally, the optical variability of our objects are studied by using the data of the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS). It is found that the vast majority does not display variability. However, for some of them, the phased light curve may indicate the presence of a secondary component.

  4. s-Process Abundances in Binary Stars With White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, T.; Jorissen, A.; Van Eck, S.; Masseron, T.; van Winckel, H.

    2015-12-01

    The enrichment of barium stars in s-process elements is known to be due to pollution by mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) companion star, now an extincted C-O white-dwarf (McClure et al. [4]; Gray et al. [1]). We investigate the relationship between the level of enrichment in s-process elements in the barium star and the mass of its white dwarf (WD) companion. It is expected that helium WDs, which have masses smaller than about 0.5 M⊙ and whose progenitor never reached the AGB phase, should not pollute with s-process elements their giant companion. That companion should thus never turn into a barium star. Our results conform to the expectation that binary systems with WD companions less massive than 0.5 M⊙ do not host barium stars.

  5. Detection of Phosphorus, Sulphur, and Zinc in the Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Star BD+44 493

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Beers, Timothy C.

    2016-06-01

    The carbon-enhanced metal-poor star BD+44°493 ([Fe/H] = -3.9) has been proposed as a candidate second-generation star enriched by metals from a single Pop III star. We report the first detections of P and S and the second detection of Zn in any extremely metal-poor carbon-enhanced star, using new spectra of BD+44°493 collected by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We derive [P/Fe] = -0.34 ± 0.21, [S/Fe] = +0.07 ± 0.41, and [Zn/Fe] = -0.10 ± 0.24. We increase by 10-fold the number of Si i lines detected in BD+44°493, yielding [Si/Fe] = +0.15 ± 0.22. The [S/Fe] and [Zn/Fe] ratios exclude the hypothesis that the abundance pattern in BD+44°493 results from depletion of refractory elements onto dust grains. Comparison with zero-metallicity supernova (SN) models suggests that the stellar progenitor that enriched BD+44°493 was massive and ejected much less than 0.07 M ⊙ of 56Ni, characteristic of a faint SN. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-14231.

  6. A second post-AGB nebula that contains gas in rotation and in expansion: ALMA maps of IW Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, V.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Alcolea, J.; Van Winckel, H.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Santander-García, M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the presence of both rotation and expansion in post-AGB nebulae, in particular around IW Car, a binary post-AGB star that was suspected to be surrounded by a Keplerian disk. Methods: We obtained high-quality ALMA observations of 12CO and 13CO J = 3-2 lines in IW Car. The maps were analyzed by means of a simplified model of CO emission, based on those used for similar objects. Results: Our observations clearly show the presence of gas components in rotation, in an equatorial disk, and expansion, which shows an hourglass-like structure with a symmetry axis perpendicular to the rotation plane and is probably formed of material extracted from the disk. Our modeling can reproduce the observations and shows moderate uncertainties. The rotation velocity corresponds to a central stellar mass of approximately 1 M⊙. We also derive the total mass of the molecule-rich nebula, found to be of 4 × 10-3M⊙; the outflow is approximately eight times less massive than the disk. From the kinematical age of the outflow and the mass values derived for both components, we infer a (future) lifetime of the disk of approximately 5000-10 000 yr.

  7. The Galactic R Coronae Borealis Stars: The C2 Swan Bands, the Carbon Problem, and the 12C/13C Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hema, B. P.; Pandey, Gajendra; Lambert, David L.

    2012-03-01

    Observed spectra of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) and hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars are analyzed by synthesizing the C2 Swan bands (1, 0), (0, 0), and (0, 1) using our detailed line list and the Uppsala model atmospheres. The (0, 1) and (0, 0) C2 bands are used to derive the 12C abundance, and the (1, 0) 12C13C band to determine the 12C/13C ratios. The carbon abundance derived from the C2 Swan bands is about the same for the adopted models constructed with different carbon abundances over the range 8.5 (C/He = 0.1%) to 10.5 (C/He = 10%). Carbon abundances derived from C I lines are about a factor of four lower than the carbon abundance of the adopted model atmosphere over the same C/He interval, as reported by Asplund et al., who dubbed the mismatch between adopted and derived C abundance as the "carbon problem." In principle, the carbon abundances obtained from C2 Swan bands and that assumed for the model atmosphere can be equated for a particular choice of C/He that varies from star to star. Then, the carbon problem for C2 bands is eliminated. However, such C/He ratios are in general less than those of the extreme helium stars, the seemingly natural relatives to the RCB and HdC stars. A more likely solution to the C2 carbon problem may lie in a modification of the model atmosphere's temperature structure. The derived carbon abundances and the 12C/13C ratios are discussed in light of the double degenerate and the final flash scenarios.

  8. THE GALACTIC R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS: THE C{sub 2} SWAN BANDS, THE CARBON PROBLEM, AND THE {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    Hema, B. P.; Pandey, Gajendra; Lambert, David L. E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in

    2012-03-10

    Observed spectra of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) and hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars are analyzed by synthesizing the C{sub 2} Swan bands (1, 0), (0, 0), and (0, 1) using our detailed line list and the Uppsala model atmospheres. The (0, 1) and (0, 0) C{sub 2} bands are used to derive the {sup 12}C abundance, and the (1, 0) {sup 12}C{sup 13}C band to determine the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios. The carbon abundance derived from the C{sub 2} Swan bands is about the same for the adopted models constructed with different carbon abundances over the range 8.5 (C/He = 0.1%) to 10.5 (C/He = 10%). Carbon abundances derived from C I lines are about a factor of four lower than the carbon abundance of the adopted model atmosphere over the same C/He interval, as reported by Asplund et al., who dubbed the mismatch between adopted and derived C abundance as the 'carbon problem'. In principle, the carbon abundances obtained from C{sub 2} Swan bands and that assumed for the model atmosphere can be equated for a particular choice of C/He that varies from star to star. Then, the carbon problem for C{sub 2} bands is eliminated. However, such C/He ratios are in general less than those of the extreme helium stars, the seemingly natural relatives to the RCB and HdC stars. A more likely solution to the C{sub 2} carbon problem may lie in a modification of the model atmosphere's temperature structure. The derived carbon abundances and the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios are discussed in light of the double degenerate and the final flash scenarios.

  9. The Diverse Origins of Neutron-capture Elements in the Metal-poor Star HD 94028: Possible Detection of Products of i-Process Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Pignatari, Marco; Herwig, Falk

    2016-04-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the composition and nucleosynthetic origins of the heavy elements in the metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -1.62 ± 0.09) star HD 94028. Previous studies revealed that this star is mildly enhanced in elements produced by the slow neutron-capture process (s process; e.g., [Pb/Fe] = +0.79 ± 0.32) and rapid neutron-capture process (r process; e.g., [Eu/Fe] = +0.22 ± 0.12), including unusually large molybdenum ([Mo/Fe] = +0.97 ± 0.16) and ruthenium ([Ru/Fe] = +0.69 ± 0.17) enhancements. However, this star is not enhanced in carbon ([C/Fe] = -0.06 ± 0.19). We analyze an archival near-ultraviolet spectrum of HD 94028, collected using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope, and other archival optical spectra collected from ground-based telescopes. We report abundances or upper limits derived from 64 species of 56 elements. We compare these observations with s-process yields from low-metallicity AGB evolution and nucleosynthesis models. No combination of s- and r-process patterns can adequately reproduce the observed abundances, including the super-solar [As/Ge] ratio (+0.99 ± 0.23) and the enhanced [Mo/Fe] and [Ru/Fe] ratios. We can fit these features when including an additional contribution from the intermediate neutron-capture process (i process), which perhaps operated through the ingestion of H in He-burning convective regions in massive stars, super-AGB stars, or low-mass AGB stars. Currently, only the i process appears capable of consistently producing the super-solar [As/Ge] ratios and ratios among neighboring heavy elements found in HD 94028. Other metal-poor stars also show enhanced [As/Ge] ratios, hinting that operation of the i process may have been common in the early Galaxy. These data are associated with Program 072.B-0585(A), PI. Silva. Some data presented in this paper were obtained from the Barbara A. Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). The Space Telescope Science Institute is

  10. THE DIVERSE ORIGINS OF NEUTRON-CAPTURE ELEMENTS IN THE METAL-POOR STAR HD 94028: POSSIBLE DETECTION OF PRODUCTS OF i-PROCESS NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Pignatari, Marco; Herwig, Falk E-mail: amanda.karakas@monash.edu E-mail: fherwig@uvic.ca

    2016-04-10

    We present a detailed analysis of the composition and nucleosynthetic origins of the heavy elements in the metal-poor ([Fe/H] = −1.62 ± 0.09) star HD 94028. Previous studies revealed that this star is mildly enhanced in elements produced by the slow neutron-capture process (s process; e.g., [Pb/Fe] = +0.79 ± 0.32) and rapid neutron-capture process (r process; e.g., [Eu/Fe] = +0.22 ± 0.12), including unusually large molybdenum ([Mo/Fe] = +0.97 ± 0.16) and ruthenium ([Ru/Fe] = +0.69 ± 0.17) enhancements. However, this star is not enhanced in carbon ([C/Fe] = −0.06 ± 0.19). We analyze an archival near-ultraviolet spectrum of HD 94028, collected using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope, and other archival optical spectra collected from ground-based telescopes. We report abundances or upper limits derived from 64 species of 56 elements. We compare these observations with s-process yields from low-metallicity AGB evolution and nucleosynthesis models. No combination of s- and r-process patterns can adequately reproduce the observed abundances, including the super-solar [As/Ge] ratio (+0.99 ± 0.23) and the enhanced [Mo/Fe] and [Ru/Fe] ratios. We can fit these features when including an additional contribution from the intermediate neutron-capture process (i process), which perhaps operated through the ingestion of H in He-burning convective regions in massive stars, super-AGB stars, or low-mass AGB stars. Currently, only the i process appears capable of consistently producing the super-solar [As/Ge] ratios and ratios among neighboring heavy elements found in HD 94028. Other metal-poor stars also show enhanced [As/Ge] ratios, hinting that operation of the i process may have been common in the early Galaxy.

  11. Leadership in Governance: The View from AGB's Current and Former Board Chairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trusteeship, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The challenges with which college and university boards must grapple promise to become only more complex in the coming years, placing ever-greater demands on the leaders of those boards. This article presents a conversation between Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) President Richard D. Legon and two AGB leaders who…

  12. Olivier Chesneau's Work on Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Olivier Chesneau challenged several fields of observational stellar astrophysics with bright ideas and an impressive amount of work to make them real in the span of his career, from his first paper on P Cygni in 2000, up to his last one on V838 Mon in 2014. He was using all the so-called high-angular resolution techniques since it helped his science to be made, namely study in details the inner structure of the environments around stars, be it small mass (AGBs), more massive (supergiant stars), or explosives (Novae). I will focus here on his work on massive stars.

  13. THE FINAL FATE OF STARS THAT IGNITE NEON AND OXYGEN OFF-CENTER: ELECTRON CAPTURE OR IRON CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Samuel; Hirschi, Raphael; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-12-20

    In the ONeMg cores of 8.8-9.5 M {sub ☉} stars, neon and oxygen burning is ignited off-center. Whether or not the neon-oxygen flame propagates to the center is critical for determining whether these stars undergo Fe core collapse or electron-capture-induced ONeMg core collapse. We present more details of stars that ignite neon and oxygen burning off-center. The neon flame is established in a manner similar to the carbon flame of super-AGB stars, albeit with a narrower flame width. The criteria for establishing a flame can be met if the strict Schwarzschild criterion for convective instability is adopted. Mixing across the interface of the convective shell disrupts the conditions for the propagation of the burning front, and instead the shell burns as a series of inward-moving flashes. While this may not directly affect whether or not the burning will reach the center (as in super-AGB stars), the core is allowed to contract between each shell flash. Reduction of the electron fraction in the shell reduces the Chandrasekhar mass and the center reaches the threshold density for the URCA process to activate and steer the remaining evolution of the core. This highlights the importance of a more accurate treatment of mixing in the stellar interior for yet another important question in stellar astrophysics—determining the properties of stellar evolution and supernova progenitors at the boundary between electron capture supernova and iron core-collapse supernova.

  14. Spectral Analysis of PG 1034+001, the Exciting Star of Hewett 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, J. W.; Mahsereci, M.; Ringat, E.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.

    2011-01-01

    PG 1034+001 is an extremely hot, helium-rich DO-type star that excites the planetary nebula Hewett 1 and large parts of the surrounding interstellar medium. We present preliminary results of an ongoing spectral analysis by means of non-LTE model atmospheres that consider most elements from hydrogen to nickel. This analysis is based on high-resolution ultraviolet (FUSE, IUE) and optical (VLT/UVES, KECK) data. The results are compared with those of PG 1034+001's spectroscopic twin, the DO star PG 0038+ 199. Keywords. stars: abundances, stars: AGB and post-AGB, stars: atmospheres, stars: evolution, stars: individual (PG 1034+001, PG 0038+ 199), planetary nebulae: individual (Hewett 1)

  15. Clear Evidence for the Presence of Second-generation Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in Metal-poor Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Mészáros, Sz.; Monelli, M.; Cassisi, S.; Stetson, P. B.; Zamora, O.; Shetrone, M.; Lucatello, S.

    2015-12-01

    Galactic globular clusters (GCs) are known to host multiple stellar populations: a first generation (FG) with a chemical pattern typical of halo field stars and a second generation (SG) enriched in Na and Al and depleted in O and Mg. Both stellar generations are found at different evolutionary stages (e.g., the main-sequence turnoff, the subgiant branch, and the red giant branch (RGB)). The non detection of SG asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in several metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1) GCs suggests that not all SG stars ascend the AGB phase, and that failed AGB stars may be very common in metal-poor GCs. This observation represents a serious problem for stellar evolution and GC formation/evolution theories. We report fourteen SG-AGB stars in four metal-poor GCs (M13, M5, M3, and M2) with different observational properties: horizontal branch (HB) morphology, metallicity, and age. By combining the H-band Al abundances obtained by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey with ground-based optical photometry, we identify SG Al-rich AGB stars in these four GCs and show that Al-rich RGB/AGB GC stars should be Na-rich. Our observations provide strong support for present, standard stellar models, i.e., without including a strong mass-loss efficiency, for low-mass HB stars. In fact, current empirical evidence is in agreement with the predicted distribution of FG and SG stars during the He-burning stages based on these standard stellar models.

  16. An atlas of optical spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet carbon and oxygen stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Ana V.; Massey, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The atlas contains a homogeneous set of optical spectrophotometric observations (3300-7300 A) at moderate resolution (about 10 A) of almost all WC and WO stars in the Galaxy, the LMC, and the SMC. The data are presented in the form of spectral tracings (in magnitude units) arranged by subtype, with no correction for interstellar reddening. A montage of prototype stars of each spectral class is also shown. Comprehensive line identifications are given for the optical lines of WC and WO spectra, with major contributions tabulated and unidentified lines noted.

  17. The Abundances of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Photospheres of Active B Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine J.

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary models for the structure and evolution of rapidly-rotating OB stars predict a photospheric enrichment of nitrogen due to the mixing of the CNO-processed material from the star's core with the original surface material. The predicted N-enhancement increases as the star approaches its critical rotational velocity. Alternatively the Algol primaries should have N-enriched photospheres if the material currently being transferred is from the mass loser's original core. To test these predictions, the C and N abundances in selected early Be stars and B-type mass gainers in Algol systems have been determined from spectroscopic data obtained with the IUE and FUSE spacecraft. The abundance analyses, carried through with the Hubeny/Lanz NLTE codes TLUSTY/SYNSPEC, were confronted with some challenges that are not encountered in abundance studies of sharp-lined, non-emission B stars including the treatment of shallow, blended rotationally-broadened lines, the appropriate value for the microturbulence parameter, correction for disk emission and possible shell absorption, and latitudinal variation of Teff and log g. The FUV offers an advantage over the optical region as there is far less influence from disk emission and the N lines are intrinsically stronger. Particularly useful are the features of C II 1324 Å, C III 1176 Å, 1247 Å, N I 1243 Å, and N III 1183,84 Å. Be stars with v sin i < 150 km s-1 were chosen to minimize the effect of latitudinal parameter variation. Given the errors it appears that the N abundance in the Be stars is normal. Expected mixing is apparently suppressed, and this study lends no support for Be star models based upon critical rotation. However, expected N-enhancement and a low C abundance are inferred for the B-type primaries in some interacting binaries. GJP is grateful for support from NASA Grants NNX07AH56G (ADP) and NNX07AF89G (FUSE), and the USC WiSE program.

  18. WHO PULLED THE TRIGGER: A SUPERNOVA OR AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A. E-mail: keiser@dtm.ciw.ed

    2010-07-01

    The short-lived radioisotope (SLRI) {sup 60}Fe requires production in a core collapse supernova or asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star immediately before its incorporation into the earliest solar system solids. Shock waves from a somewhat distant supernova, or a relatively nearby AGB star, have the right speeds to simultaneously trigger the collapse of a dense molecular cloud core and to inject shock wave material into the resulting protostar. A new set of FLASH2.5 adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic models shows that the injection efficiency depends sensitively on the assumed shock thickness and density. Supernova shock waves appear to be thin enough to inject the amount of shock wave material necessary to match the SLRI abundances measured for primitive meteorites. Planetary nebula shock waves from AGB stars, however, appear to be too thick to achieve the required injection efficiencies. These models imply that a supernova pulled the trigger that led to the formation of our solar system.

  19. A POPULATION OF ACCRETED SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD STARS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Knut A. G.; Blum, Robert D.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Boyer, Martha L.; Gordon, Karl D. E-mail: rblum@noao.edu E-mail: mboyer@stsci.edu

    2011-08-10

    We present an analysis of the stellar kinematics of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) based on {approx}5900 new and existing velocities of massive red supergiants, oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and other giants. After correcting the line-of-sight velocities for the LMC's space motion and accounting for asymmetric drift in the AGB population, we derive a rotation curve that is consistent with all of the tracers used, as well as that of published H I data. The amplitude of the rotation curve is v{sub 0} = 87 {+-} 5 km s{sup -1} beyond a radius R{sub 0} = 2.4 {+-} 0.1 kpc and has a position angle of the kinematic line of nodes of {theta} = 142 deg. {+-} 5 deg. By examining the outliers from our fits, we identify a population of 376 stars, or {approx}>5% of our sample, that have line-of-sight velocities that apparently oppose the sense of rotation of the LMC disk. We find that these kinematically distinct stars are either counter-rotating in a plane closely aligned with the LMC disk, or rotating in the same sense as the LMC disk, but in a plane that is inclined by 54 deg. {+-} 2 deg. to the LMC. Their kinematics clearly link them to two known H I arms, which have previously been interpreted as being pulled out from the LMC. We measure metallicities from the Ca triplet lines of {approx}1000 LMC field stars and 30 stars in the kinematically distinct population. For the LMC field, we find a median [Fe/H] = -0.56 {+-} 0.02 with dispersion of 0.5 dex, while for the kinematically distinct stars the median [Fe/H] is -1.25 {+-} 0.13 with a dispersion of 0.7 dex. The metallicity differences provide strong evidence that the kinematically distinct population originated in the Small Magellanic Cloud. This interpretation has the consequence that the H I arms kinematically associated with the stars are likely falling into the LMC, instead of being pulled out.

  20. Carbon Monoxide Fundamental Bands in Late-Type Stars. III. Chromosphere or CO-mosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, G.; Ayres, T. R.; Jennings, D. E.; Saar, S. H.

    1994-03-01

    The strong vibration-rotation lines of CO at 4.6 microns (Δυ = 1) are unique diagnostics for the thermal conditions in the atmospheric altitude range of late-type stars near and above the temperature minimum in chromospheric models. Exploiting recent improvements in IR instrumentation, we observed a number of cool stars with high spectral resolution (R ≍ 100,000). The analysis of the spectra was based on an earlier theoretical study which had established CO Δυ = 1 non-LTE spectra as useful probes for stars of spectral type F, G, and K with log g ≥ 1. No direct chromospheric indicators were detected in the CO spectra. Stellar boundary (CO) temperatures were determined for the program stars and temperature profiles were constructed for α Tau, α Boo, β Gem and β Dra. The CO-based models feature a steady decrease in temperature at the height where the temperature increases in chromospheric models. Further comparison with chromospheric indicators shows an increasing discrepancy between the temperatures determined from CO measurements and those predicted from radiative equilibrium models, respectively, with increasing chromospheric activity. Thermal bifurcation of the stellar surfaces is proposed to reconcile the contradicting scenarios derived based on different spectral diagnostics.

  1. SiO AND H{sub 2}O MASER SURVEY TOWARD POST-ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Dong-Hwan; Park, Yong-Sun; Cho, Se-Hyung; Kim, Jaeheon; Yun, Young joo E-mail: yspark@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: jhkim@kasi.re.kr

    2014-03-01

    We performed simultaneous observations of SiO v = 1, 2, {sup 29}SiO v = 0, J = 1-0 and H{sub 2}O 6{sub 16}-5{sub 23} maser lines toward 143 AGB and 164 post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in order to investigate how evolutionary characteristics from AGB to post-AGB stars appear in both SiO and H{sub 2}O maser emissions. The observations were carried out from 2011 February to 2012 March using the Korean VLBI Network single-dish telescopes. We have detected SiO and/or H{sub 2}O maser emission from 21 sources out of 164 post-AGB stars including 12 new detections. Of 143 AGB stars, we detected SiO and/or H{sub 2}O maser emission from 44 stars including 24 new detections. SiO v = 2, J = 1-0 maser emission without a SiO v = 1 maser was detected from 7 sources among 14 SiO-detected post-AGB stars, and the intensity of the SiO v = 2, J = 1-0 maser tends to be much stronger than that of SiO v = 1, which is different from those of AGB stars. This may be related to the development of hot dust shells according to the evolutionary processes of post-AGB stars. We also found that both SiO and H{sub 2}O masers were detected in the blue group (LI, or Left of IRAS), while only the H{sub 2}O maser was detected in the red group (RI, or Right of IRAS) for post-AGB stars. These different detection rates between SiO and H{sub 2}O masers may originate from the different abundances of masing molecules in the circumstellar envelope according to the different mass and expansion velocity between LI and RI regions together with their evolutionary stages.

  2. The First Mass Function and Rise of Carbon in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Kaitlin; Beers, Timothy C.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Yoon, Jinmi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the impact of the First Mass Function (FMF) of stars on the distribution of stellar carbon abundances in the early Universe. We propose a picture that includes primary carbon production by the massive first-generation stars, recorded in the atmospheres of CEMP-no stars (which show no over-abundances of neutron-capture elements), and secondary carbon production by subsequent generations of AGB stars, recorded in the subset of mass-transfer binaries now observed as CEMP-$s$ stars (which exhibit strong over-abundances of neutron-capture elements).Recently, CEMP-no stars have been found to comprise separable populations within this category, distinguished by their light-element and iron-peak element abundances (Yoon et al. 2016, Placco et al. 2016). The existence of these populations can also be used to indirectly infer information about the FMF. Additionally, we investigate the contrasting behavior of CEMP stars with their more metal-rich counterparts, focusing on their kinematics, spatial distribution, and elemental abundances, in order to constrain the chemical-enrichment history of the Galaxy, from the earliest stars to the present.References:Placco, V.~M., et al. (2016), ApJ, in press (arXiv:1609.02134)Yoon, J., et al. (2016), ApJ, in press (arXiv:1607.06336)This work received partial support from PHY 14-30152; Physics FrontierCenter/JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE), awardedby the US National Science Foundation.

  3. a Search for Interstellar Carbon-Chain Alcohol HC4OH in the Star Forming Region L1527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Mitsunori; Takano, Shuro; Koshikawa, Hiromichi Yamabe Naohiro; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Nakane, Aya; Okabatyashi, Toshiaki; Kunimatsu, Arisa; Kuze, Nobuhiko

    2011-06-01

    We have made a sensitive search for the rotational transitions of carbon-chain alcohol HC_4OH with the frequency ragne from 21.2 to 46.7 GHz in the star forming region L1527 in Taurus with rich carbon-chain chemistry. The incentive of this observation was a laboratory detection of HC_4OH by the microwave spectroscopy. Despite achieving an rms of several mK in antenna temperature by the 45m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory, the searche for HC_4OH was negative, leading to a 5 sigma upper limit corresponding to the column density of 4 × 1012 Cm-2 based on the excitation temperature of 12.3 K. The upper limit indicates that the [HC_4-OH]/[HC_4-CN] ratio is less than 1.0. The ratio suggests that the cyanide species with carbon-chain structure is dominant in comparison with the hydroxyl one in L1527, which can be the opposite case of saturated compounds, e.g. CH_3OH and CH_3CN, in hot cores and dark clouds.

  4. A Spitzer Space Telescope Survey of Extreme Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in M32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, O.C.; McDonald, I.; Rich, R.M.; Kemper, F.; Boyer, M.L.; Zijlstra, A.A.; Bendo, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the population of cool, evolved stars in the Local Group dwarf elliptical galaxy M32, using Infrared Array Camera observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We construct deep mid-infrared colour-magnitude diagrams for the resolved stellar populations within 3.5 arcminutes of M32's centre, and identify those stars that exhibit infrared excess. Our data is dominated by a population of luminous, dustproducing stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and extend to approximately 3 magnitudes below the AGB tip. We detect for the first time a sizeable population of 'extreme' AGB stars, highly enshrouded by circumstellar dust and likely completely obscured at optical wavelengths. The total dust-injection rate from the extreme AGB candidates is measured to be 7.5 x 10 (sup -7) solar masses per year, corresponding to a gas mass-loss rate of 1.5 x 10 (sup -4) solar masses per year. These extreme stars may be indicative of an extended star-formation epoch between 0.2 and 5 billion years ago.

  5. Sc and neutron-capture abundances in Galactic low- and high-α field halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishlock, C. K.; Yong, D.; Karakas, A. I.; Alves-Brito, A.; Meléndez, J.; Nissen, P. E.; Kobayashi, C.; Casey, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    We determine relative abundance ratios for the neutron-capture elements Zr, La, Ce, Nd, and Eu for a sample of 27 Galactic dwarf stars with -1.5 < [Fe/H] <-0.8. We also measure the iron-peak element Sc. These stars separate into three populations (low- and high-α halo and thick-disc stars) based on the [α/Fe] abundance ratio and their kinematics as discovered by Nissen & Schuster. We find differences between the low- and high-α groups in the abundance ratios of [Sc/Fe], [Zr/Fe], [La/Zr], [Y/Eu], and [Ba/Eu] when including Y and Ba from Nissen & Schuster. For all ratios except [La/Zr], the low-α stars have a lower abundance compared to the high-α stars. The low-α stars display the same abundance patterns of high [Ba/Y] and low [Y/Eu] as observed in present-day dwarf spheroidal galaxies, although with smaller abundance differences, when compared to the high-α stars. These distinct chemical patterns have been attributed to differences in the star formation rate between the two populations and the contribution of low-metallicity, low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to the low-α population. By comparing the low-α population with AGB stellar models, we place constraints on the mass range of the AGB stars.

  6. Carbon Monoxide and the Potential for Prebiotic Chemistry on Habitable Planets around Main Sequence M Stars.

    PubMed

    Nava-Sedeño, J Manik; Ortiz-Cervantes, Adrian; Segura, Antígona; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D

    2016-10-04

    Lifeless planets with CO2 atmospheres produce CO by CO2 photolysis. On planets around M dwarfs, CO is a long-lived atmospheric compound, as long as UV emission due to the star's chromospheric activity lasts, and the sink of CO and O2 in seawater is small compared to its atmospheric production. Atmospheres containing reduced compounds, like CO, may undergo further energetic and chemical processing to give rise to organic compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. We calculated the yield of organic compounds from CO2-rich atmospheres of planets orbiting M dwarf stars, which were previously simulated by Domagal-Goldman et al. (2014) and Harman et al. (2015), by cosmic rays and lightning using results of experiments by Miyakawa et al. (2002) and Schlesinger and Miller ( 1983a , 1983b ). Stellar protons from active stars may be important energy sources for abiotic synthesis and increase production rates of biological compounds by at least 2 orders of magnitude compared to cosmic rays. Simple compounds such as HCN and H2CO are more readily synthesized than more complex ones, such as amino acids and uracil (considered here as an example), resulting in higher yields for the former and lower yields for the latter. Electric discharges are most efficient when a reducing atmosphere is present. Nonetheless, atmospheres with high quantities of CO2 are capable of producing higher amounts of prebiotic compounds, given that CO is constantly produced in the atmosphere. Our results further support planetary systems around M dwarf stars as candidates for supporting life or its origin. Key Words: Prebiotic chemistry-M dwarfs-Habitable planets-Cosmic rays-Lightning-Stellar activity. Astrobiology 16, 744-754.

  7. Carbon Monoxide and the Potential for Prebiotic Chemistry on Habitable Planets around Main Sequence M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava-Sedeño, J. Manik; Ortiz-Cervantes, Adrian; Segura, Antígona; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.

    2016-10-01

    Lifeless planets with CO2 atmospheres produce CO by CO2 photolysis. On planets around M dwarfs, CO is a long-lived atmospheric compound, as long as UV emission due to the star's chromospheric activity lasts, and the sink of CO and O2 in seawater is small compared to its atmospheric production. Atmospheres containing reduced compounds, like CO, may undergo further energetic and chemical processing to give rise to organic compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. We calculated the yield of organic compounds from CO2-rich atmospheres of planets orbiting M dwarf stars, which were previously simulated by Domagal-Goldman et al. (2014) and Harman et al. (2015), by cosmic rays and lightning using results of experiments by Miyakawa et al. (2002) and Schlesinger and Miller (1983a, 1983b). Stellar protons from active stars may be important energy sources for abiotic synthesis and increase production rates of biological compounds by at least 2 orders of magnitude compared to cosmic rays. Simple compounds such as HCN and H2CO are more readily synthesized than more complex ones, such as amino acids and uracil (considered here as an example), resulting in higher yields for the former and lower yields for the latter. Electric discharges are most efficient when a reducing atmosphere is present. Nonetheless, atmospheres with high quantities of CO2 are capable of producing higher amounts of prebiotic compounds, given that CO is constantly produced in the atmosphere. Our results further support planetary systems around M dwarf stars as candidates for supporting life or its origin.

  8. Spitzer-IRS Spectroscopic Studies of Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Star and Red Supergiant Star Dust Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Speck, Angela; Volk, Kevin; Kemper, Ciska; Reach, William T.; Lagadec, Eric; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; McDonald, Iain; Meixner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the dust emission features seen in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of Oxygen-rich (O-rich) asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars. The spectra come from the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) and other archival Spitzer-IRS programs. The broad 10 and 20 micron emission features attributed to amorphous dust of silicate composition seen in the spectra show evidence for systematic differences in the centroid of both emission features between O-rich AGB and RSG populations. Radiative transfer modeling using the GRAMS grid of models of AGB and RSG stars suggests that the centroid differences are due to differences in dust properties. We present an update of our investigation of differences in dust composition, size, shape, etc that might be responsible for these spectral differences. We explore how these differences may arise from the different circumstellar environments around RSG and O-rich AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX13AD54G.

  9. THE MOST METAL-POOR STARS. III. THE METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION AND CARBON-ENHANCED METAL-POOR FRACTION , ,

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, David; Norris, John E.; Bessell, M. S.; Asplund, M.; Christlieb, N.; Beers, Timothy C.; Barklem, P. S.; Frebel, Anna; Ryan, S. G. E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: martin@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu E-mail: afrebel@mit.edu

    2013-01-01

    We examine the metallicity distribution function (MDF) and fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in a sample that includes 86 stars with [Fe/H] {<=} -3.0, based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectroscopy, of which some 32 objects lie below [Fe/H] = -3.5. After accounting for the completeness function, the 'corrected' MDF does not exhibit the sudden drop at [Fe/H] = -3.6 that was found in recent samples of dwarfs and giants from the Hamburg/ESO survey. Rather, the MDF decreases smoothly down to [Fe/H] = -4.1. Similar results are obtained from the 'raw' MDF. We find that the fraction of CEMP objects below [Fe/H] = -3.0 is 23% {+-} 6% and 32% {+-} 8% when adopting the Beers and Christlieb and Aoki et al. CEMP definitions, respectively. The former value is in fair agreement with some previous measurements, which adopt the Beers and Christlieb criterion.

  10. Circumstellar Crystalline Silicates: Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartar, Josh; Speck, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most exciting developments in astronomy in the last 15 years was the discovery of crystalline silicate stardust by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board of ISO; discovery of the crystalline grains was indeed one of the biggest surprises of the ISO mission. Initially discovered around AGB stars (evolved stars in the range of 0.8 > M/M¤>8) at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths, crystalline silicates have since been seen in many astrophysical environments including young stellar objects (T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be), comets and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies. Low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) comprise 95% of the contributors to the ISM, so study of the formation of crystalline silicates is critical to our understanding of the ISM, which is thought to be primarily amorphous (one would expect an almost exact match between the composition of AGB dust shells and the dust in the ISM). Whether the crystalline dust is merely undetectable or amorphized remains a mystery. The FORCAST instrument on SOFIA as well as the PACS instrument on Herschel will provide exciting observing opportunities for the further study of crystalline silicates.

  11. K{sub s} -BAND LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH POPULATION BASED ON STAR CLUSTERS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Youkyung; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lim, Sungsoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-11-10

    We present a study of K{sub s} -band luminosity evolution of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) population in simple stellar systems using star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We determine physical parameters of LMC star clusters including center coordinates, radii, and foreground reddenings. Ages of 83 star clusters are derived from isochrone fitting with the Padova models, and those of 19 star clusters are taken from the literature. The AGB stars in 102 star clusters with log(age) = 7.3-9.5 are selected using near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams based on Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Then we obtain the K{sub s} -band luminosity fraction of AGB stars in these star clusters as a function of ages. The K{sub s} -band luminosity fraction of AGB stars increases, on average, as age increases from log(age) ∼ 8.0, reaching a maximum at log(age) ∼ 8.5, and it decreases thereafter. There is a large scatter in the AGB luminosity fraction for given ages, which is mainly due to stochastic effects. We discuss this result in comparison with five simple stellar population models. The maximum K{sub s} -band AGB luminosity fraction for bright clusters is reproduced by the models that expect the value of 0.7-0.8 at log(age) = 8.5-8.7. We discuss the implication of our results with regard to the study of size and mass evolution of galaxies.

  12. History of the mass ejection in K4-37: from the AGB to the evolved planetary nebula phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, L. F.; Guillén, P. F.; Olguín, L.; Vázquez, R.

    2017-04-01

    We present narrow-band, broad-band and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive images, and high- and intermediate-resolution long-slit spectra of K4-37, a planetary nebula that has never been analysed in detail. Although K4-37 appears bipolar, the morphokinematical analysis discloses the existence of three distinct axes and additional particular directions in the object, indicating that K4-37 is a multi-axis planetary nebula that has probably been shaped by several bipolar outflows at different directions. A 4-6 M⊙ main-sequence progenitor is estimated from the derived high nebular He and N abundances, and very high N/O abundance ratio (∼2.32). The general properties are compatible with K4-37 being a highly evolved planetary nebula located at ∼14 kpc. The WISE image at 22 μm reveals K4-37 to be surrounded by a large (∼13 × 8 pc2) elliptical detached shell probably related to material ejected from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) progenitor. The observed elliptical morphology suggests deformation of an originally spherical AGB shell by the interstellar medium magnetic field or by the influence of a companion. We compare K4-37 and NGC 6309 and found remarkable similarities in their physical structure but noticeably different chemical abundances that indicate very different progenitor mass. This strongly suggests that, irrespective of the initial mass, their (presumably binary) central stars have shared a very similar mass ejection history.

  13. Extrinsic and intrinsic S stars in the Henize sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eck, Sophie; Jorissen, Alain; Mayor, Michel; Udry, Stephane; Burnet, Michel

    Previous studies have identified two distinct families among S stars: intrinsic S stars exhibiting Tc lines in their spectrum, and extrinsic S stars lacking Tc lines. Extrinsic S stars were found to be binaries, and probably owe their chemical peculiarities to mass transfer in the binary system. On the contrary, intrinsic S stars are thermally-pulsating AGB stars where the third dredge-up brought heavy elements to the surface. The Henize sample of 205 S stars south of declination -25^circ is especially well suited for inferring the relative frequency of extrinsic/intrinsic S stars, since it is not biased towards low galactic latitudes where intrinsic S stars tend to concentrate. Each star has been measured 3 or 4 times over a period of 5 years with the spectrovelocimeter CORAVEL. The search for binaries is complicated by the fact that Mira-type pulsations are frequent among intrinsic S stars. Fortunately, radial-velocity variations due to atmospheric motions are generally associated with very broad and asymmetric CORAVEL cross-correlation profiles [see also poster P2-14!]. Therefore extrinsic and intrinsic S stars can be distinguished thanks to (1) radial velocity variations, (2) the shape of the CORAVEL cross-correlation profiles, (3) the presence or absence of the radioactive element Tc, as derived from high-resolution spectroscopy, (4) photometric variability, as derived from a survey in the Geneva photometric system. These criteria correlate in a nice way and allow to derive the frequency of intrinsic-genuine AGB-S stars. The galactic distributions of the two families of S stars are clearly distinct, intrinsic S stars being much more concentrated along the galactic plane that extrinsic S stars. High-resolution spectroscopy led to the discovery of two symbiotic stars among the Henize sample (symbiotic stars are interacting binary systems in which a hot compact object accretes matter ejected by a cool (super)giant). The physical parameters responsible for the

  14. Processing of low carbon content interstellar ice analogues by cosmic rays: implications for the chemistry around oxygen-rich stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; da Silveira, E. F.; Pilling, S.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P.

    2014-03-01

    Radiolysis of a homogeneous H2O:H2CO:CH3OH (100:2:0.8) ice mixture by fast heavy ions is performed in the laboratory in an attempt to simulate the interaction of cosmic rays with frozen surfaces at 15 K. Bombarded by 220-MeV 16O7 + ions, the ice layer is thin enough to be traversed by projectiles at approximately constant velocity and with charge states close to the equilibrium one. Analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) reveals that the molecular species formed are CH4, CO2, CO, HCO, HCOO- and CH3OCHO. The formation and dissociation cross-sections of all observed daughter molecules are determined. As a control procedure, a carbon budget is performed as the beam fluence increases. The observed radiation effects lead to a general observation that the destruction cross-sections of condensed gases by heavy ions are ruled by a power law that is a function of the electronic stopping power: σd ˜ Sn_e, where n is approximately 3/2. This relation is observed for the destruction of precursor H2CO molecules and for the formation of daughter species. The present results help our understanding of the chemical and physicochemical interactions induced by heavy cosmic rays in cold astrophysical environments with low carbon contents, such as those around oxygen-rich stars.

  15. Constraining dust properties in circumstellar envelopes of C-stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud: optical constants and grain size of carbon dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Ambra; Marigo, Paola; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Aringer, Bernhard; Girardi, Léo; Pastorelli, Giada; Bressan, Alessandro; Bladh, Sara

    2016-10-01

    We present a new approach aimed at constraining the typical size and optical properties of carbon dust grains in circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of carbon-rich stars (C-stars) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). To achieve this goal, we apply our recent dust growth description, coupled with a radiative transfer code to the CSEs of C-stars evolving along the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch, for which we compute spectra and colours. Then, we compare our modelled colours in the near- and mid-infrared (NIR and MIR) bands with the observed ones, testing different assumptions in our dust scheme and employing several data sets of optical constants for carbon dust available in the literature. Different assumptions adopted in our dust scheme change the typical size of the carbon grains produced. We constrain carbon dust properties by selecting the combination of grain size and optical constants which best reproduce several colours in the NIR and MIR at the same time. The different choices of optical properties and grain size lead to differences in the NIR and MIR colours greater than 2 mag in some cases. We conclude that the complete set of observed NIR and MIR colours are best reproduced by small grains, with sizes between ˜0.035 and ˜0.12 μm, rather than by large grains between ˜0.2 and 0.7 μm. The inability of large grains to reproduce NIR and MIR colours seems independent of the adopted optical data set. We also find a possible trend of the grain size with mass-loss and/or carbon excess in the CSEs of these stars.

  16. Detection of second-generation asymptotic giant branch stars in metal-poor globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Multiple stellar populations are actually known to be present in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). The first generation (FG) displays a halo-like chemical pattern, while the second generation (SG) one is enriched in Al and Na (depleted in Mg and O).Both generations of stars are found at different evolutionary stages like the main-sequence turnoff, the subgiant branch, and the red giant branch (RGB), but the SG seems to be absent - especially in metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1) GCs - in more evolved evolutionary stages such as the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. This suggests that not all SG stars experience the AGB phase and that AGB-manqué stars may be quite common in metal-poor GCs, which represents a fundamental problem for the theories of