Science.gov

Sample records for agc technology work

  1. AGC-2 Disassembly Report

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes

    2014-05-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite Research and Development (R&D) Program is currently measuring irradiated material properties for predicting the behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades available for use within the cores of new very high temperature reactor designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment, consisting of six irradiation capsules, will generate irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. The AGC experiment is designed to determine the changes to specific material properties such as thermal diffusivity, thermal expansion, elastic modulus, mechanical strength, irradiation induced dimensional change rate, and irradiation creep for a wide variety of nuclear grade graphite types over a range of high temperature, and moderate doses. A series of six capsules containing graphite test specimens will be used to expose graphite test samples to a dose range from 1 to 7 dpa at three different temperatures (600, 900, and 1200°C) as described in the Graphite Technology Development Plan. Since irradiation induced creep within graphite components is considered critical to determining the operational life of the graphite core, some of the samples will also be exposed to an applied load to determine the creep rate for each graphite type under both temperature and neutron flux. All six AGC capsules in the experiment will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). AGC-1 and AGC-2 will be irradiated in the south flux trap and AGC-3–AGC-6 will be irradiated in the east flux trap. The change in flux traps is due to NGNP irradiation priorities requiring the AGC experiment to be moved to accommodate Fuel irradiation experiments. After irradiation, all six AGC capsules will be cooled in the ATR Canal, sized for shipment, and shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) where the capsule will be disassembled in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF). During disassembly, the metallic

  2. Research of AGC technology in a digital optical fiber sensing system with PGC modulation and demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianfeng; Xiong, Shuidong; Zhang, Yan

    2014-11-01

    The magnitude of light intensity on the photo-to-electric detector fluctuates all the time in an optic fiber sensing system, because of the influence of various factors in the fiber optic sensing system and from the external environment. As a result of the excessive intensity, the electric signal will be overload after the amplifier circuit with constant enlargement factor, and when the light intensity becames too small, it will reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the electric signal. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce an automatic gain control (AGC) module into the system, which can insure the electric signal in a reasonable magnitude. In order to solve the problem of optic intensity fluctuating in the optical fiber sensing system with PGC modulation and demodulation, in this paper, firstly, it is analyzed that the impact of different magnitudes of interferential intensity to the PGC demodulation in theory. Secondly, a reasonable control method is put forward and an AGC module based on the AD602 chip is designed and produced. Finally, it is proved that the optic fiber sensor system with an AGC module has strong ability to resist fluctuation of light intensity within 40dB.

  3. AGC 226067: A possible interacting low-mass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, E. A. K.; Cannon, J. M.; Rhode, K. L.; Janesh, W. F.; Janowiecki, S.; Leisman, L.; Giovanelli, R.; Haynes, M. P.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Salzer, J. J.; Zaidi, T.

    2015-08-01

    We present Arecibo, GBT, VLA, and WIYN/pODI observations of the ALFALFA source AGC 226067. Originally identified as an ultra-compact high velocity cloud and candidate Local Group galaxy, AGC 226067 is spatially and kinematically coincident with the Virgo cluster, and the identification by multiple groups of an optical counterpart with no resolved stars supports the interpretation that this systems lies at the Virgo distance (D = 17 Mpc). The combined observations reveal that the system consists of multiple components: a central H i source associated with the optical counterpart (AGC 226067), a smaller H i-only component (AGC 229490), a second optical component (AGC 229491), and extended low-surface brightness H i. Only ~1/4 of the single-dish H i emission is associated with AGC 226067; as a result, we find MHI/Lg ~ 6M⊙/L⊙ which is lower than previous work. At D = 17 Mpc, AGC 226067 has an H i mass of 1.5 × 107M⊙ and Lg = 2.4 × 106L⊙, AGC 229490 (the H i-only component) has MHI = 3.6 × 106M⊙, and AGC 229491 (the second optical component) has Lg = 3.6 × 105L⊙. The nature of this system of three sources is uncertain: AGC 226067 and AGC 229490 may be connected by an H i bridge, and AGC 229490 and AGC 229491 are separated by only 0.5'. The current data do not resolve the H i in AGC 229490 and its origin is unclear. We discuss possible scenarios for this system of objects: an interacting system of dwarf galaxies, accretion of material onto AGC 226067, or stripping of material from AGC 226067.

  4. Robust AGC : Traditional Structure Versus Restructured Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevrani, Hassan; Mitani, Yasunori; Tsuji, Kiichiro

    In this paper, a decentralized robust approach is proposed for the Automatic Generation Control (AGC) system based on a modified traditional AGC structure. This work addresses the new strategy to adapt well-tested classical AGC scheme to the changing environment of power system operation under deregulation. The effect of bilateral contracts is considered as a set of new input signals in each control area dynamical model. In practice, AGC systems use simple proportional-integral (PI) controllers. However, since the PI controller parameters are usually tuned based on classical or trial-and-error approaches, they are incapable of obtaining good dynamical performance for a wide range of operating conditions and various scenarios in deregulated environment. In this paper with regard to this problem, the AGC synthesis is formulated as an H∞ static output control problem and is solved using a developed iterative linear matrix inequalities (ILMI) algorithm to design of robust PI controllers in the restructured power system control areas. A three area power system example with possible contract scenarios and wide range of load changes is given to illustrate the proposed approach. The resulting controllers are shown to minimize the effect of disturbances and maintain the robust performance.

  5. AGC-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Bratton

    2006-05-01

    The Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC) irradiation test program supports the acquisition of irradiated graphite performance data to assist in the selection of the technology to be used for the VHTR. Six irradiations are planned to investigate compressive creep in graphite subjected to a neutron field and obtain irradiated mechanical properties of vibrationally molded, extruded, and iso-molded graphites for comparison. The experiments will be conducted at three temperatures: 600, 900, and 1200°C. At each temperature, two different capsules will be irradiated to different fluence levels, the first from 0.5 to 4 dpa and the second from 4 to 7 dpa. AGC-1 is the first of the six capsules designed for ATR and will focus on the prismatic fluence range.

  6. Making Technology Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soucie, Tanja; Radovic, Nikol; Svedrec, Renata

    2010-01-01

    Students need to learn how to use technology in a meaningful way to become literate. Teachers should take advantage of technology and what it has to offer. Technology can motivate students and can help them visualize mathematics problems. It can enable them to work on more complex tasks that often involve real-life applications of mathematics. It…

  7. AGC-2 Irradiation Data Qualification Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence C. Hull

    2012-07-01

    The Graphite Technology Development Program will run a series of six experiments to quantify the effects of irradiation on nuclear grade graphite. The second Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment (AGC-2) began with Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 149A on April 12, 2011, and ended with ATR Cycle 151B on May 5, 2012. The purpose of this report is to qualify AGC-2 irradiation monitoring data following INL Management and Control Procedure 2691, Data Qualification. Data that are Qualified meet the requirements for data collection and use as described in the experiment planning and quality assurance documents. Data that do not meet the requirements are Failed. Some data may not quite meet the requirements, but may still provide some useable information. These data are labeled as Trend. No Trend data were identified for the AGC-2 experiment. All thermocouples functioned throughout the AGC-2 experiment. There was one instance where spurious signals or instrument power interruption resulted in a recorded temperature value being well outside physical reality. This value was identified and labeled as Failed data. All other temperature data are Qualified. All helium and argon gas flow data are within expected ranges. Total gas flow was approximately 50 sccm through the capsule. Helium gas flow was briefly increased to 100 sccm during reactor shutdown. All gas flow data are Qualified. At the start of the experiment, moisture in the outflow gas line increased to 200 ppmv then declined to less than 10 ppmv over a period of 5 days. This increase in moisture coincides with the initial heating of the experiment and drying of the system. Moisture slightly exceeded 10 ppmv three other times during the experiment. While these moisture values exceed the 10 ppmv threshold value, the reported measurements are considered accurate and to reflect moisture conditions in the capsule. All moisture data are Qualified. Graphite creep specimens are subjected to one of three loads, 393 lbf

  8. AGC-3 Experiment Irradiation Monitoring Data Qualification Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence Hull

    2014-10-01

    The Graphite Technology Development Program will run a series of six experiments to quantify the effects of irradiation on nuclear grade graphite. The third experiment, Advanced Graphite Creep 3 (AGC 3), began with Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 152B on November 27, 2012, and ended with ATR Cycle 155B on April 23, 2014. This report documents qualification of AGC 3 experiment irradiation monitoring data for use by the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Program for research and development activities required to design and license the first VHTR nuclear plant. Qualified data meet the requirements for data collection and use as described in the experiment planning and quality assurance documents. Failed data do not meet the requirements. Trend data may not meet the requirements, but may still provide some useable information. All thermocouples (TCs) functioned throughout the AGC 3 experiment. There was one interval between December 18, 2012, and December 20, 2012, where 10 NULL values were reported for various TCs. These NULL values were deleted from the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System database. All temperature data are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program. Argon, helium, and total gas flow data were within expected ranges and are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program. Total gas flow was approximately 50 sccm through the AGC 3 experiment capsule. Helium gas flow was briefly increased to 100 sccm during ATR shutdowns. At the start of the AGC 3 experiment, moisture in the outflow gas line was stuck at a constant value of 335.6174 ppmv for the first cycle (Cycle 152B). When the AGC 3 experiment capsule was reinstalled in ATR for Cycle 154B, a new moisture filter was installed. Moisture data from Cycle 152B are Failed. All moisture data from the final three cycles (Cycles 154B, 155A, and 155B) are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program.

  9. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A high-performance low-power CMOS AGC for GPS application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qianqian, Lei; Qiming, Xu; Zhiming, Chen; Yin, Shi; Min, Lin; Hailong, Jia

    2010-02-01

    A wide tuning range, low power CMOS automatic gain control (AGC) with a simple architecture is proposed. The proposed AGC is composed of a variable gain amplifier (VGA), a comparator and a charge pump, and the dB-linear gain is controlled by the charge pump. The AGC was implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The dynamic range of the VGA is more than 55 dB, the bandwidth is 30 MHz, and the gain error is lower than ±1.5 dB over the full temperature and gain ranges. It is designed for GPS application and is fed from a single 1.8 V power supply. The AGC power consumption is less than 5 mW, and the area of the AGC is 700 × 450 μm2.

  10. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  11. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  12. A Robust Distributed Multipoint Fiber Optic Gas Sensor System Based on AGC Amplifier Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cunguang; Wang, Rende; Tao, Xuechen; Wang, Guangwei; Wang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    A harsh environment-oriented distributed multipoint fiber optic gas sensor system realized by automatic gain control (AGC) technology is proposed. To improve the photoelectric signal reliability, the electronic variable gain can be modified in real time by an AGC closed-loop feedback structure to compensate for optical transmission loss which is caused by the fiber bend loss or other reasons. The deviation of the system based on AGC structure is below 4.02% when photoelectric signal decays due to fiber bending loss for bending radius of 5 mm, which is 20 times lower than the ordinary differential system. In addition, the AGC circuit with the same electric parameters can keep the baseline intensity of signals in different channels of the distributed multipoint sensor system at the same level. This avoids repetitive calibrations and streamlines the installation process. PMID:27483267

  13. RF front end interface and AGC modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary results indicate that the new front end automatic gain control (AGC) combination perform satisfactorily. Side by side bench tests with Trimble 10A and Texas Instruments 9900 LORAN-C receivers have proven that the proper time differences are being obtained. Further optimization of the AGC circuit will occur as software to track all of the stations in a LORAN-C chain is developed. The AGC circuit was designed to sample up to six separate LORAN-C stations. Along with expanded station tracking software, a more sophisticated search routine is also under development. A printed circuit board for the AGC is planned and will be enclosed with the RF front end in a sealed enclosure to reduce interference from the other digital circuits of the microcomputer.

  14. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    SciTech Connect

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  15. Technology Programs That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Michael B., Ed.

    This directory contains descriptions of 44 National Diffusion Network (NDN) programs that have been validated by the Joint Dissemination Review Panel of the Department of Education and make use of technology. The programs are organized into three sections. Section I describes 11 Lighthouse Projects in the areas of administrative…

  16. RF Front End Interface and AGC Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The latest RF front end built by Burhans (Mini-L-82) was successfully interfaced to the Ohio University LORAN-C receiver. In order for the front end to operate optimally, modifications were made to existing automatic gain control (AGC) circuitry already developed for the Ohio University LORAN-C receiver. The hardware modifications to the AGC and other interface circuitry, as well as some preliminary results are discussed.

  17. AGC-1 Post Irradiation Examination Status

    SciTech Connect

    David Swank

    2011-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite R&D program is currently measuring irradiated material property changes in several grades of nuclear graphite for predicting their behavior and operating performance within the core of new Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment consisting of six irradiation capsules will generate this irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. All six AGC capsules in the experiment will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), disassembled in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF), and examined at the INL Research Center (IRC) or Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This is the first in a series of status reports on the progress of the AGC experiment. As the first capsule, AGC1 was irradiated from September 2009 to January 2011 to a maximum dose level of 6-7 dpa. The capsule was removed from ATR and transferred to the HFEF in April 2011 where the capsule was disassembled and test specimens extracted from the capsules. The first irradiated samples from AGC1 were shipped to the IRC in July 2011and initial post irradiation examination (PIE) activities were begun on the first 37 samples received. PIE activities continue for the remainder of the AGC1 specimen as they are received at the IRC.

  18. FY-2010 AGC-1 Disassembly Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Philip L. Winston

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Graphite Research and Development program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a very high temperature reactor design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluencies, and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor and preirradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed.

  19. Pulse-width-modulated attenuator for AGC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconnell, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Automatic-gain-control (AGC) circuit regulates gain of intermediate-frequency and radio-frequency signals over wide dynamic range with high linearity and very low phase shift. Device has potential uses in radio and television receivers, signal distribution systems, and test and measurement instruments.

  20. Technology and Work--Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    Technology in the workplace can raise productivity, but often the cost is deskilled jobs or unemployment for both blue- and white-collar workers. Vocational education must adjust curriculum, instruction, and research to understand how work is changing and how best to prepare workers. (SK)

  1. AGC1/2, the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carriers.

    PubMed

    Amoedo, N D; Punzi, G; Obre, E; Lacombe, D; De Grassi, A; Pierri, C L; Rossignol, R

    2016-10-01

    In this review we discuss the structure and functions of the aspartate/glutamate carriers (AGC1-aralar and AGC2-citrin). Those proteins supply the aspartate synthesized within mitochondrial matrix to the cytosol in exchange for glutamate and a proton. A structure of an AGC carrier is not available yet but comparative 3D models were proposed. Moreover, transport assays performed by using the recombinant AGC1 and AGC2, reconstituted into liposome vesicles, allowed to explore the kinetics of those carriers and to reveal their specific transport properties. AGCs participate to a wide range of cellular functions, as the control of mitochondrial respiration, calcium signaling and antioxydant defenses. AGC1 might also play peculiar tissue-specific functions, as it was found to participate to cell-to-cell metabolic symbiosis in the retina. On the other hand, AGC1 is involved in the glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in neurons and AGC gene or protein alterations were discovered in rare human diseases. Accordingly, a mice model of AGC1 gene knock-out presented with growth delay and generalized tremor, with myelinisation defects. More recently, AGC was proposed to play a crucial role in tumor metabolism as observed from metabolomic studies showing that the asparate exported from the mitochondrion by AGC1 is employed in the regeneration of cytosolic glutathione. Therefore, given the central role of AGCs in cell metabolism and human pathology, drug screening are now being developed to identify pharmacological modulators of those carriers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:27132995

  2. Bifunctional Ag/C3N4.5 composite nanobelts for photocatalysis and antibacterium.

    PubMed

    Lei, Renbo; Jian, Jikang; Zhang, Zhihua; Song, Bo; Wu, Rong

    2016-09-30

    Multiple functions can be achieved in carbon nitride-based composite nanomaterials by tuning their components and structures. Here, we report on a large-scale synthesis of novel bifunctional Ag/C3N4.5 composite nanobelts (CNBs) with efficient photocatalytic and antibacterial activity. The Ag/C3N4.5 CNBs were synthesized in high yield by a two-step route including a homogeneous precipitation process and a subsequent calcination treatment. The structural, morphological, compositional, and spectroscopic characterizations revealed that the Ag/C3N4.5 CNBs are composed of N-deficient melem ultrathin nanobelts and crystalline Ag nanoparticles attached to the surface of the nanobelts with good contact. The band gap of the Ag/C3N4.5 CNBs is determined to be about 3.04 eV. The efficient photocatalytic and antibacterial activities of the composite nanomaterials are verified by testing the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and the inhibition zone to bacterium E. coli. The work provides a facile route to bifunctional carbon nitride-based composites with potential applications in the fields of the environment and biology. PMID:27560165

  3. SHIELD II: AGC 198507 - An Extremely Rare Low-Mass Galaxy Interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolina Borg Stevens, Karin; Cannon, John M.; McNichols, Andrew; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Teich, Yaron; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. New HST imaging of one of these sample galaxies, AGC 198507, has revealed it to be a very rare interacting system; to our knowledge this is one of only a few known interactions in this extreme mass range. WSRT imaging indicates that the bulk of the HI is associated with the more luminous AGC 198507, while low surface brightness gas extends toward and coincides with the less luminous companion, which is separated by roughly 1.5 kpc from AGC 198507. Here we present new VLA B configuration HI imaging that allows us to localize the HI gas, to examine the rotational dynamics of AGC 198507, and to study the nature of star formation in this unique low-mass interacting system.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  4. Coupled AGC-Costas loops with AM/PM conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Costas loops are invariably designed in conjunction with an automatic gain control (AGC) loop for stabilizing performance. In such systems an inherent coupling between the AGC and Costas loops develops, complicating the standard phase referencing analysis. This coupling is further emphasized if the gain control amplifier introduces an AM/PM conversion, which causes power variations to enter the Costas loop as phase variations. In this paper the coupling effect between AGC and Costas loops is developed, leading to a pair of joint, interconnected dynamical tracking loops. Some degree of solution is attainable by assuming a first order AGC loop, and resorting to quasi-stationary analysis for evaluating the phase referencing generation. Results with and without AM/PM are presented, and illustrate how an improper AGC may in fact degrade the phase referencing from the expected performance.

  5. Technology Works in the Outdoors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zita, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Technology is all around us and no matter how hard educators promote the value of outdoor and experiential education (OEE) to adults and children alike, they are pulled away by a different reality--one might say, a virtual reality. Even when one is engaged in the outdoors either through a night hike or a stream study, technology is lingering…

  6. Influences to System and Superiority of Model Parameters in Dynamic Setting AGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, LI; Hao-yu, Zhang; Jin, Zhang; Jian-fei, Guo; Cui-hong, Liu; Ping-wen, Cheng

    Dynamic setting AGC is based on the improvement of the BISRA-AGC model. Based on the control algorithms and control models of dynamic setting AGC, the influences of the model parameters to system performance were analyzed using the GUI in MATLAB. At the same time, the superiority and limitation of the dynamic setting AGC were analyzed.

  7. Making Technology Work for Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherkasky, Todd; Scannell, Ray

    1999-01-01

    A company can undo a generation of organizing and collective bargaining by redesigning the technology of the workplace. Unions must define a different vision of how production can be organized--a vision that is worker centered and skill based--and struggle for it in decision-making arenas of government and private enterprise. (Author)

  8. AGC-2 Graphite Pre-irradiation Data Package

    SciTech Connect

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2010-08-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  9. A Plan for Advanced Guidance and Control Technology for 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, John M.; Fogle, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Advanced guidance and control (AG&C) technologies are critical for meeting safety/reliability and cost requirements for the next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV). This becomes clear upon examining the number of expendable launch vehicle failures in the recent past where AG&C technologies would have saved a RLV with the same failure mode, the additional vehicle problems where this technology applies, and the costs associated with mission design with or without all these failure issues. The state-of-the-art in guidance and control technology, as well as in computing technology, is at the point where we can took to the possibility of being able to safely return a RLV in any situation where it can physically be recovered. This paper outlines reasons for AG&C, current technology efforts, and the additional work needed for making this goal a reality.

  10. Integrating Technology into the Social Work Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Jo Ann R. Coe, Ed.; Freddolino, Paul P., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Learn which cutting-edge technologies are most useful and how to integrate them into your social work curriculum! The rapid development of technology-supported learning in higher education institutions has created a demand for social work education programs to develop online courses, distance educations programs, and distributed learning…

  11. Applying Technology in the Work Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Reed, Ed.

    A series of papers is presented from two symposia sponsored by the Work Environment and Technology Committee and offered at annual conferences of the President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities. The 1988 symposium was called "Applying Technology in the Work Environment" and the 1989 symposium was called "Reasonable…

  12. The wheat AGC kinase TaAGC1 is a positive contributor to host resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen Rhizoctonia cerealis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuliang; Yang, Kun; Wei, Xuening; Zhang, Qiaofeng; Rong, Wei; Du, Lipu; Ye, Xingguo; Qi, Lin; Zhang, Zengyan

    2015-11-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the roles of AGC kinases in mammalian systems. However, very little is known about the roles of AGC kinases in wheat (Triticum aestivum). The necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia cerealis is the major pathogen of the destructive disease sharp eyespot of wheat. In this study, the wheat AGC kinase gene TaAGC1, responding to R. cerealis infection, was isolated, and its properties and role in wheat defence were characterized. R. cerealis-resistant wheat lines expressed TaAGC1 at higher levels than susceptible wheat lines. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses showed that the TaAGC1 protein is a serine/threonine kinase belonging to the NDR (nuclear Dbf2-related) subgroup of AGC kinases. Kinase activity assays proved that TaAGC1 is a functional kinase and the Asp-239 residue located in the conserved serine/threonine kinase domain of TaAGC1 is required for the kinase activity. Subcellular localization assays indicated that TaAGC1 localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Virus-induced TaAGC1 silencing revealed that the down-regulation of TaAGC1 transcripts significantly impaired wheat resistance to R. cerealis. The molecular characterization and responses of TaAGC1 overexpressing transgenic wheat plants indicated that TaAGC1 overexpression significantly enhanced resistance to sharp eyespot and reduced the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in wheat plants challenged with R. cerealis. Furthermore, ROS-scavenging and certain defence-associated genes were up-regulated in resistant plants overexpressing TaAGC1 but down-regulated in susceptible knock-down plants. These results suggested that the kinase TaAGC1 positively contributes to wheat immunity to R. cerealis through regulating expression of ROS-related and defence-associated genes. PMID:26220083

  13. The wheat AGC kinase TaAGC1 is a positive contributor to host resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen Rhizoctonia cerealis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiuliang; Yang, Kun; Wei, Xuening; Zhang, Qiaofeng; Rong, Wei; Du, Lipu; Ye, Xingguo; Qi, Lin; Zhang, Zengyan

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the roles of AGC kinases in mammalian systems. However, very little is known about the roles of AGC kinases in wheat (Triticum aestivum). The necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia cerealis is the major pathogen of the destructive disease sharp eyespot of wheat. In this study, the wheat AGC kinase gene TaAGC1, responding to R. cerealis infection, was isolated, and its properties and role in wheat defence were characterized. R. cerealis-resistant wheat lines expressed TaAGC1 at higher levels than susceptible wheat lines. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses showed that the TaAGC1 protein is a serine/threonine kinase belonging to the NDR (nuclear Dbf2-related) subgroup of AGC kinases. Kinase activity assays proved that TaAGC1 is a functional kinase and the Asp-239 residue located in the conserved serine/threonine kinase domain of TaAGC1 is required for the kinase activity. Subcellular localization assays indicated that TaAGC1 localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Virus-induced TaAGC1 silencing revealed that the down-regulation of TaAGC1 transcripts significantly impaired wheat resistance to R. cerealis. The molecular characterization and responses of TaAGC1 overexpressing transgenic wheat plants indicated that TaAGC1 overexpression significantly enhanced resistance to sharp eyespot and reduced the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in wheat plants challenged with R. cerealis. Furthermore, ROS-scavenging and certain defence-associated genes were up-regulated in resistant plants overexpressing TaAGC1 but down-regulated in susceptible knock-down plants. These results suggested that the kinase TaAGC1 positively contributes to wheat immunity to R. cerealis through regulating expression of ROS-related and defence-associated genes. PMID:26220083

  14. Capacitive deionization of seawater effected by nano Ag and Ag@C on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cai, P-F; Su, C-J; Chang, W-T; Chang, F-C; Peng, C-Y; Sun, I-W; Wei, Y-L; Jou, C-J; Wang, H Paul

    2014-08-30

    Drinking water shortage has become worse in recent decades. A new capacitive deionization (CDI) method for increasing water supplies through the effective desalination of seawater has been developed. Silver as nano Ag and Ag@C which was prepared by carbonization of the Ag(+)-β-cyclodextrin complex at 573 K for 30 min can add the antimicrobial function into the CDI process. The Ag@C and Ag nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (Ag@C/rGO and nano Ag/rGO) were used as the CDI electrodes. The nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can reduce the charging resistant, and enhance the electrosorption capability. Better CDI efficiencies with the nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can therefore be obtained. When reversed the voltage, the electrodes can be recovered up to 90% within 5 min. This work presents the feasibility for the nano Ag and Ag@C on rGO electrodes applied in CDI process to produce drinking water from seawater or saline water. PMID:24928455

  15. Technology and Work. Research Review No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taviss, Irene; Gerber, William

    Recent literature reflecting the impact of technological change on the occupational distribution of the labor force and on work patterns and skills is reviewed. Social and policy implications of technological change which are considered include mechanisms for improving the coordination between labor supply and demand and the problems and prospects…

  16. AGC198606: A gas-bearing dark matter minihalo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, E. A. K.; Faerman, Y.; Janesh, W. F.; Janowiecki, S.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Rhode, K. L.; Giovanelli, R.; Haynes, M. P.; Salzer, J. J.; Sternberg, A.; Cannon, J. M.; Muñoz, R. R.

    2015-01-01

    We present neutral hydrogen (H i) imaging observations with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope of AGC198606, an H i cloud discovered in the ALFALFA 21cm survey. This object is of particular note as it is located 16 km s-1 and 1.̊2 from the gas-bearing ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Leo T while having a similar H i linewidth and approximately twice the flux density. The H i imaging observations reveal a smooth, undisturbed H i morphology with a full extent of 23' × 16' at the 5 × 1018 atoms cm-2 level. The velocity field of AGC198606 shows ordered motion with a gradient of ~25 km s-1 across ~20'. The global velocity dispersion is 9.3 km s-1 with no evidence for a narrow spectral component. No optical counterpart to AGC198606 is detected. The distance to AGC198606 is unknown, and we consider several different scenarios: physical association with Leo T, a minihalo at a distance of ~150 kpc based on the models of Faerman et al. (2013, ApJ, 777, 119), and a cloud in the Galactic halo. At a distance of 420 kpc, AGC198606 would have an H i mass of 6.2 × 105 M⊙, an H i radius of 1.4 kpc, and a dynamical mass within the H i extent of 1.5 × 108 M⊙.

  17. AGC-3 IRRADIATION DATA QUALIFICATION FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Laurence

    2014-08-01

    All thermocouples functioned throughout the AGC-3 experiment. There was one interval between Dec 18, 2012 and Dec 20, 2012 where 10 NULL values were reported for various thermocouples. These NULL values were deleted from the database. All temperature data are Qualified. During Oct and Nov 2013, 135,849 helium and argon gas flow values were below 0. These negative gas flow values are not correct and are Failed. The remaining argon, helium, and total gas flow data are within expected ranges and are Qualified. Total gas flow was approximately 50 sccm through the capsule. Helium gas flow was briefly increased to 100 sccm during reactor shutdowns. At the start of the experiment, moisture in the outflow gas line was stuck at a constant value of 335.6174 ppmv for the first cycle. When the capsule was reinstalled in the reactor for Cycle 154B, a new moisture filter was installed. Moisture data from Cycle 152B are Failed. All moisture data from the final three cycles are Qualified. Graphite creep specimens were subjected to one of two loads, 393 lbf or 589 lbf. The experiment plan included three loads, but problems with gas leaks in the rams applying the load to the stacks resulted in lower loads being applied to some of the stacks. While the loads applied are not the loads in the plan, the loads were consistently applied throughout the experiment. Therefore the reported loads are accurate and can be used in analysis of graphite creep. Loads were consistently within 5% of the specified values throughout the experiment. Stack displacement increased consistently throughout the experiment with total displacement ranging from 1 to 1.25 inches. No anomalous values were identified. During reactor outages, a set of pneumatic rams was used to raise the stacks of graphite creep specimens to ensure the specimens had not become stuck within the test train. This stack raising was performed three times; all stacks were raised successfully each time. The load and displacement data are

  18. Simulation and Analyzing on Model Parameters Effect of BISRA-AGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Shu-zong, Chen; De-shun, Du; Hua-xin, Chen; Dian-hua, Zhang

    According to the control principle of pressure AGC, the control thought and control model of BISRA-AGC were analyzed. By changing the external disturbance of rolling force and sampling time, the BISRA-AGC and Dynamic Set AGC were simulated under the conditions that the position control system was ideal by using GUI. Then, the advantages and disadvantages were analyzed combining the results of simulation, and the intrinsic factors were quantitatively analyzed.

  19. AGC-2 Specimen Post Irradiation Data Package Report

    SciTech Connect

    Windes, William Enoch; Swank, W. David; Rohrbaugh, David T.; Cottle, David L.

    2015-08-01

    This report documents results of the post-irradiation examination material property testing of the creep, control, and piggyback specimens from the irradiation creep capsule Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC)-2 are reported. This is the second of a series of six irradiation test trains planned as part of the AGC experiment to fully characterize the neutron irradiation effects and radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphite grades. The AGC-2 capsule was irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor at a nominal temperature of 600°C and to a peak dose of 5 dpa (displacements per atom). One-half of the creep specimens were subjected to mechanical stresses (an applied stress of either 13.8, 17.2, or 20.7 MPa) to induce irradiation creep. All post-irradiation testing and measurement results are reported with the exception of the irradiation mechanical strength testing, which is the last destructive testing stage of the irradiation testing program. Material property tests were conducted on specimens from 15 nuclear graphite grades using a similar loading configuration as the first AGC capsule (AGC-1) to provide easy comparison between the two capsules. However, AGC-2 contained an increased number of specimens (i.e., 487 total specimens irradiated) and replaced specimens of the minor grade 2020 with the newer grade 2114. The data reported include specimen dimensions for both stressed and unstressed specimens to establish the irradiation creep rates, mass and volume data necessary to derive density, elastic constants (Young’s modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson’s ratio) from ultrasonic time-of-flight velocity measurements, Young’s modulus from the fundamental frequency of vibration, electrical resistivity, and thermal diffusivity and thermal expansion data from 100–500°C. No data outliers were determined after all measurements were completed. A brief statistical analysis was performed on the irradiated data and a limited comparison between

  20. Evolutionary Adaptations of Plant AGC Kinases: From Light Signaling to Cell Polarity Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Eike H.; Offringa, Remko

    2012-01-01

    Signaling and trafficking over membranes involves a plethora of transmembrane proteins that control the flow of compounds or relay specific signaling events. Next to external cues, internal stimuli can modify the activity or abundance of these proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). One such regulatory mechanism is protein phosphorylation by membrane-associated kinases, several of which are AGC kinases. The AGC kinase family is one of seven kinase families that are conserved in all eukaryotic genomes. In plants evolutionary adaptations introduced specific structural changes within the AGC kinases that most likely allow modulation of kinase activity by external stimuli (e.g., light). Starting from the well-defined structural basis common to all AGC kinases we review the current knowledge on the structure-function relationship in plant AGC kinases. Nine of the 39 Arabidopsis AGC kinases have now been shown to be involved in the regulation of auxin transport. In particular, AGC kinase-mediated phosphorylation of the auxin transporters ABCB1 and ABCB19 has been shown to regulate their activity, while auxin transporters of the PIN family are located to different positions at the PM depending on their phosphorylation status, which is a result of counteracting AGC kinase and PP6 phosphatase activities. We therefore focus on regulation of AGC kinase activity in this context. Identified structural adaptations of the involved AGC kinases may provide new insight into AGC kinase functionality and demonstrate their position as central hubs in the cellular network controlling plant development and growth. PMID:23162562

  1. Work and technological innovation in organic agriculture.

    PubMed

    Tereso, M J A; Abrahão, R F; Gemma, S F B; Montedo, U B; Menegon, N L; Guarneti, J E; Ribeiro, I A V

    2012-01-01

    Organic agriculture is a sustainable cultivation ecologically, economically and socially. Several researches in organic agriculture have been made from technical perspectives, economic traits or related to ecological aspects. There are practically no investigations into the nature of the technology used in organic agriculture, especially from an ergonomic perspective. From the activity analysis, this study aimed to map the technology used in the production of organic vegetables. Properties producing organic vegetables were selected representing the State of São Paulo. It was applied an instrument (questionnaire and semi-structured interview) with their managers and it was made visual records to identify adaptations, innovations and technological demands that simultaneously minimize the workload and the difficulties in performing the tasks and increase work productivity. For some of the technological innovations a digital scanner was used to generate a virtual solid model to facilitate its redesign and virtual prototyping. The main results show that organic farmers have little technology in product form. The main innovations that enable competitive advantage or allow higher labor productivity occur in the form of processes, organization and marketing. PMID:22317490

  2. Dust recycling technology in Kimitsu Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hiroshi; Ibaraki, Tetsuharu

    Dust recycling technology by the rotary hearth furnace has been applied at Nippon Steel‧s Kimitsu Works since 2000. The dust and sludge with iron oxide and carbon are agglomerated into shaped articles and the iron oxide is reduced in a high temperature atmosphere. Zinc and other impurities in the dust and sludge are expelled and exhausted into off gas. The DRI pellets made from the dust and sludge have 70% metallization and are strong enough for being recycled to the blast furnaces. No.1 plant, which was constructed in May 2000 and has an agglomeration method of pelletizing, recycles mainly dry dusts. No.2 plant, which was constructed in December 2002 and has an agglomeration method of extrusion, recycles mainly sludge. The combination of the two plants is a solution for recycling various kinds of dusts and sludge emitted in a large scale steel works as Kimitsu Works

  3. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Brian E.; Taylor, Harry O.; Glass, Joseph E.; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research. PMID:21691444

  4. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work.

    PubMed

    Perron, Brian E; Taylor, Harry O; Glass, Joseph E; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research. PMID:21691444

  5. AGC-1 Pre-Irradiation Data Report Status

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes

    2011-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite R&D program is currently measuring irradiated material property changes in several grades of nuclear graphite for predicting their behavior and operating performance within the core of new Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment consisting of six irradiation capsules will generate this irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. All samples in the experiment will be fully characterized before irradiation, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and then re-examined to determine the irradiation induced changes to key materials properties in the different graphite grades. The information generated during the AGC experiment will be utilized for NRC licensing of NGNP reactor designs, shared with international collaborators in the Generation IV Information Forum (GIF), and eventually utilized in ASME design code for graphite nuclear applications. This status report will describe the process the NGNP Graphite R&D program has developed to record the AGC1 pre-irradiation examination data.

  6. Geophysical Technologies to Image Old Mine Works

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaan Hanna; Jim Pfeiffer

    2007-01-15

    ZapataEngineering, Blackhawk Division performed geophysical void detection demonstrations for the US Department of Labor Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). The objective was to advance current state-of-practices of geophysical technologies for detecting underground mine voids. The presence of old mine works above, adjacent, or below an active mine presents major health and safety hazards to miners who have inadvertently cut into locations with such features. In addition, the presence of abandoned mines or voids beneath roadways and highway structures may greatly impact the performance of the transportation infrastructure in terms of cost and public safety. Roads constructed over abandoned mines are subject to potential differential settlement, subsidence, sinkholes, and/or catastrophic collapse. Thus, there is a need to utilize geophysical imaging technologies to accurately locate old mine works. Several surface and borehole geophysical imaging methods and mapping techniques were employed at a known abandoned coal mine in eastern Illinois to investigate which method best map the location and extent of old works. These methods included: 1) high-resolution seismic (HRS) using compressional P-wave (HRPW) and S-wave (HRSW) reflection collected with 3-D techniques; 2) crosshole seismic tomography (XHT); 3) guided waves; 4) reverse vertical seismic profiling (RVSP); and 5) borehole sonar mapping. In addition, several exploration borings were drilled to confirm the presence of the imaged mine voids. The results indicated that the RVSP is the most viable method to accurately detect the subsurface voids with horizontal accuracy of two to five feet. This method was then applied at several other locations in Colorado with various topographic, geologic, and cultural settings for the same purpose. This paper presents the significant results obtained from the geophysical investigations in Illinois.

  7. The Numerical Studies Program for the Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment (AGCE) for Spacelab Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W. (Editor); Davis, M. H. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric general circulation experiment (AGCE) numerical design for Spacelab flights was studied. A spherical baroclinic flow experiment which models the large scale circulations of the Earth's atmosphere was proposed. Gravity is simulated by a radial dielectric body force. The major objective of the AGCE is to study nonlinear baroclinic wave flows in spherical geometry. Numerical models must be developed which accurately predict the basic axisymmetric states and the stability of nonlinear baroclinic wave flows. A three dimensional, fully nonlinear, numerical model and the AGCE based on the complete set of equations is required. Progress in the AGCE numerical design studies program is reported.

  8. Idea Technology and Product Technology: Seeing beyond the Text to the Technology That Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednar, Maryanne R.

    2004-01-01

    Sifting through the myriad "idea" technologies (such as multiple intelligence theories or Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development) and "product" technologies (such as PowerPoint or digital cameras) can be overwhelming, but Bednar persuades us that it's not about having the most recent technology, it's about using what works for "your" students in…

  9. A wide dynamic range laser rangefinder with cm-level resolution based on AGC amplifier structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feihu; Gong, Ke; Huo, Yujing

    2012-03-01

    A pulsed time-of-flight (TOF) laser rangefinder with a pulsed laser diode and an avalanche photo diode (APD) receiver is constructed and tested. Trigged by an avalanche transistor, the laser diode can emit a periodic pulse with rise time of ˜2 ns. A new structure with auto gain control (AGC) circuits both in the pre-amplifier and the post-amplifier is presented. Through this technology, not only the dynamic range of the receiver is extended, but also the walk error of timing discriminators is reduced. Large measurement range from 5 m to 500 m is achieved without any cooperative target. The single-shot precision is 3 cm for the weakest signal. Compared with previous laser rangefinders, the complexity of this system is greatly simplified.

  10. A CMOS low power, process/temperature variation tolerant RSSI with an integrated AGC loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qianqian, Lei; Min, Lin; Yin, Shi

    2013-03-01

    A low voltage low power CMOS limiter and received signal strength indicator (RSSI) with an integrated automatic gain control (AGC) loop for a short-distance receiver are implemented in SMIC 0.13 μm CMOS technology. The RSSI has a dynamic range of more than 60 dB and the RSSI linearity error is within ±0.5 dB for an input power from -65 to -8 dBm. The RSSI output voltage is from 0.15 to 1 V and the slope of the curve is 14.17 mV/dB while consuming 1.5 mA (I and Q paths) from a 1.2 V supply. Auto LNA gain mode selection with a combined RSSI function is also presented. Furthermore, with the compensation circuit, the proposed RSSI shows good temperature-independent and good robustness against process variation characteristics.

  11. The Future of Work: Technology Beckons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donlevy, Jim

    2005-01-01

    In the schools, each day, teachers see cell phones, laptops, iPods, personal digital assistants, computer games and more. They are struggling to cope with this technological profusion as new devices seem to appear almost daily. With the pace of technological change, the emergence of new technologies, demographic changes and trends towards…

  12. Changing Technology and Work: Northern Telecom. CAW Technology Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, David; Wareham, Jeff

    A project to examine the implications of technological change at Northern Telecom consisted of two major components: a technological survey and case study research. A questionnaire that contained more than 90 questions on technological change was distributed through local union technology committee meetings in Brampton, London, Belleville, and…

  13. Management, Technology and Behavior of Work Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Charles A.

    This study examines the impact various variables associated with the technical structure of a work setting have on the potential relationship between supervisory style and the attitudes and behavior of industrial work groups. The research explores the assumption that supervision is an integral part of an organization and whatever characteristics…

  14. Communication Technology: Pros and Cons of Constant Connection to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Ismael; Chiaburu, Dan S.; Zimmerman, Ryan D.; Boswell, Wendy R.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship between employees' attitudes related to communication technology (CT) flexibility, communication technology (CT) use, work-to-life conflict and work satisfaction. Based on data obtained from 193 employees, CT flexibility predicted more CT use. Further, CT use was associated not only with increased work satisfaction,…

  15. Making technological innovation work for sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Chan, Gabriel; Harley, Alicia G; Matus, Kira; Moon, Suerie; Murthy, Sharmila L; Clark, William C

    2016-08-30

    This paper presents insights and action proposals to better harness technological innovation for sustainable development. We begin with three key insights from scholarship and practice. First, technological innovation processes do not follow a set sequence but rather emerge from complex adaptive systems involving many actors and institutions operating simultaneously from local to global scales. Barriers arise at all stages of innovation, from the invention of a technology through its selection, production, adaptation, adoption, and retirement. Second, learning from past efforts to mobilize innovation for sustainable development can be greatly improved through structured cross-sectoral comparisons that recognize the socio-technical nature of innovation systems. Third, current institutions (rules, norms, and incentives) shaping technological innovation are often not aligned toward the goals of sustainable development because impoverished, marginalized, and unborn populations too often lack the economic and political power to shape innovation systems to meet their needs. However, these institutions can be reformed, and many actors have the power to do so through research, advocacy, training, convening, policymaking, and financing. We conclude with three practice-oriented recommendations to further realize the potential of innovation for sustainable development: (i) channels for regularized learning across domains of practice should be established; (ii) measures that systematically take into account the interests of underserved populations throughout the innovation process should be developed; and (iii) institutions should be reformed to reorient innovation systems toward sustainable development and ensure that all innovation stages and scales are considered at the outset. PMID:27519800

  16. Making Technology Work for Campus Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floreno, Jeff; Keil, Brad

    2010-01-01

    The challenges associated with securing schools from both on- and off-campus threats create constant pressure for law enforcement, campus security professionals, and administrators. And while security technology choices are plentiful, many colleges and universities are operating with limited dollars and information needed to select and integrate…

  17. Preparing for High Technology: Programs That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abram, Robert; And Others

    Ten case studies of collaborative arrangements between postsecondary vocational education institutions and companies manufacturing or using advanced technologies are reported in this document. The intention is to explore exemplary approaches to planning, developing, and implementing training programs for technicians in rapidly changing…

  18. Myotonin protein-kinase [AGC]n trinucleotide repeat in seven nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Novelli, G.; Sineo, L.; Pontieri, E. ||

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is due to a genomic instability of a trinucleotide [AGC]n motif, located at the 3{prime} UTR region of a protein-kinase gene (myotonin protein kinase, MT-PK). The [AGC] repeat is meiotically and mitotically unstable, and it is directly related to the manifestations of the disorder. Although a gene dosage effect of the MT-PK has been demonstrated n DM muscle, the mechanism(s) by which the intragenic repeat expansion leads to disease is largely unknown. This non-standard mutational event could reflect an evolutionary mechanism widespread among animal genomes. We have isolated and sequenced the complete 3{prime}UTR region of the MT-PK gene in seven primates (macaque, orangutan, gorilla, chimpanzee, gibbon, owl monkey, saimiri), and examined by comparative sequence nucleotide analysis the [AGC]n intragenic repeat and the surrounding nucleotides. The genomic organization, including the [AGC]n repeat structure, was conserved in all examined species, excluding the gibbon (Hylobates agilis), in which the [AGC]n upstream sequence (GGAA) is replaced by a GA dinucleotide. The number of [AGC]n in the examined species ranged between 7 (gorilla) and 13 repeats (owl monkeys), with a polymorphism informative content (PIC) similar to that observed in humans. These results indicate that the 3{prime}UTR [AGC] repeat within the MT-PK gene is evolutionarily conserved, supporting that this region has important regulatory functions.

  19. The Extremely Metal-Poor Dwarf Galaxy AGC 198691

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschauer, Alec S.; Salzer, John Joseph; Cannon, John M.; Skillman, Evan D.; SHIELD II Team

    2016-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the nearby dwarf irregular galaxy AGC 198691. This object is part of the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-Mass Dwarfs (SHIELD) sample, which consists of ultra-low HI mass galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast-Acting ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. SHIELD is a multi-configuration Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) study of the neutral gas content and dynamics of galaxies with HI masses in the range of 106-107 M⊙. Our spectral data were obtained using the new high-throughput KPNO Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph (KOSMOS) on the Mayall 4-m telescope as part of a systematic study of the nebular abundances in the SHIELD galaxy sample. These observations enable measurement of the temperature sensitive [OIII]λ4363 line and hence the determination of a "direct" oxygen abundance for AGC 198691. We find this system to be an extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxy with an oxygen abundance comparable to such objects as I Zw 18, SBS 0335-052W, Leo P, and DDO 68 - the lowest metallicity star-forming systems known. It is worth noting that two of the five lowest-abundance galaxies currently recognized were discovered via the ALFALFA blind HI survey. These XMD galaxies are potential analogues to the first star-forming systems, which through hierarchical accretion processes built up the large galaxies we observe today in the local Universe. Detailed analysis of such XMD systems offers observational constraint to models of galactic evolution and star formation histories to allow a better understanding of the processes that govern the chemical evolution of low-mass galaxies.

  20. FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2

    SciTech Connect

    George Rizeq; Ravi Kumar; Janice West; Vitali Lissianski; Neil Widmer; Vladimir Zamansky

    2001-01-01

    It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE-EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE-EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R and D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the 1st quarterly progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program

  1. Technology, law, and the working environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ashford, N.A.; Caldart, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    This book is designed to serve as a text for students and legal and health professionals. The authors address scientific and legal policies that have revolutionized through time in the workplace. An aim of this book is to demonstrate to the reader how the legal system can be used to redirect technology to produce a healthier and safer workplace. Appendicies are provided for OSHA and TSCA.

  2. Laboratory Practical Work as a Technological Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pich-Otero, Augusto; Molina-Ortiz, Sara; Delaplace, Laura; Castellani, Oscar; Hozbor, Daniela; Sorgentini, Delia; Lodeiro, Anibal

    1998-01-01

    Evaluates the traditional method of intercalating theoretical and seminar classes with laboratory practical work. Proposes a new schedule where students get problem-based learning of theoretical concepts during the first half of the course, and plan and execute a laboratory project during the second half. (Author/CCM)

  3. Electrical System Technology Working Group (WG) Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, S.; Ford, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    The technology needs for space power systems (military, public, commercial) were assessed for the period 1995 to 2005 in the area of power management and distribution, components, circuits, subsystems, controls and autonomy, modeling and simulation. There was general agreement that the military requirements for pulse power would be the dominant factor in the growth of power systems. However, the growth of conventional power to the 100 to 250kw range would be in the public sector, with low Earth orbit needs being the driver toward large 100kw systems. An overall philosophy for large power system development is also described.

  4. Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

  5. 75 FR 21602 - Online Safety and Technology Working Group Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration Online Safety and Technology Working Group Meeting AGENCY: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce... and Technology Working Group (OSTWG). DATES: The meeting will be held on May 19, 2010, from 1:30...

  6. 75 FR 1338 - Online Safety and Technology Working Group Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration Online Safety and Technology Working Group Meeting AGENCY: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce... and Technology Working Group (OSTWG). DATES: The meeting will be held on February 4, 2010, from 8:40...

  7. Surfactant chemical technology works for environmental jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, J.T. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on surface active agents that have been employed in mining and mineral processing operations for many years. They are beginning to find increasing use as tools to deal with pressing environmental problems in the industry. Surface active agents are attracting particular attention from mining operators as environmental regulations as well as safety and health standards continue to tighten. These surfactants comprise a variety of products that have different end uses. They promote foaming, wetting, emulsification and crystal growth modification, among other functions. And they are generally environmentally friendly and non-toxic. Among the major environmental issues facing mine operators are effluent control, dust and fume suppression, acid drainage control and soil reclamation and remediation. Surfactants have already been put to work in each of these areas.

  8. A 6 μW per channel analog biomimetic cochlear implant processor filterbank architecture with across channels AGC.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Lyon, Richard F; Drakakis, Emmanuel M

    2015-02-01

    A new analog cochlear implant processor filterbank architecture of increased biofidelity, enhanced across-channel contrast and very low power consumption has been designed and prototyped. Each channel implements a biomimetic, asymmetric bandpass-like One-Zero-Gammatone-Filter (OZGF) transfer function, using class-AB log-domain techniques. Each channel's quality factor and suppression are controlled by means of a new low power Automatic Gain Control (AGC) scheme which is coupled across the neighboring channels and emulates lateral inhibition (LI) phenomena in the auditory system. Detailed measurements from a five-channel silicon IC prototype fabricated in a 0.35 μm AMS technology confirm the operation of the coupled AGC scheme and its ability to enhance contrast among channel outputs. The prototype is characterized by an input dynamic range of 92 dB while consuming only 28 μW of power in total ( ∼ 6 μW per channel) under a 1.8 V power supply. The architecture is well-suited for fully-implantable cochlear implants. PMID:25069120

  9. Information flow and work productivity through integrated information technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigand, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The work environment surrounding integrated office systems is reviewed. The known effects of automated office technologies is synthesized and their known impact on work efficiency is reviewed. These effects are explored with regard to their impact on networks, work flow/processes, as well as organizational structure and power. Particular emphasis is given to structural changes due to the introduction of newer information technologies in organizations. The new information technologies have restructed the average organization's middle banks and, as a consequence, they have shrunk drastically. Organizational pyramids have flattened with fewer levels since executives have realized that they can get ahold of the needed information via the new technologies quicker and directly and do not have to rely on middle-level managers. Power shifts are typically accompanied with the introduction of these technologies resulting in the generation of a new form of organizational power.

  10. High Technology School-to-Work Program at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Argonne's High Technology School-to-Work Program for Chicago Public School Students. Supported by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Chicago Public Schools, Argonne National Laboratory and the City of Chicago.

  11. High Technology School-to-Work Program at Argonne

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    Argonne's High Technology School-to-Work Program for Chicago Public School Students. Supported by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Chicago Public Schools, Argonne National Laboratory and the City of Chicago.

  12. Group Work in a Technology-Rich Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penner, Nikolai; Schulze, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses several components of successful language-learning methodologies--group work, task-based instruction, and wireless computer technologies--and examines how the interplay of these three was perceived by students in a second-year university foreign-language course. The technology component of our learning design plays a central…

  13. Contemporary Critiques of Technology. Working Papers Series Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutcliffe, Stephen H., Ed.

    The third volume of the working paper series produced in association with the Regional Colloquium for Technology Studies offers a range of insights into modern technology and some of the thinkers who have philosophized about its nature and societal impact. The essays are critical appraisals of the ideas of philosophers of twentieth-century…

  14. Mobility of Labour, Technological Transformations and the Right to Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelpi, Ettore

    1985-01-01

    The author discusses the macro level of analysis and focuses on the nature of work within the world economy. He examines the cultural characteristics of work, the dynamics of international economic relations, the transformation of international relations, geographical mobility, technological transformation and immigration, professional mobility,…

  15. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Lammel et al.

    2002-12-10

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large.

  16. FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2

    SciTech Connect

    George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Edwin Hippo; Tomasz Wiltowski

    2002-07-01

    It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the seventh quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program

  17. FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2

    SciTech Connect

    George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Vladimir Zamansky; Linda Denton; Hana Loreth; Tomasz Wiltowski

    2001-07-01

    It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the third quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program

  18. FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2

    SciTech Connect

    George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

    2002-10-01

    It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the second annual technical progress report for the Vision 21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1

  19. Managing Technology Resourcefully: Part II--Working with Your District's Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A large school district may have a technology department staffed by a chief technology officer who supervises two or more directors of operations, project managers, and technicians. On the other hand, a small district may employ an information technologist who works with technicians, consultants, volunteers with a knack for technology, and…

  20. Design and performance test of a MEMS vibratory gyroscope with a novel AGC force rebalance control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Woon-Tahk; Sung, Sangkyung; Lee, Jang Gyu; Kang, Taesam

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the development and performance test results of a laterally oscillating MEMS gyroscope using a novel force rebalance control strategy are presented. The micromachined structure and electrodes are fabricated using the deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and anodic wafer bonding process. The high quality factor required for the resonance-based sensor is achieved using a vacuum-sealed device package. A systematic design approach of the force rebalance control is applied via a modified automatic gain control (AGC) method. The rebalance control design takes advantages of a novel AGC loop modification, which allows the approximation of the system's dynamics into a simple linear form. Using the proposed modification of AGC and the rebalance strategy that maintains a biased oscillation, a number of performance improvements including bandwidth extension and widened operating range were observed to be achieved. Finally, the experimental results of the gyroscope's practical application verify the feasibility and performance of the developed sensor.

  1. Career/Technology Centers That Work: An Enhanced "High Schools That Work" Design for Technology Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2007

    2007-01-01

    "High Schools That Work" is an effort-based school improvement initiative founded on the conviction that most students can master rigorous career/technical and academic studies if school leaders and teachers create an environment that motivates students to make the effort to succeed. HSTW is the nation's first large-scale effort to engage state,…

  2. Multi-area adaptive LFC developed for a comprehensive AGC simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Shoults, R.R. . Energy Systems Research Center); Ibarra, J.A.J. )

    1993-05-01

    A multi-area adaptive Load Frequency Control (LFC) based on the Self-Tuning Regulator (STR) for a comprehensive Automatic Generator Control Simulator (AGCS) is investigated. A multi-area AGCS comprising the dynamic as well as the static solutions of an interconnected power system has been implemented to accommodate a control center with adaptive LFC features. Simulation results from a three-area system driven by realistic load compositions show that the STR presents better tracking properties than the integral or the combination of integral and STR controllers.

  3. Data Report on Post-Irradiation Dimensional Change of AGC-1 Samples

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the initial dimensional changes for loaded and unloaded AGC-1 samples. The dimensional change for all samples is presented as a function of dose. The data is further presented by graphite type and applied load levels to illustrate the differences between graphite forming processes and stress levels within the graphite components. While the three different loads placed on the samples have been verified [ ref: Larry Hull’s report] verification of the AGC-1 sample temperatures and dose levels are expected in the summer of 2012. Only estimated dose and temperature values for the samples are presented in this report to allow a partial analysis of the results.

  4. Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light…

  5. Opening the Box: Information Technology, Work Practices, and Wages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Larry W.; Lakfas, John J.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of 1994-95 data on customer service representatives in 303 banks revealed a positive relationship between high-involvement work practices (quality circles) and extensive use of information technology (IT) to support sales. Use of IT to automate routine processes and no quality circles were associated with lower wages. (Contains 55…

  6. Using Technology with Classroom Instruction that Works. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Matt; Hubbell, Elizabeth R.; Pitler, Howard

    2012-01-01

    If you've upgraded to the second edition of the landmark book "Classroom Instruction That Works," you need this companion guide to help you use technology to support research-based instruction. The authors follow the revised Instructional Planning Guide that makes it easier for you to know when to emphasize each of the instructional strategies,…

  7. Alternatives to Industrial Work Placement at Dublin Institute of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Catherine; Gamble, Elena

    2011-01-01

    In the current economic crisis, higher education graduates need transferable professional skills more than ever. They need resourcefulness, an ability to work reflectively, a sense of civic awareness and an impressive curriculum vitae. This case study analyses how Dublin Institute of Technology's Programme for Students Learning With Communities…

  8. Technology and Literature. Working Papers Series, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutcliffe, Stephen H., Ed.

    Designed to help foster new research and facilitate a wider dissemination of research and ideas, this fifth volume in an ongoing series of working papers explores selected themes on the relationship between technology and literature. Three papers are presented which represent a sampling of the themes that could be pursued through literature in a…

  9. Pilot Project Technology Business Case: Mobile Work Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ken; Lawrie, Sean; Niedermuller, Josef

    2015-05-01

    Performance advantages of the new pilot project technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on demonstrating actual cost reductions that can be credited to budgets and thereby truly reduce O&M or capital costs. Technology enhancements, while enhancing work methods and making work more efficient, often fail to eliminate workload such that it changes overall staffing and material cost requirements. It is critical to demonstrate cost reductions or impacts on non-cost performance objectives in order for the business case to justify investment by nuclear operators. The Business Case Methodology (BCM) was developed in September of 2015 to frame the benefit side of II&C technologies to address the “benefit” side of the analysis—as opposed to the cost side—and how the organization evaluates discretionary projects (net present value (NPV), accounting effects of taxes, discount rates, etc.). The cost and analysis side is not particularly difficult for the organization and can usually be determined with a fair amount of precision (not withstanding implementation project cost overruns). It is in determining the “benefits” side of the analysis that utilities have more difficulty in technology projects and that is the focus of this methodology. The methodology is presented in the context of the entire process, but the tool provided is limited to determining the organizational benefits only. This report describes a the use of the BCM in building a business case for mobile work packages, which includes computer-based procedures and other automated elements of a work package. Key to those impacts will be identifying where the savings are

  10. RF Variable-Gain Amplifiers and AGC Loops for Digital TV Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Kunihiko; Koutani, Masato; Mitsunaka, Takeshi; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Toyoyama, Shinji; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Matsuzawa, Akira

    RF Variable Gain Amplifiers (RF-VGA) are important components for integrated TV broadcast receivers. Analog and digital controlled RF-VGAs are compared in terms of linearity and an AGC loop architecture suitable for digitally controlled RF-VGA is proposed. Further linearity enhancement applicable for CMOS implementation is also discussed.

  11. ASASSN-16ke: Discovery of A Probable Supernova in AGC 331536

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Bock, G.; Cruz, I.; Marples, P.; Post, R. S.

    2016-09-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin"), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii, we discovered a new transient source, most likely a supernova, in the galaxy AGC 331536.

  12. ALFALFA Discovery of the Most Metal-poor Gas-rich Galaxy Known: AGC 198691

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschauer, Alec S.; Salzer, John J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Cannon, John M.; Gordon, Alex J. R.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Janowiecki, Steven; Rhode, Katherine L.; Pogge, Richard W.; Croxall, Kevin V.; Aver, Erik

    2016-05-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the nearby dwarf galaxy AGC 198691. This object is part of the Survey of H i in Extremely Low-Mass Dwarfs project, which is a multi-wavelength study of galaxies with H i masses in the range of 106–107.2 M ⊙, discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We have obtained spectra of the lone H ii region in AGC 198691 with the new high-throughput KPNO Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Mayall 4 m, as well as with the Blue Channel spectrograph on the MMT 6.5 m telescope. These observations enable the measurement of the temperature-sensitive [O iii]λ4363 line and hence the determination of a “direct” oxygen abundance for AGC 198691. We find this system to be an extremely metal-deficient (XMD) system with an oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H) = 7.02 ± 0.03, making AGC 198691 the lowest-abundance star-forming galaxy known in the local universe. Two of the five lowest-abundance galaxies known have been discovered by the ALFALFA blind H i survey; this high yield of XMD galaxies represents a paradigm shift in the search for extremely metal-poor galaxies.

  13. Helping Schools Make Technology Work: Managing Information Technology from Classrooms to Lunchrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Comptroller of Public Accounts, Austin.

    This report discusses the following "Top 10" ways to make technology work for schools: (1) develop long and short-range plans and budgets--don't fly blind; (2) create policies, procedures, and standards--the bedrock of effective technological change; (3) know what you need before you buy it; (4) apply the "Yellow Pages test" when deciding to buy…

  14. Long life technology work at Rockwell International Space Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huzel, D. K.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents highlights of long-life technology oriented work performed at the Space Division of Rockwell International Corporation under contract to NASA. This effort included evaluation of Saturn V launch vehicle mechanical and electromechanical components for potential extended life capabilities, endurance tests, and accelerated aging experiments. A major aspect was evaluation of the components at the subassembly level (i.e., at the interface between moving surfaces) through in-depth wear analyses and assessments. Although some of this work is still in progress, preliminary conclusions are drawn and presented, together with the rationale for each. The paper concludes with a summary of the effort still remaining.

  15. Mobile Work Platform - A Fluor Fernald innovative dismantlement technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mark S. Peters; Paul R. Cromer; Robert Danner

    2000-06-16

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Focus Area, led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been charged with finding new and innovative D&D technologies and then validating through field demonstration that the technologies are safer, faster and/or more cost-effective. The D&D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D&D technologies is to use them at DOE sites in large-scale demonstration and deployment (LSDD) projects. The DOE's Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), near Cincinnati Ohio, was host for a LSDD Project overseen by the D&D Focus Area. The FEMP was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal; and is now currently undergoing active environmental restoration, including removal of major process facilities. As observed during the D&D of Fernald's Plant 1, the baseline method for removing piping required laborers to work above the floor on ladders, scaffolding, ardor man-lifts with hand-held power tools. The pipe must first be rigged to prevent falling when cut. After cutting, the pipe is manually lowered to the ground and placed in a storage/disposal container. The Mobile Work Platform (MWP) consists of a mobile chassis, telescoping arm and a dual crimper/shear ''end-effecter''. It has the capability to grab and hold a pipe, crimp and shear the pipe (up to a ten-foot section) on either side of where it is being held and then lower and place the pipe section into a storage/disposal container. The MWP can crimp/shear up to a 6-inch diameter, schedule 401, carbon steel pipe. A single operator using a radio remote control operates the MWP. The paper will describe the results (productivity, safety advantages and lessons learned) during the Mobile Work Platform demonstration at Fernald.

  16. Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry; Hunter, James

    2014-06-24

    Los Alamos scientists have advanced a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. They've added low-power X-ray data to the mix, and as a result have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new system is named MagRay. The goal is to quickly and accurately distinguish between liquids that visually appear identical. For example, what appears to be a bottle of white wine could potentially be nitromethane, a liquid that could be used to make an explosive. Both are clear liquids, one would be perfectly safe on a commercial aircraft, the other would be strictly prohibited. How to tell them apart quickly without error at an airport security area is the focus of Michelle Espy, Larry Schultz and their team. In this video, Espy and the MagRay team explain how the new technology works, how they've developed an easy operator interface, and what the next steps might be in transitioning this technology to the private sector.

  17. Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry; Hunter, James

    2013-11-25

    Los Alamos scientists have advanced a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. They've added low-power X-ray data to the mix, and as a result have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new system is named MagRay. The goal is to quickly and accurately distinguish between liquids that visually appear identical. For example, what appears to be a bottle of white wine could potentially be nitromethane, a liquid that could be used to make an explosive. Both are clear liquids, one would be perfectly safe on a commercial aircraft, the other would be strictly prohibited. How to tell them apart quickly without error at an airport security area is the focus of Michelle Espy, Larry Schultz and their team. In this video, Espy and the MagRay team explain how the new technology works, how they've developed an easy operator interface, and what the next steps might be in transitioning this technology to the private sector.

  18. Theoretical studies of the structure and stability of (Ag(C 6H 6) n+ ( n = 1 and 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, N. L.; Ng, K. M.; Tsang, C. W.

    1997-10-01

    Ab initio molecular orbital techniques are used to probe the structure and stability of Ag(C 6H 6) + and Ag(C 6H 6) 2+ recently observed in electrospray ionization mass spectra. Of all the Ag(C 6H 6) + structures investigated, the C 6v complex is the most stable. Our calculated first binding energy of benzene to Ag + is in agreement with the experimental value and the second binding enegy of benzene to Ag + is estimated to be 114 (10) kJ mol -1.

  19. Use of additive technologies for practical working with complex models for foundry technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhovik, E.; Butsanets, A. A.; Ageeva, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The article presents the results of research of additive technology (3D printing) application for developing a geometrically complex model of castings parts. Investment casting is well known and widely used technology for the production of complex parts. The work proposes the use of a 3D printing technology for manufacturing models parts, which are removed by thermal destruction. Traditional methods of equipment production for investment casting involve the use of manual labor which has problems with dimensional accuracy, and CNC technology which is less used. Such scheme is low productive and demands considerable time. We have offered an alternative method which consists in printing the main knots using a 3D printer (PLA and ABS) with a subsequent production of castings models from them. In this article, the main technological methods are considered and their problems are discussed. The dimensional accuracy of models in comparison with investment casting technology is considered as the main aspect.

  20. Working Group 5: Measurements technology and active experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E.; Barfield, J. N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Feynman, J.; Quinn, J. N.; Roberts, W.; Stone, N.; Taylor, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Technology issues identified by working groups 5 are listed. (1) New instruments are needed to upgrade the ability to measure plasma properties in space. (2) Facilities should be developed for conducting a broad range of plasma experiments in space. (3) The ability to predict plasma weather within magnetospheres should be improved and a capability to modify plasma weather developed. (4) Methods of control of plasma spacecraft and spacecraft plasma interference should be upgraded. (5) The space station laboratory facilities should be designed with attention to problems of flexibility to allow for future growth. These issues are discussed.

  1. Design and realization of an AEC&AGC system for the CCD aerial camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai ying; Feng, Bing; Wang, Peng; Li, Yan; Wei, Hao yun

    2015-08-01

    An AEC and AGC(Automatic Exposure Control and Automatic Gain Control) system was designed for a CCD aerial camera with fixed aperture and electronic shutter. The normal AEC and AGE algorithm is not suitable to the aerial camera since the camera always takes high-resolution photographs in high-speed moving. The AEC and AGE system adjusts electronic shutter and camera gain automatically according to the target brightness and the moving speed of the aircraft. An automatic Gamma correction is used before the image is output so that the image is better for watching and analyzing by human eyes. The AEC and AGC system could avoid underexposure, overexposure, or image blurring caused by fast moving or environment vibration. A series of tests proved that the system meet the requirements of the camera system with its fast adjusting speed, high adaptability, high reliability in severe complex environment.

  2. NV Energy Large-Scale Photovoltaic Integration Study: Intra-Hour Dispatch and AGC Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Meng, Da; Guo, Xinxin; Jin, Chunlian; Samaan, Nader A.

    2013-01-02

    The uncertainty and variability with photovoltaic (PV) generation make it very challenging to balance power system generation and load, especially under high penetration cases. Higher reserve requirements and more cycling of conventional generators are generally anticipated for large-scale PV integration. However, whether the existing generation fleet is flexible enough to handle the variations and how well the system can maintain its control performance are difficult to predict. The goal of this project is to develop a software program that can perform intra-hour dispatch and automatic generation control (AGC) simulation, by which the balancing operations of a system can be simulated to answer the questions posed above. The simulator, named Electric System Intra-Hour Operation Simulator (ESIOS), uses the NV Energy southern system as a study case, and models the system’s generator configurations, AGC functions, and operator actions to balance system generation and load. Actual dispatch of AGC generators and control performance under various PV penetration levels can be predicted by running ESIOS. With data about the load, generation, and generator characteristics, ESIOS can perform similar simulations and assess variable generation integration impacts for other systems as well. This report describes the design of the simulator and presents the study results showing the PV impacts on NV Energy real-time operations.

  3. Technology and Harmony with Nature. Technology Studies Resource Center, Working Papers Series, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutcliffe, Stephen H., Ed.

    A non-anthropocentric view of humankind's relationship with nature is addressed in these essays which are a part of an ongoing series of working papers on technology. The first essay, "Extremist Conceptions of Man and Nature" by Eric Katz critiques three popular philosophies regarding nature and the environment that are believed to be misguided…

  4. A digitally controlled AGC loop circuitry for GNSS receiver chip with a binary weighted accurate dB-linear PGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Jin; Yiqi, Zhuang; Yue, Yin; Miao, Cui

    2015-03-01

    A novel digitally controlled automatic gain control (AGC) loop circuitry for the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receiver chip is presented. The entire AGC loop contains a programmable gain amplifier (PGA), an AGC circuit and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is implemented in a 0.18 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process and measured. A binary-weighted approach is proposed in the PGA to achieve wide dB-linear gain control with small gain error. With binary-weighted cascaded amplifiers for coarse gain control, and parallel binary-weighted trans-conductance amplifier array for fine gain control, the PGA can provide a 64 dB dynamic range from -4 to 60 dB in 1.14 dB gain steps with a less than 0.15 dB gain error. Based on the Gaussian noise statistic characteristic of the GNSS signal, a digital AGC circuit is also proposed with low area and fast settling. The feed-backward AGC loop occupies an area of 0.27 mm2 and settles within less than 165 μs while consuming an average current of 1.92 mA at 1.8 V.

  5. Relationships between work-home segmentation and psychological detachment from work: the role of communication technology use at home.

    PubMed

    Park, YoungAh; Fritz, Charlotte; Jex, Steve M

    2011-10-01

    Employees can have difficulty mentally distancing themselves from work during off-job time due to increasing use of communication technologies (e.g., e-mail, cell phone, etc.). However, psychological detachment from work during nonwork time is important for employee recovery and health. This study examined several antecedents of psychological detachment: work-home segmentation preference, perceived segmentation norm, and the use of communication technology at home. Results indicate that segmentation preference and segmentation norm were positively associated with psychological detachment. Further, technology use at home partially mediated these relationships. Findings indicate that segmenting work and nonwork roles can help employees detach and recover from work demands. In addition, findings show that the segmentation norm within a work group is associated with employee experiences outside of work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:21728434

  6. AGC System after Deregulation Considering TCPS in Series with the Tie-Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Rajesh Joseph; Das, D.; Patra, A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the study of automatic generation control (AGC) of two area interconnected power system after deregulation, considering a thyristor controlled phase shifter (TCPS) in series with the tie-line. It is possible to minimize the system frequency and tie-power oscillations by controlling the phase angle of TCPS which is expected to provide a new ancillary service for the future power system. Effect of TCPS is examined for three different cases, i.e. (1) unilateral contract, (2) bilateral contract and (3) contract violation. Analysis reveals that a TCPS is quite capable of suppressing the frequency and tie-power oscillations effectively as compared to that obtained without TCPS.

  7. Engagement and Uncertainty: Emerging Technologies Challenge the Work of Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Weston; Wright, Wynne; Whyte, Kyle; Gasteyer, Stephen P.; Gehrke, Pat J.

    2014-01-01

    Universities' increasing applications of science and technology to address a wide array of societal problems may serve to thwart democratic engagement strategies. For emerging technologies, such challenges are particularly salient, as knowledge is incomplete and application and impact are uncertain or contested. Insights from science and…

  8. Does Technology Integration "Work" when Key Barriers Are Removed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowther, Deborah L.; Inan, Fethi A.; Strahl, J. Daniel; Ross, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of Tennessee EdTech Launch (TnETL), a statewide technology program designed to meet the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) mandate, was investigated in this matched treatment-control quasi-experimental study. The goal of the program was to provide full-time, on-site technology coaches to prepare teachers to create lessons that engage…

  9. Engaging Education: Integrating Work, Technology and Learning for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC.

    This guide is for Neighborhood Networks center staff and volunteers who want to learn how centers across the country are helping adults meet work force demands. It provides resources to work force development programs so examples can be tailored to meet the needs of other communities. It focuses on challenges that integrating academics and job…

  10. Work Addiction and 21st Century Information Technologies in Traditional and Virtual Work Spaces in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunka, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    This study was completed to understand whether or not work addiction or work addiction intensity could be predicted from mobile technology use. The study further investigated whether or not gender, workspace, income, or education level would moderate the relationship. The sample used was drawn from service industry employees who are not in the…

  11. E-Technology and Work/Life Balance for Academics with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Jan; Eveline, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, research on post-industrialized economies shows that the boundary between work and family is increasingly becoming blurred. The continuing evolution of e-technology allows work for some to be done anywhere, anytime. This article examines the degree to which e-technology has transferred work into the home lives of academics…

  12. 75 FR 57520 - NASA Advisory Council; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Supporting Research and Technology Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... Technology Working Group; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of... Technology Working Group of the Planetary Science Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. DATED: Wednesday... the meeting will include: Presentation of Working Group Process. Discussion of Role of NASA HQ...

  13. Making Technology Work for Scholarship: Investing in the Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockey, Susan

    This paper examines issues related to how providers and consumers can make the best use of electronic information, focusing on the humanities. Topics include: new technology or old; electronic text and data formats; Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML); text encoding initiative; encoded archival description (EAD); other applications of…

  14. Putting Technology to Work on a Capital Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Dudley, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Managing complex capital construction projects provides formidable challenges to school leaders. Increasing enrollment, new state mandates, aging schools and the need for technology-rich environments are issues that require both more space and better quality facilities. Short-handed district leadership teams already find themselves more than fully…

  15. Technology and Politics: Incentives for Youth Participation. Working Paper 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyengar, Shanto; Jackman, Simon

    2004-01-01

    No other group is as disengaged from elections as youth. Voter turnout in the United States trails that of other industrialized societies, and is particularly anemic among youth between the ages of 18 and 24. The purpose of this study was to assess whether young people's expertise with information technology could be harnessed to stimulate a…

  16. Work Organization, Technology, and Performance in Customer Service and Sales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batt, Rosemary

    1999-01-01

    Performance data on 223 customer-service and sales representatives showed that participation in self-managed teams correlated with significant improvement in service quality and 9.3% sales increase. New technology helped teams increase sales 17.4%. Total-quality management did not affect performance. Results show that group collaboration fosters…

  17. The Technology of Skill Formation. NBER Working Paper No. 12840

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunha, Flavio; Heckman, James

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops a model of skill formation that explains a variety of findings established in the child development and child intervention literatures. At its core is a technology that is stage-specific and that features self productivity, dynamic complementarity and skill multipliers. Lessons are drawn for the design of new policies to…

  18. Creating a Community of Distance Learners: Putting Technology To Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menlove, Ronda R.; Hansford, Dave; Lignugaris-Kraft, Benjamin

    Learning at a distance can be challenging for preservice teacher education students living in remote rural sites. The Department of Special Education at Utah State University (USU) uses technology to overcome student isolation by linking students to supportive university learning communities. Many students in the USU distance education, special…

  19. Working Together: A Literature Review of Campus Information Technology Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exline, Eleta

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the recent literature about the essential but often uneasy alliances made between content experts (archivists and librarians) and technology experts. Differing professional cultures, misunderstandings of one another, limited abilities to envision change, and lack of support from top-level administrators are the most often…

  20. Making aerospace technology work for the automotive industry, introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    NASA derived technology already in use in the automotive industry include: (1) developments in electronics design, computer systems, and quality control methods for line testing of cars and trucks; (2) a combustion analysis computer program for automotive engine research and development; (3) an infrared scanner and television display for analyzing tire design and performance, and for studying the effects of heat on the service life of V-belts, shock mounts, brakes, and rubber bearings; (4) exhaust gas analyzers for trouble shooting and emissions certification; (5) a device for reducing noise from trucks; and (6) a low cost test vehicle for measuring highway skid resistance. Services offered by NASA to facilitate access to its technology are described.

  1. Interprofessional E-Learning and Collaborative Work: Practices and Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromage, Adrian, Ed.; Clouder, Lynn, Ed.; Thistlethwaite, Jill, Ed.; Gordon, Frances, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Interprofessionalism, an emerging model and philosophy of multi-disciplinary and multi-agency working, has in increasingly become an important means of cultivating joint endeavors across varied and diverse disciplinary and institutional settings. This book is therefore, an important source for understanding how interprofessionalism can be promoted…

  2. Success in large high-technology projects: What really works?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, P.

    2014-08-01

    Despite a plethora of tools, technologies and management systems, successful execution of big science and engineering projects remains problematic. The sheer scale of globally funded projects such as the Large Hadron Collider and the Square Kilometre Array telescope means that lack of project success can impact both on national budgets, and collaborative reputations. In this paper, I explore data from contemporary literature alongside field research from several current high-technology projects in Europe and Australia, and reveal common `pressure points' that are shown to be key influencers of project control and success. I discuss the how mega-science projects sit between being merely complicated, and chaotic, and explain the importance of understanding multiple dimensions of project complexity. Project manager/leader traits are briefly discussed, including capability to govern and control such enterprises. Project structures are examined, including the challenge of collaborations. I show that early attention to building project resilience, curbing optimism, and risk alertness can help prepare large high-tech projects against threats, and why project managers need to understand aspects of `the silent power of time'. Mission assurance is advanced as a critical success function, alongside the deployment of task forces and new combinations of contingency plans. I argue for increased project control through industrial-style project reviews, and show how post-project reviews are an under-used, yet invaluable avenue of personal and organisational improvement. Lastly, I discuss the avoidance of project amnesia through effective capture of project knowledge, and transfer of lessons-learned to subsequent programs and projects.

  3. How Technology Changes Demands for Human Skills. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 45

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This paper places the competencies to be measured by the OECD's Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) in the context of the technological developments which are reshaping the nature of the workplace and work in the 21st century. The largest technological force currently shaping work is the computer. Computers are…

  4. Programs for Middle School Math: An Inventory of Existing Technology. Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saultz, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In this working paper, Andrew Saultz of Michigan State University inventories the current landscape of technology programs available for middle school math. The working paper is not intended as a "consumers' guide" to technology programs, and the descriptions of some specific programs are not fully accurate or current. Readers who are interested…

  5. Examining Middle School Students' Statistical Thinking While Working in a Technological Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scranton, Melissa Arnold

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how students think in a technological environment. This was accomplished by exploring the differences in the thinking of students while they worked in a technological environment and comparing this to their work in a paper and pencil environment. The software program TinkerPlots:…

  6. Intimate Technology: A Tool for Teaching Anti-Racism in Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deepak, Anne C.; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce a new conceptual tool, intimate technology, to mobilize social work students' commitment to anti-racism. Intimate technology is marked by its emotional intensity and accessibility, and its effect of de-centering knowledge and authority. This teaching strategy integrates the modality of intimate technology via…

  7. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  8. Technology of research of hydroturbine unit work using seismic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, V. S.; Liseikin, A. V.; Gromyko, P. V.; Soloviev, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    On August, 17, 2009 one of the most significant accident in hydropower engineering was happened at Sayano-Shushenskaya Hydroelectric Power Station. Specialists of Geophysical Survey SB RAS took part in the State Committee on investigation of the accident cause at Sayano-Shushenskaya HPS. It was determined, that the cause of the accident was a break of stud-bolts on the turbine cover. Why stud-bolts did not stand a load? There were assumptions that hydraulic shock provoked the accident. But, if it is so, seismic station "Cheremushky", situated in 4 km away from the HPS, should has a record of this event. First of all, investigating the record, got at the seismic station in the moment of the accident, it was determined that strength of seismic waves, recorded at the moment of the accident, did not exceed strength of waves got at trotyl explosion of 500 g at a distance to 4 km. The version of hydraulic shock was not proved. There were distinguished low-frequency oscillations and it was determined that the hydroturbine unit (HU) had been raised up more then 10 m in height for 10 sec. Analyzing the seismic station records during the period of more than a year before the accident and records of operating modes of different HU, there was determined that oscillations radiated by second (damaged) HU were approximately 1.5 times more intense than oscillations from all other HU. After the accident at Sayano-Shushenskaya HPS hydroturbine units were started in turns: at first there were started hydroturbine units of old construction (3, 4, 5, 6), then HP of new construction (1, 7, 8, 9). We installed 10 - 15 three-component seismic stations in different points around a HU and studied field of seismic oscillations from it's work. It was determined, that HU radiates a set of monochromatic oscillations divisible by speed of rotation equal to 2.381 Hz. Change of these signals amplitude is connected with change of HU operation modes. Research of changes in oscillations spectral

  9. Understanding the Impact of New Technology on Life and Work. Learning Guide 12. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This learning guide on understanding the impact of new technology on life and work is part of a series of learning guides developed for competency-based adult consumer and homemaking education programs in community colleges, adult education centers, community centers, and the workplace. Focus is on the connections among personal, family, and job…

  10. Working the network: Initiating a new science and technology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepburn, Gary Roy

    1997-12-01

    This study explores the introduction of a new applied physics course into a British Columbia high school during the 1994-1995 school year. The course was part of a provincial effort aimed at making science and technology education more responsive to the workplace. Data collection took place during the first year the applied physics course was being piloted at the school and focused on the pilot teacher and the applied physics classes, but also involved others inside and outside the school who had a connection to the course. A variety of methods were used in data collection including interviews, observation, and document analysis. Using actor-network theory and sociocultural theory, the focus of the research is on the networks that were constructed at the pilot school and at the provincial level where the course was conceptualized and developed. The research describes how the teacher and other network builders attempted to enroll various human and nonhuman actors into the networks they were constructing in support of the course. They did this by convincing the actors that the course was compatible with their interests. The types of actors that were enrolled, the sociocultural communities they belonged to, and what it took to convince them to support the course are shown to shape the way that the course was enacted in the classroom. In addition, it is demonstrated that the network that was constructed at the provincial level had only a minor connection to the one the teacher was constructing at the school level. The lack of contact between the two networks meant that the interests of those who were involved in organizing the applied physics pilots at the provincial level were seldom taken into account in the course at the school. Fourteen conclusions are drawn about the networks that were constructed and the network building process at both the school and provincial levels. These conclusions have implications for policy in educational change initiatives and for

  11. Social work, technology, and ethical practices: a review and evaluation of the national association of social workers' technology standards.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Amy

    2014-10-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are becoming essential to social work practice by providing increased treatment possibilities and reducing barriers to service. While recognizing the importance of ICTs in practice, social work practitioners have had concerns about ethical use. In response, NASW compiled the Standards for Technology and Social Work Practice. While the guidelines set the groundwork, they were not embedded in a process that would allow them to adapt to the swift pace of ICT changes. This article reviews the current Standards, evaluates how these have been implemented by practitioners, and offers suggestions for updates. PMID:25321931

  12. Technology for Work, Home, and Leisure. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John M.

    This guide provides a brief introduction to several types of technological devices useful to individuals with disabilities and illustrates how some individuals are applying technology in the workplace and at home. Devices described include communication aids, low-vision products, voice-activated systems, environmental controls, and aids for…

  13. Identifying the Ethical Challenges Encountered by Information Technology Professionals Working within the Nevada Casino Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essig, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A thematic analysis qualitative study was used to identify the unethical challenges encountered by Information Technology (IT) professionals working within the Nevada casino industry. Fourteen current and former IT leaders working or who worked in the Nevada casino industry were interviewed. Using thematic analysis, nine themes regarding ethical…

  14. Ag/C nanoparticles as an cathode catalyst for a zinc-air battery with a flowing alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jia-Jun; Li, Ning; Zhang, Tian-Yun

    The cyclic voltammetry indicated that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeded by the four-electron pathway mechanism on larger Ag particles (174 nm), and that the ORR proceeded by the four-electron pathway and the two-electron pathway mechanisms on finer Ag particles (4.1 nm), simultaneously. The kinetics towards ORR was measured at a rotating disk electrode (RDE) with Ag/C electrode. The number of exchanged electrons for the ORR was found to be close to four on larger Ag particles (174 nm) and close to three on finer Ag particles (4.1 nm). The zinc-air battery with Ag/C catalysts (25.9 nm) was fabricated and examined.

  15. Controlling Wind Turbines for Secondary Frequency Regulation: An Analysis of AGC Capabilities Under New Performance Based Compensation Policy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, J.; Pao, L. Y.; Fleming, P.; Ela, E.

    2015-02-01

    As wind energy becomes a larger portion of the world's energy portfolio there has been an increased interest for wind turbines to control their active power output to provide ancillary services which support grid reliability. One of these ancillary services is the provision of frequency regulation, also referred to as secondary frequency control or automatic generation control (AGC), which is often procured through markets which recently adopted performance-based compensation. A wind turbine with a control system developed to provide active power ancillary services can be used to provide frequency regulation services. Simulations have been performed to determine the AGC tracking performance at various power schedule set-points, participation levels, and wind conditions. The performance metrics used in this study are based on those used by several system operators in the US. Another metric that is analyzed is the damage equivalent loads (DELs) on turbine structural components, though the impacts on the turbine electrical components are not considered. The results of these single-turbine simulations show that high performance scores can be achieved when there is sufficient wind resource available. The capability of a wind turbine to rapidly and accurately follow power commands allows for high performance even when tracking rapidly changing AGC signals. As the turbine de-rates to meet decreased power schedule set-points there is a reduction in the DELs, and the participation in frequency regulation has a negligible impact on these loads.

  16. Comparison between the Strength Levels of Baseline Nuclear-Grade Graphite and Graphite Irradiated in AGC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Mark Christopher

    2015-07-01

    This report details the initial comparison of mechanical strength properties between the cylindrical nuclear-grade graphite specimens irradiated in the second Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC-2) experiment with the established baseline, or unirradiated, mechanical properties compiled in the Baseline Graphite Characterization program. The overall comparative analysis will describe the development of an appropriate test protocol for irradiated specimens, the execution of the mechanical tests on the AGC-2 sample population, and will further discuss the data in terms of developing an accurate irradiated property distribution in the limited amount of irradiated data by leveraging the considerably larger property datasets being captured in the Baseline Graphite Characterization program. Integrating information on the inherent variability in nuclear-grade graphite with more complete datasets is one of the goals of the VHTR Graphite Materials program. Between “sister” specimens, or specimens with the same geometry machined from the same sub-block of graphite from which the irradiated AGC specimens were extracted, and the Baseline datasets, a comprehensive body of data will exist that can provide both a direct and indirect indication of the full irradiated property distributions that can be expected of irradiated nuclear-grade graphite while in service in a VHTR system. While the most critical data will remain the actual irradiated property measurements, expansion of this data into accurate distributions based on the inherent variability in graphite properties will be a crucial step in qualifying graphite for nuclear use as a structural material in a VHTR environment.

  17. Art, Technology, and the Holy: Reflections on the Work of J. M. W. Turner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Michael

    1974-01-01

    The following reflections focus on one of the late works by Turner, Rain, Steam, and Speed: The Great Western Railway (1844), and its possible bearing on the three-fold theme of art, technology, and the holy. (Author)

  18. Regulation of planar growth by the Arabidopsis AGC protein kinase UNICORN.

    PubMed

    Enugutti, Balaji; Kirchhelle, Charlotte; Oelschner, Maxi; Torres Ruiz, Ramón Angel; Schliebner, Ivo; Leister, Dario; Schneitz, Kay

    2012-09-11

    The spatial coordination of growth is of central importance for the regulation of plant tissue architecture. Individual layers, such as the epidermis, are clonally propagated and structurally maintained by symmetric cell divisions that are oriented along the plane of the layer. The developmental control of this process is poorly understood. The simple cellular basis and sheet-like structure of Arabidopsis integuments make them an attractive model system to address planar growth. Here we report on the characterization of the Arabidopsis UNICORN (UCN) gene. Analysis of ucn integuments reveals localized distortion of planar growth, eventually resulting in an ectopic multicellular protrusion. In addition, ucn mutants exhibit ectopic growth in filaments and petals, as well as aberrant embryogenesis. We further show that UCN encodes an active AGC VIII kinase. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological data suggest that UCN suppresses ectopic growth in integuments by directly repressing the KANADI transcription factor ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE. Our findings indicate that UCN represents a unique plant growth regulator that maintains planar growth of integuments by repressing a developmental regulator involved in the control of early integument growth and polarity. PMID:22927420

  19. Regulation of planar growth by the Arabidopsis AGC protein kinase UNICORN

    PubMed Central

    Enugutti, Balaji; Kirchhelle, Charlotte; Oelschner, Maxi; Torres Ruiz, Ramón Angel; Schliebner, Ivo; Leister, Dario; Schneitz, Kay

    2012-01-01

    The spatial coordination of growth is of central importance for the regulation of plant tissue architecture. Individual layers, such as the epidermis, are clonally propagated and structurally maintained by symmetric cell divisions that are oriented along the plane of the layer. The developmental control of this process is poorly understood. The simple cellular basis and sheet-like structure of Arabidopsis integuments make them an attractive model system to address planar growth. Here we report on the characterization of the Arabidopsis UNICORN (UCN) gene. Analysis of ucn integuments reveals localized distortion of planar growth, eventually resulting in an ectopic multicellular protrusion. In addition, ucn mutants exhibit ectopic growth in filaments and petals, as well as aberrant embryogenesis. We further show that UCN encodes an active AGC VIII kinase. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological data suggest that UCN suppresses ectopic growth in integuments by directly repressing the KANADI transcription factor ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE. Our findings indicate that UCN represents a unique plant growth regulator that maintains planar growth of integuments by repressing a developmental regulator involved in the control of early integument growth and polarity. PMID:22927420

  20. Polymer Assisted Core-shell Ag-C nanoparticles Synthesis via Green hydrothermal Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, James; Mishra, Sanjay

    2009-03-01

    Core-Shell Ag-C nanoparticles were synthesized in the presence of glucose through a one-pot green hydrothermal wet chemical process. An aqueous solution of glucose and Ag nitrate was hydrothermally treated to produce porous carbonaceous shell over silver core nanoparticles. The growth of carbon shells was regulated by either of the polymers (poly) vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) or poly vinyl alcohol (PVA). The two polymers were compared to take a measure of different tunable sizes of cores, and shells. The effects of hydrothermal temperature, time, and concentration of reagents on the final formation of nanostructures were studied using UV-vis extinction spectra, transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy. The polymer molecules were found to be incorporated into carbonaceous shell. The resulting opacity of the shell was found to be hydrothermal time and temperature dependent. The shell structure was found to be more uniform with PVP than PVA. Furthermore, the polymer concentration was found to influence size and shape of the core-silver particles as well. The core-shelled nanoparticles have surfaces with organic groups capable of assembling with different reagents that could be useful in drug-delivery, optical nanodevices or biochemistry.

  1. Challenge 98: Sustaining the Work of a Regional Technology Integration Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billig, Shelley H.; Sherry, Lorraine; Havelock, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we offer a research-based theoretical framework for sustainability, describing the proven qualities of a project and the innovations that support its sustained existence over time. We then describe how a US Department of Education Technology Innovation Challenge grantee, working to promote technology integration in a…

  2. Technology-Enhanced Courses and a Mode III Organization of Instructional Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Although information technology is increasingly used to deliver distance and conventional courses, there have been few studies of the effect of technology-enhanced education on the organization and purposes of academics' instructional work. I explore this issue in undergraduate and masters level education through the vehicle of case analyses of…

  3. The Diffusion of Information Technology in the Human Services: Implications for Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Dale

    2005-01-01

    The spread and utilization of information technology in the human services is examined using innovation diffusion theory. This examination is contextualized within the values basis of social work. Literature from the human services, the business sector, and the social sciences regarding the role of information technology is used to promote a…

  4. Technology Acceptance in Social Work Education: Implications for the Field Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Alex Don; Bullock, Angela N.

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth and sophistication of new information and computer technology (ICT) have greatly influenced human interactions and provided new metaphors for understanding the world. The acceptance and integration of ICT into social work field education are examined here using the technological acceptance model. This article also explores…

  5. Technology to Support Teachers Using Evidence from Student Work to Customize Technology-Enhanced Inquiry Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matuk, Camillia F.; Linn, Marcia C.; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' involvement in curriculum design is essential for sustaining the relevance of technology-enhanced learning materials. Customizing--making small adjustments to tailor given materials to particular situations and settings--is one design activity in which busy teachers can feasibly engage. Research indicates that customizations based…

  6. Funding of Assistive Technology to Make Work a Reality. Policy & Practice Brief #3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Ronald M.; Sheldon, James R., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The availability of assistive technology (AT) can make a tremendous difference in the ability of an individual to work, even when that individual has a severe disability. In the work context, AT serves several functions: it may make it possible to participate in an education or training program; it may make it possible to get prepared to leave the…

  7. OECD Work on Technology and Education: Innovative Learning Environments as an Integrating Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Istance, David; Kools, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This article presents in summary a selection of the work conducted by OECD in the field of technology and education, which has been an on-going focus of OECD work since the 1980s. Recently, much of this has been under the heading of "New Millennium Learners", but it has also included the widening of student achievement surveys towards digital…

  8. A Review of Information and Communication Technology Enhanced Social Work Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Chitat; Holosko, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Information and communications technology (ICT) has impacted almost all human service disciplines and currently is evolving in social work. This study provides a systematic review of ICT-enhanced social work interventions, with particular reference to their intervention fidelity (IF), validity, and the role of ICT in the helping…

  9. Technology-based Interventions in Social Work Practice: A Systematic Review of Mental Health Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Despite concerns around the use of technology-based interventions, they are increasingly being employed by social workers as a direct practice methodology to address the mental health needs of vulnerable clients. Researchers have highlighted the importance of using innovative technologies within social work practice, yet little has been done to summarize the evidence and collectively assess findings. In this systematic review, we describe accounts of technology-based mental health interventions delivered by social workers over the past 10 years. Results highlight the impacts of these tools and summarize advantages and disadvantages to utilizing technologies as a method for delivering or facilitating interventions. PMID:25321935

  10. New Forces at Work in Mining: Industry View of Critical Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D. J.; LaTourrette, Tom; Bartis, James T.

    2007-04-01

    RAND has just published a report entitled, "New Forces at Work in Mining: Industry Views of Critical Technologies," by D. J. Peterson, Tom LaTourrette, and James T. Bartis. The report presents the results of a series of in-depth discussions with leading mining industry representatives selected for their prominent position and their ability to think broadly about technology trends. The discussions highlighted the importance of collaborative technology research, development, and implementation strategies and the increasingly critical role of mine personnel in the utilization of new technologies.

  11. Technology-based interventions in social work practice: a systematic review of mental health interventions.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Alex T; Montgomery, Katherine

    2014-10-01

    Despite concerns around the use of technology-based interventions, they are increasingly being employed by social workers as a direct practice methodology to address the mental health needs of vulnerable clients. Researchers have highlighted the importance of using innovative technologies within social work practice, yet little has been done to summarize the evidence and collectively assess findings. In this systematic review, we describe accounts of technology-based mental health interventions delivered by social workers over the past 10 years. Results highlight the impacts of these tools and summarize advantages and disadvantages to utilizing technologies as a method for delivering or facilitating interventions. PMID:25321935

  12. Transient response and stability of the AGC-PI closed-loop controlled MEMS vibratory gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Chi, X. Z.; Ding, H. T.; Lin, L. T.; Yang, Z. C.; Yan, G. Z.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a detailed study on the transient response and stability of the automatic gain control (AGC) with a proportion-integral (PI) controller for a MEMS vibratory gyroscope, which constructs a closed-loop control system to make the gyroscope achieve a constant amplitude vibration at its resonant frequency. The nonlinear mathematical model for the control system is established by applying the averaging and linearization method, which is evaluated through numerical simulations. The stability and convergence characteristics of the whole loop are investigated by using the phase plane method and Routh-Hurwitz criterion. The analysis provides a quantitative methodology for selecting the system parameters to approach stability and an optimal transient response. The negative impact induced by drift of the resonant frequency and Q-factor is also discussed. Simulation results predicted by the model are shown to be in close agreement with the experimental results carried out on a doubly decoupled bulk micromachined gyroscope. By optimizing the control parameters, the measured rising time is less than 100 ms without obvious overshoot. The setting time of the whole loop is less than 200 ms with the relative fluctuation of velocity amplitude within approximately 16 ppm for an hour. The resulting overall performance of the gyroscope is tested under atmospheric pressure. The resonant frequencies and the Q-factor of the drive mode and sense mode are 2.986 kHz, 213 and 3.199 kHz, 233, respectively. The gyroscope achieves a scale factor of 27.6 mV/deg/s with nonlinearity less than 120 ppm in the full-scale range of 800° s-1. The threshold of sensitivity is measured to be about 0.005° s-1 with noise equivalent angular rate evaluated to be 0.001°/s/Hz1/2.

  13. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION..., Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.207 What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? (a) The State DOT's RD&T work program must, as a...

  14. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION..., Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.207 What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? (a) The State DOT's RD&T work program must, as a...

  15. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is…

  16. Characteristics modeling for supercritical circulating fluidized bed boiler working in oxy-combustion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balicki, Adrian; Bartela, Łukasz

    2014-06-01

    Among the technologies which allow to reduce greenhouse gas emission, mainly carbon dioxide, special attention deserves the idea of `zeroemission' technology based on boilers working in oxy-combustion technology. In the paper the results of analyses of the influence of changing two quantities, namely oxygen share in oxidant produced in the air separation unit, and oxygen share in oxidant supplied to the furnace chamber on the selected characteristics of a steam boiler including the degree of exhaust gas recirculation, boiler efficiency and adiabatic flame temperature, was examined. Due to the possibility of the integration of boiler model with carbon dioxide capture, separation and storage installation, the subject of the analysis was also to determine composition of the flue gas at the outlet of a moisture condensation installation. Required calculations were made using a model of a supercritical circulating fluidized bed boiler working in oxy-combustion technology, which was built in a commercial software and in-house codes.

  17. Searching for Optical Counterparts to Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds: Possible Detection of a Counterpart to AGC 198606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesh, William; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.

    2015-09-01

    We report initial results from a campaign to obtain optical imaging of Ultra Compact High Velocity Clouds (UCHVCs) discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) Hi survey. UCHVCs have properties consistent with their being low-mass dwarf galaxies in the Local Volume, but do not have identified optical counterparts. We are using the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to image these objects and search for an associated stellar population. Here we present our observational strategy and method for searching for resolved stellar counterparts to the UCHVCs. We combine careful photometry, a color-magnitude filter, and spatial smoothing techniques to search for stellar overdensities in the g- and i-band images. We also run statistical tests to quantify the likelihood that detected overdensities are real and not chance superpositions of sources. We demonstrate the method by applying it to WIYN imaging of two objects: Leo P, a UCHVC discovered by ALFALFA and shown to be a star-forming dwarf galaxy in the Local Volume and AGC 198606, an ALFALFA source near in position and velocity to the Local Group dwarf galaxy Leo T. Applying the search method to the Leo P data yields an unambiguous detection (>99% confidence) of the galaxy’s stellar population. Applying the method to the AGC 198606 imaging yields a possible detection (92% confidence) of an optical counterpart located ˜2.5 arcmin from the centroid of AGC 198606's Hi distribution and within the Hi disk. We estimate a distance to the stellar counterpart of 373-393 kpc, an absolute magnitude Mi = -4.67 ± 0.09, and an Hi-to-stellar mass ratio of ˜45-110.

  18. Searching for Optical Counterparts to Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds: Possible Detection of a Counterpart to AGC 198606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesh, William; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.

    2015-09-01

    We report initial results from a campaign to obtain optical imaging of Ultra Compact High Velocity Clouds (UCHVCs) discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) Hi survey. UCHVCs have properties consistent with their being low-mass dwarf galaxies in the Local Volume, but do not have identified optical counterparts. We are using the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to image these objects and search for an associated stellar population. Here we present our observational strategy and method for searching for resolved stellar counterparts to the UCHVCs. We combine careful photometry, a color–magnitude filter, and spatial smoothing techniques to search for stellar overdensities in the g- and i-band images. We also run statistical tests to quantify the likelihood that detected overdensities are real and not chance superpositions of sources. We demonstrate the method by applying it to WIYN imaging of two objects: Leo P, a UCHVC discovered by ALFALFA and shown to be a star-forming dwarf galaxy in the Local Volume and AGC 198606, an ALFALFA source near in position and velocity to the Local Group dwarf galaxy Leo T. Applying the search method to the Leo P data yields an unambiguous detection (>99% confidence) of the galaxy’s stellar population. Applying the method to the AGC 198606 imaging yields a possible detection (92% confidence) of an optical counterpart located ∼2.5 arcmin from the centroid of AGC 198606's Hi distribution and within the Hi disk. We estimate a distance to the stellar counterpart of 373–393 kpc, an absolute magnitude Mi = ‑4.67 ± 0.09, and an Hi-to-stellar mass ratio of ∼45–110.

  19. Hybrid Stochastic Search Technique based Suboptimal AGC Regulator Design for Power System using Constrained Feedback Control Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibraheem, Omveer, Hasan, N.

    2010-10-01

    A new hybrid stochastic search technique is proposed to design of suboptimal AGC regulator for a two area interconnected non reheat thermal power system incorporating DC link in parallel with AC tie-line. In this technique, we are proposing the hybrid form of Genetic Algorithm (GA) and simulated annealing (SA) based regulator. GASA has been successfully applied to constrained feedback control problems where other PI based techniques have often failed. The main idea in this scheme is to seek a feasible PI based suboptimal solution at each sampling time. The feasible solution decreases the cost function rather than minimizing the cost function.

  20. Michigan State University Extension Educators' Perceptions of the Use of Digital Technology in Their Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth Chase

    2009-01-01

    This research study examined Michigan State University Extension educators' perceptions of the use of digital technology in their work. It used a mixed method of research which included a mailed survey and interviews of selected respondents. A census survey using Dillman's Total Design method was sent to 290 field staff of Michigan State…

  1. Information Technology for Workplace Communication. Workscape 21: The Ecology of New Ways of Working.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Franklin; Tennessen, Carolyn M.; Young, David

    A study was undertaken to understand the role of electronic communication technologies (ECTs) in maintaining work-related communication. The study site was Sun Microsystems, a company at the high end of the curve in terms of its commitment to and employees' experience with ECTs. An electronic focus group (n=40, 4% response) and an e-mail survey…

  2. Technology and the Organisation of Work. EEE701 Adults Learning: The Changing Workplace B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littler, Craig R.

    This publication is part of the study materials for the distance education course, Adults Learning: The Changing Workplace B, in the Open Campus Program at Deakin University. The first part of the document analyzes the relationship between technology, skill, and work within the context of the debates concerning deskilling and managerial control…

  3. Digital Technology in Mathematics Education: Why It Works (Or Doesn't)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The integration of digital technology confronts teachers, educators and researchers with many questions. What is the potential of ICT for learning and teaching, and which factors are decisive in making it work in the mathematics classroom? To investigate these questions, six cases from leading studies in the field are described, and decisive…

  4. History and Development of Instructional Technology and Media in Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorkey, Clayton T.; Uebel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Since the mid-20th century, instructional technologies and educational media in social work education have undergone significant development with the goals of improving learning and performance and enhancing access. This growth has been marked by technical advances in hardware and by innovations in media, or so-called soft formats. Current…

  5. Beyond Role-Playing: Using Technology to Enhance Modeling and Behavioral Rehearsal in Group Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smokowski, Paul R.

    2003-01-01

    Videotape and computer simulation are sophisticated technological applications that have great potential to enhance group work practice. Computer simulation has been harnessed for entertainment and business purposes but has not been adequately utilized for teaching social skills. This article describes strategies for integrating video and computer…

  6. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okoro, Ephraim A.; Hausman, Angela; Washington, Melvin C.

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication increases students' learning outcomes in higher education. Web 2.0 technologies encourages students' active engagement, collaboration, and participation in class activities, facilitates group work, and encourages information sharing among students. Familiarity with organizational use and sharing in social networks aids…

  7. Issues Involved in Attempting to Develop Independent Learning in Pupils Working on Technological Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Moshe

    2004-01-01

    This research addresses the impact of technological projects at high school on pupils' learning. The participants were sixty low-mid achieving pupils who worked for one year on final projects for matriculation exams. Data were collected through observations of laboratory lessons, interviews with pupils and teachers, and analysis of pupils'…

  8. Report of the Software Subcommittee to the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works, Washington, DC.

    The Software Subcommittee of the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works (CONTU) has proposed some changes in the new copyright law to provide specific protection for computer programs. The rationale for this recommendation includes (1) the necessity for some form of protection to encourage the creation and broad…

  9. Working with an Imperfect Medium: Speech Recognition Technology in Reading Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kartal, Gunizi

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on the read-aloud and attendant behaviors of learners working with an experimental computer-based program, which made use of speech recognition technology to provide reading practice with immediate feedback for beginning readers. The study drew on data from 13 participants, who used the software as part of their twice-weekly…

  10. Engaging with Employers in Work-Based Learning: A Foundation Degree in Applied Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benefer, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the work of Staffordshire University in engaging with local employers and local further education colleges in the development of a Foundation Degree in Applied Technology. Design/methodology/approach: Following an outline of current government policy in employer engagement, the paper identifies--from the…

  11. Bridging the Hemispheres through the Use of Technology: International Collaboration in Social Work Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rautenbach, John Victor; Black-Hughes, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The social work programs of the University of Fort Hare, East London, South Africa, and Minnesota State University, Mankato, United States, began using various technologies in 2007 to facilitate interaction. This project included conducting practicum supervision and seminars via videoconferencing (using Breeze, Adobe Connect, and Skype) and…

  12. WORK PLAN FOR COMPLETING A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF WESTERN ENERGY RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a work plan for completing the final phase of a three year technology assessment of the development of six energy resources (coal, geothermal, natural gas, oil, oil shale, and uranium) in eight western states (Arizona, Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, North and South Dakota...

  13. Technology as a Factor in Gender Differentiation of Work Roles: A Case Study of Israel's Smallholder Co-operative Villages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevo, Naomi

    1991-01-01

    Examines the work roles of Israeli village women at home and in the fields, the effects of technological change, and sex stereotypes related to technological aptitude. Suggests that the crucial variable influencing gender differentiation in work roles is technology itself rather that its context of application. (SV)

  14. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., development, and technology transfer work programs? (a) The State DOT's RD&T work program must, as a minimum... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  15. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., development, and technology transfer work programs? (a) The State DOT's RD&T work program must, as a minimum... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  16. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., development, and technology transfer work programs? (a) The State DOT's RD&T work program must, as a minimum... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  17. Creating technological boundaries to protect bedtime: examining work-home boundary management, psychological detachment and sleep.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larissa K; Jenkins, Jade S

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the mechanism by which information and communication technology (ICT) use at home for work purposes may affect sleep. In this investigation, data from 315 employees were used to examine the indirect effect of ICT use at home on sleep outcomes through psychological detachment, and how boundary creation may moderate this effect. Results revealed the indirect effect of increased work-home boundary crossing on sleep (quantity, quality and consistency) through psychological detachment occurred only among individuals with low boundaries around ICT use and not among those with high boundaries. These results suggest that creating boundaries around work-relevant ICT use while at home is beneficial to sleep as a recovery process through being able to psychologically disengage from work. PMID:24123651

  18. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges (standing, center) poses with members of the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG), which is holding the 1999 Technology Fair Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  19. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to talk to one of the vendors at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. With him at the far left is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG, and Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair; at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  20. A 2-mW 50-dB DR wideband hybrid AGC for a GNSS receiver in 65 nm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Baoyong, Chi; Yang, Xu; Nan, Qi; Zhihua, Wang

    2012-07-01

    A low-power wideband hybrid automatic gain control (AGC) loop for a GNSS receiver is presented. Single AGC in the I/Q path is composed of four-stage programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs), a differential peak detector, two comparators, a control algorithm logic, a decoder and the reference voltage source. Besides being controlled by an AGC loop, the gain of PGAs could alternatively be controlled by an off-chip digital baseband processor through the SPI interface. To obtain low power consumption and noise, an improved source degenerated amplifier is adopted, and the I/Q path phase mismatch within the ±5° range is calibrated with 0.2° accuracy. Implemented in 65 nm CMOS, the measured PGA total gains range from 9.8 to 59.5 dB with an average step of 0.95 dB and simulated bandwidth of more than 110 MHz. The settling time is about 180 μs with 80% AM input with measured signal power from -76.7 to -56.6 dBm from a radio-frequency amplifier (RFA) input port, and also reduces to 90 μs with clock frequency doubling. The single AGC consumes almost 0.8 mA current from the 2.5-V supply and occupies an area of 750 × 300 μm2.

  1. Dual Arm Work Platform teleoperated robotics system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) has developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Dual Arm Work Platform (DAWP) demonstration focused on the use of the DAWP to segment and dismantle the CP-5 reactor tank and surrounding bio-shield components (including the graphite block reflector, lead and boral sheeting) and performing some minor tasks best suited for the use of teleoperated robotics that were not evaluated in this demonstration. The DAWP system is not a commercially available product at this time. The CP-5 implementation was its first D and D application. The demonstration of the DAWP was to determine the areas on which improvements must be made to make this technology commercially viable. The results of the demonstration are included in this greenbook. It is the intention of the developers to incorporate lessons learned at this demonstration and current technological advancements in robotics into the next generation of the DAWP.

  2. A Review of Filovirus Work and Facilities at The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Porton Down

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie J.; Lever, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Porton Down houses two separate sites capable of conducting high containment research on ACDP (Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens) Hazard Group 4 agents: the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) and the Health Protection Agency (HPA), and filovirus research has been performed at Porton Down since the first Marburg virus disease outbreak in 1967. All work is conducted within primary containment either within cabinet lines (for in vitro work) or large rigid half-suit isolators (for in vivo work). There are extensive aerobiological facilities at high containment and the use of these facilities will be reported. Research at Dstl is primarily focused on assessing and quantifying the hazard, and testing the efficacy of medical countermeasures against filoviruses. Fundamental research directed to the study and understanding of the infectious and pathogenic nature of the filoviruses, particularly in aerosols, will be reported. PMID:23012627

  3. WORK ETHICS, ORGANIZATIONAL ALIENATION AND JUSTICE AMONG HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGERS

    PubMed Central

    Zadeh, Jamileh Mahdi; Kahouei, Mehdi; Cheshmenour, Omran; Sangestani, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Failure to comply with work ethics by employees working in Health Information Technology (HIT) Departments and their negative attitudes about organizational justice may have an adverse impact on patient satisfaction, quality of care, collecting health statistics, reimbursement, and management and planning at all levels of health care; it can also lead to unbearable damages to the health information system in the country. As so far there has been no research on HIT managers to assess the moral and ethical aspects of works and their relationship with organizational alienation and justice, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between work ethics and organizational justice and alienation among the HIT managers. Methods: This study was performed in affiliated hospitals of Semnan University of medical sciences in Semnan, Iran, in 2015. In this study, a census method was used. The data collection tool was a researcher made questionnaire. Results: There was a negative and significant relationship between work ethic and organizational alienation (B= - 0.217, P<0.001), and there was also a positive and significant relationship between work ethic and organizational justice (B= 0.580, P<0.001). There were negative and significant relationships among between education level and work ethic (B= - 0.215, P=0.034) and organizational justice (B=- 0.147, P=0.047). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the managers’ attitude toward justice and equality in the organization can affect their organizational commitment and loyalty and thus have a significant impact on the work ethics in the work environment. On the other hand, with increasing the education level of the managers, they will have higher expectation of the justice in the organization, and they feel that the justice is not observed in the organization. PMID:27482167

  4. Electron transport properties and spin modulation effect analysis for C60, Au@C60 and Ag@C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fangyuan; Li, Guiqin

    2016-04-01

    The electron transport properties of C60, Au@C60 and Ag@C60 junctions between Au electrodes are investigated with density functional theory and the first-principle nonequilibrium Greens function. Density of states and transmission possibility as functions of energy are examined, and current-voltage characteristics of all these models are calculated with and without spin correction. With spin correction, we find a spin-current difference in Au@C60 as large as an order of magnitude. It may be used to obtain high-purity arbitrary spin current. By comparing the calculation results with and without spin correction, we attribute this spin difference to the spin resonance between transmission electrons and the valence electron of endohedral Au atom.

  5. E-care as craftsmanship: virtuous work, skilled engagement, and information technology in health care.

    PubMed

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Contemporary health care relies on electronic devices. These technologies are not ethically neutral but change the practice of care. In light of Sennett's work and that of other thinkers (Dewey, Dreyfus, Borgmann) one worry is that "e-care"--care by means of new information and communication technologies--does not promote skilful and careful engagement with patients and hence is neither conducive to the quality of care nor to the virtues of the care worker. Attending to the kinds of knowledge involved in care work and their moral significance, this paper explores what "craftsmanship" means in the context of medicine and health care and discusses whether today the care giver's craftsmanship is eroded. It is argued that this is a real danger, especially under modern conditions and in the case of telecare, but that whether it happens, and to what extent it happens, depends on whether in a specific practice and given a specific technology e-carers can develop the know-how and skill to engage more intensely with those under their care and to cooperate with their co-workers. PMID:23338289

  6. Flattening filter-free accelerators: a report from the AAPM Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Kry, Stephen F; Popple, Richard; Yorke, Ellen; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios; Xia, Ping; Huq, Saiful; Bayouth, John; Galvin, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the current state of flattening filter-free (FFF) radiotherapy beams implemented on conventional linear accelerators, and is aimed primarily at practicing medical physicists. The Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a writing group to assess FFF technology. The published literature on FFF technology was reviewed, along with technical specifications provided by vendors. Based on this information, supplemented by the clinical experience of the group members, consensus guidelines and recommendations for implementation of FFF technology were developed. Areas in need of further investigation were identified. Removing the flattening filter increases beam intensity, especially near the central axis. Increased intensity reduces treatment time, especially for high-dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS). Furthermore, removing the flattening filter reduces out-of-field dose and improves beam modeling accuracy. FFF beams are advantageous for small field (e.g., SRS) treatments and are appropriate for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For conventional 3D radiotherapy of large targets, FFF beams may be disadvantageous compared to flattened beams because of the heterogeneity of FFF beam across the target (unless modulation is employed). For any application, the nonflat beam characteristics and substantially higher dose rates require consideration during the commissioning and quality assurance processes relative to flattened beams, and the appropriate clinical use of the technology needs to be identified. Consideration also needs to be given to these unique characteristics when undertaking facility planning. Several areas still warrant further research and development. Recommendations pertinent to FFF technology, including acceptance testing, commissioning, quality assurance, radiation safety, and facility planning, are presented. Examples of clinical

  7. Range and AGC normalization in airborne discrete-return LiDAR intensity data for forest canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, Ilkka; Ørka, Hans Ole; Hyyppä, Juha; Heikkinen, Ville; Tokola, Timo

    Recently, the intensity characteristics of discrete-return LiDAR sensors were studied for vegetation classification. We examined two normalization procedures affecting LiDAR intensity through the scanning geometry and the system settings, namely, range normalization and the effects of the automatic gain control (AGC) in the Optech ALTM3100 and Leica ALS50-II sensors. Range normalization corresponds to weighting of the observed intensities with the term (, where R is the range, R is a mean reference range, and a∈[2,4] is the exponent that is, according to theory, dependent on the target geometry. LiDAR points belonging to individual tree crowns were extracted for 13 887 trees in southern Finland. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the intensity was analyzed for a range of values of exponent a. The tree species classification performance using 13 intensity variables was also used for sensitivity analysis of the effect of a. The results were in line with the established theory, since the optimal level of a was lower (a≈2) for trees with large or clumped leaves and higher (a≈3) for diffuse coniferous crowns. Different echo groups also showed varying responses. Single-return pulses that represented strong reflections had a lower optimal value of a than the first and all echoes in a pulse. The gain in classification accuracy from the optimal selection of the exponent was 2%-3%, and the optimum for classification was different from that obtained using the CV analysis. In the ALS50-II sensor, the combined and optimized AGC and R normalizations had a notably larger effect (6%-9%) on classification accuracy. Our study demonstrates the ambiguity of R normalization in vegetation canopies.

  8. Job Change and Workplace Learning in the Public Sector: The Significance of New Technology for Unskilled Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munro, Anne; Rainbird, Helen

    2002-01-01

    Interviews (n=350) and a survey (n=323) of managers, trainers, and union representatives in British health care agencies showed that technology caused some job enlargement and enrichment; positive or negative effects depended on context. Other jobs were deskilled due to work organization, not technology. Technology's impact on job change was…

  9. A New Education Model as a Collaborative Work of Industry, Local Government and College of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himuro, Shozo

    A new educational program was introduced to our college in 2000. This program based on the extensive knowledge in the engineering and high culture, originally intended to foster young engineers with creativity, diversity, interdisciplinarity, internationality and high practical skills. It also aimed to nourish engineers who would be engaged in developing user-friendly technologies that can coexist with nature and who can flexibly cope with current global issues such as environmental problems, food shortages and energy efficiency. Regrettably, great numbers of students don't seem to be interested in studying. We feel that there is an urgent need to improve the educational program to attract students to learn and encourage their motivations. In this paper, We would like to propose a new education model that is the Collaborative Work of Industry, Local Government and College of Technology.

  10. ALARA Center of Technology promotes good radiological work practices at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

    1997-10-31

    The central Radiological Control Organization, originally under the previous Management and Operations contractor (Westinghouse Hanford Company) decided that a significant improvement in ALARA implementation would result if examples of engineered controls used for radiological work were assembled in one location to provide a ``showcase`` for workers and managers. The facility would be named the ALARA Center of Technology (ACT) and would include the latest technologies used to accomplish radiological work, as well as proven techniques, tools, and equipment. A location for the Center was selected in the 200 East Area of Hanford in a central location to be easily accessible to all facilities and contractors. Since there was little money available for this project, a decision was made to contact several vendors and request loans of their tools, equipment, and materials. In return, the center would help market products on site and assist with product demonstrations when the vendors visited Hanford. Out of 28 vendors originally contacted, 16 responded with offers to loan products. This included a containment tent, several glove bags, BEPA filtered vacuum cleaners, portable ventilation systems, fixatives, temporary shielding, pumps, and several special tools. Vendors who could not provide products sent videos and brochures. Westinghouse Hanford Company began using the ACT in June 1996. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., the present Management and Integrating Contractor for the Hanford Site, held the formal opening ceremony of the ALARA Center of Technology on October 1, 1996. The Center now has about 1200 ft{sup 2} of floor space fi Iled with tools, equipment and material used to perform radiological work.

  11. Technologies That Assist in Online Group Work: A Comparison of Synchronous and Asynchronous Computer Mediated Communication Technologies on Students' Learning and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockinson-Szapkiw, Amanda; Wendt, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    While the benefits of online group work completed using asynchronous CMC technology is documented, researchers have identified a number of challenges that result in ineffective and unsuccessful online group work. Fewer channels of communication and lack of immediacy when compared to face-to-face group work are a few of the noted limitations. Thus,…

  12. Using the CAE technologies of engineering analysis for designing steam turbines at ZAO Ural Turbine Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshumova, V. N.; Kortenko, V. V.; Pokhoriler, V. L.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Ivanovskii, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    We describe the experience ZAO Ural Turbine Works specialists gained from mastering the series of CAD/CAE/CAM/PDM technologies, which are modern software tools of computer-aided engineering. We also present the results obtained from mathematical simulation of the process through which high-and intermediate-pressure rotors are heated for revealing the most thermally stressed zones, as well as the results from mathematical simulation of a new design of turbine cylinder shells for improving the maneuverability of these turbines.

  13. Work stress and subsequent risk of internet addiction among information technology engineers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sung-Wei; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Pikhart, Hynek; Peasey, Anne; Chen, Shih-Tse; Tsai, Ming-Chen

    2014-08-01

    Work stress, as defined by the Demand-Control-Support (DCS) model and the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model, has been found to predict risks for depression, anxiety, and substance addictions, but little research is available on work stress and Internet addiction. The aims of this study are to assess whether the DCS and ERI models predict subsequent risks of Internet addiction, and to examine whether these associations might be mediated by depression and anxiety. A longitudinal study was conducted in a sample (N=2,550) of 21-55 year old information technology engineers without Internet addiction. Data collection included questionnaires covering work stress, demographic factors, psychosocial factors, substance addictions, Internet-related factors, depression and anxiety at wave 1, and the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) at wave 2. Ordinal logistic regression was used to assess the associations between work stress and IAT; path analysis was adopted to evaluate potentially mediating roles of depression and anxiety. After 6.2 months of follow-up, 14.0% of subjects became problematic Internet users (IAT 40-69) and 4.1% pathological Internet users (IAT 70-100). Job strain was associated with an increased risk of Internet addiction (odds ratio [OR] of having a higher IAT outcome vs. a lower outcome was 1.53); high work social support reduced the risk of Internet addiction (OR=0.62). High ER ratio (OR=1.61) and high overcommitment (OR=1.68) were associated with increased risks of Internet addiction. Work stress defined by the DCS and ERI models predicted subsequent risks of Internet addiction. PMID:24950412

  14. Using GIS technology to integrate remote sensing and field work data with templates

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, G. ); Ellis, J.M.; Davis, H.H. )

    1996-01-01

    Field work for major projects is becoming more dependent upon contractors who have a variety of training, experience and methodology Contractor gaps in data collected, inconsistent methodology and terminology and out-of-context observations are minimized by using digital templates and remote sensing support. The digital templates utilize off-the-shelf PC software and portable hardware. Some field data can be customized to easily correlate with well logs utilizing computer-aided drafting (CAD) technology. Processed satellite images are georeferenced to a specific map projection, utilizing ground control points determined with Global Positioning System (GPS). Geographical Information System (GIS) technology is being evaluated as an integration tool to make complex tables of field data, CAD base maps, interpretation maps, and images more useful to Earth Scientists. The GIS enables users to: (1) examine their field data, maps, and images in a PC-based environment. (2) better understand spatial relationships between field observations, images and geologic maps. (3) interactively query field data while viewing associated images and maps. (4) ultimately improve database usage, database quality, and geological interpretations. The geologic interpretation of georeferenced images and field work in the Rio Blanco license of Colombia resulted in (1) an improved geologic map with better definition of source-reservoir rock from the hangingwall to the footwall of the main thrust and (2) better surface controlled balanced crossed-sections that led to play definition and to improve seismic planning/field parameters design for refining seismic acquisition.

  15. Using GIS technology to integrate remote sensing and field work data with templates

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, G.; Ellis, J.M.; Davis, H.H.

    1996-12-31

    Field work for major projects is becoming more dependent upon contractors who have a variety of training, experience and methodology Contractor gaps in data collected, inconsistent methodology and terminology and out-of-context observations are minimized by using digital templates and remote sensing support. The digital templates utilize off-the-shelf PC software and portable hardware. Some field data can be customized to easily correlate with well logs utilizing computer-aided drafting (CAD) technology. Processed satellite images are georeferenced to a specific map projection, utilizing ground control points determined with Global Positioning System (GPS). Geographical Information System (GIS) technology is being evaluated as an integration tool to make complex tables of field data, CAD base maps, interpretation maps, and images more useful to Earth Scientists. The GIS enables users to: (1) examine their field data, maps, and images in a PC-based environment. (2) better understand spatial relationships between field observations, images and geologic maps. (3) interactively query field data while viewing associated images and maps. (4) ultimately improve database usage, database quality, and geological interpretations. The geologic interpretation of georeferenced images and field work in the Rio Blanco license of Colombia resulted in (1) an improved geologic map with better definition of source-reservoir rock from the hangingwall to the footwall of the main thrust and (2) better surface controlled balanced crossed-sections that led to play definition and to improve seismic planning/field parameters design for refining seismic acquisition.

  16. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops at the Stewart Eye Institute table at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) 1999 Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. Behind Bridges is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG. At the near right are George and Marian Hall, who are with the Institute. At the left is Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  17. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to pet one of the dogs that serves with Canine Companions for Independence, a vendor displaying its capabilities at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) 1999 Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. Standing at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services; behind Bridges is Nancie Strott (left), a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair, and Sterling Walker (right), director of Engineering Development and chairman of DAAWG. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the other vendors participating are Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  18. Shining Worlds: Putting Technology To Work for Law-Related Education. Working Conference on Technology and Law-Related Education (Boston, Massachusetts, October 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Bar Association, Chicago, IL. Special Committee on Youth Education for Citizenship.

    This document is a collection of articles growing out of a conference on technology and law related education. The papers are intended to give a broad overview of some of the technologies that allow access to more law related education information, to illustrate the potential of multimedia presentations, and to examine new tools available to…

  19. [Technology and future ways of thinking related to work from ergonomics points of views in moments of global crisis].

    PubMed

    Puentes-Lagos, David E; García-Acosta, Gabriel

    2012-06-01

    Is it possible to establish (at short, medium and long term) future work conditions or expected work conditions for Colombian people considering upcoming work technologies? Is it possible to anticipate future work desirable work conditions for Colombian people in order to plan (foresee?) work technologies? These questions guided this research and they point to an action thesis and to a reaction one in this context of work crisis. Even though a work technology establishes where, when, how, who, who with, and using what element work is done, it also establishes certain work conditions. Besides, multiple forms of considering and deconstructing past have been created from many disciplines. However, in order to foresee or construct work technologies requires a different perspective for looking further. This research has been carried out considering other disciplines points of view regarding Future Studies and Future Thinking Studies. This research has the purpose of finding future paths for Future Thinking Studies from ergonomics point of view in this moment of global work crisis we are going through. PMID:23258752

  20. RadWorks Project. ISS REM - to - BIRD - to - HERA: The Evolution of a Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLeod, Catherine D.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of particle detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. One such device, the TimePix, is being developed at CERN, and is providing the technology basis for the most recent line of radiation detection devices being developed by the NASA AES RadWorks project. The most fundamental of these devices, an ISS-Radiation Environment Monitor (REM), is installed as a USB device on ISS where it is monitoring the radiation environment on a perpetual basis. The second generation of this TimePix technology, the BIRD (Battery-operated Independent Radiation Detector), was flown on the NASA EFT-1 flight in December 2014. Data collected by BIRD was the first data made available from the Trapped Belt region of the Earth's atmosphere in over 40 years. The 3rdgeneration of this technology, the HERA (Hybrid Electronic Radiation Assessor), is planned to be integrated into the Orion EM-1, and EM-2 vehicles where it will monitor the radiation environment. For the EM-2 flight, HERA will provide Caution and Warning notification for SPEs as well as real time dose measurements for crew members. The development of this line of radiation detectors provide much greater information and characterization of charged particles in the space radiation environment than has been collected in the past, and in the process provide greater information to inform crew members of radiation related risks, while being very power and mass efficient.

  1. The Berry Informational Technology (B.I.T.S.) Student Work Program: An Effective Environment for Collaborative Learning, Leadership, Technological Training, and Certification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Amy; Macaluso, Paul

    The Berry Informational Technology (B.I.T.S.) program at Berry College (Georgia) is an apprenticeship opportunity associated with student work. The program gives students the opportunity to seek technological training in areas, such as building computer systems, trouble-shooting, networking, Web development, and user and technical support. In…

  2. Individual Need Satisfaction in Work and Non-Work: A Comparative Study of the Effects of the Technology and Organization of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubner, Walter Frank

    This study attempted to identify the nature of the relationship between organizational variables and attitudinal and behavioral reactions of individuals to employment - WORK. Employee needs, satisfaction, non-work activities, and overall attitudes toward company and work were assessed through responses to questionnaires; and organizational…

  3. The Impact of Technological Change on Work and Training. Tripartite European Meeting on the Impact of Technological Change on Work and Training (Geneva, Switzerland, October 28-November 2, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    The first part of this report examines the relationship of technological change to employment and work. After a brief introduction, chapter 1 discusses new technology and labor productivity versus employment, emphasizing the effects of labor-saving machinery and changes in specific sectors of employment, such as electrical machinery,…

  4. Effect of visible-light illumination on resistive switching characteristics in Ag/Ce2W3O12/FTO devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bai; Li, Xiaoping; Liang, Dandan; Chen, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The resistive switching device is a fascinating candidate for next generation nonvolatile memories. In this Letter, we report a simple hydrothermal way to prepare Ce2W3O12 powder. Furthermore, we fabricated a resistive switching memory device with Ag/Ce2W3O12/fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) structure. Moreover, we observed the effect of visible-light illumination on resistive switching memory behaviour in Ag/Ce2W3O12/FTO devices. This Letter is useful for exploring the new potential materials for resistive switching memory device, and provides the visible-light as a new control method for resistive switching random access memory (RRAM).

  5. Using technology and collaborative working for a positive patient experience and to improve safety.

    PubMed

    Desai, Usha

    2016-09-01

    Clinicians who treat patients with wounds need access to the resources that will enable them to deliver the best and most appropriate treatments. A partnership working initiative between Greenwich CCG Medicines management (commissioner), Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust (provider) and ConvaTec (commercial partner) was set up to provide wound-care dressings and products to patients via the community services. It lead to improved access, greater patient benefits, a reduction in dressings waste, and an increase in clinical confidence to make cost-effective, evidence-based prescribing decisions. This inspired the commissioners to collaborate with BlueBay (technology partner) to 'trailblaze' the development and introduction of an electronic wound care template for practice nurses and doctors in primary care to use in conjunction with VISION and EMIS, clinical software systems used in GP practices. This interoperability of clinical systems to improve wound care is, to date, the only one of its kind in the UK. PMID:27594317

  6. Surfatron Plasma Source Working at Frequency 2.45 GHz for Technological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, V.; Tichy, M.; Blazek, J.; Adamek, P.; Navratil, Z.; Slavicek, P.; Spatenka, P.

    2006-01-15

    Plasma as an active medium is widely exploited in technological applications. We have developed a microwave plasma source which might be suitable for future technological application. Plasma is generated by commercial (Sairem) surfatron working at frequency 2.45 GHz. The surfatron is fed by microwave power in the range from several watts up to 300 watts. Plasma is created from working gas mixture; typical flow rate is kept constant at 600 sccm. Technical Ar is used as carrier gas, O2 or N2 as reactive gases. We present complex diagnostics of the plasma created by this plasma source: by means of Langmuir probe measurements and by optical emission spectroscopy. Single probe method was used for determination of basic plasma parameters (plasma potential Vpl, mean electron energy Em, electron density ne, electron temperature) at low pressures. For determination of electron temperature at higher pressures when ion-neutral collision processes in the probe sheath had to be taken into account the double probe method was used. The discharge plasma was investigated and the results are discussed in cw as well as in computer-controlled impulse regime (time-resolved measurements). The pulse regime of plasma source is one of the ways how to increase an instantaneous input power and at the same time prevent treated materials (especially thermal sensitive materials, e.g. plastics) against thermal damage. Rotational and vibrational temperatures as well as consistence of discharge and axial intensity development of particular spectral lines were revealed on base of optical emission spectroscopy in cw regime.

  7. Emerging Issues in Science and Technology, 1981. A Compendium of Working Papers for the National Science Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The eight working papers presented in this compendium were prepared for the National Science Foundation (NSF) as one means to assist the Office of Science and Technology Policy with preparation of the Administration's Annual Science and Technology Report to the Congress, 1981. They focus on specific aspects of three central themes directly related…

  8. Wishing Won't Work: 10 Things You Need to Know and Do when Applying for Technology Grants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerding, Stephanie; MacKellar, Pam

    2006-01-01

    This article explores obtaining grants as a way of funding technology projects in the library. The authors' approach views technology as a component of a grant project or a way to accomplish the goals of a project. One can be more successful in his or her grant work by addressing existing community needs, rather than by requesting funding for…

  9. Emerging Issues in Science and Technology, 1982. A Compendium of Working Papers for the National Science Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    Presented are nine working papers prepared for the National Science Foundation as one means of assisting the Office of Science and Technology Policy in preparing the administration's "Annual Science and Technology Report to the Congress, 1982." The papers explore aspects of three broad themes central to the administration's science and technology…

  10. Native American Women Leaders' Use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) for Work-Life Balance (WLB) and Capacity Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Crystal C.

    2013-01-01

    Native American women's leadership, information communication technologies (ICTs), work-life balance (WLB) and human capacity building (HCB) are grounded in social justice issues due to their long history of overall cultural decimation, inequitable access to technology, monetary resources, and social power (agency), and influence. Currently, there…

  11. The Impact of New Work Technologies on Training. Five Case Studies in French Industry. Discussion Paper No. 81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo e Oliveira, Joao Batista

    Case studies of five French firms illustrate the impact of new work technologies on training. Liquid Corporation has embarked on changes in production technology in response to market needs. Four aspects of the change process are as follows: creating the climate for change, selecting operators, defining new training requirements, and training for…

  12. Phosphorylation of the amino-terminus of the AGC kinase Gad8 prevents its interaction with TORC2.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Forte, Gabriella M; Smith, Duncan; Petersen, Janni

    2016-03-01

    Cell proliferation, metabolism, migration and survival are coordinated through the tight control of two target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase complexes: TORC1 and TORC2. Here, we show that a novel phosphorylation of fission yeast Gad8 (AGC kinase) on the evolutionarily conserved threonine 6 (Thr6) prevents the physical association between Gad8 and TORC2. Accordingly, this block to protein interactions by Gad8 Thr6 phosphorylation decreases TORC2-controlled activation of Gad8. Likewise, phosphorylation of Gad8 Thr6, possibly by PKC, prevents the association of Gad8 with TORC2 thereby increasing TORC2 activity, because it reduces Gad8-mediated feedback inhibition of TORC2. Consistently, the introduction of a Gad8 T6D mutant, that mimics phosphorylation, increased TORC2 activity. Increased PKC(Pck2) expression prevented Gad8-TORC2 binding and so reduced the TORC2-mediated phosphorylation of Gad8 serine 546 that activates Gad8. Interestingly, independent of the Ser546 phosphorylation status, Gad8 Thr6 phosphorylation is important for remodelling the actin cytoskeleton and survival upon potassium ion and heat stresses. In contrast, Ser546 phosphorylation is required for the control of G1 arrest, mating, cell length at division and vascular size. Finally, these findings reveal a novel mode of TORC2 activation that is essential for cell survival following stress. PMID:26935949

  13. Phosphorylation of the TOR ATP binding domain by AGC kinase constitutes a novel mode of TOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hálová, Lenka; Du, Wei; Kirkham, Sara; Smith, Duncan L; Petersen, Janni

    2013-11-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling coordinates cell growth, metabolism, and cell division through tight control of signaling via two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2. Here, we show that fission yeast TOR kinases and mTOR are phosphorylated on an evolutionarily conserved residue of their ATP-binding domain. The Gad8 kinase (AKT homologue) phosphorylates fission yeast Tor1 at this threonine (T1972) to reduce activity. A T1972A mutation that blocked phosphorylation increased Tor1 activity and stress resistance. Nitrogen starvation of fission yeast inhibited TOR signaling to arrest cell cycle progression in G1 phase and promoted sexual differentiation. Starvation and a Gad8/T1972-dependent decrease in Tor1 (TORC2) activity was essential for efficient cell cycle arrest and differentiation. Experiments in human cell lines recapitulated these yeast observations, as mTOR was phosphorylated on T2173 in an AKT-dependent manner. In addition, a T2173A mutation increased mTOR activity. Thus, TOR kinase activity can be reduced through AGC kinase-controlled phosphorylation to generate physiologically significant changes in TOR signaling. PMID:24247430

  14. Phosphorylation of the amino-terminus of the AGC kinase Gad8 prevents its interaction with TORC2

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Forte, Gabriella M.; Smith, Duncan; Petersen, Janni

    2016-01-01

    Cell proliferation, metabolism, migration and survival are coordinated through the tight control of two target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase complexes: TORC1 and TORC2. Here, we show that a novel phosphorylation of fission yeast Gad8 (AGC kinase) on the evolutionarily conserved threonine 6 (Thr6) prevents the physical association between Gad8 and TORC2. Accordingly, this block to protein interactions by Gad8 Thr6 phosphorylation decreases TORC2-controlled activation of Gad8. Likewise, phosphorylation of Gad8 Thr6, possibly by PKC, prevents the association of Gad8 with TORC2 thereby increasing TORC2 activity, because it reduces Gad8-mediated feedback inhibition of TORC2. Consistently, the introduction of a Gad8 T6D mutant, that mimics phosphorylation, increased TORC2 activity. Increased PKCPck2 expression prevented Gad8–TORC2 binding and so reduced the TORC2-mediated phosphorylation of Gad8 serine 546 that activates Gad8. Interestingly, independent of the Ser546 phosphorylation status, Gad8 Thr6 phosphorylation is important for remodelling the actin cytoskeleton and survival upon potassium ion and heat stresses. In contrast, Ser546 phosphorylation is required for the control of G1 arrest, mating, cell length at division and vascular size. Finally, these findings reveal a novel mode of TORC2 activation that is essential for cell survival following stress. PMID:26935949

  15. Catalytic dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride in liquid phase with methanol as H-donor over Ag/C catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mohong; Li, Xuebing; Chen, Bo; Li, Mingshi; Xin, Hongchuan; Song, Liang

    2014-09-01

    Catalytic hydrodechlorination of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an effective measure to remove CCl4 due to its pollutant character. The dechlorination of CCl4 to dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) and chloroform (CHCl3) with a molar ratio of 3:2 was catalyzed by carbon-supported silver (Ag/C) catalyst in methanol solution. It was proposed from the catalytic results and characterization (X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) data that, the chloride ion is abstracted from adsorbed CCl4 by Ag to form CCl3 and CCI2 radicals and silver chloride (AgCl), and meanwhile the dehydrogenation of methanol over Ag domains intrigues initial active Ag-H species and formaldehyde (HCHO); then the CCI3 and CCI, radicals are combined with Ag-H to generate reaction products (CHCl3 and CH2Cl2) and Ag, and the dehydrogenated product HCHO facilitates the regeneration of formed AgCl to Ag with formation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen chloride. The catalyst can be recovered and recycled, and there was no significant decrease in catalytic activity and selectivity after 4th recycling. PMID:25924408

  16. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 10: Space technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Space Technology group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The elements of the space technology program are: (1) long duration exposure facility, (2) advanced technology laboratory, (3) physics and chemistry laboratory, (4) contamination experiments, and (5) laser information/data transmission technology. The space technology mission model is presented in tabular form. The proposed experiments to be conducted by each test facility are described. Recommended approaches for user community interfacing are included.

  17. A Quantitative Study of Factors Contributing to Perceived Job Satisfaction of Information Technology Professionals Working in California Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, James Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this replication study was to understand job satisfaction factors (work, pay, supervision, people, opportunities for promotion, and job in general) as measured by the abridged Job Descriptive Index (aJDI) and the abridged Job in General (aJIG) scale for information technology (IT) professionals working in California…

  18. Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rizeq, George; West, Janice; Frydman, Arnaldo; Subia, Raul; Kumar, Ravi; Zamansky, Vladimir; Das, Kamalendu

    2001-11-06

    Electricity produced from hydrogen in fuel cells can be highly efficient relative to competing technologies and has the potential to be virtually pollution free. Thus, fuel cells may become an ideal solution to this nation's energy needs if one has a satisfactory process for producing hydrogen from available energy resources such as coal, and low-cost alternative feedstocks such as biomass. GE EER is developing an innovative fuel-flexible advanced gasification-combustion (AGC) technology for production of hydrogen for fuel cells or combustion turbines, and a separate stream of sequestration-ready CO2. The AGC module can be integrated into a number of Vision- 21 power systems. It offers increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems and near-zero pollution. The R&D on the AGC technology is being conducted under a Vision-21 award from the U.S. DOE NETL with co-funding from GE EER, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), and the California Energy Commission (CEC). The AGC technology converts coal and air into three separate streams of pure hydrogen, sequestration-ready CO2, and high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The three-year program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. Process and kinetic modeling studies as well as an economic assessment will also be performed. This paper provides an overview of the program and its objectives, and discusses first-year R&D activities, including design of experimental facilities and results from initial tests and modeling studies. In particular, the paper describes the design of the bench-scale facility and initial process modeling data. In addition, a process flow diagram is shown for a complete plant incorporating the AGC module with other Vision-21 plant components to maximize hydrogen production and process efficiency.

  19. Putting all our noise technology to work. [NASA Quiet Engine Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    An assessment of the present state of the art in noise reduction technology indicates that this technology has the potential for effectively attaining this goal - a conclusion that is in apparent conflict with the frequently voiced complaints on intolerable noise levels near airports. Measures are suggested for a more vigorous implementation of available technology in practice to combat the aircraft noise problem.

  20. Technology and Learning: Putting the Research To Work. Hot Topics Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David M., Ed.; Lockee, Barbara B., Ed.; Moore, David R., Ed.

    This report focuses on the nature, use, and challenges of educational technology. The following articles are included: "Technology and Change for the Information Age" (James B. Ellsworth); "Education in a Digital Democracy: Leading the Charge for Learning about, with, and beyond Technology" (Mark David Milliron and Cindy L. Miles); "Toward a…

  1. Women in Technology: The Evolution of a Simple Program That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumb, Jean Marie; Fenton, Ray

    Three papers present views on women in technology programs and occupations, and on Corning Community College's (CCC's) program to encourage women to enter technological fields in which they have been historically underrepresented. First, Edward F. Herman presents the historical background to the development of CCC's Women in Technology program,…

  2. New forces at work in mining: industry views of critical technologies

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Peterson; Tom LaTourrette; James T. Bartis

    2001-01-15

    Between March and July 2000, the RAND Science and Technology Policy Institute conducted a series of in-depth, confidential discussions with key members of the mining community to elicit a wide range of views on technology trends in all sectors of the U.S. mining and quarrying industry. The discussions included 58 organizations engaged in coal, metals, aggregates, and industrial minerals production, as well as technology providers and research institutions. This report brings to light those technologies viewed by industry leaders as critical to the success of the industry currently, and critical technologies likely to be implemented between now and 2020. 7 figs., 6 tabs., 2 apps.

  3. Do High Technology Policies Work?: High Technology Industry Employment Growth in U.S. Metropolitan Areas, 1988-1998

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, J. Craig; Leicht, Kevin T.; Jaynes, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Since the 1970s, federal, state and local governments have launched an array of new high technology development programs. Researchers and policy-makers disagree about the relative merits of these policies. We address the effects of seven of these policies on high tech industry employment growth in metropolitan statistical areas in the United…

  4. Working Towards a Theory for Music Technologies in the Classroom: How Pupils Engage with and Organise Sounds with New Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in schools is now commonplace and, for many, an unquestionable part of everyday teaching and learning. But detailed studies of the use of ICT in classroom-based music education are rare. This article explores how pupils aged between 11 and 16 used ICT to create and perform music in new…

  5. Can information and communication technologies support patient engagement? A review of opportunities and challenges in health social work.

    PubMed

    Craig, Shelley L; Calleja Lorenzo, Maria Victoria

    2014-10-01

    Despite becoming a prerequisite for participation in an information-based society, the use of information communication technologies (ICT) within social work and health care remains in its infancy. Currently, there is a push to adopt newer technologies to enhance practice. This article aims to highlight some of the innovative ways in which ICT have been adopted and adapted to augment social work practice. The need for social workers to become proficient in the use of newer technologies, opportunities for implementing ICT within a health care setting, and potential challenges at the professional, ethical, and systemic level are explored. Using the available literature as a guide, recommendations and strategies to strengthen implementation of ICTs into health social work are provided. PMID:25321933

  6. Assignment of the human aggrecan gene (AGC1) to 15q26 using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N.; Doege, K.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J.

    1993-05-01

    The large aggregating proteoglycan aggrecan is a major structural component of the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage. Recent cDNA cloning of the human aggrecan gene (AGC1) reveals a core protein of at least 2316 amino acids characterized by several distinct structural domains. Two globular domains, termed G1 and G2, are present at the amino terminus of the molecule and a third, termed G3, is present at the carboxy terminus. The G1 domain is homologous in structure to the cartilage link protein and accounts for the aggregating potential of aggrecan through its ability to interact with hyaluronic acid. The aggrecan gene is known to consist of 15 exons, with each exon encoding a distinct functional region of the mature protein. However, while the link protein gene is known to reside on chromosome 5 in the human, the location of the aggrecan gene is currently undetermined in any species. The probe (pAGG2) for the aggrecan gene was mapped on chromosome band 15q26, most likely in the subregion of 15q26.1, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clear signals were noted on both chromatids of chromosome band 15q26 in over 80% of the 300 metaphase cells examined in three independent experiments using pAGG2. No other sites of hybridization were noted on both chromatids of any other chromosome band. The precise band location was identified by using chromsomes of about 650 bands and employing fluorescence reverse banding with chromomycin A3 and distamycin. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Deriving Requirements for Pervasive Well-Being Technology From Work Stress and Intervention Theory: Framework and Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Koldijk, Saskia; Kraaij, Wessel

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress in office environments is a big concern, often leading to burn-out. New technologies are emerging, such as easily available sensors, contextual reasoning, and electronic coaching (e-coaching) apps. In the Smart Reasoning for Well-being at Home and at Work (SWELL) project, we explore the potential of using such new pervasive technologies to provide support for the self-management of well-being, with a focus on individuals' stress-coping. Ideally, these new pervasive systems should be grounded in existing work stress and intervention theory. However, there is a large diversity of theories and they hardly provide explicit directions for technology design. Objective The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive and concise framework that can be used to design pervasive technologies that support knowledge workers to decrease stress. Methods Based on a literature study we identify concepts relevant to well-being at work and select different work stress models to find causes of work stress that can be addressed. From a technical perspective, we then describe how sensors can be used to infer stress and the context in which it appears, and use intervention theory to further specify interventions that can be provided by means of pervasive technology. Results The resulting general framework relates several relevant theories: we relate “engagement and burn-out” to “stress”, and describe how relevant aspects can be quantified by means of sensors. We also outline underlying causes of work stress and how these can be addressed with interventions, in particular utilizing new technologies integrating behavioral change theory. Based upon this framework we were able to derive requirements for our case study, the pervasive SWELL system, and we implemented two prototypes. Small-scale user studies proved the value of the derived technology-supported interventions. Conclusions The presented framework can be used to systematically develop theory

  8. Technology Use and Mathematics Teaching: Teacher Change as Discursive Identity Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronaki, Anna; Matos, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    Teacher change towards developing competences for technology use in mathematics teaching has been the focus of current educational reforms worldwide. However, a considerable amount of research denotes the extent to which teachers resist a full integration of technology in mathematics classrooms. The present paper is based on an ethnographic study…

  9. Technology Enhanced Learning Environments for Closing the Gap in Student Achievement between Regions: Does It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakir, Hasan; Delialioglu, Omer; Dennis, Alan; Duffy, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Student achievement gap between urban and suburban regions are a major issue in U.S. schools. Technology enhanced learning environments that support teaching and learning process with advanced technology may close this achievement gap. This paper examines the impact of student and school factors with an emphasis on schools' geographic location on…

  10. Technology and the Politics of Change at Work: The Case of Dalebake Bakeries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Patrick; Gunson, Nicky

    2002-01-01

    A case study of automation in the British baking industry illustrates several perspectives: (1) technological change as inevitable due to external market forces; (2) selection and implementation of technology as an outcome of strategic choices; and (3) awareness of the need for change as part of a political process in which choices are made among…

  11. Symposium on Applications of Technology in Education and Communications for the Deaf. Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Washington, DC.

    Thirteen papers from a symposium on technology in education and communications for the deaf are presented. The following papers are included: "Technology Trends in Special Education" (C. Blaschke); "Microcomputer Usage in American Schools for the Deaf: The State of the Art" (M. Deninger); "Management and Computers" (P. Mackall); "The Computer as…

  12. Australian University Technology Transfer Managers: Backgrounds, Work Roles, Specialist Skills and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Grant; Stone, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Technology transfer managers are a new group of specialist professionals engaged in facilitating transfer of university research discoveries and inventions to business firms and other research users. With relatively high academic qualifications and enjoying higher salaries than many other comparable university staff, technology transfer managers…

  13. Danger! Automation at Work; Report of the State of Illinois Commission on Automation and Technological Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, William

    The 74th Illinois General Assembly created the Illinois Commission on Automation and Technological Progress to study and analyze the economic and social effects of automation and other technological changes on industry, commerce, agriculture, education, manpower, and society in Illinois. Commission members visited industrial plants and business…

  14. How Are Community, Technical, and Junior Colleges Putting Technology to Work for Their Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHart, A. Robert; And Others

    1987-01-01

    In these four technology-related articles, Robert DeHart examines uses of satellite technology; Jack Pirkey describes televised instruction at Tarrant County Junior College (Texas); Baxter Hood focuses on occupational curriculum development at York Technical College (South Carolina); and Richard Schinoff considers computer-based student services…

  15. Technological Literacy Skills Everybody Should Learn. Ideas for Action in Education and Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR. Education and Work Program.

    This report reviews the skills and attitudes students need for success in today's technology-oriented workplace. The several facets of technological literacy are first clustered into three broad categories: attitudes or generic skills, applied skills, and specialized skills. Attitudes or generic skills are accuracy and precision, anticipating…

  16. Workshop on Science and Technology Education and Productive Work. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia).

    This workshop was organized as a contribution to Ethiopia's human resettlement activities necessitated by the recurrent drought. The objectives of the workshop were to: (1) appraise the relevance of basic rural technologies and identify modalities of their application; (2) develop materials in the fields of biotechnology and basic technology; (3)…

  17. A Fully Digital AGC System with 100MHz Bandwidth and 35dB Dynamic Range Power Detectors for DVB-S2 Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Younggun; Lee, Kang-Yoon

    This paper presents a fully digital gain control system with a new high bandwidth and wide dynamic range power detector for DVB-S2 application. Because the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of DVB-S2 system is so high and the settling time requirement is so stringent, the conventional closed-loop analog gain control scheme cannot be used. The digital gain control is necessary for the robust gain control and the direct digital interface with the baseband modem. Also, it has several advantages over the analog gain control in terms of the settling time and insensitivity to the process, voltage and temperature variation. In order to have a wide gain range with fine step resolution, a new AGC system is proposed. The system is composed of high-bandwidth digital VGAs, wide dynamic range power detectors with RMS detector, low power SAR type ADC, and a digital gain controller. To reduce the power consumption and chip area, only one SAR type ADC is used, and its input is time-interleaved based on four power detectors. Simulation and measurement results show that the new AGC system converges with gain error less than 0.25dB to the desired level within 10µs. It is implemented in a 0.18µm CMOS process. The measurement results of the proposed IF AGC system exhibit 80-dB gain range with 0.25-dB resolution, 8nV/\\\\!\\\\sqrt{Hz} input referred noise, and 5-dBm IIP3 at 60-mW power consumption. The power detector shows the 35dB dynamic range for 100MHz input.

  18. Society 3.0: How Technology Is Reshaping Education, Work and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilen-Daugenti, Tracey

    2012-01-01

    Higher education in the U.S. has traditionally prepared students for work and social success, but with families, work, and society itself undergoing revolutionary change, is this preparation sufficient to develop the 21st-century workforce? This book explores how evolving family structures, new ways of balancing work and personal lives, and rapid…

  19. Report of the Data Base Subcommittee to the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works, Washington, DC.

    The agreement of the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works (CONTU) with the legislative intent of the new copyright law, which accords copyright protection for computer data bases equivalent with the protection accorded compilations in traditional hard-copy format, includes several problem areas: (1) What copyright…

  20. "Kaizen" and Technology Transfer Instructors as Work-based Learning Facilitators in Overseas Transplants: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsey, Barry; Fujiwara, Asahi

    2000-01-01

    A study of 240 instructors of kaizen (continuous quality improvement) and technology transfer in overseas assignments for Toyota found that commitment to work and corporate cultural values were significant. Instructors recognized the responsibility and challenges of communicating and transferring their know-how across cultures. (SK)

  1. Employee Participation, Work Redesign, and New Technology: Implications for Public Policy in the 1990s. Background Paper No. 35A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochan, Thomas; And Others

    The 1980s have been a period during which important private experiments with innovations have occurred in employee participation, work redesign, and the introduction of new technologies and new systems of production. It is now time to move beyond the experimental stage. The following four interrelated policy initiatives should guide public efforts…

  2. Employees' Choices in Learning How to Use Information and Communication Technology Systems at Work: Strategies and Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korpelainen, Eija; Kira, Mari

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to promote the understanding of how employees learn to use information and communication technology (ICT) systems at work. The elements of a learning activity in the context of ICT use are identified from the literature. In particular, approaches to learning, learning strategies and problem-solving strategies are…

  3. Technology Partnership Organization: Quality Work Force Planning in East Texas. Final Report for Project Year 1990-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabac, John N.

    The Technology Partnership Organization (TPO) is one of 24 Quality Work Force Planning (QWFP) entities in Texas. The TPO met its objectives through a variety of activities, including the following: (1) establishing a QWFP committee for the region; (2) providing an inventory of key regional industries with the greatest job opening potential and…

  4. National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works, Meeting Number Four (Bethesda, Maryland, February 11-13, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Copyright Office.

    In a series of meetings held over a period of three days, the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works (CONTU) heard presentations, arranged by the American Society for Information Science, on information systems in general and on the operations of specific systems. The first presentation covered information storage and…

  5. HANDBOOK FOR USING DYNAMIC WORK PLANNING AND FIELD ANALYTICAL TECHNOLOGIES (ON-LINE ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The handbook will assist site managers in applying field analytical technologies before and during site cleanup to maximize analysis efforts to ensure the fastest, least expensive, and best cleanup for their sites.

  6. Spaces for Geometric Work: Figural, Instrumental, and Discursive Geneses of Reasoning in a Technological Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gómez-Chacón, Inés Ma; Kuzniak, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this research was to assess the effect of a dynamic environment on relationships between the three geneses (figural, instrumental, and discursive) of Spaces for Geometric Work. More specifically, it was to determine whether the interactive geometry program GeoGebra could play a specific role in the geometric work of future…

  7. Laser-Assisted Sheet Metal Working by the Integration of Scanner System Technology into a Progressive Die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus

    Within the sheet metal working industry the demand for thinner sheet materials with very high strength is growing due to the increasing importance for saving energy and responsible usage of natural resources. High strength and low ductility restrict application of state-of-the-art technology to shear, bend or deep draw parts with the needed complexity and quality. The Fraunhofer IPT has developed a "hy-PRESS" system to combine laser-assisted preheating and conventional punching to a hybrid technology in a progressive die, which allows to shear, bend and deep draw high strength materials with a high quality and complexity in progressive dies.

  8. Denver School of Science and Technology: A High School that Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Children's Campaign, 2006

    2006-01-01

    When one sees the new Denver School of Science and Technology (DSST), the first thing one will likely to notice is the building's impressive design. The school looks more like a Silicon Valley biotech firm than a typical new Colorado high school. Indeed, the innovative structure, modeled on a similar facility in San Diego, has already garnered…

  9. Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement. Working Paper 48

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigdor, Jacob L.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Does differential access to computer technology at home compound the educational disparities between rich and poor? Would a program of government provision of computers to early secondary school students reduce these disparities? The authors use administrative data on North Carolina public school students to corroborate earlier surveys that…

  10. Working Smarter: The Skill Bias of Computer Technologies. The Evolving Workplace Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wannell, Ted; Ali, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    This document provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies,…

  11. Making Learning and Web 2.0 Technologies Work for Higher Learning Institutions in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to assess the extent to which learning and Web 2.0 technologies are utilised to support learning and teaching in Africa's higher learning institutions, with a specific focus on Tanzania's public universities. Design/methodology/approach: A combination of content analysis and semi-structured interviews was used to collect…

  12. The Work of Children: Seeking Patterns in the Design of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Michael; Jacobson-Weaver, Zack

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of research in educational technology focuses, justifiably, on what might be described as "short-term" (or perhaps "medium-term") questions: how to improve an existing software system, how to assess a particular classroom innovation, how to teach some current subject matter in a more effective fashion. From…

  13. Crowdsourcing Scientific Work: A Comparative Study of Technologies, Processes, and Outcomes in Citizen Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Citizen science projects involve the public with scientists in collaborative research. Information and communication technologies for citizen science can enable massive virtual collaborations based on voluntary contributions by diverse participants. As the popularity of citizen science increases, scientists need a more thorough understanding of…

  14. MuseumScouts: Exploring How Schools, Museums and Interactive Technologies Can Work Together to Support Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishart, Jocelyn; Triggs, Pat

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report on the successes and challenges of a creative project involving museums, schools and interactive technologies. The MuseumScouts project is EU Comenius 2.1 funded and involves teachers, teacher educators, museum staff, students and researchers from five European countries: Germany (Berlin and Munich), Lithuania (Vilnius),…

  15. Long Distance Teaching: The Impact of Offshore Programs and Information Technology on Academic Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzarol, Tim; Hosie, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Two distinct but related issues in Australian higher education are noted: the apparent spread of overseas campuses of Australian universities seeking a competitive advantage in international education, and the emergence of new information technologies that enable packaging and delivery of interactive educational services on demand over long…

  16. A Team Approach to Managing Technology: Despite Our Differences--We Had To Make IT Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliani, Peter R.

    Franklin University, a private urban university with 4500 students located in Columbus, Ohio, completed the initial phase of a long-range, campus-wide technology plan. The plan creates a well supported and managed computing and communications infrastructure focusing on: user support systems; classrooms and laboratories; offices; outside access;…

  17. The YouthLearn Guide: A Creative Approach to Working with Youth and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromer, Janis; Driggs, Lorin

    This guide is designed to help after-school and in-school programs create and implement high-quality, technology-enriched learning activities. It contains hands-on lessons, worksheets, and sample activities that have proven effective at inspiring young people's curiosity and creativity. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the issues, including…

  18. The New Technicians Study: Opportunities for Entry-Level Workers in Information Technology Occupations. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The purpose of this study was to develop a body of labor market information to support the development of regional information technology instructional programs by a consortium of California Community Colleges located in the San Francisco Bay Region. This collection of summaries of six occupations begins with a guide that explains the components…

  19. Encouraging Girls into Science and Technology with Feminine Role Model: Does This Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberger, Yael M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect of a program that aimed to encourage girls to choose a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) career in Israel. The program involved school visits to a high-tech company and meeting with role model female scientists. Sixty ninth-grade female students from a Jewish modern-orthodox single-sex…

  20. Preparedness of Educators to Implement Modern Information Technologies in Their Work with Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velickovic, Sonja; Stošic, Lazar

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the issue of the preparedness of educators to realize the contents of the PPP (Preschool Preparatory Program) from the point of view of digitalization and informatization of the society. The authors are in favour of the implementation of modern educational technology in the process of educating preschool children with the aim…

  1. THE AFFORDABLE BIOSHELTERS PROJECT: TESTING INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES, WORKING TO MAKE HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLAR GREENHOUSES COST COMPETITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The economic feasibility and limitations of technologies investigated will be evaluated, including for liquid foam insulation, subsoil heat storages, and compost exhaust heating. These systems will save most of the energy and money spent to heat greenhouses in exchange for a h...

  2. Technology, Utopia and Scholarly Life: Ideals and Realities in the Work of Hermann Hesse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the relationship between technology, utopia and scholarly life in Hermann Hesse's novel, "The Glass Bead Game." In the first part of Hesse's book, the Glass Bead Game and the society of which it is a part, Castalia, are portrayed in idealistic terms. The second part of the novel chronicles the educational life of Joseph…

  3. The Integration of Economic Development and Education: Making High Technology Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Michael H.

    Numerous factors can make an area attractive to high technology industries, including: (1) local exclusionary zoning and restrictive covenants which seek to enhance the beauty of industrial park areas; (2) mutually beneficial affiliations with universities; (3) installation of special utility lines to minimize disruption of service to park areas;…

  4. Technology Enhanced Elementary and Middle School Science (TEEMSS). What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Technology Enhanced Elementary and Middle School Science" ("TEEMSS") is a physical science curriculum for grades 3-8 that utilizes computers, sensors, and interactive models to support investigations of real-world phenomena. Through 15 inquiry-based instructional units, students interact with computers, gather and analyze data, and formulate…

  5. Families in a High-Tech Age: Technology Usage Patterns, Work and Family Correlates, and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesley, Noelle

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzes a couple-level ("N" = 581), longitudinal data set of employees to provide evidence about technology use over time, the factors that predict use, and the potential for a spouse to influence an individual's use. Although longitudinal usage patterns suggest a trend toward adoption and use of e-mail, the Internet, cell phones, and…

  6. How Working Collaboratively with Technology Can Foster a Creative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gómez, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that collaborative learning is a very powerful methodology as it ensures interaction among students, humanises the learning process and has positive effects on academic achievement. An activity based on this approach can also benefit from the use of technology, making this task more appealing to our students today. The aim of…

  7. Disruptive Technology: What Is It? How Can It Work for Professional Writing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Writing in 1995 for the "Harvard Business Review" audience of executive managers, Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen coined the term "disruptive technologies" to describe innovations that improve a product, service, or operation in ways wholly unanticipated by leaders of existing markets. Christensen's economic theory offers a launch…

  8. Combining Emerging Technology and Writing across the Curriculum: Professional Development that Works!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampson, Margaret P.; Hearron, Tom; Noggle, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Though Writing Across the Curriculum is not a new concept, Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute offers a two-semester professional development program that combines this instructional approach with emerging technology. Though this program focuses on the use of writing to enhance student learning, this training format can be…

  9. [100 years of Draeger Medical Technology (1902 - 2002) -- working for the applicability of oxygen].

    PubMed

    Strätling, M; Schmucker, P

    2004-09-01

    This survey analyses the history of 100 years of Draeger Medical Technology. Between 1889 and 1902 a number of inventions on the field of pressure gas technology allowed to solve application problems, which until then proved major obstacles to the safe and efficient use of compressed gases such as oxygen, nitrous oxide or carbon dioxide for medical and industrial purposes. A special significance is to be awarded here to pressure reducing valves, but also reliable manometers, nozzles and valves for pressure tanks were not generally available until then. These were first successfully and on a really significant scale introduced into international medical and non-medical pressure-gas technology by Draeger Inc. (Luebeck/Germany), and proved particularly successful in anaesthesia and rescue-devices (e. g. in the "Roth-Draeger Anaesthesia Apparatus" (1902). Consequently, starting in 1902, Draeger Inc. increasingly put an emphasis on developing medical and rescue technology and -- by doing so -- gained an important influence on the history of the implementation of modern oxygen therapy and of inhalative anaesthesia. A survey of the historically most important Draeger-Developments is provided. PMID:15490342

  10. Working Overseas: Implementing Technology for a Branch Campus in the Middle East

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Timothy M.

    2005-01-01

    On July 5, 2003, the author landed in Qatar, a newly minted CIO from College Station, Texas. His charge is to design and implement the required IT infrastructure--including telecommunications, networking, computing, and instructional technology--necessary to support Texas A&M University's newest branch campus, Texas A&M University at Qatar…

  11. Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 16078

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigdor, Jacob L.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Does differential access to computer technology at home compound the educational disparities between rich and poor? Would a program of government provision of computers to early secondary school students reduce these disparities? We use administrative data on North Carolina public school students to corroborate earlier surveys that document broad…

  12. A Working Model for Student Success: The Tennessee Technology Centers. Preliminary Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoops, John

    2010-01-01

    This is a report about a unique postsecondary education system, the Tennessee Technology Centers--a statewide system of 27 institutions providing a wide range of rigorous, one to two year, technical/occupational education programs at consistently high completion and placement rates in high skill and relatively high wage employment. This report…

  13. A Science and Technology Excursion-based Unit of Work: The Human Body.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Laura

    2000-01-01

    Presents a unit of work based on a few systems of the human body. Stretches students' learning beyond the classroom into the local community by going on an excursion to Kalgoorlie Regional Hospital. (ASK)

  14. Preparation of a technology development roadmap for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) System : report of the ATW separations technologies and waste forms technical working group.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.; Duguid, J.; Henry, R.; Karell, E.; Laidler, J.; McDeavitt, S.; Thompson, M.; Toth, M.; Williamson, M.; Willit, J.

    1999-08-12

    In response to a Congressional mandate to prepare a roadmap for the development of Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) technology, a Technical Working Group comprised of members from various DOE laboratories was convened in March 1999 for the purpose of preparing that part of the technology development roadmap dealing with the separation of certain radionuclides for transmutation and the disposal of residual radioactive wastes from these partitioning operations. The Technical Working Group for ATW Separations Technologies and Waste Forms completed its work in June 1999, having carefully considered the technology options available. A baseline process flowsheet and backup process were identified for initial emphasis in a future research, development and demonstration program. The baseline process combines aqueous and pyrochemical processes to permit the efficient separation of the uranium, technetium, iodine and transuranic elements from the light water reactor (LWR) fuel in the head-end step. The backup process is an all- pyrochemical system. In conjunction with the aqueous process, the baseline flowsheet includes a pyrochemical process to prepare the transuranic material for fabrication of the ATW fuel assemblies. For the internal ATW fuel cycle the baseline process specifies another pyrochemical process to extract the transuranic elements, Tc and 1 from the ATW fuel. Fission products not separated for transmutation and trace amounts of actinide elements would be directed to two high-level waste forms, one a zirconium-based alloy and the other a glass/sodalite composite. Baseline cost and schedule estimates are provided for a RD&D program that would provide a full-scale demonstration of the complete separations and waste production flowsheet within 20 years.

  15. Could ozonation technology really work for mitigating air emissions from animal feeding operations?

    PubMed

    Li, Qianfeng; Wang, Lingjuan; Liu, Zifei; Kamens, Richard M

    2009-10-01

    Among various mitigation technologies for ammonia (NH3) emission control at animal feeding operations (AFOs), room ozonation technology is the most controversial. This paper aims to present full perspectives of ozonation techniques through a literature review and a series of laboratory experiments. In the literature review, ozone chemistry was summarized to address (1) ozone and NH3 reactions, (2) ozone and odor reactions, (3) ozone and particulate matter reactions, and (4) ozone and microorganism reactions. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted in a dual large outdoor aerosol smog chamber (270 m3). NH3 and fine particle number concentrations from ozone-treated and control experiments were compared. The experimental results indicated that (1) ozone has no significant effect on NH3 emissions/concentrations or NH3 decay of an outdoor chamber; and (2) with ozone treatment, high concentration of particles in the "high-risk" respiratory fraction (in submicron range) are generated. PMID:19842331

  16. Work Began on Contracts for Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA has had a history of successful space flight missions that depended on radioisotope-fueled power systems. These Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) converted the heat generated from the decay of radioisotope material into useful electrical power. An RPS is most attractive in applications where photovoltaics are not optimal, such as deep-space applications where the solar flux is too low or extended applications on planets such as Mars where the day/night cycle, settling of dust, and life requirements limit the usefulness of photovoltaics. NASA s Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) Program is developing next-generation power-conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by the two RPS flight systems currently being developed by the Department of Energy for NASA: the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG).

  17. NICE technology appraisals: working with multiple levels of uncertainty and the potential for bias.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick; Calnan, Michael

    2013-05-01

    One of the key roles of the English National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is technology appraisal. This essentially involves evaluating the cost effectiveness of pharmaceutical products and other technologies for use within the National Health Service. Based on a content analysis of key documents which shed light on the nature of appraisals, this paper draws attention to the multiple layers of uncertainty and complexity which are latent within the appraisal process, and the often socially constructed mechanisms for tackling these. Epistemic assumptions, bounded rationality and more explicitly relational forms of managing knowledge are applied to this end. These findings are discussed in the context of the literature highlighting the inherently social process of regulation. A framework is developed which posits the various forms of uncertainty, and responses to these, as potential conduits of regulatory bias-in need of further research. That NICE's authority is itself regulated by other actors within the regulatory regime, particularly the pharmaceutical industry, exposes it to the threat of regulatory capture. Following Lehoux, it is concluded that a more transparent and reflexive format for technological appraisals is necessary. This would enable a more robust, defensible form of decision-making and moreover enable NICE to preserve its legitimacy in the midst of pressures which threaten this. PMID:22198480

  18. The Impact of Mobile Handheld Technology on Hospital Physicians' Work Practices and Patient Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Prgomet, Mirela; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I.

    2009-01-01

    The substantial growth in mobile handheld technologies has heralded the opportunity to provide physicians with access to information, resources, and people at the right time and place. But is this technology delivering the benefits to workflow and patient care promised by increased mobility? The authors conducted a systematic review to examine evidence regarding the impact of mobile handheld technology on hospital physicians' work practices and patient care, focusing on quantification of the espoused virtues of mobile technologies. The authors identified thirteen studies that demonstrated the ability of personal digital assistants (PDAs) to positively impact on areas of rapid response, error prevention, and data management and accessibility. The use of PDAs demonstrates the greatest benefits in contexts where time is a critical factor and a rapid response crucial. However, the extent to which these devices improved outcomes and workflow efficiencies because of their mobility was largely absent from the literature. The paucity of evidence calls for much needed future research that asks explicit questions about the impact the mobility of devices has on work practices and outcomes. PMID:19717793

  19. Technology, Consciousness, and the Transitional Symbolic Self: Implications for Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liechty, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of literature is focused on hypertechnology in curriculum and culture. This article contributes to that literature. Taking the perspective of social work education that human reality emerges from the interaction of biological, psychological, and socio-cultural forces, the reader is invited to consider the possibility that in this…

  20. The Evolution of New Technology, Work and Skills in the Service Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    This document reports on an analysis conducted to find out how white-collar workers have been affected by the latest developments in computerization and how current changes influence work organization, personnel training, and skills. The document consists of an introduction, seven chapters, and an 18-page bibliography. The first chapter examines…

  1. New Technologies and Old Ways of Working in the Home of the Self-Employed Teleworker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baines, Susan

    2002-01-01

    A study of home-based media workers found they were aware of discourses of freedom and innovation associated with teleworking, but they did not fit the reality of competing demands of domestic life and work. The research suggests that if home-based micro enterprises become more widespread, the results may be harsh for individuals and households as…

  2. Long Story...beyond "Technologies" of Knowing in Case Study Work with Permanently Excluded Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankham, Jo; Edwards-Kerr, Deon

    2009-01-01

    This paper draws on case study research with Lee who had been permanently excluded from an urban secondary school in England. It begins with two extended extracts from the case study in order to illustrate the challenges the principal researcher, Deon, faced in the day-to-day conduct of the work. The section that follows engages in a reflexive…

  3. Understanding Prospective Mathematics Teachers' Processes for Making Sense of Students' Work with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, P. Holt; Lee, Hollylynne Stohl; Hollebrands, Karen F.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the processes used by prospective mathematics teachers as they examined middle-school students' work solving statistical problems using a computer software program. Ways in which the model may be used by other researchers and implications for the design of pedagogical tasks for prospective teachers are discussed. (Contains…

  4. Making a new technology work: the standardization and regulation of microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Susan; Cambrosio, Alberto

    2007-12-01

    The translation of laboratory innovations into clinical tools is dependent upon the development of regulatory arrangements designed to ensure that the new technology will be used reliably and consistently. A case study of a key post-genomic technology, gene chips or microarrays, exemplifies this claim. The number of microarray publications and patents has increased exponentially during the last decade and diagnostic microarray tests already are making their way into the clinic. Yet starting in the mid-1990s, scientific journals were overrun with criticism concerning the ambiguities involved in interpreting most of the assumptions of a microarray experiment. Questions concerning platform comparability and statistical calculations were and continue to be raised, in spite of the emergence by 2001 of an initial set of standards concerning several components of a microarray experiment. This article probes the history and ongoing efforts aimed at turning microarray experimentation into a viable, meaningful, and consensual technology by focusing on two related elements:1) The history of the development of the Microarray Gene Expression Data Society (MGED), a remarkable bottom-up initiative that brings together different kinds of specialists from academic, commercial, and hybrid settings to produce, maintain, and update microarray standards; and 2) The unusual mix of skills and expertise involved in the development and use of microarrays. The production, accumulation, storage, and mining of microarray data remain multi-skilled endeavors bridging together different types of scientists who embody a diversity of scientific traditions. Beyond standardization, the interfacing of these different skills has become a key issue for further development of the field. PMID:18449388

  5. Synthesis of single-crystal α-MnO2 nanotubes-loaded Ag@C core-shell matrix and their application for electrochemical sensing of nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sai; Zheng, Jianbin

    2016-10-01

    A nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor was fabricated by combing the crystal α-MnO2 nanotubes and Ag@C core-shell matrix with their own superior characteristics. The morphology, size and electrochemical of the sensing interface materials and the relationship between the electrical catalytic properties and sensor response performance were also studied, established a new method for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The structure and morphology of hollow tubular-like MnO2 and MnO2-Ag@C film were characterized by scanning electron micrograph (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical properties of the sensor were explored by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry. The investigation showed that the MnO2-Ag@C at the sensor exhibited a high electrocatalytic activity towards electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide; and under the optimal conditions, the linear ranges of hydrogen peroxide were 0.5μM to 5.7mM with a low detection limit of 0.17μM (S/N=3) and high sensitivity of 127.2μAmM(-1)cm(-2). Compared with other nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor, the fabricated sensor own lower detection limit, demonstrating that MnO2-Ag@C nanocomposite film will be a new promising platform for the construction of hydrogen peroxide sensors. PMID:27474303

  6. Can incubators work in Africa? Acorn Technologies and the entrepreneur-centric model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Incubators are organizations that support the growth of new and typically technology-based enterprises, by providing business support services that bring together human and financial capital. Although the traditional role of incubators has been for economic development, they may also be a useful policy lever to tackle global health, by fostering the development and delivery of local health innovation. Given its high disease burden, life sciences incubators hold particular potential for Africa. As the most industrially advanced African nation, South Africa serves as a litmus test for identifying effective incubator policies. The case study method was used to illustrate how one such publicly funded incubator founded in 2002, Acorn Technologies, helped to catalyze local health product innovation. Discussion Acorn helped to support twelve biomedical device firms. One of them, Real World Diagnostics, was founded by a trainee from Acorn’s innovative internship program (Hellfire). It developed rapid strip diagnostic tests for locally prevalent diseases including schistosomiasis and HIV, and reported $2 million (USD) in revenue in 2009. Acorn achieved this success by operating as a non-profit virtual incubator with little physical infrastructure. Employing a virtual model in combination with stringent selection criteria of capital efficiency for clients proved to be effective in reducing its own fixed costs. Acorn focused on entrepreneurship training and networking, both critical at an early stage in an environment dominated by multinational biomedical device companies. Acorn and its clients learned that employing a cross-subsidy business model allowed one to generate royalty revenue through imports to subsidize R&D for local diseases. However, funding constraints and government expectations for rapid self-sustainability forced Acorn to merge with its sister biotechnology incubator in 2009. Summary A key to Acorn’s achievements was identifying entrepreneurs

  7. Proven clean coal technology at work: The Provence 250 MW CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Lucat, P.; Jacquet, L.; Roulet, V.

    1997-12-31

    The successful start-up, in the last months of 1995, of the 250 MW Provence/Gardanne unit represents a significant milestone in the development of atmospheric Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boilers for power stations. This high performance unit (over 700 tonnes/hour of steam at 169 bar, 567 C, with reheat at 566 C) has been in operation since April 1996. It is the first CFB boiler in the world to reach such a capacity. CFB boilers, with their excellent SO{sub 2} and NOx emission control capability, are today recognized as a very attractive Clean Coal Technology, particularly because of their simplicity. The Provence/Gardanne project is part of a French development program for large CFB boilers which has been elaborated in the perspective of domestic applications (mainly future semi-base load units) and of the overseas market. It responds to the converging interests of Electricite de France (EDF), Charbonnages de France (CdF)and GEC ALSTHOM Stein Industrie. Besides comprehensive R and D-type investigations aiming at an in-depth understanding of the CFB process and preparing for future scale-up and development, this program has already been marked by two outstanding commercial repowering projects: a 125 MW unit, in operation since 1990 at the Emile Huchet Power Station, and the 250 MW Provence unit. These boilers have been designed and supplied by GEC ALSTHOM Stein Industrie in the framework of their long standing cooperation with Lurgi, a pioneer of the CFB process. The main components are: (1) Furnace; (2) Cyclone; (3) Back-pass; (4) Ash cooler; (5) External Heat Exchanger. However, a brief discussion of some key design options affecting bed performance is necessary to better understand this technology. The paper describes the design of the system, the retrofitting project at Emile Huchet/Carling, and then gives background information on the Provence/Gardanne retrofit, describing SO{sub 2} emissions, the 250 MW boiler, and results from the performance tests. The

  8. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Cold Work Embrittlement of Interstitial Free Steel

    SciTech Connect

    John T Bowker; Pierre Martin

    2002-10-31

    This work addresses the issues of measurement of secondary cold work embrittlement (SCWE) of an IF steel in deep-drawn parts using laboratory tests, and its correlation with real part fracture. It aimed at evaluating the influence of the steel chemistry and processing condition, microstructure, and test conditions, on SCWE as well as the effect of SCWE on fatigue properties. Size 6-in. cups produced with various draw ratios or trimmed at different heights were tested to determine the ductile-to-brittle-transition temperature (DBTT) as a function of strain. The 2-in. cup/expansion test, bend test and fracture of notched specimens were also used to generate information complementary to that provided by the 6-inch cup/expansion test. The relationship between laboratory tests and fracture in real parts was established by testing large-scale parts. The fatigue behavior was investigated in the as-rolled and deep drawn (high stain) conditions, using prestrained specimens taken from the wall of a formed part.

  9. People with multiple disabilities learn to engage in occupation and work activities with the support of technology-aided programs.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Alberti, Gloria; Perilli, Viviana; Laporta, Dominga; Campodonico, Francesca; Oliva, Doretta; Groeneweg, Jop

    2014-06-01

    These two studies were aimed at assessing technology-aided programs to help persons with multiple disabilities engage in basic occupation or work activities. Specifically, Study I focused on teaching two participants (an adolescent and an adult) with low vision or total blindness, severe/profound intellectual disabilities, and minimal object interaction to engage in constructive object-manipulation responses. The technology monitored their responses and followed them with brief stimulation periods automatically. Study II focused on teaching three adults with deafness, severe visual impairment, and profound intellectual disabilities to perform a complex activity, that is, to assemble a five-component water pipe. The technology regulated (a) light cues to guide the participants through the workstations containing single pipe components and the carton for completed pipes and (b) stimulation events. The results of both studies were positive. The participants of Study I showed consistent and independent engagement in object-manipulation responses. The participants of Study II showed consistent and independent pipe assembling performance. General implications of the two programs and the related technology packages for intervention with persons with multiple disabilities are discussed. PMID:24685943

  10. AT13148, a first-in-class multi-AGC kinase inhibitor, potently inhibits gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yu; Niu, Jianhua; Shen, Yun; Li, Dongmei; Peng, Xinyu; Wu, Xiangwei

    2016-09-01

    The AGC kinase family is important cell proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of this family contributes to gastric cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the potential activity of AT13148, a first-in-class multi-AGC kinase inhibitor, against gastric cancer cells. Our results showed that AT13148 exerted potent cytotoxic and anti-proliferative activities against a panel human gastric cancer cell lines (HGC-27, AGS, SNU-601, N87 and MKN-28), possibly via inducing cancer cell apoptotic death. Apoptosis inhibition by the Caspase blockers dramatically attenuated AT13148-caused cytotoxicity against gastric cancer cells. Intriguingly, same AT13148 treatment was not cytotoxic/pro-apoptotic to the non-cancerous human gastric epithelial GEC-1 cells. At the signaling level, AT13148 treatment in gastric cancer cells dramatically suppressed activation of multiple AGC kinases, including Akt (at p-Thr-308), p70S6 kinase (p70S6K), glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK). Our in vivo studies demonstrated that daily oral gavage of AT13148 at well-tolerated doses significantly inhibited HGC27 xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. AGC activity was also dramatically decreased in AT13148-administrated HGC27 tumors. Therefore, targeting AGC kinases by AT13148 demonstrates superior anti-gastric cancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. The preclinical results of this study support the progression of this molecule into future evaluation as a valuable anti-gastric cancer candidate. PMID:26828267

  11. Evaluation of a "no-cost" Internet technology-based system for teleradiology and co-operative work.

    PubMed

    Bergh, B; Schlaefke, A; Pietsch, M; García, I; Vogl, T J

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of a no-cost system based on standard Internet technology components for teleradiology. The system was composed of free software (communication, DICOM viewer, compression) and standard off-the-shelf hardware components. For different image (CR, CT, MR) and network types (LAN and ISDN) the File Transfer, Audio and Video Conference, and Co-operative Work properties were examined and compared with the literature referring to standard complete packages and dedicated teleradiology systems. The main advantages of the no-cost system are: price; ease of use; independence from specific hardware; and potential connection to any possible partner. The performance of the File Transfer and the Audio and Video Conference was comparable to the other system groups with slight disadvantages in the usability. For Co-operative Work the employed "application sharing" technology does not meet the clinical requirements, which applies identically to the standard complete packages. Here the specialized systems prove superior, although they are proprietary. With minimal restraints the evaluated no-cost solution can be used for File Transfer and Conference scenarios. The usage for Co-operative Work with ISDN is not recommended, unless for the purpose of gaining experience or when dealing with small amounts of cases or images. PMID:12599011

  12. Encouraging Girls into Science and Technology with Feminine Role Model: Does This Work?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberger, Yael M.

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the effect of a program that aimed to encourage girls to choose a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) career in Israel. The program involved school visits to a high-tech company and meeting with role model female scientists. Sixty ninth-grade female students from a Jewish modern-orthodox single-sex secondary school in the same city as the company participated in the study. The control group contained 30 girls from the same classes who did not participate in the program. Data were collected through pre-post questionnaires, observations, and focus group interviews. It was analyzed for three main themes: perceptions of scientists and engineers, capability of dealing with STEM, and future career choice. Findings indicated respect toward the women scientists as being smart and creative, but significant negative change on the perceptions of women scientists/engineers, the capability of dealing with STEM, and the STEM career choices. Possible causes for these results are discussed, as well as implications for education.

  13. Work, meaning, and gene regulation: Findings from a Japanese information technology firm.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Shinobu; Akutsu, Satoshi; Uchida, Yukiko; Cole, Steve W

    2016-10-01

    The meaning in life, typically reflected in a sense of purpose, growth, or social embeddedness (called eudaimonic well-being, EWB), has been linked to favorable health outcomes. In particular, this experience is inversely associated with the conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA), which involves up-regulation of genes linked to inflammation and down-regulation of genes linked to viral resistance. So far, however, little is known about how this transcriptome profile might be situated in specific socio-cultural contexts. Here, we tested 106 male workers at a large Japanese IT firm and found that the CTRA is inversely associated not only with general EWB but also with a more contextualized sense of meaning derived from the perceived significance of one's work and a sense of interdependence with others in the workplace. These results expand previous links between personal well-being and CTRA gene expression to include the socio-cultural determinants of meaning in life. PMID:27434635

  14. Three Great Technologies Working Together: DOAS, Radiant Heating and Cooling, and Envelope Tightness

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Benne, K.

    2010-01-22

    Synergistic systems are: (1) Dedicated Outdoor Air System (DOAS) - Efficient ventilation and dehumidification, Works well with energy recovery, Potential to cascade chilled water to radiant system; (2) Radiant heating and cooling - Comfort heating and cooling, Efficient delivery of energy, Improved zoning capabilities; and (3) Tighter envelope - Reduce uncontrolled loads, Humidity and Cold air. Whole building energy analysis of retrofit energy conservation measures. Conclusions are that: (1) These are preliminary results - further analysis for actual projects should completed; Savings depends on the starting point; Higher savings in the barracks because of 24 hour occupation vs. half-time occupation in the office; and May be difficult to justify retrofit just for energy savings; however, the premium cost over a standard retrofit can be cost effective.

  15. After the Biomedical Technology Revolution: Where to Now for a Bio-Psycho-Social Approach to Social Work?

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    In the late twentieth century, the bio-psycho-social framework emerged as a powerful influence on the conceptualisation and delivery of health and rehabilitation services including social work services in these fields. The bio-psycho-social framework is built on a systems view of health and well-being ( Garland and Howard, 2009). The systems perspective encourages medical and allied health professions, including social work, to recognise and to respond to the multiple systems impacting on individual health and well-being ( Engel, 2003). This paper analyses how advances in biomedical technology, particularly in the fields of neuroscience and human genomics, are challenging the bio-psycho-social approach to practice. The paper examines the pressures on the social work profession to embrace biomedical science and points to the problems in doing so. The conclusion points to some tentative ways forward for social workers to engage critically with biomedical advances and to strengthen the bio-psycho-social framework in the interests of holistic and ethical approaches to social work practice. PMID:27559237

  16. The Effect of Technology on Alienation from Work. Testing Blauner's Inverted U-Curve Hypothesis for 110 Industrial Organizations and 245 Retrained Printers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Frank M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Presents new evidence on the effect of technology on worker alienation, using data from the organizational level as well as the individual level. In the latter approach, the impact of automation on the work of newspaper printers is examined. (SK)

  17. VHSIC technology working group report (IDA/OSD R&M (Institute for Defense Analyses/Office of the Secretary of Defense Reliability and Maintainability) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, E.

    1983-11-01

    This document records the activities and presents the findings of the VHSIC Technology Working Group, part of the IDA/OSD Reliability and Maintainability Study, conducted during the period from July 1982 through August 1983.

  18. Addendum to the East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    SAIC

    2011-04-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan (DOE 2004) describes the planned fieldwork to support the remedial investigation (RI) for residual contamination at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) not addressed in previous Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) decisions. This Addendum describes activities that will be conducted to gather additional information in Zone 1 of the ETTP for groundwater, surface water, and sediments. This Addendum has been developed from agreements reached in meetings held on June 23, 2010, August 25, 2010, October 13, 2010, November 13, 2010, December 1, 2010, and January 13, 2011, with representatives of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Based on historical to recent groundwater data for ETTP and the previously completed Sitewide Remedial Investigation for the ETTP (DOE 2007a), the following six areas of concern have been identified that exhibit groundwater contamination downgradient of these areas above state of Tennessee and EPA drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs): (1) K-720 Fly Ash Pile, (2) K-770 Scrap Yard, (3) Duct Island, (4) K-1085 Firehouse Burn/J.A. Jones Maintenance Area, (5) Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA), and (6) Former K-1070-A Burial Ground. The paper presents a brief summary of the history of the areas, the general conceptual models for the observed groundwater contamination, and the data gaps identified.

  19. Technology for improving cognitive function. A workshop sponsored by the US Interagency Committee on Disability Research (ICDR): reports from working groups.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Cathy; Scherer, Marcia J

    2006-12-30

    The U.S. federal Interagency Committee on Disability Research (ICDR) and its Subcommittee on Technology (IST) sponsored a state of the art workshop on "Technology for Improving Cognitive Function", from 29-30 June 2006 in Washington, D.C. This paper summarizes the content of the working groups charged with providing strategic direction for the future of technology for persons with cognitive disabilities. PMID:17178621

  20. Statement of work for applied technology tasks to be performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in support of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project; Fiscal year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, O.L.

    1991-02-01

    Detailed Design for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project was initiated during fiscal year (FY) 1990. The Project requires technology development and design support from the research and development contractor, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), while this work is in progress. This Statement of Work (SOW) addresses the PNL work funded by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during FY 1991 to accomplish applied technology, PNL project management, and quality assurance (QA) tasks in support of HWVP Project requirements. Under the HWVP integrated management scheme, PNL is responsible for performing vitrification technology development. The PNL technical responsibilities include, but are not limited to, the following activities: provide process technology development and vitrification testing; evaluate equipment adaptation for the HWVP processes; provide glass formulation development; develop waste and glass characterization technology; provide waste form qualification (WFQ) models and data development; issue and maintain the HWVP Applied Technology Handbook (to be written); and prepare preliminary cost estimates, schedules, and scope definition covering the above technology activities. Pacific Northwest Laboratory will also participate with the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in technology exchanges and design reviews related to vitrification technology with the DOE-RL and Fluor Daniel, Inc. (Fluor). 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Characterizing land condition variability in Ferlo, Senegal (2001-2009) using multi-temporal 1-km Apparent Green Cover (AGC) SPOT Vegetation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, B.; Gilabert, M. A.; García-Haro, F. J.; Faye, A.; Meliá, J.

    2011-04-01

    The ecosystem state or 'land condition' can be characterized by a set of attributes, which show variations at different temporal scales. A multi-resolution analysis (MRA) based on the wavelet transform (WT) has been implemented to examine the land condition of a dryland region in Ferlo (Senegal) over the period 2001-2009. This methodology has proven to be useful for smoothing time series while considering those temporal resolutions that incorporate information about the vegetation dynamics. For this purpose, time series of the 1-km Apparent Green Cover (AGC) from the 10-day composites SPOT Vegetation (VGT) data are analyzed. Two relevant outputs from the MRA, A1 (de-noised) and the A6 (inter-annual) components have served us for characterizing the annual vegetation production and assess the long-term variation, respectively. In a first stage, the vegetation seasonality (or intra-annual variation) over the area is described by using several metrics related to vegetation phenology derived from the de-noised time series ( A1). In a second phase, the temporal variability of the inter-annual component series ( A6) is accomplished to detect potential vegetation changes over the considered period. A Mann-Kendall test has been applied to confirm the significance of the observed inter-annual changes. A higher number of significant pixels (86%) are obtained when considering the inter-annual component in the trend analysis instead of the original time-series (47%). The results confirm a general greening up over the period 2001-2009, not fully explained by precipitation, as well as rather local negative trends. The Rain-Use Efficiency (RUE) ratio computed using the AGC as a proxy of vegetation production has been considered to further analyze the detected changes. Inter-annual changes in RUE provide a potential method of separating vegetation declines due to lack of rainfall from declines associated with degradation. Some spots of negative values in inter-annual RUE changes

  2. Engaging Students with the Nature of Science and the Nature of Technology by Modeling the Work of Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Jerrid W.; Wilcox, Jesse L.

    2013-01-01

    Just as science education is too often limited to the acquisition of facts, technology education is too often limited to proficient use of technology. Neither of these goals fully realize a robust definition of science and technology literacy. To achieve greater science and technology literacy, students must understand the natures of both science…

  3. Measuring Our Progress with Real Tools: Why Does Technology Work in Some Schools and Not in Others?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Bernajean

    This document is an outline of a presentation on measuring the impact of technology in schools. Highlights include: technology as a system lever; training and conducting audits in over 2,500 schools; Illinois NextSteps--organizing technology for student results; asking big questions of our technology investments; making instructional technology…

  4. Funding of Assistive Technology to Make Work a Reality, Part II: Using the Americans with Disabilities Act to Fund AT. Policy & Practice Brief #13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Ronald M.

    2004-01-01

    This is a continuation of "Funding of Assistive Technology to Make Work a Reality" (Work and AT), Article # 3 in this Policy and Practice Brief Series. This article will review the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), with a particular emphasis on how the ADA can be used to ensure that a person with a disability has access to…

  5. Is the Use of Information and Communication Technology Related to Performance in Working Memory Tasks? Evidence from Seventh-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Lucy; Nussbaum, Miguel; Preiss, David D.

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to assess whether seventh-grade students use of information and communication technology (ICT) was related to performance on working memory tasks. In addition, the study tested whether the relationship between ICT use and performance on working memory tasks interacted with seventh-grade students' socioeconomic…

  6. eHealth Technology Competencies for Health Professionals Working in Home Care to Support Older Adults to Age in Place: Outcomes of a Two-Day Collaborative Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Ansam; Woolrych, Ryan D; Sixsmith, Andrew; Kearns, William D

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for care is increasing, whereas in the near future the number of people working in professional care will not match with the demand for care. eHealth technology can help to meet the growing demand for care. Despite the apparent positive effects of eHealth technology, there are still barriers to technology adoption related to the absence of a composite set of knowledge and skills among health care professionals regarding the use of eHealth technology. Objective The objective of this paper is to discuss the competencies required by health care professionals working in home care, with eHealth technologies such as remote telecare and ambient assisted living (AAL), mobile health, and fall detection systems. Methods A two-day collaborative workshop was undertaken with academics across multiple disciplines with experience in working on funded research regarding the application and development of technologies to support older people. Results The findings revealed that health care professionals working in home care require a subset of composite skills as well as technology-specific competencies to develop the necessary aptitude in eHealth care. This paper argues that eHealth care technology skills must be instilled in health care professionals to ensure that technologies become integral components of future care delivery, especially to support older adults to age in place. Educating health care professionals with the necessary skill training in eHealth care will improve service delivery and optimise the eHealth care potential to reduce costs by improving efficiency. Moreover, embedding eHealth care competencies within training and education for health care professionals ensures that the benefits of new technologies are realized by casting them in the context of the larger system of care. These care improvements will potentially support the independent living of older persons at home. Conclusions This paper describes the health care professionals

  7. A fast Monte Carlo EM algorithm for estimation in latent class model analysis with an application to assess diagnostic accuracy for cervical neoplasia in women with AGC

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Le; Carter, Randy; Darcy, Kathleen; Kauderer, James; Liao, Shu-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    In this article we use a latent class model (LCM) with prevalence modeled as a function of covariates to assess diagnostic test accuracy in situations where the true disease status is not observed, but observations on three or more conditionally independent diagnostic tests are available. A fast Monte Carlo EM (MCEM) algorithm with binary (disease) diagnostic data is implemented to estimate parameters of interest; namely, sensitivity, specificity, and prevalence of the disease as a function of covariates. To obtain standard errors for confidence interval construction of estimated parameters, the missing information principle is applied to adjust information matrix estimates. We compare the adjusted information matrix based standard error estimates with the bootstrap standard error estimates both obtained using the fast MCEM algorithm through an extensive Monte Carlo study. Simulation demonstrates that the adjusted information matrix approach estimates the standard error similarly with the bootstrap methods under certain scenarios. The bootstrap percentile intervals have satisfactory coverage probabilities. We then apply the LCM analysis to a real data set of 122 subjects from a Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) study of significant cervical lesion (S-CL) diagnosis in women with atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance (AGC) to compare the diagnostic accuracy of a histology-based evaluation, a CA-IX biomarker-based test and a human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test. PMID:24163493

  8. Deviations from one-electron behavior in the Ag and Pd M4,5-VV Auger spectra of AgcPd1-c alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariot, J.-M.; Hague, C. F.; Dufour, G.

    1981-04-01

    A systematic investigation of the Ag and Pd M4,5-VV Auger spectra in the pure metals and in the AgcPd1-c(0.1<=c<=0.9) alloys is presented. The shape of the Auger spectra is discussed in relation to the values of the effective Coulomb interaction Ueff between the two holes present in the final state of the Auger transition and of the width W of the one-electron local densities of states as obtained from Lβ2,15 soft-x-ray emission bands. The Auger spectra of Ag in the metal and the alloys have a pronounced quasiatomic character, as can be expected from the Ueff2W ratio which is found to be close to unity. The Auger spectrum of pure Pd (Ueff2W~0.4) can be explained in terms of an atomic model in which strong band effects are present. For alloys with low-Pd content where Pd forms an impurity state, it is shown that final states other than the localized [4d2] two-hole state have to be invoked to explain the line shape.

  9. Understanding the Impact of New Technology on Life and Work. Secondary Learning Guide 12. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This competency-based secondary learning guide on understanding the impact of new technology is part of a series that are adaptations of guides developed for adult consumer and homemaking education programs. The guides provide students with experiences that help them learn to do the following: make decisions; use creative approaches to solve…

  10. Providing Low-Cost Information Technology Access to Rural Communities in Developing Countries: What Works? What Pays? OECD Development Centre Working Paper No. 229 (Formerly Webdoc No. 17)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caspary, Georg; O'Connor, David

    2003-01-01

    Rural areas of the developing world are the last frontier of the information technology revolution. Telephone and internet penetration there remains a small fraction of what it is in the developed world. Limited means of electronic communication with the outside world are just one source of isolation of rural communities and economies from the…

  11. McGraw Hill encyclopedia of science and technology. An international reference work in fifteen volumes including an index

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This extensively revised and updated 5th Edition features contributions by 3000 distinguished experts - including 16 Nobel Prize winners - working with an international advisory board and 60 consulting editors. Thorough coverage is devoted to 75 separate disciplines in science and technology, from acoustics and biochemistry through fluid mechanics and geophysics to thermodynamics and vertebrate zoology. Detailed entries examine not only the physical and natural sciences, but also all engineering disciplines, discussing both the basic and the most recent theories, concepts, terminology, discoveries, materials, methods, and techniques. All of the new developments and technical advances that have occurred during the last five years - in each of the 75 disciplines - have been added to the encyclopedia and are explored in depth. Completely new material deals with such timely and newsworthy subjects as genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, nuclear medicine, desertification, psycholinguistics, industrial robots, and immunoassay. Also covered in extensive entries are such current topics as video disk recording, metallic glasses, acoustic levitation, magnetic bubble memory, gluons, and computerized tomography. The encyclopedia includes more than 15,000 photographs, drawings, maps, charts, and diagrams, shown in full-color, two-color, or black-and-white reproductions.

  12. Capturing Nanotechnology's Current State of Development via Analysis of Patents. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers, 2007/4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igami, Masatsura; Okazaki, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    This analysis aims at capturing current inventive activities in nanotechnologies based on the analysis of patent applications to the European Patent Office (EPO). Reported findings include: (1) Nanotechnology is a multifaceted technology, currently consisting of a set of technologies on the nanometre scale rather than a single technological field;…

  13. Why We All Want It to Work: Towards a Culturally Based Model for Technology and Educational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Stephen T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores reasons why the use of technology in education may be so attractive to so many people. Two emerging perspectives--memetics, and the social history of technology--are explored, and a typology of technology-as-cultural-tool is presented. Finally, implications of these ideas for educational change are considered.

  14. Research on intelligent detection and processing technology of laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haili; Jiang, Huilin

    2005-01-01

    Aimed at the influence of turbulent atmosphere effect on laser pulse detection, it discusses the key factors that affect the signal test in this paper. Based on it, the article also discusses two key techniques, namely, floating threshold value and AGC (Automatic Gain Control) technology in detail, especially about the technique of floating threshold value. According to discussion about intelligent detection technology of laser pulse, the system designs a low noise detecting unit of laser pulse, tests its performance by the experiment, and validates correctness of the results.

  15. Modification of tobacco plant development by sense and antisense expression of the tomato viroid-induced AGC VIIIa protein kinase PKV suggests involvement in gibberellin signaling

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The serine-threonine protein kinase gene, designated pkv (protein kinase- viroid induced) was previously found to be transcriptionally activated in tomato plants infected with the plant pathogen Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). These plants exhibited symptoms of stunting, and abnormal development of leaf, root, and vascular tissues. The encoded protein, PKV, is a novel member of the AGC VIIIa group of signal-transducing protein kinases; however, the role of PKV in plant development is unknown. In this communication, we report the phenotypic results of over expression and silencing of pkv in transgenic tobacco. Results Over expression of pkv in Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi (tobacco) resulted in stunting, reduced root formation, and delay in flowering, phenotypes similar to symptoms of PSTVd infection of tomato. In addition, homozygous T2 tobacco plants over expressing PKV were male sterile. Antisense expression of pkv, on the other hand, resulted in plants that were taller than non-transformed plants, produced an increased number of flowers, and were fertile. Exogenous application of GA3 stimulated stem elongation in the stunted, sense-expressing plants. PKV sense and antisense expression altered transcript levels of GA biosynthetic genes and genes involved in developmental and signaling pathways, but not genes involved in salicylic acid- or jasmonic acid-dependent pathways. Our data provide evidence suggesting that PKV plays an important role in a GA signaling pathway that controls plant height and fertility. Conclusion We have found that the over expression of the tomato protein kinase PKV resulted in stunting, modified vascular tissue development, reduced root formation, and male sterility in tobacco, and we propose that PKV regulates plant development by functioning in critical signaling pathways involved in gibberellic acid metabolism. PMID:19689802

  16. Calcium-regulation of mitochondrial respiration maintains ATP homeostasis and requires ARALAR/AGC1-malate aspartate shuttle in intact cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Llorente-Folch, Irene; Rueda, Carlos B; Amigo, Ignacio; del Arco, Araceli; Saheki, Takeyori; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrústegui, Jorgina

    2013-08-28

    Neuronal respiration is controlled by ATP demand and Ca2+ but the roles played by each are unknown, as any Ca2+ signal also impacts on ATP demand. Ca2+ can control mitochondrial function through Ca2+-regulated mitochondrial carriers, the aspartate-glutamate and ATP-Mg/Pi carriers, ARALAR/AGC1 and SCaMC-3, respectively, or in the matrix after Ca2+ transport through the Ca2+ uniporter. We have studied the role of Ca2+ signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial respiration in intact mouse cortical neurons in basal conditions and in response to increased workload caused by increases in [Na+]cyt (veratridine, high-K+ depolarization) and/or [Ca2+]cyt (carbachol). Respiration in nonstimulated neurons on 2.5-5 mm glucose depends on ARALAR-malate aspartate shuttle (MAS), with a 46% drop in aralar KO neurons. All stimulation conditions induced increased OCR (oxygen consumption rate) in the presence of Ca2+, which was prevented by BAPTA-AM loading (to preserve the workload), or in Ca2+-free medium (which also lowers cell workload). SCaMC-3 limits respiration only in response to high workloads and robust Ca2+ signals. In every condition tested Ca2+ activation of ARALAR-MAS was required to fully stimulate coupled respiration by promoting pyruvate entry into mitochondria. In aralar KO neurons, respiration was stimulated by veratridine, but not by KCl or carbachol, indicating that the Ca2+ uniporter pathway played a role in the first, but not in the second condition, even though KCl caused an increase in [Ca2+]mit. The results suggest a requirement for ARALAR-MAS in priming pyruvate entry in mitochondria as a step needed to activate respiration by Ca2+ in response to moderate workloads. PMID:23986233

  17. Socio-Technical Systems Analysis and Manufacturing Technology: Addressing "Big Brother" and Computers in Blue-Collar Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, James C.

    For more than 80 years, jobs in the United States have been designed by people for others. For most of these years, the experts in job design have placed the production technology above the job holder in importance. Since the 1950s, many jobs have been redesigned around new, computer-based technology. Often, the net effect has been to make those…

  18. A review of contemporary work on the ethics of ambient assisted living technologies for people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Novitzky, Peter; Smeaton, Alan F; Chen, Cynthia; Irving, Kate; Jacquemard, Tim; O'Brolcháin, Fiachra; O'Mathúna, Dónal; Gordijn, Bert

    2015-06-01

    Ambient assisted living (AAL) technologies can provide assistance and support to persons with dementia. They might allow them the possibility of living at home for longer whilst maintaining their comfort and security as well as offering a way towards reducing the huge economic and personal costs forecast as the incidence of dementia increases worldwide over coming decades. However, the development, introduction and use of AAL technologies also trigger serious ethical issues. This paper is a systematic literature review of the on-going scholarly debate about these issues. More specifically, we look at the ethical issues involved in research and development, clinical experimentation, and clinical application of AAL technologies for people with dementia and related stakeholders. In the discussion we focus on: (1) the value of the goals of AAL technologies, (2) the special vulnerability of persons with dementia in their private homes, (3) the complex question of informed consent for the usage of AAL technologies. PMID:24942810

  19. Emergent Learning Practices in Globalizing Work: The Case of a Finnish-Chinese Project in a Finnish Technology Consulting Firm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toiviainen, Hanna; Lallimo, Jiri; Hong, Jianzhong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to analyze emergent learning practices for globalizing work through two research questions: "What are the conceptualizations of work represented by the Virtual Factory and how do they mediate globalizing work?" and "What is the potential of expansive learning efforts to expand conceptualizations towards the emergent…

  20. Bridging the Professional Digital Divide: Comparative Analysis of Technology Usage Behaviors across the Working Lifespan of Professional Social Workers: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, Aisha Ain

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research is the mandatory use of Computer Based Technology (CBT) with social work professionals. Such a study is important in order to investigate which determinants are essential for social workers 45 and older to achieve adoption of CBT. The membership list of the National Association of Social Workers provided access to…

  1. National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works, Meeting Number Five (New York, N.Y., April 1-2, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Copyright Office.

    At the fifth meeting of the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works (CONTU) the Information Industries Association sponsored a presentation on copyright issues related to data bases, computer programs, and microform composition. Presentations were made by representatives of Standard and Poors, the New York Times, IBM,…

  2. Embracing Complexity: Using Technology to Develop a Life-Long Learning Model for Non-Working Time in the Interdependent Homes for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, I-Tsun; Chen, Mei-Li

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to employ complexity theory as a theoretical framework and technology to facilitate the development of a life-long learning model for non-working time in the interdependent homes for adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). A "Shining Star Sustainable Action Project" of the ROC Foundation for Autistic Children and…

  3. Science Policy: A Working Glossary. Fourth Edition. Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Fifth Congress, Second Session. Committee Print.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddle, Franklin P., Ed.; Carlson, Elaine, Ed.

    Presented is the fourth edition of the Working Glossary on Science Policy, prepared by the Congressional Research Service for the Subcommittee on Science, Research and Technology in the House of Representatives. The purpose of the glossary is to facilitate communication between Congress and persons engaged in the study of science policy. This…

  4. Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  5. German-French strategy forum. Information technology. Report of the German working group production engineering 1984/1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stams, D.

    1985-11-01

    Production engineering activities in Germany and France, and the possibilities of cooperation are reported on. Robotics, CAD, and local area networks are discussed. Proposals for the European advanced technology program EUREKA are given.

  6. Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America

    MedlinePlus

    ... ESTD) Cognitive Accessibility (CA) Inclusive Fitness (IF) Adaptive Golf Cars (AGC) U.S. TAG Subgroup RESNA is a ... ESTD) Cognitive Accessibility (CA) Inclusive Fitness (IF) Adaptive Golf Cars (AGC) U.S. TAG Subgroup Knowledge Center Speech ...

  7. Human Resources in Science and Technology in India and the International Mobility of Highly Skilled Indians. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers, 2004/7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khadria, Binod

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides estimates of the stocks and flows of human resources in science and technology (HRST) in India, and their breakdown by education and occupation. Furthermore, the paper provides estimates of the number of highly skilled people moving to India and out of India during the 1990s, mainly to the United States. This part of the study…

  8. Focusing on Challenging Content and Practical Applications in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Studies in Middle Grades Schools, High Schools and Technology Centers. High Schools That Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Schools that give students access to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) studies are accomplishing several objectives: introducing students to higher-level academic and career studies, expanding project-based learning in the curriculum, enticing students to remain in school until graduation, and preparing students for…

  9. Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breakstone, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This column presents an interview with Nick Baker, Reference and Web Services librarian at Williams College. Baker has produced several films for and about the library profession. In 2007, he won an InfoTubey Award for Outstanding Library YouTube Productions for his work. In this interview, Baker shares his ideas and experiences about this…

  10. Student Attitudes towards and Use of ICT in Course Study, Work and Social Activity: A Technology Acceptance Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Rob; Thorpe, Mary; Conole, Grainne

    2012-01-01

    The increasing use of information and communication technology (ICT) in higher education has been explored largely in relation to student experience of coursework and university life. Students' lives and experience beyond the university have been largely unexplored. Research into student experience of ICT used a validated model--the technology…

  11. An Examination of the Career, Salary and Training Expectations of Information Technology Professionals Working in the Help Desk Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, William C.

    2013-01-01

    The Information Technology (IT) help desk positions serve as the gateway between the IT department and users. Although IT is one of the most employable job categories, and crucial for business, staffing these positions with properly trained and certified IT personnel and retaining them is a major challenge for IT help desk managers. What are the…

  12. Nurses' Perceptions of the Impact of Work Systems and Technology on Patient Safety during the Medication Administration Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher Gordon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines nurses' perceptions of the impacts of systems and technology utilized during the medication administration process on patient safety and the culture of medication error reporting. This exploratory research study was grounded in a model of patient safety based on Patricia Benner's Novice to Expert Skill…

  13. The Center for Learning Technologies in Urban Schools (LeTUS) Program[R]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "LeTUS" program is a three-year, project-based, technology-integrated middle school science curriculum for grades 6-8. The "LeTUS" program is composed of multiple units, each lasting between eight and ten weeks. Topics include global warming, water and air quality, force and motion, communicable diseases, and ecological systems. The units are…

  14. Making mLearning Work: Utilizing Mobile Technology for Active Exploration, Collaboration, Assessment, and Reflection in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Mercedes; Baird, Derek E.

    2007-01-01

    The convergence of mobile technologies into student-centered learning environments requires academic institutions to design new and more effective learning, teaching, and user experience strategies. In this article we share results from an mLearning design experiment and analysis from a student survey conducted at the National College of Ireland.…

  15. Delgado Community College/Sears-Roebuck Keeping America Working. Math, Science and Technology Summer Youth Enrichment Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado Community Coll., New Orleans, LA.

    Recognizing the need for better preparation of high school students in mathematics, science, and technology, Delgado Community College and the Orleans Parish School System entered into an agreement for the provision of a summer enrichment program for minority students in grades 7 through 9 who had exhibited average or above average abilities in…

  16. Highly Skilled Labour and International Mobility in South America. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers, 2004/10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrere, Rodolfo; Luchilo, Lucas; Raffo, Julio

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the main trends in respect of the supply of human resources in science and technology (HRST) in Latin America and the international mobility of its highly skilled labour. This will be done through the identification of potential data sources, followed by a presentation of indicators drawn from these sources. In addition, a…

  17. UNISIST Working Group on Technology of Systems Interconnection. Meeting (3rd, Quezon City, Philippines, October 17-20, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). General Information Programme.

    Participants in the meeting summarized in this report advised and made recommendations on appropriate activities and programs conducive to the development of cooperative networks and the exchange of information and experience in science and technology in the Asia Pacific Region. Invited in their personal capacity as experts, the 14 participants…

  18. The North/South Debate: Technology, Basic Human Needs and the New International Economic Order. Working Paper Number Twelve. 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtung, Johan

    This document contains two articles by Johan Galtung presented as papers at an international conference on the relationship of technology to the environment and human needs. The monograph is part of a series intended to stimulate research, education, dialogue, and political action toward a just world order. The first paper, "Towards a New…

  19. Conducting a University Career and Technical Education Degree Program through Multiple Technology Delivery Formats: A Working Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkle, Chris

    The Department of Industrial Technology Education (ITE) at Indiana State University offers approximately 20 courses per semester, split equally between undergraduate and graduate courses. Although all classes are offered on campus, almost half of the ITE courses are also taught using these three alternative simultaneous delivery methods: (1) for…

  20. Supported Employment and Assistive Technology for Persons with Spinal Cord Injury: Three Illustrations of Successful Work Supports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inge, Katherine J.; Wehman, Paul; Strobel, Wendy; Powell, Deanie; Todd, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    Case studies of three adults with spinal cord injury illustrate the role of assistive technology, employment specialists, and types of workplace supports needed to enable them to secure and maintain employment. Employment specialists are able to analyze accommodation needs and help employers understand them. (SK)

  1. Revolutionary/Unconventional Aeropropulsion Technology Evaluation through Thermodynamic Work Potential: A Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts Program Research Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri; Danner, Travis; Roth, Bryce

    2002-01-01

    This report is intended as a status report for activities covered May through July 2002 under the auspices of NASA Glenn's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts (RAC) project. This is the first phase I quarterly report and as such, considerable focus will be given to defining the basic need and motivation driving this research effort. In addition, background research has been ongoing for the past several months and has culminated in considerable information pertaining to the state-of-the-art in work potential analysis methods. This work is described in detail herein. Finally, the proposed analysis approach is described, as are the various ancillary concepts required for its implementation.

  2. Student Absences During Learning Cycle Phases: A Technological Alternative for Make-Up Work in Laboratory Based High School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marek, Edmund A.; Askey, David M.; Abraham, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    Absences from school present a major obstacle to students gaining understanding of concepts developed in class. Investigates an alternative procedure for making up missed class work: viewing a quasi-interactive videotaped presentation of missed portions of a learning cycle in chemistry. (Author/SAH)

  3. Strengthening Collaborative Work: Go beyond the Obvious with Tools for Technology-Enhanced Collaboration. Project-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Diane

    2004-01-01

    Collaborative work is the cornerstone of project-based learning, central to inquiry, research, organization, time and task management, design, reflection, feedback and revision, and public presentation. Some collaborations take place within a single classroom, some across classrooms in a district, some across the country or the globe. Within a…

  4. The Impact of a Working Conference Focused on Supporting Students with Disabilities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Stefanich, Greg P.; Boody, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of a two-day working conference on attitudes and dispositions of educators and other professionals who have a responsibility to students with disabilities. During this professional meeting, participants shared their experiences and suggested strategies to better educate students with sensory and mobility…

  5. Science Practical Work Instructional Technologies and Open Distance Learning in Science Teacher Training: A Case Study in Zimbabwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhukuvhani, Crispen; Mupa, Mathew; Mhishi, Misheck; Dziva, Daimond

    2012-01-01

    The practical work component offers unique challenges for university science courses. This is even more pertinent in an Open and Distance Learning (ODL) environment like the Bindura University of Science Education's Virtual and Open Distance Learning (VODL) programme. Effective ODL education should be flexible enough to accommodate science…

  6. Can Incineration Technology Convert CELSS Wastes to Resources for Crop Production ? A Working Hypothesis and some Preliminary Findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wignarajah, K.; Pisharody, S.; Fisher, J. W.

    Considerable evidence exists to support the hypothesis that human-generated wastes can be utilized as resources in crop production. In the waste mix from a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS), the elemental resources are found mainly in the solid fraction. In order to make these resources available for crop growth, it is necessary to convert the solid wastes to either an aqueous or a gaseous phase. Incineration is one method for processing solid wastes to produce a gaseous fraction and a small solid fraction of ash. Evidence from literature provides a compelling case for a working hypothesis that plants can utilize the gases of incineration. Although uptake and utilization of inorganic elements in the aqueous phase is well established, the uptake and utilization of inorganic elements in the gaseous phase, with the exception of CO2 and O2, is not fully understood. This paper attempts to (a) summarize existing literature on uptake/metabolism of inorganic elements in the gaseous fraction, with the exception of CO2 and O2 and (b) develop a working hypothesis to predict the use of incineration flue gases by plants. Preliminary experimental findings on effects of carbon monoxide, a component of the flue gas, are also presented

  7. UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN ROBOTICS, TECHNOLOGIES FOR MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS IN DIRECTED STOCKPILE WORK RADIATION AND ENGINEERING CAMPAIGNS - 2005-06 FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    James S. Tulenko; Dean Schoenfeld; David Hintenlang; Carl Crane; Shannon Ridgeway; Jose Santiago; Charles Scheer

    2006-11-30

    The research performed by the University of Florida (UF) is directed to the development of technologies that can be utilized at a micro-scale in varied environments. Work is focused on micro-scale energy systems, visualization, and mechanical devices. This work will impact the NNSA need related to micro-assembly operations. The URPR activities are executed in a University environment, yet many applications of the resulting technologies may be classified or highly restrictive in nature. The NNSA robotics technologists apply an NNSA needs focus to the URPR research, and actively work to transition relevant research into the deployment projects in which they are involved. This provides a “Research to Development to Application” structure within which innovative research has maximum opportunity for impact without requiring URPR researchers to be involved in specific NNSA projects. URPR researchers need to be aware of the NNSA applications in order to ensure the research being conducted has relevance, the URPR shall rely upon the NNSA sites for direction.

  8. Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location, Location, Location

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Paul; Selman, Nancy; Volpe, Anthony Della; Moss, Deborah; Mobley, Rick; Dickey, Halley; Unruh, Jeffery; Hitchcock, Chris; Tanguay, Jasmine; Butler, Steven; Stacey, Robert; Robertson-Tait, Ann; Pruess, Karsten; Gutoski, Greg; Fay, Jamie M.; Stitzer, John T.; Oglesby, Ken

    2012-04-30

    Substantial unexploited opportunity exists for the US, and the world, in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). As a result of US DOE investment, new drilling technology, new power generation equipment and cycles enable meaningful power production, in a compact and modular fashion; at lower and lower top side EGS working fluid temperatures and in a broader range of geologies and geographies. This cost analysis effort supports the expansion of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), furthering DOE strategic themes of energy security and sub goal of energy diversity; reducing the Nation's dependence on foreign oil while improving the environment.

  9. On A Project Work for International Students Paired with Japanese Partners in a Summer Intensive Japanese Program for Science and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudano, Hiroko

    A project work in which learners of a foreign language engage in a task with the native speakers is one of the effective ways to bring in ample real communication opportunities to a classroom. This scheme also gives both parties meaningful experiences for intercultural understanding. This paper reports a “Pythagoras” machine production project in which international students were paired up with Japanese students as a part of a Japanese for science and technology course in a summer intensive program. Based on the participants‧ course evaluation data, the paper also discusses the effectiveness of the project for Japanese language learning and for promoting intercultural understanding.

  10. Computer architectures for computational physics work done by Computational Research and Technology Branch and Advanced Computational Concepts Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Slides are reproduced that describe the importance of having high performance number crunching and graphics capability. They also indicate the types of research and development underway at Ames Research Center to ensure that, in the near term, Ames is a smart buyer and user, and in the long-term that Ames knows the best possible solutions for number crunching and graphics needs. The drivers for this research are real computational physics applications of interest to Ames and NASA. They are concerned with how to map the applications, and how to maximize the physics learned from the results of the calculations. The computer graphics activities are aimed at getting maximum information from the three-dimensional calculations by using the real time manipulation of three-dimensional data on the Silicon Graphics workstation. Work is underway on new algorithms that will permit the display of experimental results that are sparse and random, the same way that the dense and regular computed results are displayed.

  11. Survey of trends and approaches of the works related to the Information and Communication Technologies presented at the XIX National Symposium on Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes de Macêdo, Josué; Soares Pedroso, Luciano; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Teixeira de Araújo, Mauro Sérgio

    2014-04-01

    In this study, an investigation of 231 articles of the oral communication sections presented at the National Symposium on Physics Teaching (NSPT) was conducted, trying to identify those related to Information and Communication Technology (ICT), its form of organization, the involved thematic areas and the degree of teaching, allowing to compare the different perspectives and trends in this field. The conducted state of the art-study had a bibliographical character and qualitative contours involving content analysis. It was realized that the thematic area "Information technology, technology diffusion and Physics teaching", where most of the research related to ICT is concentrated, represent 11.7% of the total number of papers at the XIX NSPT, confirming a trend of research in this area. It was found, among other things, the predominance of studies where learning objects are used in Physics Education, especially in High School and University Education; the use of ICT in multidisciplinary work and that some features need to be further explored, such as thermodynamics. It was also noted an expressive amount of studies involving the use of ICT in teacher training proposals, which can contribute to the enlargement of the methodological options of teachers and meet their training needs.

  12. Work demands and health consequences of organizational and technological measures introduced to enhance the quality of home care services--A subgroup analysis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Gunn Robstad; Bendal, Synne; Westgaard, Rolf H

    2015-11-01

    This study of home care workers in a Norwegian municipality aimed to examine the effect of two measures involving organizational (job checklists) and technological (personal digital assistants) job aids on perceived work demands and musculoskeletal health. Questionnaire data was collected in 2009 (n = 138, response rate 76.2%) and 2011 (n = 80, response rate 54%). Forty-six home care workers responded at both waves. Respondents were assigned into 'high', 'moderate' and 'low' strain groups based on their responses to open and closed survey questions regarding impact of the two measures. One-way ANOVA with post-hoc t-tests and regression analyses investigated group differences and examined development in variables. Perceived work demands and health effects over the two-year study period were unchanged overall, yet significant differences between subgroups were highlighted. Work demands and shoulder-neck pain remained high for high-strain workers, but were reduced for low and moderate strain workers. Management should be aware of diversity in worker responses to rationalizations and give priority to supplementary, targeted measures to counteract adverse effects. PMID:26154215

  13. Swamp Works: A New Approach to Develop Space Mining and Resource Extraction Technologies at the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. P.; Sibille, L.; Leucht, K.; Smith, J. D.; Townsend, I. I.; Nick, A. J.; Schuler, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The first steps for In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on target bodies such as the Moon, Mars and Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), and even comets, involve the same sequence of steps as in the terrestrial mining of resources. First exploration including prospecting must occur, and then the resource must be acquired through excavation methods if it is of value. Subsequently a load, haul and dump sequence of events occurs, followed by processing of the resource in an ISRU plant, to produce useful commodities. While these technologies and related supporting operations are mature in terrestrial applications, they will be different in space since the environment and indigenous materials are different than on Earth. In addition, the equipment must be highly automated, since for the majority of the production cycle time, there will be no humans present to assist or intervene. This space mining equipment must withstand a harsh environment which includes vacuum, radical temperature swing cycles, highly abrasive lofted dust, electrostatic effects, van der Waals forces effects, galactic cosmic radiation, solar particle events, high thermal gradients when spanning sunlight terminators, steep slopes into craters / lava tubes and cryogenic temperatures as low as 40 K in permanently shadowed regions. In addition the equipment must be tele-operated from Earth or a local base where the crew is sheltered. If the tele-operation occurs from Earth then significant communications latency effects mandate the use of autonomous control systems in the mining equipment. While this is an extremely challenging engineering design scenario, it is also an opportunity, since the technologies developed in this endeavor could be used in the next generations of terrestrial mining equipment, in order to mine deeper, safer, more economical and with a higher degree of flexibility. New space technologies could precipitate new mining solutions here on Earth. The NASA KSC Swamp Works is an innovation

  14. A review of radio frequency identification technology for the anatomic pathology or biorepository laboratory: Much promise, some progress, and more work needed

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jerry J.; Andrechak, Gary; Riben, Michael; Yong, William H.

    2011-01-01

    biorepository laboratories could avoid or mitigate the “islands of data” dilemma presented by barcode usage where there are innumerable standards and a consequent paucity of hardware or software “plug and play” interoperability. Work remains to be done to establish the durability and appropriate shielding of individual tag types for use in harsh laboratory environmental conditions, and for long-term archival storage. Finally, given the requirements for long-term storage of biospecimen assets, consideration should be given to ways of mitigating data isolation due to eventual technological obsolescence of a particular RFID technology or software. PMID:21886890

  15. A review of radio frequency identification technology for the anatomic pathology or biorepository laboratory: Much promise, some progress, and more work needed.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jerry J; Andrechak, Gary; Riben, Michael; Yong, William H

    2011-01-01

    biorepository laboratories could avoid or mitigate the "islands of data" dilemma presented by barcode usage where there are innumerable standards and a consequent paucity of hardware or software "plug and play" interoperability. Work remains to be done to establish the durability and appropriate shielding of individual tag types for use in harsh laboratory environmental conditions, and for long-term archival storage. Finally, given the requirements for long-term storage of biospecimen assets, consideration should be given to ways of mitigating data isolation due to eventual technological obsolescence of a particular RFID technology or software. PMID:21886890

  16. Teaching Planetary Sciences with the Master in Space Science and Technology at Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU: Theory and Practice works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.

    2012-10-01

    The Master in Space Science and Technology is a postgraduate course at the Universidad del País Vasco in Spain (http://www.ehu.es/aula-espazio/master.html). It has two elective itineraries on space studies: scientific and technological. The scientific branch is intended for students aiming to access the PhD doctorate program in different areas of space science, among them the research of the solar system bodies. The theoretical foundations for the solar system studies are basically treated in four related matters: Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics of the Solar System, Planetary Atmospheres, and Image Processing and Data Analysis. The practical part is developed on the one hand by analyzing planetary images obtained by different spacecrafts from public archives (e. g. PDS), and on the other hand from observations obtained by the students employing the 50 cm aperture telescope and other smaller telescopes from the Aula EspaZio Gela Observatory at the Engineering Faculty. We present the scheme of the practice works realized at the telescope to get images of the planets in different wavelengths pursuing to study the following aspects of Planetary Atmospheres: (1) Data acquisition; (2) Measurements of cloud motions to derive winds; (3) Measurement of the upper cloud reflectivity at the different wavelengths and position in the disk to retrieve the upper cloud properties and vertical structure. The theoretical foundations accompanying these practices are then introduced: atmospheric dynamics and thermodynamics, and the radiative transfer problem. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by Departamento de Promoción Económica of Diputación Foral Bizkaia through a grant to Aula EspaZio Gela at E.T.S. Ingeniería (Bilbao, Spain).

  17. Polysomnographic Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACCREDITATION MENTOR | TAKE THE SITE VISITOR QUIZ Polysomnographic Technology Occupational Description Polysomnographic technologists perform sleep tests and work with physicians to provide information needed ...

  18. Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (UseIT): Preparing Students for the Twenty-First Century Work Force via a Multidisciplinary and Collaborative Learning Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degroot, R. M.; Jordan, T. H.; Benthien, M. L.; Ihrig, M.; Berti, R.

    2009-12-01

    UseIT is one of the three undergraduate research programs sponsored by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). The program allows students to work in multi-disciplinary collaborative teams to tackle a scientific “Grand Challenge.” The topic varies each year but it always entails performing computer science research that is needed by earthquake scientists, educators, and other target audiences. The program allows undergraduates to use the advanced tools of information technology to solve important problems in interdisciplinary earthquake research. Since the program began in 2002, 145 students have participated in UseIT. The program stresses problem solving and interdisciplinary cross training. A key aspect of the UseIT program is its flexible, yet structured, team approach. Students share their diverse skills and interests, creating a powerful synergy through this peer mentoring. The majority of UseIT interns have considerable computer science skill or aptitude, but successful UseIT interns have hailed from nearly three-dozen disciplines, all class levels, and all skill levels. Successful UseIT interns have in common a willingness to step outside their comfort zones and try new things. During the 2009 internship the focus of the program was to deliver SCEC Virtual Display of Objects (VDO) images and animations of faults and earthquake sequences to SCEC, the Earthquake Country Alliance, and other virtual organizations via a content management system that captures the metadata and guides the user. SCEC-VDO is the SCEC intern-developed visualization software that allows the user to see earthquake related phenomena in three and four dimensions. The 2009 Grand Challenge had special relevance for the interns because the products they created were used for The Great California ShakeOut. This talk will discuss lessons learned from this program, how it addresses the needs of the 21st century STEM work force, and highlights of the 2009 internship.

  19. The Role of Technology in Higher Education in North America: Policy Implication. Understanding the Differences. A Working Paper Series on Higher Education in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Working Paper Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Glen; Johnstone, Sally; Lopez del Puerto, Patricio

    This paper describes the current policies and initiatives regarding the application of technology in Canada, Mexico and the United States. It also analyzes the need for policy development regarding technological networks, equipment, and educational content. The report also includes recommendations regarding specific initiatives for tri-national…

  20. Technology Survey to Support Revision to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200­-SW­-2 Operable Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.; Nimmons, Michael J.

    2007-09-01

    A survey of technologies was conducted to provide information for a Data Quality Objectives process being conducted to support revision of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-SW-2 Operable Unit. The technology survey considered remediation and characterization technologies. This effort was conducted to address, in part, comments on the previous version of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-SW-2 Operable Unit as documented in 200­SW­1 and 200­SW­2 Collaborative Workshops-Agreement, Completion Matrix, and Supporting Documentation. By providing a thorough survey of remediation and characterization options, this report is intended to enable the subsequent data quality objectives and work plan revision processes to consider the full range of potential alternatives for planning of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study activities.

  1. The Creative Application of Science, Technology and Work Force Innovations to the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Plutonium Finishing Plant at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Charboneau, S.; Klos, B.; Heineman, R.; Skeels, B.; Hopkins, A.

    2006-07-01

    's approach to overcome these challengers are described. Many of the challenges to the D and D work at PFP were met with innovative approaches based on new science and/or technology and many were also based on the creativity and motivation of the work force personnel. (authors)

  2. THE CREATIVE APPLICATION OF SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & WORK FORCE INNOVATIONS TO THE D&D OF PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    SciTech Connect

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01

    described. Many of the challenges to the D&D work at PFP were met with innovative approaches based on new science and/or technology and many were also based on the creativity and motivation of the work force personnel.

  3. Technology Night.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPont, Albert P.

    1998-01-01

    A Maryland elementary school enlightened parents and community members about school technology by hosting a technology night showcasing student work. Through staff and community members' cooperative efforts, the technology committee created a comprehensive program composed of several elements: student involvement, district vision,…

  4. Podcasting as Transformative Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez, Vivian Maria

    2015-01-01

    Although technology is most often heralded an intrinsic efficiency, the process of using technology to create a text is full of opportunities to learn new information, create and distribute knowledge, and engage in identity work. This article explores how the production of 1 such technological text, a podcast, offered students opportunities to…

  5. Ultra-stable optical amplifier technologies for dynamic optical switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Tsang, K. S.; Man, R.; Puttnam, B. J.; Awaji, Y.; Wada, N.

    2015-01-01

    High-capacity fiber-optic communications are promising technologies to satisfy people's continuously growing demands for bandwidth hungry data services. Multi-wavelength optical circuit switching (OCS) technology is already widely deployed, however, with the limited number of transceivers equipped at each optical node and other constraints, the number of lightpaths which can be established and employed simultaneously in an optical network is restricted. This reduces the utilization efficiency of wavelength resources. Comparing to OCS, dynamic optical switching systems such as optical packet switching (OPS) offer higher efficiency in terms of wavelength resource utilization and have the potential to share more of the wavelength resources on fiber-links between larger numbers of users simultaneously. In such networks, bursty input signals or changes in traffic density may cause optical power surges that can damage optical components or impose gain transients on the signals that impair signal quality. A common approach for reducing gain transients is to employ electrical automatic gain control (AGC) or optical gain-clamping by optical feedback (OFB). AGC may be limited by the speed of the feedback circuit and result in additional transients. Meanwhile OFB can clamp the gain of power varying optical signals without transient but can introduce amplitude fluctuations caused by relaxation oscillations in the lasing cavity for large input power fluctuations. We propose and demonstrate a novel scheme for suppressing the power transients and the relaxation oscillations. This scheme can be utilized in optical amplifiers even if the optical feedback is employed.

  6. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working Group Summary. 5: Propulsion (P-1). A. Summary Statement. B. Technology Needs (Form 1). C. Priority Assessments (Form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    All themes require some form of advanced propulsion capabilities to achieve their stated objectives. Requirements cover a broad spectrum ranging from a new generation of heavy lift launch vehicles to low thrust, long lift system for on-orbit operations. The commonality extant between propulsive technologies was established and group technologies were grouped into vehicle classes by functional capability. The five classes of launch vehicles identified by the space transportation theme were augmented with a sixth class, encompassing planetary and on-orbit operations. Propulsion technologies in each class were then ranked, and assigned priority numbers. Prioritized technologies were matched to theme requirements.

  7. WWC Review of the Report "Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 study, "Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-Up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies," examined the effects of "Technology-enhanced, Research-based, Instruction, Assessment, and professional Development (TRIAD)," a math intervention for preschoolers that combines a curriculum, a…

  8. Work Out at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise into your busy work day. Find 10-minute workout breaks throughout the day. There are a variety of strength, balance, and flexibility exercises you can do right at your desk. The Go4Life website has easy-to-follow directions for all of ...

  9. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 2: Data handling, communications (E-2). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Technologies required to support the stated OAST thrust to increase information return by X1000, while reducing costs by a factor of 10 are identified. The most significant driver is the need for an overall end-to-end data system management technology. Maximum use of LSI component technology and trade-offs between hardware and software are manifest in most all considerations of technology needs. By far, the greatest need for data handling technology was identified for the space Exploration and Global Services themes. Major advances are needed in NASA's ability to provide cost effective mass reduction of space data, and automated assessment of earth looking imagery, with a concomitant reduction in cost per useful bit. A combined approach embodying end-to-end system analysis, with onboard data set selection, onboard data processing, highly parallel image processing (both ground and space), low cost, high capacity memories, and low cost user data distribution systems would be necessary.

  10. OAST Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 8: Structures, dynamics (M-2). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessments (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A technology program on large space structures was defined to respond to common need perceived for five of the six themes. Greatly expanded power, facilities, and communications/sensing requirements appear to demand a new structures technology for construction in space. Requirements to construct huge structural arrays with precision surfaces in space will need creative research efforts to identify practical structural elements and construction techniques. Requirements for advanced transportation structures were defined to respond to the space transportation theme. Because of the criticality of thermal structures to achieve lower cost transportation systems, renewed emphasis on technology in this area is recommended. A second technology needing renewed emphasis is the area of recovery and landing technology structures to permit full reuse of launch vehicle propulsion elements.

  11. Species detection using HyBeacon(®) probe technology: Working towards rapid onsite testing in non-human forensic and food authentication applications.

    PubMed

    Dawnay, Nick; Hughes, Rebecca; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Duxbury, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Identifying individual species or determining species' composition in an unknown sample is important for a variety of forensic applications. Food authentication, monitoring illegal trade in endangered species, forensic entomology, sexual assault case work and counter terrorism are just some of the fields that can require the detection of the biological species present. Traditional laboratory based approaches employ a wide variety of tools and technologies and exploit a number of different species specific traits including morphology, molecular differences and immuno-chemical analyses. A large number of these approaches require laboratory based apparatus and results can take a number of days to be returned to investigating authorities. Having a presumptive test for rapid identification could lead to savings in terms of cost and time and allow sample prioritisation if confirmatory testing in a laboratory is required later. This model study describes the development of an assay using a single HyBeacon(®) probe and melt curve analyses allowing rapid screening and authentication of food products labelled as Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Exploiting melt curve detection of species specific SNP sites on the COI gene the test allows detection of a target species (Atlantic cod) and closely related species which may be used as substitutes. The assay has been designed for use with the Field Portable ParaDNA system, a molecular detection platform for non-expert users. The entire process from sampling to result takes approximately 75min. Validation studies were performed on both single source genomic DNA, mixed genomic DNA and commercial samples. Data suggests the assay has a lower limit of detection of 31 pg DNA. The specificity of the assay to Atlantic cod was measured by testing highly processed food samples including frozen, defrosted and cooked fish fillets as well as fish fingers, battered fish fillet and fish pie. Ninety-six (92.7%) of all Atlantic cod food products

  12. System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles: Moderate lift/drag (0.75-1.5). Volume 3: Cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary, phase 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Technology payoffs of representative ground based (Phase 1) and space based (Phase 2) mid lift/drag ratio aeroassisted orbit transfer vehicles (AOTV) were assessed and prioritized. A narrative summary of the cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary for both study phases is presented. Costs were estimated using the Grumman Space Programs Algorithm for Cost Estimating (SPACE) computer program and results are given for four AOTV configurations. The work breakdown structure follows the standard of the joint government/industry Space Systems Cost Analysis Group (SSCAG). A table is provided which shows cost estimates for each work breakdown structure element.

  13. Work of the cosmonaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demin, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    The necessity for the cosmonaut to receive broad training in many fields in order to carry out his multifaceted work is discussed. The work includes: scientific research, engineering, operator's work, participation in technical commissions and councils, training on simulators, and the study of technology and sports.

  14. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 4: Software (E-4). A. Summary. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Only a few efforts are currently underway to develop an adequate technology base for the various themes. Particular attention must be given to software commonality and evolutionary capability, to increased system integrity and autonomy; and to improved communications among the program users, the program developers, and the programs themselves. There is a need for quantum improvement in software development methods and increasing the awareness of software by all concerned. Major thrusts identified include: (1) data and systems management; (2) software technology for autonomous systems; (3) technology and methods for improving the software development process; (4) advances related to systems of software elements including their architecture, their attributes as systems, and their interfaces with users and other systems; and (5) applications of software including both the basic algorithms used in a number of applications and the software specific to a particular theme or discipline area. The impact of each theme on software is assessed.

  15. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 9: Aerothermodynamics (M-3). A: Statement. B: Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2). D. Additional assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Twelve aerothermodynamic space technology needs were identified to reduce the design uncertainties in aerodynamic heating and forces experienced by heavy lift launch vehicles, orbit transfer vehicles, and advanced single stage to orbit vehicles for the space transportation system, and for probes, planetary surface landers, and sample return vehicles for solar system exploration vehicles. Research and technology needs identified include: (1) increasing the fluid dynamics capability by at least two orders of magnitude by developing an advanced computer processor for the solution of fluid dynamic problems with improved software; (2) predicting multi-engine base flow fields for launch vehicles; and (3) developing methods to conserve energy in aerothermodynamic ground test facilities.

  16. Is There a Skills Crisis? Trends in Job Skill Requirements, Technology, and Wage Inequality in the United States. Working Paper No. 295.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Michael

    Many economists and policymakers believe that the growth in inequality in the last 2 decades reflects mostly an imbalance between the demand for and the supply of employee skills driven by technological change, particularly the spread of computers. However, the empirical basis for this belief is not strong. The growth in inequality was…

  17. Technology Programs That Work. A National Diffusion Network Resource of Exemplary Programs Approved by the Joint Dissemination Review Panel, Department of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Larry, Ed.

    This report presents brief descriptions of exemplary programs validated by the National Diffusion Network (NDN) and approved for national dissemination by the Joint Dissemination Review Panel, which focus specifically on the effective use of technology in education. As exemplary projects called Developer Demonstrators, 12 of the programs described…

  18. What Does Human Capital Do? A Review of Goldin and Katz's "The Race between Education and Technology". NBER Working Paper No. 17820

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acemoglu, Daron; Autor, David

    2012-01-01

    Goldin and Katz's "The Race between Education and Technology" is a monumental achievement that supplies a unified framework for interpreting how the demand and supply of human capital have shaped the distribution of earnings in the U.S. labor market over the 20th century. This essay reviews the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of this work…

  19. India's Information Technology Sector: What Contribution to Broader Economic Development? OECD Development Centre Working Paper, No. 207 (Formerly Technical Paper No. 207)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2003-01-01

    What contribution can information technology (IT) make to India's overall economic development? This paper provides an analytical framework centred around the concepts of comparative advantage, complementarities, and innovation. There is strong evidence that India has a strong and sustainable comparative advantage in software development and…

  20. Touch the Future: Discovering Abilities through Technology for Living, Learning, Working and Playing. Southeast Regional Conference (3rd, Atlanta, Georgia, April 10-12, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Human Resources, Atlanta. Div. of Rehabilitation Services.

    This packet of materials was originally intended for participants in a 1991 conference on assistive technology for the disabled. After a detailed listing of the conference schedule, individual sections provide abstracts, biographical sketches, and summaries concerning the following conference topics: blending, computer labs, family, grants and…

  1. Creative and Computational Thinking in the Context of New Literacies: Working with Teachers to Scaffold Complex Technology-Mediated Approaches to Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSchryver, Michael D.; Yadav, Aman

    2015-01-01

    For too long, creativity in schools has been almost solely associated with art, music, and writing classes. Now, creative thinking skills are increasingly emphasized across the disciplines. At the same time, technological progress has brought about calls for the integration of new literacies and computational thinking to prepare students as…

  2. I Can Soar: How Technology Helps Students Take Off. A Resource Kit for Parents, Educators, and School Administrators Who Work with Students Who Have Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruner, Allison; Fleming, Erin; Bradley, Carl; Diamond, Christina M.; Ruedel, Kristin L. A.; Saunders, Jessica; Paulsen, Christine; McInerney, Maurice

    This resource kit includes the following: Executive Summary; Legal Fact Sheet; Resource Guide; 26-minute "I Can Soar" Videotape; Video User's Guide; and Stories of Students Featured in Video. The materials provide tips to hep guide consumers in better integrating assistive technology (AT) within effective programs and services for children with…

  3. A Case Study on the Impacts of Connective Technology on Self-Efficacy and Self-Regulated Learning of Female Adult Students Managing Work-Life Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheetz, Tracey L.

    2014-01-01

    Adults frequently define their lives as "hectic" and "overextended;" yet, many make the decision to return to school and add the role of student into their busy lives. This research study explored and explained the impact of connective technology on self-efficacy and self-regulated learning of female adult students balancing…

  4. Technology Push

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2008-01-01

    When students, teachers, administrators and others employed in education arrive at work every day on thousands of campuses across the nation, it should come as no surprise that at every step along the way, technology is there to greet them. Technological advancements in education, as well as in facilities operation and management, are not a…

  5. Failsafe: Women at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCants, Louise S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes women's course-taking patterns and their resultant underrepresentation in skilled trades, technologies, and sciences. Considers the effects of value systems and conditioning on women's perceptions of work and success. Analyzes the lack of synchronization between traditional value systems and technological change in terms. Describes three…

  6. Making the market right for environmentally sound energy-efficient technologies: US buildings sector successes that might work in developing countries and Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

    1991-12-01

    Between 1973 and 1985, when energy prices were high, all Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries improved their E/GNP by about 2.5% annually. Increased energy efficiency accounted for 2/3rds of this improvement; the remaining portion was due to structural changes in the economy. In the US, analytic and policy tools that have successfully promoted energy efficiency include integrated resource planning, energy use labels, energy use standards, ``Golden Carrot`` incentive programs, and revenue-neutral ``feebates.`` In addition, a number of low cost, environmentally sound, energy-efficient technologies, such as electronic ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows, have recently been developed. We discuss how many of these policies and technologies are probably exportable to developing countries and Eastern Europe, giving examples of successful starts in India, the ASEAN countries, and Brazil.

  7. Amplifying Learning through Sites of Pedagogical Practice: A Possible Effect of Working with Disciplinary Technologies in Schools Operating under Adverse Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Debra

    2005-01-01

    Schools located within communities experiencing high levels of social dislocation, educational disadvantage and student disengagement from learning are working under "adverse conditions". These schools face particular challenges when it comes to stabilising and sustaining wholeschool change aimed at improving students' learning outcomes. In this…

  8. Moving to Their Own Beat: Exploring How Students Use Web 2.0 Technologies to Support Group Work outside of Class Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Norman; Nickle, Todd; Silovs, Jim; Zimmer, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, researchers have consistently reported that, regardless of the subject matter, students working in small groups tend to learn more of what is taught and retain it longer than when the same content is presented in other instructional formats (Beckman, 1990; Chickering & Gamson, 1991). The majority of these research studies have…

  9. Using Technology to Facilitate the Accreditation of Prior and Experiential Learning in Developing Personalised Work-Based Learning Programmes. A Case Study Involving the University of Derby, UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haldane, Andrew; Wallace, John

    2009-01-01

    This article recognises the well-established processes available to educators for the validation of competence, however acquired, and suggests that these mechanisms could be deployed more frequently in future. This proposition is based on employers' adoption of work-based learning strategies that focus on learning outcomes rather than on…

  10. An Emerging Knowledge-Based Economy in China? Indicators from OECD Databases. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers, 2004/4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criscuolo, Chiara; Martin, Ralf

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this Working Paper is to show a set of indicators on the knowledge-based economy for China, mainly compiled from databases within EAS, although data from databases maintained by other parts of the OECD are included as well. These indicators are put in context by comparison with data for the United States, Japan and the EU (or…

  11. Improving Transition from the Middle Grades to High School and from High Schools and Technology Centers to Further Study and Careers. High Schools That Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Every step in a student's life is important for future success. Schools are building stronger frameworks of curricula, instruction and assessments to prepare students to move from one learning environment to another with maximum results as they journey toward adulthood. This issue of "High Schools That Work" contains examples of "best practices"…

  12. Status of the AGC Booster project

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    To meet the needs of new experiments in high energy and nuclear physics, a rapid-cycling Booster for the AGS has been under construction at Brookhaven. For each mode of operation there are corresponding accelerator physics and design issues that need special attention. Problems pertinent to any single mode of operation have been encountered and solved before, but putting high intensity proton requirements and high vacuum heavy ion requirements into one machine demands careful design considerations and decisions. The lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed. Major design issues will be discussed and design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. And finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 7: Material (M-1). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The approach of matching technology areas with various themes needs was not effective for the materials and thermal control discipline because of the diversity of requirements for each. Top priorities were evolved from the advanced space transportation system and the space power platform because these are essential building blocks in fulfilling some of the other themes. Important needs identified include life long-life cryogenic cooling systems for sensors, masers, and other devices and the needs for lightweight nuclear shielding materials for nuclear electric propulsion.

  14. Predictors of Team Work Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlyn-Harris, James H.; Hurst, Barbara J.; von Baggo, Karola; Bayley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to work in teams is an attribute highly valued by employers of information technology (IT) graduates. For IT students to effectively engage in team work tasks, the process of working in teams should be satisfying for the students. This work explored whether university students who were involved in compulsory team work were satisfied…

  15. Aspect on Research Works of Late Years Contributed to the Industrial Development of a New Trend in Chilling and Freezing Technology of Meat in Oversea Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shunro

    Author presents his review paper on a noticeable trend of late years in meat refrigeration characterizing in three technological concerns such as increase of operation efficiency in chilling and freezing which result in substantial reduction of energy consumption, improvement in meat tenderness and re-examination of the currently available T. T. T. data for frozen meat storage. He considers from industrial point of view that the new trend has been much encouraged by many research papers so far published treating three topics as follows ;1) removal of meat from unchilled carcass (hot boning) which saves time and energy used for operation and helps a concomitant reasonable reduction of refrigeration facilities, 2) electrical stimulation of carcass in order to protect meat from adverse toughening due to cold shortening and 3) processing-induced changes in frozen storage life of meat. And he makes a brief comment on each topic to elucidate its technological or economical significance and gives a review of relevant studies abroad, citing abstracts of many papers from IIR Bulletin and International Journal of Refrigeration issued in last two or three years.

  16. Working Out Works for Shawn Kelly | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer When Shawn Kelly found out last year that he had high blood pressure, he was determined to do something about it. Luckily for Kelly, an instrumentation technician III, Facilities Maintenance and Engineering, he works at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), where he can take advantage of the gym there, known as the Wellness Center.

  17. Effect of Soederberg smelting technology, anode paste composition, and work shift on the relationship between benzo(a)pyrene and individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Eric G. Sanderson; Peter J. Kelly; Jean-Pierre Farant

    2005-02-01

    This follow-up of the Farant and Gariepy study investigates the relationship between benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in coal tar pitch volatiles in two types of Soederberg aluminum smelters horizontal and vertical stud. The study confirms the strong relationships between B(a)P and total PAHs, and that B(a)P was a good indicator for other PAHs in this industry. The PAH profiles were consistent within each smelter, but the smelter technology used and the changes in the raw material formulation resulted in significantly different profiles. B(a)P toxic equivalency factors for emitted PAH mixtures were greater in the horizontal stud smelter than in the vertical stud smelter. Overall, this study illustrates the potential usefulness of B(a)P relative abundance ratios to simplify exposure assessment in the workplace and reduce associated costs.

  18. Effect of Söderberg smelting technology, anode paste composition, and work shift on the relationship between benzo[a]pyrene and individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Eric; Kelly, Peter; Farant, Jean-Pierre

    2005-02-01

    This follow-up study of Farant and Gariepy study investigates the relationship between benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in coal tar pitch volatiles in two types of Soderberg aluminum smelters-horizontal and vertical stud. The study confirms the strong relationships between B[a]P and total PAHs, and that B[a]P was a good indicator for other PAHs in this industry. The PAH profiles were consistent within each smelter, but the smelter technology used and the changes in the raw material formulation resulted in significantly different profiles. B[a]P toxic equivalency factors for emitted PAH mixtures were greater in the horizontal stud smelter than in the vertical stud smelter. Overall, this study illustrates the potential usefulness of B[a]P relative abundance ratios to simplify exposure assessment in the workplace and reduce associated costs. PMID:15764526

  19. `It didn't really change my opinion': exploring what works, what doesn't and why in a school science, technology, engineering and mathematics careers intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Louise; DeWitt, Jennifer; Dillon, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is widely agreed that more needs to be done to improve participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Despite considerable investment in interventions, it has been difficult to discern their effectiveness and/or impact on participation. Purpose: This paper discusses findings from a six-week pilot STEM careers intervention that was designed and overseen by a teacher from one London girls' school. We reflect on the challenges for those attempting such interventions and the problems associated with evaluating them. Sample: Data were collected from Year 9 students (girls aged 13-14 years) at the school. Design and methods: Pre- and post-intervention surveys of 68 students, classroom observations of intervention activities, three post-intervention discussion groups (five or six girls per group) and a post-intervention interview with the lead teacher were conducted. Results: Although the intervention did not significantly change students' aspirations or views of science, it did appear to have a positive effect on broadening students' understanding of the range of jobs that science can lead to or be useful for. Conclusions: Student aspirations may be extremely resistant to change and intervention, but students' understanding of 'where science can lead' may be more amenable to intervention. Implications are discussed, including the need to promote the message that science is useful for careers in and beyond science, at degree and technical levels.

  20. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  1. Sono-leather technology with ultrasound: a boon for unit operations in leather processing - review of our research work at Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), India.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Venkatasubramanian; Swaminathan, Gopalaraman; Rao, Paruchuri Gangadhar; Ramasami, Thirumalachari

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound is a sound wave with a frequency above the human audible range of 16 Hz to 16 kHz. In recent years, numerous unit operations involving physical as well as chemical processes are reported to have been enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation. There have been benefits such as improvement in process efficiency, process time reduction, performing the processes under milder conditions and avoiding the use of some toxic chemicals to achieve cleaner processing. These could be a better way of augmentation for the processes as an advanced technique. The important point here is that ultrasonic irradiation is physical method activation rather than using chemical entities. Detailed studies have been made in the unit operations related to leather such as diffusion rate enhancement through porous leather matrix, cleaning, degreasing, tanning, dyeing, fatliquoring, oil-water emulsification process and solid-liquid tannin extraction from vegetable tanning materials as well as in precipitation reaction in wastewater treatment. The fundamental mechanism involved in these processes is ultrasonic cavitation in liquid media. In addition to this there also exist some process specific mechanisms for the enhancement of the processes. For instance, possible real-time reversible pore-size changes during ultrasound propagation through skin/leather matrix could be a reason for diffusion rate enhancement in leather processing as reported for the first time. Exhaustive scientific research work has been carried out in this area by our group working in Chemical Engineering Division of CLRI and most of these benefits have been proven with publications in valued peer-reviewed international journals. The overall results indicate that about 2-5-fold increase in the process efficiency due to ultrasound under the given process conditions for various unit operations with additional benefits. Scale-up studies are underway for converting these concepts in to a real viable larger scale operation. In

  2. Good Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorkquist, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The deterioration of the quality of work and the resulting impact on workers are of increasing concern. Those being prepared for entry into the workplace can also be prepared for the context and condition of work. (SK)

  3. Working Mothers

    MedlinePlus

    ... for their child when child care arrangements have broken down, or to take their child to necessary appointments. When to Return to Work A woman’s decision to return to work must take into account her own needs as well as those of her family. If you are considering returning to work, try ...

  4. Future Work. Myths and Realities No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    In many of the stories foretelling the future of work, technology is assumed to be the irresistible driver of change. Both ends of the spectrum are foreseen: either technology will create new jobs and transform existing work to higher skill levels, or technology, especially information technology, will destroy jobs or degrade them into less…

  5. Work Coordination Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zendejas, Silvino; Bui, Tung; Bui, Bach; Malhotra, Shantanu; Chen, Fannie; Kim, Rachel; Allen, Christopher; Luong, Ivy; Chang, George; Sadaqathulla, Syed

    2009-01-01

    The Work Coordination Engine (WCE) is a Java application integrated into the Service Management Database (SMDB), which coordinates the dispatching and monitoring of a work order system. WCE de-queues work orders from SMDB and orchestrates the dispatching of work to a registered set of software worker applications distributed over a set of local, or remote, heterogeneous computing systems. WCE monitors the execution of work orders once dispatched, and accepts the results of the work order by storing to the SMDB persistent store. The software leverages the use of a relational database, Java Messaging System (JMS), and Web Services using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) technologies to implement an efficient work-order dispatching mechanism capable of coordinating the work of multiple computer servers on various platforms working concurrently on different, or similar, types of data or algorithmic processing. Existing (legacy) applications can be wrapped with a proxy object so that no changes to the application are needed to make them available for integration into the work order system as "workers." WCE automatically reschedules work orders that fail to be executed by one server to a different server if available. From initiation to completion, the system manages the execution state of work orders and workers via a well-defined set of events, states, and actions. It allows for configurable work-order execution timeouts by work-order type. This innovation eliminates a current processing bottleneck by providing a highly scalable, distributed work-order system used to quickly generate products needed by the Deep Space Network (DSN) to support space flight operations. WCE is driven by asynchronous messages delivered via JMS indicating the availability of new work or workers. It runs completely unattended in support of the lights-out operations concept in the DSN.

  6. Teaching with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Jeff; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Special section on teaching with technology offers eight articles on how to get over technophobia, how to overcome obstacles and "do-it-yourself," teacher training, what teachers are currently doing with technology, how one school uses technology, whether technology works, how to buy a computer, and available resources. (SM)

  7. Working Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, David

    The resurgence of "lifelong learning" has renewed consideration of the nature of "working knowledge." Lifelong learning has many aspects, including construction and distribution of individuals' very self-hood, educational institutions' role in capturing informal experiences, and the juggling required between family and work-based responsibilities.…

  8. Projects Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  9. Online Literacies at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Uses examples drawn from research across several sites in tourism and hospitality in which employees are required to interact with technology, in order to highlight issues relating to new online literacies that are now required for efficient work practices and to discuss implications for practice. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy…

  10. Alternative Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehn, Kerri L.

    2004-01-01

    Employers are feeling the strain of needing to offer alternative work arrangements to retain and recruit employees. Due to a change in demographics, dual-career couples and increased technology; people are demanding a transformation in the workplace environment. Two alternatives, which are being offered by employers, are flextime and…

  11. What Works for Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mark; Lykken, Laurie; Rose, Jeanne Marie

    2010-01-01

    Today's learners are busy. They dash from work to school and back, talking and texting as they go. In their downtime, they are immersed in a digitized world of point-and-click technology that integrates sound and image. Teachers can talk to these students more--and more effectively--by offering an analogous style of teacher response. This article…

  12. [Wet work].

    PubMed

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Chomiczewska, Dorota; Krecisz, Beata

    2010-01-01

    Wet work is one of the most important risk factors of occupational skin diseases. Exposure of hands to the wet environment for more than 2 hours daily, wearing moisture-proof protective gloves for a corresponding period of time or necessity to wash hands frequently lead to the disruption of epidermal stratum corneum, damage to skin barrier function and induction of irritant contact dermatitis. It may also promote penetration of allergens into the skin and increase the risk of sensitization to occupational allergens. Exposure to wet work plays a significant role in occupations, such as hairdressers and barbers, nurses and other health care workers, cleaning staff, food handlers and metalworkers. It is more common among women because many occupations involving wet work are female-dominated. The incidence of wet-work-induced occupational skin diseases can be reduced by taking appropriate preventive measures. These include identification of high-risk groups, education of workers, organization of work enabling to minimize the exposure to wet work, use of personal protective equipment and skin care after work. PMID:20437890

  13. Working longer.

    PubMed

    2014-11-27

    New NHS pension scheme rules come into force in April, and one of the changes is a higher retirement age. To help staff plan for this, NHS Employers' Working Longer Group will publish a suite a resources to help employees understand and prepare for the implications of working into their late sixties. In the meantime, a factsheet with information for staff can be found at tinyurl.com/mjb4u5f and for employers at http://www.nhsemployers.org/your-workforce/need-to-know/working-longer-group. PMID:25428321

  14. Working Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Tom

    2011-01-01

    During the last twenty-five years or more, administrative jobs have increased dramatically as colleges compete for students. Who could argue that academic professionals can get by without more admissions counselors or more technology experts to make sure e-mail and computers are promptly fixed, or more fundraisers in advancement to pursue needed…

  15. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

  16. Is New Work Good Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Andy

    Some new work is good work. Quality is ultimately defined by the individual. However, these perceptions are inevitably colored by the circumstances in which people find themselves, by the time, place, and wide range of motivations for having to do a particular job in the first place. One person's quality may be another's purgatory and vice versa.…

  17. Which Welfare Work Strategies Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Nancy S.

    1986-01-01

    AFDC Welfare work strategies have been implemented to help AFDC (Aid to Families with Dependent Children) recipients secure unsubsidized employment. Reviews research on employment programs for AFDC clients and highlights the respective advantages of these programs. Suggests program changes to improve welfare work strategies. (Author/ABB)

  18. Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

  19. Working Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the family's values, fathers may assume more responsibility for child care and housework than has traditionally ... and fatigue as they try to juggle their responsibilities at home and at work. If you are ...

  20. [Work addiction].

    PubMed

    Mentzel, G

    1979-01-01

    The symptomatology of workaholism (work addiction) was presented in the form of a questionnaire and compared with other forms of addiction, especially alcoholism. Then a case was used as example to illustrate the development of the illness and its psychodynamics. The therapy procedure was also briefly explained. Moreover the psychodynamics of workaholism (work addiction) are described, once again in comparison to other addictions. Finally the author gives general guidelines for therapy. PMID:452731

  1. Wetlands Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messina, Linda; Blanchard, Pamela Borne

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how a biology teacher's search for a cross-curricular project in science, math, history, and environmental science, that would help her students connect what they were learning in the classroom to their everyday life, resulted in an ongoing stewardship project. Working together with the Louisiana Sea Grant College Program…

  2. Work Simplification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Lynne

    1970-01-01

    Excerpts from a talk by Mrs. Ross at the 23rd annual convention of the American School Food Service Association in Detroit, August 5, 1969. A book on work simplification by Mrs. Ross will be available in June from the Iowa State University Press, Ames, Iowa. (Editor)

  3. Working Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Annemaree; Somerville, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore the contribution that an information literacy approach to the empirical study of workplace learning can make to how people understand and conceptualise workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: Three cohorts of fire-fighters working in two regional locations in NSW, Australia were…

  4. Working Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Students need space to gather, share ideas, talk, develop common understanding and work to create greater knowledge. This focus on collaboration has put a strain on group study spaces. Students need to collaborate spontaneously, and scheduling time in a study room is not conducive to spur-of-the-moment collaboration. At many education…

  5. Working Corners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochtritt, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    When people think of a person "working the corners," a G-rated image does not generally come to mind. Yet that is precisely what the author, posing as "June Cleavage," did in New York City one dreary morning: she facilitated a meeting of strangers through the creation of a character and an approachable situation. June, with her wacky outfit and…

  6. Biotechnology Works!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby G.; Spenciner, Loraine

    There have been few initiatives addressing the improvement of science education for students with disabilities. Funded by the National Science Foundation, Biotechnology Works is a summer institute in immunology and genetics for students with disabilities, high school science teachers, and high school counselors. During the 1998 summer session,…

  7. Digital work-flow

    PubMed Central

    MARSANGO, V.; BOLLERO, R.; D’OVIDIO, N.; MIRANDA, M.; BOLLERO, P.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective. The project presents a clinical case in which the digital work-flow procedure was applied for a prosthetic rehabilitation in natural teeth and implants. Materials. Digital work-flow uses patient’s photo for the aesthetic’s planning, digital smile technology for the simulation of the final restoration and real time scanning to register the two arches. Than the scanning are sent to the laboratory that proceed with CAD-CAM production. Results. Digital work-flow offers the opportunities to easily speak with laboratory and patients, gives better clinical results and demonstrated to be a less invasiveness method for the patient. Conclusion. Intra-oral scanner, digital smile design, preview using digital wax-up, CAD-CAM production, are new predictable opportunities for prosthetic team. This work-flow, compared with traditional methods, is faster, more precise and predictable. PMID:25694797

  8. KSC's work flow assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, John; Johnson, Earl

    1991-01-01

    The work flow assistant (WFA) is an advanced technology project under the shuttle processing data management system (SPDMS) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). It will be utilized for short range scheduling, controlling work flow on the floor, and providing near real-time status for all major space transportation systems (STS) work centers at KSC. It will increase personnel and STS safety and improve productivity through deeper active scheduling that includes tracking and correlation of STS and ground support equipment (GSE) configuration and work. It will also provide greater accessibility to this data. WFA defines a standards concept for scheduling data which permits both commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) scheduling tools and WFA developed applications to be reused. WFA will utilize industry standard languages and workstations to achieve a scalable, adaptable, and portable architecture which may be used at other sites.

  9. Technology Transfer: Marketing Tomorrow's Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Erene

    1995-01-01

    The globalization of the economy and the end of the Cold War have triggered many changes in the traditional practices of U.S. industry. To effectively apply the resources available to the United States, the federal government has firmly advocated a policy of technology transfer between private industry and government labs, in this case the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin is a strong proponent of this policy and has organized technology transfer or commercialization programs at each of the NASA field centers. Here at Langley Research Center, the Technology Applications Group (TAG) is responsible for facilitating the transfer of Langley developed research and technology to U.S. industry. Entering the program, I had many objectives for my summer research with TAG. Certainly, I wanted to gain a more thorough understanding of the concept of technology transfer and Langley's implementation of a system to promote it to both the Langley community and the community at large. Also, I hoped to become more familiar with Langley's research capabilities and technology inventory available to the public. More specifically, I wanted to learn about the technology transfer process at Langley. Because my mentor is a member of Materials and Manufacturing marketing sector of the Technology Transfer Team, another overriding objective for my research was to take advantage of his work and experience in materials research to learn about the Advanced Materials Research agency wide and help market these developments to private industry. Through the various projects I have been assigned to work on in TAG, I have successfully satisfied the majority of these objectives. Work on the Problem Statement Process for TAG as well as the development of the Advanced Materials Research Brochure have provided me with the opportunity to learn about the technology transfer process from the outside looking in and the inside looking out. Because TAG covers

  10. Fabrication Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Fabrication Technology thrust area is to have an adequate base of manufacturing technology, not necessarily resident at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), to conduct the future business of LLNL. The specific goals continue to be to (1) develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes; (2) construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability; (3) document findings and models in journals; (4) transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues; and (5) develop continuing relationships with the industrial and academic communities to advance the collective understanding of fabrication processes. The strategy to ensure success is changing. For technologies in which they are expert and which will continue to be of future importance to LLNL, they can often attract outside resources both to maintain their expertise by applying it to a specific problem and to help fund further development. A popular vehicle to fund such work is the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with industry. For technologies needing development because of their future critical importance and in which they are not expert, they use internal funding sources. These latter are the topics of the thrust area. Three FY-92 funded projects are discussed in this section. Each project clearly moves the Fabrication Technology thrust area towards the goals outlined above. They have also continued their membership in the North Carolina State University Precision Engineering Center, a multidisciplinary research and graduate program established to provide the new technologies needed by high-technology institutions in the US. As members, they have access to and use of the results of their research projects, many of which parallel the precision engineering efforts at LLNL.

  11. Eight Skills in Future Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Wenting

    2015-01-01

    This article elaborates eight skills in future work which are based on three main changes and are available to different domains of professions. The first change is an increasing technological world for the future. Technology becomes a part of human being's life and affects people's daily life. Mastering relevant competences is necessary to boost…

  12. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  13. Integrating Technology in Program Development for Children and Youth with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders. Fourth CCBD Mini-Library Series: Addressing the Diverse Needs of Children and Youth with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders--Programs That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Lynn K., Ed.; Black, Sharon, Ed.

    This monograph presents research-based solutions to the integration of technology in programs serving students with emotional and/or behavior disorders. Chapters include: (1) "Introduction: Technology, the Great Equalizer" (Lynn K. Wilder) which considers challenges and solutions to the technology challenge; (2) "Project PEGS! Interactive CDs for…

  14. Classroom Technology: A View from the Trenches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soules, Aline; Adams, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Outlines challenges to classroom technology use (unrealistic expectations; hardware, software, and network reliability; copyright considerations; service capability; technological literacy; technological limitations; time; facility limitations; maintenance; working hours) and argues that while technological developments outstrip education's…

  15. The Changing Nature of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Joseph F.

    1982-01-01

    There are many changing elements in the world of work that will have an effect on jobs in the future. They include the rise of telecommunications, biotechnology, energy technology, demographic changes, working women, and employees' need for personal satisfaction. The job of vocational education is to prepare people for these changes. (CT)

  16. Challenges Facing Group Work Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Bo; Kang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Online group work can be complicated because of its asynchronous characteristics and lack of physical presence, and its requirements for skills in handling technology, human relationships, and content-related tasks. This study focuses on the administrative, logistical and relationship-related challenges in online group work. Challenges in areas…

  17. FCS Technology Investigation Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James; Gilbert, Tricia

    2007-01-01

    This working paper provides an overview of the Future Communication Study (FCS) technology investigation progress. It includes a description of the methodology applied to technology evaluation; evaluation criteria; and technology screening (down select) results. A comparison of screening results with other similar technology screening activities is provided. Additional information included in this working paper is a description of in-depth studies (including characterization of the L-band aeronautical channel; L-band deployment cost assessment; and performance assessments of candidate technologies in the applicable aeronautical channel) that have been conducted to support technology evaluations. The paper concludes with a description on-going activities leading to conclusion of the technology investigation and the development of technology recommendations.

  18. Working Memory and Neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    YuLeung To, Eric; Abbott, Kathy; Foster, Dale S; Helmer, D'Arcy

    2016-01-01

    Impairments in working memory are typically associated with impairments in other cognitive faculties such as attentional processes and short-term memory. This paper briefly introduces neurofeedback as a treatment modality in general, and, more specifically, we review several of the current modalities successfully used in neurofeedback (NF) for the treatment of working memory deficits. Two case studies are presented to illustrate how neurofeedback is applied in treatment. The development of Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) and its application in neurofeedback now makes it possible to specifically target deep cortical/subcortical brain structures. Developments in neuroscience concerning neural networks, combined with highly specific yet practical NF technologies, makes neurofeedback of particular interest to neuropsychological practice, including the emergence of specific methodologies for treating very difficult working memory (WM) problems. PMID:27191218

  19. Communications technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, Martin M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the Communications Technology Program is to enable data transmission to and from low Earth orbit, geostationary orbit, and solar and deep space missions. This can be achieved by maintaining an effective, balances effort in basic, applied, and demonstration prototype communications technology through work in theory, experimentation, and components. The program consists of three major research and development discipline areas which are: microwave and millimeter wave tube components; solid state monolithic integrated circuit; and free space laser communications components and devices. The research ranges from basic research in surface physics (to study the mechanisms of surface degradation from under high temperature and voltage operating conditions which impacts cathode tube reliability and lifetime) to generic research on the dynamics of electron beams and circuits (for exploitation in various micro- and millimeter wave tube devices). Work is also performed on advanced III-V semiconductor materials and devices for use in monolithic integrated analog circuits (used in adaptive, programmable phased arrays for microwave antenna feeds and receivers) - on the use of electromagnetic theory in antennas and on technology necessary for eventual employment of lasers for free space communications for future low earth, geostationary, and deep space missions requiring high data rates with corresponding directivity and reliability.

  20. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  1. Technology Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomory, Ralph E.

    1983-01-01

    The evolutionary character and complexity of technological development is discussed, focusing on the steam engine and computer as examples. Additional topics include characteristics of science/technology, cultural factors in technological development, technology transfer, and problems in technological organization. (JN)

  2. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, Kimberly R.

    1995-01-01

    The development and application of new technologies in the United States has always been important to the economic well being of the country. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been an important source of these new technologies for almost four decades. Recently, increasing global competition has emphasized the importance of fully utilizing federally funded technologies. Today NASA must meet its mission goals while at the same time, conduct research and development that contributes to securing US economic growth. NASA technologies must be quickly and effectively transferred into commercial products. In order to accomplish this task, NASA has formulated a new way of doing business with the private sector. Emphasis is placed on forming mutually beneficial partnerships between NASA and US industry. New standards have been set in response to the process that increase effectiveness, efficiency, and timely customer response. This summer I have identified potential markets for two NASA inventions: including the Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Characterization of Flaws in Metallic Tubing and the Radiographic Moire. I have also worked to establish a cooperative program with TAG, private industry, and a university known as the TAG/Industry/Academia Program.

  3. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  4. Virtual reality at work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Frederick P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of virtual reality computer graphics in telepresence applications is not hard to grasp and promises to be great. When the virtual world is entirely synthetic, as opposed to real but remote, the utility is harder to establish. Vehicle simulators for aircraft, vessels, and motor vehicles are proving their worth every day. Entertainment applications such as Disney World's StarTours are technologically elegant, good fun, and economically viable. Nevertheless, some of us have no real desire to spend our lifework serving the entertainment craze of our sick culture; we want to see this exciting technology put to work in medicine and science. The topics covered include the following: testing a force display for scientific visualization -- molecular docking; and testing a head-mounted display for scientific and medical visualization.

  5. Water saving technologies flagship program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Flagship Project on Water Saving Technologies was formed under the protocol between the USDA and Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China. Joint work in this flagship project was reported at the 13th Joint Working Group Meeting on Agricultural Science and Technology in ...

  6. Strategic avionics technology planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Kenneth J.; Brown, Don C.

    1991-01-01

    NASA experience in development and insertion of technology into programs had led to a recognition that a Strategic Plan for Avionics is needed for space. In the fall of 1989 an Avionics Technology Symposium was held in Williamsburg, Virginia. In early 1990, as a followon, a NASA wide Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group was chartered by NASA Headquarters. This paper will describe the objectives of this working group, technology bridging, and approaches to incentivize both the federal and commercial sectors to move toward rapidly developed, simple, and reliable systems with low life cycle cost.

  7. An Examination of the Historical Time-Period and Socio-Cultural Factors That Influence Use and Non-Use of Information and Communication Technologies by Older, Working-Class Black Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Maleka N.

    2013-01-01

    The United States Administration on Aging (2011) predicts that over the next forty years the number of people 65 and older will double and the number of people 85 and older will triple. Meanwhile, technology is becoming more and more important in our everyday lives. The ubiquitous presence of technology in our lives is evidenced in daily…

  8. The Private Sector/University Technology Alliance: Making It Work. Proceedings of a Conference of the National Council of University Research Administrators (Dallas, Texas, September 4-7, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freise, Earl J., Ed.

    The transfer of technology from U.S. research universities in cooperation with the private sector is addressed in proceedings of a National Council of University Research Administrators conference. The first discussion session, "New Technology from University Research and Development (R&D)," examines the university research enterprise as a…

  9. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  10. Radiation sources working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.

    1998-12-31

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, components technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigation, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations.

  11. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  12. Technology Transfer Network and Affiliations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Technology Transfer Partnership program sponsors a number of organizations around the country that are designed to assist U.S. businesses in accessing, utilizing, and commercializing NASA-funded research and technology. These organizations work closely with the Technology Transfer Offices, located at each of the 10 NASA field centers, providing a full range of technology transfer and commercialization services and assistance.

  13. Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, M.; Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

    1996-10-24

    This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

  14. Extravehicular activity technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on extravehicular activity technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: extravehicular mobility unit; airlock and EMU support equipment; tools, mobility aids, and workstations; and telerobotic work aids interfaces.

  15. Technology in Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazner, Steve, Comp.

    2012-01-01

    Technology touches people's lives virtually every second of the day. The work world is especially rich with changing technologies, new innovations, and continually revised processes for greater effectiveness and efficiency. One could easily say that a boiler is a boiler, or a carpet is a carpet, but the reality is that all components of all the…

  16. The information technology revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, T.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with advances in telecommunications, artificial intelligence, supercomputers, personal computers, and the use of information technology. It focuses on computer crime, privacy, the impact of new technology on women and on the Third World, ''smart'' weapons, and the future of work.

  17. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  18. Abandoning wells working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  19. April 25, 2003, FY2003 Progress Summary and FY2002 Program Plan, Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers,and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W; Bibeau, C

    2005-10-25

    The High Average Power Laser Program (HAPL) is a multi-institutional, synergistic effort to develop inertial fusion energy (IFE). This program is building a physics and technology base to complement the laser-fusion science being pursued by DOE Defense programs in support of Stockpile Stewardship. The primary institutions responsible for overseeing and coordinating the research activities are the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The current LLNL proposal is a companion document to the one submitted by NRL, for which the driver development element is focused on the krypton fluoride excimer laser option. The NRL and LLNL proposals also jointly pursue complementary activities with the associated rep-rated laser technologies relating to target fabrication, target injection, final optics, fusion chamber, target physics, materials and power plant economics. This proposal requests continued funding in FY03 to support LLNL in its program to build a 1 kW, 100 J, diode-pumped, crystalline laser, as well as research into high gain fusion target design, fusion chamber issues, and survivability of the final optic element. These technologies are crucial to the feasibility of inertial fusion energy power plants and also have relevance in rep-rated stewardship experiments. The HAPL Program pursues technologies needed for laser-driven IFE. System level considerations indicate that a rep-rated laser technology will be needed, operating at 5-10 Hz. Since a total energy of {approx}2 MJ will ultimately be required to achieve suitable target gain with direct drive targets, the architecture must be scaleable. The Mercury Laser is intended to offer such an architecture. Mercury is a solid state laser that incorporates diodes, crystals and gas cooling technologies.

  20. Working Differently: The Telework Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gbezo, Bernard E.

    1995-01-01

    Telework, work carried out in a location where the worker is removed from a central office and communicates with coworkers using new technology, has become a daily routine for millions of people in the United States and Europe. Telework changes the nature of professional relationships and employment and economic development policies. (JOW)

  1. States Scrutinize Teacher Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Access to reliable technology. Help from classroom aides. Out-of-classroom duties. Planning time with colleagues. Administrator accessibility. All those working conditions and more play a vital part in whether good teachers feel sufficiently satisfied to stay in their schools. Now, policymakers are beginning to gather evidence on just how much…

  2. Manufacturing and producibility technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Activities of the manufacturing/producibility working group within the Advanced High-Pressure O2/H2 Technology Program are summarized. The objectives of the M/P working group are: to develop and evaluate process and manufacturing techniques for advanced propulsion hardware design and selected materials; and to optimize the producibility of (SSME) components and assemblies by improved performance, increased life, greater reliability, and/or reduced cost. The technologies being developed include: plasma arc, laser, and inertia welding; combustion chamber and turbine blade coatings; coating processes; high performance alloy electroforming; and process control technology.

  3. Partners in Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Deere and Company scientists are working with various NASA centers in a multifaceted technical exchange program investigating areas of aerospace technology that can be applied to company's products. This is a non-traditional type spinoff in that it does not simply reapply existing technology but development of new technology using Deere's extensive R & D capability to complement NASA's efforts, adapting NASA information to new research paths and providing feedback of importance to NASA's own work. NASA/Deere exchange extends to these areas: Composite materials, ceramics, wear and lubrication, plasma coatings and sensors, and electronics.

  4. "It Didn't Really Change My Opinion": Exploring What Works, What Doesn't and Why in a School Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Careers Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Louise; DeWitt, Jennifer; Dillon, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is widely agreed that more needs to be done to improve participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Despite considerable investment in interventions, it has been difficult to discern their effectiveness and/or impact on participation. Purpose: This paper discusses findings from a six-week pilot STEM…

  5. Impact Assessment and Forecasts of Information and Telecommunications Technologies Applied to Education and Training: Volume II--Main Report and Issues Analyses. Analysis for the Orientation of the Work of Sector Actors in the Framework of DELTA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    This report, the second volume in a three volume set, summarizes the results of a study performed by the DELTA (Developing European Learning through Technological Advance) unit in parallel with the projects underway in the research and development Exploratory Action. The report identifies the key issues, associated requirements and options, and…

  6. Development of Marine Science and Technology in Africa. Working Group of Experts Sponsored by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco). Unesco Reports in Marine Sciences, No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    Beginning in the late 1970's, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) increased their efforts to formulate and implement African development programs. Reported in this document is a meeting on marine resource technology which was jointly convened by…

  7. Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network*

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Oakes, J. Michael; Fan, Wen; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Davis, Kelly D.; Hammer, Leslie; Kossek, Ellen; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Hanson, Ginger; Mierzwa, Frank; Casper, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life are work resources that may help employees manage the work-family interface. However, existing data and designs have made it difficult to conclusively identify the effects of these work resources. This analysis utilizes a group-randomized trial in which some units in an information technology workplace were randomly assigned to participate in an initiative, called STAR, that targeted work practices, interactions, and expectations by (a) training supervisors on the value of demonstrating support for employees’ personal lives and (b) prompting employees to reconsider when and where they work. We find statistically significant, though modest, improvements in employees’ work-family conflict and family time adequacy and larger changes in schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life. We find no evidence that this intervention increased work hours or perceived job demands, as might have happened with increased permeability of work across time and space. Subgroup analyses suggest the intervention brings greater benefits to employees more vulnerable to work-family conflict. This study advances our understanding of the impact of social structures on individual lives by investigating deliberate organizational changes and their effects on work resources and the work-family interface with a rigorous design. PMID:25349460

  8. Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network*

    PubMed

    Kelly, Erin L; Moen, Phyllis; Oakes, J Michael; Fan, Wen; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Davis, Kelly D; Hammer, Leslie; Kossek, Ellen; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Hanson, Ginger; Mierzwa, Frank; Casper, Lynne

    2014-06-01

    Schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life are work resources that may help employees manage the work-family interface. However, existing data and designs have made it difficult to conclusively identify the effects of these work resources. This analysis utilizes a group-randomized trial in which some units in an information technology workplace were randomly assigned to participate in an initiative, called STAR, that targeted work practices, interactions, and expectations by (a) training supervisors on the value of demonstrating support for employees' personal lives and (b) prompting employees to reconsider when and where they work. We find statistically significant, though modest, improvements in employees' work-family conflict and family time adequacy and larger changes in schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life. We find no evidence that this intervention increased work hours or perceived job demands, as might have happened with increased permeability of work across time and space. Subgroup analyses suggest the intervention brings greater benefits to employees more vulnerable to work-family conflict. This study advances our understanding of the impact of social structures on individual lives by investigating deliberate organizational changes and their effects on work resources and the work-family interface with a rigorous design. PMID:25349460

  9. Swamp Works- Multiple Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carelli, Jonathan M.; Schuler, Jason M.; Chandler, Meredith L.

    2013-01-01

    My Surface Systems internship over the summer 2013 session covered a broad range of projects that utilized multiple fields of engineering and technology. This internship included a project to create a command center for a 120 ton regolith bin, for the design and assembly of a blast shield to add further protection for the Surface Systems engineers, for the design and assembly of a portable four monitor hyper wall strip that could extend as large as needed, research and programming a nano drill that could be utilized on a next generation robot or rover, and social media tasks including the making of videos, posting to social networking websites and creation of a new outreach program to help spread the word about the Swamp Works laboratory.

  10. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

  11. Sex Differences in Japanese Work Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, John W.

    Work values influence economic productivity of individuals and families worldwide. Since Japan's recent technological and economic productivity and growth have been phenomenal, a study was conducted to compare contemporary Japanese men's and women's work related values and beliefs. Work values questionnaires were distributed to over 900 Japanese…

  12. Reservoir Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, J.L.

    1992-03-24

    The reservoir technology program supports the utilization of geothermal resources through development and verification of new earth science technologies for: exploration, fluid production and injection; and prediction of reservoir lifetimes. A two-fold strategy of conducting DOE-sponsored research to meet higher-risk, longer-term needs and cost-shared research with industry in areas of greatest current need is utilized to maximize the benefit of the program to the geothermal industry. The program uses a coordinated, multi-disciplinary approach to investigating and solving reservoir problems facing the industry. Research at The Geysers geothermal field has received major emphasis in the past three years. Recent progress in that work will be reviewed in detail by The Geysers operators, federal, state and local regulators and other interested parties during a meeting in Santa Rosa on May 5 and 6, 1992. Hence the papers by Lipman, Bodvarsson et al., Wannamaker, et al., Horne, and Shook in this proceedings volume emphasize non-Geysers research in the program.

  13. Technology transfer issue

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, C.

    1982-05-31

    Testimony by Lawrence J. Brady, Commerce Assistant Secretary for Trade Administration, at Congressional hearings on the national security issues of technology transfers to the Soviet Union identified steps the US needs to take to deal effectively with the problem. These steps include an understanding of how the Soviet Union has and will benefit militarily by acquiring Western technology and efforts to work with other countries, counterintelligence agencies, and industries to stem the flow of technological information. Brady outlined changes in technology development that complicate the enforcement of transfer rules, and emphasized the importance of a close relationship between the business community and the Commerce Department. (DCK)

  14. Research and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for preparing and launching space missions, the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the entire KSC team, consisting of Government and contractor personnel, working in partnership with academic institutions and commercial industry. This edition of the KSC Research and Technology 1997 Annual Report covers the efforts of these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities.

  15. Assistive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Assistive Technology Assistive technology (AT) is any service or tool that helps ... be difficult or impossible. For older adults, such technology may be a walker to improve mobility or ...

  16. Technology of RF superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This work has several parts, two of which are collaborative development projects with the majority of the work being performed at Argonne. The first is the development of a superconducting RFQ structure in collaboration with AccSys Technology Inc. of Pleasanton, California, funded as a Phase II SBIR grant. Another is a collaborative project with the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi, India (who are funding the work) to develop new superconducting ion accelerating structures. Other initiatives are developing various aspects of the technology required to utilize ATLAS as a secondary beam linac for radioactive beams.

  17. Dimension Technologies

    NASA Video Gallery

    Command and Control Technologies (CCT) Corporation of Titusville, Florida, a Florida/NASA Business Incubator tenant, is commercializing technology based on Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) spacecraft...

  18. Automation Technology in Elementary Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiltunen, Jukka; Jarvinen, Esa-Matti

    2000-01-01

    Finnish fifth-graders (n=20) and sixth-graders (n=23) worked in teams in a Lego/Logo-Control Lab to complete Lego design activities. Observations showed that they became familiar with automation technology but their skills were not always up to their ideas. Activities based on real-life situations gave them ownership and engaged them in learning.…

  19. Lewis Incubator for Technology (LIFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Wayne P.; King, Joseph B.; Jankura, Richard E., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done to operate the Lewis Incubator for Technology for the period October 2000 through September 2004. The Lewis Incubator helped the startup and growth of technology based businesses with the potential to incorporate technology from the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  20. NASA works for provide business assistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The wealth of technology resulting from space exploration is a valuable national resource and an investment in the future. Through NASA's Technology Transfer Program, the John C. Stennis Space Center in South Mississippi contributes to the U.S. economy by working with companies to help them benefit from these technologies. This is called technology transfer. Transferred technology helps fulfill the technical and business needs of the public in the form of new products-called 'spinoffs,'-new applications, new programs, and improved ways of doing business. The possible results are enhanced potential for industrial productivity, creation of jobs, and increased returns on investment for the taxpayer.

  1. Women, Clerical Work, and Office Automation: Issues for Research. Report of a Conference Sponsored by the Women's Bureau in Cooperation with the Panel on Technology and Women's Employment National Research Council (Washington, D.C., October 19, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Panel on Technology and Women's Employment.

    These proceedings contain presentations (speeches, discussions, papers) from a conference on how office automation is affecting the work lives and employment future of clerical workers. They include a "Welcome to the [National] Academy [of Sciences]" (Roslyn Feldberg), "Opening Remarks" (Lenora Cole Alexander), and "Goals and Objectives" (Mary…

  2. Work and Learning in Micro Car-Repair Enterprises. A Comparative Study on the Relationship between Technological and Organisational Developments and Training Activities in Micro Car-Repair Enterprises in Four European Countries. Synthesis Report. CEDEFOP Panorama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Tillaart, Harry; van den Berg, Sjaak; Warmerdam, John

    Work and learning in microenterprises in the car repair industries of four European Community (EC) countries were examined through 21 case studies of firms with 10 or fewer employees (6 firms in Ireland and 5 each in Greece, the Netherlands, and Spain). Structured interviews were conducted with each firm's owner and 60 motor vehicle mechanics at…

  3. University Research Program in Robotics - "Technologies for Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems in directed Stockpile Work (DSW) Radiation and Campaigns", Final Technical Annual Report, Project Period 9/1/06 - 8/31/07

    SciTech Connect

    James S. Tulenko; Carl D. Crane

    2007-12-13

    The University Research Program in Robotics (URPR) is an integrated group of universities performing fundamental research that addresses broad-based robotics and automation needs of the NNSA Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) and Campaigns. The URPR mission is to provide improved capabilities in robotics science and engineering to meet the future needs of all weapon systems and other associated NNSA/DOE activities.

  4. Technology coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Steven

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology coordination are provided. Topics covered include: technology coordination process to date; goals; how the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) can support the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA); how OSSA can support OAST; steps to technology transfer; and recommendations.

  5. Guerilla Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    1999-01-01

    Staff at disadvantaged schools lacking sufficient technology must take matters into their own hands. Guerilla technology tactics include finding all the hidden technology on campus, scanning the school budget carefully, helping others spend their technology money, and scrounging free computers at universities and local businesses. (MLH)

  6. Technology 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Mike

    2005-01-01

    This brief article discusses the new technologies that may be available in 2020 that will impact the field of education. The author believes that the new educational themes will be "flexibility" and "autonomy", and the new technological theme will be "transparency". Topics discussed include genetic technology, pharmacological technology, digital…

  7. Flywheel Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Lisa M.

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the summer of 2004, I am working on a number of different projects. While located in the Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering branch, my main area of study is flywheel technology. I have been exposed to flywheels, their components, and their uses in today's society. I have been able to experience numerous flywheels here in the flywheel lab at NASA Glenn. My first main project was to explore the attributes and physical characteristics of a flywheel. Our branch was constructing a flywheel demonstration to be presented at the public open house taking place in June. Our Flywheel Interactive Demo, or FIDO, represents a real life multi-flywheel system here at NASA. I was given the opportunity to learn about how these flywheels store energy and are able to position a satellite. With all of this new knowledge, I was able to create the posters that explained how our demonstration worked. I also composed a step-by-step process made up of four experiments that any visitor could follow and perform on FIDO. By stepping through these experiments, the individual learns how a flywheel works. They not only read the explanation of what is happening, but they are also able to see it happen. Creating these two posters not only taught me, but also helped teach the general public during the open house, how flywheel technology is a very important part of our future. Through my research, I have learned that flywheels are able to store massive amounts of energy. They can be described as an electro-mechanical battery that stores kinetic energy while rotating. The faster it rotates, the more energy it stores. Their lifetime is about triple that of an ordinary battery. Flywheels also have the ability to combine energy storage with attitude control all in a single system. Attitude control is the ability to position a satellite as required. FIDO helps us to understand the rotational force (torque) that is applied upon a turn-table or satellite during wheel acceleration

  8. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  9. FY2002 Progress Summary Program Plan, Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers, and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A; Bibeau, C; Beach, R; Behrendt, B; Ebbers, C; Latkowski, J; Meier, W; Payne, S; Perkins, J; Schaffers, K; Skulina, K; Ditmire, T; Kelly, J; Waxer, L; Rudi, P; Randles, M; Witter, D; Meissner, H; Merissner, O

    2001-12-13

    The High Average Power Laser Program (HAPL) is a multi-institutional, coordinated effort to develop a high-energy, repetitively pulsed laser system for Inertial Fusion Energy and other DOE and DOD applications. This program is building a laser-fusion energy base to complement the laser-fusion science developed by DOE Defense programs over the past 25 years. The primary institutions responsible for overseeing and coordinating the research activities are the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and LLNL. The current LLNL proposal is a companion proposal to that submitted by NRL, for which the driver development element is focused on the krypton fluoride excimer laser option. Aside from the driver development aspect, the NRL and LLNL companion proposals pursue complementary activities with the associated rep-rated laser technologies relating to target fabrication, target injection, final optics, fusion chamber, materials and power plant economics. This report requests continued funding in FY02 to support LLNL in its program to build a 1kW, 100J, diode-pumped, crystalline laser. In addition, research in high gain laser target design, fusion chamber issues and survivability of the final optic element will be pursued. These technologies are crucial to the feasibility of inertial fusion energy power plants and also have relevance in rep-rated stewardship experiments.

  10. Intelligent Work Process Engineering System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kent E.

    2003-01-01

    Optimizing performance on work activities and processes requires metrics of performance for management to monitor and analyze in order to support further improvements in efficiency, effectiveness, safety, reliability and cost. Information systems are therefore required to assist management in making timely, informed decisions regarding these work processes and activities. Currently information systems regarding Space Shuttle maintenance and servicing do not exist to make such timely decisions. The work to be presented details a system which incorporates various automated and intelligent processes and analysis tools to capture organize and analyze work process related data, to make the necessary decisions to meet KSC organizational goals. The advantages and disadvantages of design alternatives to the development of such a system will be discussed including technologies, which would need to bedesigned, prototyped and evaluated.

  11. Work Cultures and Work/Family Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sue Campbell

    2001-01-01

    For 179 workers with family responsibilities, flexibility of work was associated with job satisfaction and family well-being, flexible work schedules were not. Supportive supervision was associated only with increased employee citizenship and did not increase work-family balance of those at risk. Family-friendly culture did not appear to benefit…

  12. TORC1 and TORC2 work together to regulate ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yerlikaya, Seda; Meusburger, Madeleine; Kumari, Romika; Huber, Alexandre; Anrather, Dorothea; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Ammerer, Gustav; Baranov, Pavel V; Loewith, Robbie

    2016-01-15

    Nutrient-sensitive phosphorylation of the S6 protein of the 40S subunit of the eukaryote ribosome is highly conserved. However, despite four decades of research, the functional consequences of this modification remain unknown. Revisiting this enigma in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that the regulation of Rps6 phosphorylation on Ser-232 and Ser-233 is mediated by both TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TORC2. TORC1 regulates phosphorylation of both sites via the poorly characterized AGC-family kinase Ypk3 and the PP1 phosphatase Glc7, whereas TORC2 regulates phosphorylation of only the N-terminal phosphosite via Ypk1. Cells expressing a nonphosphorylatable variant of Rps6 display a reduced growth rate and a 40S biogenesis defect, but these phenotypes are not observed in cells in which Rps6 kinase activity is compromised. Furthermore, using polysome profiling and ribosome profiling, we failed to uncover a role of Rps6 phosphorylation in either global translation or translation of individual mRNAs. Taking the results together, this work depicts the signaling cascades orchestrating Rps6 phosphorylation in budding yeast, challenges the notion that Rps6 phosphorylation plays a role in translation, and demonstrates that observations made with Rps6 knock-ins must be interpreted cautiously. PMID:26582391

  13. Social Work Informatics: A New Specialty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker-Oliver, Debra; Demiris, George

    2006-01-01

    The use of technology in social work practice has risen dramatically over the past 10 years. Clinical interventions such as psychotherapy using telephones, interactive video, and the Internet are gaining in popularity. For a discipline traditionally tied to face-to-face interaction, many concerns about moving to technology-based practices have…

  14. Technology in action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In keeping with the NASA Administrator's announcement that technology transfer will become a fundamental mission of NASA, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has initiated new programs to reach the heartland of U.S. industry. The Center has continued to expand its already well-established outreach program aimed at helping American business, industry, and academia at the grassroots level. The goal is to ensure that America regains and maintains its proper place of leadership among the world's technologically developed nations. MSFC's national goal is to enhance America's competitiveness in the world marketplace, fortify the value of the dollar, and ensure technological breakthroughs by American laboratories benefit taxpayers and industries. The Technology Utilization (TU) Office at MSFC believes a number of measures are possible to slow, then halt, and ultimately reverse the erosion of American technological leadership. MSFC's TU Office is reaching out to American industry on an increasingly broadening scope, facilitating the transfer of NASA derived technologies to American businesses, industries, educational institutions, and individuals. There are many valid approaches to achieving this goal. Some, such as the National Technology Initiative, begin at the top and work down through America's top corporate structure. Others, such as the technology transfer program that MSFC has implemented, begin at the one-on-one, grassroots level -- working with small and medium-sized firms that form the bulk of American industry. What can be done by one NASA center is, admittedly, limited. But by extrapolating this one-on-one approach to the more than 700 Federal laboratories, a great deal can be accomplished. This report contains an examination of outreach and in reach programs, problem statements programs, applications projects, new technology reporting, new technology administration, and the need for increased resources to further facilitate technology transfer.

  15. AGC-1 Experiment and Final Preliminary Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L. Bratton; Tim Burchell

    2006-08-01

    This report details the experimental plan and design as of the preliminary design review for the Advanced Test Reactor Graphite Creep-1 graphite compressive creep capsule. The capsule will contain five graphite grades that will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory to determine the irradiation induced creep constants. Seven other grades of graphite will be irradiated to determine irradiated physical properties. The capsule will have an irradiation temperature of 900 C and a peak irradiation dose of 5.8 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} [E > 0.1 MeV], or 4.2 displacements per atom.

  16. The AGCE related studies of baroclinic flows in spherical geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyun, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Steady state, axisymmetric motions of a Boussineaq fluid continued in rotating spherical anmulus are considered. The motions are driven by latitudinally varying temperature gradient at the shells. Linearized formulations for a narrow gap are derived and the flow field is divided into the Ekman layers and the geostrophic interior. The Ekman layer flows are consistent with the known results for cylindrical geometries. Within the framework of rather restrictive assumptions, the interior flows are solved by a series of associated Legendre polynomials. The solutions show qualitative features valid at midlatitudes.

  17. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 4 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Marin, Jose A.; Nelson, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG), and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures on a 24/7 basis. ECT is a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. This is the fourth year of the project.

  18. Space Mechanisms Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a workshop to discuss the state of drive systems technology needed for space exploration. The Workshop was held Thursday, November 2, 2000. About 70 space mechanisms experts shared their experiences from working in this field and considered technology development that will be needed to support future space exploration in the next 10 to 30 years.

  19. Swamp Works- Multiple Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carelli, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    My Surface Systems internship over the summer 2013 session covered a broad range of projects that ranged multiple aspects and fields of engineering and technology. This internship included a project to create a command center for a 120 ton regolith bin, a design and build for a blast shield to add further protection for the Surface Systems engineers, a design for a portable four monitor hyper wall that can extend as large as needed, research and programming a nano drill for a next generation robot, and social media tasks including the making of videos, posting to social networking websites and implementation of a new weekly outreach program to help spread the word about the Swamp Works laboratory. The objectives for the command center were to create a central computer controlled area for the still in production lunar regolith bin. It needed to be easy to use and the operating systems had to be Linux. The objectives for the hyper wall were to build a mobile transport of monitors that could potentially attach to one another. It needed to be light but sturdy, and have the ability to last. The objectives for the blast shield included a robust design that could withstand a small equipment malfunction, while also being convenient for use. The objectives for the nano-drill included the research and implementation of programming for vertical and horizontal movement. The hyper wall and blasts shield project were designed by me in the Pro/Engineer/Creo2 software. Each project required a meeting with the Swamp Works engineers and was declared successful.

  20. Health care technology assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.