Science.gov

Sample records for age class structure

  1. Density dependence in an age-structured population of great tits: identifying the critical age classes.

    PubMed

    Gamelon, Marlène; Grøtan, Vidar; Engen, Steinar; Bjørkvoll, Eirin; Visser, Marcel E; Saether, Bernt-Erik

    2016-09-01

    Classical approaches for the analyses of density dependence assume that all the individuals in a population equally respond and equally contribute to density dependence. However, in age-structured populations, individuals of different ages may differ in their responses to changes in population size and how they contribute to density dependence affecting the growth rate of the whole population. Here we apply the concept of critical age classes, i.e., a specific scalar function that describes how one or a combination of several age classes affect the demographic rates negatively, in order to examine how total density dependence acting on the population growth rate depends on the age-specific population sizes. In a 38-yr dataset of an age-structured great tit (Parus major) population, we find that the age classes, including the youngest breeding females, were the critical age classes for density regulation. These age classes correspond to new breeders that attempt to take a territory and that have the strongest competitive effect on other breeding females. They strongly affected population growth rate and reduced recruitment and survival rates of all breeding females. We also show that depending on their age class, females may differently respond to varying density. In particular, the negative effect of the number of breeding females was stronger on recruitment rate of the youngest breeding females. These findings question the classical assumptions that all the individuals of a population can be treated as having an equal contribution to density regulation and that the effect of the number of individuals is age independent. Our results improve our understanding of density regulation in natural populations.

  2. Age-class structure and variability of two populations of the bluemask darter etheostoma (Doration) sp.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, J.W.; Layzer, J.B.; Smith, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    The bluemask darter Etheostoma (Doration) sp. is an endangered fish endemic to the upper Caney Fork system in the Cumberland River drainage in central Tennessee. Darters (Etheostoma spp.) are typically short-lived and exhibit rapid growth that quickly decreases with age. Consequently, estimating age of darters from length-frequency distributions can be difficult and subjective. We used a nonparametric kernel density estimator to reduce subjectivity in estimating ages of bluemask darters. Data were collected from a total of 2926 bluemask darters from the Collins River throughout three growing seasons. Additionally, data were collected from 842 bluemask darters from the Rocky River during one growing season. Analysis of length-frequencies indicated the presence of four age classes in both rivers. In each river, the majority of the population was comprised of fish 0.05). In both rivers, females were more abundant than males.

  3. Divergent patterns of abundance and age-class structure of headwater stream tadpoles in burned and unburned watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hossack, B.R.; Corn, P.S.; Fagre, D.B.

    2006-01-01

    Wildfire is a potential threat to many species with narrow environmental tolerances like the Rocky Mountain tailed frog (Ascaphus montanus Mittleman and Myers, 1949), which inhabits a region where the frequency and intensity of wildfires are expected to increase. We compared pre- and post-fire counts of tadpoles in eight streams in northwestern Montana to determine the effects of wildfire on A. montanus. All streams were initially sampled in 2001, 2 years before four of them burned in a large wildfire, and were resampled during the 2 years following the fire. Counts of tadpoles were similar in the two groups of streams before the fire. After the fire, tadpoles were almost twice as abundant in unburned streams than in burned streams. The fire seemed to have the greatest negative effect on abundance of age-1 tadpoles, which was reflected in the greater variation in same-stream age-class structure compared with those in unburned streams. Despite the apparent effect on tadpoles, we do not expect the wildfire to be an extirpation threat to populations in the streams that we sampled. Studies spanning a chronosequence of fires, as well as in other areas, are needed to assess the effects of fires on streams with A. montanus and to determine the severity and persistence of these effects.

  4. Social class, dementia and the fourth age.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian Rees

    2017-02-01

    Research addressing social class and dementia has largely focused on measures of socioeconomic status as causal risk factors for dementia and in observed differences in diagnosis, treatment and care. This large body of work has produced important insights but also contains numerous problems and weaknesses. Research needs to take account of the ways in which ageing and social class have been transformed in tandem with the economic, social and cultural coordinates of late modernity. These changes have particular consequences for individual identities and social relations. With this in mind this article adopts a critical gaze on research that considers interactions between dementia and social class in three key areas: (i) epidemiological approaches to inequalities in risk (ii) the role of social class in diagnosis and treatment and (iii) class in the framing of care and access to care. Following this, the article considers studies of dementia and social class that focus on lay understandings and biographical accounts. Sociological insights in this field come from the view that dementia and social class are embedded in social relations. Thus, forms of distinction based on class relations may still play an important role in the lived experience of dementia.

  5. Food item use by coyote sex and age classes

    SciTech Connect

    Cypher, B.L.; Spencer, K.A.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    Food item use by coyotes was compared between sexes and among age classes at the Naval Petroleum Reserves, California. Item use did not differ significantly between males and females. Although leporid was the item most frequently used by all age classes, item use differed significantly between pups (< 1 year), yearlings (1 year), and adults (> 1 year), probably due to differential use of secondary items. Variation in item use among age classes could potentially bias results of coyote food habit studies.

  6. Dance Class Structure Affects Youth Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: A Study of Seven Dance Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez Castillo, Maria A.; Carlson, Jordan A.; Cain, Kelli L.; Bonilla, Edith A.; Chuang, Emmeline; Elder, John P.; Sallis, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims were to determine: (a) how class structure varies by dance type, (b) how moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behavior vary by dance class segments, and (c) how class structure relates to total MVPA in dance classes. Method: Participants were 291 boys and girls ages 5 to 18 years old enrolled in 58…

  7. Women and class structure in contemporary Japan.

    PubMed

    Shirahase, S

    2001-09-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine how to determine the class position of women, especially married women, in Japan. This study examines three different approaches to conceptualizing women's position in the class structure: the conventional approach, the individual approach, and the dominance approach. Since 1975, the overall rate of female labour force participation in Japan has increased, and given this growth, particularly of employees working outside home, I discuss whether the increased entry of women, particularly married women, into the labour market challenges the conventional way of assigning class positions to women by simply deriving them from their husband's class positions. The data set used in this study is derived from the 1995 Japanese Social Stratification and Mobility Survey. An examination of class distributions suggests that the pictures of macro-class structure provided by the conventional approach and the dominance approach show very little difference. Married women who belong to the female-dominant family still form a very small minority of all married women in the society. Furthermore, the male-dominant family shows the greatest stability over the life course whereas the female-dominant family, where the wife experiences withdrawal from the labour market, is least stable. The increasing number of married women in the labour market, thus, has not yet become a major threat to the conventional way of assigning women to a class position in contemporary Japan. Women, even among those working on a full-time basis, perceive their position in the stratification system using not only their own work, but also their husband's. In contrast, men's perception is determined by their own education and employment, not by their wives'. This asymmetry in the effect of the husband's class and of the wife's class on class identification is related not only to gender inequality within the labour market but also to the division of labour by gender within

  8. Evaluation of Structural Equation Mixture Models: Parameter Estimates and Correct Class Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tueller, Stephen; Lubke, Gitta

    2010-01-01

    Structural equation mixture models (SEMMs) are latent class models that permit the estimation of a structural equation model within each class. Fitting SEMMs is illustrated using data from 1 wave of the Notre Dame Longitudinal Study of Aging. Based on the model used in the illustration, SEMM parameter estimation and correct class assignment are…

  9. Population density, biomass, and age-class structure of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in rivers of the lower San Joaquin River watershed, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.R.; Thompson, J.K.; Higgins, K.; Lucas, L.V.

    2007-01-01

    Corbicula fluminea is well known as an invasive filter-feeding freshwater bivalve with a variety of effects on ecosystem processes. However. C. fluminea has been relatively unstudied in the rivers of the western United States. In June 2003, we sampled C. fluminea at 16 sites in the San Joaquin River watershed of California, which was invaded by C. fluminea in the 1940s. Corbicula fluminea was common in 2 tributaries to the San Joaquin River, reaching densities of 200 clams??m-2, but was rare in the San Joaquin River. Biomass followed a similar pattern. Clams of the same age were shorter in the San Joaquin River than in the tributaries. Distribution of clams was different in the 2 tributaries, but the causes of the difference are unknown. The low density and biomass of clams in the San Joaquin River was likely due to stressful habitat or to water quality, because food was abundant. The success of C. fluminea invasions and subsequent effects on trophic processes likely depends on multiple factors. As C. fluminea continues to expand its range around the world, questions regarding invasion success and effects on ecosystems will become important in a wide array of environmental settings.

  10. Structural aging program status report

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Graves, H.L. III

    1994-12-31

    Research is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of safety-related concrete structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Program accomplishments have included development of the Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, performance assessments of reinforced concrete structures in several United Kingdom nuclear power facilities, evaluation of European and North American repair practices for concrete, an evaluation of factors affecting the corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and application of the time-dependent reliability methodology to reinforced concrete flexure and shear structural elements to investigate the role of in-service inspection and repair on their probability of failure.

  11. Structural aging program status report

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1995-04-01

    Research is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of safety-related concrete structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Program accomplishments have included development of the Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information of the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors of aging factors, performance assessments of reinforced concrete structures in several United Kingdom nuclear power facilities, evaluation of European and North American repair practices for concrete, an evaluation of factors affecting the corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and application of the time-dependent reliability methodology to reinforced concrete flexure and shear structural elements to investigate the role of in-service inspection and repair on their probability of failure.

  12. Natural selection and age-structured populations.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1975-03-01

    This paper studies the properties of a new class of demographic parameters for age-structured populations and analyzes the effect of natural selection on these parameters. Two new demographic variables are introduced: the entropy of a population and the reproductive potential. The entropy of a population measures the variability of the contribution of the different age classes to the stationary population. The reproductive potential measures the mean of the contribution of the different age classes to the Malthusian parameter. The Malthusian parameter is precisely the difference between the entropy and the reproductive potential. The effect of these demographic variables on changes in gene frequency is discussed. The concept of entropy of a genotype is introduced and it is shown that in a random mating population in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and under slow selection, the rate of change of entropy is equal to the genetic variance in entropy minus the covariance in entropy and reproductive potential. This result is an information theoretic analog of Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection.

  13. COMPLEX STRUCTURE IN CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Looney, Leslie W.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang

    2010-04-01

    We use archived Infrared Array Camera images from the Spitzer Space Telescope to show that many Class 0 protostars exhibit complex, irregular, and non-axisymmetric structure within their dusty envelopes. Our 8 {mu}m extinction maps probe some of the densest regions in these protostellar envelopes. Many of the systems are observed to have highly irregular and non-axisymmetric morphologies on scales {approx}>1000 AU, with a quarter of the sample exhibiting filamentary or flattened dense structures. Complex envelope structure is observed in regions spatially distinct from outflow cavities, and the densest structures often show no systematic alignment perpendicular to the cavities. These results indicate that mass ejection is not responsible for much of the irregular morphologies we detect; rather, we suggest that the observed envelope complexity is mostly the result of collapse from protostellar cores with initially non-equilibrium structures. The striking non-axisymmetry in many envelopes could provide favorable conditions for the formation of binary systems. We also note that protostars in the sample appear to be formed preferentially near the edges of clouds or bends in filaments, suggesting formation by gravitational focusing.

  14. Demographic analysis from summaries of an age-structured population.

    PubMed

    Link, William A; Royle, J Andrew; Hatfield, Jeff S

    2003-12-01

    Demographic analyses of age-structured populations typically rely on life history data for individuals, or when individual animals are not identified, on information about the numbers of individuals in each age class through time. While it is usually difficult to determine the age class of a randomly encountered individual, it is often the case that the individual can be readily and reliably assigned to one of a set of age classes. For example, it is often possible to distinguish first-year from older birds. In such cases, the population age structure can be regarded as a latent variable governed by a process prior, and the data as summaries of this latent structure. In this article, we consider the problem of uncovering the latent structure and estimating process parameters from summaries of age class information. We present a demographic analysis for the critically endangered migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana), based only on counts of first-year birds and of older birds. We estimate age and year-specific survival rates. We address the controversial issue of whether management action on the breeding grounds has influenced recruitment, relating recruitment rates to the number of seventh-year and older birds, and examining the pattern of variation through time in this rate.

  15. Demographic analysis from summaries of an age-structured population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, William A.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hatfield, Jeff S.

    2003-01-01

    Demographic analyses of age-structured populations typically rely on life history data for individuals, or when individual animals are not identified, on information about the numbers of individuals in each age class through time. While it is usually difficult to determine the age class of a randomly encountered individual, it is often the case that the individual can be readily and reliably assigned to one of a set of age classes. For example, it is often possible to distinguish first-year from older birds. In such cases, the population age structure can be regarded as a latent variable governed by a process prior, and the data as summaries of this latent structure. In this article, we consider the problem of uncovering the latent structure and estimating process parameters from summaries of age class information. We present a demographic analysis for the critically endangered migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana), based only on counts of first-year birds and of older birds. We estimate age and year-specific survival rates. We address the controversial issue of whether management action on the breeding grounds has influenced recruitment, relating recruitment rates to the number of seventh-year and older birds, and examining the pattern of variation through time in this rate.

  16. Neural network definitions of highly predictable protein secondary structure classes

    SciTech Connect

    Lapedes, A. |; Steeg, E.; Farber, R.

    1994-02-01

    We use two co-evolving neural networks to determine new classes of protein secondary structure which are significantly more predictable from local amino sequence than the conventional secondary structure classification. Accurate prediction of the conventional secondary structure classes: alpha helix, beta strand, and coil, from primary sequence has long been an important problem in computational molecular biology. Neural networks have been a popular method to attempt to predict these conventional secondary structure classes. Accuracy has been disappointingly low. The algorithm presented here uses neural networks to similtaneously examine both sequence and structure data, and to evolve new classes of secondary structure that can be predicted from sequence with significantly higher accuracy than the conventional classes. These new classes have both similarities to, and differences with the conventional alpha helix, beta strand and coil.

  17. Nodal Structure and the Partitioning of Equivalence Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Lanny; Watanabe-Rose, Mari

    2008-01-01

    By definition, all of the stimuli in an equivalence class have to be functionally interchangeable with each other. The present experiment, however, demonstrated that this was not the case when using post-class-formation dual-option response transfer tests. With college students, two 4-node 6-member equivalence classes with nodal structures of…

  18. First in the Class? Age and the Education Production Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cascio, Elizabeth U.; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2016-01-01

    We estimate the effects of relative age in kindergarten using data from an experiment where children of the same age were randomly assigned to different kindergarten classmates. We exploit the resulting experimental variation in relative age in conjunction with variation in expected kindergarten entry age based on birth date to account for…

  19. Building Structure into a Class for Emotionally Disturbed Children: One Teacher's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambone, Joseph

    The paper is a description of how one teacher structured a classroom for five seriously disturbed violent boys (ages 5.5 to 8 years) at a private residential and day school for emotionally disturbed students. Anecdotes are reported as well as the teacher's reflections. Changes in the teacher's original planned class structure while maintaining the…

  20. Disease spread in age structured populations with maternal age effects.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jessica; Garbutt, Jennie S; McNally, Luke; Little, Tom J

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental ecological processes, such as extrinsic mortality, determine population age structure. This influences disease spread when individuals of different ages differ in susceptibility or when maternal age determines offspring susceptibility. We show that Daphnia magna offspring born to young mothers are more susceptible than those born to older mothers, and consider this alongside previous observations that susceptibility declines with age in this system. We used a susceptible-infected compartmental model to investigate how age-specific susceptibility and maternal age effects on offspring susceptibility interact with demographic factors affecting disease spread. Our results show a scenario where an increase in extrinsic mortality drives an increase in transmission potential. Thus, we identify a realistic context in which age effects and maternal effects produce conditions favouring disease transmission.

  1. Education of Social Skills among Senior High School Age Students in Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akelaitis, Arturas V.; Malinauskas, Romualdas K.

    2016-01-01

    Research aim was to reveal peculiarities of the education of social skills among senior high school age students in physical education classes. We hypothesized that after the end of the educational experiment the senior high school age students will have more developed social skills in physical education classes. Participants in the study were 51…

  2. Structural and Cultural Factors in Successful Aging Among Older Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Successful or healthful aging are terms that draw attention to life course issues related to individual, physical, and psychologic development and maturation, but they also draw attention to the material basis of successful aging and the social structures that determine one’s place in the social hierarchy. This article focuses on barriers to optimal aging for Hispanics, especially those of Mexican origin, and argues that cultural factors and social class are closely associated. The reduction of health disparities and equity in medical and long-term care requires an understanding of both cultural and material sources of differential health levels. PMID:19065093

  3. Age-class separation of blue-winged ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hohman, W.L.; Moore, J.L.; Twedt, D.J.; Mensik, John G.; Logerwell, E.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate determination of age is of fundamental importance to population and life history studies of waterfowl and their management. Therefore, we developed quantitative methods that separate adult and immature blue-winged teal (Anas discors), cinnamon teal (A. cyanoptera), and northern shovelers (A. clypeata) during spring and summer. To assess suitability of discriminant models using 9 remigial measurements, we compared model performance (% agreement between predicted age and age assigned to birds on the basis of definitive cloacal or rectral feather characteristics) in different flyways (Mississippi and Pacific) and between years (1990-91 and 1991-92). We also applied age-classification models to wings obtained from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service harvest surveys in the Mississippi and Central-Pacific flyways (wing-bees) for which age had been determined using qualitative characteristics (i.e., remigial markings, shape, or wear). Except for male northern shovelers, models correctly aged lt 90% (range 70-86%) of blue-winged ducks. Model performance varied among species and differed between sexes and years. Proportions of individuals that were correctly aged were greater for males (range 63-86%) than females (range 39-69%). Models for northern shovelers performed better in flyway comparisons within year (1991-92, La. model applied to Calif. birds, and Calif. model applied to La. birds: 90 and 94% for M, and 89 and 76% for F, respectively) than in annual comparisons within the Mississippi Flyway (1991-92 model applied to 1990-91 data: 79% for M, 50% for F). Exclusion of measurements that varied by flyway or year did not improve model performance. Quantitative methods appear to be of limited value for age separation of female blue-winged ducks. Close agreement between predicted age and age assigned to wings from the wing-bees suggests that qualitative and quantitative methods may be equally accurate for age separation of male blue-winged ducks. We interpret annual

  4. Comparison of function of created wetlands of two age classes in central Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Hoeltje, S M; Cole, C A

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogeomorphic (HGM) functional assessment models were used to assess whether function in created wetlands of two ages (1 year old and >12 years old) was equivalent to that of natural (reference) mainstem floodplain wetlands. Reference wetlands scored higher than both created age classes for providing energy dissipation and short-term surface water storage. Reference wetlands scored higher in maintaining native plant community and structure than 1-year-old sites, and 12-year-old wetlands scored higher than reference sites for providing vertebrate habitat structure. Analysis of individual model variables showed that reference wetlands had greater vegetative biomass and higher soil organic matter content than both created wetland age classes. Created wetlands were farther from natural wetlands and had smaller mean forest patch sizes within a 1-km-radius circle around the site than did the reference sites, indicating less hydrologic connectivity. Created wetlands also had less microtopographic variation than reference wetlands. The 1-year-old created sites were placed in landscape settings with greater land use diversity and road density than reference sites. The 12-year-old sites had a higher gradient and a higher percentage of their surrounding area in urban land use. These results show that the created wetlands were significantly structurally different (if not functionally so) from reference wetlands even after 12 years. The most profound differences were in hydrology and the characteristics of the surrounding landscape. More attention needs to be focused on placing created wetlands in appropriate settings to encourage proper hydrodynamics, eliminate habitat fragmentation, and minimize the effects of stressors to the site.

  5. 33 CFR 67.30-1 - Class “C” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class âCâ structures. 67.30-1... NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âCâ Requirements § 67.30-1 Class “C” structures. Class “C” structures shall be the structures erected in an area where Class...

  6. 33 CFR 67.20-1 - Class “A” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class âAâ structures. 67.20-1... NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âAâ Requirements § 67.20-1 Class “A” structures. Class “A” structures shall be the structures erected in an area where Class...

  7. 33 CFR 67.25-1 - Class “B” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class âBâ structures. 67.25-1... NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements § 67.25-1 Class “B” structures. Class “B” structures shall be the structures erected in an area where Class...

  8. Dance Class Structure Affects Youth Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: A Study of Seven Dance Types

    PubMed Central

    Lopez Castillo, Maria A.; Carlson, Jordan A.; Cain, Kelli L.; Bonilla, Edith A.; Chuang, Emmeline; Elder, John P.; Sallis, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Study aims were to determine: (a) how class structure varies by dance type, (b) how moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behavior (SB) vary by dance class segments, and (c) how class structure relates to total MVPA in dance classes. Methods Participants were 291 boys and girls ages 5–18 yr. enrolled in 58 dance classes at 21 dance studios in Southern California. MVPA and SB were assessed with accelerometry, with data aggregated to 15-sec epochs. Percent and minutes of MVPA and SB during dance class segments and percent of class time and minutes spent in each segment were calculated using Freedson age-specific cut points. Differences in MVPA (>3 METS) and SB (<100 counts/min) were examined using mixed effects linear regression. Results The length of each class segment was fairly consistent across dance types, with the exception that in ballet, more time was spent in technique as compared to private jazz/hip-hop classes, and Latin-flamenco and less time was spent in routine/practice as compared to Latin-salsa/ballet folklorico. Segment type accounted for 17% of the variance in the proportion of the segment spent in MVPA. The proportion of the segment in MVPA was higher for routine/practice (44.2%) than technique (34.7%). The proportion of the segment in SB was lowest for routine/practice (22.8%). Conclusion The structure of dance lessons can impact youth’s physical activity. Working with instructors to increase time in routine/practice during dance classes could contribute to physical activity promotion in youth. PMID:25775088

  9. Structure of Class B GPCRs: new horizons for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Bortolato, Andrea; Doré, Andrew S; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Tehan, Benjamin G; Mason, Jonathan S; Marshall, Fiona H

    2014-01-01

    Class B GPCRs of the secretin family are important drug targets in many human diseases including diabetes, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and psychiatric disorders. X-ray crystal structures for the glucagon receptor and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 have now been published. In this review, we analyse the new structures and how they compare with each other and with Class A and F receptors. We also consider the differences in druggability and possible similarity in the activation mechanisms. Finally, we discuss the potential for the design of small-molecule modulators for these important targets in drug discovery. This new structural insight allows, for the first time, structure-based drug design methods to be applied to Class B GPCRs. PMID:24628305

  10. Does 3rd Age + 3rd World = 3rd Class?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tout, Ken

    1992-01-01

    Demographic changes, migration, and industrialization are having drastic effects on older adults in developing nations. Local programs such as Pro Vida in Colombia, supported by Help Age International, rely on the support of volunteers to improve the quality of life for elderly people. (SK)

  11. Tropical forest biomass and successional age class relationships to a vegetation index derived from Landsat TM data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.; Waide, Robert B.; Lawrence, William T.; Joyce, Armond T.

    1989-01-01

    Forest stand structure and biomass data were collected using conventional forest inventory techniques in tropical, subtropical, and warm temperate forest biomes. The feasibility of detecting tropical forest successional age class and total biomass differences using Landsat-Thematic mapper (TM) data, was evaluated. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) calculated from Landsat-TM data were not significantly correlated with forest regeneration age classes in the mountain terrain of the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. The low sun angle and shadows cast on steep north and west facing slopes reduced spectral reflectance values recorded by TM orbital altitude. The NDVI, calculated from low altitude aircraft scanner data, was significatly correlated with forest age classes. However, analysis of variance suggested that NDVI differences were not detectable for successional forests older than approximately 15-20 years. Also, biomass differences in young successional tropical forest were not detectable using the NDVI. The vegetation index does not appear to be a good predictor of stand structure variables (e.g., height, diameter of main stem) or total biomass in uneven age, mixed broadleaf forest. Good correlation between the vegetation index and low biomass in even age pine plantations were achieved for a warm temperate study site. The implications of the study for the use of NDVI for forest structure and biomass estimation are discussed.

  12. Spatial and temporal variations in the age structure of Arctic sea ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, G.I.; Douglas, D.C.; Platonov, N.G.

    2005-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the age structure of Arctic sea ice are investigated using a new reverse chronology algorithm that tracks ice-covered pixels to their location and date of origin based on ice motion and concentration data. The Beaufort Gyre tends to harbor the oldest (>10 years old) sea ice in the western Arctic while direct ice advection pathways toward the Transpolar Drift Stream maintain relatively young (10 years old (10+ year age class) were observed during 1989-2003. Since the mid-1990s, losses to the 10+ year age class lacked compensation by recruitment due to a prior depletion of all mature (6-10 year) age classes. Survival of the 1994 and 1996-1998 sea ice generations reestablished most mature age classes, and thereby the potential to increase extent of the 10+ year age class during the mid-2000s.

  13. A Way Forward: Nurturing the Imagination at the Intersection of Race, Class, Gender, and Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockhart-Gilroy, Annie A.

    2016-01-01

    Those who are oppressed often find themselves internalizing voices that limit their ability. This article focuses on a population that falls on the non-hegemonic side of the intersection of race, class, gender, and age: Black girls from poor and working-class backgrounds. From my work with youth, I have noticed that internalizing these limiting…

  14. Structure-activity relationship for the oxadiazole class of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Spink, Edward; Ding, Derong; Peng, Zhihong; Boudreau, Marc A; Leemans, Erika; Lastochkin, Elena; Song, Wei; Lichtenwalter, Katerina; O'Daniel, Peter I; Testero, Sebastian A; Pi, Hualiang; Schroeder, Valerie A; Wolter, William R; Antunes, Nuno T; Suckow, Mark A; Vakulenko, Sergei; Chang, Mayland; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2015-02-12

    The structure-activity relationship (SAR) for the newly discovered oxadiazole class of antibiotics is described with evaluation of 120 derivatives of the lead structure. This class of antibiotics was discovered by in silico docking and scoring against the crystal structure of a penicillin-binding protein. They impair cell-wall biosynthesis and exhibit activities against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant and linezolid-resistant S. aureus. 5-(1H-Indol-5-yl)-3-(4-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy)phenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole (antibiotic 75b) was efficacious in a mouse model of MRSA infection, exhibiting a long half-life, a high volume of distribution, and low clearance. This antibiotic is bactericidal and is orally bioavailable in mice. This class of antibiotics holds great promise in recourse against infections by MRSA.

  15. Nicotinamide: a class III HDACi delays in vitro aging of mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Reum; Kishigami, Satoshi; Amano, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Hosoi, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Postovulatory mammalian oocyte developmental potential decreases with aging in vivo and in vitro. Aging oocytes typically show cellular fragmentation and chromosome scattering with an abnormally shaped spindle over time. Previously, it was shown that histone acetylation in the mouse oocyte increased during aging and that treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor for class I and II histone deacetylases (HDACs), enhanced the acetylation, that is, aging. In this study, we examined the effect of nicotinamide (NAM), an inhibitor for class III HDACs, on in vitro aging of mouse oocytes as well as TSA. We found that treatment with NAM significantly inhibited cellular fragmentation, spindle elongation and astral microtubules up to 48 h of culture. Although presence of TSA partially inhibited cellular fragmentation and spindle elongation up to 36 h of culture, treatment with TSA induced chromosome scattering at 24 h of culture and more severe cellular fragmentation at 48 h of culture. Further, we found that α-tubulin, a nonhistone protein, increased acetylation during aging, suggesting that not only histone but nonhistone protein acetylation may also increase with oocyte aging. Thus, these data indicate that protein acetylation is abnormally regulated in aging oocytes, which are associated with a variety of aging phenotypes, and that class I/II and class III HDACs may play distinct roles in aging oocytes.

  16. Class I Microcins: Their Structures, Activities, and Mechanisms of Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severinov, Konstantin; Semenova, Ekaterina; Kazakov, Teymur

    Microcin J25, microcin B17, and microcin C7-C51 are the three known members of class I posttranslationally modified microcins (heavily posttranslationally modified antibacterial peptides produced by Enterobacteriaceae with molecular weights of less than 5 kDa). The three microcins are unrelated to each other; they have structures that are highly atypical for ribosomally synthesized peptides and target essential molecular machines that are validated drug targets. In this chapter, available data on mechanisms of action, structure-activity relationships, and immunity mechanisms for class I microcins and related compounds are discussed.

  17. Structural Imaging Measures of Brain Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Samuel N.

    2014-01-01

    During the course of normal aging, biological changes occur in the brain that are associated with changes in cognitive ability. This review presents data from neuroimaging studies of primarily “normal” or healthy brain aging. As such, we focus on research in unimpaired or nondemented older adults, but also include findings from lifespan studies that include younger and middle aged individuals as well as from populations with prodromal or clinically symptomatic disease such as cerebrovascular or Alzheimer’s disease. This review predominantly addresses structural MRI biomarkers, such as volumetric or thickness measures from anatomical images, and measures of white matter injury and integrity respectively from FLAIR or DTI, and includes complementary data from PET and cognitive or clinical testing as appropriate. The findings reveal highly consistent age-related differences in brain structure, particularly frontal lobe and medial temporal regions that are also accompanied by age-related differences in frontal and medial temporal lobe mediated cognitive abilities. Newer findings also suggest that degeneration of specific white matter tracts such as those passing through the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum may also be related to age-related differences in cognitive performance. Interpretation of these findings, however, must be tempered by the fact that comorbid diseases such as cerebrovascular and Alzheimer’s disease also increase in prevalence with advancing age. As such, this review discusses challenges related to interpretation of current theories of cognitive aging in light of the common occurrence of these later-life diseases. Understanding the differences between “Normal” and “Healthy” brain aging and identifying potential modifiable risk factors for brain aging is critical to inform potential treatments to stall or reverse the effects of brain aging and possibly extend cognitive health for our aging society. PMID:25146995

  18. Controllable tensegrity: a new class of smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, Robert T.; Sultan, Cornel

    1997-06-01

    Tensegrity structures represent a special class of tendon space structures, whose members may simultaneously perform the functions of strength, sensing, actuating and feedback control. Thus, these structures ideally match the definition of smart structures. This paper introduces the concept of controllable tensegrity as a new class of smart structures capable of large displacement. The kinematics and nonlinear dynamics of one element of this class is derived and analyzed. Pre-stressability conditions are given and a particular equilibrium identified. The equations of motion are then linearized about this equilibrium and linear parametric models generated. These are next used for controller design. For control system design some of the tendons are chosen as actuators and some as sensors and a family of dynamic controllers designed such that the control energy is minimized while requiring output variance constraints to be satisfied. Another family of controllers is designed such that the output variance is minimized while requiring input variance constraints to be satisfied. The performances of these controllers are evaluated.

  19. Continuous Age-Structured Model for Bovine Tuberculosis in African buffalo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguelov, R.; Kojouharov, H.

    2009-10-01

    The paper deals with a model of the spread of bovine tuberculosis in the buffalo population in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The model uses continuous age structure and it is formulated in terms of partial differential equations using eight epidemiological classes (compartments). More precisely, the age density for each class at time t satisfies a one way wave equation, where the age is the space variable. The continuous age model discussed here is derived from a 2006 age groups model by P. C. Cross and W. M. Getz.

  20. Structural integrity of future aging airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Jack F.; Goranson, Ulf G.

    1992-01-01

    A multitude of design considerations is involved in ensuring the structural integrity of Boeing jet transports that have common design concepts validated by extensive analyses, tests, and three decades of service. As airplanes approach their design service objectives, the incidences of fatigue and corrosion may become widespread. Continuing airworthiness of the aging jet fleet requires diligent performance from the manufacturer, the airlines, and airworthiness authorities. Aging fleet support includes timely development of supplemental structural inspection documents applicable to selected older airplanes, teardown inspections of high-time airframes retired from service, fatigue testing of older airframes, and structural surveys of more than 130 airplanes operated throughout the world. Lessons learned from these activities are incorporated in service bulletin recommendations, production line modifications, and design manual updates. An overview of traditional Boeing fleet support activities and the anticipated benefits for future generations of commercial airplanes based on the continuous design improvement process are presented.

  1. Effects of Age, Gender, School Class on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills of Nigerian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin; Onyeaso, Chukwudi Ochi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The need for training of schoolchildren on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as potential bystander CPR providers is growing globally but Nigeria is still behind and lacks basic necessary data. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of age, gender and school class on CPR skills of Nigerian secondary school…

  2. Social Skills Expression of Senior High School Age Students in Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akelaitis, Arturas V.

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to reveal the peculiarities of social skills expression of senior high school age students in physical education classes. The independent random sample consisted of 244 (15-16 years old) students and 258 (17-18 years old) students, of which there were 224 boys and 278 girls. L. Bulotaite and V. Gudžinskiene…

  3. Dynamic analysis of a hepatitis B model with three-age-classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Suxia; Zhou, Yicang

    2014-07-01

    Based on the fact that the likelihood of becoming chronically infected is dependent on age at primary infection Kane (1995) [2], Edmunds et al. (1993) [3], Medley et al. (2001) [4], and Ganem and Prince (2004) [6], we formulate a hepatitis B transmission model with three age classes. The reproduction number, R0 is defined and the dynamical behavior of the model is analyzed. It is proved that the disease-free equilibrium is globally stable if R0<1, and there exists at least one endemic equilibrium and that the disease is uniformly persistent if R0>1. The unique endemic equilibrium and its global stability is obtained in a special case. Simulations are also conducted to compare the dynamical behavior of the model with and without age classes.

  4. Relative Age Effects in Mathematics and Reading: Investigating the Generalizability across Students, Time and Classes

    PubMed Central

    Thoren, Katharina; Heinig, Elisa; Brunner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A child's age in comparison to the age of her or his classmates (relative age) has been found to be an influential factor on academic achievement, particularly but not exclusively at the beginning of formal schooling. However, few studies have focused on the generalizability of relative age effects. To close this gap, the present study analyzes the generalizability across students with and without immigrant backgrounds, across three student cohorts that entered school under a changing law of school enrollment, and across classes. To this end, we capitalized on representative large-scale data sets from three student cohorts attending public schools in Berlin, the capital of Germany. We analyzed the data using a multilevel framework. Our results for the overall student sample indicate relative age effects for reading and mathematics in favor of the relatively older students in Grade 2 that become somewhat smaller in size in Grade 3. By Grade 8, relative age effects had vanished in reading and had even reversed in favor of the relatively young in mathematics. Furthermore, relative age effects were not found to be systematically different among students with and without immigrant backgrounds, student cohorts, or across classes. Taken together, these results empirically underscore the broad generalizability of the findings as found for the overall student population and replicate the pattern of findings on relative effects as identified by the majority of previous studies. PMID:27242593

  5. Relative Age Effects in Mathematics and Reading: Investigating the Generalizability across Students, Time and Classes.

    PubMed

    Thoren, Katharina; Heinig, Elisa; Brunner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A child's age in comparison to the age of her or his classmates (relative age) has been found to be an influential factor on academic achievement, particularly but not exclusively at the beginning of formal schooling. However, few studies have focused on the generalizability of relative age effects. To close this gap, the present study analyzes the generalizability across students with and without immigrant backgrounds, across three student cohorts that entered school under a changing law of school enrollment, and across classes. To this end, we capitalized on representative large-scale data sets from three student cohorts attending public schools in Berlin, the capital of Germany. We analyzed the data using a multilevel framework. Our results for the overall student sample indicate relative age effects for reading and mathematics in favor of the relatively older students in Grade 2 that become somewhat smaller in size in Grade 3. By Grade 8, relative age effects had vanished in reading and had even reversed in favor of the relatively young in mathematics. Furthermore, relative age effects were not found to be systematically different among students with and without immigrant backgrounds, student cohorts, or across classes. Taken together, these results empirically underscore the broad generalizability of the findings as found for the overall student population and replicate the pattern of findings on relative effects as identified by the majority of previous studies.

  6. Crystal Structure of Patatin-17 in Complex with Aged and Non-Aged Organophosphorus Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva J.; Richardson, Rudy J.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.

    2014-01-01

    Patatin is a non-specific plant lipase and the eponymous member of a broad class of serine hydrolases termed the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing proteins (PNPLAs). Certain PNPLA family members can be inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) compounds. Currently, no structural data are available on the modes of interaction between the PNPLAs and OP compounds or their native substrates. To this end, we present the crystal structure of patatin-17 (pat17) in its native state as well as following inhibition with methyl arachidonyl fluorophosphonate (MAFP) and inhibition/aging with diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP). The native pat17 structure revealed the existence of two portals (portal1 and portal2) that lead to its active-site chamber. The DFP-inhibited enzyme underwent the aging process with the negatively charged phosphoryl oxygen, resulting from the loss of an isopropyl group, being within hydrogen-binding distance to the oxyanion hole. The MAFP-inhibited pat17 structure showed that MAFP did not age following its interaction with the nucleophilic serine residue (Ser77) of pat17 since its O-methyl group was intact. The MAFP moiety is oriented with its phosphoryl oxygen in close proximity to the oxyanion hole of pat17 and its O-methyl group located farther away from the oxyanion hole of pat17 relative to the DFP-bound state. The orientation of the alkoxy oxygens within the two OP compounds suggests a role for the oxyanion hole in stabilizing the emerging negative charge on the oxygen during the aging reaction. The arachidonic acid side chain of MAFP could be contained within portals 1 or 2. Comparisons of pat17 in the native, inhibited, and aged states showed no significant global conformational changes with respect to their Cα backbones, consistent with observations from other α/β hydrolases such as group VIIA phospholipase A2. PMID:25248161

  7. Social class, prenatal care, maternal age and parity: a study of their interrelation in six Italian centres.

    PubMed

    Cortinovis, I; Boracchi, P; De Scrilli, A; Milani, S; Bertulessi, C; Zuliani, G; Bevilacqua, G; Corchia, C; Davanzo, R; Selvaggi, L

    1986-01-01

    "Multiple Correspondence Analysis was used to describe the complex structure formed by those sociodemographic variables, whose association with the occurrence of prenatal and neonatal deaths and diseases has been most frequently stressed in literature: social class, prenatal care, maternal age and parity. The study regards 41,537 women included in a multicentre survey of perinatal preventive medicine, which was carried out, between 1973 and 1979, in six Italian centres...." It is found that "in all centres there are distinct groups of women characterized by a set of unfavourable factors closely interrelated: low social class implies lower prenatal care, higher occurrence of precocious or belated childbearing and higher number of pregnancies, often unintended." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND ITA)

  8. Nodal Structure and Stimulus Relatedness in Equivalence Classes: Post-Class Formation Preference Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss-Lourenco, Patricia; Fields, Lanny

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments used postclass formation within-class preference test performances to evaluate the effects of nodal distance on the relatedness of stimuli in equivalence classes. In Experiment 1, two 2-node four-member equivalence classes were established using the simultaneous protocol in which all of the baseline relations were trained…

  9. AGE-STRUCTURAL TRANSITION IN INDONESIA

    PubMed Central

    Kreager, Philip; Schröder-Butterfill, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This paper responds to recent calls for empirical study of the impact of age-structural transition. It begins by reviewing evidence of cohort oscillations in twentieth-century Indonesia, which indicates that current older generations are likely to have smaller numbers of children on whom they may rely than generations before and after them. However, to assess whether the imbalances implied by this situation are actually influencing people’s lives, attention to further factors shaping the availability and reliability of younger generations, notably differences in socio-economic status and in patterns of inter-generational support flows, is required. Community-level Indonesian data confirm that elders in the lower social strata are child-poor. Social structural and family network patterns, however, have a greater influence on the availability of inter-generational support than cohort differentials. PMID:27158254

  10. Race, childhood insulin, childhood caloric intake, and class 3 obesity at age 24: 14-year prospective study of schoolgirls.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John A; Glueck, Charles J; Daniels, Stephen R; Wang, Ping

    2012-03-01

    The prevalence of Class 3 obesity (BMI ≥40 kg/m(2)) has more than doubled in the past 25 years. In a 14-year prospective study from age 10 to 24 of a biracial schoolgirl cohort (293 black, 256 white), we assessed childhood correlates of Class 3 BMI at age 24. Of 42 girls with Class 3 BMI at age 24, 36 (86%) were black. By logistic regression, significant explanatory variables of Class 3 BMI at age 24 included top decile waist circumference at age 11 (odds ratio (OR) 5.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-13.9, P = 0.0002), age 10 BMI ≥ the Center for Disease Control (CDC) 2000 top 15% (OR 7.0, 95% CI 2.5-19.3, P = 0.0002), and a three-way interaction between race, childhood insulin, and average caloric intake from age 10 to age 19 (for each unit increase, OR 1.7 95% CI 1.3-2.2, P = 0.0003). Age 10 BMI, age 11 waist circumference, and interaction of race, childhood insulin, and childhood caloric intake predict Class 3 obesity in young adulthood, facilitating childhood identification of girls at high risk for developing Class 3 obesity.

  11. Structural Basis for Activation of Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-12-03

    The class Ib ribonucleotide reductase of Escherichia coli can initiate reduction of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides with either a Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-tyrosyl radical (Y{sm_bullet}) or a Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor in the NrdF subunit. Whereas Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} can self-assemble from Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and O{sub 2}, activation of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF requires a reduced flavoprotein, NrdI, proposed to form the oxidant for cofactor assembly by reduction of O{sub 2}. The crystal structures reported here of E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF reveal different coordination environments, suggesting distinct initial binding sites for the oxidants during cofactor activation. In the structures of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF in complex with reduced and oxidized NrdI, a continuous channel connects the NrdI flavin cofactor to the NrdF Mn{sub 2}{sup II} active site. Crystallographic detection of a putative peroxide in this channel supports the proposed mechanism of Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly.

  12. Restoration of Retarded Influenza Virus-specific Immunoglobulin Class Switch in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongxin; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Monica; Liu, Lin; Mbawuike, Innocent N

    2016-01-01

    Objective The declined immune response to infection causes significant higher morbidity and mortality in aging in spite of the coexisted hyperimmunoglobulinemia (HIG). This study is to reveal the cellular basis of HIG and mechanism of weakened HA-specific IgG response in aged mice and to test cell therapy in the treatment of age-related IgG antibody production deficiency with immunocyte adoptive transfer. Methods BALB/c mice was immunized with Influenza A/Taiwan vaccine and challenged with the same strain of virus. ELISA was used to assess the levels of total immunoglobulins and antigen specific antibody response. The flow cytometry and ELISPOT were used to evaluate the frequencies of total immunoglobulin- and specific antibody-producing and secreting B lymphocytes. In vitro expanded mononuclear cells, CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD20+ B lymphocytes from old and young mice were adoptively transferred into influenza virus-challenged aged mice, and HA-specific IgG responses were observed. Results It is found that old mice exhibited higher levels of total serum IgG, IgM and IgA, higher frequencies of IgG+, IgM+ and IgA+ cells, and greater antigen-specific IgM and IgA responses to influenza infection, in comparison to young mice. However, influenza antigen- specific IgG and its subclass responses in old mice were significantly lower. Conclusion The retarded specific IgG response could be attributed to an insufficiency of immunoglobulin class switch in aging. Correlation analysis indicated that HIG and deficient specific IgG production in aged mice could be independent to each other in their pathogenesis. Correction of deficient specific IgG production by adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded and unexpanded CD4+ cells from immunized young mice suggests the CD4+ cell dysfunction contributes to the insufficiency of immunoglobulin class switch in aged mice. The transfusion of in vitro expanded lymphocytes could be a potential effective therapy for the age

  13. Common structural requirements for heptahelical domain function in class A and class C G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Binet, Virginie; Duthey, Béatrice; Lecaillon, Jennifer; Vol, Claire; Quoyer, Julie; Labesse, Gilles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prézeau, Laurent

    2007-04-20

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in cell communication. Several classes of such receptors have been identified. Although all GPCRs possess a heptahelical domain directly activating G proteins, important structural and sequence differences within receptors from different classes suggested distinct activation mechanisms. Here we show that highly conserved charged residues likely involved in an interaction network between transmembrane domains (TM) 3 and 6 at the cytoplasmic side of class C GPCRs are critical for activation of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor. Indeed, the loss of function resulting from the mutation of the conserved lysine residue into aspartate or glutamate in the TM3 of gamma-aminobutyric acid type B(2) can be partly rescued by mutating the conserved acidic residue of TM6 into either lysine or arginine. In addition, mutation of the conserved lysine into an acidic residue leads to a nonfunctional receptor that displays a high agonist affinity. This is reminiscent of a similar ionic network that constitutes a lock stabilizing the inactive state of many class A rhodopsin-like GPCRs. These data reveal that despite their original structure, class C GPCRs share with class A receptors at least some common structural feature controlling G protein activation.

  14. Long-term outcome of surgical Class III correction as a function of age at surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, L'Tanya J.; Phillips, Ceib; Proffit, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we assessed whether the likelihood of a positive overjet 5 to 10 years after Class III surgery was affected by age at the surgery or the type of surgery and evaluated the amount and pattern of postsurgical growth. Methods Cephalometric measurements including overjet were evaluated from immediately postsurgery and long-term recall cephalograms of 104 patients who had had surgical Class III correction and at least 5-year recalls. The patients were classified as younger (<age 18 years for females at the surgery or 20 years for males) or older and by type of surgery (maxilla only vs mandibular only or 2 jaw). For the younger patients, the timing of treatment was based largely on serial cephalometric radiographs that eventually showed minimal or no mandibular growth. Results Long-term changes in overjet and other cephalometric characteristics in the younger and the older patients were similar. No patients in the sample had negative overjet in the long term, but zero overjet (<1 mm) was observed in some patients in all groups. Patients who had mandibular setback at any age were 2.6 times more likely to have zero overjet in the long term (P = .003) than those with maxillary surgery alone. For the younger patients, the likelihood of zero overjet in the long term was not significantly different from patients who were treated later (P = .87), with or without mandibular surgery. Conclusions The data support the use of serial cephalometric radiographs, with surgery deferred until little or no mandibular growth is observed, to determine the timing of Class III surgery in younger patients. PMID:18331934

  15. The Use of Bayesian Latent Class Cluster Models to Classify Patterns of Cognitive Performance in Healthy Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Pedro; Palha, Joana Almeida; Sousa, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of this study is to illustrate the applicability of latent class analysis in the assessment of cognitive performance profiles during ageing. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to detect main cognitive dimensions (based on the neurocognitive test variables) and Bayesian latent class analysis (LCA) models (without constraints) were used to explore patterns of cognitive performance among community-dwelling older individuals. Gender, age and number of school years were explored as variables. Three cognitive dimensions were identified: general cognition (MMSE), memory (MEM) and executive (EXEC) function. Based on these, three latent classes of cognitive performance profiles (LC1 to LC3) were identified among the older adults. These classes corresponded to stronger to weaker performance patterns (LC1>LC2>LC3) across all dimensions; each latent class denoted the same hierarchy in the proportion of males, age and number of school years. Bayesian LCA provided a powerful tool to explore cognitive typologies among healthy cognitive agers. PMID:23977183

  16. Multifunctional electronic structure in a topological insulator class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Suyang; Hasan, Zahid

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of topological properties in three dimensional bulk solids have opened up many new research avenues in condensed matter physics. Only a very few compounds have been identified to be topological insulators to this date. However, none of them is proven to be suitable for the majority of experimental configurations including giant magnetoelectric and anomalous optical rotation, unusual exciton condensation, or the neutral half-fermions and interface superconductivity. In fact the realization of even any one of these proposals requires a number of multiply-connected topological compounds with modulated surface band dispersions and naturally tuned in-gap Fermi level, as well as spin variations in the presence of long life-time of the surface states. Here, using conventional and spin-sensitive probes, we report the discovery of several classes of positive band-gap high figure of merit topological insulators with critically important functional properties such as high degree of bulk resistivity and insulation, electronic structure with both in-gap Dirac point and Fermi level crossing, long surface state life-times, as well as chirality inversion through the Dirac node. The unprecedented combinations of electronic, spin, life-time and resistive bulk transport featured by the topological insulators uncovered here not only provide a new platform for research on topological quantum phenomena but also pave the way for functional devices.

  17. [Dry matter storage and water soluble sugar content in different age classes rhizomes of Phragmites communis population in dry land habitat of Songnen Plain of China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Bao-Tian; Tian, Shang-Yi

    2008-09-01

    Based on the investigation and measurement of Phragmites communis in a single dominant species community in dry land habitat of Songnen Plain, the seasonal variation of dry matter storage and water soluble sugar content in different age classes rhizomes at three growth stages were analyzed. The results showed that at all growth stages, younger age class rhizomes had lower dry matter storage and water soluble sugar content, and there was an obvious difference between younger and older age classes. The dry matter storage and water soluble sugar content in younger age class rhizomes increased rapidly with growth season, and the difference between younger and older age classes reduced gradually. In the whole growth season, all the rhizomes of six age classes kept up the activities in nutrient consumption, re-storage and even overcompensating storage, and the activities of younger age class rhizomes were much higher. The dry matter storage and water soluble sugar content in older age class rhizomes increased with year. There existed extremely significant differences (P < 0.01) in the dry matter storage within and among different age class rhizomes, and the difference was larger within age classes than among age classes. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in water soluble sugar content were also observed among different age class rhizomes. The dry matter storage and water soluble sugar content in P. communis rhizomes increased in quadratic with increasing age class.

  18. Differential range use between age classes of southern African Bearded Vultures Gypaetus barbatus.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Sonja; Reid, Timothy; Amar, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus movements were investigated in southern Africa to determine whether an individual's age, sex or breeding status influenced its ranging behaviour and to provide the information required to guide conservation activities. Data from satellite transmitters fitted to 18 individuals of four age classes were used to determine range size and use. Because of the nature of the movements of marked individuals, these data could be used to determine the overall foraging range of the entire population, which was estimated to be 51 767 km(2). Although juvenile, immature and sub-adult birds used different parts of the overall range, their combined foraging range was 65% (33 636 km(2)) of the overall range. Average adult home ranges (286 km(2)) were only around 1% the size of the average foraging ranges of non-adults (10 540 -25 985 km(2)), with those of breeding adults being even smaller (95 km(2)). Home ranges of breeding adults did not vary in size between seasons but adults utilized their home range more intensively whilst breeding, moving greater distances during the incubation and chick hatching period. Range size and use increased as non-adults aged. Immatures and sub-adults had larger range sizes during winter, but range use of non-adults did not vary seasonally. Range size and use did not differ between the sexes in any of the age classes. Information on home range size and use enables specific areas within the species' range to be targeted for management planning, education and conservation action.

  19. Differential Range Use between Age Classes of Southern African Bearded Vultures Gypaetus barbatus

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Sonja; Reid, Timothy; Amar, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus movements were investigated in southern Africa to determine whether an individual's age, sex or breeding status influenced its ranging behaviour and to provide the information required to guide conservation activities. Data from satellite transmitters fitted to 18 individuals of four age classes were used to determine range size and use. Because of the nature of the movements of marked individuals, these data could be used to determine the overall foraging range of the entire population, which was estimated to be 51 767 km2. Although juvenile, immature and sub-adult birds used different parts of the overall range, their combined foraging range was 65% (33 636 km2) of the overall range. Average adult home ranges (286 km2) were only around 1% the size of the average foraging ranges of non-adults (10 540 –25 985 km2), with those of breeding adults being even smaller (95 km2). Home ranges of breeding adults did not vary in size between seasons but adults utilized their home range more intensively whilst breeding, moving greater distances during the incubation and chick hatching period. Range size and use increased as non-adults aged. Immatures and sub-adults had larger range sizes during winter, but range use of non-adults did not vary seasonally. Range size and use did not differ between the sexes in any of the age classes. Information on home range size and use enables specific areas within the species' range to be targeted for management planning, education and conservation action. PMID:25551614

  20. Age class, longevity and growth rate relationships: protracted growth increases in old trees in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah E; Abrams, Marc D

    2009-11-01

    This study uses data from the International Tree-Ring Data Bank website and tree cores collected in the field to explore growth rate (basal area increment, BAI) relationships across age classes (from young to old) for eight tree species in the eastern US. These species represent a variety of ecological traits and include those in the genera Populus, Quercus, Pinus, Tsuga and Nyssa. We found that most trees in all age classes and species exhibit an increasing BAI throughout their lives. This is particularly unusual for trees in the older age classes that we expected to have declining growth in the later years, as predicted by physiological growth models. There exists an inverse relationship between growth rate and increasing age class. The oldest trees within each species have consistently slow growth throughout their lives, implying an inverse relationship between growth rate and longevity. Younger trees (< 60 years of age) within each species are consistently growing faster than the older trees when they are of the same age resulting from a higher proportion of fast-growing trees in these young age classes. Slow, but increasing, BAI in the oldest trees in recent decades is a continuation of their growth pattern established in previous centuries. The fact that they have not shown a decreasing growth rate in their old age contradicts physiological growth models and may be related to the stimulatory effects of global change phenomenon (climate and land-use history).

  1. The Impact of Ignoring the Level of Nesting Structure in Nonparametric Multilevel Latent Class Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jungkyu; Yu, Hsiu-Ting

    2016-01-01

    The multilevel latent class model (MLCM) is a multilevel extension of a latent class model (LCM) that is used to analyze nested structure data structure. The nonparametric version of an MLCM assumes a discrete latent variable at a higher-level nesting structure to account for the dependency among observations nested within a higher-level unit. In…

  2. Normative and Structural Perspectives on Age in a Work Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Barbara S.

    Age grading, the differentiation of social groups by members' age judgments, is widely regarded to be a universal aspect of social life. Most studies have examined age structurally (demographically), rather than normatively (modally). This study presents survey data measuring employees' age judgments of managerial careers collected from an…

  3. Structural, Functional, and Taxonomic Diversity of Three PreQ1 Riboswitch Classes

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Zasha; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Previously, two riboswitch classes have been identified that sense and respond to the hypermodified nucleobase called pre-queuosine1 (preQ1). The enormous expansion of available genomic DNA sequence data creates new opportunities to identify additional representatives of the known riboswitch classes and to discover novel classes. We conducted bioinformatics searches on microbial genomic DNA datasets to discover numerous additional examples belonging to the two previously known riboswitch classes for preQ1 (classes preQ1-I and preQ1-II), including some structural variants that further restrict ligand specificity. Additionally, we discovered a third preQ1-binding riboswitch class (preQ1-III) that is structurally distinct from previously known classes. These findings demonstrate that numerous organisms monitor the concentrations of this modified nucleobase by exploiting one or more riboswitch classes for this widespread compound. PMID:25036777

  4. Age Differences Explain Social Class Differences in Students' Friendship at University: Implications for Transition and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Mark; Wright, Chrysalis L.

    2015-01-01

    The present research tested the hypotheses that (a) working-class students have fewer friends at university than middle-class students and (b) this social class difference occurs because working-class students tend to be older than middle-class students. A sample of 376 first-year undergraduate students from an Australian university completed an…

  5. Aging IQ Intervention with Older Korean Americans: A Comparison of Internet-Based and In-Class Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Yuri; Yoon, Hyunwoo; Marti, C. Nathan; Kim, Miyong T.

    2015-01-01

    Using the translated contents of the National Institute on Aging (NIA)'s Aging IQ, an educational intervention was delivered to older Korean Americans. The educational program was delivered via two different modalities, Internet-based education (n = 12) and in-class education (n = 11), and the overall feasibility and efficacy were evaluated by the…

  6. Spatio-Temporal Variation in Age Structure and Abundance of the Endangered Snail Kite: Pooling across Regions Masks a Declining and Aging Population

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, William L.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2016-01-01

    While variation in age structure over time and space has long been considered important for population dynamics and conservation, reliable estimates of such spatio-temporal variation in age structure have been elusive for wild vertebrate populations. This limitation has arisen because of problems of imperfect detection, the potential for temporary emigration impacting assessments of age structure, and limited information on age. However, identifying patterns in age structure is important for making reliable predictions of both short- and long-term dynamics of populations of conservation concern. Using a multistate superpopulation estimator, we estimated region-specific abundance and age structure (the proportion of individuals within each age class) of a highly endangered population of snail kites for two separate regions in Florida over 17 years (1997–2013). We find that in the southern region of the snail kite—a region known to be critical for the long-term persistence of the species—the population has declined significantly since 1997, and during this time, it has increasingly become dominated by older snail kites (> 12 years old). In contrast, in the northern region—a region historically thought to serve primarily as drought refugia—the population has increased significantly since 2007 and age structure is more evenly distributed among age classes. Given that snail kites show senescence at approximately 13 years of age, where individuals suffer higher mortality rates and lower breeding rates, these results reveal an alarming trend for the southern region. Our work illustrates the importance of accounting for spatial structure when assessing changes in abundance and age distribution and the need for monitoring of age structure in imperiled species. PMID:27681854

  7. Spatio-temporal variation in age structure and abundance of the endangered snail kite: Pooling across regions masks a declining and aging population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichert, Brian E.; Kendall, William; Fletcher, Robert J.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2016-01-01

    While variation in age structure over time and space has long been considered important for population dynamics and conservation, reliable estimates of such spatio-temporal variation in age structure have been elusive for wild vertebrate populations. This limitation has arisen because of problems of imperfect detection, the potential for temporary emigration impacting assessments of age structure, and limited information on age. However, identifying patterns in age structure is important for making reliable predictions of both short- and long-term dynamics of populations of conservation concern. Using a multistate superpopulation estimator, we estimated region-specific abundance and age structure (the proportion of individuals within each age class) of a highly endangered population of snail kites for two separate regions in Florida over 17 years (1997–2013). We find that in the southern region of the snail kite—a region known to be critical for the long-term persistence of the species—the population has declined significantly since 1997, and during this time, it has increasingly become dominated by older snail kites (> 12 years old). In contrast, in the northern region—a region historically thought to serve primarily as drought refugia—the population has increased significantly since 2007 and age structure is more evenly distributed among age classes. Given that snail kites show senescence at approximately 13 years of age, where individuals suffer higher mortality rates and lower breeding rates, these results reveal an alarming trend for the southern region. Our work illustrates the importance of accounting for spatial structure when assessing changes in abundance and age distribution and the need for monitoring of age structure in imperiled species.

  8. Precision of age estimates from different ageing structures in selected freshwater teleosts.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahista; Khan, M Afzal; Miyan, Kaish; Lone, Faisal Ahmad

    2015-03-01

    The present study was undertaken with a view to compare the precision of age readings obtained from different ageing structures of some important freshwater teleosts viz., Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, Mastacembelus armatus and Ompok pabda. Standard procedures were followed to study the ageing structures. Based on the highest percent agreement and lowest average percentage of error and coefficient of variation values, precise age estimates were exhibited by opercular bones in H. molitrix and vertebrae in the remaining two fish, M. armatus and O. pabda. When precise age estimates were compared among the age estimates of other ageing structures, highest percent agreement and lowest average percent error and coefficient of variation values were exhibited by vertebrae (versus opercular bones) in H. molitrix and opercular bones (versus vertebrae) in both M. armatus and O. pabda. When mean age estimates from different ageing structures were compared, vertebrae and opercular bones exhibited comparable values in H. molitrix. In M. armatus, mean values of precise age estimates from vertebrae were significantly different from the values of other ageing structures. However, in O. pabda, vertebrae as well as opercular bones showed insignificantly different age readings.

  9. 33 CFR 67.30-1 - Class “C” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Class âCâ structures. 67.30-1 Section 67.30-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âCâ Requirements §...

  10. 33 CFR 67.20-1 - Class “A” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Class âAâ structures. 67.20-1 Section 67.20-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âAâ Requirements §...

  11. 33 CFR 67.25-1 - Class “B” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Class âBâ structures. 67.25-1 Section 67.25-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements §...

  12. 33 CFR 67.25-1 - Class “B” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Class âBâ structures. 67.25-1 Section 67.25-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements §...

  13. 33 CFR 67.20-1 - Class “A” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Class âAâ structures. 67.20-1 Section 67.20-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âAâ Requirements §...

  14. 33 CFR 67.25-1 - Class “B” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Class âBâ structures. 67.25-1 Section 67.25-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements §...

  15. 33 CFR 67.20-1 - Class “A” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Class âAâ structures. 67.20-1 Section 67.20-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âAâ Requirements §...

  16. 33 CFR 67.30-1 - Class “C” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Class âCâ structures. 67.30-1 Section 67.30-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âCâ Requirements §...

  17. 33 CFR 67.25-1 - Class “B” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Class âBâ structures. 67.25-1 Section 67.25-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âBâ Requirements §...

  18. 33 CFR 67.30-1 - Class “C” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Class âCâ structures. 67.30-1 Section 67.30-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âCâ Requirements §...

  19. 33 CFR 67.30-1 - Class “C” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Class âCâ structures. 67.30-1 Section 67.30-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âCâ Requirements §...

  20. 33 CFR 67.20-1 - Class “A” structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Class âAâ structures. 67.20-1 Section 67.20-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Class âAâ Requirements §...

  1. Middle-Class Mythology in an Age of Immigration and Segmented Assimilation: Implication for Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Richard M.; Dean, Brooke L.

    2004-01-01

    W. M. Liu, S. R. Ali, et al. (2004) provide a useful framework to understand the relevance of social class to counseling psychology research, but they overlook the intersection of race and social class in their review. The authors critique the middle-class mythology that pervades social class research in psychology and introduce segmented…

  2. Estimating survival rates with age-structure data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udevitz, M.S.; Ballachey, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    We developed a general statistical model that provides a comprehensive framework for inference about survival rates based on standing age-structure and ages-at-death data. Previously available estimators are maximum likelihood under the general model, but they use only 1 type of data and require the assumption of a stable age structure and a known population growth rate. We used the general model to derive new survival rate estimators that use both types of data and require only the assumption of a stable age structure or a known population growth rate. Our likelihood-based approach allows use of standard model-selection procedures to test hypotheses about age-structure stability, population growth rates, and age-related patterns in survival. We used this approach to estimate survival rates for female sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in Prince William Sound, Alaska.

  3. Structural aging program -- a summary of activities, results, and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Research has been conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. The purpose was to identify potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments. Primary program accomplishments have included formulation of a Structural Materials Information Center that contains data and information on the time variation of material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors for 144 materials, an aging assessment methodology to identify critical structures and degradation factors that can potentially impact their performance, guidelines and evaluation criteria for use in condition assessments of reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current condition assessments and estimations of future performance of reinforced concrete nuclear power plant structures. In addition, the Structural Aging Program conducted in-depth evaluations of several nondestructive evaluation and repair-related technologies to develop guidance on their applicability.

  4. Lipid composition of the Antarctic fish Pleuragramma antarcticum. Influence of age class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayzaud, P.; Chevallier, J.; Tavernier, E.; Moteki, M.; Koubbi, P.

    2011-08-01

    Larvae and juvenile stages of Pleuragramma antarcticum have been collected in the Dumont D’Urville Sea (East Antarctica) during summer 2008 on board the TRV Umitaka Maru during the CEAMARC survey. Detailed analyses of their lipid class and fatty acid compositions were carried out. P. antarcticum showed a pronounced ontogenic lipid accumulation with increasing size. Larvae displayed a dominance of polar lipids (83% of total lipids) and low percentage of triglycerides (7%). Conversely juveniles showed an increasing accumulation of triglycerides (up to 72.4%). The fatty acid composition of polar lipids remained rather stable between stages with 22:6n-3 and 20:5n-3 as dominant contributors. The relatively minor ontogenic changes, e.g. increase of monounsaturated and decrease of C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids, may reflect the influence of differences in diet. Triglycerides showed that all three age classes are well segregated in term of fatty acid composition. Larvae triglycerides are characterized by significant percentages of 16:0, 20:5n-3, 20:6n-3 and to a minor extent 18:4n-3, which suggest a prymnesiophyte based diet. Juveniles are characterized by larger percentages of C20:1 and C22:1 acids, considered as markers of Calanus type copepods. The increasing contribution of 18:1n-9 in the triglycerides of the older juveniles suggests a gradual and increasing shift from a copepod dominant diet to an euphausiid dominant diet. Fatty acid trophic markers pattern suggests a shift from a phytophagous and omnivorous diet for larvae to a carnivorous diet for juveniles.

  5. Size, longevity and cancer: age structure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There is significant recent interest in Peto's paradox and the related problem of the evolution of large, long-lived organisms in terms of cancer robustness. Peto's paradox refers to the expectation that large, long-lived organisms have a higher lifetime cancer risk, which is not the case: a paradox. This paradox, however, is circular: large, long-lived organisms are large and long-lived because they are cancer robust. Lifetime risk, meanwhile, depends on the age distributions of both cancer and competing risks: if cancer strikes before competing risks, then lifetime risk is high; if not, not. Because no set of competing risks is generally prevalent, it is instructive to temporarily dispose of competing risks and investigate the pure age dynamics of cancer under the multistage model of carcinogenesis. In addition to augmenting earlier results, I show that in terms of cancer-free lifespan large organisms reap greater benefits from an increase in cellular cancer robustness than smaller organisms. Conversely, a higher cellular cancer robustness renders cancer-free lifespan more resilient to an increase in size. This interaction may be an important driver of the evolution of large, cancer-robust organisms. PMID:27629030

  6. Age and structure of the southern Rockall Trough: New evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. G.; Masson, D. G.; Miles, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    The Rockall Trough separates the Rockall Plateau microcontinent from the shelf and slope west of the British Isles. The structure and age of the trough has been the source of considerable discussion. Although widely considered to be of oceanic origin, postulated ages for the spreading range from Permian to Cretaceous. New seismic profiles linked to the IPOD sites in the Bay of Biscay and to oceanic anomalies of known age are used to present a new assessment of the age and structure of the southern Rockall Trough. It is concluded that about 120 km of ocean crust is present in the trough and that spreading took place in the Albian-Maastrichtian interval.

  7. Measurement and Structural Model Class Separation in Mixture CFA: ML/EM versus MCMC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depaoli, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Parameter recovery was assessed within mixture confirmatory factor analysis across multiple estimator conditions under different simulated levels of mixture class separation. Mixture class separation was defined in the measurement model (through factor loadings) and the structural model (through factor variances). Maximum likelihood (ML) via the…

  8. The Relationship between Professional Preparation and Class Structure on Health Instruction in the Secondary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammig, Bart; Ogletree, Roberta; Wycoff-Horn, Marcie R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of professional preparation and class structure on health content delivery and time spent delivering content among required health education classes in the United States. Methods: Data from the classroom-level file of the 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study were…

  9. Suggested Structure for Meetings of Home-Based ESL Classes for Native Speakers of Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spener, David

    This guide for volunteer teachers of English as a Second Language to Spanish speakers in a home-based program outlines a suggested format for class time and activities. The guide describes how teachers can organize their class periods to promote learner-centeredness and participation in the English learning process. The structure, designed to help…

  10. Communication breakdown: the impact of ageing on synapse structure.

    PubMed

    Petralia, Ronald S; Mattson, Mark P; Yao, Pamela J

    2014-03-01

    Impaired synaptic plasticity is implicated in the functional decline of the nervous system associated with ageing. Understanding the structure of ageing synapses is essential to understanding the functions of these synapses and their role in the ageing nervous system. In this review, we summarize studies on ageing synapses in vertebrates and invertebrates, focusing on changes in morphology and ultrastructure. We cover different parts of the nervous system, including the brain, the retina, the cochlea, and the neuromuscular junction. The morphological characteristics of aged synapses could shed light on the underlying molecular changes and their functional consequences.

  11. Undergraduates Improve upon Published Crystal Structure in Class Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Scott; Koldewey, Philipp; Bardwell, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, 57 undergraduate students at the University of Michigan were assigned the task of solving a crystal structure, given only the electron density map of a 1.3 Å crystal structure from the electron density server, and the position of the N-terminal amino acid. To test their knowledge of amino acid chemistry, the students were not given the…

  12. The age structure of selected countries in the ESCAP region.

    PubMed

    Hong, S

    1982-01-01

    The study objective was to examine the age structure of selected countries in the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) region, using available data and frequently applied indices such as the population pyramid, aged-child ratio, and median age. Based on the overall picture of the age structure thus obtained, age trends and their implication for the near future were arrived at. Countries are grouped into 4 types based on the fertility and mortality levels. Except for Japan, Hong Kong, and Singapore, the age structure in the 18 ESCAP region countries changed comparatively little over the 1950-80 period. The largest structural change occurred in Singapore, where the proportion of children under age 15 in the population declined significantly from 41-27%, while that of persons 65 years and older more than doubled. This was due primarily to the marked decline in fertility from a total fertility rate (TFR) of 6.7-1.8 during the period. Hong Kong also had a similar major transformation during the same period: the proportion of the old age population increased 2 1/2 times, from 2.5-6.3%. The age structures of the 18 ESCAP countries varied greatly by country. 10 countries of the 2 high fertility and mortality types showed a similar young age structural pattern, i.e., they have higher dependency ratios, a higher proportion of children under 15 years, a lower proportion of population 65 years and older, lower aged-child ratios, and younger median ages than the average countries in the less developed regions of the world. With minimal changes over the 1950-80 period, the gap between these countries and the average of the less developed regions widened. Unlike these 10 (mostly South Asian) countries, moderately low fertility and mortality countries (China, Korea, and Sri Lanka) are located between the world average and the less developed region in most of the indices, particularly during the last decade. Although their rate of population aging is not

  13. Age effect on subcortical structures in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Goodro, Matt; Sameti, Mohammad; Patenaude, Brian; Fein, George

    2012-01-01

    Cross-sectional age effects in normal control volunteers were investigated in 8 subcortical structures: lateral ventricles, thalamus, caudate, putamen, pallidum, hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens. Two hundred and twenty six control subjects, ranging in age from 19 to 85 years, were scanned on a 1.5T GE system (n = 184) or a 3.0T Siemens system (n = 42). Cranium-size adjusted subcortical structure volumes were estimated using FSL’s FIRST software, which is fully automated. Significant age effects were found for all volumes when the entire age range was analyzed, however the older subjects (60–85 years of age) showed a stronger correlation between age and structural volume for the ventricles, hippocampus, amygdala and accumbens than middle-aged (35–60 years of age) subjects. Middle-aged subjects were studied at both sites, and age effects in these groups were comparable, despite differences in magnet strength and acquisition systems. This agreement lends support to the validity of the image analysis tools and procedures used in the present study. PMID:22863654

  14. Mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (stomach alcohol dehydrogenase): structure, origin, and correlation with enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Parés, X; Cederlund, E; Moreno, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Farrés, J; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    The structure of a mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined by peptide analysis of the protein isolated from rat stomach. The structure indicates that the enzyme constitutes a separate alcohol dehydrogenase class, in agreement with the distinct enzymatic properties; the class IV enzyme is somewhat closer to class I (the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenase; approximately 68% residue identities) than to the other classes (II, III, and V; approximately 60% residue identities), suggesting that class IV might have originated through duplication of an early vertebrate class I gene. The activity of the class IV protein toward ethanol is even higher than that of the classical liver enzyme. Both Km and kcat values are high, the latter being the highest of any class characterized so far. Structurally, these properties are correlated with replacements at the active site, affecting both substrate and coenzyme binding. In particular, Ala-294 (instead of valine) results in increased space in the middle section of the substrate cleft, Gly-47 (instead of a basic residue) results in decreased charge interactions with the coenzyme pyrophosphate, and Tyr-363 (instead of a basic residue) may also affect coenzyme binding. In combination, these exchanges are compatible with a promotion of the off dissociation and an increased turnover rate. In contrast, residues at the inner part of the substrate cleft are bulky, accounting for low activity toward secondary alcohols and cyclohexanol. Exchanges at positions 259-261 involve minor shifts in glycine residues at a reverse turn in the coenzyme-binding fold. Clearly, class IV is distinct in structure, ethanol turnover, stomach expression, and possible emergence from class I. PMID:8127901

  15. Teachers' and Pupils' Behavior in Large and Small Classes: A Systematic Observation Study of Pupils Aged 10 and 11 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatchford, Peter; Bassett, Paul; Brown, Penelope

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined class size effects on teacher-pupil interactions, pupil engagement, and pupil-pupil interaction. They extended previous research by recognizing the hierarchical nature of observation data and the possible influence of other variables. The study used a time sampling method involving 257 children (aged 10-11 years) in 16 small…

  16. Posttraumatic symptom structure across age groups.

    PubMed

    Helpman, Liat; Rachamim, Lilach; Aderka, Idan M; Gabai-Daie, Ayala; Schindel-Allon, Inbal; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of diagnostic criteria of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder to the pediatric population has been a focus of much debate (e.g., Carrion, Weems, Ray, & Reiss, 2002 ), informing changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5). The current study examined the factor structure of posttraumatic distress among adult versus pediatric samples using confirmatory factor analysis. The analysis was performed on the DSM-IV-adherent Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (Foa, Cashman, Jaycox, & Perry, 1997 ) and Child Posttraumatic Symptom Scale (Foa, Johnson, Feeny, & Treadwell, 2001 ). The sample included 378 adult and 204 child and adolescent victims of diverse single-event traumas. A series of models based on previous findings and DSM-IV specification were evaluated. A 4-factor model (Intrusions, Avoidance, Dysphoria, and Hyperarousal), similar to the DSM-5 model, best fit the data among adults, and a different 4-factor model (Intrusion, Avodiance, Numbing, and Hyperarousal) best fit the data among children and adolescents. Despite some similarity, the posttraumatic symptom profiles of pediatric and adult samples may differ. These differences are not fully incorporated into the DSM-5, and warrant further examination.

  17. Structure and Age Jointly Influence Rates of Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; Bostick, David; Albà, M. Mar; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2012-01-01

    What factors determine a protein's rate of evolution are actively debated. Especially unclear is the relative role of intrinsic factors of present-day proteins versus historical factors such as protein age. Here we study the interplay of structural properties and evolutionary age, as determinants of protein evolutionary rate. We use a large set of one-to-one orthologs between human and mouse proteins, with mapped PDB structures. We report that previously observed structural correlations also hold within each age group – including relationships between solvent accessibility, designabililty, and evolutionary rates. However, age also plays a crucial role: age modulates the relationship between solvent accessibility and rate. Additionally, younger proteins, despite being less designable, tend to evolve faster than older proteins. We show that previously reported relationships between age and rate cannot be explained by structural biases among age groups. Finally, we introduce a knowledge-based potential function to study the stability of proteins through large-scale computation. We find that older proteins are more stable for their native structure, and more robust to mutations, than younger ones. Our results underscore that several determinants, both intrinsic and historical, can interact to determine rates of protein evolution. PMID:22693443

  18. China's marriage squeeze: A decomposition into age and sex structure.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Quanbao; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Shuzhuo; Feldman, Marcus W

    2016-06-01

    Most recent studies of marriage patterns in China have emphasized the male-biased sex ratio but have largely neglected age structure as a factor in China's male marriage squeeze. In this paper we develop an index we call "spousal sex ratio" (SSR) to measure the marriage squeeze, and a method of decomposing the proportion of male surplus into age and sex structure effects within a small spousal age difference interval. We project that China's marriage market will be confronted with a relatively severe male squeeze. For the decomposition of the cohort aged 30, from 2010 to 2020 age structure will be dominant, while from 2020 through 2034 the contribution of age structure will gradually decrease and that of sex structure will increase. From then on, sex structure will be dominant. The index and decomposition, concentrated on a specific female birth cohort, can distinguish spousal competition for single cohorts which may be covered by a summary index for the whole marriage market; these can also be used for consecutive cohorts to reflect the situation of the whole marriage market.

  19. A structural transition in class II major histocompatibility complex proteins at mildly acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Peptide binding by class II major histocompatibility complex proteins is generally enhanced at low pH in the range of hydrogen ion concentrations found in the endosomal compartments of antigen- presenting cells. We and others have proposed that class II molecules undergo a reversible conformational change at low pH that is associated with enhanced peptide loading. However, no one has previously provided direct evidence for a structural change in class II proteins in the mildly acidic pH conditions in which enhanced peptide binding is observed. In this study, susceptibility to denaturation induced by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) detergent or heat was used to probe the conformation of class II at different hydrogen ion concentrations. Class II molecules became sensitive to denaturation at pH 5.5-6.5 depending on the allele and experimental conditions. The observed structural transition was fully reversible if acidic pH was neutralized before exposure to SDS or heat. Experiments with the environment- sensitive fluorescent probe ANS (8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid) provided further evidence for a reversible structural transition at mildly acidic pH associated with an increase in exposed hydrophobicity in class II molecules. IAd conformation was found to change at a higher pH than IEd, IEk, or IAk, which correlates with the different pH optimal for peptide binding by these molecules. We conclude that pH regulates peptide binding by influencing the structure of class II molecules. PMID:8551215

  20. Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Graves, H.L. III; Norris, W.E.

    1994-12-31

    Research is being conducted by ORNL under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques. assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

  1. Euler Teaches a Class in Structural Steel Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyajian, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Even before steel was a topic of formal study for structural engineers, the brilliant eighteenth century Swiss mathematician and physicist, Leonhard Euler (1707-1783), investigated the theory governing the elastic behaviour of columns, the results of which are incorporated into the American Institute of Steel Construction's (AISC's) Bible: the…

  2. Age-structured optimal control in population economics.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, Gustav; Prskawetz, Alexia; Veliov, Vladimir M

    2004-06-01

    This paper brings both intertemporal and age-dependent features to a theory of population policy at the macro-level. A Lotka-type renewal model of population dynamics is combined with a Solow/Ramsey economy. We consider a social planner who maximizes an aggregate intertemporal utility function which depends on per capita consumption. As control policies we consider migration and saving rate (both age-dependent). By using a new maximum principle for age-structured control systems we derive meaningful results for the optimal migration and saving rate in an aging population. The model used in the numerical calculations is calibrated for Austria.

  3. Travelling Wave Solutions in Multigroup Age-Structured Epidemic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducrot, Arnaut; Magal, Pierre; Ruan, Shigui

    2010-01-01

    Age-structured epidemic models have been used to describe either the age of individuals or the age of infection of certain diseases and to determine how these characteristics affect the outcomes and consequences of epidemiological processes. Most results on age-structured epidemic models focus on the existence, uniqueness, and convergence to disease equilibria of solutions. In this paper we investigate the existence of travelling wave solutions in a deterministic age-structured model describing the circulation of a disease within a population of multigroups. Individuals of each group are able to move with a random walk which is modelled by the classical Fickian diffusion and are classified into two subclasses, susceptible and infective. A susceptible individual in a given group can be crisscross infected by direct contact with infective individuals of possibly any group. This process of transmission can depend upon the age of the disease of infected individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide sufficient conditions that ensure the existence of travelling wave solutions for the age-structured epidemic model. The case of two population groups is numerically investigated which applies to the crisscross transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and some sexual transmission diseases.

  4. Three-dimensional evaluation of facial morphology in children aged 5-6 years with a Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Krneta, Bojana; Primožič, Jasmina; Zhurov, Alexei; Richmond, Stephen; Ovsenik, Maja

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate facial morphology in 25 Class III and 46 non-Class III children aged 5-6 years using three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging; 3D facial images were obtained, two average facial templates were constructed for the non-Class III male and female groups, each individual face was superimposed on the corresponding average template and group comparisons were evaluated (facial height, facial convexity, mandibular position and facial surface morphology). Differences between parameters were evaluated by using an analysis of variance and colour deviation maps. The results showed that Class III children had less mid-face prominence and a concave facial profile when compared to non-Class III children (P = 0.002 and P = 0.018). The position of the pg point in the z-axis just failed to reach statistical significance when comparing the two groups (P = 0.051). A vertical analysis showed no statistical significance between the groups, when evaluating middle (n-sn) and lower (sn-pg) facial height. Coincidence of the Class III faces to normal templates with a tolerance set as 0.5 mm was low (less than 30%). The soft tissue characteristics of a Class III face differ significantly from the non-Class III face in the mid-face region and in the facial profile. A 3D laser imaging method evaluated and identified morphological characteristics of Class III children in deciduous dentition, which could in the future become an important diagnostic tool in small children. The most important clinical advantage of this study is the non-invasiveness of the method.

  5. Structural developmental psychology and health promotion in the third age.

    PubMed

    Bauger, Lars; Bongaardt, Rob

    2017-01-12

    In response to the ever-increasing longevity in Western societies, old age has been divided into two different periods, labelled the third and fourth age. Where the third age, with its onset at retirement, mostly involves positive aspects of growing old, the fourth age involves functional decline and increased morbidity. This article focuses on the entry to the third age and its potential for health promotion initiatives. Well-being is an important factor to emphasize in such health promotion, and this article views the lifestyle of third agers as essential for their well-being. The structural developmental theory of Robert Kegan delineates how a person's way of knowing develops throughout the life course. This theory is an untapped and salient perspective for health promotion initiatives in the third age. This article outlines Kegan's approach as a tool for developing psychologically spacious health promotion, and suggests future directions for research on the topic.

  6. Solar Array Structures for 300 kW-Class Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard; Rose, Geoff; Mann, Troy O.; Warren, Jerry E.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Kerslake, Tom; Kraft, Tom; Banik, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art solar arrays for spacecraft provide on the order of 20 kW of electrical power, and they usually consist of 3J solar cells bonded to hinged rigid panels about 1 inch in thickness. This structural construction allows specific mass and packaging volumes of up to approximately 70 W/kg and 15 kW/m3 to be achieved. Significant advances in solar array structures are required for future very-high-power spacecraft (300+ kW), such as those proposed for pre-positioning heavy cargo on or near the Moon, Mars, or asteroids using solar electric propulsion. These applications will require considerable increases in both W/kg and kW/m3, and will undoubtedly require the use of flexible-substrate designs. This presentation summarizes work sponsored by NASA's Game Changing Development Program since Oct. 2011 to address the challenge of developing 300+ kW solar arrays. The work is primarily being done at NASA Langley, NASA Glenn, and two contractor teams (ATK and DSS), with technical collaboration from AFRL/Kirtland. The near-tem objective of the project is design, analysis, and testing of 30-50 kW solar array designs that are extensible to the far-term objective of 300+ kW. The work is currently focused on three designs: the MegaFlex concept by ATK, the Mega-ROSA concept by DSS, and an in-house 300-kW Government Reference Array concept. Each of these designs will be described in the presentation. Results obtained to date by the team, as well as future work plans, for the design, analysis, and testing of these large solar array structures will be summarized.

  7. Mathematical modeling of a class of multibody flexible spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul, G.

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model for a general multibody flexible spacecraft is obtained. The generic spacecraft considered consists of a flexible central body to which a number of flexible multibody structures are attached. The coordinate systems used in the derivation allow effective decoupling of the translational motion of the entire spacecraft from its rotational motion about its center of mass. The derivation assumes that the deformations in the bodies are only due to elastic motions. The dynamic model derived is a closed-form vector-matrix differential equation. The model developed can be used for analysis and simulation of many realistic spacecraft configurations.

  8. Integrated controls-structures design methodology development for a class of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, P. G.; Joshi, S. M.; Walz, J. E.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1990-01-01

    Future utilization of space will require large space structures in low-Earth and geostationary orbits. Example missions include: Earth observation systems, personal communication systems, space science missions, space processing facilities, etc., requiring large antennas, platforms, and solar arrays. The dimensions of such structures will range from a few meters to possibly hundreds of meters. For reducing the cost of construction, launching, and operating (e.g., energy required for reboosting and control), it will be necessary to make the structure as light as possible. However, reducing structural mass tends to increase the flexibility which would make it more difficult to control with the specified precision in attitude and shape. Therefore, there is a need to develop a methodology for designing space structures which are optimal with respect to both structural design and control design. In the current spacecraft design practice, it is customary to first perform the structural design and then the controller design. However, the structural design and the control design problems are substantially coupled and must be considered concurrently in order to obtain a truly optimal spacecraft design. For example, let C denote the set of the 'control' design variables (e.g., controller gains), and L the set of the 'structural' design variables (e.g., member sizes). If a structural member thickness is changed, the dynamics would change which would then change the control law and the actuator mass. That would, in turn, change the structural model. Thus, the sets C and L depend on each other. Future space structures can be roughly divided into four mission classes. Class 1 missions include flexible spacecraft with no articulated appendages which require fine attitude pointing and vibration suppression (e.g., large space antennas). Class 2 missions consist of flexible spacecraft with articulated multiple payloads, where the requirement is to fine-point the spacecraft and each

  9. Atrial structure, function and arrhythmogenesis in aged and frail mice

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Hailey J.; Moghtadaei, Motahareh; Mackasey, Martin; Rafferty, Sara A.; Bogachev, Oleg; Sapp, John L.; Howlett, Susan E.; Rose, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent in aging populations; however not all individuals age at the same rate. Instead, individuals of the same chronological age can vary in health status from fit to frail. Our objective was to determine the impacts of age and frailty on atrial function and arrhythmogenesis in mice using a frailty index (FI). Aged mice were more frail and demonstrated longer lasting AF compared to young mice. Consistent with this, aged mice showed longer P wave duration and PR intervals; however, both parameters showed substantial variability suggesting differences in health status among mice of similar chronological age. In agreement with this, P wave duration and PR interval were highly correlated with FI score. High resolution optical mapping of the atria demonstrated reduced conduction velocity and action potential duration in aged hearts that were also graded by FI score. Furthermore, aged mice had increased interstitial fibrosis along with changes in regulators of extracellular matrix remodelling, which also correlated with frailty. These experiments demonstrate that aging results in changes in atrial structure and function that create a substrate for atrial arrhythmias. Importantly, these changes were heterogeneous due to differences in health status, which could be identified using an FI. PMID:28290548

  10. Population age structure and asset returns: an empirical investigation.

    PubMed

    Poterba, J M

    1998-10-01

    "This paper investigates the association between population age structure, particularly the share of the population in the 'prime saving years' 45-60, and the returns on stocks and bonds. The paper is motivated by the claim that the aging of the 'Baby Boom' cohort in the United States is a key factor in explaining the recent rise in asset values. It also addresses the associated claim that asset prices will decline when this large cohort reaches retirement age and begins to reduce its asset holdings. This paper begins by considering household age-asset accumulation profiles. Data from the Survey of Consumer Finances suggest that while cross-sectional age-wealth profiles peak for households in their early 60s, cohort data on the asset ownership of the same households show a much less pronounced peak.... The paper then considers the historical relationship between demographic structure and real returns on Treasury bills, long-term government bonds, and corporate stock. The results do not suggest any robust relationship between demographic structure and asset returns.... The paper concludes by discussing factors such as international capital flows and forward-looking behavior on the part of market participants that could weaken the relationship between age structure and asset returns in a single nation."

  11. Structure formation upon barocryodeformation of a steel of austenitic class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoshina, I. A.; Khaymovich, P. A.; Chernyaeva, E. V.; Shulgin, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    Data are given concerning the opportunity of applying barocryodeformation (plastic deformation under the conditions of severe uniform compression at cryogenic temperatures) to produce ultrafine-disperse martensitic structure in Kh18N10T steel (≤0.08 C, 18 Cr, 10 Ni, <0.7 Ti, ≤2 Mn, ≤0.8 Si (wt %)), which ensures an increase in the physicomechanical characteristics of material that are unattainable when using other types of treatment. Experiments are described that make it possible to explain the high (in spite of the presence of large forces of uniform compression) rate of completion of the martensitic transition upon the deformation of the steel under such conditions.

  12. Hygrothermal aging effects on buried molecular structures at epoxy interfaces.

    PubMed

    Myers, John N; Zhang, Chi; Lee, Kang-Wook; Williamson, Jaimal; Chen, Zhan

    2014-01-14

    Interfacial properties such as adhesion are determined by interfacial molecular structures. Adhesive interfaces in microelectronic packages that include organic polymers such as epoxy are susceptible to delamination during accelerated stress testing. Infrared-visible sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to study molecular structures at buried epoxy interfaces during hygrothermal aging to relate molecular structural changes at buried interfaces to decreases in macroscopic adhesion strength. SFG peaks associated with strongly hydrogen bonded water were detected at hydrophilic epoxy interfaces. Ordered interfacial water was also correlated to large decreases in interfacial adhesion strength that occurred as a result of hygrothermal aging, which suggests that water diffused to the interface and replaced original hydrogen bond networks. No water peaks were observed at hydrophobic epoxy interfaces, which was correlated with a much smaller decrease in adhesion strength from the same aging process. ATR-FTIR water signals observed in the epoxy bulk were mainly contributed by relatively weakly hydrogen bonded water molecules, which suggests that the bulk and interfacial water structure was different. Changes in interfacial methyl structures were observed regardless of the interfacial hydrophobicity which could be due to water acting as a plasticizer that restructured both the bulk and interfacial molecular structure. This research demonstrates that SFG studies of molecular structural changes at buried epoxy interfaces during hygrothermal aging can contribute to the understanding of moisture-induced failure mechanisms in electronic packages that contain organic adhesives.

  13. Structural and Functional Changes With the Aging Kidney.

    PubMed

    Denic, Aleksandar; Glassock, Richard J; Rule, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Senescence or normal physiologic aging portrays the expected age-related changes in the kidney as compared to a disease that occurs in some but not all individuals. The microanatomical structural changes of the kidney with older age include a decreased number of functional glomeruli from an increased prevalence of nephrosclerosis (arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and tubular atrophy with interstitial fibrosis), and to some extent, compensatory hypertrophy of remaining nephrons. Among the macroanatomical structural changes, older age associates with smaller cortical volume, larger medullary volume until middle age, and larger and more numerous kidney cysts. Among carefully screened healthy kidney donors, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declines at a rate of 6.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) per decade. There is reason to be concerned that the elderly are being misdiagnosed with CKD. Besides this expected kidney function decline, the lowest risk of mortality is at a GFR of ≥75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) for age <55 years but at a lower GFR of 45 to 104 mL/min/1.73 m(2) for age ≥65 years. Changes with normal aging are still of clinical significance. The elderly have less kidney functional reserve when they do actually develop CKD, and they are at higher risk for acute kidney injury.

  14. Aging Effects on Regional Brain Structural Changes in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nenadić, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Smesny, Stefan; Gaser, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although mostly conceptualized as a neurodevelopmental disorder, there is an increasing interest in progressive changes of cognitive deficits and brain structure and function in schizophrenia across the life span. Methods: In this study, we investigated age-related changes in regional gray matter using voxel-based morphometry in a sample of 99 patients (age range 18–65 years) with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV schizophrenia and 113 healthy controls (age range 19–59 years) using a cross-sectional design. Results: We found steeper age-related decline in gray matter in patients in a cluster comprising the left superior temporal cortex and adjacent inferior parietal lobule. We then divided the schizophrenia sample in 3 subgroups based on a 3-factor model of psychopathology ratings. Age-related changes were markedly different in each of the 3 subgroups (compared with healthy controls). While patients with predominantly paranoid symptoms showed stronger age-related progression in the left superior temporal cortex and right inferior frontal gyrus, those of the disorganized subgroup had stronger gray matter loss in the left lateral cerebellum, while the predominantly negative subgroup showed minor effects in the left superior temporal gyrus. Conclusions: Our findings show that differences in brain structural changes associated with aging diverge between schizophrenia patients and healthy subjects and that different subgroups within a patient sample might be at higher risk of age-related regional gray matter loss. PMID:21296908

  15. Aging of safety class 1E transformers in safety systems of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, E.W.; Edson, J.L.; Udy, A.C.

    1996-02-01

    This report discusses aging effects on safety-related power transformers in nuclear power plants. It also evaluates maintenance, testing, and monitoring practices with respect to their effectiveness in detecting and mitigating the effects of aging. The study follows the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Nuclear Plant-Aging Research approach. It investigates the materials used in transformer construction, identifies stressors and aging mechanisms, presents operating and testing experience with aging effects, analyzes transformer failure events reported in various databases, and evaluates maintenance practices. Databases maintained by the nuclear industry were analyzed to evaluate the effects of aging on the operation of nuclear power plants.

  16. Subtypes, Severity, and Structural Stability of Peer Victimization: What Does Latent Class Analysis Say?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nylund, Karen; Bellmore, Amy; Nishina, Adrienne; Graham, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    This study uses latent class analysis (LCA) to empirically identify victimization groups during middle school. Approximately 2,000 urban, public middle school students (mean age in sixth grade = 11.57) reported on their peer victimization during the Fall and Spring semesters of their sixth, seventh, and eighth grades. Independent LCA analyses at…

  17. Periodic and quasi-periodic behavior in resource-dependent age structured population models.

    PubMed

    Dilão, R; Domingos, T

    2001-03-01

    To describe the dynamics of a resource-dependent age structured population, a general non-linear Leslie type model is derived. The dependence on the resources is introduced through the death rates of the reproductive age classes. The conditions assumed in the derivation of the model are regularity and plausible limiting behaviors of the functions in the model. It is shown that the model dynamics restricted to its omega-limit sets is a diffeomorphism of a compact set, and the period-1 fixed points of the model are structurally stable. The loss of stability of the non-zero steady state occurs by a discrete Hopf bifurcation. Under general conditions, and after the loss of stability of the structurally stable steady states, the time evolution of population numbers is periodic or quasi-periodic. Numerical analysis with prototype functions has been performed, and the conditions leading to chaotic behavior in time are discussed.

  18. [Age structure and genetic diversity of Homatula pycnolepis in the Nujiang River basin].

    PubMed

    Yue, Xing-Jian; Liu, Shao-Ping; Liu, Ming-Dian; Duan, Xin-Bin; Wang, Deng-Qiang; Chen, Da-Qing

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the age structure of the Loach, Homatula pycnolepis through the otolith growth rings in 204 individual specimens collected from the Xiaomengtong River of the Nujiang River (Salween River) basin in April, 2008. There were only two different age classes, 1 and 2 years of age-no 3 year olds were detected. The age structure of H. pycnolepis was simple. The complete mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene sequences (1140) of 80 individuals from 4 populations collected in the Nujiang River drainage were sequenced and a total of 44 variable sites were found among 4 different haplotypes. The global haplotype diversity (Hd) and nucleotide diversity (Pi) were calculated at 0.7595, 0.0151 respectively, and 0, 0 in each population, indicating a consistent lack of genetic diversity in each small population. There was obvious geographic structure in both the Nujiang River basin (NJB) group, and the Nanding River (NDR) group. The genetic distance between NJB and NDR was calculated at 0.0356, suggesting that genetic divergence resulted from long-term isolation of individual population. Such a simple age structure and a lack of genetic diversity in H. pycnolepis may potentially be due to small populations and locale fishing pressures. Accordingly, the results of this study prompt us to recommend that the NJB, NDR and Lancang River populations should be protected as three different evolutionary significant units or separated management units.

  19. Aviation Structural Mechanic, Second Class, 2-13. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This self-paced, individualized course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, teaches students the skills needed to become aviation structural mechanics (second class). The course materials consist of five pamphlets covering the structural maintenance and repair of aircraft. The first pamphlet…

  20. [Aging and retrieval-induced forgetting of associatively structured lists].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takashi; Matsukawa, Junko

    2010-12-01

    Research on retrieval-induced forgetting has shown that remembering can cause forgetting of related information. This study examined whether such forgetting occurred for associatively structured lists and if aging influenced such forgetting. We compared retrieval-induced forgetting during a free recall test by using Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) lists with an associative structure as the stimulus. Two age groups of young and old adult participants were tested. The results indicated that both age groups showed the same degree of retrieval-induced forgetting of the lists. These results suggest that the association between items causes retrieval-induced forgetting and that the inhibitory function of the association in retrieval-induced forgetting does not decline with age.

  1. Thalamic structures and associated cognitive functions: Relations with age and aging

    PubMed Central

    Fama, Rosemary; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2015-01-01

    The thalamus, with its cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar connections, is a critical node in networks supporting cognitive functions known to decline in normal aging, including component processes of memory and executive functions of attention and information processing. The macrostructure, microstructure, and neural connectivity of the thalamus changes across the adult lifespan. Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have demonstrated, regional thalamic volume shrinkage and microstructural degradation, with anterior regions generally more compromised than posterior regions. The integrity of selective thalamic nuclei and projections decline with advancing age, particularly those in thalamofrontal, thalamoparietal, and thalamolimbic networks. This review presents studies that assess the relations between age and aging and the structure, function, and connectivity of the thalamus and associated neural networks and focuses on their relations with processes of attention, speed of information processing, and working and episodic memory. PMID:25862940

  2. Likelihood analysis of spatial capture-recapture models for stratified or class structured populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Sutherland, Christopher S.; Fuller, Angela K.; Sun, Catherine C.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a likelihood analysis framework for fitting spatial capture-recapture (SCR) models to data collected on class structured or stratified populations. Our interest is motivated by the necessity of accommodating the problem of missing observations of individual class membership. This is particularly problematic in SCR data arising from DNA analysis of scat, hair or other material, which frequently yields individual identity but fails to identify the sex. Moreover, this can represent a large fraction of the data and, given the typically small sample sizes of many capture-recapture studies based on DNA information, utilization of the data with missing sex information is necessary. We develop the class structured likelihood for the case of missing covariate values, and then we address the scaling of the likelihood so that models with and without class structured parameters can be formally compared regardless of missing values. We apply our class structured model to black bear data collected in New York in which sex could be determined for only 62 of 169 uniquely identified individuals. The models containing sex-specificity of both the intercept of the SCR encounter probability model and the distance coefficient, and including a behavioral response are strongly favored by log-likelihood. Estimated population sex ratio is strongly influenced by sex structure in model parameters illustrating the importance of rigorous modeling of sex differences in capture-recapture models.

  3. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  4. Who Tweets? Deriving the Demographic Characteristics of Age, Occupation and Social Class from Twitter User Meta-Data

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Luke; Morgan, Jeffrey; Burnap, Pete; Williams, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This paper specifies, designs and critically evaluates two tools for the automated identification of demographic data (age, occupation and social class) from the profile descriptions of Twitter users in the United Kingdom (UK). Meta-data data routinely collected through the Collaborative Social Media Observatory (COSMOS: http://www.cosmosproject.net/) relating to UK Twitter users is matched with the occupational lookup tables between job and social class provided by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) using SOC2010. Using expert human validation, the validity and reliability of the automated matching process is critically assessed and a prospective class distribution of UK Twitter users is offered with 2011 Census baseline comparisons. The pattern matching rules for identifying age are explained and enacted following a discussion on how to minimise false positives. The age distribution of Twitter users, as identified using the tool, is presented alongside the age distribution of the UK population from the 2011 Census. The automated occupation detection tool reliably identifies certain occupational groups, such as professionals, for which job titles cannot be confused with hobbies or are used in common parlance within alternative contexts. An alternative explanation on the prevalence of hobbies is that the creative sector is overrepresented on Twitter compared to 2011 Census data. The age detection tool illustrates the youthfulness of Twitter users compared to the general UK population as of the 2011 Census according to proportions, but projections demonstrate that there is still potentially a large number of older platform users. It is possible to detect “signatures” of both occupation and age from Twitter meta-data with varying degrees of accuracy (particularly dependent on occupational groups) but further confirmatory work is needed. PMID:25729900

  5. Who tweets? Deriving the demographic characteristics of age, occupation and social class from twitter user meta-data.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Luke; Morgan, Jeffrey; Burnap, Pete; Williams, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This paper specifies, designs and critically evaluates two tools for the automated identification of demographic data (age, occupation and social class) from the profile descriptions of Twitter users in the United Kingdom (UK). Meta-data data routinely collected through the Collaborative Social Media Observatory (COSMOS: http://www.cosmosproject.net/) relating to UK Twitter users is matched with the occupational lookup tables between job and social class provided by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) using SOC2010. Using expert human validation, the validity and reliability of the automated matching process is critically assessed and a prospective class distribution of UK Twitter users is offered with 2011 Census baseline comparisons. The pattern matching rules for identifying age are explained and enacted following a discussion on how to minimise false positives. The age distribution of Twitter users, as identified using the tool, is presented alongside the age distribution of the UK population from the 2011 Census. The automated occupation detection tool reliably identifies certain occupational groups, such as professionals, for which job titles cannot be confused with hobbies or are used in common parlance within alternative contexts. An alternative explanation on the prevalence of hobbies is that the creative sector is overrepresented on Twitter compared to 2011 Census data. The age detection tool illustrates the youthfulness of Twitter users compared to the general UK population as of the 2011 Census according to proportions, but projections demonstrate that there is still potentially a large number of older platform users. It is possible to detect "signatures" of both occupation and age from Twitter meta-data with varying degrees of accuracy (particularly dependent on occupational groups) but further confirmatory work is needed.

  6. Exploring the vertical age structure of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca

    While in external or high-redshift galaxies we can only measure integrated stellar properties at best, the Milky Way offers us the unique opportunity to study its individual baryonic components, including stars. We use oscillations measured in red giant stars by the Kepler satellite to derive stellar ages and explore the vertical age structure across few kpc of the Milky Way disc. We find that old stars dominate at increasing Galactic heights, whereas closer to the plane a rich zoology of ages exists. The age distribution of stars shows a smooth distribution over the last 10 Gyr, which together with a flat age-metallicity relation is consistent with a quiescent evolution for the Milky Way disc since a redshift of about two.

  7. [Age-related characteristics of structural support for ovarian function].

    PubMed

    Koval'skiĭ, G B

    1984-12-01

    Histoenzymological assay was used to investigate various structures of the ovaries of rats of two groups aged 3-4 and 12-14 months during estral cycle. The activity of 3 beta-, 17 beta- and 20 alpha-steroid dehydrogenases, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, NAD and NADP-diaphorases, esterase, acid and alkaline phosphatases was studied. It has been shown that transport alterations in the microcirculation including the hematofollicular barrier play, the leading part in age-dependent depression of reproductive and endocrine functions. Ageing rats demonstrated no linkage between endothelial, thecal and granular cells, which points to the injury of the histophysiological mechanisms of the follicular system integration.

  8. Associations between education and brain structure at age 73 years, adjusted for age 11 IQ

    PubMed Central

    Dickie, David Alexander; Ritchie, Stuart J.; Karama, Sherif; Pattie, Alison; Royle, Natalie A.; Corley, Janie; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Valdés Hernández, Maria; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Starr, John M.; Bastin, Mark E.; Evans, Alan C.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate how associations between education and brain structure in older age were affected by adjusting for IQ measured at age 11. Methods: We analyzed years of full-time education and measures from an MRI brain scan at age 73 in 617 community-dwelling adults born in 1936. In addition to average and vertex-wise cortical thickness, we measured total brain atrophy and white matter tract fractional anisotropy. Associations between brain structure and education were tested, covarying for sex and vascular health; a second model also covaried for age 11 IQ. Results: The significant relationship between education and average cortical thickness (β = 0.124, p = 0.004) was reduced by 23% when age 11 IQ was included (β = 0.096, p = 0.041). Initial associations between longer education and greater vertex-wise cortical thickness were significant in bilateral temporal, medial-frontal, parietal, sensory, and motor cortices. Accounting for childhood intelligence reduced the number of significant vertices by >90%; only bilateral anterior temporal associations remained. Neither education nor age 11 IQ was significantly associated with total brain atrophy or tract-averaged fractional anisotropy. Conclusions: The association between years of education and brain structure ≈60 years later was restricted to cortical thickness in this sample; however, the previously reported associations between longer education and a thicker cortex are likely to be overestimates in terms of both magnitude and distribution. This finding has implications for understanding, and possibly ameliorating, life-course brain health. PMID:27664981

  9. A protein structural classes prediction method based on PSI-BLAST profile.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuyan; Yan, Shoujiang; Qi, Shuhua; Li, Yan; Yao, Yuhua

    2014-07-21

    Knowledge of protein structural classes plays an important role in understanding protein folding patterns. Prediction of protein structural class based solely on sequence data remains to be a challenging problem. In this study, we extract the long-range correlation information and linear correlation information from position-specific score matrix (PSSM). A total of 3600 features are extracted, then, 278 features are selected by a filter feature selection method based on 1189 dataset. To verify the performance of our method (named by LCC-PSSM), jackknife tests are performed on three widely used low similarity benchmark datasets. Comparison of our results with the existing methods shows that our method provides the favorable performance for protein structural class prediction. Stand-alone version of the proposed method (LCC-PSSM) is written in MATLAB language and it can be downloaded from http://bioinfo.zstu.edu.cn/LCC-PSSM/.

  10. HIV Structural Database using Chem BLAST for all classes of AIDS inhibitors

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 155 HIV Structural Database using Chem BLAST for all classes of AIDS inhibitors (Web, free access)   The HIV structural database (HIVSDB) is a comprehensive collection of the structures of HIV protease, both of unliganded enzyme and of its inhibitor complexes. It contains abstracts and crystallographic data such as inhibitor and protein coordinates for 248 data sets, of which only 141 are from the Protein Data Bank (PDB).

  11. Mind-Reading Ability and Structural Connectivity Changes in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Cabinio, Monia; Rossetto, Federica; Blasi, Valeria; Savazzi, Federica; Castelli, Ilaria; Massaro, Davide; Valle, Annalisa; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Marchetti, Antonella; Baglio, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The Mind-Reading ability through the eyes is an important component of the affective Theory of Mind (ToM), which allows people to infer the other’s mental state from the eye gaze. The aim of the present study was to investigate to which extent age-associated structural brain changes impact this ability and to determine if this association is related to executive functions in elderly subjects. For this purpose, Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to determine both gray matter and white matter (WM) areas associated with aging. The resulting areas have been included in a subsequent correlation analysis to detect the brain regions whose structure was associated with the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes, assessed with the Italian version of the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” (RME) test, in a sample of 36 healthy subjects ranging from 24 to 79 years of age. The analysis resulted in three important findings: (1) the performance to the RME test is relatively stable across the decades 20–70 (despite a slight decrease of this ability with aging) and independent from executive functions; (2) structural brain imaging demonstrated the involvement of a great number of cortical ToM areas for the execution of the RME test: the bilateral precentral gyrus, the bilateral posterior insula, the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus, which also showed a significant volume decrease with age; (3) an age and task-related decline in WM connectivity on left fronto-temporal portion of the brain. Our results confirm the age-related structural modifications of the brain and show that these changes have an influence on the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes. PMID:26635702

  12. Mind-Reading Ability and Structural Connectivity Changes in Aging.

    PubMed

    Cabinio, Monia; Rossetto, Federica; Blasi, Valeria; Savazzi, Federica; Castelli, Ilaria; Massaro, Davide; Valle, Annalisa; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Marchetti, Antonella; Baglio, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The Mind-Reading ability through the eyes is an important component of the affective Theory of Mind (ToM), which allows people to infer the other's mental state from the eye gaze. The aim of the present study was to investigate to which extent age-associated structural brain changes impact this ability and to determine if this association is related to executive functions in elderly subjects. For this purpose, Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to determine both gray matter and white matter (WM) areas associated with aging. The resulting areas have been included in a subsequent correlation analysis to detect the brain regions whose structure was associated with the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes, assessed with the Italian version of the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" (RME) test, in a sample of 36 healthy subjects ranging from 24 to 79 years of age. The analysis resulted in three important findings: (1) the performance to the RME test is relatively stable across the decades 20-70 (despite a slight decrease of this ability with aging) and independent from executive functions; (2) structural brain imaging demonstrated the involvement of a great number of cortical ToM areas for the execution of the RME test: the bilateral precentral gyrus, the bilateral posterior insula, the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus, which also showed a significant volume decrease with age; (3) an age and task-related decline in WM connectivity on left fronto-temporal portion of the brain. Our results confirm the age-related structural modifications of the brain and show that these changes have an influence on the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes.

  13. Tuberculosis in Cape Town: an age-structured transmission model

    PubMed Central

    Blaser, Nello; Zahnd, Cindy; Hermans, Sabine; Salazar-Vizcaya, Luisa; Estill, Janne; Morrow, Carl; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia; Wood, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death in South Africa. The burden of disease varies by age, with peaks in TB notification rates in the HIV-negative population at ages 0-5, 20-24 and 45-49 years. There is little variation between age groups in the rates in the HIV-positive population. The drivers of this age pattern remain unknown. Methods We developed an age-structured simulation model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) transmission in Cape Town, South Africa. We considered five states of TB progression: susceptible, infected (latent TB), active TB, treated TB and treatment default. Latently infected individuals could be re-infected; a previous Mtb infection slowed progression to active disease. We further considered three states of HIV progression: HIV negative, HIV positive, on antiretroviral therapy. To parameterize the model, we analysed treatment outcomes from the Cape Town electronic TB register, social mixing patterns from a Cape Town community and literature estimates for other parameters. To investigate the main drivers behind the age patterns, we conducted sensitivity analyses on all parameters related to the age structure. Results The model replicated the age patterns in HIV-negative TB notification rates of Cape Town in 2009. Simulated TB notification rate in HIV-negative patients was 1,000/100,000 person-years (pyrs) in children aged < 5 years and decreased to 51/100,000 in children 5-15 years. The peak in early adulthood occurred at 25-29 years (463/100,000 pyrs). After a subsequent decline, simulated TB notification rates gradually increased from the age of 30 years. Sensitivity analyses showed that the dip after the early adult peak was due to the protective effect of latent TB and that retreatment TB was mainly responsible for the rise in TB notification rates from the age of 30 years. Conclusion The protective effect of a first latent infection on subsequent infections and the faster progression in previously treated patients

  14. Some bounds in classes of {open_quotes}aging{close_quotes} distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kotlyar, V.Yu.

    1995-03-01

    Reliability of technical systems is closely linked with {open_quotes}aging{close_quotes} properties of the components. So-called monotone systems whose components have certain aging characteristics are of considerable importance in this field of research. Efficient bounds of reliability, mean time to failure, and other parameters can be obtained for such systems. The bounds in literature were obtained under the least restrictive assumptions on aging. In this paper, we generalize some results of literature to the case of even more general aging principles, specifically, when the system components are HNBUE, HNWUE, NBAFR, NWAFR in terms of their reliability properties. We start with a definition of these properties.

  15. Means-Ends Thinking, Adjustment, and Social Class Among Elementary-School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shure, Myrna B.; Spivack, George

    1972-01-01

    Irrespective of social class and intellectual functioning, disturbed youngsters in special schools (in contrast to normal Ss in regular schools), expressed both fewer elements of means-ends thinking and stories more limited to pragmatic, impulsive, and physically aggressive means. (Author)

  16. Assessment of Cardiorespiratory Fitness of College Aged Students in Large Physical Education Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vehrs, Pat R.; George, James D.

    1995-01-01

    Most colleges and universities provide physical fitness classes plus courses teaching basic concepts of healthy living. Such courses empower students to learn physical fitness assessment, make wise lifetime physical fitness decisions, and design customized exercise programs. The paper examines types of cardiorespiratory fitness testing, explaining…

  17. Identity, Age, Proportion of Online Classes, and Success among Students in a Predominantly Online Degree Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsen-Landy, Bev

    2012-01-01

    Most colleges and universities in the US offer at least some classes online, and a significant number of colleges and universities offer degree programs either all online or predominantly online. Many of the distance learning courses and programs emerge from traditional courses and programs; however, in the past decade we have seen the emergence…

  18. A New Class of Risk-Importance Measures to Support Reactor Aging Management and the Prioritization of Materials Degradation Research

    SciTech Connect

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Toyooka, Michael Y.

    2010-06-07

    As the US fleet of light water reactors ages, the risks of operation might be expected to increase. Although probabilistic risk assessment has proven a critical resource in risk-informed regulatory decision-making, limitations in current methods and models have constrained their prospective value in reactor aging management. These limitations stem principally from the use of static component failure rate models (which do not allow the impact of component aging on failure rates to be represented) and a very limited treatment of passive components (which would be expected to have an increasingly significant risk contribution in an aging system). Yet, a PRA captures a substantial knowledge base that could be of significant value in addressing plant aging. In this paper we will describe a methodology and a new class of risk importance measures that allow the use of an existing PRA model to support the management of plant aging, the prioritization of improvements to non-destructive examination and monitoring techniques, and the establishment of research emphases in materials science. This methodology makes use of data resources generated under the USNRC Proactive Management of Materials Degradation program which addresses the anticipated effects of numerous aging degradation mechanisms on a wide variety of component types.

  19. Aging and Heterogeneity: Genetics, Social Structure, and Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, John M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that the heterogeneity of human personality characteristics increases with age. Examines reasons for this phenomenon in terms of individual differentiation, social structure/allocation, and behavioral genetics. Develops a model synthesizing various study designs that prevent variation and covariation errors from occurring in life course…

  20. Seismic-fragility tests of new and accelerated-aged Class 1E battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L.L.; Janis, W.J.; Black, D.A.; Paulsen, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the potential survivability of a battery given a seismic event. Prior reports in this series discussed the seismic-fragility tests and results for three specific naturally-aged cell types: 12-year old NCX-2250, 10-year old LCU-13, and 10-year old FHC-19. This report focuses on the complementary approach, namely, the seismic-fragility response of accelerated-aged batteries. Of particular interest is the degree to which such approaches accurately reproduce the actual failure modes and thresholds. In these tests the significant aging effects observed, in terms of seismic survivability, were: embrittlement of cell cases, positive bus material and positive plate grids; and excessive sulphation of positive plate active material causing hardening and expansion of positive plates. The IEEE Standard 535 accelerated aging method successfully reproduced seismically significant aging effects in new cells but accelerated grid embrittlement an estimated five years beyond the conditional age of other components.

  1. Management of aging of nuclear power plant containment structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Norris, W.E.; Graves, H.L. III

    1998-06-01

    Research addressing aging management of nuclear power plant concrete and steel containment structures is summarized. Accomplishments related to concrete containment structures include formation of a materials` property database; an aging assessment methodology to identify critical structures and degradation factors; guidelines and evaluation criteria for use in condition assessments; and a time-dependent reliability-based methodology for condition assessments and estimations of future performance. Under the steel containments and liners activity, a degradation assessment methodology has been developed, mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in the containment due to aggressive environmental factors have been identified, and statistical data supporting the use of these models in time-dependent reliability analysis have been summarized.

  2. The leader peptide of mutacin 1140 has distinct structural components compared to related class I lantibiotics.

    PubMed

    Escano, Jerome; Stauffer, Byron; Brennan, Jacob; Bullock, Monica; Smith, Leif

    2014-12-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics composed of an N-terminal leader peptide that promotes the core peptide's interaction with the post translational modification (PTM) enzymes. Following PTMs, mutacin 1140 is transported out of the cell and the leader peptide is cleaved to yield the antibacterial peptide. Mutacin 1140 leader peptide is structurally unique compared to other class I lantibiotic leader peptides. Herein, we further our understanding of the structural differences of mutacin 1140 leader peptide with regard to other class I leader peptides. We have determined that the length of the leader peptide is important for the biosynthesis of mutacin 1140. We have also determined that mutacin 1140 leader peptide contains a novel four amino acid motif compared to related lantibiotics. PTM enzyme recognition of the leader peptide appears to be evolutionarily distinct from related class I lantibiotics. Our study on mutacin 1140 leader peptide provides a basis for future studies aimed at understanding its interaction with the PTM enzymes.

  3. The lived experience of middle-aged women with New York Heart Association class III heart failure: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jennifer Wayment; Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Lynch-Sauer, Judith

    2009-09-01

    Although heart failure (HF) is equally prevalent in men and women, women with HF are more likely to report decreased quality of life and are more likely to die of the disease compared with men. Moreover, HF has been studied less extensively in women and no study has specifically addressed women with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III HF using a qualitative method. This pilot study sought to gain insight into the lived experience of women with NYHA class III HF. Using a phenomenological approach, interviews obtained from 4 middle-aged women with NYHA class III HF were analyzed using the Giorgi method of data analysis. Five themes emerged: (1) developing a new conception of self, (2) conceding physical limitations, (3) enduring emotional heartache, (4) accepting support, and (5) rejuvenating through rest. This study provides a beginning to our understanding of the lived experience of women with NYHA class III HF. However, further exploration is needed to increase our knowledge of HF in women, particularly among diverse populations.

  4. Age structured dynamical model for an endangered lizard Eulamprus leuraensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriatna, A. K.; Rachmadani, Q.; Ilahi, F.; Anggriani, N.; Nuraini, N.

    2014-02-01

    The Blue Mountains Water Skink, Eulamprus leuraensis, is listed as an endangered species under the IUCN Red List. This lizard species has a typical characteristic of growth with a low fecundity. It is known that the offspring quality may decline with maternal age of the parents despite they can grow rapidly from neonatal size to adult size within two to three years. It is also believed that low adult survival rates and specialization on rare and fragmented type of habitat are the main cause leading to the endangered status of the lizard. A mathematical model with age structure for Eulamprus leuraensis, taking into account the variation of survival rate in each structure and the declining of offspring quality with respect to maternal age is considered here. Stable coexistence of non-trivial equilibriumis shown. It is also shown that an endangered status is due to combination oflow reproductive output and low rates of adult survival. Further, understanding the age structure within populations can facilitate efective management of the endangered species.

  5. Embedded Learning Strategy Instruction: Story-Structure Pedagogy in Heterogeneous Secondary Literature Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faggella-Luby, Michael; Schumaker, Jean S.; Deshler, Donald D.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of using the Embedded Story-Structure (ESS) Routine in a literature course were investigated. A heterogeneous group of 79 ninth graders, including 14 students with LD, were randomly assigned to one of two conditions, with instruction occurring in groups of 12 to 14 students in general education literature classes over a nine-day…

  6. Permanence of a stage-structured predator-prey system with a class of functional responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhihui; Wang, Shufan; Wang, Wenting; Li, Zizhen

    2011-12-01

    A stage-structured predator-prey system incorporating a class of functional responses is presented in this article. By analyzing the system and using the standard comparison theorem, the sufficient conditions are derived for permanence of the system and non-permanence of predators.

  7. Influence of Professional Preparation and Class Structure on HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Prevention Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Darson L.; Jozkowski, Kristen N.; Hammig, Bart J.; Ogletree, Roberta J.; Fogarty, Erin C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if education about human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted disease (STD) and pregnancy prevention is dependent on professional preparation and/or class structure. Design: A secondary data analysis of the 2006 School Health Policies and Programmes Study (SHPPS) was conducted.…

  8. Aviation Structural Mechanic, First Class, 2-12. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This self-paced, individualized course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, teaches students the skills needed to become aviation structural mechanics (first class). The course materials consist of three pamphlets. The first pamphlet covers aircraft maintenance management, records, and reports…

  9. Second Stiefel-Whitney class and spin structures on flat manifolds of diagonal type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Console, Sergio; Rossetti, Juan Pablo; Miatello, Roberto J.

    2011-07-01

    In this note, using previous works of Miatello and Podestá and of the authors, we provide simple, explicit combinatorial conditions for the existence of a spin structure on a diagonal flat manifold. We show in an elementary way that the above conditions are equivalent to the vanishing of the second Stiefel-Whitney class.

  10. [Age structure and growth pattern of Polytrichum juniperum populations in a mire of Changbai Mountains].

    PubMed

    Bu, Zhaojun; Yan, Yunfei; Dai, Dan; Wang, Xianwei

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the age structure and growth pattern of two Polytrichum juniperum populations with and without sporophytes in Hani mire of Changbai Mountains were studied by 'innate annual marker' method. The ramets of both populations were composed of 6 age classes, and their quantity and biomass showed a declining age structure, which was more obvious in the sporophyte produced population. No significant difference of biomass was found (P > 0.05) between the two populations. The dry material accumulation of the ramets in both populations increased with aging, and showed similar patterns of linear function. The ramets mean height of sporophyte-produced population was 6.17% shorter (P < 0.05) than the another, because sporophyte production limited the height growth. The ramets mean height also increased with aging, and showed similar patterns of linear function. In non-sporophyte produced population, the variation coefficient of ramets height was only 2.44%, which indicated the significance of similar height for ramets survival. In sporophyte produced population, the variation coefficient of ramets height was 25.07%, while that of ramets biomass was 8.25%, suggesting the significance of similar biomass to the reproduction of population. The biomass of ramets had a significantly positive correlation with height in both populations (P < 0.001), and no allometric growth was showed.

  11. Prediction of protein structural classes for low-similarity sequences using reduced PSSM and position-based secondary structural features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junru; Wang, Cong; Cao, Jiajia; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Yuhua; Dai, Qi

    2015-01-10

    Many efficient methods have been proposed to advance protein structural class prediction, but there are still some challenges where additional insight or technology is needed for low-similarity sequences. In this work, we schemed out a new prediction method for low-similarity datasets using reduced PSSM and position-based secondary structural features. We evaluated the proposed method with four experiments and compared it with the available competing prediction methods. The results indicate that the proposed method achieved the best performance among the evaluated methods, with overall accuracy 3-5% higher than the existing best-performing method. This paper also found that the reduced alphabets with size 13 simplify PSSM structures efficiently while reserving its maximal information. This understanding can be used to design more powerful prediction methods for protein structural class.

  12. Some Remarks on the Choice of Ductility Class for Earthquake-Resistant Steel Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejčeková-Farhat, Miroslava; Ároch, Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The implementation of the Eurocodes in current structural design practice has brought about a new emphasis on the design of earthquake-resistant structures. In some European countries, new earthquake zones have been defined; henceforth, the design requirements of many ongoing projects have changed as well. The choice of the ductility class of steel structures as one of the key design parameters, the consequences of this choice on design procedure, and some applications of the Eurocode 8 design criteria by comparing French and Slovak national practice are discussed, using a practical example of a structure.

  13. Aging of Johari-Goldstein Relaxation in Structural Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Leheny, Robert L.

    2006-03-01

    Using frequency-dependent dielectric susceptibility measurements we characterize the aging in two supercooled liquids, sorbitol and xylitol, below their calorimetric glass transition temperatures, Tg. In addition to the alpha relaxation that tracks the structural dynamics, the susceptibilities of both liquids possess a secondary Johari-Goldstein relaxation at higher frequencies. Following a quench below Tg, the susceptibility slowly approaches equilibrium behavior. For both liquids, features of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation display a dependence on the time since the quench, or aging time, that is very similar to the age dependence of the alpha peak. However, one can not assign a single fictive temperature to both the alpha and Johari-Goldstein relaxations. For example, the peak frequency of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation remains constant during aging for sorbitol while it increases with age for xylitol, inconsistent with a decreasing fictive temperature. This behavior contrasts with that of the high frequency tail of the alpha peak whose shape and position track the aging of the main part of the peak.

  14. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  15. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  16. Inferring the structure of latent class models using a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    van der Maas, Han L J; Raijmakers, Maartje E J; Visser, Ingmar

    2005-05-01

    Present optimization techniques in latent class analysis apply the expectation maximization algorithm or the Newton-Raphson algorithm for optimizing the parameter values of a prespecified model. These techniques can be used to find maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters, given the specified structure of the model, which is defined by the number of classes and, possibly, fixation and equality constraints. The model structure is usually chosen on theoretical grounds. A large variety of structurally different latent class models can be compared using goodness-of-fit indices of the chi-square family, Akaike's information criterion, the Bayesian information criterion, and various other statistics. However, finding the optimal structure for a given goodness-of-fit index often requires a lengthy search in which all kinds of model structures are tested. Moreover, solutions may depend on the choice of initial values for the parameters. This article presents a new method by which one can simultaneously infer the model structure from the data and optimize the parameter values. The method consists of a genetic algorithm in which any goodness-of-fit index can be used as a fitness criterion. In a number of test cases in which data sets from the literature were used, it is shown that this method provides models that fit equally well as or better than the models suggested in the original articles.

  17. Social Orders and Interactions among Children in Age-Mixed Classes in Primary Schools--New Perspectives from a Synthesis of Ethnographic Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huf, Christina; Raggl, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The article synthesises data from two ethnographic projects, which both explore interactions of children in age-mixed groups in primary schools. It illuminates critical perspectives on social orders and children's interactions in age-mixed classes by showing how pupils in age-mixed groups become involved in power relations and how the teacher's…

  18. Ageing management of french NPP civil work structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallitre, E.; Dauffer, D.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents EDF practice about concrete structure ageing management, from the mechanisms analysis to the formal procedure which allows the French company to increase 900 MWe NPP lifetime until 40 years; it will also introduce its action plan for 60 years lifetime extension. This practice is based on a methodology which identifies every ageing mechanism; both plants feedback and state of the art are screened and conclusions are drawn up into an "ageing analysis data sheet". That leads at first to a collection of 57 data sheets which give the mechanism identification, the components that are concerned and an analysis grid which is designed to assess the safety risk. This analysis screens the reference documents describing the mechanism, the design lifetime hypotheses, the associated regulation or codification, the feedback experiences, the accessibility, the maintenance actions, the repair possibility and so one. This analysis has to lead to a conclusion about the risk taking into account monitoring and maintenance. If the data sheet conclusion is not clear enough, then a more detailed report is launched. The technical document which is needed, is a formal detailed report which summarizes every theoretical knowledge and monitoring data: its objective is to propose a solution for ageing management: this solution can include more inspections or specific research development, or additional maintenance. After a first stage on the 900 MWe units, only two generic ageing management detailed reports have been needed for the civil engineering part: one about reactor building containment, and one about other structures which focuses on concrete inflating reactions. The second stage consists on deriving this generic analysis (ageing mechanism and detailed reports) to every plant where a complete ageing report is required (one report for all equipments and structures of the plant, but specific for each reactor). This ageing management is a continuous process because the

  19. Phylogeny, topology, structure and functions of membrane-bound class III peroxidases in vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Lüthje, Sabine; Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Hopff, David; Möller, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Peroxidases are key player in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. Membrane-bound isoenzymes have been described for peroxidase superfamilies in plants and animals. Recent studies demonstrated a location of peroxidases of the secretory pathway (class III peroxidases) at the tonoplast and the plasma membrane. Proteomic approaches using highly enriched plasma membrane preparations suggest organisation of these peroxidases in microdomains, a developmentally regulation and an induction of isoenzymes by oxidative stress. Phylogenetic relations, topology, putative structures, and physiological function of membrane-bound class III peroxidases will be discussed.

  20. Reduction in single muscle fiber rate of force development with aging is not attenuated in world class older masters athletes.

    PubMed

    Power, Geoffrey A; Minozzo, Fábio C; Spendiff, Sally; Filion, Marie-Eve; Konokhova, Yana; Purves-Smith, Maddy F; Pion, Charlotte; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Morais, José A; Herzog, Walter; Hepple, Russell T; Taivassalo, Tanja; Rassier, Dilson E

    2016-02-15

    Normal adult aging is associated with impaired muscle contractile function; however, to what extent cross-bridge kinetics are altered in aging muscle is not clear. We used a slacken restretch maneuver on single muscle fiber segments biopsied from the vastus lateralis of young adults (∼23 yr), older nonathlete (NA) adults (∼80 yr), and age-matched world class masters athletes (MA; ∼80 yr) to assess the rate of force redevelopment (ktr) and cross-bridge kinetics. A post hoc analysis was performed, and only the mechanical properties of "slow type" fibers based on unloaded shortening velocity (Vo) measurements are reported. The MA and NA were ∼54 and 43% weaker, respectively, for specific force compared with young. Similarly, when force was normalized to cross-sectional area determined via the fiber shape angularity data, both old groups did not differ, and the MA and NA were ∼43 and 48% weaker, respectively, compared with young (P < 0.05). Vo for both MA and NA old groups was 62 and 46% slower, respectively, compared with young. Both MA and NA adults had approximately two times slower values for ktr compared with young. The slower Vo in both old groups relative to young, coupled with a similarly reduced ktr, suggests impaired cross-bridge kinetics are responsible for impaired single fiber contractile properties with aging. These results challenge the widely accepted resilience of slow type fibers to cellular aging.

  1. Age differences in the perception of hierarchical structure in events.

    PubMed

    Kurby, Christopher A; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    Everyday activities break down into parts and subparts, and appreciating this hierarchical structure is an important component of understanding. In two experiments we found age differences in the ability to perceive hierarchical structure in continuous activity. In both experiments, younger and older adults segmented movies of everyday activities into large and small meaningful events. Older adults' segmentation deviated more from group norms than did younger adults' segmentation, and older adults' segmentation was less hierarchically organized than that of younger adults. Older adults performed less well than younger adults on event memory tasks. In some cases, measures of event segmentation discriminated between those older adults with better and worse memory. These results suggest that the hierarchical encoding of ongoing activity declines with age, and that such encoding may be important for memory.

  2. Age Differences in the Perception of Hierarchical Structure in Events

    PubMed Central

    Kurby, Christopher A.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Everyday activities break down into parts and subparts, and appreciating this hierarchical structure is an important component of understanding. In two experiments we found age differences in the ability to perceive hierarchical structure in continuous activity. In both experiments, younger and older adults segmented movies of everyday activities into large and small meaningful events. Older adults’ segmentation deviated more from group norms than did younger adults’ segmentation, and older adults’ segmentation was less hierarchically organized than that of younger adults. Older adults performed less well than younger adults on event memory tasks. In some cases, measures of event segmentation discriminated between those older adults with better and worse memory. These results suggest that the hierarchical encoding of ongoing activity declines with age, and that such encoding may be important for memory. PMID:21264613

  3. Development of acoustography for NDE of aging structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Jaswinder S.; Wang, Honghui; Popek, Witold J.; Sincebaugh, Patrick J.

    2001-07-01

    Military and commercial aircraft structures are being fielded well beyond their designed life cycle, resulting in escalating maintenance costs. The principle driver behind these costs is the need to nondestructively interrogate large areas to detect and quantify anomalies such as corrosion, cracks, and delaminations. Manual ultrasonic techniques are routinely applied to inspect aircraft structures, but these techniques are time consuming, laborious, and are prone to errors such as operator fatigue and subjectivity. Automated ultrasonic systems require costly, complex scanning systems that are often difficult to adapt to complex shaped structures. Acoustography can provide full-field ultrasonic images in near real-time, making it a suitable method for high-speed, wide area inspection applications. This paper will report on progress being made toward developing acoustography for NDE of aging aircraft structures.

  4. Sweepnet captures of Lygus hesperus (Hemiptera:Miridae) adult genders and age-classes in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of the western tarnished plant bug, Lygus hesperus Knight, in cotton usually relies on population estimates obtained using the sweepnet. Recent studies indicated adult L. hesperus gender and physiological age influence feeding behavior, within-plant distribution, and injury to cotton. W...

  5. First in the Class? Age and the Education Production Function. NBER Working Paper No. 13663

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cascio, Elizabeth; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2007-01-01

    Older children outperform younger children in a school-entry cohort well into their school careers. The existing literature has provided little insight into the causes of this phenomenon, leaving open the possibility that school-entry age is zero-sum game, where relatively young students lose what relatively old students gain. In this paper, we…

  6. Stratified at Seven: In-Class Ability Grouping and the Relative Age Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    There is an established body of evidence indicating that a pupil's relative age within their school year cohort is associated with academic attainment throughout compulsory education. In England, autumn-born pupils consistently attain at higher levels than summer-born pupils. Analysis here investigates a possible channel of this relative age…

  7. Aggressive Conduct Disorder: The Influence of Social Class, Sex and Age on the Clinical Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar, D.; Stewart, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Investigates how socioeconomic status, sex, and age of admission to a child psychiatry ward influenced the clinical picture of aggressive conduct disorder among 58 affected children. As little evidence of variation in any of the three variables was found, results reinforced the idea that the disorder is a valid psychiatric syndrome. (RH)

  8. Crystal structure of class III chitinase from pomegranate provides the insight into its metal storage capacity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taro; Zhao, Guanghua; Mikami, Bunzo

    2015-01-01

    Chitinase hydrolyzes the β-1,4-glycosidic bond in chitin. In higher plants, this enzyme has been regarded as a pathogenesis-related protein. Recently, we identified a class III chitinase, which functions as a calcium storage protein in pomegranate (Punica granatum) seed (PSC, pomegranate seed chitinase). Here, we solved a crystal structure of PSC at 1.6 Å resolution. Although its overall structure, including the structure of catalytic site and non-proline cis-peptides, was closely similar to those of other class III chitinases, PSC had some unique structural characteristics. First, there were some metal-binding sites with coordinated water molecules on the surface of PSC. Second, many unconserved aspartate residues were present in the PSC sequence which rendered the surface of PSC negatively charged. This acidic electrostatic property is in contrast to that of hevamine, well-characterized plant class III chitinase, which has rather a positively charged surface. Thus, the crystal structure provides a clue for metal association property of PSC.

  9. Structure of the imipenem-hydrolyzing class A beta-lactamase SME-1 from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Sougakoff, Wladimir; L'Hermite, Guillaume; Pernot, Lucile; Naas, Thierry; Guillet, Valérie; Nordmann, Patrice; Jarlier, Vincent; Delettré, Jean

    2002-02-01

    The structure of the beta-lactamase SME-1 from Serratia marcescens, a class A enzyme characterized by its significant activity against imipenem, has been determined to 2.13 A resolution. The overall structure of SME-1 is similar to that of other class A beta-lactamases. In the active-site cavity, most of the residues found in SME-1 are conserved among class A beta-lactamases, except at positions 104, 105 and 237, where a tyrosine, a histidine and a serine are found, respectively, and at position 238, which is occupied by a cysteine forming a disulfide bridge with the other cysteine residue located at position 69. The crucial role played by this disulfide bridge in SME-1 was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis of Cys69 to Ala, which resulted in a mutant unable to confer resistance to imipenem and all other beta-lactam antibiotics tested. Another striking structural feature found in SME-1 was the short distance separating the side chains of the active serine residue at position 70 and the strictly conserved glutamate at position 166, which is up to 1.4 A shorter in SME-1 compared with other class A beta-lactamases. Consequently, the SME-1 structure cannot accommodate the essential catalytic water molecule found between Ser70 and Glu166 in the other class A beta-lactamases described so far, suggesting that a significant conformational change may be necessary in SME-1 to properly position the hydrolytic water molecule involved in the hydrolysis of the acyl-enzyme intermediate.

  10. The Umm Al Binni Structure and Bronze Age Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    Archaeological excavations of sites dating from 2200 BCE and 1200 BCE in the Middle East, Asia Minor, and southeast Europe provide evidence that a large scale disaster affected Bronze Age civilizations. There are numerous debates as to whether this was caused by warfare, a large-scale natural disaster, or some other factor. In 2001, Sharad Master used satellite images to discover a possible Holocene impact structure in the Al 'Amarah marshes of southern Iraq, known as Umm al Binni lake. With an estimated age of < 5000 years and a diameter of ~3.4 km, this structure may help explain this disaster. Using numerical models and scaling equations for a cosmic impact, I show that although destructive forces would have damaged Sumerian cities within a few hundred km of the coast, it is unlikely that this single impact would have caused the large-scale destruction seen over the larger region. The impact origin of the structure is unconfirmed and any connection to Bronze Age catastrophes remains speculative. Errata: Table 4 provides a list of impact sites, three of which are associated with nickel-iron impactors and therefore cannot be from a "fragmented comet".

  11. Does 3rd age plus 3rd world equal 3rd class?

    PubMed

    Tout, K

    1992-04-01

    The patterns of care of the aged population are being influenced by demographic changes, migration, and industrialization in developing countries. There is no longer a secure place for the elders in the community as chiefs, sages, or useful members of the household. In very large mega-cities the aged living in an extended family are more prone to psychological problems than in a lone living situation. There are many variations in the degree of abandonment or loss of dignity, which are described in examples from Vilcabamba, Potosi, Lima, and Belize. For example in Belize, there are no cities to migrate to so people leave to seek their fortunes in the US or the UK. Solutions are possible within the community. The experiences of HelpAge International are reported for Pro Vida, Colombia; India; and Sri Lanka. In Colombia efforts were made to acquire a bakery so that the elderly could be employed in bread baking, donating loaves to institutions, and selling half the loaves on the street. Other projects involved improving living conditions for lone old people in shanty towns and training social workers. The institutional aim was to concentrate on a locale. Attention was given to providing instruction in classrooms to enlighten youth about the needs of the elderly. HelpAge in India concentrated on eye problems of the elderly in remote areas through awareness and fundraising campaigns. HelpAge Sri Lanka has set up seminars and training programs which have been models for similar programs in Thailand. Shared experience with the problems of aged beggars suggests that funding must come from nongovernmental agencies. The cultivation and sale of herbs by the elderly was promoted in Vilcabamba; in Jamaica a memory bank was established for preserving cultural traditions. Abandoned industries have been revived. The needs of the organizers, who are primarily volunteers, are organization skills. Governments can supplement meager funds by enhancing traditional life, by removing

  12. Physicians' perception of demand-induced supply in the information age: a latent class model analysis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2012-03-01

    This paper introduces a concept called 'demand-induced supply' that reflects the excess supply of services due to an increase in demand initiated by patients. We examine its association with the proportion of information-savvy patients in physicians' practice. Using data from a national representative physician survey, we apply latent class models to analyze this association. Our analyses categorize physicians into three 'types' according to the frequency with which they provided additional medical services at their patients' requests: frequent, occasional, and rare. The proportion of information-savvy patients is significantly and positively correlated with demand-induced supply for the frequent or occasional type, but not among physicians in the rare type. Efforts to contain healthcare costs through utilization control need to recognize the pattern of responses from physicians who treat an increasing number of information-savvy patients.

  13. Cost-effective age structure and geographical distribution of boreal forest reserves.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Johanna; Ohman, Karin; Perhans, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena; Bugman, Harald

    2011-02-01

    1. Forest reserves are established to preserve biodiversity, and to maintain natural functions and processes. Today there is heightened focus on old-growth stages, with less attention given to early successional stages. The biodiversity potential of younger forests has been overlooked, and the cost-effectiveness of incorporating different age classes in reserve networks has not yet been studied.2. We performed a reserve selection analysis in boreal Sweden using the Swedish National Forest Inventory plots. Seventeen structural variables were used as biodiversity indicators, and the cost of protecting each plot as a reserve was assessed using the Heureka system. A goal programming approach was applied, which allowed inclusion of several objectives and avoided a situation in which common indicators affected the result more than rare ones. The model was limited either by budget or area.3. All biodiversity indicators were found in all age classes, with more than half having the highest values in ages ≥ 100 years. Several large-tree indicators and all deadwood indicators had higher values in forests 0-14 years than in forests 15-69 years.4. It was most cost-effective to protect a large proportion of young forests since they generally have a lower net present value compared to older forests, but still contain structures of importance for biodiversity. However, it was more area-effective to protect a large proportion of old forests since they have a higher biodiversity potential per area.5. The geographical distribution of reserves selected with the budget-constrained model was strongly biassed towards the north-western section of boreal Sweden, with a large proportion of young forest, whereas the area-constrained model focussed on the south-eastern section, with dominance by the oldest age class.6.Synthesis and applications. We show that young forests with large amounts of structures important to biodiversity such as dead wood and remnant trees are cheap and cost

  14. Cost-effective age structure and geographical distribution of boreal forest reserves

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Perhans, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena; Bugman, Harald

    2011-01-01

    1. Forest reserves are established to preserve biodiversity, and to maintain natural functions and processes. Today there is heightened focus on old-growth stages, with less attention given to early successional stages. The biodiversity potential of younger forests has been overlooked, and the cost-effectiveness of incorporating different age classes in reserve networks has not yet been studied. 2. We performed a reserve selection analysis in boreal Sweden using the Swedish National Forest Inventory plots. Seventeen structural variables were used as biodiversity indicators, and the cost of protecting each plot as a reserve was assessed using the Heureka system. A goal programming approach was applied, which allowed inclusion of several objectives and avoided a situation in which common indicators affected the result more than rare ones. The model was limited either by budget or area. 3. All biodiversity indicators were found in all age classes, with more than half having the highest values in ages ≥ 100 years. Several large-tree indicators and all deadwood indicators had higher values in forests 0–14 years than in forests 15–69 years. 4. It was most cost-effective to protect a large proportion of young forests since they generally have a lower net present value compared to older forests, but still contain structures of importance for biodiversity. However, it was more area-effective to protect a large proportion of old forests since they have a higher biodiversity potential per area. 5. The geographical distribution of reserves selected with the budget-constrained model was strongly biassed towards the north-western section of boreal Sweden, with a large proportion of young forest, whereas the area-constrained model focussed on the south-eastern section, with dominance by the oldest age class. 6. Synthesis and applications. We show that young forests with large amounts of structures important to biodiversity such as dead wood and remnant trees are cheap and

  15. Molecular structure and baking performance of individual glycolipid classes from lecithins.

    PubMed

    Selmair, Patrick L; Koehler, Peter

    2009-06-24

    The potential of individual glycolipid classes from lecithins (soybean, rapeseed, and sunflower) in breadmaking was determined in comparison to classical surfactants such as diacetyltartaric acid esters of mono- and diacylglycerides (DATEM), monoacylglycerides, sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate (SSL), and two synthetic glycolipids by means of rheological and baking tests on a microscale. A highly glycolipid-enriched sample containing the entire glycolipid moiety of the lecithin was obtained using an optimized batch procedure with silica gel. This sample was subsequently used to gain individual glycolipid classes through column chromatography on silica gel. The major glycolipid classes in the lecithins, digalactosyl diacylglycerides (1), sterol glucosides (2), acylated sterol glucosides (3), and cerebrosides (4), were identified and characterized. All isolated glycolipid classes displayed excellent baking performance. A better baking activity than that of the classical surfactants was displayed by 1, 3, and 4 and an equivalent baking activity by 2. The same glycolipid classes, except 3, of different lecithin origin showed only slight differences in their baking activities, due to different fatty acid compositions. Furthermore, the glycolipid classes influenced the crumb structure significantly by improving the crumb softness and grain. Interestingly, none of the glycolipid classes showed significant antistaling effect. A direct effect on the overall rheological behavior of the dough was only found for the commercial surfactants. However, the rheological effect seen on gluten isolated from surfactant-containing dough revealed that the surfactants could be divided into two main groups, one of them directly forming and stabilizing liquid film lamellae through adsorption to interfaces and the other indirectly increasing the surface activity of the endogenous lipids in the flour. The results suggest that in wheat dough, glycolipids seem to have an impact on the dough liquor

  16. An observer for a nonlinear age-structured model of a harvested fish population.

    PubMed

    Ngom, Diène; Iggidr, Abderrahman; Guiro, Aboudramane; Ouahbi, Abderrahim

    2008-04-01

    We consider an age-structured model of a harvested population. This model is a discrete-time system that includes a nonlinear stock-recruitment relationship. Our purpose is to estimate the stock state. To achieve this goal, we built an observer, which is an auxiliary system that uses the total number of fish caught over each season and gives a dynamical estimation of the number of fish by age class. We analyse the convergence of the observer and we show that the error estimation tends to zero with exponential speed if a condition on the fishing effort is satisfied. Moreover the constructed observer (dynamical estimator) does not depend on the poorly understood stock-recruitment relationship. This study shows how some tools from nonlinear control theory can help to deal with the state estimation problem in the field of renewable resource management.

  17. Hsp72 is present in plasma from Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle, and the concentration level is repeatable across days and age classes.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Løvendahl, Peter; Berg, Peer; Loeschcke, Volker

    2004-01-01

    Although heat shock proteins (Hsps) are primarily considered as being intracellular, this study identified the presence of Hsp72 in plasma from female Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle. Plasma samples were collected from the same animals at different ages and on different days after calving and accordingly divided into 5 age classes. The age classes were calves less than 235 days of age, young heifers between 235 and 305 days of age, older heifers between 305 and 560 days of age, cows early in lactation, and cows later in lactation. For a subsample of animals within each age class, replicate plasma samples were collected from 1 to 7 days apart to test whether the Hsp72 concentration levels are repeatable on this shorter timescale. Hsp72 was observed in plasma samples from animals of all 5 age classes. For animals with blood samples taken a few days apart, the repeatability (within age class) of the Hsp72 concentration was 0.52 +/- 0.06. Age and days from calving significantly affected the Hsp72 concentration level. The highest Hsp72 level was observed in older heifers (305-560 days of age). The repeatability of Hsp72 concentrations across age classes within animal was 0.22 +/- 0.06. High environmental sensitivity and negative genetic associations between production and health traits in this high-producing breed have been documented earlier. Hsp72 is believed to be strictly stress inducible, and the finding of Hsp72 in plasma indicates that even apparently healthy individuals may experience extrinsic or intrinsic stress (or both).

  18. Structural basis of the inhibition of class C acid phosphatases by adenosine 5;#8242;-phosphorothioate

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J.

    2012-01-20

    The inhibition of phosphatases by adenosine 5'-phosphorothioate (AMPS) was first reported in the late 1960s; however, the structural basis for the inhibition has remained unknown. Here, it is shown that AMPS is a submicromolar inhibitor of class C acid phosphatases, a group of bacterial outer membrane enzymes belonging to the haloacid dehalogenase structural superfamily. Furthermore, the 1.35-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the inhibited recombinant Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase was determined; this is the first structure of a phosphatase complexed with AMPS. The conformation of AMPS is identical to that of the substrate 5'-AMP, except that steric factors force a rotation of the thiophosphoryl out of the normal phosphoryl-binding pocket. This conformation is catalytically nonproductive, because the P atom is not positioned optimally for nucleophilic attack by Asp64, and the O atom of the scissile O-P bond is too far from the Asp (Asp66) that protonates the leaving group. The structure of 5'-AMP complexed with the Asp64 {yields} Asn mutant enzyme was also determined at 1.35-{angstrom} resolution. This mutation induces the substrate to adopt the same nonproductive binding mode that is observed in the AMPS complex. In this case, electrostatic considerations, rather than steric factors, underlie the movement of the phosphoryl. The structures not only provide an explanation for the inhibition by AMPS, but also highlight the precise steric and electrostatic requirements of phosphoryl recognition by class C acid phosphatases. Moreover, the structure of the Asp64 {yields} Asn mutant illustrates how a seemingly innocuous mutation can cause an unexpected structural change.

  19. Inhibitory Control Efficiency in a Piaget-Like Class-Inclusion Task in School-Age Children and Adults: A Developmental Negative Priming Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borst, G.; Poirel, N.; Pineau, A.; Cassotti, M.; Houdé, O.

    2013-01-01

    Most children under 7 years of age presented with 10 daisies and 2 roses fail to indicate that there are more flowers than daisies. Instead of the appropriate comparison of the relative numerosities of the superordinate class (flowers) to its subordinate class (daisies), they perform a direct perceptual comparison of the extensions of the 2…

  20. Prediction of Protein Structural Class Based on Gapped-Dipeptides and a Recursive Feature Selection Approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taigang; Qin, Yufang; Wang, Yongjie; Wang, Chunhua

    2015-12-24

    The prior knowledge of protein structural class may offer useful clues on understanding its functionality as well as its tertiary structure. Though various significant efforts have been made to find a fast and effective computational approach to address this problem, it is still a challenging topic in the field of bioinformatics. The position-specific score matrix (PSSM) profile has been shown to provide a useful source of information for improving the prediction performance of protein structural class. However, this information has not been adequately explored. To this end, in this study, we present a feature extraction technique which is based on gapped-dipeptides composition computed directly from PSSM. Then, a careful feature selection technique is performed based on support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE). These optimal features are selected to construct a final predictor. The results of jackknife tests on four working datasets show that our method obtains satisfactory prediction accuracies by extracting features solely based on PSSM and could serve as a very promising tool to predict protein structural class.

  1. Complex structure of a bacterial class 2 histone deacetylase homologue with a trifluoromethylketone inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Tine Kragh; Hildmann, Christian; Riester, Daniel; Wegener, Dennis; Schwienhorst, Andreas; Ficner, Ralf

    2007-04-01

    The crystal structure of HDAH FB188 in complex with a trifluoromethylketone at 2.2 Å resolution is reported and compared to a previously determined inhibitor complex. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have emerged as attractive targets in anticancer drug development. To date, a number of HDAC inhibitors have been developed and most of them are hydroxamic acid derivatives, typified by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Not surprisingly, structural information that can greatly enhance the design of novel HDAC inhibitors is so far only available for hydroxamic acids in complex with HDAC or HDAC-like enzymes. Here, the first structure of an enzyme complex with a nonhydroxamate HDAC inhibitor is presented. The structure of the trifluoromethyl ketone inhibitor 9,9,9-trifluoro-8-oxo-N-phenylnonanamide in complex with bacterial FB188 HDAH (histone deacetylase-like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes strain FB188) has been determined. HDAH reveals high sequential and functional homology to human class 2 HDACs and a high structural homology to human class 1 HDACs. Comparison with the structure of HDAH in complex with SAHA reveals that the two inhibitors superimpose well. However, significant differences in binding to the active site of HDAH were observed. In the presented structure the O atom of the trifluoromethyl ketone moiety is within binding distance of the Zn atom of the enzyme and the F atoms participate in interactions with the enzyme, thereby involving more amino acids in enzyme–inhibitor binding.

  2. Aging, condition monitoring, and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests of Class 1E electrical cables: Summary of results

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobus, M.J.

    1991-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results of aging, condition monitoring, and accident testing of Class 1E cables used in nuclear power generating stations. Three sets of cables were aged for up to 9 months under simultaneous thermal ({approx_equal} 100{degrees}C) and radiation ({approx_equal}0.10 kGy/hr) conditions. After the aging, the cables were exposed to a simulated accident consisting of high dose rate irradiation ({approx_equal}6 kGy/hr) followed by a high temperature steam exposure. A fourth set of cables, which were unaged, were also exposed to the accident conditions. The cables that were aged for 3 months and then accident tested were subsequently exposed to a high temperature steam fragility test (up to 400{degrees}C), while the cables that were aged for 6 months and then accident tested were subsequently exposed to a 1000-hour submergence test in a chemical solution. The results of the tests indicate that the feasibility of life extension of many popular nuclear power plant cable products is promising and that mechanical measurements (primarily elongation, modulus, and density) were more effective than electrical measurements for monitoring age-related degradation. In the high temperature steam test, ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cable materials generally survived to higher temperatures than crosslinked polyolefin (XLPO) cable materials. In dielectric testing after the submergence testing, the XLPO materials performed better than the EPR materials. This paper presents some recent experimental data that are not yet available elsewhere and a summary of findings from the entire experimental program.

  3. Aging, condition monitoring, and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests of Class 1E electrical cables: Summary of results

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobus, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of aging, condition monitoring, and accident testing of Class 1E cables used in nuclear power generating stations. Three sets of cables were aged for up to 9 months under simultaneous thermal ({approx equal} 100{degrees}C) and radiation ({approx equal}0.10 kGy/hr) conditions. After the aging, the cables were exposed to a simulated accident consisting of high dose rate irradiation ({approx equal}6 kGy/hr) followed by a high temperature steam exposure. A fourth set of cables, which were unaged, were also exposed to the accident conditions. The cables that were aged for 3 months and then accident tested were subsequently exposed to a high temperature steam fragility test (up to 400{degrees}C), while the cables that were aged for 6 months and then accident tested were subsequently exposed to a 1000-hour submergence test in a chemical solution. The results of the tests indicate that the feasibility of life extension of many popular nuclear power plant cable products is promising and that mechanical measurements (primarily elongation, modulus, and density) were more effective than electrical measurements for monitoring age-related degradation. In the high temperature steam test, ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cable materials generally survived to higher temperatures than crosslinked polyolefin (XLPO) cable materials. In dielectric testing after the submergence testing, the XLPO materials performed better than the EPR materials. This paper presents some recent experimental data that are not yet available elsewhere and a summary of findings from the entire experimental program.

  4. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-03-08

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (NM) impedance technique are sighted and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency EIM impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acoustic-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  5. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-02-29

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  6. The Effects of Treadmill Running on Aging Laryngeal Muscle Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kletzien, Heidi; Russell, John A.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2015-01-01

    Levels of Evidence NA (animal study) Objective Age-related changes in laryngeal muscle structure and function may contribute to deficits in voice and swallowing observed in elderly people. We hypothesized that treadmill running, an exercise that increases respiratory drive to upper airway muscles, would induce changes in thyroarytenoid muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms consistent with a fast-slow transformation in muscle fiber type. Study Design Randomized parallel group controlled trial. Methods Fifteen young adult and 14 old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats received either treadmill running or no exercise (5 days/week/8 weeks). Myosin heavy chain isoform composition in the thyroarytenoid muscle was examined at the end of 8 weeks. Results Significant age and treatment effects were found. The young adult group had the greatest proportion of superfast contracting MHCIIL. The treadmill running group had the lowest proportion of MHCIIL and the greatest proportion of MHCIIx. Conclusion Thyroarytenoid muscle structure was affected both by age and treadmill running in a fast-slow transition that is characteristic of exercise manipulations in other skeletal muscles. PMID:26256100

  7. Structural manifestations of aging in Se-rich glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Ravindren, S.; Chen, P.; Boolchand, P.

    2015-03-01

    We examine weakly cross-linked GexSe100-x (0%aging at RT for 4 months, we find the width of the glass transition W(x) steadily decreasing from 10C at 7% Ge to 2C for pure Se. The 5-fold reduction of W(x) with a decrease of Ge content is accompanied by a 2-fold increase in the non-reversing enthalpy. Rejuvenation of the aged glasses changes W(x) from 15C at 7% Ge to 7C for pure Se. Tg is found to decrease upon rejuvenation with the difference (Tg(aged)-Tg(rejuv)) showing a maximum near 3% Ge and vanishing for pure Se and 6% of Ge, which are topological thresholds. These results in Se-rich glasses are consistent with aging induced decoupling of Se8 crowns and growth of extended range structural correlations between polymeric Sen chains due to lone pair interactions. At higher x, near 8-10% of Ge, eutectic effects are manifested. Work supported by NSF Grant DMR 08-53957.

  8. Implications of a class of grand unified theories for large scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafi, Q.; Stecker, F. W.

    1983-01-01

    A class of grand unified theories in which cosmologicaly significant axion and neutrino energy densities arise naturally is discussed. To obtain large scale structure three scenarios are considered: (1) an inflationary scenario; (2) inflation followed by string production; and (3) a non-inflationary scenario with density fluctuations caused solely by strings. Inflation may be compatible with the recent observational indications that mega 1 on the scale of superclusters, particularly if strings are present.

  9. A novel class of cysteine protease inhibitors: solution structure of staphostatin A from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Grzegorz; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Stec-Niemczyk, Justyna; Bochtler, Matthias; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Adam; Holak, Tad A

    2003-11-25

    A series of secreted proteases are included among the virulence factors documented for Staphylococcus aureus. In light of increasing antibiotic resistance of this dangerous human pathogen, these proteases are considered as suitable targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The recent discovery of staphostatins, endogenous, highly specific, staphylococcal cysteine protease inhibitors, opened a possibility for structure-based design of low molecular weight analogues. Moreover, the crystal structure of staphostatin B revealed a distinct folding pattern and an unexpected, substrate-like binding mode. The solution structure of staphostatin A reported here confirms that staphostatins constitute a novel, distinct class of cysteine protease inhibitors. In addition, the structure knowledge-based mutagenesis studies shed light on individual structural features of staphostatin A, the inhibition mechanism, and the determinants of distinct specificity of staphostatins toward their target proteases.

  10. Age structure and cooperation in coevolutionary games on dynamic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zilong; Hu, Zhenhua; Zhou, Xiaoping; Yi, Jingzhang

    2015-04-01

    Our proposed model imitates the growth of a population and describes the age structure and the level of cooperation in games on dynamic network with continuous changes of structure and topology. The removal of nodes and links caused by age-dependent attack, together with the nodes addition standing for the newborns of population, badly ruins Matthew effect in this coevolutionary process. Though the network is generated by growth and preferential attachment, it degenerates into random network and it is no longer heterogeneous. When the removal of nodes and links is equal to the addition of nodes and links, the size of dynamic network is maintained in steady-state, so is the low level of cooperation. Severe structure variation, homogeneous topology and continuous invasion of new defection jointly make dynamic network unsuitable for the survival of cooperator even when the probability with which the newborn players initially adopt the strategy cooperation is high, while things change slightly when the connections of newborn players are restricted. Fortunately, moderate interactions in a generation trigger an optimal recovering process to encourage cooperation. The model developed in this paper outlines an explanation of the cohesion changes in the development process of an organization. Some suggestions for cooperative behavior improvement are given in the end.

  11. Structures of the Class D Carbapenemase OXA-24 from Acinetobacter baumannii in Complex with Doripenem

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kyle D.; Ortega, Caleb J.; Renck, Nicholas A.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Powers, Rachel A.; Leonard, David A.

    2012-02-08

    The emergence of class D {beta}-lactamases with carbapenemase activity presents an enormous challenge to health practitioners, particularly with regard to the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii. Unfortunately, class D {beta}-lactamases with carbapenemase activity are resistant to {beta}-lactamase inhibitors. To better understand the details of the how these enzymes bind and hydrolyze carbapenems, we have determined the structures of two deacylation-deficient variants (K84D and V130D) of the class D carbapenemase OXA-24 with doripenem bound as a covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate. Doripenem adopts essentially the same configuration in both OXA-24 variant structures, but varies significantly when compared to the non-carbapenemase class D member OXA-1/doripenem complex. The alcohol of the 6a hydroxyethyl moiety is directed away from the general base carboxy-K84, with implications for activation of the deacylating water. The tunnel formed by the Y112/M223 bridge in the apo form of OXA-24 is largely unchanged by the binding of doripenem. The presence of this bridge, however, causes the distal pyrrolidine/sulfonamide group to bind in a drastically different conformation compared to doripenem bound to OXA-1. The resulting difference in the position of the side-chain bridge sulfur of doripenem is consistent with the hypothesis that the tautomeric state of the pyrroline ring contributes to the different carbapenem hydrolysis rates of OXA-1 and OXA-24. These findings represent a snapshot of a key step in the catalytic mechanism of an important class D enzyme, and might be useful for the design of novel inhibitors.

  12. STRUCTURES OF THE CLASS D CARBAPENEMASE OXA-24 FROM ACINETOBACTER BAUMANNII IN COMPLEX WITH DORIPENEM

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Kyle D.; Ortega, Caleb J.; Renck, Nicholas A.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Powers, Rachel A.; Leonard, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of class D β-lactamases with carbapenemase activity presents an enormous challenge to health practitioners, particularly with regard to the treatment of infections caused by Gram negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumanii. Unfortunately, class D β-lactamases with carbapenemase activity are resistant to β-lactamase inhibitors. To better understand the details of the how these enzymes bind and hydrolyze carbapenems, we have determined the structures of two deacylation-deficient variants (K84D and V130D) of the class D carbapenemase OXA-24 with doripenem bound as a covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate. Doripenem adopts essentially the same configuration in both OXA-24 variant structures, but varies significantly when compared to the non-carbapenemase class D member OXA-1/doripenem complex. The alcohol of the 6α hydroxyethyl moiety is directed away from the general base carboxy-K84, with implications for activation of the deacylating water. The tunnel formed by the Y112/M223 bridge in the apo form of OXA-24 is largely unchanged by the binding of doripenem. The presence of this bridge, however, causes the distal pyrrolidine/sulfonamide group to bind in a drastically different conformation compared to doripenem bound to OXA-1. The resulting difference in the position of the side-chain bridge sulfur of doripenem is consistent with the hypothesis that the tautomeric state of the pyrroline ring contributes to the different carbapenem hydrolysis rates of OXA-1 and OXA-24. These findings represent a snapshot of a key step in the catalytic mechanism of an important class D enzyme, and may be useful for the design of novel inhibitors. PMID:21215758

  13. INS VNTR class genotype and indexes of body size and obesity: population-based studies of 7,999 middle-aged men and women.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Manjinder S; Heude, Barbara; Young, Elizabeth H; Luben, Robert; Luan, Jian'an; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Todd, John; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2005-09-01

    The relevance of the insulin gene (INS) variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism to indexes of body size and adult obesity is inconclusive. Given the equivocal reports on the association between the VNTR class genotype at the insulin gene locus and indexes of body size and obesity, we assessed these associations in a series of cohort studies based on 7,999 middle-aged men and women. We found no convincing evidence that INS VNTR class genotype was associated with indexes of body size and adult obesity. These data suggest that INS VNTR class is not an important determinant of size and body weight regulation in middle-aged men and women.

  14. Paleomagnetic Age for the World-class Century Zn-Pb-Ag Deposit, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, K.; Symons, D. T.; Dawborn, T.

    2009-05-01

    Paleomagnetic results are reported for the Century Zn-Pb-Ag SEDEX deposit in northwestern Queensland, Australia. The stratiform mineralization occurs in fine parallel lamellae in ˜1595 Ma siderite-rich siltstones and black shales of the upper Lawn Hill Formation in the Proterozoic McNamara Group. Galena from the deposit has given a Pb/Pb model age of ˜1575 Ma. Paleomagnetic analysis of 333 specimens from ore zones (15 sites), and hanging wall (4 sites) and footwall (5 sites) siltstones using mostly thermal and then alternating field step demagnetization, isolates a stable characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) for the ore sites only. Step demagnetization, rock magnetic tests and thermomagnetic analyses of ore, Zn and Pb concentrates and tailings show that the main remanence carriers are single- or pseudosingle-domain inclusions of titanomagnetite in sphalerite and gangue, and pyrrhotite in galena with modern goethite and/or hematite from the weathering of siderite. A paleomagnetic fold test using the ore sites is positive, showing that the ore ChRM predates D2 deformation in the ˜1595 to ˜1500 Ma Isan orogeny. The orogeny folded the main-stage mineralization, indicating that the ore retains a primary magnetization. The optimum 80% tilt-corrected unit mean ChRM direction for the ore gives a Mesoproterozoic paleopole at ˜1560 Ma on the northern Australian apparent polar wander path. Thus this result both constrains the timing of mineralization and provides an upper age limit for D2 deformation in the orogeny.

  15. Multiple plumage traits convey information about age and within-age-class qualities of a canopy-dwelling songbird, the Cerulean Warbler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boves, Than J.; Buehler, David A.; Wood, Petra Bohall; Rodewald, Amanda D.; Larkin, Jeffrey L.; Keyser, Patrick D.; Wigley, T. Ben

    2014-01-01

    Colorful plumage traits in birds may convey multiple, redundant, or unreliable messages about an individual. Plumage may reliably convey information about disparate qualities such as age, condition, and parental ability because discrete tracts of feathers may cause individuals to incur different intrinsic or extrinsic costs. Few studies have examined the information content of plumage in a species that inhabits forest canopies, a habitat with unique light environments and selective pressures. We investigated the information content of four plumage patches (blue-green crown and rump, tail white, and black breast band) in a canopy-dwelling species, the Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea), in relation to age, condition, provisioning, and reproduction. We found that older males displayed wider breast bands, greater tail white, and crown and rump feathers with greater blue-green (435–534 nm) chroma and hue than males in their first potential breeding season. In turn, older birds were in better condition (short and long term) and were reproductively superior to younger birds. We propose that these age-related plumage differences (i.e. delayed plumage maturation) were not a consequence of a life history strategy but instead resulted from constraints during early feather molts. Within age classes, we found evidence to support the multiple messages hypothesis. Birds with greater tail white molted tails in faster, those with more exaggerated rump plumage (lower hue, greater blue-green chroma) provisioned more, and those with lower rump blue-green chroma were in better condition. Despite evidence of reliable signaling in this species, we found no strong relationships between plumage and reproductive performance, potentially because factors other than individual differences more strongly influenced fecundity.

  16. Estimating survival of precocial chicks during the prefledging period using a catch-curve analysis and count-based age-class data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGowan, C.P.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Ryan, M.R.; Kruse, C.D.; Pavelka, G.

    2009-01-01

    Estimating reproductive success for birds with precocial young can be difficult because chicks leave nests soon after hatching and individuals or broods can be difficult to track. Researchers often turn to estimating survival during the prefledging period and, though effective, mark-recapture based approaches are not always feasible due to cost, time, and animal welfare concerns. Using a threatened population of Piping Plovers (Charadrius melodus) that breeds along the Missouri River, we present an approach for estimating chick survival during the prefledging period using long-term (1993-2005), count-based, age-class data. We used a modified catch-curve analysis, and data collected during three 5-day sampling periods near the middle of the breeding season. The approach has several ecological and statistical assumptions and our analyses were designed to minimize the probability of violating those assumptions. For example, limiting the sampling periods to only 5 days gave reasonable assurance that population size was stable during the sampling period. Annual daily survival estimates ranged from 0.825 (SD = 0.03) to 0.931 (0.02) depending on year and sampling period, with these estimates assuming constant survival during the prefledging period and no change in the age structure of the population. The average probability of survival to fledging ranged from 0.126 to 0.188. Our results are similar to other published estimates for this species in similar habitats. This method of estimating chick survival may be useful for a variety of precocial bird species when mark-recapture methods are not feasible and only count-based age class data are available. ?? 2009 Association of Field Ornithologists.

  17. [Dental age in the relation with nutrition model of school children from swimming classes of championship school].

    PubMed

    Dyras, Marta; Lyszczarz, Justyna; Wójtowicz, Barbara; Jankowska, Katarzyna

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was the comparison of calendar age with dental age in the aspect of basic nutritional ingredients intake with precise taking into consideration microelements, macroelements and vitamins. 79 schoolchildren from swimming classes of championship school in Cracow aged 10-13 were included in the examination. Among this group of pupils 24-hour recall and complex dental examination including the estimation of dental status, the hygienic status of oral cavity were conducted and the presence of dental and occlusion defects were estimated. 24-hour recall including 3 following days contained the number of products in every meal, the number of meals and the time of their consumption. The schoolchildren were divided into 3 groups on the ground of the difference between dental and calendar age. Dentition on time (no more than 5 months difference between dental and calendar age) was stated by 25 pupils--group I. Accelerated dentition of fixed teeth was observed by 36 pupils--group II and delayed dentition by 18 persons--group III. In all groups lower than safe calcium intake (80% of pupils from these groups) and iron intake (55%) was noticed. In the range of left micro- and macroelements the disturbances in nutritional status were mainly stated bypersons with delayed dentition. The shortages in Magnesium intake concerned 67% of school children and in Zinc intake--72%. In the group of schoolchildren with accelerated dentition these shortages were about 40%. In the range of vitamins intake low niacin intake (39% of schoolchildren) and riboflavin intake (25%) were stated. The differences among these groups were observed only in thiamine intake (33% from group II and 19% from group III). In the group III more often low energetic value of daily nutrient intake was stated.

  18. Necessity of Periodic Ophthalmological Examinations in Binocular B Class Driving Licence Holders Over 50 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Ali; Öktem, Çağlar; Karabıçak Acer, Ayşe; Kocamış, Özkan; Taşdemir, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether binocular B class driving licence (BBCDL) holders over 50 years old are in compliance with the BBCDL criteria for visual acuity, to determine the age-based prevalence of ophthalmological disorders reducing visual acuity in this group, and to investigate whether periodic ophthalmological examinations are needed in licence holders over 50 years of age. Materials and Methods: This prospective study enrolled 451 adults over 50 years old having a BBCDL. The study subjects were categorized into 3 age groups as group 1 (51-60 years), group 2 (61-70 years), and group 3 (over 71 years). Results: The mean age of the subjects was 60.02±7.27 years; 338 (74.9%) were male and 113 (25.1%) were female. The BBCDL criteria were met by 353 (78.3%) subjects whereas 98 (21.7%) subjects did not meet them. Eighty-four (85.7%) of 98 patients not meeting BBCDL criteria still drove. The mean age of the subjects meeting BBCDL criteria (58.82±6.77 years) was significantly lower than the subjects not meeting them (64.34±7.40 years) (p<0.001). The most common pathologies in the individuals still driving despite not meeting BBCDL criteria were senile cataract (38.5%) and diabetic retinopathy (23.1%) in group 1, senile cataract (55.3%) and diabetic retinopathy (14.9%) in group 2, and senile cataract (63.6%) and senile macular degeneration+senile cataract (18.2%) in group 3. Conclusion: More than a fifth of individuals over 50 years old did not meet the BBCDL criteria, due predominantly to senile cataract, and the majority of these individuals continue to drive. Therefore, we believe that individuals over 50 years old who have a BBCDL should undergo periodic ophthalmological examinations. PMID:27800264

  19. Cluster analysis of structural stage classes to map wildland fuels in a Madrean ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jay D; Danzer, Shelley R; Watts, Joseph M; Stone, Sheridan; Yool, Stephen R

    2003-07-01

    Geospatial information technology is changing the nature of fire mapping science and management. Geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning system technology coupled with remotely sensed data provide powerful tools for mapping, assessing, and understanding the complex spatial phenomena of wildland fuels and fire hazard. The effectiveness of these technologies for fire management still depends on good baseline fuels data since techniques have yet to be developed to directly interrogate understory fuels with remotely sensed data. We couple field data collections with GIS, remote sensing, and hierarchical clustering to characterize and map the variability of wildland fuels within and across vegetation types. One hundred fifty six fuel plots were sampled in eight vegetation types ranging in elevation from 1150 to 2600 m surrounding a Madrean 'sky island' mountain range in the southwestern US. Fuel plots within individual vegetation types were divided into classes representing various stages of structural development with unique fuel load characteristics using a hierarchical clustering method. Two Landsat satellite images were then classified into vegetation/fuel classes using a hybrid unsupervised/supervised approach. A back-classification accuracy assessment, which uses the same pixels to test as used to train the classifier, produced an overall Kappa of 50% for the vegetation/fuels map. The map with fuel classes within vegetation type collapsed into single classes was verified with an independent dataset, yielding an overall Kappa of 80%.

  20. Age and structure of a model vapour-deposited glass

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Daniel R.; Lyubimov, Ivan; Ediger, M. D.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Glass films prepared by a process of physical vapour deposition have been shown to have thermodynamic and kinetic stability comparable to those of ordinary glasses aged for thousands of years. A central question in the study of vapour-deposited glasses, particularly in light of new knowledge regarding anisotropy in these materials, is whether the ultra-stable glassy films formed by vapour deposition are ever equivalent to those obtained by liquid cooling. Here we present a computational study of vapour deposition for a two-dimensional glass forming liquid using a methodology, which closely mimics experiment. We find that for the model considered here, structures that arise in vapour-deposited materials are statistically identical to those observed in ordinary glasses, provided the two are compared at the same inherent structure energy. We also find that newly deposited hot molecules produce cascades of hot particles that propagate far into the film, possibly influencing the relaxation of the material. PMID:27762262

  1. Alliance for aging research AD biomarkers work group: structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Jack, Clifford R

    2011-12-01

    Biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are increasingly important. All modern AD therapeutic trials employ AD biomarkers in some capacity. In addition, AD biomarkers are an essential component of recently updated diagnostic criteria for AD from the National Institute on Aging--Alzheimer's Association. Biomarkers serve as proxies for specific pathophysiological features of disease. The 5 most well established AD biomarkers include both brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measures--cerebrospinal fluid Abeta and tau, amyloid positron emission tomography (PET), fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography, and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This article reviews evidence supporting the position that MRI is a biomarker of neurodegenerative atrophy. Topics covered include methods of extracting quantitative and semiquantitative information from structural MRI; imaging-autopsy correlation; and evidence supporting diagnostic and prognostic value of MRI measures. Finally, the place of MRI in a hypothetical model of temporal ordering of AD biomarkers is reviewed.

  2. Nebraska School Facilities: Educational Adequacy of Class III School District Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidner, John M., Sr.

    2009-01-01

    In 2009, a replication of the Pool study was conducted. This study, however, focused on the school systems classified as Class III districts. Nebraska has 252 Class III districts. Compared with Class II (21), Class IV (1), and Class V(1) districts, the Class III districts offer a wide array of school settings, from urban to extremely rural, and…

  3. Application of data mining tools for classification of protein structural class from residue based averaged NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun V; Ali, Rehana F M; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V V

    2015-10-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue's averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80% accuracy measured by Matthew correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with >90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments.

  4. Application of Data Mining Tools for Classification of Protein Structural Class from Residue Based Averaged NMR Chemical Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun. V.; Ali, Rehana F.M.; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue’s averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80 % accuracy measured by Matthew Correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with > 90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments. PMID:25758094

  5. Structural damping with shape-memory alloys: one class of devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumme, Robert; Hayes, Jack; Sweeney, Steve

    1995-05-01

    Passive control of the dynamic response of civil structures utilizing shape-memory alloy (SMA) damping techniques is reviewed. An important class of SMA damper -- the center- tapped (CT) device -- is described. Coverage includes: (1) characterization of damping requirements and passive damping approaches for civil structures; (2) characterization of SMA material behaviors relevant to civil structural applications; (3) overview of our SMA passive damping device technology and description of the center-tapped device operation and structure; (4) precis of an experimental program conducted to verify the CT device behavior, the detailed results of which are reported in another paper by the Earthquake Engineering Research Center; (5) review of a design study of SMA passive damping for retrofit of an extant nonductile concrete building.

  6. Consumptive and nonconsumptive effects of cannibalism in fluctuating age-structured populations.

    PubMed

    Wissinger, Scott A; Whiteman, Howard H; Denoël, Mathieu; Mumford, Miranda L; Aubee, Catherine B

    2010-02-01

    Theory and empirical studies suggest that cannibalism in age-structured populations can regulate recruitment depending on the intensity of intraspecific competition between cannibals and victims and the nature of the cannibalism window, i.e., which size classes interact as cannibals and victims. Here we report on a series of experiments that quantify that window for age-structured populations of salamander larvae and paedomorphic adults. We determined body size limits on cannibalism in microcosms and then the consumptive and nonconsumptive (injuries, foraging and activity, diet, growth) effects on victims in mesocosms with seminatural levels of habitat complexity and alternative prey. We found that cannibalism by the largest size classes (paedomorphs and > or = age 3+ yr larvae) occurs mainly on young-of-the-year (YOY) victims. Surviving YOY and other small larvae had increased injuries, reduced activity levels, and reduced growth rates in the presence of cannibals. Data on YOY survival in an experiment in which we manipulated the density of paedomorphs combined with historical data on the number of cannibals in natural populations indicate that dominant cohorts of paedomorphs can cause observed recruitment failures. Dietary data indicate that ontogenetic shifts in diet should preclude strong intraspecific competition between YOY and cannibals in this species. Thus our results are consistent with previous empirical and theoretical work that suggests that recruitment regulation by cannibalism is most likely when YOY are vulnerable to cannibalism but have low dietary overlap with cannibals. Understanding the role of cannibalism in regulating recruitment in salamander populations is timely, given the widespread occurrences of amphibian decline. Previous studies have focused on extrinsic (including anthropogenic) factors that affect amphibian population dynamics, whereas the data presented here combined with long-term field observations suggest the potential for

  7. [Analysis on age structure and dynamics of Kindonia uniflora populations].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Li, Jingxia; Li, Hong; Liu, Xiangjun

    2004-04-01

    Kindonia uniflora is a perennial clone herbaceous plant, and also, a native endangered plant in China. This paper studied its age structure, life table and survivorship curve in different habitats in Taibai mountain area. The results indicated that the age structure and dynamics of K. uniflora populations in the Betula utilis forest at altitude 2500-2700 m, in the Abies fargesii forest at altitude 2700-2900 m, and in the Larix chinensis forest at altitude 2900-3100 m had the similar pattern and developing tendency. The number of younger ramets at 1-2 years old or older than 5 years was less, and the number of ramets at 3-5 years old was the highest in the age structures. The negative values of dx (dead number), qx (mortality rate) and Kx (Killing rate) in the life table showed the increasing rate of the population sizes during the age stage. The survivorship curve of K. uniflora populations in different habitats belonged to Deevey C after 3-5 years old. The mortality rate of populations during 5-10 years stage was higher, and was stable after 10 years old. As for the characters of asexual propagation and clone growth, the rhizomes of the populations were in humus of soil, and developed and expanded as guerilla line style. During growth season, only one leaf grew above ground at every inter-node, and the population growth and development were rarely influenced by external factors. The forest communities, such as Betula utilis, Abies fargesii and Larix chinensis forest, in which K. uniflora populations lived, were at middle or higher mountain, where there were rarely disturbance from human being. Therefore, the habitats for K. uniflora populations to live were relatively stable. As the altitude increased, the disturbances from human being became less, the density of K. uniflora populations increased, the life cycle expanded, the peak of population death delayed, and the population living strategy changed to adapt to the habitats. K. uniflora populations preferred to

  8. [The demographic aging of the Austrian population: on the long-term changes in the age structure in Austria].

    PubMed

    Kytir, J

    1995-01-01

    "The Austrian population is presently in the middle of its age structure transition which started with World War I and will continue until the 40s of the next century. Within this time period the number of people aged 60 years or over will increase from about half a million to 2.8 million (1995: 1.6 million) and the share of the elderly will mount from about 9 percent to more than 35 percent (1995: 20 percent). The present article points out the demographic causes for population aging asking whether high fertility and/or high numbers of migrants can stop the aging process. Different measurements of demographic aging in Austria (share of various age groups, mean age and median age, dependency ratios, several aging indices) are calculated for the time period 1869 to 2050. Special attention is paid to regional differences within Austria and to changes of the sex ratio at older ages over time." (EXCERPT)

  9. Impact of structural aging on seismic risk assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingwood, B.; Song, J.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program is addressing the potential for degradation of concrete structural components and systems in nuclear power plants over time due to aging and aggressive environmental stressors. Structures are passive under normal operating conditions but play a key role in mitigating design-basis events, particularly those arising from external challenges such as earthquakes, extreme winds, fires and floods. Structures are plant-specific and unique, often are difficult to inspect, and are virtually impossible to replace. The importance of structural failures in accident mitigation is amplified because such failures may lead to common-cause failures of other components. Structural condition assessment and service life prediction must focus on a few critical components and systems within the plant. Components and systems that are dominant contributors to risk and that require particular attention can be identified through the mathematical formalism of a probabilistic risk assessment, or PRA. To illustrate, the role of structural degradation due to aging on plant risk is examined through the framework of a Level 1 seismic PRA of a nuclear power plant. Plausible mechanisms of structural degradation are found to increase the core damage probability by approximately a factor of two.

  10. Identification, characterization and structure of a new Delta class glutathione transferase isoenzyme

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The insect GST (glutathione transferase) supergene family encodes a varied group of proteins belonging to at least six individual classes. Interest in insect GSTs has focused on their role in conferring insecticide resistance. Previously from the mosquito malaria vector Anopheles dirus, two genes encoding five Delta class GSTs have been characterized for structural as well as enzyme activities. We have obtained a new Delta class GST gene and isoenzyme from A. dirus, which we name adGSTD5-5. The adGSTD5-5 isoenzyme was identified and was only detectably expressed in A. dirus adult females. A putative promoter analysis suggests that this GST has an involvement in oogenesis. The enzyme displayed little activity for classical GST substrates, although it possessed the greatest activity for DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)ethane] observed for Delta GSTs. However, GST activity was inhibited or enhanced in the presence of various fatty acids, suggesting that the enzyme may be modulated by fatty acids. We obtained a crystal structure for adGSTD5-5 and compared it with other Delta GSTs, which showed that adGSTD5-5 possesses an elongated and more polar active-site topology. PMID:15717864

  11. On a class of synchronized observers attached to the Lorentzian structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Bartolomé; Moreno, Carlos

    1983-05-01

    The first-order evolution form for the Klein-Gordon equation is characterized by an operator T(t) which, for inertial observers in the Minkowski space-time, is skew-self-adjoint with respect to the energy product. This fact is essential for a rigorous treatment of the equation. We prove here that, in arbitrary Lorentzian structures, there always exists a class of ``synchronized observers'' (equivalence class of physically admissible local charts), here called adjoint systems, for which this property of T(t) remains true. They are completely determined by the Lorentzian structure, and, in this sense, they appear as a suitable generalization of the Killing vector fields. We obtain the definition equations for such observers and state some of their properties. A particular class of them, here called simple adjoint systems, has already been introduced by one of us (C.M.) for the study of the Klein-Gordon equation in arbitrary space-times, according with Lichnerowicz's quantization program.

  12. Computer-assisted mechanistic structure-activity studies: application to diverse classes of chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Loew, G H; Poulsen, M; Kirkjian, E; Ferrell, J; Sudhindra, B S; Rebagliati, M

    1985-01-01

    In the first part of this paper we have indicated how the techniques and capabilities of theoretical chemistry, together with experimental results, can be used in a mechanistic approach to structure-activity studies of toxicity. In the second part, we have illustrated how this computer-assisted approach has been used to identify and calculate causally related molecular indicators of relative carcinogenic activity in five classes of chemical carcinogens: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their methyl derivatives, aromatic amines, chloroethanes, chloroalkenes and dialkyl nitrosamines. In each class of chemicals studied, candidate molecular indicators have been identified that could be useful in predictive screening of unknown compounds. In addition, further insights into some mechanistic aspects of chemical carcinogenesis have been obtained. Finally, experiments have been suggested to both verify the usefulness of the indicators and test their mechanistic implications. PMID:3905382

  13. Structural and phylogenetic analysis of the MHC class I-like Fc receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kandil, Eman; Ishibashi, Teruo; Kasahara, Masanori

    1995-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium of neonatal mice and rats expresses an Fc receptor that mediates selective uptake of IgG in mothers`milk. This receptor (FcRn), which helps newborn animals to acquire passive immunity, is an MHC class I-like heterodimer made up of a heavy chain and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin. In the present study, we determined the genomic structure of a mouse gene (FcRn) encoding the heavy of FcRn. The overall exon-intron organization of the Fcrn gene was similar to that of the Fcrn gene, thus providing structural evidence that Fcrn os a bona fide class I gene. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the Fcrn gene contained the binding motifs for two cytokine-inducible transcription factors, NF-IL6 and NF1. However, regulatory elements found in MHC class I genes (enhancer A, enhancer B, and the IFN response element) were absent. Phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that, like the MICA, AZGP1, and CD1 genes, the Fcrn gene diverged form MHC class I genes after the emergence of amphibians but before the split of placental and marsupial mammals. Consistent with this result, Southern blot analysis with a mouse Fcrn cDNA probe detected cross-hybridizing bands in various mammalian species and chickens. Sequence analysis of the Fcrn gene isolated from eight mouse strains showed that the membrane-distal domain of FcRn has at least three amino acid variants. The fact that Fcrn is a single copy gene indicates that it is expressed in both the neonatal intestine and the fetal yolk sac. 74 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Structural and evolutionary aspects of antenna chromophore usage by class II photolyases.

    PubMed

    Kiontke, Stephan; Gnau, Petra; Haselsberger, Reinhard; Batschauer, Alfred; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2014-07-11

    Light-harvesting and resonance energy transfer to the catalytic FAD cofactor are key roles for the antenna chromophores of light-driven DNA photolyases, which remove UV-induced DNA lesions. So far, five chemically diverse chromophores have been described for several photolyases and related cryptochromes, but no correlation between phylogeny and used antenna has been found. Despite a common protein topology, structural analysis of the distantly related class II photolyase from the archaeon Methanosarcina mazei (MmCPDII) as well as plantal orthologues indicated several differences in terms of DNA and FAD binding and electron transfer pathways. For MmCPDII we identify 8-hydroxydeazaflavin (8-HDF) as cognate antenna by in vitro and in vivo reconstitution, whereas the higher plant class II photolyase from Arabidopsis thaliana fails to bind any of the known chromophores. According to the 1.9 Å structure of the MmCPDII·8-HDF complex, its antenna binding site differs from other members of the photolyase-cryptochrome superfamily by an antenna loop that changes its conformation by 12 Å upon 8-HDF binding. Additionally, so-called N- and C-motifs contribute as conserved elements to the binding of deprotonated 8-HDF and allow predicting 8-HDF binding for most of the class II photolyases in the whole phylome. The 8-HDF antenna is used throughout the viridiplantae ranging from green microalgae to bryophyta and pteridophyta, i.e. mosses and ferns, but interestingly not in higher plants. Overall, we suggest that 8-hydroxydeazaflavin is a crucial factor for the survival of most higher eukaryotes which depend on class II photolyases to struggle with the genotoxic effects of solar UV exposure.

  15. Experimental validation of an integrated controls-structures design methodology for a class of flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Gupta, Sandeep; Elliott, Kenny B.; Joshi, Suresh M.; Walz, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the first experimental validation of an optimization-based integrated controls-structures design methodology for a class of flexible space structures. The Controls-Structures-Interaction (CSI) Evolutionary Model, a laboratory test bed at Langley, is redesigned based on the integrated design methodology with two different dissipative control strategies. The redesigned structure is fabricated, assembled in the laboratory, and experimentally compared with the original test structure. Design guides are proposed and used in the integrated design process to ensure that the resulting structure can be fabricated. Experimental results indicate that the integrated design requires greater than 60 percent less average control power (by thruster actuators) than the conventional control-optimized design while maintaining the required line-of-sight performance, thereby confirming the analytical findings about the superiority of the integrated design methodology. Amenability of the integrated design structure to other control strategies is considered and evaluated analytically and experimentally. This work also demonstrates the capabilities of the Langley-developed design tool CSI DESIGN which provides a unified environment for structural and control design.

  16. Self-Learning Variable Structure Control for a Class of Sensor-Actuator Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sanfeng; Li, Shuai; Liu, Bo; Lou, Yuesheng; Liang, Yongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Variable structure strategy is widely used for the control of sensor-actuator systems modeled by Euler-Lagrange equations. However, accurate knowledge on the model structure and model parameters are often required for the control design. In this paper, we consider model-free variable structure control of a class of sensor-actuator systems, where only the online input and output of the system are available while the mathematic model of the system is unknown. The problem is formulated from an optimal control perspective and the implicit form of the control law are analytically obtained by using the principle of optimality. The control law and the optimal cost function are explicitly solved iteratively. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness and the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:22778633

  17. Discovery of a new class of coronal structures in white light eclipse images

    SciTech Connect

    Druckmüller, Miloslav; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw

    2014-04-10

    White light images of the solar corona, taken during total solar eclipses, capture the complex dynamic relationship between the coronal plasma and the magnetic field. This relationship can be recorded on timescales of seconds to minutes, within a few solar radii above the solar surface. Rays, large-scale loops, and streamers, which are the brightest structures in these images, have shaped current models of the coronal magnetic field and solar wind flow. We show in this work how the application of novel image processing techniques to unique high-resolution white light eclipse images reveals the presence of a new class of structures, reminiscent of smoke rings, faint nested expanding loops, expanding bubbles, and twisted helical structures. These features are interpreted as snapshots of the dynamical evolution of instabilities developing at prominence-corona interfaces and propagating outward with the solar wind.

  18. Development of a new class of satellites: a composite lightweight affordable spacecraft structure

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.C.; Parietti, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) has successfully designed and tested a Composite Lightweight Affordable Structure (CLASS). The use of advanced composites in space applications is well developed, but the application of an all-composite satellite structure has not been achieved until now. The development of this low-cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in small satellite structures, in this case, for the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORT{acute E}) satellite mission will make a considerable contribution to the advanced spacecraft community. A common practice for constructing small spacecraft structures is to use an all-aluminum spacecraft bus. Compared to a composite structure, this reduces the payload capacity significantly; however, the cost of the aluminum structure has historically been lower than one of that uses lightweight components. LANL mission requirements dictate the need for a long term solution that substantially increased the ratio of payload to structural mass while maintaining a low-risk low-cost approach. LANL intends to use the concept developed for FORT{acute E} on future missions requiring similar enhanced payload capacities. 1 fig.

  19. Site and age class variation of hematologic parameters for female Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) of Northern Nevada.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Kathryn J; Perryman, Barry L; Holcombe, Dale W

    2010-01-01

    Decreases in Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) numbers throughout the western United States have been attributed to declining habitat quantity and quality. Improving our understanding of how interannual ecologic site variability affects nutritional status and fitness of different bird age classes will lead to improved land management and conservation strategies. Greater Sage Grouse were sampled from two Population Management Units located in northern Nevada, United States: Tuscarora (TU) and Lone Willow (LW) during 15 March-11 April 2004 and 14-20 March 2005. Twenty (16 yearlings, four adults) and 17 (7 yearlings, 10 adults) female Sage Grouse were captured and bled during 2004, and 12 (four yearlings, eight adults) and 14 (10 yearlings, four adults) were sampled during 2005 in TU and LW, respectively. Samples were evaluated to examine the effect of site, age, and year on specific hematologic and serum chemistry parameters. Several differences between age classes, sites, and years were detected for a number of fitness indicators; however, actual values fell within normal ranges of variation for Sage Grouse or other avian species. Differences were also detected for several parameters more closely related to reproductive fitness, including total plasma and serum proteins, and serum calcium and phosphorus. Yearlings had lower plasma protein (P<0.0001) and lower serum protein than did adults (P=0.0003). In 2004, TU yearlings had lower serum calcium levels than the adults, and in 2005, LW yearlings had lower levels than adults (P=0.008). Females on the TU site had lower serum phosphorus than the LW females (P<0.0001). Overall, adult females weighed more than yearlings (P=0.0004). Lower values found in yearlings, and on the TU management unit, indicate a lower production potential, particularly in unfavorable years. A lower intrinsic ability of yearlings to reproduce, combined with lower nutrition potentials and associated annual variations on certain types

  20. Visual recognition of age class and preference for infantile features: implications for species-specific vs universal cognitive traits in primates.

    PubMed

    Sato, Anna; Koda, Hiroki; Lemasson, Alban; Nagumo, Sumiharu; Masataka, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    Despite not knowing the exact age of individuals, humans can estimate their rough age using age-related physical features. Nonhuman primates show some age-related physical features; however, the cognitive traits underlying their recognition of age class have not been revealed. Here, we tested the ability of two species of Old World monkey, Japanese macaques (JM) and Campbell's monkeys (CM), to spontaneously discriminate age classes using visual paired comparison (VPC) tasks based on the two distinct categories of infant and adult images. First, VPCs were conducted in JM subjects using conspecific JM stimuli. When analyzing the side of the first look, JM subjects significantly looked more often at novel images. Based on analyses of total looking durations, JM subjects looked at a novel infant image longer than they looked at a familiar adult image, suggesting the ability to spontaneously discriminate between the two age classes and a preference for infant over adult images. Next, VPCs were tested in CM subjects using heterospecific JM stimuli. CM subjects showed no difference in the side of their first look, but looked at infant JM images longer than they looked at adult images; the fact that CMs were totally naïve to JMs suggested that the attractiveness of infant images transcends species differences. This is the first report of visual age class recognition and a preference for infant over adult images in nonhuman primates. Our results suggest not only species-specific processing for age class recognition but also the evolutionary origins of the instinctive human perception of baby cuteness schema, proposed by the ethologist Konrad Lorenz.

  1. Inhibitory control efficiency in a Piaget-like class-inclusion task in school-age children and adults: a developmental negative priming study.

    PubMed

    Borst, G; Poirel, N; Pineau, A; Cassotti, M; Houdé, O

    2013-07-01

    Most children under 7 years of age presented with 10 daisies and 2 roses fail to indicate that there are more flowers than daisies. Instead of the appropriate comparison of the relative numerosities of the superordinate class (flowers) to its subordinate class (daisies), they perform a direct perceptual comparison of the extensions of the 2 subordinate classes (daisies vs. roses). In our experiment, we investigated whether increasing efficiency in solving the Piagetian class-inclusion task is related to increasing efficiency in the ability to resist (inhibit) this direct comparison of the subordinate classes' extensions. Ten-year-old and young adult participants performed a computerized priming version of a Piaget-like class-inclusion task. The experimental design was such that the misleading perceptual strategy to inhibit on the prime (in which a superordinate class had to be compared with a subordinate class) became a congruent strategy to activate on the probe (in which the two subordinate classes' extensions were directly compared). We found a negative priming effect of 291 ms in children and 129 ms in adults. These results provide evidence for the first time (a) that adults still need to inhibit the comparison of the subordinate classes' extensions in class-inclusion tasks and (b) that the ability to inhibit this heuristic increases with age (resulting in a lower executive cost). Taken together, these findings provide additional support for the neo-Piagetian approach of cognitive development that suggests that the acquisition of increasingly complex knowledge is based on the ability to resist (inhibit) heuristics and previously acquired knowledge.

  2. Tectonic structures on Mercury: kinematics and age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Rothery, David; Di Achille, Gaetano; Marchi, Simone; Galluzzi, Valentina; Ferrari, Sabrina; Fassett, Caleb; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    At a global scale, Mercury is dominated by contractional features manifested as lobate scarps, wrinkle ridges and high-relief ridges. Here, we show that some of these features are associated with strike-slip kinematic indicators, which we identified using flyby and orbital Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) data and digital terrain models. We recognize oblique-shear kinematics along lobate scarps and high-relief ridges by means of (1) map geometries of fault patterns (frontal thrusts bordered by lateral ramps, strike-slip duplexes, restraining bends); (2) structural morphologies indicating lateral shearing (en echelon folding, pop-ups, pull-aparts); and (3) estimates of offsets based on displaced crater rims and differences in elevation between pop-up structures and pull-apart basins and their surroundings. Transpressional faults, documented across a wide range of latitudes, are found associated with reactivated rims of ancient buried basins and, in most cases, linked to frontal thrusts as lateral ramps hundreds of kilometres long. This latter observation suggests stable directions of tectonic transport over wide regions of Mercury's surface. In contrast, global cooling would imply an overall isotropic contraction with limited processes of lateral shearing induced by pre-existent lithospheric heterogeneities. Mantle convection therefore may have played an important role during the early tectonic evolution of Mercury. Estimating absolute model ages for compressional features and comparing it from what it is envisaged with thermal modeling based on cooling alone can be useful in determining if other processes could have been responsible for lobate scarps nucleation. In particular, ages more ancient that the one predicted by the models would imply other kind of tectonic processes ongoing during the early evolution of Mercury . For this reason, we date an extended thrust system, which we term the Blossom Thrust System, located between 80°E and 100°E, and 30°N and 15

  3. Physical maturation, life-history classes and age estimates of free-ranging western gorillas--insights from Mbeli Bai, Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Thomas; Hockemba, Mireille Breuer-Ndoundou; Olejniczak, Claudia; Parnell, Richard J; Stokes, Emma J

    2009-02-01

    Physical maturation and life-history parameters are seen as evolutionary adaptations to different ecological and social conditions. Comparison of life-history patterns of closely related species living in diverse environments helps to evaluate the validity of these assumptions but empirical data are lacking. The two gorilla species exhibit substantial differences in their environment, which allows investigation into the role of increased frugivory in shaping western gorilla life histories. We present behavioral and morphological data on western gorilla physical maturation and life-history parameters from a 12.5-year study at Mbeli Bai, a forest clearing in the Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park in northern Congo. We assign photographs of known individuals to different life-history classes and propose new age boundaries for life-history classes in western gorillas, which can be used and tested at other western gorilla research sites. Our results show that western gorillas are weaned at a later age compared with mountain gorillas and indicate slower physical maturation of immatures. These findings support the risk-aversion hypothesis for more frugivorous species. However, our methods need to be applied and tested with other gorilla populations. The slow life histories of western gorillas could have major consequences for social structure, mortality patterns and population growth rates that will affect recovery from population crashes of this critically endangered species. We emphasize that long-term studies can provide crucial demographic and life-history data that improve our understanding of life-history evolution and adaptation and help to refine conservation strategies.

  4. A new class of room-temperature multiferroic thin films with bismuth-based supercell structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiping; Zhou, Honghui; Bi, Zhenxing; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Luo, Zhiping; Bayraktaroglu, Adrian; Phillips, Jamie; Choi, Eun-Mi; Macmanus-Driscoll, Judith L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Narayan, Jagdish; Jia, Quanxi; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2013-02-20

    Intergrowth of two partially miscible phases of BiFeO(3) and BiMnO(3) gives a new class of room-temperature multiferroic phase, Bi(3) Fe(2) Mn(2) O(10+δ) , which has a unique supercell (SC) structure. The SC heterostructures exhibit simultaneously room-temperature ferrimagnetism and remanent polarization. These results open up a new avenue for exploring room-temperature single-phase multiferroic thin films by controlling the phase mixing of two perovskite BiRO(3) (R = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) materials.

  5. Evolving tip structures can explain age-dependent microtubule catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Courtney E; Yamamoto, Ami; Kenzie, Madeline R; Odde, David J; Gardner, Melissa K

    2013-07-22

    Microtubules are key structural and transport elements in cells. The dynamics at microtubule ends are characterized by periods of slow growth, followed by stochastic switching events termed "catastrophes," in which microtubules suddenly undergo rapid shortening. Growing microtubules are thought to be protected from catastrophe by a GTP-tubulin "cap": GTP-tubulin subunits add to the tips of growing microtubules but are subsequently hydrolyzed to GDP-tubulin subunits once they are incorporated into the microtubule lattice. Loss of the GTP-tubulin cap exposes GDP-tubulin subunits at the microtubule tip, resulting in a catastrophe event. However, the mechanistic basis for sudden loss of the GTP cap, leading to catastrophe, is not known. To investigate microtubule catastrophe events, we performed 3D mechanochemical simulations that account for interactions between neighboring protofilaments. We found that there are two separate factors that contribute to catastrophe events in the 3D simulation: the GTP-tubulin cap size, which settles into a steady-state value that depends on the free tubulin concentration during microtubule growth, and the structure of the microtubule tip. Importantly, 3D simulations predict, and both fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments confirm, that microtubule tips become more tapered as the microtubule grows. This effect destabilizes the tip and ultimately contributes to microtubule catastrophe. Thus, the likelihood of a catastrophe event may be intimately linked to the aging physical structure of the growing microtubule tip. These results have important consequences for catastrophe regulation in cells, as microtubule-associated proteins could promote catastrophe events in part by modifying microtubule tip structures.

  6. Integrated prediction of protein folding and unfolding rates from only size and structural class.

    PubMed

    De Sancho, David; Muñoz, Victor

    2011-10-14

    Protein stability, folding and unfolding rates are all determined by the multidimensional folding free energy surface, which in turn is dictated by factors such as size, structure, and amino-acid sequence. Work over the last 15 years has highlighted the role of size and 3D structure in determining folding rates, resulting in many procedures for their prediction. In contrast, unfolding rates are thought to depend on sequence specifics and be much more difficult to predict. Here we introduce a minimalist physics-based model that computes one-dimensional folding free energy surfaces using the number of aminoacids (N) and the structural class (α-helical, all-β, or α-β) as only protein-specific input. In this model N sets the overall cost in conformational entropy and the net stabilization energy, whereas the structural class defines the partitioning of the stabilization energy between local and non-local interactions. To test its predictive power, we calibrated the model empirically and implemented it into an algorithm for the PREdiction of Folding and Unfolding Rates (PREFUR). We found that PREFUR predicts the absolute folding and unfolding rates of an experimental database of 52 proteins with accuracies of ±0.7 and ±1.4 orders of magnitude, respectively (relative to experimental spans of 6 and 8 orders of magnitude). Such prediction uncertainty for proteins vastly varying in size and structure is only two-fold larger than the differences in folding (±0.34) and unfolding rates (±0.7) caused by single-point mutations. Moreover, PREFUR predicts protein stability with an accuracy of ±6.3 kJ mol(-1), relative to the 5 kJ mol(-1) average perturbation induced by single-point mutations. The remarkable performance of our simplistic model demonstrates that size and structural class are the major determinants of the folding landscapes of natural proteins, whereas sequence variability only provides the final 10-20% tuning. PREFUR is thus a powerful bioinformatic tool

  7. Characterization of a Basidiomycota hydrophobin reveals the structural basis for a high-similarity Class I subdivision

    PubMed Central

    Gandier, Julie-Anne; Langelaan, David N.; Won, Amy; O’Donnell, Kylie; Grondin, Julie L.; Spencer, Holly L.; Wong, Philip; Tillier, Elisabeth; Yip, Christopher; Smith, Steven P.; Master, Emma R.

    2017-01-01

    Class I hydrophobins are functional amyloids secreted by fungi. They self-assemble into organized films at interfaces producing structures that include cellular adhesion points and hydrophobic coatings. Here, we present the first structure and solution properties of a unique Class I protein sequence of Basidiomycota origin: the Schizophyllum commune hydrophobin SC16 (hyd1). While the core β-barrel structure and disulphide bridging characteristic of the hydrophobin family are conserved, its surface properties and secondary structure elements are reminiscent of both Class I and II hydrophobins. Sequence analyses of hydrophobins from 215 fungal species suggest this structure is largely applicable to a high-identity Basidiomycota Class I subdivision (IB). To validate this prediction, structural analysis of a comparatively distinct Class IB sequence from a different fungal order, namely the Phanerochaete carnosa PcaHyd1, indicates secondary structure properties similar to that of SC16. Together, these results form an experimental basis for a high-identity Class I subdivision and contribute to our understanding of functional amyloid formation. PMID:28393921

  8. Characterization of a Basidiomycota hydrophobin reveals the structural basis for a high-similarity Class I subdivision.

    PubMed

    Gandier, Julie-Anne; Langelaan, David N; Won, Amy; O'Donnell, Kylie; Grondin, Julie L; Spencer, Holly L; Wong, Philip; Tillier, Elisabeth; Yip, Christopher; Smith, Steven P; Master, Emma R

    2017-04-10

    Class I hydrophobins are functional amyloids secreted by fungi. They self-assemble into organized films at interfaces producing structures that include cellular adhesion points and hydrophobic coatings. Here, we present the first structure and solution properties of a unique Class I protein sequence of Basidiomycota origin: the Schizophyllum commune hydrophobin SC16 (hyd1). While the core β-barrel structure and disulphide bridging characteristic of the hydrophobin family are conserved, its surface properties and secondary structure elements are reminiscent of both Class I and II hydrophobins. Sequence analyses of hydrophobins from 215 fungal species suggest this structure is largely applicable to a high-identity Basidiomycota Class I subdivision (IB). To validate this prediction, structural analysis of a comparatively distinct Class IB sequence from a different fungal order, namely the Phanerochaete carnosa PcaHyd1, indicates secondary structure properties similar to that of SC16. Together, these results form an experimental basis for a high-identity Class I subdivision and contribute to our understanding of functional amyloid formation.

  9. 76 FR 69292 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water AGENCY... Staff Guidance (LR-ISG), LR- ISG-2011-01, ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and... Learned (GALL) Report for the aging management of stainless steel structures and components exposed...

  10. Using principal component analysis and support vector machine to predict protein structural class for low-similarity sequences via PSSM.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengli; Ye, Feng; Yuan, Xiguo

    2012-01-01

    The accurate identification of protein structure class solely using extracted information from protein sequence is a complicated task in the current computational biology. Prediction of protein structural class for low-similarity sequences remains a challenging problem. In this study, the new computational method has been developed to predict protein structural class by fusing the sequence information and evolution information to represent a protein sample. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on two widely used benchmark data-sets, 1189 and 25PDB with sequence similarity lower than 40 and 25%, respectively. Comparison of our results with other methods shows that the proposed method by us is very promising and may provide a cost-effective alternative to predict protein structural class in particular for low-similarity data-sets.

  11. Age- and sex-specific mortality and population structure in sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, J.L.; Burdin, A.M.; Ryazanov, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    We used 742 beach-cast carcasses to characterize age- and sex-specific sea otter mortality during the winter of 1990-1991 at Bering Island, Russia. We also examined 363 carcasses recovered after the 1989 grounding of the T/V Exxon Valdez, to characterize age and sex composition in the living western Prince William Sound (WPWS) sea otter population. At Bering Island, mortality was male-biased (81%), and 75% were adults. The WPWS population was female-biased (59%) and most animals were subadult (79% of the males and 45% of the females). In the decade prior to 1990-1991 we found increasing sea otter densities (particularly among males), declining prey resources, and declining weights in adult male sea otters at Bering Island. Our findings suggest the increased mortality at Bering Island in 1990-1991 was a density-dependent population response. We propose male-maintained breeding territories and exclusion of juvenile females by adult females, providing a mechanism for potentially moderating the effects of prey reductions on the female population. Increased adult male mortality at Bearing Island in 1990-1991 likely modified the sex and age class structure there toward that observed in Prince William Sound.

  12. Understanding social reproduction: The recursive nature of structure and agency within a science class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Gale A.

    Schools and science classrooms within schools continue to contribute to social reproduction and to the disenfranchisement of inner city African American students though attempts have been made to remedy the situation through standards, high-stakes testing, and compensatory programs. Such reforms ignore the sociocultural, political, and economic contexts of the individual students in the schools they are impacting. They do not take into account the uniqueness and diversity of the learners in these settings and have not included the voices of the students. Another possibility was studied here; that of starting with the cultural capital of the learner rather than with external standards. In a non-required science course at a local high school two coteachers endeavored to enact a student-emergent curriculum as a way to foster student agency and to counteract the reproductive nature of schools. The class was examined as a field within multiple other fields. The dialectical relationship between structure and agency in the class was used to frame the analysis and the tension between them was examined at several levels through video and audio analysis. Structural and rational choice views of action were abandoned in favor of an understanding hinged upon strategies of action that actors construct from cultural toolkits in and through practice. In this setting the students and teachers co-constructed a class that can be described and characterized in certain ways yet contained many counter-examples and alternative characterizations. A continuum of successes and failures, agency and subjectivity can be found in the trends and counter-trends in the course. The contradictions were examined to portray the complexity of the interactions and the possibilities for agency within them.

  13. Structural basis for decreased induction of class IB PI3-kinases expression by MIF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhay Kumar; Pantouris, Georgios; Borosch, Sebastian; Rojanasthien, Siripong; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang

    2017-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a master regulator of proinflammatory cytokines and plays pathological roles when not properly regulated in rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, atherosclerosis, asthma and cancer. Unlike canonical cytokines, MIF has vestigial keto-enol tautomerase activity. Most of the current MIF inhibitors were screened for the inhibition of this enzymatic activity. However, only some of the enzymatic inhibitors inhibit receptor-mediated biological functions of MIF, such as cell recruitment, through an unknown molecular mechanism. The goal of this study was to understand the molecular basis underlying the pharmacological inhibition of biological functions of MIF. Here, we demonstrate how the structural changes caused upon inhibitor binding translate into the alteration of MIF-induced downstream signalling. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor activates phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) that play a pivotal role in immune cell recruitment in health and disease. There are several different PI3K isoforms, but little is known about how they respond to MIF. We demonstrate that MIF up-regulates the expression of Class IB PI3Ks in leucocytes. We also demonstrate that MIF tautomerase active site inhibitors down-regulate the expression of Class IB PI3Ks as well as leucocyte recruitment in vitro and in vivo. Finally, based on our MIF:inhibitor complex crystal structures, we hypothesize that the reduction in Class IB PI3K expression occurs because of the displacement of Pro1 towards the second loop of MIF upon inhibitor binding, which results in increased flexibility of the loop 2 and sub-optimal MIF binding to its receptors. These results will provide molecular insights for fine-tuning the biological functions of MIF.

  14. Structural basis for a class of nanomolar influenza A neuraminidase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, Philip S.; Mohan, Sankar; Russell, Rupert J. M.; Bance, Nicole; Niikura, Masahiro; Pinto, B. Mario

    2013-10-01

    The influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is essential for the virus life cycle. The rise of resistance mutations against current antiviral therapies has increased the need for the development of novel inhibitors. Recent efforts have targeted a cavity adjacent to the catalytic site (the 150-cavity) in addition to the primary catalytic subsite in order to increase specificity and reduce the likelihood of resistance. This study details structural and in vitro analyses of a class of inhibitors that bind uniquely in both subsites. Crystal structures of three inhibitors show occupation of the 150-cavity in two distinct and novel binding modes. We believe these are the first nanomolar inhibitors of NA to be characterized in this way. Furthermore, we show that one inhibitor, binding within the catalytic site, offers reduced susceptibility to known resistance mutations via increased flexibility of a pendant pentyloxy group and the ability to pivot about a strong hydrogen-bonding network.

  15. How good strong union men line it out: explorations of the structure and dynamics of coal-miners' class consciousness

    SciTech Connect

    Yarrow, M.N.

    1982-01-01

    This study explores how working-class people apprehend and analyze the class dynamics of their social world. As an exploratory empirical study of the structure and dynamics of working-class consciousness, it seeks to develop the theory of actual class consciousness by bringing previous theories into dialogue with the articulated analyses of coal miners in central Appalachia. Although changing conditions are shown to have a powerful effect on class consciousness, the respondents were found to respond differently to the changing context and to remain loyal to important elements of their earlier perspectives. Suggestions are made for how the theory could be developed further. The data for the study are flexibly structured interviews which were conducted with active, retired, and disabled miners in southern West Virginia and western Virginia. A dozen miners were interviewed during the 1978 strike and again the following summer; during the summer of 1978, nineteen additional miners were interviewed.

  16. Self-optimising control for a class of continuous bioreactor via variable-structure feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Cisneros, Gerardo; Alvarez-Ramírez, José; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A self-optimising controller is designed for stabilisation of a class of bioreactor exploiting sliding-mode techniques. The stability analysis for the class of bioreactor, in open-loop configuration, suggests that the optimal behaviour, respect to maximal biomass production, occurs in an unstable region (structurally unstable). In this contribution, a variable-structure controller is designed, exploiting the inhibitory effect of substrate concentration under the biomass growth rate, such that the closed-loop system reaches the optimal manifold where the effect induced by the growth rate gradient is compensated (favouring the maximum growth rate). The self-optimising comprises an uncertainty estimator which computes the unknown terms for increasing the robustness issues of the sliding-mode scheme. Numerical experiments illustrate the performance and execution of the control strategy considering different parameter values for biomass growth rate. The robustness and fragility of the proposed controller are also discussed with respect to the modelling uncertainty and small changes in the controller gains, respectively.

  17. Measures of success in a class of evolutionary models with fixed population size and structure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Benjamin; Tarnita, Corina E

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a class of evolutionary models, encompassing many established models of well-mixed and spatially structured populations. Models in this class have fixed population size and structure. Evolution proceeds as a Markov chain, with birth and death probabilities dependent on the current population state. Starting from basic assumptions, we show how the asymptotic (long-term) behavior of the evolutionary process can be characterized by probability distributions over the set of possible states. We then define and compare three quantities characterizing evolutionary success: fixation probability, expected frequency, and expected change due to selection. We show that these quantities yield the same conditions for success in the limit of low mutation rate, but may disagree when mutation is present. As part of our analysis, we derive versions of the Price equation and the replicator equation that describe the asymptotic behavior of the entire evolutionary process, rather than the change from a single state. We illustrate our results using the frequency-dependent Moran process and the birth-death process on graphs as examples. Our broader aim is to spearhead a new approach to evolutionary theory, in which general principles of evolution are proven as mathematical theorems from axioms.

  18. Characterization of Two Distinct Structural Classes of Selective Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Cynthia A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) catalyze the irreversible oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acid. Alterations in ALDH1A1 activity are associated with such diverse diseases as cancer, Parkinson’s disease, obesity, and cataracts. Inhibitors of ALDH1A1 could aid in illuminating the role of this enzyme in disease processes. However, there are no commercially available selective inhibitors for ALDH1A1. Here we characterize two distinct chemical classes of inhibitors that are selective for human ALDH1A1 compared to eight other ALDH isoenzymes. The prototypical members of each structural class, CM026 and CM037, exhibit sub-micromolar inhibition constants, but have different mechanisms of inhibition. The crystal structures of these compounds bound to ALDH1A1 demonstrate that they bind within the aldehyde binding pocket of ALDH1A1 and exploit the presence of a unique Glycine residue to achieve their selectivity. These two novel and selective ALDH1A1 inhibitors may serve as chemical tools to better understand the contributions of ALDH1A1 to normal biology and to disease states. PMID:25634381

  19. Crystal structures and inhibitor binding properties of plant class V chitinases: the cycad enzyme exhibits unique structural and functional features.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kanda, Yuka; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Osawa, Takuo; Numata, Tomoyuki; Sakuda, Shohei; Taira, Toki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2015-04-01

    A class V (glycoside hydrolase family 18) chitinase from the cycad Cycas revoluta (CrChiA) is a plant chitinase that has been reported to possess efficient transglycosylation (TG) activity. We solved the crystal structure of CrChiA, and compared it with those of class V chitinases from Nicotiana tabacum (NtChiV) and Arabidopsis thaliana (AtChiC), which do not efficiently catalyze the TG reaction. All three chitinases had a similar (α/β)8 barrel fold with an (α + β) insertion domain. In the acceptor binding site (+1, +2 and +3) of CrChiA, the Trp168 side chain was found to stack face-to-face with the +3 sugar. However, this interaction was not found in the identical regions of NtChiV and AtChiC. In the DxDxE motif, which is essential for catalysis, the carboxyl group of the middle Asp (Asp117) was always oriented toward the catalytic acid Glu119 in CrChiA, whereas the corresponding Asp in NtChiV and AtChiC was oriented toward the first Asp. These structural features of CrChiA appear to be responsible for the efficient TG activity. When binding of the inhibitor allosamidin was evaluated using isothermal titration calorimetry, the changes in binding free energy of the three chitinases were found to be similar to each other, i.e. between -9.5 and -9.8 kcal mol(-1) . However, solvation and conformational entropy changes in CrChiA were markedly different from those in NtChiV and AtChiC, but similar to those of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens (SmChiA), which also exhibits significant TG activity. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the TG reaction and the molecular evolution from bacterial chitinases to plant class V chitinases.

  20. Urban groundwater age modeling under unconfined condition - Impact of underground structures on groundwater age: Evidence of a piston effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Guillaume; Rossier, Yvan; Eisenlohr, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, underground structures are shown to have a major influence on the groundwater mean age distribution described as a dispersive piston effect. Urban underground development does not occur without impacts on subsoil resources. In particular, groundwater resources can be vulnerable and generate disturbances when this space is exploited. Groundwater age spatial distribution data are fundamental for resource management as it can provide operational sustainability indicators. However, the application of groundwater age modeling is neglected regarding the potential effect of underground structures in urban areas. A three dimensional modeling approach was conducted to quantify the impact of two underground structures: (1) an impervious structure and (2) a draining structure. Both structures are shown to cause significant mixing processes occurring between shallow and deeper aquifers. The design technique used for draining structures is shown to have the greatest impact, generating a decrease in mean age of more than 80% under the structure. Groundwater age modeling is shown to be relevant for highlighting the role played by underground structures in advective-dispersive flows in urban areas.

  1. The influence of alewife year-class strength on prey selection and abundance of age-1 Chinook salmon in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, D.M.; Kiley, C.S.; Claramunt, R.M.; Clapp, D.F.

    2008-01-01

    We used growth and diet data from a fishery-independent survey of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, acoustic estimates of prey density and biomass, and statistical catch-at-age modeling to study the influence of the year-class strength of alewife Alosa pseudoharengus on the prey selection and abundance of age-1 Chinook salmon in Lake Michigan during the years 1992-1996 and 2001-2005. Alewives age 2 or younger were a large part of age-1 Chinook salmon diets but were not selectively fed upon by age-1 Chinook salmon in most years. Feeding by age-1 Chinook salmon on alewives age 2 or younger became selective as the biomass of alewives in that young age bracket increased, and age-1 Chinook salmon also fed selectively on young bloaters Coregonus hoyi when bloater density was high. Selection of older alewives decreased at high densities of alewives age 2 or younger and, in some cases, high densities of bloater. The weight and condition of age-1 Chinook salmon were not related to age-1 Chinook salmon abundance or prey abundance, but the abundance of age-1 Chinook salmon in year t was positively related to the density of age-0 alewives in year t - 1. Our results suggest that alewife year-class strength exerts a positive bottom-up influence on age-1 Chinook salmon abundance, prey switching behavior by young Chinook salmon contributing to the stability of the predator-prey relationship between Chinook salmon and alewives. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  2. The Work of Power and the Power of Work: Teaching for Class Consciousness in the Neo-Liberal Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    As workers throughout the globe struggle to gain control over the conditions in which they labor as well as the means by which capital is produced, the importance of understanding class struggle, class formation and class consciousness as they relate to education and schooling takes on a new urgency. In the early part of the twenty-first century,…

  3. Perceptual-Motor Performance on the Vane and Bender Tests as Related to Two Socio-Economic Classes and Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Diane J.; Pishkin, Vladimir

    1974-01-01

    Confirms that perceptual and linguistic differences exist between middle-class and lower-class children, favoring middle-class children, and lends support to the usefulness of the Vane Kindergarten Test as a screening test for determining the intellectual potential of young children. (RB)

  4. Deriving and Analyzing Analytical Structures of a Class of Typical Interval Type-2 TS Fuzzy Controllers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibo; Ying, Hao

    2016-06-01

    A conventional controller's explicit input-output mathematical relationship, also known as its analytical structure, is always available for analysis and design of a control system. In contrast, virtually all type-2 (T2) fuzzy controllers are treated as black-box controllers in the literature in that their analytical structures are unknown, which inhibits precise and comprehensive understanding and analysis. In this regard, a long-standing fundamental issue remains unresolved: how a T2 fuzzy set's footprint of uncertainty, a key element differentiating a T2 controller from a type-1 (T1) controller, affects a controller's analytical structure. In this paper, we describe an innovative technique for deriving analytical structures of a class of typical interval T2 (IT2) TS fuzzy controllers. This technique makes it possible to analyze the analytical structures of the controllers to reveal the role of footprints of uncertainty in shaping the structures. Specifically, we have mathematically proven that under certain conditions, the larger the footprints, the more the IT2 controllers resemble linear or piecewise linear controllers. When the footprints are at their maximum, the IT2 controllers actually become linear or piecewise linear controllers. That is to say the smaller the footprints, the more nonlinear the controllers. The most nonlinear IT2 controllers are attained at zero footprints, at which point they become T1 controllers. This finding implies that sometimes if strong nonlinearity is most important and desired, one should consider using a smaller footprint or even just a T1 fuzzy controller. This paper exemplifies the importance and value of the analytical structure approach for comprehensive analysis of T2 fuzzy controllers.

  5. Crystal structure of Pistol, a class of self-cleaving ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Laura A; Wang, Jimin; Steitz, Thomas A

    2017-01-31

    Small self-cleaving ribozymes have been discovered in all evolutionary domains of life. They can catalyze site-specific RNA cleavage, and as a result, they have relevance in gene regulation. Comparative genomic analysis has led to the discovery of a new class of small self-cleaving ribozymes named Pistol. We report the crystal structure of Pistol at 2.97-Å resolution. Our results suggest that the Pistol ribozyme self-cleavage mechanism likely uses a guanine base in the active site pocket to carry out the phosphoester transfer reaction. The guanine G40 is in close proximity to serve as the general base for activating the nucleophile by deprotonating the 2'-hydroxyl to initiate the reaction (phosphoester transfer). Furthermore, G40 can also establish hydrogen bonding interactions with the nonbridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate. The proximity of G32 to the O5' leaving group suggests that G32 may putatively serve as the general acid. The RNA structure of Pistol also contains A-minor interactions, which seem to be important to maintain its tertiary structure and compact fold. Our findings expand the repertoire of ribozyme structures and highlight the conserved evolutionary mechanism used by ribozymes for catalysis.

  6. Structural Insights into a Novel Class of Aspartate Aminotransferase from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAspAT) is a PLP-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the production of L-aspartate and α-ketoglutarate from L-glutamate and oxaloacetate in L-lysine biosynthesis. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of CgAspAT and compare it with those of other aspartate aminotransferases (AspATs) from the aminotransferase class I, we determined the crystal structure of CgAspAT. CgAspAT functions as a dimer, and the CgAspAT monomer consists of two domains, the core domain and the auxiliary domain. The PLP cofactor is found to be bound to CgAspAT and stabilized through unique residues. In our current structure, a citrate molecule is bound at the active site of one molecule and mimics binding of the glutamate substrate. The residues involved in binding of the PLP cofactor and the glutamate substrate were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, compared with other AspATs from aminotransferase subgroup Ia and Ib, CgAspAT exhibited unique binding sites for both cofactor and substrate; moreover, it was found to have unusual structural features in the auxiliary domain. Based on these structural differences, we propose that CgAspAT does not belong to either subgroup Ia or Ib, and can be categorized into a subgroup Ic. The phylogenetic tree and RMSD analysis also indicates that CgAspAT is located in an independent AspAT subgroup. PMID:27355211

  7. The DAG project, a 4m class telescope: the telescope main structure performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.; Busatta, A.; Ghedin, L.; Marcuzzi, E.; Manfrin, C.; Battistel, C.; Pirnay, O.; Flebus, Carlo; Yeşilyaprak, C.; Keskin, O.; Yerli, S.

    2016-07-01

    Dogu Anatolu Gözlemevi (DAG-Eastern Anatolia Observatory) Project is a 4m class optical, near-infrared Telescope and suitable enclosure which will be located at an altitude of 3.170m in Erzurum, Turkey. The DAG telescope is a project fully funded by Turkish Ministry of Development and the Atatürk University of Astrophysics Research Telescope - ATASAM. The Project is being developed by the Belgian company AMOS (project leader), which is also the optics supplier and EIE GROUP, the Telescope Main Structure supplier and responsible for the final site integration. The design of the Telescope Main Structure fits in the EIE TBO Program which aims at developing a Dome/Telescope systemic optimization process for both performances and competitive costs based on previous project commitments like NTT, VLT, VST and ASTRI. The optical Configuration of the DAG Telescope is a Ritchey-Chretien with two Nasmyth foci and a 4m primary thin mirror controlled in shape and position by an Active Optic System. The main characteristics of the Telescope Main Structure are an Altitude-Azimuth light and rigid structure system with Direct Drive Systems for both axis, AZ Hydrostatic Bearing System and Altitude standard bearing system; both axes are equipped with Tape Encoder System. An innovative Control System characterizes the telescope performance.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of the age-structured malaria transmission model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addawe, Joel M.; Lope, Jose Ernie C.

    2012-09-01

    We propose an age-structured malaria transmission model and perform sensitivity analyses to determine the relative importance of model parameters to disease transmission. We subdivide the human population into two: preschool humans (below 5 years) and the rest of the human population (above 5 years). We then consider two sets of baseline parameters, one for areas of high transmission and the other for areas of low transmission. We compute the sensitivity indices of the reproductive number and the endemic equilibrium point with respect to the two sets of baseline parameters. Our simulations reveal that in areas of either high or low transmission, the reproductive number is most sensitive to the number of bites by a female mosquito on the rest of the human population. For areas of low transmission, we find that the equilibrium proportion of infectious pre-school humans is most sensitive to the number of bites by a female mosquito. For the rest of the human population it is most sensitive to the rate of acquiring temporary immunity. In areas of high transmission, the equilibrium proportion of infectious pre-school humans and the rest of the human population are both most sensitive to the birth rate of humans. This suggests that strategies that target the mosquito biting rate on pre-school humans and those that shortens the time in acquiring immunity can be successful in preventing the spread of malaria.

  9. Structure, expression, and molecular mapping of a divergent member of the class I HLA gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.; Chorney, M.J.; Lawrance, S.K.; Pan, J.; Smith, Z.; Smith, C.L.; Weissman, S.M.

    1987-06-01

    A class I gene distinct from HLA-A, -B, or -C was identified in a cosmid clone and transfected into mouse L cells. The gene, placed adjacent to the polyoma enhancer, produced a full-length class I mRNA and high levels of a 43-kDa protein in the cytoplasm. The surface expression of the gene product required its association with human ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin. The protein was recognized by a xenoantiserum raised against a mixture of human B- and T-cell lines. The product was also serologically reactive the HLA framework monoclonal antibodies. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined and a specific oligonucleotide probe was synthesized. This probe was used to identify a full-length mRNA transcript in a B-lymphoblastoid cell line (JY). The gene was mapped within a 190-kilobase Not I restriction fragment located in the telomeric portion of the human major histocompatibility complex. Distinct features of the gene include (i) the structure of the promoter, (ii) the position of the translation initiation site, (iii) a frameshift mutation at the carboxyl terminus, (iv) the insertion of an Alu repeat element in the eighth exon, (v) divergence in the derived amino acid sequence, and (vi) the lack of expression of the gene in some cells.

  10. A Class of Population Covariance Matrices in the Bootstrap Approach to Covariance Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Hayashi, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Hirokazu

    2007-01-01

    Model evaluation in covariance structure analysis is critical before the results can be trusted. Due to finite sample sizes and unknown distributions of real data, existing conclusions regarding a particular statistic may not be applicable in practice. The bootstrap procedure automatically takes care of the unknown distribution and, for a given sample size, also provides more accurate results than those based on standard asymptotics. But the procedure needs a matrix to play the role of the population covariance matrix. The closer the matrix is to the true population covariance matrix, the more valid the bootstrap inference is. The current paper proposes a class of covariance matrices by combining theory and data. Thus, a proper matrix from this class is closer to the true population covariance matrix than those constructed by any existing methods. Each of the covariance matrices is easy to generate and also satisfies several desired properties. An example with nine cognitive variables and a confirmatory factor model illustrates the details for creating population covariance matrices with different misspecifications. When evaluating the substantive model, bootstrap or simulation procedures based on these matrices will lead to more accurate conclusion than that based on artificial covariance matrices.

  11. A Class of Rigid Linker-bearing Glucosides for Membrane Protein Structural Study

    PubMed Central

    Sadaf, Aiman; Mortensen, Jonas S.; Capaldi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Elena; Hariharan, Parameswaran; de Castro Ribeiro, Orquidea; Loland, Claus J; Guan, Lan; Byrne, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are amphipathic bio-macromolecules incompatible with the polar environments of aqueous media. Conventional detergents encapsulate the hydrophobic surfaces of membrane proteins allowing them to exist in aqueous solution. Membrane proteins stabilized by detergent micelles are used for structural and functional analysis. Despite the availability of a large number of detergents, only a few agents are sufficiently effective at maintaining the integrity of membrane proteins to allow successful crystallization. In the present study, we describe a novel class of synthetic amphiphiles with a branched tail group and a triglucoside head group. These head and tail groups were connected via an amide or ether linkage by using a tris(hydroxylmethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) or neopentyl glycol (NPG) linker to produce TRIS-derived triglucosides (TDTs) and NPG-derived triglucosides (NDTs), respectively. Members of this class conferred enhanced stability on target membrane proteins compared to conventional detergents. Because of straightforward synthesis of the novel agents and their favourable effects on a range of membrane proteins, these agents should be of wide applicability to membrane protein science. PMID:27110345

  12. HLA class II genotypes are not associated with age related macular degeneration in a case-control, population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Derek; Hollenbach, Jill; Coleman, Anne L.; Gorin, Michael B.; Yu, Fe; Williams, Kevin; Noble, Janelle; Tranah, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support an immunologic basis and genetic disposition for the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Comprehensive Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) class II typing at four loci (DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1) was assessed using next generation sequencing methods and tested for association with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in a case-control study of 456 AMD cases and 499 controls from the population-based Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) cohort. No statistically significant associations were identified for any of the class II loci and a previously identified association between DRB1*13:01 was not replicated in this dataset. These results reported here suggest that common HLA class II genetic variation does not contribute to AMD disease risk. PMID:25665771

  13. A Progress Report: The Relationship Between Mother-Infant Interaction and Sensory-Motor Development According to Age, Sex and Social Class Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curcio, Frank; And Others

    This paper describes the purposes and procedures of a longitudinal study designed to: (1) relate mother-infant interaction patterns to infant age, sex, and social class; (2) relate mother-infant interaction patterns to infant sensory-motor development; and (3) to examine the relationship between infant sensory-motor development and infant sex and…

  14. The Influence of Age, Sex, Social Class and Religion on Television Viewing Time and Programme Preferences among 11-15 Year Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Leslie J.; Gibson, Harry M.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study that was conducted to investigate the influence of age, sex, social class, and religion on total television viewing time and program preferences among a large sample of Scottish secondary school students. Four main program types are examined, i.e., soap, sport, light entertainment, and current awareness. (50 references) (LRW)

  15. Family Structure and the Timing of Transitions from 70 to 103 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Colleen L.; Troll, Lillian

    1996-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional analysis of 250 white individuals, 70-103 years of age, this article questions whether a vertical family structure is found with increasing age. Findings indicate, among other things, that at least until age 90 the proportion of individuals with a vertical family structure with four generations never exceeds the numbers of…

  16. Adaptive neural network control for a class of low-triangular-structured nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongbin; Shao, Huihe; Yao, Pingjing

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, a class of unknown perturbed nonlinear systems is theoretically stabilized by using adaptive neural network control. The systems, with disturbances and nonaffine unknown functions, have low triangular structure, which generalizes both strict-feedback uncertain systems and pure-feedback ones. There do not exist any effective methods to stabilize this kind of systems. With some new conclusions for Nussbaum-Gain functions (NGF) and the idea of backstepping, semiglobal, uniformal, and ultimate boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop is proved at equilibrium point. The two problems, control directions and control singularity, are well dealt with. The effectiveness of proposed scheme is shown by simulation on a proper nonlinear system.

  17. Discovery and refinement of a new structural class of potent peptide deformylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Boularot, Adrien; Giglione, Carmela; Petit, Sylvain; Duroc, Yann; Alves de Sousa, Rodolphe; Larue, Valéry; Cresteil, Thierry; Dardel, Frédéric; Artaud, Isabelle; Meinnel, Thierry

    2007-01-11

    New classes of antibiotics are urgently needed to counter increasing levels of pathogen resistance. Peptide deformylase (PDF) was originally selected as a specific bacterial target, but a human homologue, the inhibition of which causes cell death, was recently discovered. We developed a dual-screening strategy for selecting highly effective compounds with low inhibition effect against human PDF. We selected a new scaffold in vitro that discriminated between human and bacterial PDFs. Analyses of structure-activity relationships identified potent antibiotics such as 2-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-hydroxyacetamide (6b) with the same mode of action in vivo as previously identified PDF inhibitors but without the apoptotic effects of these inhibitors in human cells.

  18. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors are divided into three classes (A, B and C) based on homology of their seven transmembrane domains. Class C is the smallest class with 22 human receptor subtypes including eight metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1-8) receptors, two GABAB receptors (GABAB1 and GABAB2), three taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we review the existence of post-translational modifications in class C G protein-coupled receptors and their regulatory roles, with particular focus on glycosylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, disulphide bonding and lipidation.

  19. Variation of Meat Quality Parameters Due to Conformation and Fat Class in Limousin Bulls Slaughtered at 25 to 27 Months of Age

    PubMed Central

    Guzek, Dominika; Głąska, Dominika; Pogorzelski, Grzegorz; Kozań, Karolina; Pietras, Jacek; Konarska, Małgorzata; Sakowska, Anna; Głąski, Krzysztof; Pogorzelska, Ewelina; Barszczewski, Jerzy; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of age of animal, hot carcass weight, pH, conformation and fat class on basic beef quality attributes (tenderness, sarcomere length, basic chemical composition, marbling and colour) in a group of purebred animals. The object of the study was beef of Limousin bulls (25 to 27 months, hot carcass weight - 432±31 kg, “U” conformation class, “2”–“3” fat class). Analysed cuts were Infraspinatus muscle from the blade and Longissimus dorsi muscle from the cube roll and the striploin. Tenderness was analysed with universal testing machine, colour - chromometer analysis, sarcomere length - microscopic method, basic chemical composition - near-infrared spectroscopy and marbling - computer image analysis. No differences in tenderness and sarcomere length were observed within the age groups of Limousin bulls (age of 25, 26, 27 months) (p>0.05). Moisture (p = 0.0123) and fat (p = 0.0250) content were significantly different for meat of animals slaughtered at the age of 25 and 27 months. No influence of pH value on tenderness was observed, but at the same time, influence on sarcomere length (p = 0.039) and b* component of colour (0.045) was found. For “U” conformation class, in subclasses, as well as for fat classes “2”–“3”, there were no differences in tenderness, sarcomere length and colour components. Higher fat content was observed in the higher fat class, rather than in lower, however this feature was not associated with marbling. PMID:25049844

  20. The Indris Have Got Rhythm! Timing and Pitch Variation of a Primate Song Examined between Sexes and Age Classes

    PubMed Central

    Gamba, Marco; Torti, Valeria; Estienne, Vittoria; Randrianarison, Rose M.; Valente, Daria; Rovara, Paolo; Bonadonna, Giovanna; Friard, Olivier; Giacoma, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    A crucial, common feature of speech and music is that they show non-random structures over time. It is an open question which of the other species share rhythmic abilities with humans, but in most cases the lack of knowledge about their behavioral displays prevents further studies. Indris are the only lemurs who sing. They produce loud howling cries that can be heard at several kilometers, in which all members of a group usually sing. We tested whether overlapping and turn-taking during the songs followed a precise pattern by analysing the temporal structure of the individuals' contribution to the song. We found that both dominants (males and females) and non-dominants influenced the onset timing one another. We have found that the dominant male and the dominant female in a group overlapped each other more frequently than they did with the non-dominants. We then focused on the temporal and frequency structure of particular phrases occurring during the song. Our results show that males and females have dimorphic inter-onset intervals during the phrases. Moreover, median frequencies of the unit emitted in the phrases also differ between the sexes, with males showing higher frequencies when compared to females. We have not found an effect of age on the temporal and spectral structure of the phrases. These results indicate that singing in indris has a high behavioral flexibility and varies according to social and individual factors. The flexible spectral structure of the phrases given during the song may underlie perceptual abilities that are relatively unknown in other non-human primates, such as the ability to recognize particular pitch patterns. PMID:27378834

  1. The Two-Peptide (Class-IIb) Bacteriocins: Genetics, Biosynthesis, Structure, and Mode of Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Oppegård, Camilla; Rogne, Per; Haugen, Helen Sophie; Kristiansen, Per Eugen

    The two-peptide (class-IIb) bacteriocins consist of two different peptides, both of which are required to obtain high antimicrobial activity. These bacteriocins kill target-cells by inducing membrane-leakage and they seem to display some specificity with respect to the molecules they transfer across membranes. The genes encoding the two peptides of two-peptide bacteriocins are next to each other on the same operon. In the same or a nearby operon are genes encoding (i) the immunity protein that protects the bacteriocin-producer from its own bacteriocin, (ii) a dedicated ABC-transporter that exports the bacteriocin from cells and cleaves off the N-terminal bacteriocin leader sequence, and (iii) an accessory protein whose exact function has not been fully clarified. Some two-peptide bacteriocins appear to be produced constitutively, whereas the production of other two-peptide bacteriocins is regulated through a three-component regulatory system that consists of a peptide pheromone, a membrane-associated histidine protein kinase, and response regulators. It has recently been proposed that the two peptides of (some) two-peptide bacteriocins may form a membrane-penetrating helix-helix structure involving helix-helix interacting GxxxG-motifs present in all currently characterized two-peptide bacteriocins. It has also been suggested that the helix-helix structure interacts with an integrated membrane (transport) protein, thus inducing a conformational change in the protein, which in turn causes membrane-leakage. This proposed mode-of-action is similar to that of the pediocin-like (class-IIa) bacteriocins and lactococcin A, which bind to a part of the mannose phosphotransferase permease that is embedded in the cell membrane, thereby altering the conformation of the ­permease in a manner that causes membrane-leakage and cell death.

  2. The poplar Phi class glutathione transferase: expression, activity and structure of GSTF1

    PubMed Central

    Pégeot, Henri; Koh, Cha San; Petre, Benjamin; Mathiot, Sandrine; Duplessis, Sébastien; Hecker, Arnaud; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes with essential roles in cellular detoxification and secondary metabolism in plants as in other organisms. Several plant GSTs, including those of the Phi class (GSTFs), require a conserved catalytic serine residue to perform glutathione (GSH)-conjugation reactions. Genomic analyses revealed that terrestrial plants have around ten GSTFs, eight in the Populus trichocarpa genome, but their physiological functions and substrates are mostly unknown. Transcript expression analyses showed a predominant expression of all genes both in reproductive (female flowers, fruits, floral buds) and vegetative organs (leaves, petioles). Here, we show that the recombinant poplar GSTF1 (PttGSTF1) possesses peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide and GSH-conjugation activity toward model substrates such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, benzyl and phenetyl isothiocyanate, 4-nitrophenyl butyrate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal but interestingly not on previously identified GSTF-class substrates. In accordance with analytical gel filtration data, crystal structure of PttGSTF1 showed a canonical dimeric organization with bound GSH or 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid molecules. The structure of these protein-substrate complexes allowed delineating the residues contributing to both the G and H sites that form the active site cavity. In sum, the presence of GSTF1 transcripts and proteins in most poplar organs especially those rich in secondary metabolites such as flowers and fruits, together with its GSH-conjugation activity and its documented stress-responsive expression suggest that its function is associated with the catalytic transformation of metabolites and/or peroxide removal rather than with ligandin properties as previously reported for other GSTFs. PMID:25566286

  3. Novel 3D bio-macromolecular bilinear descriptors for protein science: Predicting protein structural classes.

    PubMed

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Contreras-Torres, Ernesto; García-Jacas, César R; Barigye, Stephen J; Cubillán, Néstor; Alvarado, Ysaías J

    2015-06-07

    In the present study, we introduce novel 3D protein descriptors based on the bilinear algebraic form in the ℝ(n) space on the coulombic matrix. For the calculation of these descriptors, macromolecular vectors belonging to ℝ(n) space, whose components represent certain amino acid side-chain properties, were used as weighting schemes. Generalization approaches for the calculation of inter-amino acidic residue spatial distances based on Minkowski metrics are proposed. The simple- and double-stochastic schemes were defined as approaches to normalize the coulombic matrix. The local-fragment indices for both amino acid-types and amino acid-groups are presented in order to permit characterizing fragments of interest in proteins. On the other hand, with the objective of taking into account specific interactions among amino acids in global or local indices, geometric and topological cut-offs are defined. To assess the utility of global and local indices a classification model for the prediction of the major four protein structural classes, was built with the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) technique. The developed LDA-model correctly classifies the 92.6% and 92.7% of the proteins on the training and test sets, respectively. The obtained model showed high values of the generalized square correlation coefficient (GC(2)) on both the training and test series. The statistical parameters derived from the internal and external validation procedures demonstrate the robustness, stability and the high predictive power of the proposed model. The performance of the LDA-model demonstrates the capability of the proposed indices not only to codify relevant biochemical information related to the structural classes of proteins, but also to yield suitable interpretability. It is anticipated that the current method will benefit the prediction of other protein attributes or functions.

  4. Tangled Up in Knots: Structures of Inactivated Forms of E. coli Class Ia Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Zimanyi, Christina M.; Ando, Nozomi; Brignole, Edward J.; Asturias, Francisco J.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2012-10-23

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) provide the precursors for DNA biosynthesis and repair and are successful targets for anticancer drugs such as clofarabine and gemcitabine. Recently, we reported that dATP inhibits E. coli class Ia RNR by driving formation of RNR subunits into {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 4} rings. Here, we present the first X-ray structure of a gemcitabine-inhibited E. coli RNR and show that the previously described {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 4} rings can interlock to form an unprecedented ({alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 4}){sub 2} megacomplex. This complex is also seen in a higher-resolution dATP-inhibited RNR structure presented here, which employs a distinct crystal lattice from that observed in the gemcitabine-inhibited case. With few reported examples of protein catenanes, we use data from small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy to both understand the solution conditions that contribute to concatenation in RNRs as well as present a mechanism for the formation of these unusual structures.

  5. Notes on the Age of Maternity, Population Growth and Family Structure in the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendels, Franklin F.

    1978-01-01

    Emphasizes that the age of marriage was effective in determining the birth rate and the rate of population growth; measures the magnitude of the effects of the age of marriage; and offers some observations on the relationships between age of marriage, age of male and female fertility, and family structure. (Author)

  6. Race/Ethnicity and Social Capital among Middle- and Upper-Middle-Class Elementary School Families: A Structural Equation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldas, Stephen J.; Cornigans, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This study used structural equation modeling to conduct a first and second order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of a scale developed by McDonald and Moberg (2002) to measure three dimensions of social capital among a diverse group of middle- and upper-middle-class elementary school parents in suburban New York. A structural path model was…

  7. Middle and upper cretaceous amber from the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia: Evidence for a new structural sub-class of resinite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.B.

    1994-08-01

    Analysis of three amber (resinite) samples collected from Middle and Upper Cretaceous sediments in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia, indicates that these materials are based on copolymers of biformene (I) and communol (II). No resinites of similar structural character have previously been described and hence, these samples represent a previously unknown structural sub-class of resinite.

  8. Geo-structural mapping and age determinations of Rembrandt basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Sabrina; Massironi, Matteo; Martellato, Elena; Giacomini, Lorenza; Cremonese, Gabriele; Rothery, David; Prockter, Louise M.

    During its second and thirds flybys MESSENGER imaged a new large and well-preserved basin called Rembrandt Basin (Watters et al., 2009) in Mercury's southern hemisphere. Rembrandt is partially filled by volcanic overlay and is crossed by a marked lobate scarp with some similarities to another prominent mercurian lobate scarp, Beagle Rupes. In attempt to reveal Rembrandt Basin evolution, we mapped its geological units inferring -where possible -their stratigraphic relationships. In addition, we performed crater counts on several of these units and derived age estimates by applying Model Production Function (MPF) absolute-model chronology (Marchi et al., 2009). Since Rembrandt basin (in contrast to other well-seen basins) displays evidence of global-scale in addition to basin-localized deformation (Watters et al. 2009), it is characterized by different tectonic features that in some cases may be controlled by rheological layering within the crust. We attempted to map the contractional and extensional local patterns and the global tectonic features. Notably, the pronounced scarp transecting a 60 km crater near the edge of Rembrandt's inner ring and other structural features in the surrounding regions suggest a linked fault system. The apparent bow shape of this feature could be compared with Beagle Rupes, and similarly may imply special conditions of weakness inside the crust (Rothery and Massironi, 2010). Ref. Watters, T. R., Head, J. W., Solomon, S. C., Robinson, M. S., Chapman, C. R., Denevi, B. W., Fassett, C. I., Murchie, S. L., and Strom, R. G., 2009. Evolution of the Rembrandt Impact Basin on Mercury. Science, 324 , 618-621. Marchi, S., Mottola, S., Cremonese, G., Massironi, M., and Martellato, E., 2009. A new Chronology for the Moon and Mercury. Astronomical Journal, 137 , 4936-4948. Rothery, D. A. and Massironi, M., 2010. Beagle Rupes -evidence for a basal decollement of regional extent in Mercury's lithosphere. Icarus (In Press).

  9. Eighteen-year study of South Australian dolphins shows variation in lung nematodes by season, year, age class, and location.

    PubMed

    Tomo, Ikuko; Kemper, Catherine M; Lavery, Trish J

    2010-04-01

    Between 1990 and 2007, carcasses of opportunistically collected short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis; n=238), Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus; n=167), and common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus; n=15) were examined for parasites and life history data. Three species of lung nematodes (Halocercus lagenorhynchi, Stenurus ovatus, Pharurus alatus) were identified in surface nodules, subsurface lesions, or airways. Nematode burdens were light to heavy and, in many cases, would have compromised the dolphins' health. The number of dolphins infected was related to species, year, season, age class, and geographic region. Nematodes were found in all three species but were more prevalent in short-beaked common dolphins (mean annual prevalence=26%) than in bottlenose dolphins (12%). There was a significant increase in prevalence of nematodes in short-beaked common dolphins in 2005-06 (63%) compared to 1990-2004 (14%), with a peak in April-June. More young short-beaked common dolphins were infected than subadults and adults and, during the unusual infection event, there were more dependent calves (<130 cm) than juveniles. There were also more infections in dependent bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops spp.) calves but no increase in overall prevalence was detected during 2005-06. Because neonates of both short-beaked common dolphins and bottlenose dolphins were infected, mother-to-calf transmission is suspected for these species in South Australia. Numbers of infections in short-beaked common dolphins were higher in Gulf St Vincent than elsewhere in South Australia, particularly in 2005-06. The cause of the unusual infection event in short-beaked common dolphins is unknown. We discuss the influence of dolphin diet, life history, and external factors.

  10. Spatio-temporal variations in age structures of a partially re-established population of northern river otters (Lontra canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrett, Dominic A.; Leslie,, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Examination of age structures and sex ratios is useful in the management of northern river otters (Lontra canadensis) and other furbearers. Reintroductions and subsequent recolonizations of river otters have been well documented, but changes in demographics between expanding and established populations have not been observed. As a result of reintroduction efforts, immigration from Arkansas and northeastern Texas, and other efforts, river otters have become partially reestablished throughout eastern and central Oklahoma. Our objective was to examine age structures of river otters in Oklahoma and identify trends that relate to space (watersheds, county) and time (USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service county trapping records). We predicted that river otters in western areas of the state were younger than river otters occurring farther east. From 2005–2007, we obtained salvaged river otter carcasses from federal and state agencies, and we live-captured other river otters using leg hold traps. Seventy-two river otters were sampled. Overall, sex ratios were skewed toward females (1F∶0.8M), but they did not differ among spatiotemporal scales examined. Teeth were removed from salvaged and live-captured river otters (n  =  63) for aging. One-year old river otters represented the largest age class (30.2%). Proportion of juveniles (<1 y old) in Oklahoma (19.0%) was less than other states. Mean age of river otters decreased from east-to-west in the Arkansas River and its tributaries. Mean age of river otters differed between the Canadian River Watershed (0.8 y) and the Arkansas River Watershed (2.9 y) and the Canadian River Watershed and the Red River Watershed (2.4 y). Proportion of juveniles did not differ among spatiotemporal scales examined. Similar to age structure variations in other mammalian carnivores, colonizing or growing western populations of river otters in Oklahoma contained younger ages than more established eastern populations.

  11. Differential predation by age and sex classes in blue wildebeest in Serengeti: study of a modern carnivore den in Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania).

    PubMed

    Arriaza, Mari Carmen; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Martínez-Maza, Cayetana; Mabulla, Audax; Baquedano, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Age and sex selection of prey is an aspect of predator ecology which has been extensively studied in both temperate and African ecosystems. This dimension, along with fecundity, survival rates of prey and mortality factors other than predation are important in laying down the population dynamics of prey and have important implications in the management of species. A carnivore den located in the short-grassland ecological unit of the Serengeti was studied. Sex- and age- class (using five age categories) of the wildebeest remains recovered were analyzed through horn morphology, biometrics of the bones and tooth wear patterns. We compared our results with previous studies from lion and hyaena kills through multivariate analyses. Seasonality of the accumulation was analyzed through tooth histology. PCA and CVA results show that age class selection by predators depends on season, habitat-type, and growth rate of the wildebeest population. Female-biased predation was found to contradict classical hypotheses based on territorial male behaviour. The lion and spotted hyaena showed strong selection on age classes, contrary to previous studies. Migratory wildebeest sex ratio is regulated through differential predation by seasons and female deaths in the wet season are a trade-off for population stability. These data are crucial for an effective management of the species and the new method created may be useful for different carnivore species and their prey.

  12. Differential Predation by Age and Sex Classes in Blue Wildebeest in Serengeti: Study of a Modern Carnivore Den in Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania)

    PubMed Central

    Arriaza, Mari Carmen; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Martínez-Maza, Cayetana; Mabulla, Audax; Baquedano, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Age and sex selection of prey is an aspect of predator ecology which has been extensively studied in both temperate and African ecosystems. This dimension, along with fecundity, survival rates of prey and mortality factors other than predation are important in laying down the population dynamics of prey and have important implications in the management of species. A carnivore den located in the short-grassland ecological unit of the Serengeti was studied. Sex- and age- class (using five age categories) of the wildebeest remains recovered were analyzed through horn morphology, biometrics of the bones and tooth wear patterns. We compared our results with previous studies from lion and hyaena kills through multivariate analyses. Seasonality of the accumulation was analyzed through tooth histology. PCA and CVA results show that age class selection by predators depends on season, habitat-type, and growth rate of the wildebeest population. Female-biased predation was found to contradict classical hypotheses based on territorial male behaviour. The lion and spotted hyaena showed strong selection on age classes, contrary to previous studies. Migratory wildebeest sex ratio is regulated through differential predation by seasons and female deaths in the wet season are a trade-off for population stability. These data are crucial for an effective management of the species and the new method created may be useful for different carnivore species and their prey. PMID:26017363

  13. RSL Class I Genes Controlled the Development of Epidermal Structures in the Common Ancestor of Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Proust, Hélène; Honkanen, Suvi; Jones, Victor A S; Morieri, Giulia; Prescott, Helen; Kelly, Steve; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Dolan, Liam

    2016-01-11

    The colonization of the land by plants, sometime before 470 million years ago, was accompanied by the evolution tissue systems [1-3]. Specialized structures with diverse functions-from nutrient acquisition to reproduction-derived from single cells in the outermost layer (epidermis) were important sources of morphological innovation at this time [2, 4, 5]. In extant plants, these structures may be unicellular extensions, such as root hairs or rhizoids [6-9], or multicellular structures, such as asexual propagules or secretory hairs (papillae) [10-12]. Here, we show that a ROOTHAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL) class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor positively regulates the development of the unicellular and multicellular structures that develop from individual cells that expand out of the epidermal plane of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; mutants that lack MpRSL1 function do not develop rhizoids, slime papillae, mucilage papillae, or gemmae. Furthermore, we discovered that RSL class I genes are also required for the development of multicellular axillary hairs on the gametophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Because class I RSL proteins also control the development of rhizoids in mosses and root hairs in angiosperms [13, 14], these data demonstrate that the function of RSL class I genes was to control the development of structures derived from single epidermal cells in the common ancestor of the land plants. Class I RSL genes therefore controlled the generation of adaptive morphological diversity as plants colonized the land from the water.

  14. 49 CFR 176.172 - Structural serviceability of freight containers and vehicles carrying Class 1 (explosive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and vehicles carrying Class 1 (explosive) materials on ships. 176.172 Section 176.172 Transportation... serviceability of freight containers and vehicles carrying Class 1 (explosive) materials on ships. (a) Except for...) Before a freight container or transport vehicle is packed with Class 1 (explosive) materials, it must...

  15. CONTINUITY AND CHANGE IN THE AMERICAN CLASS STRUCTURE: WORKPLACE OWNERSHIP AND AUTHORITY RELATIONS FROM 1972 TO 2010

    PubMed Central

    Wodtke, Geoffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates changes in the American class structure—defined in terms of workplace ownership and authority relations—and trends in status group disparities in class attainment from 1972 to 2010. Although theory and prior research suggest a variety of appreciable changes in class structure and class attainment, data from the General Social Survey indicate that the sizes of different classes remained fairly stable during this time period and that status group disparities in access to ownership and authority persisted largely intact. The 1970s witnessed a decline in the proportion of workers and growth in the proportion of managers and proprietors, but these trends reversed in the 1980s. As a result, by the late 2000s, the ownership and authority structure of the U.S. economy closely resembled that of the early 1970s. Racial and gender disparities in class attainment also did not change significantly over time: blacks and women remained underrepresented (relative to whites and men) in positions of ownership and authority throughout this period. Even after controlling for an extensive set of human capital characteristics, family constraints, and structural economic factors, there is little evidence of status group integration across these key dimensions of economic power. PMID:27134335

  16. 77 FR 27815 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water AGENCY..., ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water.'' This LR-ISG... stainless steel structures and components exposed to treated borated water. The NRC published Revision 2...

  17. Effects of Aging Structures and Humidity on Fatigue Properties of Maraging Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kousuke; Nagano, Takanori; Moriyama, Michihiko; Wang, Xishu; Kawagoishi, Norio

    Effects of aging structures and humidity on fatigue properties of 350 grade 18% Ni maraging steel were investigated under rotating bending in relative humidity of 25% and 85%. Aging conditions tested were a conventional single aging and a double one which was aged at low temperature after the conventional aging. In each aging, under and peak aged steels were prepared. Tensile strength was increased by the double aging without reduction of the ductility. Proportional relation between fatigue limit and Vickers hardness held until 750HV in low humidity. However fatigue strength was largely decreased by high humidity, especially in the peak aged steel at the single aging. The decrease in fatigue strength by high humidity was mainly caused by the acceleration of a crack initiation due to the anodic dissolution. The acceleration of a crack initiation was larger in the steel peak aged at the single aging with larger precipitated particles.

  18. Structure Determination and Interception of Biosynthetic Intermediates for the Plantazolicin Class of Highly Discriminating Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Molohon, Katie J.; Melby, Joel O.; Lee, Jaeheon; Evans, Bradley S.; Dunbar, Kyle L.; Bumpus, Stefanie B.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    The soil dwelling, plant-growth promoting bacterium, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42, is a prolific producer of complex natural products. Recently, a new FZB42 metabolite, plantazolicin (PZN), has been described as a member of the growing thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin (TOMM) family. TOMMs are biosynthesized from inactive, ribosomal peptides and undergo a series of cyclodehydrations, dehydrogenations, and other modifications to become bioactive natural products. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, chemoselective modification, genetic interruptions, and other spectroscopic tools, we have determined the molecular structure of PZN. In addition to two conjugated polyazole moieties, the amino-terminus of PZN has been modified to Nα,Nα-dimethylarginine. PZN exhibited a highly selective antibiotic activity towards Bacillus anthracis, but no other tested human pathogen. By altering oxygenation levels during fermentation, PZN analogs were produced that bear variability in their heterocycle content, which yielded insight into the order of biosynthetic events. Lastly, genome-mining has revealed the existence of four additional PZN-like biosynthetic gene clusters. Given their structural uniqueness and intriguing antimicrobial specificity, the PZN class of antibiotics may hold pharmacological value. PMID:21950656

  19. Structure of an extended-spectrum class A beta-lactamase from Proteus vulgaris K1.

    PubMed

    Nukaga, Michiyoshi; Mayama, Kayoko; Crichlow, Gregg V; Knox, James R

    2002-03-15

    The structure of a chromosomal extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) having the ability to hydrolyze cephalosporins including cefuroxime and ceftazidime has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.75 A resolution. The species-specific class A beta-lactamase from Proteus vulgaris K1 was crystallized at pH 6.25 and its structure solved by molecular replacement. Refinement of the model resulted in crystallographic R and R(free) of 16.9 % and 19.3 %, respectively. The folding of the K1 enzyme is broadly similar to that of non-ESBL TEM-type beta-lactamases (2 A rmsd for C(alpha)) and differs by only 0.35 A for all atoms of six conserved residues in the catalytic site. Other residues promoting extended-spectrum activity in K1 include the side-chains of atypical residues Ser237 and Lys276. These side-chains are linked by two water molecules, one of which lies in the position normally filled by the guanidinium group of Arg244, present in most non-ESBL enzymes but absent from K1. The ammonium group of Lys276, ca 3.5 A from the virtual Arg244 guanidinium position, may interact with polar R2 substitutents on the dihydrothiazene ring of cephalosporins.

  20. Structure and Correlates of Cognitive Aging in a Narrow Age Cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aging-related changes occur for multiple domains of cognitive functioning. An accumulating body of research indicates that, rather than representing statistically independent phenomena, aging-related cognitive changes are moderately to strongly correlated across domains. However, previous studies have typically been conducted in age-heterogeneous samples over longitudinal time lags of 6 or more years, and have failed to consider whether results are robust to a comprehensive set of controls. Capitalizing on 3-year longitudinal data from the Lothian Birth Cohort of 1936, we took a longitudinal narrow age cohort approach to examine cross-domain cognitive change interrelations from ages 70 to 73 years. We fit multivariate latent difference score models to factors representing visuospatial ability, processing speed, memory, and crystallized ability. Changes were moderately interrelated, with a general factor of change accounting for 47% of the variance in changes across domains. Change interrelations persisted at close to full strength after controlling for a comprehensive set of demographic, physical, and medical factors including educational attainment, childhood intelligence, physical function, APOE genotype, smoking status, diagnosis of hypertension, diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, and diagnosis of diabetes. Thus, the positive manifold of aging-related cognitive changes is highly robust in that it can be detected in a narrow age cohort followed over a relatively brief longitudinal period, and persists even after controlling for many potential confounders. PMID:24955992

  1. The distribution of Fst and other genetic statistics for a class of population structure models.

    PubMed

    Leviyang, Sivan

    2011-02-01

    We examine genetic statistics used in the study of structured populations. In a 1999 paper, Wakeley observed that the coalescent process associated with the finite island model can be decomposed into a scattering phase and a collecting phase. This decomposition becomes exact in the large population limit with the coalescent at the end of the scattering phase converging to the Ewens sampling formula and the coalescent during the collecting phase converging to the Kingman coalescent. In this paper we introduce a class of limiting models, which we refer to as G/KC models, that generalize Wakeley's decomposition. G in G/KC represents a completely general limit for the scattering phase, while KC represents a Kingman coalescent limit for the collecting phase. We show that both the island and two-dimensional stepping stone models converge to G/KC models in the large population limit. We then derive the distribution of the statistic F(st) for all G/KC models under a large sample limit for the cases of strong or weak mutation, thereby deriving the large population, large sample limiting distribution of F(st) for the island and two-dimensional stepping stone models as a special case of a general formula. Our methods allow us to take the large population and large sample limits simultaneously. In the context of large population, large sample limits, we show that the variance of F(st) in the presence of weak mutation collapses as O(1/log d) where d is the number of demes sampled. Further, we show that this O(1/log d) is caused by a heavy tail in the distribution of F(st). Our analysis of F(st) can be extended to an entire class of genetic statistics, and we use our approach to examine homozygosity measures. Our analysis uses coalescent based methods.

  2. Adaptive variable structure hierarchical fuzzy control for a class of high-order nonlinear dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mohammad; Teshnehlab, Mohammad; Aliyari Shoorehdeli, Mahdi

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel adaptive hierarchical fuzzy control system based on the variable structure control is developed for a class of SISO canonical nonlinear systems in the presence of bounded disturbances. It is assumed that nonlinear functions of the systems be completely unknown. Switching surfaces are incorporated into the hierarchical fuzzy control scheme to ensure the system stability. A fuzzy soft switching system decides the operation area of the hierarchical fuzzy control and variable structure control systems. All the nonlinearly appeared parameters of conclusion parts of fuzzy blocks located in different layers of the hierarchical fuzzy control system are adjusted through adaptation laws deduced from the defined Lyapunov function. The proposed hierarchical fuzzy control system reduces the number of rules and consequently the number of tunable parameters with respect to the ordinary fuzzy control system. Global boundedness of the overall adaptive system and the desired precision are achieved using the proposed adaptive control system. In this study, an adaptive hierarchical fuzzy system is used for two objectives; it can be as a function approximator or a control system based on an intelligent-classic approach. Three theorems are proven to investigate the stability of the nonlinear dynamic systems. The important point about the proposed theorems is that they can be applied not only to hierarchical fuzzy controllers with different structures of hierarchical fuzzy controller, but also to ordinary fuzzy controllers. Therefore, the proposed algorithm is more general. To show the effectiveness of the proposed method four systems (two mechanical, one mathematical and one chaotic) are considered in simulations. Simulation results demonstrate the validity, efficiency and feasibility of the proposed approach to control of nonlinear dynamic systems.

  3. The age structure of the Milky Way's halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, D.; Beers, T. C.; Placco, V. M.; Santucci, R. M.; Denissenkov, P.; Tissera, P. B.; Lentner, G.; Rossi, S.; Lee, Y. S.; Tumlinson, J.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new, high-resolution chronographic (age) map of the Milky Way's halo, based on the inferred ages of ~130,000 field blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars with photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our map exhibits a strong central concentration of BHB stars with ages greater than 12 Gyr, extending up to ~15 kpc from the Galactic Centre (reaching close to the solar vicinity), and a decrease in the mean ages of field stars with distance by 1-1.5 Gyr out to ~45-50 kpc, along with an apparent increase of the dispersion of stellar ages, and numerous known (and previously unknown) resolved over-densities and debris streams, including the Sagittarius Stream. These results agree with expectations from modern lambda cold dark matter cosmological simulations, and support the existence of a dual (inner/outer) halo system, punctuated by the presence of over-densities and debris streams that have not yet completely phase-space mixed.

  4. Lake Erie Yellow perch age estimation based on three structures: Precision, processing times, and management implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergoot, C.S.; Bur, M.T.; Powell, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Yellow perch Perca flavescens support economically important recreational and commercial fisheries in Lake Erie and are intensively managed. Age estimation represents an integral component in the management of Lake Erie yellow perch stocks, as age-structured population models are used to set safe harvest levels on an annual basis. We compared the precision associated with yellow perch (N = 251) age estimates from scales, sagittal otoliths, and anal spine sections and evaluated the time required to process and estimate age from each structure. Three readers of varying experience estimated ages. The precision (mean coefficient of variation) of estimates among readers was 1% for sagittal otoliths, 5-6% for anal spines, and 11-13% for scales. Agreement rates among readers were 94-95% for otoliths, 71-76% for anal spines, and 45-50% for scales. Systematic age estimation differences were evident among scale and anal spine readers; less-experienced readers tended to underestimate ages of yellow perch older than age 4 relative to estimates made by an experienced reader. Mean scale age tended to underestimate ages of age-6 and older fish relative to otolith ages estimated by an experienced reader. Total annual mortality estimates based on scale ages were 20% higher than those based on otolith ages; mortality estimates based on anal spine ages were 4% higher than those based on otolith ages. Otoliths required more removal and preparation time than scales and anal spines, but age estimation time was substantially lower for otoliths than for the other two structures. We suggest the use of otoliths or anal spines for age estimation in yellow perch (regardless of length) from Lake Erie and other systems where precise age estimates are necessary, because age estimation errors resulting from the use of scales could generate incorrect management decisions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  5. On the dynamics of the age structure, dependency, and consumption

    PubMed Central

    Hock, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effects of population aging due to declining fertility and rising elderly life expectancy on consumption possibilities in the presence of intergenerational transfers. Our analysis is based on a highly tractable continuous-time overlapping generations model in which the population is divided into three groups (youth dependents, workers, and elderly dependents) and lifecourse transitions take place in a probabilistic fashion. We show that the consumption-maximizing response to greater longevity in highly developed countries is an increase in fertility. However, with larger transfer payments, the actual fertility response will likely be the opposite, leading to further population aging. PMID:24353374

  6. Structural and Functional Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus’s Class IIb Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common nosocomial sources of soft-tissue and skin infections and has more recently become prevalent in the community setting as well. Since the use of penicillins to combat S. aureus infections in the 1940s, the bacterium has been notorious for developing resistances to antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). With the persistence of MRSA as well as many other drug resistant bacteria and parasites, there is a growing need to focus on new pharmacological targets. Recently, class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) have garnered attention to fill this role. Regrettably, scarce biochemical data and no structural data are currently available for the class II FBA found in MRSA (SaFBA). With the recent finding of a flexible active site zinc-binding loop (Z-Loop) in class IIa FBAs and its potential for broad spectrum class II FBA inhibition, the lack of information regarding this feature of class IIb FBAs, such as SaFBA, has been limiting for further Z-loop inhibitor development. Therefore, we elucidated the crystal structure of SaFBA to 2.1 Å allowing for a more direct structural analysis of SaFBA. Furthermore, we determined the KM for one of SaFBA’s substrates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, as well as performed mode of inhibition studies for an inhibitor that takes advantage of the Z-loop’s flexibility. Together the data offers insight into a class IIb FBA from a pervasively drug resistant bacterium and a comparison of Z-loops and other features between the different subtypes of class II FBAs. PMID:25390935

  7. Structural and functional characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus's class IIb fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase.

    PubMed

    Capodagli, Glenn C; Lee, Stephen A; Boehm, Kyle J; Brady, Kristin M; Pegan, Scott D

    2014-12-09

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common nosocomial sources of soft-tissue and skin infections and has more recently become prevalent in the community setting as well. Since the use of penicillins to combat S. aureus infections in the 1940s, the bacterium has been notorious for developing resistances to antibiotics, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). With the persistence of MRSA as well as many other drug resistant bacteria and parasites, there is a growing need to focus on new pharmacological targets. Recently, class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) have garnered attention to fill this role. Regrettably, scarce biochemical data and no structural data are currently available for the class II FBA found in MRSA (SaFBA). With the recent finding of a flexible active site zinc-binding loop (Z-Loop) in class IIa FBAs and its potential for broad spectrum class II FBA inhibition, the lack of information regarding this feature of class IIb FBAs, such as SaFBA, has been limiting for further Z-loop inhibitor development. Therefore, we elucidated the crystal structure of SaFBA to 2.1 Å allowing for a more direct structural analysis of SaFBA. Furthermore, we determined the KM for one of SaFBA's substrates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, as well as performed mode of inhibition studies for an inhibitor that takes advantage of the Z-loop's flexibility. Together the data offers insight into a class IIb FBA from a pervasively drug resistant bacterium and a comparison of Z-loops and other features between the different subtypes of class II FBAs.

  8. A class of promising acaricidal tetrahydroisoquinoline derivatives: synthesis, biological evaluation and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Ruan, Qiao; Zhang, Bing-Yu; Zheng, Zuo-Lue; Miao, Fang; Zhou, Le; Geng, Hui-Ling

    2014-06-16

    As part of our continuing research on isoquinoline acaricidal drugs, this paper reports the preparation of a series of the 2-aryl-1-cyano-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolines with various substituents on the N-phenyl ring, their in vitro acaricidal activities against Psoroptes cuniculi, a mange mite, and discusses their SAR as well. The structures of all compounds, including 12 new ones, were elucidated by analysis of UV, IR, NMR, ESI-MS, HR-MS spectra and X-ray diffraction experiments. All target compounds showed varying degrees of activity at 0.4 mg/mL. Compound 1 showed the strongest activity, with a 50% lethal concentration value (LC50) of 0.2421 μg/mL and 50% lethal time value (LT50) of 7.79 h, comparable to the standard drug ivermectin (LC50 = 0.2474 μg/mL; LT50 = 20.9 h). The SAR showed that the substitution pattern on the N-aromatic ring exerted a significant effect on the activity. The substituents 2'-F, 3'-F, 2'-Cl, 2'-Br and 2'-CF3 remarkably enhanced the activity. Generally, for the isomers with the same substituents at different positions, the order of the activity was ortho > meta > para. It was concluded that the target compounds represent a class of novel promising candidates or lead compounds for the development of new tetrahydroisoquinoline acaricidal agents.

  9. Structural synthesis of a class of 2R2T hybrid mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chunxu; Fang, Yuefa; Guo, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Conventional overconstrained parallel manipulators have been widely studied both in industry and academia, however the structural synthesis of hybrid mechanisms with additional constraints is seldom studied, especially for the four degrees of freedom(DOF) hybrid mechanisms. In order to develop a manipulator with additional constraints, a class of important spatial mechanisms with coupling chains(CCs) whose motion type is two rotations and two translations(2R2T) is presented. Based on screw theory, the combination of different types of limbs which are used to construct parallel mechanisms and coupling chains is proposed. The basic types of the general parallel mechanisms and geometric conditions of the kinematic chains are given using constraint synthesis method. Moreover, the 2R2T motion pattern hybrid mechanisms which are derived by adding coupling chains between different serial kinematic chains(SKCs) of the corresponding parallel mechanisms are presented. According to the constraint analysis of the mechanisms, the movement relationship of the moving platform and the kinematic chains is derived by disassembling the coupling chains. At last, fourteen novel hybrid mechanisms with two or three serial kinematic chains are presented. The proposed novel hybrid mechanisms and construction method enrich the family of the spatial mechanisms and provide an instruction to design more complex hybrid mechanisms.

  10. Structure of putrescine aminotransferase from Escherichia coli provides insights into the substrate specificity among class III aminotransferases.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyung Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Rojviriya, Catleya; Kim, Yeon-Gil

    2014-01-01

    YgjG is a putrescine aminotransferase enzyme that transfers amino groups from compounds with terminal primary amines to compounds with an aldehyde group using pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Previous biochemical data show that the enzyme prefers primary diamines, such as putrescine, over ornithine as a substrate. To better understand the enzyme's substrate specificity, crystal structures of YgjG from Escherichia coli were determined at 2.3 and 2.1 Å resolutions for the free and putrescine-bound enzymes, respectively. Sequence and structural analyses revealed that YgjG forms a dimer that adopts a class III PLP-dependent aminotransferase fold. A structural comparison between YgjG and other class III aminotransferases revealed that their structures are similar. However, YgjG has an additional N-terminal helical structure that partially contributes to a dimeric interaction with the other subunit via a helix-helix interaction. Interestingly, the YgjG substrate-binding site entrance size and charge distribution are smaller and more hydrophobic than other class III aminotransferases, which suggest that YgjG has a unique substrate binding site that could accommodate primary aliphatic diamine substrates, including putrescine. The YgjG crystal structures provide structural clues to putrescine aminotransferase substrate specificity and binding.

  11. The Frontal Hypothesis of Cognitive Aging: Factor Structure and Age Effects on Four "Frontal Tests" among Healthy Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Aranda, Claudia; Sundet, Kjetil

    2006-01-01

    With 101 healthy aging adult participants, the authors investigated whether executive functions are a unitary concept. The authors established the factor structure of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST; E. A. Berg, 1948), the Stroop color and word test (C. J. Golden, 1978), verbal fluency using the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT;…

  12. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service Fee Searches of one census for one person and one transcript $65.00 Each additional copy of census transcript...

  13. Structure and disulfide bonding pattern of the hevein-like peptide domains from plant class IV chitinases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) produce GH family 19 plant class IV chitinases. These chitinases contain two domains: a small N-terminal hevein region, and a C-terminal chitinase. Numerous structures of GH19 chitinase domains have been reported, including the chitinase domain ...

  14. Structural Basis for Catalysis of a Tetrameric Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Ruskseree, Kamolchanok; Franzblau, Scott G.; Mesecar, Andrew D. ); )

    2009-03-04

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), currently infects one-third of the world's population in its latent form. The emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensive drug-resistant strains has highlighted the need for new pharmacological targets within M. tuberculosis. The class IIa fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) enzyme from M. tuberculosis (MtFBA) has been proposed as one such target since it is upregulated in latent TB. Since the structure of MtFBA has not been determined and there is little information available on its reaction mechanism, we sought to determine the X-ray structure of MtFBA in complex with its substrates. By lowering the pH of the enzyme in the crystalline state, we were able to determine a series of high-resolution X-ray structures of MtFBA bound to dihydroxyacetone phosphate, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate at 1.5, 2.1, and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. Through these structures, it was discovered that MtFBA belongs to a novel tetrameric class of type IIa FBAs. The molecular details at the interface of the tetramer revealed important information for better predictability of the quaternary structures among the FBAs based on their primary sequences. These X-ray structures also provide interesting and new details on the reaction mechanism of class II FBAs. Substrates and products were observed in geometries poised for catalysis; in addition, unexpectedly, the hydroxyl-enolate intermediate of dihydroxyacetone phosphate was also captured and resolved structurally. These concise new details offer a better understanding of the reaction mechanisms for FBAs in general and provide a structural basis for inhibitor design efforts aimed at this class of enzymes.

  15. Normative and Structural Perspectives on Age in a Work Organization,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Professional Apprentice: Observations on Fieldwork Roles in Two Organizational Settings." In S.B. Bacharach (ed.), Research in Organizational Sociology...Career: Its Meaning, Its Satisfactions, Its Difficulties." In press: Journal of Occupational Behavior. November, 1982. TR-12 Schein, Edgar H. "The Role of...behavior because the distribution of ages within a social group constrains the roles and statuse; allocated to members. The scarcity of young marriageable

  16. Who Ate Whom: Population Dynamics With Age-Structured Predation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-15

    competes for food. Werner and Gilliam [2] review many examples of ecosystems in which competitive and predatory relationships are age- and size-dependent. As...of reproduction in that it transfers biomass from tadpoles to frogs, though it is certainly not identical. We have not fully explored the relationship ...limit cycles, though the limit cycles are not robust and rather unrealistic biologically, so in this model the two species are completely codependent

  17. Age structure of refractory interstellar dust and isotopic consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Scowen, Paul; Liffman, Kurt

    1989-01-01

    A sputtering and recycling Monte Carlo model, developed by Liffman and Clayton (1988) is used to calculate the distribution of existence times of the matter in interstellar dust composed of refractory metals. The mean age of each dust particle is defined not as the time it has existed but rather as the mass-weighted existence times of its parts at t = 6 Gyr of the modeled solar system formation. It is shown that Galactic evolution generates a mean correlation, applying to large numbers of particles binned according to size rather than according to individual particles, whose mean ages fluctuate statistically. The cosmochemical consequence is that if interstellar particles can be dynamically sorted into separate size populations during the aggregation history of solar system bodies, the collections of larger grains will constitute matter that is chemically older than collections of smaller grains. The macroscopic age difference generates isotopic anomalies by virtue of the time dependence of the secondary/primary nucleosynthesis yields. Results are compared with three different prescriptions for the sputtering of interstellar dust.

  18. Geographic variation in age, growth and size structure of Percilia irwini from south-central Chile.

    PubMed

    Aedo, J R; Belk, M C; Habit, E M

    2009-01-01

    Percilia irwini from the Andalién and Biobío River basins of south-central Chile exhibited a mean age of 1.4 years with a maximum age of 4 years. Size at age differed among river zones and males were 10% larger than females at all ages. Compared to other locations, populations of P. irwini inhabiting areas subject to industrial and domestic effluents exhibited smaller size structure.

  19. Nanoscale Structure, Dynamics, and Aging Behavior of Metallic Glass Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, J. A. J.; Holt, C. M. B.; Luber, E. J.; Fortin, D. C.; Popowich, G.; Zahiri, B.; Concepcion, P.; Mitlin, D.; Freeman, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy observations resolve the structure and dynamics of metallic glass Cu100−xHfx films and demonstrate scanning tunnelling microscopy control of aging at a metallic glass surface. Surface clusters exhibit heterogeneous hopping dynamics. Low Hf concentration films feature an aged surface of larger, slower clusters. Argon ion-sputtering destroys the aged configuration, yielding a surface in constant fluctuation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy can locally restore the relaxed state, allowing for nanoscale lithographic definition of aged sections. PMID:27498698

  20. Educating Other People's Children: Race, Class, Ethnicity, Aging, and the Politics of School Funding in Long Island, New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan

    Long Island, New York, including Nassau and Suffolk Counties, is a patchwork of small ethnically, racially, and economically segregated towns organized into 126 school districts. School funding patterns and problems conform to racial, ethnic, and class lines. Predominantly minority school districts generally have higher property tax rates, fewer…

  1. Healthy aging and myocardium: A complicated process with various effects in cardiac structure and physiology.

    PubMed

    Nakou, E S; Parthenakis, F I; Kallergis, E M; Marketou, M E; Nakos, K S; Vardas, P E

    2016-04-15

    It is known that there is an ongoing increase in life expectancy worldwide, especially in the population older than 65years of age. Cardiac aging is characterized by a series of complex pathophysiological changes affecting myocardium at structural, cellular, molecular and functional levels. These changes make the aged myocardium more susceptible to stress, leading to a high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (heart failure, atrial fibrillation, left ventricular hypertrophy, coronary artery disease) in the elderly population. The aging process is genetically programmed but modified by environmental influences, so that the rate of aging can vary widely among people. We summarized the entire data concerning all the multifactorial changes in aged myocardium and highlighting the recent evidence for the pathophysiological basis of cardiac aging. Keeping an eye on the clinical side, this review will explore the potential implications of the age-related changes in the clinical management and on novel therapeutic strategies potentially deriving from the scientific knowledge currently acquired on cardiac aging process.

  2. Radiostratigraphy and age structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Joseph A; Fahnestock, Mark A; Catania, Ginny A; Paden, John D; Prasad Gogineni, S; Young, S Keith; Rybarski, Susan C; Mabrey, Alexandria N; Wagman, Benjamin M; Morlighem, Mathieu

    2015-02-01

    Several decades of ice-penetrating radar surveys of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have observed numerous widespread internal reflections. Analysis of this radiostratigraphy has produced valuable insights into ice sheet dynamics and motivates additional mapping of these reflections. Here we present a comprehensive deep radiostratigraphy of the Greenland Ice Sheet from airborne deep ice-penetrating radar data collected over Greenland by The University of Kansas between 1993 and 2013. To map this radiostratigraphy efficiently, we developed new techniques for predicting reflection slope from the phase recorded by coherent radars. When integrated along track, these slope fields predict the radiostratigraphy and simplify semiautomatic reflection tracing. Core-intersecting reflections were dated using synchronized depth-age relationships for six deep ice cores. Additional reflections were dated by matching reflections between transects and by extending reflection-inferred depth-age relationships using the local effective vertical strain rate. The oldest reflections, dating to the Eemian period, are found mostly in the northern part of the ice sheet. Within the onset regions of several fast-flowing outlet glaciers and ice streams, reflections typically do not conform to the bed topography. Disrupted radiostratigraphy is also observed in a region north of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream that is not presently flowing rapidly. Dated reflections are used to generate a gridded age volume for most of the ice sheet and also to determine the depths of key climate transitions that were not observed directly. This radiostratigraphy provides a new constraint on the dynamics and history of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  3. Radiostratigraphy and age structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Joseph A; Fahnestock, Mark A; Catania, Ginny A; Paden, John D; Prasad Gogineni, S; Young, S Keith; Rybarski, Susan C; Mabrey, Alexandria N; Wagman, Benjamin M; Morlighem, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Several decades of ice-penetrating radar surveys of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have observed numerous widespread internal reflections. Analysis of this radiostratigraphy has produced valuable insights into ice sheet dynamics and motivates additional mapping of these reflections. Here we present a comprehensive deep radiostratigraphy of the Greenland Ice Sheet from airborne deep ice-penetrating radar data collected over Greenland by The University of Kansas between 1993 and 2013. To map this radiostratigraphy efficiently, we developed new techniques for predicting reflection slope from the phase recorded by coherent radars. When integrated along track, these slope fields predict the radiostratigraphy and simplify semiautomatic reflection tracing. Core-intersecting reflections were dated using synchronized depth-age relationships for six deep ice cores. Additional reflections were dated by matching reflections between transects and by extending reflection-inferred depth-age relationships using the local effective vertical strain rate. The oldest reflections, dating to the Eemian period, are found mostly in the northern part of the ice sheet. Within the onset regions of several fast-flowing outlet glaciers and ice streams, reflections typically do not conform to the bed topography. Disrupted radiostratigraphy is also observed in a region north of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream that is not presently flowing rapidly. Dated reflections are used to generate a gridded age volume for most of the ice sheet and also to determine the depths of key climate transitions that were not observed directly. This radiostratigraphy provides a new constraint on the dynamics and history of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Key Points Phase information predicts reflection slope and simplifies reflection tracing Reflections can be dated away from ice cores using a simple ice flow model Radiostratigraphy is often disrupted near the onset of fast ice flow PMID:26213664

  4. REACH Coarse-Grained Biomolecular Simulation: Transferability between Different Protein Structural Classes

    PubMed Central

    Moritsugu, Kei; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2008-01-01

    Coarse graining of protein interactions provides a means of simulating large biological systems. The REACH (Realistic Extension Algorithm via Covariance Hessian) coarse-graining method, in which the force constants of a residue-scale elastic network model are calculated from the variance-covariance matrix obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, involves direct mapping between scales without the need for iterative optimization. Here, the transferability of the REACH force field is examined between protein molecules of different structural classes. As test cases, myoglobin (all α), plastocyanin (all β), and dihydrofolate reductase (α/β) are taken. The force constants derived are found to be closely similar in all three proteins. An MD version of REACH is presented, and low-temperature coarse-grained (CG) REACH MD simulations of the three proteins are compared with atomistic MD results. The mean-square fluctuations of the atomistic MD are well reproduced by the CGMD. Model functions for the CG interactions, derived by averaging over the three proteins, are also shown to produce fluctuations in good agreement with the atomistic MD. The results indicate that, similarly to the use of atomistic force fields, it is now possible to use a single, generic REACH force field for all protein studies, without having first to derive parameters from atomistic MD simulation for each individual system studied. The REACH method is thus likely to be a reliable way of determining spatiotemporal motion of a variety of proteins without the need for expensive computation of long atomistic MD simulations. PMID:18469078

  5. Aromatic interactions and rotational strengths within protein environment: An electronic structural study on β-lactamases from class A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Christo; Karabencheva, Tatyana; Lodola, Alessio

    2008-04-01

    β-Lactamases are important enzymes, responsible for bacterial resistance against β-lactam antibiotics. The enzymes from class A are the most common and the most intensively studied. Here we present our electronic structural study on the relationships between electrostatic interactions and chiroptical properties of three enzymes from class A in the following directions: (i) an integrated influence of environment and ionization state on the rotational strengths mechanisms of tyrosine chromophore in TEM-1 β-lactamase; (ii) an effect of electrostatic environment on the mechanisms of aromatic rotational strengths in β-lactamases from Streptomyces albus and Staphylococcus aureus.

  6. The effect of a senior jazz dance class on static balance in healthy women over 50 years of age: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wallmann, Harvey W; Gillis, Carrie B; Alpert, Patricia T; Miller, Sally K

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study is to assess the impact of a senior jazz dance class on static balance for healthy women over 50 years of age using the NeuroCom Smart Balance Master System (Balance Master). A total of 12 healthy women aged 54-88 years completed a 15-week jazz dance class which they attended 1 time per week for 90 min per class. Balance data were collected using the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) at baseline (pre), at 7 weeks (mid), and after 15 weeks (post). An equilibrium score measuring postural sway was calculated for each of six different conditions. The composite equilibrium score (all six conditions integrated to 1 score) was used as an overall measure of balance. Repeated measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to compare the means of each participant's SOT composite equilibrium score in addition to the equilibrium score for each individual condition (1-6) across the 3 time points (pre, mid, post). There was a statistically significant difference among the means, p < .0005. Pairwise (Bonferroni) post hoc analyses revealed the following statistically significant findings for SOT composite equilibrium scores for the pre (67.33 + 10.43), mid (75.25 + 6.97), and post (79.00 + 4.97) measurements: premid (p = .008); prepost (p < .0005); midpost (p = .033). In addition, correlational statistics were used to determine any relationship between SOT scores and age. Results indicated that administration of a 15-week jazz dance class 1 time per week was beneficial in improving static balance as measured by the Balance Master SOT.

  7. Phylogeny of the moss class Polytrichopsida (BRYOPHYTA): Generic-level structure and incongruent gene trees.

    PubMed

    Bell, Neil E; Hyvönen, Jaakko

    2010-05-01

    Analysis of an extensive new molecular dataset for the moss class Polytrichopsida provides convincing support for many traditionally recognised genera and identifies higher level phylogenetic structure with a strong geographic component. A large apical clade that is most diverse in the northern hemisphere is subtended by a grade of southern temperate and tropical genera, while the earliest diverging lineages have widely separated relictual distributions. However, there is strongly supported topological incongruence between the nuclear 18S rRNA gene tree and the chloroplast and mitochondrial data for the positions of some taxa and notably for the status of Pogonatum. While Pogonatum is unambiguously paraphyletic in the 18S tree, it is well supported as monophyletic by the combined chloroplast and mitochondrial data, this being corroborated by several distinctive morphological synapomorphies and a 51-53 bp deletion in the rps4-trnS spacer. We explore various reticulate historical processes and methodological issues as possible explanations for incongruence, and suggest that either (1) the 18S topology is an artefact created by convergence of substitutions at specific sites due to functional and/or molecular-structural constraints not accounted for by the model, or (2) the incongruence is a product of ancient hybridization events. Under the latter scenario, incongruent topologies for Pogonatum are parsimoniously explained if Polytrichum (including Polytrichastrum sect. Aporotheca) is ultimately descended from a hybridization event involving an extinct maternal taxon derived from the branch ancestral to the combined Pogonatum/Polytrichum s.l. clade, and a paternal taxon belonging to (or ancestral to) the apical Pogonatum group to which the majority of extant species belong. Numerous novel relationships of taxonomic and evolutionary significance are supported. Notably, both Polytrichastrum and Oligotrichum are polyphyletic. While Polytrichastrum sect. Aporotheca is

  8. Basic Pharmacological and Structural Evidence for Class A G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromerization

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Rafael; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Lanciego, José L.; Navarro, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Cell membrane receptors rarely work on isolation, often they form oligomeric complexes with other receptor molecules and they may directly interact with different proteins of the signal transduction machinery. For a variety of reasons, rhodopsin-like class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) seem an exception to the general rule of receptor–receptor direct interaction. In fact, controversy surrounds their potential to form homo- hetero-dimers/oligomers with other class A GPCRs; in a sense, the field is going backward instead of forward. This review focuses on the convergent, complementary and telling evidence showing that homo- and heteromers of class A GPCRs exist in transfected cells and, more importantly, in natural sources. It is time to decide between questioning the occurrence of heteromers or, alternatively, facing the vast scientific and technical challenges that class A receptor-dimer/oligomer existence pose to Pharmacology and to Drug Discovery. PMID:27065866

  9. Quantitative image analysis reveals distinct structural transitions during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans tissues.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Josiah; Iser, Wendy B; Chow, David K; Goldberg, Ilya G; Wolkow, Catherine A

    2008-07-30

    Aging is associated with functional and structural declines in many body systems, even in the absence of underlying disease. In particular, skeletal muscles experience severe declines during aging, a phenomenon termed sarcopenia. Despite the high incidence and severity of sarcopenia, little is known about contributing factors and development. Many studies focus on functional aspects of aging-related tissue decline, while structural details remain understudied. Traditional approaches for quantifying structural changes have assessed individual markers at discrete intervals. Such approaches are inadequate for the complex changes associated with aging. An alternative is to consider changes in overall morphology rather than in specific markers. We have used this approach to quantitatively track tissue architecture during adulthood and aging in the C. elegans pharynx, the neuromuscular feeding organ. Using pattern recognition to analyze aged-grouped pharynx images, we identified discrete step-wise transitions between distinct morphologies. The morphology state transitions were maintained in mutants with pharynx neurotransmission defects, although the pace of the transitions was altered. Longitudinal measurements of pharynx function identified a predictive relationship between mid-life pharynx morphology and function at later ages. These studies demonstrate for the first time that adult tissues undergo distinct structural transitions reflecting postdevelopmental events. The processes that underlie these architectural changes may contribute to increased disease risk during aging, and may be targets for factors that alter the aging rate. This work further demonstrates that pattern analysis of an image series offers a novel and generally accessible approach for quantifying morphological changes and identifying structural biomarkers.

  10. The 1991 International Conference on Aging Aircraft and Structural Airworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Technical sessions of the conference included structural performance, nondestructive evaluation, maintenance and repair, international activities, and commuter airlines. Each session was organized to provide a well-rounded view of the subject from the industry, regulatory, and research perspective. Thirty-four presentations were given by the international technical community.

  11. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  12. Two-Class Structure of Income Distribution in the Usa:. Exponential Bulk and Power-Law Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovenko, V. M.; Silva, A. Christian

    2007-07-01

    Personal income distribution in the USA has a well-defined two-class structure. The majority of population (97-99 %) belongs to the lower class characterized by the exponential Boltzmann-Gibbs ("thermal") distribution, whereas the upper class (1-3 % of population) has a Pareto power-law ("superthermal") distribution. By analyzing income data for 1983-2001, we show that the "thermal" part is stationary in time, save for a gradual increase of the effective temperature, whereas the "superthermal" tail swells and shrinks following the stock market. We discuss the concept of equilibrium inequality in a society, based on the principle of maximal entropy, and quantitatively show that it applies to the majority of population.

  13. Aging and perceived event structure as a function of modality.

    PubMed

    Magliano, Joseph; Kopp, Kristopher; McNerney, M Windy; Radvansky, Gabriel A; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    The majority of research on situation model processing in older adults has focused on narrative texts. Much of this research has shown that many important aspects of constructing a situation model for a text are preserved and may even improve with age. However, narratives need not be text-based, and little is known as to whether these findings generalize to visually-based narratives. The present study assessed the impact of story modality on event segmentation, which is a basic component of event comprehension. Older and younger adults viewed picture stories or read text versions of them and segmented them into events. There was comparable alignment between the segmentation judgments and a theoretically guided analysis of shifts in situational features across modalities for both populations. These results suggest that situation models provide older adults with a stable basis for event comprehension across different modalities of expereinces.

  14. Aging and perceived event structure as a function of modality

    PubMed Central

    Magliano, Joseph; Kopp, Kristopher; McNerney, M. Windy; Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of research on situation model processing in older adults has focused on narrative texts. Much of this research has shown that many important aspects of constructing a situation model for a text are preserved and may even improve with age. However, narratives need not be text-based, and little is known as to whether these findings generalize to visually-based narratives. The present study assessed the impact of story modality on event segmentation, which is a basic component of event comprehension. Older and younger adults viewed picture stories or read text versions of them and segmented them into events. There was comparable alignment between the segmentation judgments and a theoretically guided analysis of shifts in situational features across modalities for both populations. These results suggest that situation models provide older adults with a stable basis for event comprehension across different modalities of expereinces. PMID:22182344

  15. Interplay between Shear Loading and Structural Aging in a Physical Gelatin Gel

    SciTech Connect

    Ronsin, O.; Caroli, C.; Baumberger, T.

    2009-09-25

    We show that the aging of the mechanical relaxation of a gelatin gel exhibits the same scaling phenomenology as polymer and colloidal glasses. In addition, gelatin is known to exhibit logarithmic structural aging (stiffening). We find that stress accelerates this process. However, this effect is definitely irreducible to a mere age shift with respect to natural aging. We suggest that it is interpretable in terms of elastically aided elementary (coil->helix) local events whose dynamics gradually slows down as aging increases geometric frustration.

  16. Prediction of Protein Structural Classes for Low-Similarity Sequences Based on Consensus Sequence and Segmented PSSM.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of protein structural classes for low-similarity sequences is useful for understanding fold patterns, regulation, functions, and interactions of proteins. It is well known that feature extraction is significant to prediction of protein structural class and it mainly uses protein primary sequence, predicted secondary structure sequence, and position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM). Currently, prediction solely based on the PSSM has played a key role in improving the prediction accuracy. In this paper, we propose a novel method called CSP-SegPseP-SegACP by fusing consensus sequence (CS), segmented PsePSSM, and segmented autocovariance transformation (ACT) based on PSSM. Three widely used low-similarity datasets (1189, 25PDB, and 640) are adopted in this paper. Then a 700-dimensional (700D) feature vector is constructed and the dimension is decreased to 224D by using principal component analysis (PCA). To verify the performance of our method, rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on 1189, 25PDB, and 640 datasets. Comparison of our results with the existing PSSM-based methods demonstrates that our method achieves the favorable and competitive performance. This will offer an important complementary to other PSSM-based methods for prediction of protein structural classes for low-similarity sequences.

  17. Demography of deep-dwelling red coral populations: Age and reproductive structure of a highly valued marine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priori, Cristina; Mastascusa, Vincenza; Erra, Fabrizio; Angiolillo, Michela; Canese, Simonpietro; Santangelo, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    The valuable Mediterranean red coral Corallium rubrum (Octocorallia Gorgonacea) has been harvested for more than 2 thousand years. Although our knowledge on the demographic features of red coral populations living between 10 and 50 m depth has increased considerably in recent years, the main life-history traits of deeper populations (the main target of current harvesting) are still largely unknown. To increase the demographic knowledge of the latter populations, sampling was carried out during early Summer 2010 in the North-Western Mediterranean (Tyrrhenian Sea - Italy), between 50 and 130 m depth. This paper quantifies the main demographic descriptors of this coral population in terms of size/age and sexual structure. Colony age was estimated by counting annual growth rings on thin sections of 69 colonies. A 2-way ANOVA showed no significant difference between the age estimated by three independent observers. The average annual colony growth rate (basal diameter), showing some decrease with colony age increase, was 0.26 mm/yr. The relationship between age and basal diameter derived from a subsample of colonies was then applied to assess the age of a larger sample of the population and showed 38% of the sampled colonies reached the commercial size (≥7 mm of basal diameter), corresponding to about 30 years in this population and a maximum life span of 93 years; about half of them (51.1%) were in the 21-25 and 26-30 age classes. The analysis of the sexual features revealed a balanced sex ratio, a colony fertility of 90.3% and an average fecundity of 0.83 oocytes or planulae per polyp. The knowledge of these life-history descriptors is needed for our understanding of deep dwelling red coral population dynamics and for matching of harvesting to population growth rate.

  18. The 1.4 Å Crystal Structure of the Class D [beta]-Lactamase OXA-1 Complexed with Doripenem

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kyle D.; Karpen, Mary E.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Leonard, David A.; Powers, Rachel A.

    2010-01-12

    The clinical efficacy of carbapenem antibiotics depends on their resistance to the hydrolytic action of {beta}-lactamase enzymes. The structure of the class D {beta}-lactamase OXA-1 as an acyl complex with the carbapenem doripenem was determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike most class A and class C carbapenem complexes, the acyl carbonyl oxygen in the OXA-1-doripenem complex is bound in the oxyanion hole. Interestingly, no water molecules were observed in the vicinity of the acyl linkage, providing an explanation for why carbapenems inhibit OXA-1. The side chain amine of K70 remains fully carboxylated in the acyl structure, and the resulting carbamate group forms a hydrogen bond to the alcohol of the 6{alpha}-hydroxyethyl moiety of doripenem. The carboxylate attached to the {beta}-lactam ring of doripenem is stabilized by a salt bridge to K212 and a hydrogen bond with T213, in lieu of the interaction with an arginine side chain found in most other {beta}-lactamase-{beta}-lactam complexes (e.g., R244 in the class A member TEM-1). This novel set of interactions with the carboxylate results in a major shift of the carbapenem's pyrroline ring compared to the structure of the same ring in meropenem bound to OXA-13. Additionally, bond angles of the pyrroline ring suggest that after acylation, doripenem adopts the {Delta}{sup 1} tautomer. These findings provide important insights into the role that carbapenems may have in the inactivation process of class D {beta}-lactamases.

  19. THE 1.4 Å CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE CLASS D β-LACTAMASE OXA-1 COMPLEXED WITH DORIPENEM

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Kyle D.; Karpen, Mary E.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Leonard, David A.; Powers, Rachel A.

    2009-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of carbapenem antibiotics depends on their resistance to the hydrolytic action of β-lactamase enzymes. The structure of the class D β-lactamase OXA-1 as an acyl-complex with the carbapenem doripenem was determined to 1.4 Å resolution. Unlike most class A and class C carbapenem complexes, the acyl carbonyl oxygen in OXA-1/doripenem is bound in the oxyanion hole. Interestingly, no water molecules were observed in the vicinity of the acyl linkage, providing an explanation for why carbapenems inhibit OXA-1. The side-chain amine of K70 remains fully carboxylated in the acyl structure, and the resulting carbamate group hydrogen bonds to the alcohol of the 6α-hydroxyethyl moiety of doripenem. The carboxylate attached to the β-lactam ring of doripenem is stabilized by a salt-bridge to K212 and a hydrogen bond with T213, in lieu of the interaction with an arginine side-chain found in most other β-lactamase/β-lactam complexes (eg. R244 in the class A member TEM-1). This novel set of interactions with the carboxylate results in a major shift of the carbapenem's pyrroline ring compared to the structure of the same ring in meropenem bound to OXA-13. Additionally, bond angles of the pyrroline ring suggest that after acylation, doripenem adopts the Δ 1 tautomer. These findings provide important insights into the role that carbapenems may have in the inactivation process of class D β-lactamases. PMID:19919101

  20. Geroprotectors.org: a new, structured and curated database of current therapeutic interventions in aging and age-related disease.

    PubMed

    Moskalev, Alexey; Chernyagina, Elizaveta; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Barardo, Diogo; Thoppil, Harikrishnan; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Budovsky, Arie; Fraifeld, Vadim E; Garazha, Andrew; Tsvetkov, Vasily; Bronovitsky, Evgeny; Bogomolov, Vladislav; Scerbacov, Alexei; Kuryan, Oleg; Gurinovich, Roman; Jellen, Leslie C; Kennedy, Brian; Mamoshina, Polina; Dobrovolskaya, Evgeniya; Aliper, Alex; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-09-01

    As the level of interest in aging research increases, there is a growing number of geroprotectors, or therapeutic interventions that aim to extend the healthy lifespan and repair or reduce aging-related damage in model organisms and, eventually, in humans. There is a clear need for a manually-curated database of geroprotectors to compile and index their effects on aging and age-related diseases and link these effects to relevant studies and multiple biochemical and drug databases. Here, we introduce the first such resource, Geroprotectors (http://geroprotectors.org). Geroprotectors is a public, rapidly explorable database that catalogs over 250 experiments involving over 200 known or candidate geroprotectors that extend lifespan in model organisms. Each compound has a comprehensive profile complete with biochemistry, mechanisms, and lifespan effects in various model organisms, along with information ranging from chemical structure, side effects, and toxicity to FDA drug status. These are presented in a visually intuitive, efficient framework fit for casual browsing or in-depth research alike. Data are linked to the source studies or databases, providing quick and convenient access to original data. The Geroprotectors database facilitates cross-study, cross-organism, and cross-discipline analysis and saves countless hours of inefficient literature and web searching. Geroprotectors is a one-stop, knowledge-sharing, time-saving resource for researchers seeking healthy aging solutions.

  1. Decomposing variation in population growth into contributions from environment and phenotypes in an age-structured population.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Fanie; Moyes, Kelly; Clutton-Brock, Tim H; Coulson, Tim

    2012-01-22

    Evaluating the relative importance of ecological drivers responsible for natural population fluctuations in size is challenging. Longitudinal studies where most individuals are monitored from birth to death and where environmental conditions are known provide a valuable resource to characterize complex ecological interactions. We used a recently developed approach to decompose the observed fluctuation in population growth of the red deer population on the Isle of Rum into contributions from climate, density and their interaction and to quantify their relative importance. We also quantified the contribution of individual covariates, including phenotypic and life-history traits, to population growth. Fluctuations in composition in age and sex classes ((st)age structure) of the population contributed substantially to the population dynamics. Density, climate, birth weight and reproductive status contributed less and approximately equally to the population growth. Our results support the contention that fluctuations in the population's (st)age structure have important consequences for population dynamics and underline the importance of including information on population composition to understand the effect of human-driven changes on population performance of long-lived species.

  2. Aging, condition monitoring, and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests of class 1E electrical cables

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobus, M.J. )

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the results of aging, condition monitoring, and accident testing of ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cables. Three sets of cables were aged for up to 9 months under simultaneous thermal ([approx equal]100[degrees]C) and radiation ([approx equal]0.10 kGy/hr) conditions. A sequential accident consisting of high dose rate irradiation ([approx equal]6 kGy/hr) and high temperature steam followed the aging. Also exposed to the accident conditions was a fourth set of cables, which were unaged. The test results indicate that most properly installed EPR cables should be able to survive an accident after 60 years for total aging doses of at least 150--200 kGy and for moderate ambient temperatures on the order of 45--55[degrees]C (potentially higher or lower, depending on material specific activation energies and total radiation doses). Mechanical measurements (primarily elongation, modulus, and density) were more effective than electrical measurements for monitoring age-related degradation.

  3. Occupational Class Inequalities in All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality among Middle-Aged Men in 14 European Populations during the Early 2000s

    PubMed Central

    Toch-Marquardt, Marlen; Menvielle, Gwenn; Eikemo, Terje A.; Kulhánová, Ivana; Kulik, Margarete C.; Bopp, Matthias; Esnaola, Santiago; Jasilionis, Domantas; Mäki, Netta; Martikainen, Pekka; Regidor, Enrique; Lundberg, Olle; Mackenbach, Johan P.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyses occupational class inequalities in all-cause mortality and four specific causes of death among men, in Europe in the early 2000s, and is the most extensive comparative analysis of occupational class inequalities in mortality in Europe so far. Longitudinal data, obtained from population censuses and mortality registries in 14 European populations, from around the period 2000–2005, were used. Analyses concerned men aged 30–59 years and included all-cause mortality and mortality from all cancers, all cardiovascular diseases (CVD), all external, and all other causes. Occupational class was analysed according to five categories: upper and lower non-manual workers, skilled and unskilled manual workers, and farmers and self-employed combined. Inequalities were quantified with mortality rate ratios, rate differences, and population attributable fractions (PAF). Relative and absolute inequalities in all-cause mortality were more pronounced in Finland, Denmark, France, and Lithuania than in other populations, and the same countries (except France) also had the highest PAF values for all-cause mortality. The main contributing causes to these larger inequalities differed strongly between countries (e.g., cancer in France, all other causes in Denmark). Relative and absolute inequalities in CVD mortality were markedly lower in Southern European populations. We conclude that relative and absolute occupational class differences in all-cause and cause specific mortality have persisted into the early 2000's, although the magnitude differs strongly between populations. Comparisons with previous studies suggest that the relative gap in mortality between occupational classes has further widened in some Northern and Western European populations. PMID:25268702

  4. The Left Hand Second to Fourth Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Does Not Discriminate World-Class Female Gymnasts from Age Matched Sedentary Girls

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Maarten W.; Claessens, Albrecht L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. Methods In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129), competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129), alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley) and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) using AN(C)OVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. Results Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020) did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018), either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p<0.01), weight (53.9±7.6 kg vs 46.2 6.3 kg p<0.01), BMI (20.51±2.41 kg/m2 vs 19.05±1.56 kg/m2), skeletal age (15.2±1.1 y vs 14.5±1.2 y p>0.01), somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01), mesomorphy (p<0.01) and ectomorphy (p<0.05) respectively) all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. Conclusion Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples

  5. The aging of elite male athletes: age-related changes in performance and skeletal muscle structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, John A.; Davis, Carol S.; Mendias, Christopher L.; Brooks, Susan V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The paper addresses the degree to which the attainment of the status as an elite athlete in different sports ameliorates the known age-related losses in skeletal muscle structure and function. Design The retrospective design, based on comparisons of published data on former elite and masters athletes and data on control subjects, assessed the degree to which the attainment of ‘elite and masters athlete status’ ameliorated the known age-related changes in skeletal muscle structure and function. Setting Institutional. Participants Elite male athletes. Interventions Participation in selected individual and team sports. Main Outcome Measurements Strength, power, VO2 max and performance. Results For elite athletes in all sports, as for the general population, age-related muscle atrophy begins at about 50 years of age. Despite the loss of muscle mass, elite athletes who maintain an active life style age gracefully with few health problems. Conversely, those who lapse into inactivity regress toward general population norms for fitness, weight control, and health problems. Elite athletes in the dual and team sports have careers that rarely extend into the thirties. Conclusions Life long physical activity does not appear to have any impact on the loss in fiber number. The loss of fibers can be buffered to some degree by hypertrophy of fibers that remain. Surprisingly, the performance of elite athletes in all sports appears to be impaired before the onset of the fiber loss. Even with major losses in physical capacity and muscle mass, the performance of elite and masters athletes is remarkable. PMID:19001883

  6. Implications of a class of grand-unified theories for large-scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafi, Q.; Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    A class of grand-unified theories in which cosmologically significant axion and neutrino energy densities arise naturally is considered. To obtain large-scale structure, attention is given to (1) an inflationary scenario, (2) inflation followed by string production, and (3) a noninflationary scenario with density fluctuations caused solely by strings. It is shown that inflation may be compatible with the recent observational indications that Omega less than 1 on the scale of superclusters, particularly if strings are present.

  7. Association of structural global brain network properties with intelligence in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Florian U; Wolf, Dominik; Scheurich, Armin; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Higher general intelligence attenuates age-associated cognitive decline and the risk of dementia. Thus, intelligence has been associated with cognitive reserve or resilience in normal aging. Neurophysiologically, intelligence is considered as a complex capacity that is dependent on a global cognitive network rather than isolated brain areas. An association of structural as well as functional brain network characteristics with intelligence has already been reported in young adults. We investigated the relationship between global structural brain network properties, general intelligence and age in a group of 43 cognitively healthy elderly, age 60-85 years. Individuals were assessed cross-sectionally using Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and diffusion-tensor imaging. Structural brain networks were reconstructed individually using deterministic tractography, global network properties (global efficiency, mean shortest path length, and clustering coefficient) were determined by graph theory and correlated to intelligence scores within both age groups. Network properties were significantly correlated to age, whereas no significant correlation to WAIS-R was observed. However, in a subgroup of 15 individuals aged 75 and above, the network properties were significantly correlated to WAIS-R. Our findings suggest that general intelligence and global properties of structural brain networks may not be generally associated in cognitively healthy elderly. However, we provide first evidence of an association between global structural brain network properties and general intelligence in advanced elderly. Intelligence might be affected by age-associated network deterioration only if a certain threshold of structural degeneration is exceeded. Thus, age-associated brain structural changes seem to be partially compensated by the network and the range of this compensation might be a surrogate of cognitive reserve or brain resilience.

  8. Structural evidence that human acetylcholinesterase inhibited by tabun ages through O-dealkylation.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Eugénie; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Dupeux, Florine; Trovaslet, Marie; Masson, Patrick; Nachon, Florian

    2010-05-27

    Tabun is a warfare agent that inhibits human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) by rapid phosphylation of the catalytic serine. A time-dependent reaction occurs on the tabun adduct, leading to an "aged" enzyme, resistant to oxime reactivators. The aging reaction may proceed via either dealkylation or deamidation, depending on the stereochemistry of the phosphoramidyl adduct. We solved the X-ray structure of aged tabun-hAChE complexed with fasciculin II, and we show that aging proceeds through O-dealkylation, in agreement with the aging mechanism that we determined for tabun-inhibited human butyrylcholinesterase and mouse acetylcholinesterase. Noteworthy, aging and binding of fasciculin II lead to an improved thermostability, resulting from additional stabilizing interactions between the two subdomains that face each other across the active site gorge. This first structure of hAChE inhibited by a nerve agent provides structural insight into the inhibition and aging mechanisms and a structural template for the design of molecules capable of reactivating aged hAChE.

  9. Estimating survival rates with time series of standing age-structure data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udevitz, Mark S.; Gogan, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that age-structure data contain useful information for assessing the status and dynamics of wildlife populations. For example, age-specific survival rates can be estimated with just a single sample from the age distribution of a stable, stationary population. For a population that is not stable, age-specific survival rates can be estimated using techniques such as inverse methods that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data. However, estimation of survival rates using these methods typically requires numerical optimization, a relatively long time series of data, and smoothing or other constraints to provide useful estimates. We developed general models for possibly unstable populations that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data to provide explicit maximum likelihood estimators of age-specific survival rates with as few as two years of data. As an example, we applied these methods to estimate survival rates for female bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone National Park, USA. This approach provides a simple tool for monitoring survival rates based on age-structure data.

  10. Factor Structure of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms for Children Age 3 to 5 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGoey, Kara E.; Schreiber, James; Venesky, Lindsey; Westwood, Wendy; McGuirk, Lindsay; Schaffner, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) distinguishes two dimensions of symptoms, inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity for ages 3 to adulthood. Currently, no separate classification for preschool-age children exists, whereas preliminary research suggests that the two-factor structure of ADHD may not match the…

  11. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy C458 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H. W.; Farahmand, B.; Rioja, R.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an examination of the fracture toughness of aluminum-lithium alloy C458 for use in cryotank structures. Topics cover include: cryogenics, alloy composition, strengthing precipitates in C458, cryogenic fracture toughness improvements, design of experiments for measuring aging optimization of C458 plate and effects of aging of properties of C458 plate.

  12. Structural hippocampal network alterations during healthy aging: a multi-modal MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Amandine; Periot, Olivier; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Hiba, Bassem; Bordessoules, Martine; Pérès, Karine; Amieva, Hélène; Dartigues, Jean-François; Allard, Michèle; Catheline, Gwénaëlle

    2013-01-01

    While hippocampal atrophy has been described during healthy aging, few studies have examined its relationship with the integrity of White Matter (WM) connecting tracts of the limbic system. This investigation examined WM structural damage specifically related to hippocampal atrophy in healthy aging subjects (n = 129), using morphological MRI to assess hippocampal volume and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) to assess WM integrity. Subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) or dementia were excluded from the analysis. In our sample, increasing age was significantly associated with reduced hippocampal volume and reduced Fractional Anisotropy (FA) at the level of the fornix and the cingulum bundle. The findings also demonstrate that hippocampal atrophy was specifically associated with reduced FA of the fornix bundle, but it was not related to alteration of the cingulum bundle. Our results indicate that the relationship between hippocampal atrophy and fornix FA values is not due to an independent effect of age on both structures. A recursive regression procedure was applied to evaluate sequential relationships between the alterations of these two brain structures. When both hippocampal atrophy and fornix FA values were included in the same model to predict age, fornix FA values remained significant whereas hippocampal atrophy was no longer significantly associated with age. According to this latter finding, hippocampal atrophy in healthy aging could be mediated by a loss of fornix connections. Structural alterations of this part of the limbic system, which have been associated with neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease, result at least in part from the aging process. PMID:24367331

  13. One-Class Support Vector Machines Identify the Language and Default Mode Regions As Common Patterns of Structural Alterations in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Retico, Alessandra; Gori, Ilaria; Giuliano, Alessia; Muratori, Filippo; Calderoni, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The identification of reliable brain endophenotypes of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been hampered to date by the heterogeneity in the neuroanatomical abnormalities detected in this condition. To handle the complexity of neuroimaging data and to convert brain images in informative biomarkers of pathology, multivariate analysis techniques based on Support Vector Machines (SVM) have been widely used in several disease conditions. They are usually trained to distinguish patients from healthy control subjects by making a binary classification. Here, we propose the use of the One-Class Classification (OCC) or Data Description method that, in contrast to two-class classification, is based on a description of one class of objects only. This approach, by defining a multivariate normative rule on one class of subjects, allows recognizing examples from a different category as outliers. We applied the OCC to 314 regional features extracted from brain structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of young children with ASD (21 males and 20 females) and control subjects (20 males and 20 females), matched on age [range: 22–72 months of age; mean = 49 months] and non-verbal intelligence quotient (NVIQ) [range: 31–123; mean = 73]. We demonstrated that a common pattern of features characterize the ASD population. The OCC SVM trained on the group of ASD subjects showed the following performances in the ASD vs. controls separation: the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.74 for the male and 0.68 for the female population, respectively. Notably, the ASD vs. controls discrimination results were maximized when evaluated on the subsamples of subjects with NVIQ ≥ 70, leading to AUC = 0.81 for the male and AUC = 0.72 for the female populations, respectively. Language regions and regions from the default mode network—posterior cingulate cortex, pars opercularis and pars triangularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, and transverse temporal

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis Identifies a Quantitative Trait Locus in the MHC Class II Region Associated with Generalized Vitiligo Age of Onset

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Birlea, Stanca A.; Fain, Pamela R.; Gowan, Katherine; Riccardi, Sheri L.; Holland, Paulene J.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Herbstman, Deborah M.; Wallace, Margaret R.; McCormack, Wayne T.; Kemp, E. Helen; Gawkrodger, David J.; Weetman, Anthony P.; Picardo, Mauro; Leone, Giovanni; Taïeb, Alain; Jouary, Thomas; Ezzedine, Khaled; van Geel, Nanny; Lambert, Jo; Overbeck, Andreas; Spritz, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Generalized vitiligo is a common autoimmune disease in which acquired patchy depigmentation of skin, hair, and mucous membranes results from loss of melanocytes from involved areas. Previous genetic analyses have focused on vitiligo susceptibility, and have identified a number of genes involved in disease risk. Age of onset of generalized vitiligo also involves a substantial genetic component, but has not previously been studied systematically. In this study, we report a genome-wide association study of vitiligo age of onset in 1,339 generalized vitiligo patients, with replication in an independent cohort of 677 cases. We identified a quantitative trait locus for vitiligo age of onset in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region, located near c6orf10-BTNL2 (rs7758128; P = 8.14×10−11), a region that is also associated with generalized vitiligo susceptibility. In contrast, there was no association of vitiligo age of onset with any other MHC or non-MHC loci that are associated with vitiligo susceptibility. These findings highlight the differing roles played by genes involved in vitiligo susceptibility versus vitiligo age of onset, and illustrate that genome-wide analyses can be used to identify genes involved in quantitative aspects of disease natural history, as well as disease susceptibility per se. PMID:21326295

  15. Structural characterization of glycosaminoglycans from zebrafish in different ages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fuming; Zhang, Zhenqing; Thistle, Robert; McKeen, Lindsey; Hosoyama, Saori; Toida, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a popular model organism for the study of developmental biology, disease mechanisms, and drug discovery. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), located on animal cell membranes and in the extracellular matrix, are important molecules in cellular communication during development, in normal physiology and pathophysiology. Vertebrates commonly contain a variety of GAGs including chondroitin/dermatan sulfates, heparin/heparan sulfate, hyaluronan and keratan sulfate. Zebrafish might represent an excellent experimental organism to study the biological roles of GAGs. A recent study showing the absence of heparan sulfate in adult zebrafish, suggested a more detailed evaluation of the GAGs present in this important model organism needed to be undertaken. This report aimed at examining the structural alterations of different GAGs at the molecular level at different developmental stages. GAGs were isolated and purified from zebrafish in different stages in development ranging from 0.5 days to adult. The content and disaccharide composition of chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate were determined using chemical assays, liquid chromotography and mass spectrometry. The presence of HS in adult fish was also confirmed using 1H-NMR. PMID:18777207

  16. Does white matter structure or hippocampal volume mediate associations between cortisol and cognitive ageing?

    PubMed

    Cox, Simon R; MacPherson, Sarah E; Ferguson, Karen J; Royle, Natalie A; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Hernández, Maria Del C Valdés; Bastin, Mark E; MacLullich, Alasdair M J; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Deary, Ian J

    2015-12-01

    Elevated glucocorticoid (GC) levels putatively damage specific brain regions, which in turn may accelerate cognitive ageing. However, many studies are cross-sectional or have relatively short follow-up periods, making it difficult to relate GCs directly to changes in cognitive ability with increasing age. Moreover, studies combining endocrine, MRI and cognitive variables are scarce, measurement methods vary considerably, and formal tests of the underlying causal hypothesis (cortisol→brain→cognition) are absent. In this study, 90 men, aged 73 years, provided measures of fluid intelligence, processing speed and memory, diurnal and reactive salivary cortisol and two measures of white matter (WM) structure (WM hyperintensity volume from structural MRI and mean diffusivity averaged across 12 major tracts from diffusion tensor MRI), hippocampal volume, and also cognitive ability at age 11. We tested whether negative relationships between cognitive ageing differences (over more than 60 years) and salivary cortisol were significantly mediated by WM and hippocampal volume. Significant associations between reactive cortisol at 73 and cognitive ageing differences between 11 and 73 (r=-.28 to -.36, p<.05) were partially mediated by both WM structural measures, but not hippocampal volume. Cortisol-WM relationships were modest, as was the degree to which WM structure attenuated cortisol-cognition associations (<15%). These data support the hypothesis that GCs contribute to cognitive ageing differences from childhood to the early 70s, partly via brain WM structure.

  17. A highly accurate protein structural class prediction approach using auto cross covariance transformation and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Wang, Chunhua; Chen, Lanming

    2015-12-01

    Structural class characterizes the overall folding type of a protein or its domain. Many methods have been proposed to improve the prediction accuracy of protein structural class in recent years, but it is still a challenge for the low-similarity sequences. In this study, we introduce a feature extraction technique based on auto cross covariance (ACC) transformation of position-specific score matrix (PSSM) to represent a protein sequence. Then support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) is adopted to select top K features according to their importance and these features are input to a support vector machine (SVM) to conduct the prediction. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is performed using the jackknife test on three low-similarity datasets, i.e., D640, 1189 and 25PDB. By means of this method, the overall accuracies of 97.2%, 96.2%, and 93.3% are achieved on these three datasets, which are higher than those of most existing methods. This suggests that the proposed method could serve as a very cost-effective tool for predicting protein structural class especially for low-similarity datasets.

  18. Insights into MHC class I peptide loading from the structure of the tapasin/ERp57 heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Gang; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Peaper, David R.; Cresswell, Peter; Reinisch, Karin M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Tapasin is a glycoprotein critical for loading Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules with high affinity peptides. It functions within the multimeric peptide-loading complex (PLC) as a disulfide-linked, stable heterodimer with the thiol oxidoreductase ERp57, and this covalent interaction is required to support optimal PLC activity. Here we present the 2.6 Å resolution structure of the tapasin/ERp57 core of the PLC. The structure reveals the basis for the stable dimerization of tapasin and ERp57 and provides the first example of a protein disulfide isomerase family member interacting with a substrate. Mutational analysis identified a conserved surface on tapasin that interacts with MHC class I molecules and is critical for the peptide loading and editing function of the tapasin-ERp57 heterodimer. By combining the tapasin/ERp57 structure with those of other defined PLC components we present a molecular model that illuminates the processes involved in MHC class I peptide loading. PMID:19119025

  19. Insights into MHC class I peptide loading from the structure of the Tapasin-ERp57 thiol oxidoreductase heterodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, G.; Wearsch, P.A.; Peaper, D.R.; Cresswell, P.; Reinisch, K.M.

    2009-03-02

    Tapasin is a glycoprotein critical for loading major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules with high-affinity peptides. It functions within the multimeric peptide-loading complex (PLC) as a disulfide-linked, stable heterodimer with the thiol oxidoreductase ERp57, and this covalent interaction is required to support optimal PLC activity. Here, we present the 2.6 {angstrom} resolution structure of the tapasin-ERp57 core of the PLC. The structure revealed that tapasin interacts with both ERp57 catalytic domains, accounting for the stability of the heterodimer, and provided an example of a protein disulfide isomerase family member interacting with substrate. Mutational analysis identified a conserved surface on tapasin that interacted with MHC class I molecules and was critical for peptide loading and editing functions of the tapasin-ERp57 heterodimer. By combining the tapasin-ERp57 structure with those of other defined PLC components, we present a molecular model that illuminates the processes involved in MHC class I peptide loading.

  20. Class Differences in Family Problem Solving: The Effects of Verbal Ability, Hierarchical Structure, and Role Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, Irving; Miller, Gary

    1974-01-01

    Reports on a study which used propositions drawn from small group problem-solving research, combined and modified, to explain social class differences in family problem solving with externally generated, rule-bound, conjunctive, puzzle-like problems. (Author/SF)

  1. Visualizing Communication Structures in Science Classrooms: Tracing Cumulativity in Teacher-Led Whole Class Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehesvuori, Sami; Viiri, Jouni; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Moate, Josephine; Helaakoski, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    Teacher-led whole class discussions are essential when it comes to guiding students' construction of knowledge, and recent studies on teaching and learning emphasize the need for more student-centered teaching methods. In previous studies, the extent to which different types of communication take place in the classroom have been extensively…

  2. Confirming the Structural Validity of the My Class Inventory -- Short Form Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariani, Melissa; Villares, Elizabeth; Sink, Christopher A.; Colvin, Kimberly; Kuba, Summer Perhay

    2015-01-01

    Researchers analyzed data collected from elementary school students (N = 893) to further establish the psychometric soundness of the My Class Inventory--Short Form Revised (MCI-SFR). A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted resulting in a good fit for a four-factor model, which corresponds to the instrument's four scales (Cohesion,…

  3. The Structure of Student Satisfaction with College Services: A Latent Class Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adwere-Boamah, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was used to identify distinct groups of Community college students based on their self-ratings of satisfaction with student service programs. The programs were counseling, financial aid, health center, student programs and student government. The best fitting model to describe the data was a two Discrete-Factor model…

  4. 49 CFR 176.172 - Structural serviceability of freight containers and vehicles carrying Class 1 (explosive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Division 1.4 materials, a freight container may not be offered for the carriage of Class 1 (explosive... equipment, mounting and securing chassis or vehicle, or insertion into ships' cells. (3) In addition... those in Division 1.4 (explosive) must be accompanied by a statement, which may appear on the...

  5. 49 CFR 176.172 - Structural serviceability of freight containers and vehicles carrying Class 1 (explosive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Division 1.4 materials, a freight container may not be offered for the carriage of Class 1 (explosive... equipment, mounting and securing chassis or vehicle, or insertion into ships' cells. (3) In addition... those in Division 1.4 (explosive) must be accompanied by a statement, which may appear on the...

  6. 49 CFR 176.172 - Structural serviceability of freight containers and vehicles carrying Class 1 (explosive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Division 1.4 materials, a freight container may not be offered for the carriage of Class 1 (explosive... equipment, mounting and securing chassis or vehicle, or insertion into ships' cells. (3) In addition... those in Division 1.4 (explosive) must be accompanied by a statement, which may appear on the...

  7. A Conflicting View in the Use of Journals for Composition and Literature Classes: Structure versus Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Julie E.

    The most powerful and profound thoughts known to humankind are the result of freedom to write whatever it is that the soul must purge; whatever a person is thinking that troubles him or her; anything that hinders his or her ability to be in that particular moment of living. On the first day of class, one writing instructor tells her students that…

  8. Students' Emotions in the High School Mathematical Class: Appraisals in Terms of a Structure of Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez-Sierra, Gustavo; García-González, María del Socorro

    2017-01-01

    Little research in the field of Mathematics Education is directed towards emotions of students beyond their emotions in problem-solving. In particular, the daily emotions of students in a mathematics class have been sparsely studied in the field of mathematics education. In order to fill this gap, this qualitative research aims to identify high…

  9. The Evolution of an Undergraduate Service Course--How To Cope with Success of an Age of Dinosaurs Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Homer

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how to address the issue of a course becoming too popular. Uses as an example the Age of Dinosaurs course at the University of Texas at Dallas. Describes some issues that can arise such as classroom overflow, overwhelmed labs, cheating, testing methods, and asynchronous instruction. Recommends looking to web-based course management…

  10. Predictors of Acculturation for Chinese Adolescents in Canada: Age of Arrival, Length of Stay, Social Class, and English Reading Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Ben C. H.; Roysircar, Gargi

    2004-01-01

    In a sample of 506 Chinese adolescents living in Canada from 3 cohort groups, age at the time of arrival in Canada, length of stay in Canada, socioeconomic status, and English reading ability predicted acculturation. The results of the study discussed in this article showed English reading ability and socioeconomic status predicted acculturative…

  11. Tolerability and efficacy of a three-age class dosage schedule of Diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) in the treatment of microfilaria carriers of Wuchereria bancrofti and its implications in mass drug administration (MDA) strategy for elimination of lymphatic filariasis (LF).

    PubMed

    Pani, S P; Das, L K; Vanamail, P

    2005-03-01

    A six-age class dosage schedule of Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) of 50mg (1-2 years), 100mg (3-4 years), 150mg (5-8 years), 200mg (9-11 years), 250mg (12-14 years) and 300mg for above 14 years is being adopted for annual single dose MDA for LF elimination treat Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaria carriers. In order to increase the community compliance as well as to make the distribution easier during MDA, a revised 3 age class dosage schedule of 100mg (2-4 years), 200mg (5-14 years) and 300mg for above 14 years was evaluated for its tolerability and efficacy. By this change, it was observed that the 4-8 years age class is receiving 50 mg higher and 11-14 years age class is receiving 50mg lesser dose compared to the earlier class schedule. Therefore, the safety aspect in the age class of 4-8 years and efficacy component in the age class of 11-14 years were assessed. Apparently "healthy" asymptomatic microfilaraemic volunteers between the age class of 4-8 and 11-14 years were recruited for the study. The incidence of side reaction in the 4-8 years age class was 50.0% with 150mg dose and 66.7% with 200mg (P>0.05). No life threatening adverse reactions was observed in any dosage schedule. Fever, headache and myalgia, the predominant adverse reactions were mild and similar in both schedules. The mean intensity of the three major specific adverse reactions (fever, headache and myalgia) also did not differ significantly (P>0.05). For the purpose of LF elimination, efficacy in terms of reduction in mean microfilaria load is important. In the 11-14 year age class considerable reduction in the geometric mean density (GMD) was observed by day 90 and 180 post-therapy in both groups (250mg group and 200mg group) compared to pre-therapy level. By day 360 post-therapy, the difference was statistically not significant (P>0.05) (reduction of 72.2% in 250mg and 69.6% reduction in 200mg). The reductions in GMD were statistically significant when compared to pre-therapy levels in both the

  12. Class Schedules Need Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monfette, Ronald J.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that college publications, including class schedules, must be accurate, timely, and easy to read and follow. Describes Schoolcraft College's unified format approach to publications marketing. Offers suggestions on the design, format, and distribution of class schedules. (DMM)

  13. The Coming of age of Low-cost Nanosatellites as Enablers for Constellation-class Space Weather Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpar, D. M.

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the development of satellite-borne space science instrumentation has focused on increased sophistication resulting in a tremendous increase in understanding of microphysical processes in space. These tremendous advancements, however, have been made without sufficient concomitant experimental characterization of the dynamic behavior of the large-scale geospace system. Global theoretical models of the geospace system need distributed measurements for authentication. Thus there is a need to acquire in-situ space weather data at higher spatio-temporal density than currently planned. Nanosatellites (i.e. 1-10 kg spacecraft) have emerged as technically capable carriers for a variety of on-orbit missions. Advances in electronic miniaturization, reductions in power consumption, increased communications capabilities and miniaturized propulsion systems for station-keeping have enabled development of highly capable miniature satellite buses. Led primarily by universities, kg-class satellites have been developed and launched for a variety of purposes. As recently as July 2006, 18 satellites were lost in a launch booster failure in what was billed as the single largest cluster launch of satellites to date. Thirteen of the 14 one kg-class satellites in this cluster launch were designed, developed, and built in university laboratories. They were built at a fraction of the cost of typical satellites. While, in this instance, these 14 satellites had, for the most part, unrelated mission goals it is perfectly reasonable to envision that a launch of several dozen related satellites is technically feasible at a cost much lower than studies based on traditional methods have shown. This paper will review current nanosatellite capabilities and explore the application of constellations of nanosatellies as carriers of relatively unsophisticated space weather instruments where the value lies in the ability to make a network of measurements that provide unprecedented

  14. An agent-based computational model for tuberculosis spreading on age-structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graciani Rodrigues, C. C.; Espíndola, Aquino L.; Penna, T. J. P.

    2015-06-01

    In this work we present an agent-based computational model to study the spreading of the tuberculosis (TB) disease on age-structured populations. The model proposed is a merge of two previous models: an agent-based computational model for the spreading of tuberculosis and a bit-string model for biological aging. The combination of TB with the population aging, reproduces the coexistence of health states, as seen in real populations. In addition, the universal exponential behavior of mortalities curves is still preserved. Finally, the population distribution as function of age shows the prevalence of TB mostly in elders, for high efficacy treatments.

  15. Mathematical Model of Three Age-Structured Transmission Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus

    PubMed Central

    Agusto, Folashade B.; Easley, Shamise; Freeman, Kenneth; Thomas, Madison

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new age-structured deterministic model for the transmission dynamics of chikungunya virus. The model is analyzed to gain insights into the qualitative features of its associated equilibria. Some of the theoretical and epidemiological findings indicate that the stable disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. Furthermore, the model undergoes, in the presence of disease induced mortality, the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where the stable disease-free equilibrium of the model coexists with a stable endemic equilibrium when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. Further analysis of the model indicates that the qualitative dynamics of the model are not altered by the inclusion of age structure. This is further emphasized by the sensitivity analysis results, which shows that the dominant parameters of the model are not altered by the inclusion of age structure. However, the numerical simulations show the flaw of the exclusion of age in the transmission dynamics of chikungunya with regard to control implementations. The exclusion of age structure fails to show the age distribution needed for an effective age based control strategy, leading to a one size fits all blanket control for the entire population. PMID:27190548

  16. Aging Influence on Gray Matter Structural Associations within the Default Mode Network Utilizing Bayesian Network Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Kewei; Zhang, Jiacai; Yao, Li; Li, Ke; Jin, Zhen; Ye, Qing; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2014-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have revealed normal aging-related alterations in functional and structural brain networks such as the default mode network (DMN). However, less is understood about specific brain structural dependencies or interactions between brain regions within the DMN in the normal aging process. In this study, using Bayesian network (BN) modeling, we analyzed gray matter volume data from 109 young and 82 old subjects to characterize the influence of aging on associations between core brain regions within the DMN. Furthermore, we investigated the discriminability of the aging-associated BN models for the young and old groups. Compared to their young counterparts, the old subjects showed significant reductions in connections from right inferior temporal cortex (ITC) to medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), right hippocampus (HP) to right ITC, and mPFC to posterior cingulate cortex and increases in connections from left HP to mPFC and right inferior parietal cortex to right ITC. Moreover, the classification results showed that the aging-related BN models could predict group membership with 88.48% accuracy, 88.07% sensitivity, and 89.02% specificity. Our findings suggest that structural associations within the DMN may be affected by normal aging and provide crucial information about aging effects on brain structural networks.

  17. A novel Multi-Agent Ada-Boost algorithm for predicting protein structural class with the information of protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming; Zheng, Bin; Li, Lihua

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the structural class of a given protein is important for understanding its folding patterns. Although a lot of efforts have been made, it still remains a challenging problem for prediction of protein structural class solely from protein sequences. The feature extraction and classification of proteins are the main problems in prediction. In this research, we extended our earlier work regarding these two aspects. In protein feature extraction, we proposed a scheme by calculating the word frequency and word position from sequences of amino acid, reduced amino acid, and secondary structure. For an accurate classification of the structural class of protein, we developed a novel Multi-Agent Ada-Boost (MA-Ada) method by integrating the features of Multi-Agent system into Ada-Boost algorithm. Extensive experiments were taken to test and compare the proposed method using four benchmark datasets in low homology. The results showed classification accuracies of 88.5%, 96.0%, 88.4%, and 85.5%, respectively, which are much better compared with the existing methods. The source code and dataset are available on request.

  18. Benefits of gregarious feeding by aposematic caterpillars depend on group age structure.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Stuart A; Stastny, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Gregarious feeding is a common feature of herbivorous insects and can range from beneficial (e.g. dilution of predation risk) to costly (e.g. competition). Group age structure should influence these costs and benefits, particularly when old and young larvae differ in their feeding mode or apparency to predators. We investigated the relative value of gregarious feeding by aposematic larvae of Uresiphita reversalis that we observed feeding in groups of mixed ages and variable densities on wild Lupinus diffusus. In a manipulative field experiment, the survivorship and growth of young larvae were enhanced in the presence of older conspecifics, but not in large groups of similarly aged larvae. Estimates of insect damage and induced plant responses suggest that mixed-age groups enhance plant quality for young larvae while avoiding competition. We conclude that benefits of gregariousness in this species are contingent on group age structure, a finding of significance for the ecology and evolution of gregariousness and other social behaviours.

  19. Quota implementation of the maximum sustainable yield for age-structured fisheries.

    PubMed

    Kanik, Zafer; Kucuksenel, Serkan

    2016-06-01

    One of the main goals stated in the proposals for the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) reform was achieving maximum sustainable yield (MSY) for all European fisheries. In this paper, we propose a fishing rights allocation mechanism or management system, which specifies catch limits for individual fishing fleets to implement MSY harvesting conditions in an age-structured bioeconomic model. An age-structured model in a single species fishery with two fleets having perfect or imperfect fishing selectivity is studied. If fishing technology or gear selectivity depends on the relative age composition of the mature fish stock, fixed harvest proportions, derived from catchability and bycatch coefficients, is not valid anymore. As a result, not only the age-structure and fishing technology but also the estimated level of MSY is steering the allocation of quota shares. The results also show that allocation of quota shares based on historical catches or auctioning may not provide viable solutions to achieve MSY.

  20. Observability coefficients for predicting the class of synchronizability from the algebraic structure of the local oscillators.

    PubMed

    Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Boccaletti, Stefano; Letellier, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the conditions under which a collective dynamics emerges in a complex network is still an open problem. A useful approach is the master stability function-and its related classes of synchronization-which offers a necessary condition to assess when a network successfully synchronizes. Observability coefficients, on the other hand, quantify how well the original state space of a system can be observed given only the access to a measured variable. The question is therefore pertinent: Given a generic dynamical system (represented by a state variable x) and given a generic measure on it h(x) (which may be either an observation of an external agent, or an output function through which the units of a network interact), are classes of synchronization and observability actually related to each other? We explicitly address this issue, and show a series of nontrivial relationships for networks of different popular chaotic systems (Rössler, Lorenz, and Hindmarsh-Rose oscillators). Our results suggest that specific dynamical properties can be evoked for explaining the classes of synchronizability.

  1. Observability coefficients for predicting the class of synchronizability from the algebraic structure of the local oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Boccaletti, Stefano; Letellier, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the conditions under which a collective dynamics emerges in a complex network is still an open problem. A useful approach is the master stability function—and its related classes of synchronization—which offers a necessary condition to assess when a network successfully synchronizes. Observability coefficients, on the other hand, quantify how well the original state space of a system can be observed given only the access to a measured variable. The question is therefore pertinent: Given a generic dynamical system (represented by a state variable x) and given a generic measure on it h (x) (which may be either an observation of an external agent, or an output function through which the units of a network interact), are classes of synchronization and observability actually related to each other? We explicitly address this issue, and show a series of nontrivial relationships for networks of different popular chaotic systems (Rössler, Lorenz, and Hindmarsh-Rose oscillators). Our results suggest that specific dynamical properties can be evoked for explaining the classes of synchronizability.

  2. Structure of macrophage colony stimulating factor bound to FMS: Diverse signaling assemblies of class III receptor tyrosine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; He, Xiaolin

    2009-06-12

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), through binding to its receptor FMS, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), regulates the development and function of mononuclear phagocytes, and plays important roles in innate immunity, cancer and inflammation. We report a 2.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of M-CSF bound to the first 3 domains (D1-D3) of FMS. The ligand binding mode of FMS is surprisingly different from KIT, another class III RTK, in which the major ligand-binding domain of FMS, D2, uses the CD and EF loops, but not the {beta}-sheet on the opposite side of the Ig domain as in KIT, to bind ligand. Calorimetric data indicate that M-CSF cannot dimerize FMS without receptor-receptor interactions mediated by FMS domains D4 and D5. Consistently, the structure contains only 1 FMS-D1-D3 molecule bound to a M-CSF dimer, due to a weak, hydrophilic M-CSF:FMS interface, and probably a conformational change of the M-CSF dimer in which binding to the second site is rendered unfavorable by FMS binding at the first site. The partial, intermediate complex suggests that FMS may be activated in two steps, with the initial engagement step distinct from the subsequent dimerization/activation step. Hence, the formation of signaling class III RTK complexes can be diverse, engaging various modes of ligand recognition and various mechanistic steps for dimerizing and activating receptors.

  3. Disk and Envelope Structure in Class 0 Protostars. I. The Resolved Massive Disk in Serpens Firs 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoch, Melissa L.; Corder, Stuartt; Dunham, Michael M.; Duchêne, Gaspard

    2009-12-01

    We present the first results of a program to characterize the disk and envelope structure of typical Class 0 protostars in nearby low-mass star-forming regions. We use Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) mid-infrared spectra, high-resolution Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) 230 GHz continuum imaging, and two-dimensional radiative transfer models to constrain the envelope structure, as well as the size and mass of the circumprotostellar disk in Serpens FIRS 1. The primary envelope parameters (centrifugal radius, outer radius, outflow opening angle, and inclination) are well constrained by the spectral energy distribution (SED), including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, IRS spectra, and 1.1 mm Bolocam photometry. These together with the excellent uv-coverage (4.5-500 kλ) of multiple antenna configurations with CARMA allow for a robust separation of the envelope and a resolved disk. The SED of Serpens FIRS 1 is best fit by an envelope with the density profile of a rotating, collapsing spheroid with an inner (centrifugal) radius of approximately 600 AU, and the millimeter data by a large resolved disk with Mdisk ~ 1.0 M sun and Rdisk ~ 300 AU. These results suggest that large, massive disks can be present early in the main accretion phase. Results for the larger, unbiased sample of Class 0 sources in the Perseus, Serpens, and Ophiuchus molecular clouds are needed to determine if relatively massive disks are typical in the Class 0 stage.

  4. Age-structured mark-recapture analysis: A virtual-population-analysis-based model for analyzing age-structured capture-recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coggins, L.G.; Pine, William E.; Walters, C.J.; Martell, S.J.D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new model to estimate capture probabilities, survival, abundance, and recruitment using traditional Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methods within a standard fisheries virtual population analysis framework. This approach compares the numbers of marked and unmarked fish at age captured in each year of sampling with predictions based on estimated vulnerabilities and abundance in a likelihood function. Recruitment to the earliest age at which fish can be tagged is estimated by using a virtual population analysis method to back-calculate the expected numbers of unmarked fish at risk of capture. By using information from both marked and unmarked animals in a standard fisheries age structure framework, this approach is well suited to the sparse data situations common in long-term capture-recapture programs with variable sampling effort. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  5. Structural Validity of the Movement ABC-2 Test: Factor Structure Comparisons across Three Age Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Joerg; Henderson, Sheila E.; Sugden, David A.; Barnett, Anna L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Movement ABC test is one of the most widely used assessments in the field of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). Improvements to the 2nd edition of the test (M-ABC-2) include an extension of the age range and reduction in the number of age bands as well as revision of tasks. The total test score provides a measure of motor…

  6. Structural Validity of the Professional Development Profile of the LoTi Digital-Age Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Vandhana; Hull, Darrell M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was used to examine the structural construct validity of the Professional Development Profile of the LoTi Digital-Age Survey, a measure of teacher instructional practices with technology in the classroom. Teacher responses ("N" = 2,840) from across the United States were used to assess factor structure of the instrument…

  7. Protection of rubbers against aging with the use of structural, diffusion and kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kablov, V. F.; Zaikov, G. E.

    2014-05-15

    Processes of rubber aging in the different kinetic modes and mathematical models of the processes including aging and destruction processes under extreme conditions have been studied. The aging process for rubbers as thermodynamically open nonlinear systems has also been considered in the paper. It has been revealed that the aging process can be controlled by the internal physical-chemical processes organization and by creation of external influences (by organization of thermodynamic forces and flows). According to the Onsager principle, in certain conditions of aging the conjugation of thermodynamic forces and flows is possible. The diffusion and structural aspects of aging in elastomeric rubbers and articles thereof have been considered. The composite antiaging systems of prolonged action based on the use of microparticles with a saturated solution of the antiagers migrating into an elastomeric matrix at the exploitation have been proposed.

  8. Laws of Influence of Structural Characteristics on the Strength and Crack Resistance of Aging Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizhnik, S. B.; Usikova, G. I.

    2005-01-01

    The structural characteristics (the volume fraction, size, and shape of and the distance among hardening-phase particles) of aging alloys and steels, which define the behavior of the critical stress intensity factor during thermal hardening, are determined using the structural-mechanical approach we have developed. It is experimentally demonstrated for maraging steels that our approach is capable of proving the correlations of strength, plasticity, and crack- resistance with the structural characteristics, which were varied by changing the chemical composition of steel and thermokinetic aging conditions

  9. Test series 1: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Gould NCX-2250 battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J. S.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D A; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

    1984-09-01

    The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged, nuclear station, safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds; and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the end-of-life of a battery, given a seismic event. This report covers the first test series of an extensive program using 12-year old, lead-calcium, Gould NCX-2250 cells, from the James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Station operated by the New York Power Authority. Seismic tests with three cell configurations were performed using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, rigidly mounted; multi-cell (three) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack; and single-cell tests specifically aimed towards examining propagation of pre-existing case cracks. In general the test philosophy was to monitor the electrical properties including discharge capacity of cells through a graduated series of g-level step increases until either the shake-table limits were reached or until electrical failure of the cells occurred. Of nine electrically active cells, six failed during seismic testing over a range of imposed g-level loads in excess of a 1-g ZPA. Post-test examination revealed a common failure mode, the cracking at the abnormally brittle, positive lead bus-bar/post interface; further examination showed that the failure zone was extremely coarse grained and extensively corroded. Presently accepted accelerated-aging methods for qualifying batteries, per IEEE Std. 535-1979, are based on plate growth, but these naturally-aged 12-year old cells showed no significant plate growth.

  10. Structure-Based Design of a Novel Series of Potent, Selective Inhibitors of the Class I Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Adrian L.; D’Angelo, Noel D.; Bo, Yunxin Y.; Booker, Shon K.; Cee, Victor J.; Herberich, Brad; Hong, Fang-Tsao; Jackson, Claire L.M.; Lanman, Brian A.; Liu, Longbin; Nishimura, Nobuko; Pettus, Liping H.; Reed, Anthony B.; Tadesse, Seifu; Tamayo, Nuria A.; Wurz, Ryan P.; Yang, Kevin; Andrews, Kristin L.; Whittington, Douglas A.; McCarter, John D.; Miguel, Tisha San; Zalameda, Leeanne; Jiang, Jian; Subramanian, Raju; Mullady, Erin L.; Caenepeel, Sean; Freeman, Daniel J.; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Nancy; Wu, Tian; Hughes, Paul E.; Norman, Mark H.

    2012-09-17

    A highly selective series of inhibitors of the class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) has been designed and synthesized. Starting from the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor 5, a structure-based approach was used to improve potency and selectivity, resulting in the identification of 54 as a potent inhibitor of the class I PI3Ks with excellent selectivity over mTOR, related phosphatidylinositol kinases, and a broad panel of protein kinases. Compound 54 demonstrated a robust PD-PK relationship inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway in vivo in a mouse model, and it potently inhibited tumor growth in a U-87 MG xenograft model with an activated PI3K/Akt pathway.

  11. Class-specific regulation of anti-DNA antibody synthesis and the age-associated changes in (NZB x NZW)F1 hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Sekigawa, I; Okada, T; Noguchi, K; Ueda, G; Hirose, S; Sato, H; Shirai, T

    1987-05-01

    Investigations of regulatory helper and suppressor T cells in the in vitro anti-DNA antibody synthesis in NZB x NZW (B/W) F1 hybrid mice were initiated by the development of an in vitro system in which G10-passed B cells from B/W F1 mice were cocultured with mitomycin C-treated T cells in the presence of Con A and either in the presence or in the absence of LPS. It was revealed that each IgG and IgM anti-DNA antibody synthesis was under the regulation of separate L3T4+ helper and Ly-2+ suppressor T cells. The function of these class-specific regulatory T cells was age-dependent. Although the helper effect of L3T4+ T cells on IgG antibody synthesis increased, the effect of L3T4+ T cells on IgM antibody production decreased in B/W F1 mice with aging. The IgG anti-DNA antibody production in the cocultures of L3T4+ T cells and B cells was suppressed by addition of Ly-2+ T cells from young but not aged B/W F1 mice, whereas the production of IgM anti-DNA antibodies was suppressed by Ly-2+ T cells from aged but not young B/W F1 mice. We also found that although IgM anti-DNA antibody-producing B cells were already present in 2-mo-old mice, B cells producing IgG antibodies under the influence of L3T4+ T cells appeared in mice at 7 mo of age. These data clearly indicate that separate class-specific regulatory T cells are involved in the production of IgM and IgG anti-DNA antibodies and that the total serum level of the antibodies is reflected by both their age-associated changes and the generation of antibody-forming B cells in B/W F1 mice.

  12. Extended Aging Theories for Predictions of Safe Operational Life of Critical Airborne Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Chen, Tony

    2006-01-01

    The previously developed Ko closed-form aging theory has been reformulated into a more compact mathematical form for easier application. A new equivalent loading theory and empirical loading theories have also been developed and incorporated into the revised Ko aging theory for the prediction of a safe operational life of airborne failure-critical structural components. The new set of aging and loading theories were applied to predict the safe number of flights for the B-52B aircraft to carry a launch vehicle, the structural life of critical components consumed by load excursion to proof load value, and the ground-sitting life of B-52B pylon failure-critical structural components. A special life prediction method was developed for the preflight predictions of operational life of failure-critical structural components of the B-52H pylon system, for which no flight data are available.

  13. Social class and workplace harassment during the transition to adulthood.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Heather; Uggen, Christopher; Blackstone, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Young disadvantaged workers are especially vulnerable to harassment due to their age and social class position. As young people enter the workforce, their experiences of, and reactions to, harassment may vary dramatically from those of older adult workers. Three case studies introduce theory and research on the relationship between social class and harassment of young workers. We suggest two mechanisms through which class may structure harassment experiences: (1) extremely vulnerable youth are directly targeted based on their social class origins, and (2) the type and condition of youth employment, which is structured by class background, indirectly affect experiences of harassment.

  14. Relations between Classroom Goal Structures and Students' Goal Orientations in Mathematics Classes: When Is a Mastery Goal Structure Adaptive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaalvik, Einar M.; Federici, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test possible interactions between mastery and performance goal structures in mathematics classrooms when predicting students' goal orientations. More specifically, we tested if the degree of performance goal structure moderated the associations between mastery goal structure and students' goal orientations.…

  15. Crystal structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin I (SEI) in complex with a human major histocompatibility complex class II molecule.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Marisa M; Guan, Rongjin; Swaminathan, Chittoor P; Malchiodi, Emilio L; Mariuzza, Roy A

    2006-09-01

    Superantigens are bacterial or viral proteins that elicit massive T cell activation through simultaneous binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and T cell receptors. This activation results in uncontrolled release of inflammatory cytokines, causing toxic shock. A remarkable property of superantigens, which distinguishes them from T cell receptors, is their ability to interact with multiple MHC class II alleles independently of MHC-bound peptide. Previous crystallographic studies have shown that staphylococcal and streptococcal superantigens belonging to the zinc family bind to a high affinity site on the class II beta-chain. However, the basis for promiscuous MHC recognition by zinc-dependent superantigens is not obvious, because the beta-chain is polymorphic and the MHC-bound peptide forms part of the binding interface. To understand how zinc-dependent superantigens recognize MHC, we determined the crystal structure, at 2.0 A resolution, of staphylococcal enterotoxin I bound to the human class II molecule HLA-DR1 bearing a peptide from influenza hemagglutinin. Interactions between the superantigen and DR1 beta-chain are mediated by a zinc ion, and 22% of the buried surface of peptide.MHC is contributed by the peptide. Comparison of the staphylococcal enterotoxin I.peptide.DR1 structure with ones determined previously revealed that zinc-dependent superantigens achieve promiscuous binding to MHC by targeting conservatively substituted residues of the polymorphic beta-chain. Additionally, these superantigens circumvent peptide specificity by engaging MHC-bound peptides at their conformationally conserved N-terminal regions while minimizing sequence-specific interactions with peptide residues to enhance cross-reactivity.

  16. Precision of hard structures used to estimate age of mountain Whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, Carson J.; Ross, Tyler J.; Hardy, Ryan S.; Quist, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) is a widely distributed salmonid in western North America that has decreased in abundance over portions of its distribution due to anthropogenic disturbances. In this investigation, we examined precision of age estimates derived from scales, pectoral fin rays, and sagittal otoliths from 167 mountain whitefish. Otoliths and pectoral fin rays were mounted in epoxy and cross-sectioned before examination. Scales were pressed onto acetate slides and resulting impressions were examined. Between-reader precision (i.e., between 2 readers), between-reader variability, and reader confidence ratings were compared among hard structures. Coefficient of variation (CV) in age estimates was lowest and percentage of exact agreement (PA-0) was highest for scales (CV = 5.9; PA-0 = 70%) compared to pectoral fin rays (CV =11.0; PA-0 = 58%) and otoliths (CV = 12.3; PA-0 = 55%). Median confidence ratings were significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) among all structures, with scales having the highest median confidence. Reader confidence decreased with fish age for scales and pectoral fin rays, but reader confidence increased with fish age for otoliths. In general, age estimates were more precise and reader confidence was higher for scales compared to pectoral fin rays and otoliths. This research will help fisheries biologists in selecting the most appropriate hard structure to use for future age and growth studies on mountain whitefish. In turn, selection of the most precise hard structure will lead to better estimates of dynamic rate functions.

  17. Structure and Evolution of Kuiper Belt Objects: The Case for Compositional Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Prialnik, D.; Stern, S. A.

    2007-10-01

    Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) accreted from a mélange of ices, carbonaceous matter, and rock of mixed interstellar and solar nebular provenance. The transneptunian region, where this accretion took place, was likely more radially compact than today. This and the influence of gas drag during the solar nebula epoch argue for more rapid KBO accretion than usually considered. Early evolution of KBOs was largely the result of radiogenic heating, with both short-term and long-term contributions being potentially important. Depending on rock content and porous conductivity, KBO interiors may have reached relatively high temperatures. Models suggest that KBOs likely lost very volatile ices during early evolution, whereas less volatile ices should be retained in cold, less altered subsurface layers; initially amorphous ice may have crystallized in the interior as well, releasing trapped volatiles. Generally, KBOs should be stratified in terms of composition and porosity, albeit subject to impact disruption and collisional stripping. KBOs are thus unlikely to be "the most pristine objects in the Solar System.” Large (dwarf planet) KBOs may be fully differentiated. KBO surface color and compositional classes are usually discussed in terms of "nature vs. nurture,” i.e., a generic primordial composition vs. surface processing, but the true nature of KBOs also depends on how they have evolved. The broad range of albedos now found in the Kuiper belt, deep water-ice absorptions on some objects, evidence for differentiation of Pluto and 2003 EL61, and a range of densities incompatible with a single, primordial composition and variable porosity strongly imply significant, intrinsic compositional differences among KBOs. The interplay of formation zone (accretion rate), body size, and dynamical (collisional) history may yield KBO compositional classes (and their spectral correlates) that recall the different classes of asteroids in the inner Solar System, but whose members are

  18. Guilds and middle-class welfare, 1550–1800: provisions for burial, sickness, old age, and widowhood.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, Marco H D

    2012-01-01

    Guilds provided for masters' and journeymen's burial, sickness, old age, and widowhood. Guild welfare was of importance to artisans, to the functioning of guilds, to the myriad of urban social relations, and to the political economy. However, it is an understated and neglected aspect of guild activities. This article looks at welfare provision by guilds, with the aim of addressing four questions. Firstly, for which risks did guild welfare arrangements exist in the Netherlands between 1550 and 1800, and what were the coverage, contributions, benefit levels, and conditions? Secondly, can guild welfare arrangements be regarded as insurance? Thirdly, to what extent and how did guilds overcome classic insurance problems such as adverse selection, moral hazards, and correlated risks? Finally, what was the position of guild provision in the Dutch political economy and vis-à-vis poor relief?

  19. Test Series 2: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Exide FHC-19 battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D. A.; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

    1985-03-01

    The seismic-fragility of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and their thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the ''end-of-life'' of a battery if subjected to a seismic event. This report, the second in a test series of an extensive seismic research program, covers the testing of 10-year old lead-calcium Exide FHC-19 cells from the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station operated by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. The Exide cells were tested in two configurations using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, both rigidly and loosely mounted; and multicell (three-cell) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack. A total of six electrically active cells was used in the two different cell configurations.

  20. Residue network in protein native structure belongs to the universality class of a three-dimensional critical percolation cluster.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2009-02-01

    Single protein molecules are regarded as contact networks of amino-acid residues. Relationships between the shortest path lengths and the numbers of residues within single molecules in the native structures are examined for various sized proteins. A universal scaling among proteins is obtained, which shows that the residue networks are fractal networks. This universal fractal network is characterized with three kinds of dimensions: the network topological dimension D{c} approximately 1.9 , the fractal dimension D{f} approximately 2.5 , and the spectral dimension D{s} approximately 1.3 . These values are in surprisingly good coincidence with those of the three-dimensional critical percolation cluster. Hence the residue contact networks in the protein native structures belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional percolation cluster. The criticality is relevant to the ambivalence in the protein native structures, the coexistence of stability and instability, both of which are necessary for protein functions.

  1. Residue network in protein native structure belongs to the universality class of a three-dimensional critical percolation cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2009-02-01

    Single protein molecules are regarded as contact networks of amino-acid residues. Relationships between the shortest path lengths and the numbers of residues within single molecules in the native structures are examined for various sized proteins. A universal scaling among proteins is obtained, which shows that the residue networks are fractal networks. This universal fractal network is characterized with three kinds of dimensions: the network topological dimension Dc≈1.9 , the fractal dimension Df≈2.5 , and the spectral dimension Ds≈1.3 . These values are in surprisingly good coincidence with those of the three-dimensional critical percolation cluster. Hence the residue contact networks in the protein native structures belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional percolation cluster. The criticality is relevant to the ambivalence in the protein native structures, the coexistence of stability and instability, both of which are necessary for protein functions.

  2. Supersymmetric gauge theory on a class of cocalibrated G2-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-06-01

    Given a seven-dimensional cocalibrated G2-structure that satisfies an additional trace condition, we construct a supersymmetric Yang-Mills-Lagrangian on it, with the supersymmetry parameters being a distinguished generalized Killing spinor of the G2-structure. The construction is based on a reinterpretation of certain generalized Killing spinors as parallel spinors in an ambient space. The results generalize previous attempts for flat G2-structures and those admitting geometric Killing spinors.

  3. Molecular structure of unsubstituted oxadiazolic analog of ortho-POPOP and peculiarities of conformational structure of this class of sterically hindered organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshenko, A. O.; Baumer, V. N.; Verezubova, A. A.; Ptyagina, L. M.

    2002-05-01

    X-ray molecular structure of unsubstituted oxadiazolic ortho-analog of 1,4-bis-(5-phenyl-oxazolyl-2)-benzene (POPOP), synthesized via the 2,5-diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole ortho-carbonic acid was revealed. Its conformation was found to be the same as for the compound obtained earlier from the 2,5-diphenyl-oxazole ortho-carbonic acid. Quantum-chemical modeling was conducted to understand the peculiarities of conformational structure of the investigated class of sterically hindered compounds.

  4. Structure-Based Design of Potent and Ligand-Efficient Inhibitors of CTX-M Class A [beta]-Lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Derek A.; Jaishankar, Priyadarshini; Larson, Wayne; Smith, Emmanuel; Liu, Guoqing; Beyrouthy, Racha; Bonnet, Richard; Renslo, Adam R.; Chen, Yu

    2012-07-11

    The emergence of CTX-M class A extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamases poses a serious health threat to the public. We have applied structure-based design to improve the potency of a novel noncovalent tetrazole-containing CTX-M inhibitor (K{sub i} = 21 {mu}M) more than 200-fold via structural modifications targeting two binding hot spots, a hydrophobic shelf formed by Pro167 and a polar site anchored by Asp240. Functional groups contacting each binding hot spot independently in initial designs were later combined to produce analogues with submicromolar potencies, including 6-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzoimidazole-4-carboxylic acid [3-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)-phenyl]-amide, which had a K{sub i} value of 89 nM and reduced the MIC of cefotaxime by 64-fold in CTX-M-9 expressing Escherichia coli. The in vitro potency gains were accompanied by improvements in ligand efficiency (from 0.30 to 0.39) and LipE (from 1.37 to 3.86). These new analogues represent the first nM-affinity noncovalent inhibitors of a class A {beta}-lactamase. Their complex crystal structures provide valuable information about ligand binding for future inhibitor design.

  5. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging.

    PubMed

    Cornils, Astrid; Maurya, Ashish K; Tereshko, Lauren; Kennedy, Julie; Brear, Andrea G; Prahlad, Veena; Blacque, Oliver E; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-12-01

    The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies.

  6. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Julie; Brear, Andrea G.; Prahlad, Veena; Blacque, Oliver E.; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies. PMID:27906968

  7. Selective enamel etching: effect on marginal adaptation of self-etch LED-cured bond systems in aged Class I composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, E J; Prieto, L T; Araújo, C T P; Paulillo, L A M S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of previous enamel etch and light emitting diode (LED) curing on gap formation of self-etch adhesive systems in Class I composite restorations after thermomechanical aging (TMA). Thus, on 192 human molars, a box-shaped Class I cavity was prepared maintaining enamel margins. Self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE and Clearfil S3) were used to restore the preparation with a microhybrid composite. Before application of the adhesives, half of the teeth were enamel etched for 15 seconds with 37% phosphoric acid; the other half were not etched. For the photoactivation of the adhesives and composite, three light-curing units (LCUs) were used: one polywave (Ultra-Lume LED 5, UL) and two single-peak (FlashLite 1401, FL and Radii-cal, RD) LEDs. After this, epoxy resin replicas of the occlusal surface were made, and the specimens were submitted to TMA. New replicas were made from the aged specimens for marginal adaptation analysis by scanning electron microscopy. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests (α=0.05). Before TMA, when enamel was etched before the application of S3, no gap formation was observed; however, there were gaps at the interface for the other tested conditions, with a statistical difference (p≤0.05). After TMA, the selective enamel etching previous to the S3 application, regardless of the LCU, promoted higher marginal adaptation compared to the other tested groups (p≤0.05). Prior to TMA, higher marginal integrity was observed, in comparison with specimens after TMA (p≤0.05). With regard to Clearfil SE and Clearfil Tri-S cured with FL, no differences of gap formation were found between before and after aging (5.3 ± 3.8 and 7.4 ± 7.5, respectively), especially when the Clearfil Tri-S was used in the conventional protocol. When cured with RD or UL and not etched, Clearfil Tri-S presented the higher gap formation. In conclusion, additional enamel etching promoted better marginal integrity

  8. Aging Theories for Establishing Safe Life Spans of Airborne Critical Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2003-01-01

    New aging theories have been developed to establish the safe life span of airborne critical structural components such as B-52B aircraft pylon hooks for carrying air-launch drop-test vehicles. The new aging theories use the equivalent-constant-amplitude loading spectrum to represent the actual random loading spectrum with the same damaging effect. The crack growth due to random loading cycling of the first flight is calculated using the half-cycle theory, and then extrapolated to all the crack growths of the subsequent flights. The predictions of the new aging theories (finite difference aging theory and closed-form aging theory) are compared with the classical flight-test life theory and the previously developed Ko first- and Ko second-order aging theories. The new aging theories predict the number of safe flights as considerably lower than that predicted by the classical aging theory, and slightly lower than those predicted by the Ko first- and Ko second-order aging theories due to the inclusion of all the higher order terms.

  9. Structure of a class II preQ1 riboswitch reveals ligand recognition by a new fold.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Salim, Mohammad; Krucinska, Jolanta; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2013-06-01

    PreQ1 riboswitches regulate genes by binding the pyrrolopyrimidine intermediate preQ1 during the biosynthesis of the essential tRNA base queuosine. We report what is to our knowledge the first preQ1-II riboswitch structure at 2.3-Å resolution, which uses a previously uncharacterized fold to achieve effector recognition at the confluence of a three-way helical junction flanking a pseudoknotted ribosome-binding site. The results account for translational control mediated by the preQ1-II riboswitch class and expand the known repertoire of ligand-binding modes used by regulatory RNAs.

  10. Narrowband DWDM filters based on Fibonacci-class quasi-periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Golmohammadi, S; Moravvej-Farshi, M K; Rostami, A; Zarifkar, A

    2007-08-20

    In this paper, we propose a narrowband DWDM filter structure, whose reflection band characteristics, meets the ITU-T standard. The proposed filter structure is based on Fibonacci quasi-periodic structures composed of multilayers with large index differences. Studying the effects of the optical and geometrical parameters of Fibonacci quasi-periodic structures on its filtering properties, we have realized that to achieve the ITU-T standard, we need to cascade two successive structures both with the same generation numbers j=4 and orders n=25 and apodized refractive indices. The apodization process helps to minimize the stop band sidelobes. We have also demonstrated that beside Fibonacci's order, n, the layers dimensions, and their refractive index ratios are the main design parameters.

  11. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans.

  12. The age and genesis of the structures in the Amerasian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verzhbitsky, E. V.; Lobkovsky, L. I.; Kononov, M. V.; Byakov, A. F.

    2012-11-01

    An insufficient number of dated native samples and indistinct magnetic anomalies in the Amerasian Basin prevent geophysicists from identifying the exact age of most of its structural elements. Due to this, it is impossible to gain an insight into the evolution of this vast region, which is highly promising in terms of its hydrocarbon potential. Therefore, the geological time of the formation of the structural elements composing the Amerasian Basin is determined either hypothetically or very loosely (for example, Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic). In order to more precisely estimate the time of formation of the structural elements within the Amerasian Basin, we applied the geothermal method, which is highly informative in terms of the age of the lithosphere, its thickness, and the evolution of the basin structures. Besides, this method provides far narrower time constraints for the formation of the structures compared to the geological data. Based on the thermal flow data, we have numerically calculated the age of the structural elements composing the Amerasian Basin: Podvodnikov Basin (97-79 Ma), Makarov Basin (75-61 Ma), Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge (97-79 Ma), and Lomonosov Ridge (69-57 Ma). The age of these structures derived from the geothermal data agrees with the estimates determined from the geological, geomagnetic, seismic, and radiometric data. Based on the age of the structures estimated from the thermal flow data and the analysis of the geological and geophysical evidence, conclusions are made concerning the genesis and character of formation of the Podvodnikov and Makarov basins and the Alpha-Mendeleev and Lomonosov ridges within the Amerasian Basin.

  13. The end of the line: The relationship between New York City's subway system and residential class structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhindress, Mindy

    Public money is necessary to build and maintain this country's vast network of mass transit systems and highways. Thus you would expect class equity in choices of infrastructure location, types of projects and pricing. However, the influence of commercial interests appears to create a contradictory effect, and may negatively influence the settlement patterns where transit serves. New York City and its subway system offered the perfect case study by which to examine the before and after effects of mass transit introduction given the enormous size of the transit system and the grand development of New York City that appeared to occur simultaneous to subway inauguration. The main objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the growth of the New York City subway system and the establishment of class structure in residential patterns. Regional census data covering the first 16-year period of the subway's development was examined along with geographic statistics on subway line expansion and station openings. GIS (Geographic Information Systems) maps were used to illustrate the development of living spaces as a function of subway introduction into communities, and several Indices were computed to demonstrate the population growth and class disparity. The results revealed that the early years of transit development were entrepreneurial efforts coordinated by business interests. This led to transit first providing significant benefits mostly to the middle and upper classes, giving them a reasonable means by which to escape horrible tenement living conditions while turning a profit at the same time. Thus new settlements were stratified by class almost immediately after introduction. The cycle continued until years later when the automobile was introduced and the once expensive and luxurious, but now more reasonably priced and just functional, public transit system finally befit the population much lower on the socioeconomic scale. Class divisions still

  14. Factorial Structure and Age-Related Psychometrics of the MIDUS Personality Adjective Items across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Zimprich, Daniel; Allemand, Mathias; Lachman, Margie E.

    2014-01-01

    The present study addresses issues of measurement invariance and comparability of factor parameters of Big Five personality adjective items across age. Data from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) survey were used to investigate age-related developmental psychometrics of the MIDUS personality adjective items in two large cross-sectional samples (exploratory sample: N = 862; analysis sample: N = 3,000). After having established and replicated a comprehensive five-factor structure of the measure, increasing levels of measurement invariance were tested across ten age groups. Results indicate that the measure demonstrates strict measurement invariance in terms of number of factors and factor loadings. Also, we found that factor variances and covariances were equal across age groups. By contrast, a number of age-related factor mean differences emerged. The practical implications of these results are discussed and future research is suggested. PMID:21910548

  15. Ageing increases reliance on sensorimotor prediction through structural and functional differences in frontostriatal circuits.

    PubMed

    Wolpe, Noham; Ingram, James N; Tsvetanov, Kamen A; Geerligs, Linda; Kievit, Rogier A; Henson, Richard N; Wolpert, Daniel M; Rowe, James B

    2016-10-03

    The control of voluntary movement changes markedly with age. A critical component of motor control is the integration of sensory information with predictions of the consequences of action, arising from internal models of movement. This leads to sensorimotor attenuation-a reduction in the perceived intensity of sensations from self-generated compared with external actions. Here we show that sensorimotor attenuation occurs in 98% of adults in a population-based cohort (n=325; 18-88 years; the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience). Importantly, attenuation increases with age, in proportion to reduced sensory sensitivity. This effect is associated with differences in the structure and functional connectivity of the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. The results suggest that ageing alters the balance between the sensorium and predictive models, mediated by the pre-SMA and its connectivity in frontostriatal circuits. This shift may contribute to the motor and cognitive changes observed with age.

  16. Relationship of decrease in fecundity with advancing age to structural changes in mouse endometrium

    PubMed Central

    SHIMIZU, KIYOSHI; YAMADA, JINZO

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between decrease in fecundity and structural changes in the antimesometrial endometrium of the mouse. Fecundity was calculated as the number of animals showing a placental sign/number of copulated animals ×100 (%). Structural changes in the endometrium were examined by electron microscopy. A negative correlation between age and fecundity was found. Fecundity was 50% at 7 mo of age. At this age, amorphous material appeared in the region between the basement membrane deep to the luminal epithelium and the subepithelial cells. This material was sometimes attached to the basement membrane. It increased in amount with advancing age, as fecundity decreased. The structure of the uterine luminal epithelial cells did not alter with age. The results indicated that decrease in fecundity with advancing age is correlated with the appearance of amorphous material beneath the basal lamina of the endometrial epithelium. It is suggested that this could impair communication between the luminal epithelium and the endometrial stroma, which plays an important role in implantation. PMID:10697293

  17. The leverage of demographic dynamics on carbon dioxide emissions: does age structure matter?

    PubMed

    Zagheni, Emilio

    2011-02-01

    This article provides a methodological contribution to the study of the effect of changes in population age structure on carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions. First, I propose a generalization of the IPAT equation to a multisector economy with an age-structured population and discuss the insights that can be obtained in the context of stable population theory. Second, I suggest a statistical model of household consumption as a function of household size and age structure to quantitatively evaluate the extent of economies of scale in consumption of energy-intensive goods, and to estimate age-specific profiles of consumption of energy-intensive goods and of CO(2) emissions. Third, I offer an illustration of the methodologies using data for the United States. The analysis shows that per-capita CO(2) emissions increase with age until the individual is in his or her 60s, and then emissions tend to decrease. Holding everything else constant, the expected change in U.S. population age distribution during the next four decades is likely to have a small, but noticeable, positive impact on CO(2) emissions.

  18. Age, growth and population structure of invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) in northeast Florida using a length-based, age-structured population model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The effective management of invasive species requires detailed understanding of the invader’s life history. This information is essential for modeling population growth and predicting rates of expansion, quantifying ecological impacts and assessing the efficacy of removal and control strategies. Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) have rapidly invaded the western Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea with documented negative impacts on native ecosystems. To better understand the life history of this species, we developed and validated a length-based, age-structured model to investigate age, growth and population structure in northeast Florida. The main findings of this study were: (1) lionfish exhibited rapid growth with seasonal variation in growth rates; (2) distinct cohorts were clearly identifiable in the length-frequency data, suggesting that lionfish are recruiting during a relatively short period in summer; and (3) the majority of lionfish were less than two years old with no lionfish older than three years of age, which may be the result of culling efforts as well as ontogenetic habitat shifts to deeper water. PMID:27920953

  19. Age, growth and population structure of invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) in northeast Florida using a length-based, age-structured population model.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric G; Swenarton, Mary Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The effective management of invasive species requires detailed understanding of the invader's life history. This information is essential for modeling population growth and predicting rates of expansion, quantifying ecological impacts and assessing the efficacy of removal and control strategies. Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) have rapidly invaded the western Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea with documented negative impacts on native ecosystems. To better understand the life history of this species, we developed and validated a length-based, age-structured model to investigate age, growth and population structure in northeast Florida. The main findings of this study were: (1) lionfish exhibited rapid growth with seasonal variation in growth rates; (2) distinct cohorts were clearly identifiable in the length-frequency data, suggesting that lionfish are recruiting during a relatively short period in summer; and (3) the majority of lionfish were less than two years old with no lionfish older than three years of age, which may be the result of culling efforts as well as ontogenetic habitat shifts to deeper water.

  20. The relationship between health expenditures and the age structure of the population in OECD countries.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, J M

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse national health expenditures of OECD countries relative to their age structures. Using econometric techniques designed to analyse cross-sectional time series data, the ageing of the population was found to affect health spending in several countries while having no effect in others. In addition, the effect of income on health spending was lower than that generally reported in the literature. These findings suggest that unobserved country-specific factors play a major role in determining the amount of resources allocated to health services in a country. Such factors also determine if the ageing of the population with increased health spending.

  1. Size class structure, growth rates, and orientation of the central Andean cushion Azorella compacta

    PubMed Central

    Trenary, Tim; Graham, Eric A.; Stenzel, William; Rundel, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    Azorella compacta (llareta; Apiaceae) forms dense, woody, cushions and characterizes the high elevation rocky slopes of the central Andean Altiplano. Field studies of an elevational gradient of A. compacta within Lauca National Park in northern Chile found a reverse J-shape distribution of size classes of individuals with abundant small plants at all elevations. A new elevational limit for A. compacta was established at 5,250 m. A series of cushions marked 14 years earlier showed either slight shrinkage or small degrees of growth up to 2.2 cm yr−1. Despite their irregularity in growth, cushions of A. compacta show a strong orientation, centered on a north-facing aspect and angle of about 20° from horizontal. This exposure to maximize solar irradiance closely matches previous observations of a population favoring north-facing slopes at a similar angle. Populations of A. compacta appear to be stable, or even expanding, with young plants abundant. PMID:25802811

  2. Size class structure, growth rates, and orientation of the central Andean cushion Azorella compacta.

    PubMed

    Kleier, Catherine; Trenary, Tim; Graham, Eric A; Stenzel, William; Rundel, Philip W

    2015-01-01

    Azorella compacta (llareta; Apiaceae) forms dense, woody, cushions and characterizes the high elevation rocky slopes of the central Andean Altiplano. Field studies of an elevational gradient of A. compacta within Lauca National Park in northern Chile found a reverse J-shape distribution of size classes of individuals with abundant small plants at all elevations. A new elevational limit for A. compacta was established at 5,250 m. A series of cushions marked 14 years earlier showed either slight shrinkage or small degrees of growth up to 2.2 cm yr(-1). Despite their irregularity in growth, cushions of A. compacta show a strong orientation, centered on a north-facing aspect and angle of about 20° from horizontal. This exposure to maximize solar irradiance closely matches previous observations of a population favoring north-facing slopes at a similar angle. Populations of A. compacta appear to be stable, or even expanding, with young plants abundant.

  3. Subunit structure of a class A aspartate transcarbamoylase from Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, S T; Evans, D R

    1993-01-01

    The class A aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase, EC 2.1.3.2) from Pseudomonas fluorescens was purified to homogeneity with retention of full catalytic and regulatory functions. Careful determinations under conditions that minimized proteolysis showed that the molecule is a 1:1 stoichiometric complex of two polypeptide chains of 34 and 45 kDa. Pyridoxal phosphate is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme (Ki = 1 microM). Reduction of the pyridoxal phosphate enzyme adduct with sodium boro[3H]hydride showed that the active site is located on the 34-kDa polypeptide. Affinity labeling with 5'-[p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl]adenosine, an ATP analog, suggested that the regulatory site is also located on the 34-kDa species. While the function of the 45-kDa subunit is unknown, neither carbamoyl phosphate synthetase nor dihydroorotase activities are associated with the ATCase. The molecular mass of the enzyme was determined by gel filtration, sedimentation velocity, and electron microscopy to be 464 kDa. Thus the enzyme is composed of six copies of the 34-kDa polypeptide and six copies of the 45-kDa polypeptide. The molecule has a Stokes' ratio of 70.9 A and a frictional ratio of 1.37, suggesting a compact globular shape. We propose that the P. fluorescens ATCase is composed of two trimers of 34-kDa catalytic chains and is likely to be a D3 dodecamer with an arrangement of subunits analogous to that of the class B ATCase molecules. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8234318

  4. Digital sleep logs reveal potential impacts of modern temporal structure on class performance in different chronotypes.

    PubMed

    Smarr, Benjamin Lee

    2015-02-01

    Stability of sleep and circadian rhythms are important for healthy learning and memory. While experimental manipulations of lifestyle and learning outcomes present major obstacles, the ongoing increase in data sources allows retrospective data mining of people's sleep timing variation. Here I use digital sleep-log data generated by 1109 students in a biology lab course at the University of Washington to test the hypothesis that higher variance in time asleep and later sleep-onset times negatively correlate with class performance, used here as a real-world proxy for learning and memory. I find that sleep duration variance and mean sleep-onset times both significantly correlate with class performance. These correlations are powerful on weeknights but undetectable on Friday and Saturday nights ("free nights"). Finally, although these data come with no demographic information beyond sex, the constructed demographic groups of "larks" and "owls" within the sexes reveal a significant decrease in performance of owls relative to larks in male students, whereas the correlation of performance with sleep-onset time for all male students was only a near-significant trend. This provides a proof of concept that deeper demographic mining of digital logs in the future may identify subgroups for which certain sleep phenotypes have greater predictive value for performance outcomes. The data analyzed are consistent with known patterns, including sleep-timing delays from weeknights to free nights and sleep-timing delays in men relative to women. These findings support the hypothesis that modern schedule impositions on sleep and circadian timing have consequences for real-world learning and memory. This study also highlights the low-cost, large-scale benefits of personal, daily, digital records as an augmentation of sleep and circadian studies.

  5. Structural transition in sputter-deposited amorphous germanium films by aging at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okugawa, M.; Nakamura, R.; Ishimaru, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yasuda, H.; Numakura, H.

    2016-06-01

    The structure of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) films prepared by sputter-deposition and the effects of aging at ambient temperature and pressure were studied by pair-distribution-function (PDF) analysis from electron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. The PDFs of the as-deposited and aged samples for 3-13 months showed that the major peaks for Ge-Ge bonds decrease in intensity and broaden with aging for up to 7 months. In the PDFs of a-Ge of molecular dynamics simulation obtained by quenching liquid at different rates, the major peak intensities of a slowly cooled model are higher than those of a rapidly cooled model. Analyses on short- and medium-range configurations show that the slowly cooled model includes a certain amount of medium-range ordered (MRO) clusters, while the rapidly cooled model includes liquid-like configurations rather than MRO clusters. The similarity between experimental and computational PDFs implies that as-deposited films are similar in structure to the slowly cooled model, whereas the fully aged films are similar to the rapidly cooled model. It is assumed that as they undergo room-temperature aging, the MRO clusters disintegrate and transform into liquid-like regions in the same matrix. This transition in local configurations is discussed in terms of instability and the non-equilibrium of nanoclusters produced by a vapor-deposition process.

  6. Functional and structural aging of the speech sensorimotor neural system: fMRI evidence

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pascale; Dick, Anthony Steven; Small, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to perceive and produce speech undergoes important changes in late adulthood. The goal of the present study was to characterize functional and structural age-related differences in the cortical network supporting speech perception and production using magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the relationship between functional and structural age-related changes occurring in this network. We asked young and older adults to (1) observe videos of a speaker producing single words (perception), and (B) observe and repeat the words produced (production). Results show a widespread bilateral network of brain activation for Perception and Production that was uncorrelated with age. In addition, several regions did show age-related change (auditory cortex, planum temporale, superior temporal sulcus, premotor cortices, SMA-proper). Examination of the relationship between brain signal and regional and global gray matter volume and cortical thickness revealed a complex set of relationships between structure and function, with some regions showing a relationship between structure and function and not. The present results provide novel findings about the neurobiology of aging and verbal communication. PMID:23523270

  7. Developing a Computerized Aging Management System for Concrete Structures in Finnish Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Neshawy, F.; Piironen, J.; Sistonen, E.; Vesikari, E.; Tuomisto, M.; Hradil, P.; Ferreira, M.

    2013-07-01

    Finland has four nuclear reactors units in two power plants. The first unit started operation in 1977 and in the early 1980's all four units were in use. During the last few years the aging management of the Nuclear Power Plant's (NPP) concrete structures has grown an important issue because the existing structures are reaching the end of their licensed operating lifetime (about 40 years). Therefore the nuclear power companies are developing aging management systems to avoid premature degradation of NPP facilities and to be able to extend their operating lifetime. This paper is about the development of a computerized ageing management system for the nuclear power plants concrete structures. The computerized ageing management system is built upon central database and implementation applications. It will assist the personnel of power companies to implement the aging management activities at different phases of the lifetime of a power plant. It will provide systematic methods for planning, surveillance, inspection, monitoring, condition assessment, maintenance and repair of structures.

  8. A class of coning algorithms based on a half-compressed structure.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuanye; Chen, Xiyuan

    2014-08-06

    Aiming to advance the coning algorithm performance of strapdown inertial navigation systems, a new half-compressed coning correction structure is presented. The half-compressed algorithm structure is analytically proven to be equivalent to the traditional compressed structure under coning environments. The half-compressed algorithm coefficients allow direct configuration from traditional compressed algorithm coefficients. A type of algorithm error model is defined for coning algorithm performance evaluation under maneuver environment conditions. Like previous uncompressed algorithms, the half-compressed algorithm has improved maneuver accuracy and retained coning accuracy compared with its corresponding compressed algorithm. Compared with prior uncompressed algorithms, the formula for the new algorithm coefficients is simpler.

  9. Neural convergence for language comprehension and grammatical class production in highly proficient bilinguals is independent of age of acquisition.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Monica; Cafiero, Riccardo; Marin, Dario; Tettamanti, Marco; Iadanza, Antonella; Fabbro, Franco; Perani, Daniela

    2013-05-01

    In bilinguals, native (L1) and second (L2) languages are processed by the same neural resources that can be modulated by age of second language acquisition (AOA), proficiency level, and daily language exposure and usage. AOA seems to particularly affect grammar processing, where a complete neural convergence has been shown only in bilinguals with parallel language acquisition from birth. Despite the fact that proficiency-related neuroanatomical differences have been well documented in language comprehension (LC) and production, few reports have addressed the influence of language exposure. A still unanswered question pertains to the role of AOA, when proficiency is comparably high across languages, with respect to its modulator effects both on LC and production. Here, we evaluated with fMRI during sentence comprehension and verb and noun production tasks, two groups of highly proficient bilinguals only differing in AOA. One group learned Italian and Friulian in parallel from birth, whereas the second group learned Italian between 3 and 6 years. All participants were highly exposed to both languages, but more to Italian than Friulian. The results indicate a complete overlap of neural activations for the comprehension of both languages, not only in bilinguals from birth, but also in late bilinguals. A slightly extra activation in the left thalamus for the less-exposed language confirms that exposure may affect language processing. Noteworthy, we report for the first time that, when proficiency and exposure are kept high, noun and verb production recruit the same neural networks for L1 and L2, independently of AOA. These results support the neural convergence hypothesis.

  10. Dynamics of climate-based malaria transmission model with age-structured human population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addawe, Joel; Pajimola, Aprimelle Kris

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed to study the dynamics of malaria transmission with periodic birth rate of the vector and an age-structure for the human population. The human population is divided into two compartments: pre-school (0-5 years) and the rest of the human population. We showed the existence of a disease-free equilibrium point. Using published epidemiological parameters, we use numerical simulations to show potential effect of climate change in the dynamics of age-structured malaria transmission. Numerical simulations suggest that there exists an asymptotically attractive solution that is positive and periodic.

  11. Predict protein structural class for low-similarity sequences by evolutionary difference information into the general form of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichao; Zhao, Xiqiang; Kong, Liang

    2014-08-21

    Knowledge of protein structural class plays an important role in characterizing the overall folding type of a given protein. At present, it is still a challenge to extract sequence information solely using protein sequence for protein structural class prediction with low similarity sequence in the current computational biology. In this study, a novel sequence representation method is proposed based on position specific scoring matrix for protein structural class prediction. By defined evolutionary difference formula, varying length proteins are expressed as uniform dimensional vectors, which can represent evolutionary difference information between the adjacent residues of a given protein. To perform and evaluate the proposed method, support vector machine and jackknife tests are employed on three widely used datasets, 25PDB, 1189 and 640 datasets with sequence similarity lower than 25%, 40% and 25%, respectively. Comparison of our results with the previous methods shows that our method may provide a promising method to predict protein structural class especially for low-similarity sequences.

  12. Structure and composition of arytenoid cartilage of the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) during maturation and aging.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Priscila Eliane dos Santos; Oliveira, Kris Daiana Silva; de Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Gomes, Laurecir; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marretto

    2015-10-01

    The aging process induces progressive and irreversible changes in the structural and functional organization of animals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of aging on the structure and composition of the extracellular matrix of the arytenoid cartilage found in the larynx of male bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) kept in captivity for commercial purposes. Animals at 7, 180 and 1080 days post-metamorphosis (n=10/age) were euthanized and the cartilage was removed and processed for structural and biochemical analysis. For the structural analyses, cartilage sections were stained with picrosirius, toluidine blue, Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin and Von Kossa stain. The sections were also submitted to immunohistochemistry for detection of collagen types I and II. Other samples were processed for the ultrastructural and cytochemical analysis of proteoglycans. Histological sections were used to chondrocyte count. The number of positive stainings for proteoglycans was quantified by ultrastructural analysis. For quantification and analysis of glycosaminoglycans were used the dimethyl methylene blue and agarose gel electrophoresis methods. The chloramine T method was used for hydroxyproline quantification. At 7 days, basophilia was observed in the pericellular and territorial matrix, which decreased in the latter over the period studied. Collagen fibers were arranged perpendicular to the major axis of the cartilaginous plate and were thicker in older animals. Few calcification areas were observed at the periphery of the cartilage specimens in 1080-day-old animals. Type II collagen was present throughout the stroma at the different ages. Elastic fibers were found in the stroma and perichondrium and increased with age in the two regions. Proteoglycan staining significantly increased from 7 to 180 days and reduced at 1080 days. The amount of total glycosaminoglycans was higher in 180-day-old animals compared to the other ages, with marked presence of

  13. Structure of a Class I Tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate Aldolase - Investigation into an Apparent Loss of Stereospecificity

    SciTech Connect

    LowKam, C.; Liotard, B; Sygusch, J

    2010-01-01

    Tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase from Streptococcus pyogenes is a class I aldolase that exhibits a remarkable lack of chiral discrimination with respect to the configuration of hydroxyl groups at both C3 and C4 positions. The enzyme catalyzes the reversible cleavage of four diastereoisomers (fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), psicose 1,6-bisphosphate, sorbose 1,6-bisphosphate, and tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate) to dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate with high catalytic efficiency. To investigate its enzymatic mechanism, high resolution crystal structures were determined of both native enzyme and native enzyme in complex with dihydroxyacetone-P. The electron density map revealed a ({alpha}/{beta}){sub 8} fold in each dimeric subunit. Flash-cooled crystals of native enzyme soaked with dihydroxyacetone phosphate trapped a covalent intermediate with carbanionic character at Lys{sup 205}, different from the enamine mesomer bound in stereospecific class I FBP aldolase. Structural analysis indicates extensive active site conservation with respect to class I FBP aldolases, including conserved conformational responses to DHAP binding and conserved stereospecific proton transfer at the DHAP C3 carbon mediated by a proximal water molecule. Exchange reactions with tritiated water and tritium-labeled DHAP at C3 hydrogen were carried out in both solution and crystalline state to assess stereochemical control at C3. The kinetic studies show labeling at both pro-R and pro-S C3 positions of DHAP yet detritiation only at the C3 pro-S-labeled position. Detritiation of the C3 pro-R label was not detected and is consistent with preferential cis-trans isomerism about the C2-C3 bond in the carbanion as the mechanism responsible for C3 epimerization in tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase.

  14. Chromophoric spin-labeled beta-lactam antibiotics for ENDOR structural characterization of reaction intermediates of class A and class C beta-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Hofer, Jennifer E; Huang, Wanzhi; Palzkill, Timothy; Makinen, Marvin W

    2004-05-01

    The chromophoric spin-label substrate 6-N-[3-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxypyrrolin-3-yl)-propen-2-oyl]penicillanic acid (SLPPEN) was synthesized by acylation of 6-aminopenicillanic acid with the acid chloride of 3-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxypyrrolinyl)-2-propenoic acid and characterized by physical methods. By application of angle-selected electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), we have determined the molecular structure of SLPPEN in solution. SLPPEN exhibited UV absorption properties that allowed accurate monitoring of the kinetics of its enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis. The maximum value of the (substrate-product) difference extinction coefficient was 2824 M(-1) cm(-1) at 275 nm compared to 670 M(-1) cm(-1) at 232 nm for SLPEN [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117 (1995) 6739]. For SLPPEN, the steady-state kinetic parameters kcat and kcat/KM, determined under initial velocity conditions, were 637 +/- 36 s(-1) and 13.8 +/- 1.4 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, for hydrolysis catalyzed by TEM-1 beta-lactamase of E. coli, and 0.5 +/- 0.04 s(-1) and 3.9 +/- 0.4 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) for hydrolysis catalyzed by the beta-lactamase of Enterobacter cloacae P99. We have also observed "burst kinetics" for the hydrolysis of SLPPEN with P99 beta-lactamase, indicative of formation of an acylenzyme reaction intermediate. In DMSO:H2O (30:70, v:v) cryosolvent mixtures buffered to pH* 7.0, the half-life of the acylenzyme intermediate formed with the P99 enzyme at -5 degrees C was > or = 3 min, suitable for optical characterization. The observation of burst kinetics in the hydrolysis of SLPPEN catalyzed by P99 beta-lactamase suggests that this chromophoric spin-labeled substrate is differentially sensitive to active site interactions underlying the cephalosporinase and penicillinase reactivity of this class C enzyme.

  15. Kinetic theory of age-structured stochastic birth-death processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenman, Chris D.; Chou, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Classical age-structured mass-action models such as the McKendrick-von Foerster equation have been extensively studied but are unable to describe stochastic fluctuations or population-size-dependent birth and death rates. Stochastic theories that treat semi-Markov age-dependent processes using, e.g., the Bellman-Harris equation do not resolve a population's age structure and are unable to quantify population-size dependencies. Conversely, current theories that include size-dependent population dynamics (e.g., mathematical models that include carrying capacity such as the logistic equation) cannot be easily extended to take into account age-dependent birth and death rates. In this paper, we present a systematic derivation of a new, fully stochastic kinetic theory for interacting age-structured populations. By defining multiparticle probability density functions, we derive a hierarchy of kinetic equations for the stochastic evolution of an aging population undergoing birth and death. We show that the fully stochastic age-dependent birth-death process precludes factorization of the corresponding probability densities, which then must be solved by using a Bogoliubov--Born--Green--Kirkwood--Yvon-like hierarchy. Explicit solutions are derived in three limits: no birth, no death, and steady state. These are then compared with their corresponding mean-field results. Our results generalize both deterministic models and existing master equation approaches by providing an intuitive and efficient way to simultaneously model age- and population-dependent stochastic dynamics applicable to the study of demography, stem cell dynamics, and disease evolution.

  16. Characterization of mechanical properties of lamellar structure of the aortic wall: Effect of aging.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Hadi; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Arterial wall tissues are sensitive to their mechanical surroundings and remodel their structure and mechanical properties when subjected to mechanical stimuli such as increased arterial pressure. Such remodeling is evident in hypertension and aging. Aging is characterized by stiffening of the artery wall which is assigned to disturbed elastin function and increased collagen content. To better understand and provide new insight on microstructural changes induced by aging, the lamellar model of the aortic media was utilized to characterize and compare wall structure and mechanical behavior of the young and old human thoracic aortic samples. Such model regards arterial media as two sets of alternating concentric layers, namely sheets of elastin and interlamellar layers. Histological and biaxial tests were performed and microstructural features and stress-strain curves of media were evaluated in young and old age groups. Then using optimization algorithms and hyperelastic constitutive equations the stress-strain curves of layers were evaluated for both age groups. Results indicated slight elevation in the volume fraction of interlamellar layer among old subjects most probably due to age related collagen deposition. Aging indicated substantial stiffening of interlamellar layers accompanied by noticeable softening of elastic lamellae. The general significant stiffening of old samples were attributed to both increase of volume fraction of interlamellar layers and earlier recruitment of collagen fibers during load bearing due to functional loss of elastin within wall lamellae. Mechanical characterization of lamellar structure of wall media is beneficial in study of arterial remodeling in response to alternated mechanical environment in aging and clinical conditions through coupling of wall microstructure and mechanical behavior.

  17. Kinetic theory of age-structured stochastic birth-death processes.

    PubMed

    Greenman, Chris D; Chou, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Classical age-structured mass-action models such as the McKendrick-von Foerster equation have been extensively studied but are unable to describe stochastic fluctuations or population-size-dependent birth and death rates. Stochastic theories that treat semi-Markov age-dependent processes using, e.g., the Bellman-Harris equation do not resolve a population's age structure and are unable to quantify population-size dependencies. Conversely, current theories that include size-dependent population dynamics (e.g., mathematical models that include carrying capacity such as the logistic equation) cannot be easily extended to take into account age-dependent birth and death rates. In this paper, we present a systematic derivation of a new, fully stochastic kinetic theory for interacting age-structured populations. By defining multiparticle probability density functions, we derive a hierarchy of kinetic equations for the stochastic evolution of an aging population undergoing birth and death. We show that the fully stochastic age-dependent birth-death process precludes factorization of the corresponding probability densities, which then must be solved by using a Bogoliubov--Born--Green--Kirkwood--Yvon-like hierarchy. Explicit solutions are derived in three limits: no birth, no death, and steady state. These are then compared with their corresponding mean-field results. Our results generalize both deterministic models and existing master equation approaches by providing an intuitive and efficient way to simultaneously model age- and population-dependent stochastic dynamics applicable to the study of demography, stem cell dynamics, and disease evolution.

  18. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy L277 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H.; Farahmand, B.; Cho, A.

    2003-01-01

    Compared with aluminum alloys such as 2219, which is widely used in space vehicle for cryogenic tanks and unpressurized structures, aluminum-lithium alloys possess attractive combinations of lower density and higher modulus along with comparable mechanical properties and improved damage tolerance. These characteristics have resulted in the successful use of the aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 for the Space Shuttle External Tank, and the consideration of newer U.S. aluminum-lithium alloys such as L277 and C458 for future space vehicles. A design of experiments aging study was conducted for plate and a limited study on extrusions. To achieve the T8 temper, Alloy L277 is typically aged at 290 F for 40 hours. In the study for plate, a two-step aging treatment was developed through a design of experiments study and the one step aging used as a control. Based on the earlier NASA studies on 2195, the first step aging temperature was varied between 220 F and 260 F. The second step aging temperatures was varied between 290 F and 310 F, which is in the range of the single-step aging temperature. For extrusions, two, single-step, and one two-step aging condition were evaluated. The results of the design of experiments used for the T8 temper as well as a smaller set of experiments for the T6 temper for plate and the results for extrusions will be presented.

  19. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jian-Ching; Rebrin, Igor; Klichko, Vladimir; Orr, William C.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity during the aging process. {yields} Abundance of seven nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase decreased with age in Drosophila. {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase is specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration. -- Abstract: The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

  20. Beyond the Schoolyard: The Contributions of Parenting Logics, Financial Resources, and Social Institutions to the Social Class Gap in Structured Activity Participation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Pamela R; Lutz, Amy; Jayaram, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    We investigate cultural and structural sources of class differences in youth activity participation with interview, survey, and archival data. We find working- and middle-class parents overlap in parenting logics about participation, though differ in one respect: middle-class parents are concerned with customizing children's involvement in activities, while working-class parents are concerned with achieving safety and social mobility for children through participation. Second, because of financial constraints, working-class families rely on social institutions for participation opportunities, but few are available. Schools act as an equalizing institution by offering low-cost activities, allowing working-class children to resemble middle-class youth in school activities, but they remain disadvantaged in out-of-school activities. School influences are complex, however, as they also contribute to class differences by offering different activities to working- and middle-class youth. Findings raise questions about the extent to which differences in participation reflect class culture rather than the objective realities parents face.

  1. Beyond the Schoolyard: The Contributions of Parenting Logics, Financial Resources, and Social Institutions to the Social Class Gap in Structured Activity Participation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Pamela R.; Lutz, Amy; Jayaram, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    We investigate cultural and structural sources of class differences in youth activity participation with interview, survey, and archival data. We find working- and middle-class parents overlap in parenting logics about participation, though differ in one respect: middle-class parents are concerned with customizing children’s involvement in activities, while working-class parents are concerned with achieving safety and social mobility for children through participation. Second, because of financial constraints, working-class families rely on social institutions for participation opportunities, but few are available. Schools act as an equalizing institution by offering low-cost activities, allowing working-class children to resemble middle-class youth in school activities, but they remain disadvantaged in out-of-school activities. School influences are complex, however, as they also contribute to class differences by offering different activities to working- and middle-class youth. Findings raise questions about the extent to which differences in participation reflect class culture rather than the objective realities parents face. PMID:25328250

  2. Topology of Class A G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Insights Gained from Crystal Structures of Rhodopsins, Adrenergic and Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Debarshi; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Biological membranes are densely packed with membrane proteins that occupy approximately half of their volume. In almost all cases, membrane proteins in the native state lack the higher-order symmetry required for their direct study by diffraction methods. Despite many technical difficulties, numerous crystal structures of detergent solubilized membrane proteins have been determined that illustrate their internal organization. Among such proteins, class A G protein-coupled receptors have become amenable to crystallization and high resolution X-ray diffraction analyses. The derived structures of native and engineered receptors not only provide insights into their molecular arrangements but also furnish a framework for designing and testing potential models of transformation from inactive to active receptor signaling states and for initiating rational drug design. PMID:18945819

  3. Structural basis for enhancement of carbapenemase activity in the OXA-51 family of class D β- lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Antunes, Nuno Tiago; Stewart, Nichole K.; Frase, Hilary; Toth, Marta; Kantardjieff, Katherine A.; Vakulenko, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Class D β-lactamases of Acinetobacter baumannii are enzymes of the utmost clinical importance, producing resistance to last resort carbapenem antibiotics. Although the OXA-51-like enzymes constitute the largest family of class D β-lactamases, they are poorly studied and their importance in conferring carbapenem resistance is controversial. We present the detailed microbiological, kinetic and structural characterization of the eponymous OXA-51 β-lactamase. Kinetic studies show that OXA-51 has low catalytic efficiency for carbapenems, primarily due to the low affinity of the enzyme for these substrates. Structural studies demonstrate that this low affinity results from the obstruction of the enzyme active site by the side chain of Trp222 which presents a transient steric barrier to an incoming carbapenem substrate. The Trp222Met substitution relieves this steric hindrance and elevates the affinity of the mutant enzyme for carbapenems by 10-fold, significantly increasing the levels of resistance to these antibiotics. The ability of OXA-51 to evolve into a robust carbapenemase as the result of a single amino acid substitution may, in the near future, elevate the ubiquitous enzymes of the OXA-51 family to the status of the most deleterious A. baumannii carbapenemases, with dire clinical consequences. PMID:26042471

  4. Structure-Function Studies Link Class II Viral Fusogens with the Ancestral Gamete Fusion Protein HAP2.

    PubMed

    Pinello, Jennifer Fricke; Lai, Alex L; Millet, Jean K; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna; Freed, Jack H; Clark, Theodore G

    2017-03-06

    The conserved transmembrane protein, HAP2/GCS1, has been linked to fertility in a wide range of taxa and is hypothesized to be an ancient gamete fusogen. Using template-based structural homology modeling, we now show that the ectodomain of HAP2 orthologs from Tetrahymena thermophila and other species adopt a protein fold remarkably similar to the dengue virus E glycoprotein and related class II viral fusogens. To test the functional significance of this predicted structure, we developed a flow-cytometry-based assay that measures cytosolic exchange across the conjugation junction to rapidly probe the effects of HAP2 mutations in the Tetrahymena system. Using this assay, alterations to a region in and around a predicted "fusion loop" in T. thermophila HAP2 were found to abrogate membrane pore formation in mating cells. Consistent with this, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the HAP2 fusion loop was found to interact directly with model membranes in a variety of biophysical assays. These results raise interesting questions regarding the evolutionary relationships of class II membrane fusogens and harken back to a long-held argument that eukaryotic sex arose as the byproduct of selection for the horizontal transfer of a "selfish" genetic element from cell to cell via membrane fusion.

  5. Aging Management of Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures - Overview and Suggested Research Topics

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures are described and their operating experience noted. Primary considerations related to management of their aging are noted and an indication of their status provided: degradation mechanisms, damage models, and material performance; assessment and remediation (i.e., component selection, in-service inspection, nondestructive examinations, and remedial actions); and estimation of performance at present or some future point in time (i.e., application of structural reliability theory to the design and optimization of in-service inspection/maintenance strategies, and determination of the effects of degradation on plant risk). Several activities are identified that provide background information and data on areas of concern with respect to nondestructive examination of nuclear power plant concrete structures: inspection of thick-walled, heavily-reinforced sections, basemats, and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. Topics are noted where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures.

  6. Prediction of protein structure classes using hybrid space of multi-profile Bayes and bi-gram probability feature spaces.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Maqsood; Tahir, Muhammad; Khan, Sher Afzal

    2014-04-07

    Proteins are the executants of biological functions in living organisms. Comprehension of protein structure is a challenging problem in the era of proteomics, computational biology, and bioinformatics because of its pivotal role in protein folding patterns. Owing to the large exploration of protein sequences in protein databanks and intricacy of protein structures, experimental and theoretical methods are insufficient for prediction of protein structure classes. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop an accurate, reliable, and high throughput computational model to predict protein structure classes correctly from polygenetic sequences. In this regard, we propose a promising model employing hybrid descriptor space in conjunction with optimized evidence-theoretic K-nearest neighbor algorithm. Hybrid space is the composition of two descriptor spaces including Multi-profile Bayes and bi-gram probability. In order to enhance the generalization power of the classifier, we have selected high discriminative descriptors from the hybrid space using particle swarm optimization, a well-known evolutionary feature selection technique. Performance evaluation of the proposed model is performed using the jackknife test on three low similarity benchmark datasets including 25PDB, 1189, and 640. The success rates of the proposed model are 87.0%, 86.6%, and 88.4%, respectively on the three benchmark datasets. The comparative analysis exhibits that our proposed model has yielded promising results compared to the existing methods in the literature. In addition, our proposed prediction system might be helpful in future research particularly in cases where the major focus of research is on low similarity datasets.

  7. Crystal Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ECM4, a Xi-Class Glutathione Transferase that Reacts with Glutathionyl-(hydro)quinones

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Mathieu; Didierjean, Claude; Hecker, Arnaud; Girardet, Jean-Michel; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie; Gelhaye, Eric; Favier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Glutathionyl-hydroquinone reductases (GHRs) belong to the recently characterized Xi-class of glutathione transferases (GSTXs) according to unique structural properties and are present in all but animal kingdoms. The GHR ScECM4 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied since 1997 when it was found to be potentially involved in cell-wall biosynthesis. Up to now and in spite of biological studies made on this enzyme, its physiological role remains challenging. The work here reports its crystallographic study. In addition to exhibiting the general GSTX structural features, ScECM4 shows extensions including a huge loop which contributes to the quaternary assembly. These structural extensions are probably specific to Saccharomycetaceae. Soaking of ScECM4 crystals with GS-menadione results in a structure where glutathione forms a mixed disulfide bond with the cysteine 46. Solution studies confirm that ScECM4 has reductase activity for GS-menadione in presence of glutathione. Moreover, the high resolution structures allowed us to propose new roles of conserved residues of the active site to assist the cysteine 46 during the catalytic act. PMID:27736955

  8. Crystal structure of Mox-1, a unique plasmid-mediated class C β-lactamase with hydrolytic activity towards moxalactam.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Takuma; Furuyama, Takamitsu; Okuno, Takashi; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Bonomo, Robert A; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko

    2014-07-01

    Mox-1 is a unique plasmid-mediated class C β-lactamase that hydrolyzes penicillins, cephalothin, and the expanded-spectrum cephalosporins cefepime and moxalactam. In order to understand the unique substrate profile of this enzyme, we determined the X-ray crystallographic structure of Mox-1 β-lactamase at a 1.5-Å resolution. The overall structure of Mox-1 β-lactamase resembles that of other AmpC enzymes, with some notable exceptions. First, comparison with other enzymes whose structures have been solved reveals significant differences in the composition of amino acids that make up the hydrogen-bonding network and the position of structural elements in the substrate-binding cavity. Second, the main-chain electron density is not observed in two regions, one containing amino acid residues 214 to 216 positioned in the Ω loop and the other in the N terminus of the B3 β-strand corresponding to amino acid residues 303 to 306. The last two observations suggest that there is significant structural flexibility of these regions, a property which may impact the recognition and binding of substrates in Mox-1. These important differences allow us to propose that the binding of moxalactam in Mox-1 is facilitated by the avoidance of steric clashes, indicating that a substrate-induced conformational change underlies the basis of the hydrolytic profile of Mox-1 β-lactamase.

  9. Structural Mechanism of ER Retrieval of MHC Class I by Cowpox

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, William H.; Wang, Xiaoli; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Hansen, Ted H.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2012-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of viral immune evasion is the capacity to disrupt major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) antigen presentation to evade T-cell detection. Cowpox virus encoded protein CPXV203 blocks MHCI surface expression by exploiting the KDEL-receptor recycling pathway, and here we show that CPXV203 directly binds a wide array of fully assembled MHCI proteins, both classical and non-classical. Further, the stability of CPXV203/MHCI complexes is highly pH dependent, with dramatically increased affinities at the lower pH of the Golgi relative to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystallographic studies reveal that CPXV203 adopts a beta-sandwich fold similar to poxvirus chemokine binding proteins, and binds the same highly conserved MHCI determinants located under the peptide-binding platform that tapasin, CD8, and natural killer (NK)-receptors engage. Mutagenesis of the CPXV203/MHCI interface identified the importance of two CPXV203 His residues that confer low pH stabilization of the complex and are critical to ER retrieval of MHCI. These studies clarify mechanistically how CPXV203 coordinates with other cowpox proteins to thwart antigen presentation. PMID:23209377

  10. The relation between structural and functional connectivity depends on age and on task goals

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Jaclyn H.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen an increase in neuroimaging studies examining structural (i.e., structural integrity of white matter tracts) and functional connectivity (e.g., correlations in neural activity throughout the brain). Although structural and functional connectivity changes have often been measured independently, examining the relation between these two measures is critical to understanding the specific function of neural networks and the ways they may differ across tasks and individuals. The current study addressed this question by examining the effect of age (treated as a continuous variable) and emotional valence on the relation between functional and structural connectivity. As prior studies have suggested that prefrontal regions may guide and regulate emotional memory search via functional connections with the amygdala, the current analysis focused on functional connectivity between the left amygdala and the left prefrontal cortex, and structural integrity of the uncinate fasciculus, a white matter tract connecting prefrontal and temporal regions. Participants took part in a scanned retrieval task in which they recalled positive, negative, and neutral images associated with neutral titles. Aging was associated with a significant increase in the relation between measures of structural integrity (specifically, fractional anisotropy, or FA) along the uncinate fasciculus and functional connectivity between the left ventral prefrontal cortex and amygdala during positive event retrieval, but not negative or neutral retrieval. Notably, during negative event retrieval, age was linked to stronger structure-function relations between the amygdala and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, such that increased structural integrity predicted stronger negative functional connectivity in older adults only. These findings suggest that young and older adults may utilize a structural pathway to engage different retrieval and regulatory strategies, even when structural

  11. Age-related changes in pial arterial structure and blood flow in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye-Min; Sohn, Inkyung; Jung, Junyang; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cerebral blood flow decreases are thought to deteriorate cognition and cause senescence, although the related mechanism is unclear. To investigate the relationships between aging and changes in cerebral blood flow and vasculature, we obtained fluorescence images of young (2-month-old) and old (12-month-old) mice using indocyanine green (ICG). First, we found that the blood flow in old mice's brains is lower than that in young mice and that old mice had more curved pial arteries and fewer pial artery junctions than young mice. Second, using Western blotting, we determined that the ratio of collagen to elastin (related to cerebral vascular wall distensibility) increased with age. Finally, we found that the peak ICG intensity and blood flow index decreased, whereas the mean transit time increased, with age in the middle cerebral artery and superior sagittal sinus. Age-related changes in pial arterial structure and composition, concurrent with the observed changes in the blood flow parameters, suggest that age-related changes in the cerebral vasculature structure and distensibility may induce altered brain blood flow.

  12. [Population structure of soil arthropod in different age Pinus massoniana plantations].

    PubMed

    Tan, Bo; Wu, Fu-zhong; Yang, Wan-qin; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Zhen-feng; Liu, Yang; Gou, Xiao-lin

    2013-04-01

    An investigation was conducted on the population structure of soil arthropod community in the 3-, 8-, 14-, 31-, and 40-years old Pinus massoniana plantations in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River in spring (May) and autumn (October), 2011, aimed to search for the scientific management of the plantation. A total of 4045 soil arthropods were collected, belonging to 57 families. Both the individual density and the taxonomic group number of the soil arthropod community decreased obviously with increasing soil depth, and this trend increased with increasing stand age. The dominant groups and ordinary groups of the soil arthropod community varied greatly with the stand age of P. massoniana plantation, and a significant difference (P<0.05) was observed in the individual density and taxonomic group number among different age P. massoniana plantations. In comparison with other stand age P. massoniana plantations, 3years old P. massoniana plantation had a significant difference in the structure and diversity of soil arthropod community, and the similarity index of the soil arthropod community was lower. The individual density, taxonomic group number, and diversity of soil arthropod community were the highest in 8-years old P. massoniana plantation, and then, decreased obviously with increasing stand age. It was suggested that the land fertility of the P. massoniana plantations could be degraded with increasing stand age, and it would be appropriate to make artificial regulation and restoration in 8-years old P. massoniana plantation.

  13. 49 CFR 176.172 - Structural serviceability of freight containers and vehicles carrying Class 1 (explosive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... top and bottom side rails, top and bottom end rails, door sill and header, floor cross members, corner... structural members; (iii) More than one splice or an improper splice (such as a lapped splice) in top or bottom end rails or door headers; (iv) More than two splices in any one top or bottom side rail; (v)...

  14. A Class of Population Covariance Matrices in the Bootstrap Approach to Covariance Structure Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Hayashi, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Hirokazu

    2007-01-01

    Model evaluation in covariance structure analysis is critical before the results can be trusted. Due to finite sample sizes and unknown distributions of real data, existing conclusions regarding a particular statistic may not be applicable in practice. The bootstrap procedure automatically takes care of the unknown distribution and, for a given…

  15. Implications of a Class of Covariance Structure Models for the Development of Measuring Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramble, William J.; Wiley, David E.

    The research on covariance structure analysis is reviewed, and various restrictions on the parameter matrices of the general model are delineated. Models employing two particular restrictions (where the matrix of weights is completely specified and is either scaled--by some unknown but estimable matrix of scaling weights--or unscaled) are…

  16. Dimensionality of the Latent Structure and Item Selection via Latent Class Multidimensional IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolucci, F.; Montanari, G. E.; Pandolfi, S.

    2012-01-01

    With reference to a questionnaire aimed at assessing the performance of Italian nursing homes on the basis of the health conditions of their patients, we investigate two relevant issues: dimensionality of the latent structure and discriminating power of the items composing the questionnaire. The approach is based on a multidimensional item…

  17. Advances in Structural Integrity Analysis Methods for Aging Metallic Airframe Structures with Local Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.; Piascik, Robert S.; Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis methodologies for predicting fatigue-crack growth from rivet holes in panels subjected to cyclic loads and for predicting the residual strength of aluminum fuselage structures with cracks and subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are described. The fatigue-crack growth analysis methodology is based on small-crack theory and a plasticity induced crack-closure model, and the effect of a corrosive environment on crack-growth rate is included. The residual strength analysis methodology is based on the critical crack-tip-opening-angle fracture criterion that characterizes the fracture behavior of a material of interest, and a geometric and material nonlinear finite element shell analysis code that performs the structural analysis of the fuselage structure of interest. The methodologies have been verified experimentally for structures ranging from laboratory coupons to full-scale structural components. Analytical and experimental results based on these methodologies are described and compared for laboratory coupons and flat panels, small-scale pressurized shells, and full-scale curved stiffened panels. The residual strength analysis methodology is sufficiently general to include the effects of multiple-site damage on structural behavior.

  18. Structural design of 3m class ground based telescope elevation ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yufeng; Wang, Jihong; Ren, Ge; Xie, Zongliang; Zhu, Fuyin; Jiang, Chuan

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the dynamic stiffness of telescope mount, the accuracy of aiming and stability of optical system, a topology optimization method based on the theory of variable density and taking maximum stiffness as objective function is studied. In the topology optimization analysis of elevation ring, one of the most important members of the telescope mount, two kinds of structural are designed: one is a traditional plate welding structure and the other is a combination of plate welding and truss welding. Furthermore, the stiffness and modal performance of the elevation ring in different performances are analyzed and compared. The results show that in meeting the strength and stiffness of the premise, the mass of elevation ring with plate welding and truss welding is 7.00T and the moment of inertia is 11.94 t•m2. What`s more, the total deformation in the horizontal direction and the zenith direction are 6.70μm and 55.86μm, respectively; the stress is within stress range of material's promise; the modal is 105.9Hz.Compared with the traditional structural with plate welding, this new structural design approached to ensure the dynamic stiffness while effectively reducing its own weight with reduction rate 10.7% and moments of inertia with reduction rate 12.3%. This new structural of plate welding and truss welding has obvious advantages in lightweight design. This new design method based on topology optimization will provide efficient help to later components design of the telescope mount.

  19. Aging and symptoms of anxiety and depression: structural invariance of the tripartite model.

    PubMed

    Teachman, Bethany A; Siedlecki, Karen L; Magee, Joshua C

    2007-03-01

    Negative affect measures were evaluated in a cross-sectional community sample of adults aged 18-93 (N = 335) to examine the structure of neuroticism, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in young, middle, and older adult cohorts. Structural equation modeling was used to contrast 3 nested models: a 1-factor general distress model; a 2-factor high negative-low positive affect model; and a 3-factor "tripartite model" reflecting a higher order Negative Affect factor that is common to depression and anxiety problems and 2 lower order factors, Low Positive Affect (mostly specific to depression) and Arousal (specific to anxiety/panic). As expected, the tripartite model fit best for all age groups. Further, multigroup analyses indicated age invariance for the tripartite model, suggesting the model can be effectively applied with older populations.

  20. A Hierarchical Kinetic Theory of Birth, Death and Fission in Age-Structured Interacting Populations.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tom; Greenman, Chris D

    We develop mathematical models describing the evolution of stochastic age-structured populations. After reviewing existing approaches, we formulate a complete kinetic framework for age-structured interacting populations undergoing birth, death and fission processes in spatially dependent environments. We define the full probability density for the population-size age chart and find results under specific conditions. Connections with more classical models are also explicitly derived. In particular, we show that factorial moments for non-interacting processes are described by a natural generalization of the McKendrick-von Foerster equation, which describes mean-field deterministic behavior. Our approach utilizes mixed-type, multidimensional probability distributions similar to those employed in the study of gas kinetics and with terms that satisfy BBGKY-like equation hierarchies.

  1. A Hierarchical Kinetic Theory of Birth, Death and Fission in Age-Structured Interacting Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Greenman, Chris D.

    2016-07-01

    We develop mathematical models describing the evolution of stochastic age-structured populations. After reviewing existing approaches, we formulate a complete kinetic framework for age-structured interacting populations undergoing birth, death and fission processes in spatially dependent environments. We define the full probability density for the population-size age chart and find results under specific conditions. Connections with more classical models are also explicitly derived. In particular, we show that factorial moments for non-interacting processes are described by a natural generalization of the McKendrick-von Foerster equation, which describes mean-field deterministic behavior. Our approach utilizes mixed-type, multidimensional probability distributions similar to those employed in the study of gas kinetics and with terms that satisfy BBGKY-like equation hierarchies.

  2. Unveiling the structural arrangements responsible for the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses during physical aging

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, V. M.; Ruta, B

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling physical aging, that is, the spontaneous temporal evolution of out-of-equilibrium systems, represents one of the greatest tasks in material science. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a complex atomic motion in metallic glasses, with different aging regimes in contrast with the typical continuous aging observed in macroscopic quantities. By combining dynamical and structural synchrotron techniques, here for the first time we directly connect previously identified microscopic structural mechanisms with the peculiar atomic motion, providing a broader unique view of their complexity. We show that the atomic scale is dominated by the interplay between two processes: rearrangements releasing residual stresses related to a cascade mechanism of relaxation, and medium range ordering processes, which do not affect the local density, likely due to localized relaxations of liquid-like regions. As temperature increases, a surprising additional secondary relaxation process sets in, together with a faster medium range ordering, likely precursors of crystallization. PMID:26787443

  3. The Relationship between Age Structure and Homicide Rates in the United States, 1970 to 1999

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    The nature of the temporal association between age structure and homicide rates between 1970 and 1999 is examined using U.S. county data. Specifically, the following questions are asked: (a) does the strong temporal association between the relative size of the young population and homicide rates demonstrated at the U.S. national level hold at a…

  4. A Second Note on Ageing in a Library Circulation Model: The Correlation Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Quentin L.

    1986-01-01

    Correlation structure of the Burrell and Cane mixed Poisson model for library loans with aging is presented and illustrated by data from University of Sussex. The approach is compared and contrasted with that originally formulated by Morse and recently reevaluated by Beheshti and Tague. Directions for future investigations are suggested. (Author)

  5. Relating structural and functional anomalous connectivity in the aging brain via neural mass modeling.

    PubMed

    Pons, A J; Cantero, Jose L; Atienza, Mercedes; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2010-09-01

    The structural changes that arise as the brain ages influence its functionality. In many cases, the anatomical degradation simply leads to normal aging. In others, the neurodegeneration is large enough to cause neurological disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's disease). Structure and function can be both currently measured using noninvasive techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) respectively. However, a full theoretical scheme linking structural and functional degradation is still lacking. Here we present a neural mass model that aims to bridge both levels of description and that reproduces experimentally observed multichannel EEG recordings of alpha rhythm in young subjects, healthy elderly subjects, and patients with mild cognitive impairment. We focus our attention in the dominant frequency of the signals at different electrodes and in the correlation between specific electrode pairs, measured via the phase-lag index. Our model allows us to study the influence of different structural connectivity pathways, independently of each other, on the normal and aberrantly aging brain. In particular, we study in detail the effect of the thalamic input on specific cortical regions, the long-range connectivity between cortical regions, and the short-range coupling within the same cortical area. Once the influence of each type of connectivity is determined, we characterize the regions of parameter space compatible with the EEG recordings of the populations under study. Our results show that the different types of connectivity must be fine-tuned to maintain the brain in a healthy functioning state independently of its age and brain condition.

  6. Trait Substitution Sequence process and Canonical Equation for age-structured populations.

    PubMed

    Méléard, Sylvie; Tran, Viet Chi

    2009-06-01

    We are interested in a stochastic model of trait and age-structured population undergoing mutation and selection. We start with a continuous time, discrete individual-centered population process. Taking the large population and rare mutations limits under a well-chosen time-scale separation condition, we obtain a jump process that generalizes the Trait Substitution Sequence process describing Adaptive Dynamics for populations without age structure. Under the additional assumption of small mutations, we derive an age-dependent ordinary differential equation that extends the Canonical Equation. These evolutionary approximations have never been introduced to our knowledge. They are based on ecological phenomena represented by PDEs that generalize the Gurtin-McCamy equation in Demography. Another particularity is that they involve an establishment probability, describing the probability of invasion of the resident population by the mutant one, that cannot always be computed explicitly. Examples illustrate how adding an age-structure enrich the modelling of structured population by including life history features such as senescence. In the cases considered, we establish the evolutionary approximations and study their long time behavior and the nature of their evolutionary singularities when computation is tractable. Numerical procedures and simulations are carried.

  7. Socio-Demographic Determinants of Economic Growth: Age-Structure, Preindustrial Heritage and Sociolinguistic Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crenshaw, Edward; Robison, Kristopher

    2010-01-01

    This study establishes a socio-demographic theory of international development derived from selected classical and contemporary sociological theories. Four hypotheses are tested: (1. population growth's effect on development depends on age-structure; (2. historic population density (used here as an indicator of preindustrial social complexity)…

  8. Developmental Trajectories of Structural and Pragmatic Language Skills in School-Aged Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Den Heuvel, E.; Manders, E.; Swillen, A.; Zink, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to compare developmental courses of structural and pragmatic language skills in school-aged children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with idiopathic intellectual disability (IID). Comparison of these language trajectories could highlight syndrome-specific developmental features. Method: Twelve monolingual…

  9. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPECIAL SERVICES AND STUDIES BY THE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service Fee Searches of one census for one person and one transcript $65.00 Each additional copy of census transcript...

  10. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPECIAL SERVICES AND STUDIES BY THE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service Fee Searches of one census for one person and one transcript $65.00 Each additional copy of census transcript...

  11. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPECIAL SERVICES AND STUDIES BY THE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service Fee Searches of one census for one person and one transcript $65.00 Each additional copy of census transcript...

  12. Analysis of Fish Age Structure and Growth in the Illinois River

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    knowing the conditions that promote Biotic factors include size, quality, and availability desired growth and age structure for a particular of food ...collected for each year determination, otoliths were soaked in glycerin , of its life using back-calculated mean length-at- placed on a dark background

  13. Decreased Default Mode Network connectivity correlates with age-associated structural and cognitive changes

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Piñeiro, Didac; Valls-Pedret, Cinta; Fernández-Cabello, Sara; Arenaza-Urquijo, Eider M.; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Solana, Elisabeth; Bargalló, Núria; Junqué, Carme; Ros, Emilio; Bartrés-Faz, David

    2014-01-01

    Ageing entails cognitive and motor decline as well as brain changes such as loss of gray (GM) and white matter (WM) integrity, neurovascular and functional connectivity alterations. Regarding connectivity, reduced resting-state fMRI connectivity between anterior and posterior nodes of the Default Mode Network (DMN) relates to cognitive function and has been postulated to be a hallmark of ageing. However, the relationship between age-related connectivity changes and other neuroimaging-based measures in ageing is fragmentarily investigated. In a sample of 116 healthy elders we aimed to study the relationship between antero-posterior DMN connectivity and measures of WM integrity, GM integrity and cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessed with an arterial spin labeling sequence. First, we replicated previous findings demonstrating DMN connectivity decreases in ageing and an association between antero-posterior DMN connectivity and memory scores. The results showed that the functional connectivity between posterior midline structures and the medial prefrontal cortex was related to measures of WM and GM integrity but not to CBF. Gray and WM correlates of anterio-posterior DMN connectivity included, but were not limited to, DMN areas and cingulum bundle. These results resembled patterns of age-related vulnerability which was studied by comparing the correlates of antero-posterior DMN with age-effect maps. These age-effect maps were obtained after performing an independent analysis with a second sample including both young and old subjects. We argue that antero-posterior connectivity might be a sensitive measure of brain ageing over the brain. By using a comprehensive approach, the results provide valuable knowledge that may shed further light on DMN connectivity dysfunctions in ageing. PMID:25309433

  14. Age at First Episode Modulates Diagnosis-Related Structural Brain Abnormalities in Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Del Rey-Mejías, Ángel; Janssen, Joost; Bioque, Miquel; González-Pinto, Ana; Arango, Celso; Lobo, Antonio; Sarró, Salvador; Desco, Manuel; Sanjuan, Julio; Lacalle-Aurioles, Maria; Cuesta, Manuel J.; Saiz-Ruiz, Jerónimo; Bernardo, Miguel; Parellada, Mara

    2016-01-01

    Brain volume and thickness abnormalities have been reported in first-episode psychosis (FEP). However, it is unclear if and how they are modulated by brain developmental stage (and, therefore, by age at FEP as a proxy). This is a multicenter cross-sectional case-control brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. Patients with FEP (n = 196), 65.3% males, with a wide age at FEP span (12–35 y), and healthy controls (HC) (n = 157), matched for age, sex, and handedness, were scanned at 6 sites. Gray matter volume and thickness measurements were generated for several brain regions using FreeSurfer software. The nonlinear relationship between age at scan (a proxy for age at FEP in patients) and volume and thickness measurements was explored in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), affective psychoses (AFP), and HC. Earlier SSD cases (ie, FEP before 15–20 y) showed significant volume and thickness deficits in frontal lobe, volume deficits in temporal lobe, and volume enlargements in ventricular system and basal ganglia. First-episode AFP patients had smaller cingulate cortex volume and thicker temporal cortex only at early age at FEP (before 18–20 y). The AFP group also had age-constant (12–35-y age span) volume enlargements in the frontal and parietal lobe. Our study suggests that age at first episode modulates the structural brain abnormalities found in FEP patients in a nonlinear and diagnosis-dependent manner. Future MRI studies should take these results into account when interpreting samples with different ages at onset and diagnosis. PMID:26371339

  15. Effects of text genre and verbal ability on adult age differences in sensitivity to text structure.

    PubMed

    Petros, T V; Norgaard, L; Olson, K; Tabor, L

    1989-06-01

    The present study examined the effects of verbal ability and text genre on adult age differences in sensitivity to the semantic structure of prose. Young and older adults of low or high verbal ability heard narrative and expository passages at different presentation rates. The results demonstrated that older adults recalled less than younger adults and that age differences in recall were larger for low-verbal adults and expository texts. However, subjects from all groups favored the main ideas in their recalls for both types of passages. The results indicated that adult age similarities in the ability to focus on the main ideas when processing prose was not compromised by the verbal ability of the subjects or the organization of the passages used. However, the results also demonstrate how the characteristics of the learner and the characteristics of the text modulate the size of the age differences observed.

  16. [Dependence of the structure of component parasite communities on host age].

    PubMed

    Dorovskikh, G N; Stepanov, V G

    2008-01-01

    Dependence of the structure of component parasite communities on host age is studied by the example of parasite communities in minnow and grayling from the North Dvina and Pechora rivers basins. Parasite communities from immature host groups are revealed to be different from those in mature fishes by lesser number of parasite individuals and biomass, number of groups discriminated by the ratio of biomasses, and frequently by lesser number of species. Indices of diversity describing parasite communities from hosts of different ages are nearly always the same in the area examined. This observation needs in verification because values of the indices characterizing parasite communities from fishes of different ages are not equal in the parasite communities from grayling of different age from the Pinega river and minnow from the Chovju river (Dorovskikh, 2002).

  17. Sparse Representation of Brain Aging: Extracting Covariance Patterns from Structural MRI

    PubMed Central

    Su, Longfei; Wang, Lubin; Chen, Fanglin; Shen, Hui; Li, Baojuan; Hu, Dewen

    2012-01-01

    An enhanced understanding of how normal aging alters brain structure is urgently needed for the early diagnosis and treatment of age-related mental diseases. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a reliable technique used to detect age-related changes in the human brain. Currently, multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) enables the exploration of subtle and distributed changes of data obtained from structural MRI images. In this study, a new MVPA approach based on sparse representation has been employed to investigate the anatomical covariance patterns of normal aging. Two groups of participants (group 1∶290 participants; group 2∶56 participants) were evaluated in this study. These two groups were scanned with two 1.5 T MRI machines. In the first group, we obtained the discriminative patterns using a t-test filter and sparse representation step. We were able to distinguish the young from old cohort with a very high accuracy using only a few voxels of the discriminative patterns (group 1∶98.4%; group 2∶96.4%). The experimental results showed that the selected voxels may be categorized into two components according to the two steps in the proposed method. The first component focuses on the precentral and postcentral gyri, and the caudate nucleus, which play an important role in sensorimotor tasks. The strongest volume reduction with age was observed in these clusters. The second component is mainly distributed over the cerebellum, thalamus, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These regions are not only critical nodes of the sensorimotor circuitry but also the cognitive circuitry although their volume shows a relative resilience against aging. Considering the voxels selection procedure, we suggest that the aging of the sensorimotor and cognitive brain regions identified in this study has a covarying relationship with each other. PMID:22590522

  18. Kinetic interactions of tazobactam with beta-lactamases from all major structural classes.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, K; Macalintal, C; Rasmussen, B A; Lee, V J; Yang, Y

    1993-01-01

    Tazobactam was shown to be a potent inhibitor of group 1, 2a, 2b, and 2b' beta-lactamases. Extended kinetic studies with class A and C serine beta-lactamases showed that the PC1, TEM-2, and P99 enzymes all were reversibly inhibited prior to inactivation of the enzymes. The CcrA metallo-beta-lactamase was less well inhibited, with a 50% inhibitory concentration at least 3 orders of magnitude less favorable than those for most serine beta-lactamases. The numbers of hydrolytic turnovers of tazobactam before inactivation were 2 for PC1, 125 for TEM-2, 50 for P99, and 4,000 for the CcrA enzyme. In spectral studies, transient intermediates were formed after reaction of tazobactam with the PC1, TEM-2, and CcrA beta-lactamases, corresponding to enzyme-associated intermediates responsible for hydrolysis of tazobactam. Chromophores absorbing at 270 nm (CcrA) and 288 nm (TEM-2 and PC1) were observed for these reaction intermediates. The P99 cephalosporinase formed a stable complex with a UV maximum at 295 nm. Incubation of tazobactam with all of the enzymes resulted in accumulation of a tazobactam reaction product with a short-wavelength absorbance. This product has characteristics similar to those of the major eucaryotic metabolite of tazobactam. Possible reaction mechanisms are presented to explain the findings. In conclusion, both serine-based and metallo-beta-lactamases were irreversibly inactivated by tazobactam following an initial transient inhibition phase. Images PMID:8388201

  19. Age-Related Somatic Structural Changes in the Nuclear Genome of Human Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Lars A.; Rasi, Chiara; Razzaghian, Hamid R.; Pakalapati, Geeta; Waite, Lindsay; Thilbeault, Krista Stanton; Ronowicz, Anna; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Boomsma, Dorret; Westerman, Maxwell P.; Harris, Jennifer R.; Lyle, Robert; Essand, Magnus; Eriksson, Fredrik; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Iribarren, Carlos; Strachan, Eric; O'Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Absher, Devin; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Structural variations are among the most frequent interindividual genetic differences in the human genome. The frequency and distribution of de novo somatic structural variants in normal cells is, however, poorly explored. Using age-stratified cohorts of 318 monozygotic (MZ) twins and 296 single-born subjects, we describe age-related accumulation of copy-number variation in the nuclear genomes in vivo and frequency changes for both megabase- and kilobase-range variants. Megabase-range aberrations were found in 3.4% (9 of 264) of subjects ≥60 years old; these subjects included 78 MZ twin pairs and 108 single-born individuals. No such findings were observed in 81 MZ pairs or 180 single-born subjects who were ≤55 years old. Recurrent region- and gene-specific mutations, mostly deletions, were observed. Longitudinal analyses of 43 subjects whose data were collected 7–19 years apart suggest considerable variation in the rate of accumulation of clones carrying structural changes. Furthermore, the longitudinal analysis of individuals with structural aberrations suggests that there is a natural self-removal of aberrant cell clones from peripheral blood. In three healthy subjects, we detected somatic aberrations characteristic of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. The recurrent rearrangements uncovered here are candidates for common age-related defects in human blood cells. We anticipate that extension of these results will allow determination of the genetic age of different somatic-cell lineages and estimation of possible individual differences between genetic and chronological age. Our work might also help to explain the cause of an age-related reduction in the number of cell clones in the blood; such a reduction is one of the hallmarks of immunosenescence. PMID:22305530

  20. Isolation, structural elucidation and immunomodulatory activity of fructans from aged garlic extract.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Puthanapura M; Prashanth, Keelara V Harish; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2011-02-01

    Traditionally, garlic (Allium sativum) is known to be a significant immune booster. Aged garlic extract (AGE) possesses superior immunomodulatory effects than raw garlic; these effects are attributed to the transformed organosulfur compounds. AGE is also known to contain fructans; the amount of fructans in AGE represents a small fraction (0.22%) of the total fructans in raw garlic. In order to evaluate the biological activity of fructans present in AGE, both high molecular weight (>3.5 kDa; HF) and low molecular weight (<3 kDa; LF) fructans were isolated. The structures of purified HF and LF from AGE determined by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy revealed that both have (2→1) β-D-fructofuranosyl bonds linked to a terminal glucose at the non-reducing end and β-D-fructofuranosyl branching on its backbone. Biological activity of fructans was assessed by immunostimulatory activity using murine lymphocytes and peritoneal exudate cells (source of macrophages). Both HF and LF displayed mitogenic activity and activation of macrophages including phagocytosis. These activities were comparable to that of known polysaccharide immunomodulators such as zymosan and mannan. This study clearly demonstrates that garlic fructans also contribute to the immunomodulatory properties of AGE, and is the first such study on the biological effects of garlic fructans.

  1. Mating structure, isonymy and social class in late nineteenth century Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Lafranchi, M; Mitchell, R J; Kosten, M

    1988-01-01

    This study analysed all marriages (N = 4258) registered in the island State of Tasmania during the period 1896-1899 for mating structure, using marital isonymy. We found that irrespective of the geographic size of the subdivisions the random component (Fr) values were similar. This is because there was a high proportion of unique names despite the large population size. Fn values were sensitive to geographic distance only with respect to the 'unrealistically' larger units of analysis. Isonymy is valid over very large distances in Tasmania. Inbreeding values in the study were typical of other mainstream populations, but the nonrandom component was unusually high. Farmer marriages were the major contributors to the high Fn values. One particular region, the Midlands, displayed both a high F (0.0081) and Fn (0.0074) component. The explanation of these values lies in the effects of a rigid socio-economic structure established during colonization.

  2. An extension to backstepping control for a class of underactuated mechanical system in tree structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choukchou-Braham, A.; Cherki, B.

    2009-03-01

    We propose in the present paper an extension via the Tora system of the well established systematic backstepping control design for underactuated mechanical systems in chain structure to a subclass in tree structure in order to generalize the systematic dealing with all underactuated systems. Designing control for such systems is a challenging task owing to the underactuation property which poses problem for example in exact linearization and most of time, these systems are dealed case by case. The transformed system verifies all assumption of application of the above backstepping control except one which is verified only on a domain rather than the hole space. This leads to a singularity in the control law that make the stability not global. To make this latter global, we propose a new control law that allows relaxation of one assumption with respect to the initial control. This control design for the Tora system is analysed theoritically and verified using numerical simulations.

  3. Identification of Structural and Catalytic Classes of Highly Conserved Amino Acid Residues in Lysine 2,3-Aminomutase †

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dawei; Frey, Perry A.; Lepore, Bryan W.; Ringe, Dagmar; Ruzicka, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    Lysine 2,3-aminomutase (LAM) from Clostridium subterminale SB4 catalyzes the interconversion of (S)-lysine and (S)-β-lysine by a radical mechanism involving coenzymatic actions of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a [4Fe-4S] cluster, and pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP). The enzyme contains a number of conserved acidic residues and a cysteine and arginine-rich motif, that binds iron and sulfide in the [4Fe–4S] cluster. The results of activity and iron, sulfide, and PLP analysis of variants resulting from site-specific mutations of the conserved acidic residues and the arginine residues in the iron-sulfide binding motif indicate two classes of conserved residues of each type. Mutation of the conserved residues Arg134, Asp293, and Asp330 abolish all enzymatic activity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure, these residues bind the ε-aminium and α-carboxylate groups of (S)-lysine. However, among these residues only Asp293 appears to be important for stabilizing the [4Fe–4S] cluster. Members of a second group of conserved residues appear to stabilize the structure of LAM. Mutations of arginine residues 130, 135, and 136 and acidic residues Glu86, Asp165, Glu236, and Asp172 dramatically decrease iron and sulfide contents in the purified variants. Mutation of Asp96 significantly decreases iron and sulfide content. Variants in Arg130 or Asp172 display no detectable activity, whereas variants in the other positions display low to very low activities. Structural roles are assigned to this latter class of conserved amino acids. In particular, a network of hydrogen bonded interactions of Arg130, Glu86, Arg135 and the main chain carbonyl groups of Cys132 and Leu55 appears to stabilize the [4Fe–4S] cluster. PMID:17042481

  4. Cellular expression and crystal structure of the murine cytomegalovirus major histocompatibility complex class I-like glycoprotein, m153.

    PubMed

    Mans, Janet; Natarajan, Kannan; Balbo, Andrea; Schuck, Peter; Eikel, Daniel; Hess, Sonja; Robinson, Howard; Simic, Hrvoje; Jonjic, Stipan; Tiemessen, Caroline T; Margulies, David H

    2007-11-30

    Mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV), a beta-herpesvirus that establishes latent and persistent infections in mice, is a valuable model for studying complex virus-host interactions. MCMV encodes the m145 family of putative immunoevasins with predicted major histocompatibility complex, class I (MHC-I) structure. Functions attributed to some family members include down-regulation of host MHC-I (m152) and NKG2D ligands (m145, m152, and m155) and interaction with inhibitory or activating NK receptors (m157). We present the cellular, biochemical, and structural characterization of m153, which is a heavily glycosylated homodimer, that does not require beta2m or peptide and is expressed at the surface of MCMV-infected cells. Its 2.4-A crystal structure confirms that this compact molecule preserves an MHC-I-like fold and reveals a novel mode of dimerization, confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, and a distinctive disulfide-stabilized extended N terminus. The structure provides a useful framework for comparative analysis of the divergent members of the m145 family.

  5. Decoding the Structural Basis For Carbapenem Hydrolysis By Class A β-lactamases: Fishing For A Pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Tondi, Donatella; Cross, Simon; Venturelli, Alberto; Costi, Maria P; Cruciani, Gabriele; Spyrakis, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays clinical therapy witnesses a challenging bacterial resistance limiting the available armament of antibiotics. Over the decades strains resistant to all antibiotics have been selected while medicinal chemists were not able to develop agents capable of destroying them or to prevent their extension. In particular, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), representing one of the most common human pathogens, have been reported with increased frequency since their first identification twenty years ago. The enterobacterial carbapenemases differ from the extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) in their ability to hydrolyze β-lactams, cephalosporins and most importantly monobactams and carbapenems. They are progressively spreading throughout the world, therefore leaving no effective β-lactam to cure bacterial infections. Several BLs-carbapenemase Xray structures have been determined making these enzymes attractive targets for structure-based drug design studies. However, very little has been done so far to powerfully address the inhibitor design issues for this emerging type of BLs. Here, we focus on the structural basis for molecular recognition and for broad spectrum activity of class A carbapenemases: based on available 3-dimensional structural information we identify a theoretical pharmacophoric model as a starting point for the development of needed carbapenemases inhibitors.

  6. An artificial intelligence-based structural health monitoring system for aging aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Tang, Stanley S.; Chen, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    To reduce operating expenses, airlines are now using the existing fleets of commercial aircraft well beyond their originally anticipated service lives. The repair and maintenance of these 'aging aircraft' has therefore become a critical safety issue, both to the airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration. This paper presents the results of an innovative research program to develop a structural monitoring system that will be used to evaluate the integrity of in-service aerospace structural components. Currently in the final phase of its development, this monitoring system will indicate when repair or maintenance of a damaged structural component is necessary.

  7. Evaluation of aged concrete structures for continued service in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Arndt, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    Results are summarized of a study on concrete component aging and its significance relative to continued service of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond the initial period for which they were granted operating licenses. Progress is presented of a second study being conducted to identify and provide acceptance criteria for structural safety issues which the USNRC staff will need to address when applications are submitted for continued service of NPPs. Major activities under this program include: development of a materials property data base, establishment of structural component assessment and repair procedures, and development of a methodology for determination of structural reliability.

  8. Evaluation of aged concrete structures for continued service in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Arndt, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    Results are summarized of a study on concrete component aging and its significance relative to continued service of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond the initial period for which they were granted operating licenses. Progress is presented of a second study being conducted to identify and provide acceptance criteria for structural safety issues which the USNRC staff will need to address when applications are submitted for continued service of NPPs. Major activities under this program include: development of a materials property data base, establishment of structural component assessment and repair procedures, and development of a methodology for determination of structural reliability. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Crystal Structure of PnpCD, a Two-subunit Hydroquinone 1,2-Dioxygenase, Reveals a Novel Structural Class of Fe2+-dependent Dioxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiheng; Su, Tiantian; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Wen-Mao; Zhu, Deyu; Su, Jing; Wei, Tiandi; Wang, Kang; Huang, Yan; Guo, Liming; Xu, Sujuan; Zhou, Ning-Yi; Gu, Lichuan

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic microorganisms have evolved a variety of pathways to degrade aromatic and heterocyclic compounds. However, only several classes of oxygenolytic fission reaction have been identified for the critical ring cleavage dioxygenases. Among them, the most well studied dioxygenases proceed via catecholic intermediates, followed by noncatecholic hydroxy-substituted aromatic carboxylic acids. Therefore, the recently reported hydroquinone 1,2-dioxygenases add to the diversity of ring cleavage reactions. Two-subunit hydroquinone 1,2-dioxygenase PnpCD, the key enzyme in the hydroquinone pathway of para-nitrophenol degradation, catalyzes the ring cleavage of hydroquinone to γ-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. Here, we report three PnpCD structures, named apo-PnpCD, PnpCD-Fe3+, and PnpCD-Cd2+-HBN (substrate analog hydroxyenzonitrile), respectively. Structural analysis showed that both the PnpC and the C-terminal domains of PnpD comprise a conserved cupin fold, whereas PnpC cannot form a competent metal binding pocket as can PnpD cupin. Four residues of PnpD (His-256, Asn-258, Glu-262, and His-303) were observed to coordinate the iron ion. The Asn-258 coordination is particularly interesting because this coordinating residue has never been observed in the homologous cupin structures of PnpCD. Asn-258 is proposed to play a pivotal role in binding the iron prior to the enzymatic reaction, but it might lose coordination to the iron when the reaction begins. PnpD also consists of an intriguing N-terminal domain that might have functions other than nucleic acid binding in its structural homologs. In summary, PnpCD has no apparent evolutionary relationship with other iron-dependent dioxygenases and therefore defines a new structural class. The study of PnpCD might add to the understanding of the ring cleavage of dioxygenases. PMID:26304122

  10. Structural and functional classes of multipolar cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Doucet, John R; Ryugo, David K

    2006-04-01

    Multipolar cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) are a structurally and functionally diverse group of projection neurons. Understanding their role in the ascending pathway involves partitioning multipolar cells into distinct populations and determining where in the brain each sends its coded messages. In this study, we used retrograde labeling techniques in rats to identify multipolar neurons that project their axons to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), the contralateral CN, or both structures. Three rats received injections of biotinylated dextran amine in the ipsilateral DCN and diamidino yellow in the contralateral CN. Several radiate multipolar neurons (defined by their axonal projections to the ipsilateral DCN and their dendrites that traverse VCN isofrequency sheets) were double-labeled but over 70% were not. This result suggests two distinct populations: (1) radiate-commissural (RC) multipolar cells that project to the ipsilateral DCN and the contralateral CN, and (2) radiate multipolar cells that project exclusively (in this context) to the ipsilateral DCN. In a different group of animals, we retrogradely labeled multipolar neurons that project their axons to the contralateral CN and measured the size of their cell bodies. The mean size of this population (266 +/- 156 microm2) was significantly smaller than those of RC-multipolar cells (418 +/- 140 microm2). We conclude that the CN commissural pathway is composed of at least two components: (1) RC multipolar cells and (2) commissural multipolar cells that are small- and medium-sized neurons that project exclusively (in this context) to the contralateral CN. These results identify separate structural groups of multipolar cells that may correspond to physiological unit types described in the literature. They also provide protocols for isolating and studying different populations of multipolar cells to determine the neural mechanisms that govern their responses to sound.

  11. A novel class of cholinergic agents structurally related to 2-morpholinol.

    PubMed

    Feriani, A; Gaviraghi, G; Toson, G; Valsecchi, B; Caldirola, P; Ravasi, M; Merlini, L; Redaelli, C; Grana, E; Zonta, F

    1992-01-01

    A series of esters and ethers of N-alkylmorpholin-2-ols, and their methiodides, which can be considered cyclic analogues of acetylcholine, were synthesized. The amines were obtained by acylation or etherification of morpholinols with the appropriate acyl chlorides and alcohols. All compounds were tested for their ability to interact with the muscarinic receptor M2 (guinea-pig atria) or M3 (rat ileum and urinary bladder) subtype. Some compounds, although endowed with relatively low potency, proved interesting for their organ selectivity. Some considerations on the structure-activity relationship are made and the results obtained with reference agonists and antagonists are also shown.

  12. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy C458 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H.; Farahmand, B.; Rioja, R.

    2003-01-01

    Compared with aluminum alloys such as 2219, which is widely used in space vehicle for cryogenic tanks and unpressurized structures, aluminum-lithium alloys possess attractive combinations of lower density and higher modulus along with comparable mechanical properties. These characteristics have resulted in the successful use of the aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 (Al-1.0 Li-4.0 Cu-0.4 Mg-0.4 Ag-0.12 Zr) for the Space Shuttle External Tank, and the consideration of newer U.S. aluminum-lithium alloys such as L277 and C458 for future space vehicles. These newer alloys generally have lithium content less than 2 wt. % and their composition and processing have been carefully tailored to increase the toughness and reduce the mechanical property anisotropy of the earlier generation alloys such 2090 and 8090. Alloy processing, particularly the aging treatment, has a significant influence on the strength-toughness combinations and their dependence on service environments for aluminum-lithium alloys. Work at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on alloy 2195 has shown that the cryogenic toughness can be improved by employing a two-step aging process. This is accomplished by aging at a lower temperature in the first step to suppress nucleation of the strengthening precipitate at sub-grain boundaries while promoting nucleation in the interior of the grains. Second step aging at the normal aging temperature results in precipitate growth to the optimum size. A design of experiments aging study was conducted for plate. To achieve the T8 temper, Alloy C458 (Al-1.8 Li-2.7 Cu-0.3 Mg- 0.08 Zr-0.3 Mn-0.6 Zn) is typically aged at 300 F for 24 hours. In this study, a two-step aging treatment was developed through a comprehensive 24 full factorial design of experiments study and the typical one-step aging used as a reference. Based on the higher lithium content of C458 compared with 2195, the first step aging temperature was varied between 175 F and 250 F. The second step aging temperatures was

  13. Rational prescription of drugs within similar therapeutic or structural class for gastrointestinal disease treatment: Drug metabolism and its related interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Yan, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Zhong-Miao; Pan, Wen-Sheng; Zeng, Su

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To review and summarize drug metabolism and its related interactions in prescribing drugs within the similar therapeutic or structural class for gastrointestinal disease treatment so as to promote rational use of medicines in clinical practice. METHODS: Relevant literature was identified by performing MEDLINE/Pubmed searches covering the period from 1988 to 2006. RESULTS: Seven classes of drugs were chosen, including gastric proton pump inhibitors, histamine H2-receptor antagonists, benzamide-type gastroprokinetic agents, selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, fluoroquinolones, macrolide antibiotics and azole antifungals. They showed significant differences in metabolic profile (i.e., the fraction of drug metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP), CYP reaction phenotype, impact of CYP genotype on interindividual pharmacokinetics variability and CYP-mediated drug-drug interaction potential). Many events of severe adverse drug reactions and treatment failures were closely related to the ignorance of the above issues. CONCLUSION: Clinicians should acquaint themselves with what kind of drug has less interpatient variability in clearance and whether to perform CYP genotyping prior to initiation of therapy. The relevant CYP knowledge helps clinicians to enhance the management of patients with gastrointestinal disease who may require treatment with polytherapeutic regimens. PMID:17948937

  14. Platyhelminth Venom Allergen-Like (VAL) proteins: revealing structural diversity, class-specific features and biological associations across the phylum

    PubMed Central

    CHALMERS, IAIN W.; HOFFMANN, KARL F.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY During platyhelminth infection, a cocktail of proteins is released by the parasite to aid invasion, initiate feeding, facilitate adaptation and mediate modulation of the host immune response. Included amongst these proteins is the Venom Allergen-Like (VAL) family, part of the larger sperm coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS) superfamily. To explore the significance of this protein family during Platyhelminthes development and host interactions, we systematically summarize all published proteomic, genomic and immunological investigations of the VAL protein family to date. By conducting new genomic and transcriptomic interrogations to identify over 200 VAL proteins (228) from species in all 4 traditional taxonomic classes (Trematoda, Cestoda, Monogenea and Turbellaria), we further expand our knowledge related to platyhelminth VAL diversity across the phylum. Subsequent phylogenetic and tertiary structural analyses reveal several class-specific VAL features, which likely indicate a range of roles mediated by this protein family. Our comprehensive analysis of platyhelminth VALs represents a unifying synopsis for understanding diversity within this protein family and a firm context in which to initiate future functional characterization of these enigmatic members. PMID:22717097

  15. Age-related reduction of structural complexity in spleen hematopoietic tissue architecture in mice.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Igor; Paunovic, Jovana; Basta-Jovanovic, Gordana; Perovic, Milan; Pantic, Senka; Milosevic, Nebojsa T

    2013-09-01

    The effects of aging on structural complexity in hematopoietic tissue are unknown. In this work, in a mouse experimental model, we report the age-related reduction of spleen hematopoietic tissue (SHT) complexity. Spleen tissue was obtained from the total of 64 male Swiss albino mice divided into 8 age groups: newborns (0 days old), 10 days, 20 days, 30 days, 120 days, 210 days, 300 and 390 days old. SHT was stained using conventional hematoxylin/eosin, and DNA-binding toluidine blue dyes. Fractal dimension as an indicator of cellular complexity, and lacunarity as indicator of tissue heterogeneity were determined based on the binarized SHT micrographs. Results indicate that fractal dimension of mice spleen hematopoietic tissue decreases with age, while lacunarity increases. These changes/trends have been detected in SHT stained both with toluidine blue and conventional hematoxylin/eosin. Fractal dimension was negatively correlated with lacunarity. The detected reduction in complexity suggests that age-related structural changes are present in mouse SHT both in general tissue architecture and progenitor cell DNA.

  16. Structure and mechanism of action of the hydroxy aryl aldehyde class of IRE1 endoribonuclease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Mario; Duffy, Nicole M.; Talukdar, Manisha; Thevakumaran, Nero; Chiovitti, David; Canny, Marella D.; Lee, Kenneth; Kurinov, Igor; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Poda, Gennadiy; Prakesch, Michael; Wilson, Brian; Tam, Victor; Schweitzer, Colleen; Toro, Andras; Lucas, Julie L.; Vuga, Danka; Lehmann, Lynn; Durocher, Daniel; Zeng, Qingping; Patterson, John B.; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates the unfolded protein response and its dysfunction is linked to multiple diseases. The stress transducer IRE1α is a transmembrane kinase endoribonuclease (RNase) that cleaves mRNA substrates to re-establish ER homeostasis. Aromatic ring systems containing hydroxy-aldehyde moieties, termed hydroxy aryl aldehydes (HAA), selectively inhibit IRE1α RNase and thus represent a novel chemical series for therapeutic development. We solved crystal structures of murine IRE1α in complex with three HAA inhibitors. HAA inhibitors engage a shallow pocket at the RNase active site through pi-stacking interactions with His910 and Phe889, an essential Schiff base with Lys907 and a H-bond with Tyr892. Structure activity studies and mutational analysis of contact residues define the optimal chemical space of inhibitors and validate the inhibitor binding site. These studies lay the foundation for understanding both the biochemical and cellular functions of IRE1α using small molecule inhibitors and suggest new avenues for inhibitor design. PMID:25164867

  17. [Structural changes of aged biochar and the influence on phenanthrene adsorption].

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Guo, Yue; Wu, Jing-Gui; Huang, Zhao-Qin; Dai, Jing-Yu

    2014-07-01

    Biochars prepared by pyrolysis of rice husk at 350 degrees C and 550 degrees C were incubated in the lucifugal thermostat for 300 d. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques were applied to explore the structural change before and after incubation. It was found that the oxygen content was increased after incubation, suggesting the formation of oxygen-containing functional groups. Incubation of the biochars also enhanced their nonlinear adsorption of phenanthrene. Structural change subjected to incubation was in fact affected by the pyrolysis temperatures at which the biochars were synthesized. Increase of polarity and decrease of aromaticity were found for biochars prepared at 350 degrees C. In contrast, incubation of biochars prepared at 550 degrees C resulted in increased aliphatic contents and aromaticity, as well as decrease of carboxyl group. The adsorption capacity of phenanthrene predicted by Langmuir model was 3.57 and 2.35 mg x g(-1) for new and aged biochar with lower pyrolysis temperature, respectively. It was assumed that change of the surface structure of the biochars due to aging inhibited the adsorption. On the contrary, aging of biochares prepared at 550 degrees C resulted in enhanced adsorption capacity of phenanthrene from 0.42 to 4.17 mg x (-1), which was probably correlated to the partition effect due to enhanced aromaticity. The data obtained in this research suggested that aging of biochars potentially affected the fate of the pollutants in environment.

  18. The effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Talalaj, Izabela Anna Walery, Maria

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • An effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was presented. • The waste accumulation index is influenced by a number of unemployed women. • Greater share of women in society contributes to greater waste production. • A model describing the analyzed dependences was determined. - Abstract: In this study the effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was investigated. The data from 10-year period, from 2001 to 2010 year, were taken into consideration. The following parameters of gender and age structure were analyzed: men and woman quantity, female to male ratio, number of working, pre-working and post-working age men/women, number of unemployed men/women. The results have showed a strong correlation of annual per capita waste generation rate with number of unemployed women (r = 0.70) and female to male ratio (r = 0.81). This indicates that waste generation rate is more depended on ratio of men and women that on quantitative size of each group. Using the regression analysis a model describing the dependence between female to male ratio, number of unemployed woman and waste quantity was determined. The model explains 70% of waste quantity variation. Obtained results can be used both to improve waste management and to a fuller understanding of gender behavior.

  19. The evolution of alternative cryptic female choice strategies in age-structured populations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Adam G

    2002-12-01

    Cryptic female choice is a potentially important aspect of the sexual selection process. According to the theory of sexual dialectics, postcopulation manipulation of relative male fertilization success can provide an avenue by which females can circumvent attempts by males to control female reproduction. Here I use stochastic models to investigate the evolution of cryptic female choice in populations with and without age structure. In populations without age structure, cryptic female choice will evolve only when (1) precopulatory mate choice by females is inefficient, (2) variation in male fitness is correlated with a trait upon which a female can base her choice of mates, and (3) the cost of multiple mating is not too high. In populations with age structure, similar conditions apply. However, selection sometimes favors females that employ alternative strategies of female choice at different ages. These results help to define the types of biological systems in which we should expect to see the evolution of cryptic female choice. They also illustrate that the evolution of choice strategies in females may be complex and may mirror in some important respects the evolution of alternative mating tactics in males.

  20. Field theoretic analysis of a class of planar microwave and optoelectronic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, Yeon-Chang

    2000-11-01

    With increasing operating frequencies in CMOS RF/microwave integrated circuits, the performance of on- chip interconnects is becoming significantly affected by the lossy substrate. It is the purpose of the first part of this thesis to develop a rigorous field theoretic analysis approach for efficient characterization of single and multiple coupled interconnects on silicon substrate, which is applicable over a wide range of substrate resistivities. The frequency-dependent transmission line parameters of a microstrip on silicon are determined by a new formulation based on a quasi- electrostatic and quasi-magnetostatic spectral domain approach. It is demonstrated that this new quasi-static formulation provides the complete frequency-dependent interconnect characteristics for all three major transmission line modes of operation. In particular, it is shown that in the case of heavily doped CMOS substrates, the distributed series inductance and series resistance parameters are significantly affected by the presence of longitudinal substrate currents giving rise to the substrate skin-effect. The method is further extended to multiple coupled single and multi-level interconnect structures with ground plane and multiple coupled co-planar stripline structures without ground plane. The finite conductor thickness is taken into account in terms of a stacked conductor model. The new quasi-static approach is validated by comparison with results obtained with a full-wave spectral domain method and the commercial planar full-wave electromagnetic field solver HP/Momentum®, as well as published simulation and measurement data. In the second part of this thesis, coupled planar optical interconnect structures are investigated based on a rigorous field theoretic analysis combined with an application of the normal mode theory for coupled transmission lines. A new transfer matrix description for a general optical directional coupler is presented. Based on this transfer matrix formulation

  1. Definitions of fitness in age-structured populations: Comparison in the haploid case.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sabin; Soares, Cintia

    2016-02-21

    Fisher's (1930) Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection (FTNS), and in particular the development of an explicit age-structured version of the theorem, is of everlasting interest. In a recent paper, Grafen (2015a) argues that Fisher regarded his theorem as justifying individual rather than population fitness maximization. The argument relies on a new definition of fitness in age-structured populations in terms of individual birth and death rates and age-specific reproductive values in agreement with a principle of neutrality. The latter are frequency-dependent and defined without reference to genetic variation. In the same paper, it is shown that the rate of increase in the mean of the breeding values of fitness weighted by the reproductive values, but keeping the breeding values constant as in Price (1972) is equal to the additive genetic variance in fitness. Therefore, this partial change is obtained by keeping constant not only the genotypic birth and death rates but also the mean age-specific birth and death rates from which the age-specific reproductive values are defined. In this paper we reaffirm that the Malthusian parameter which measures the relative rate of increase or decrease in reproductive value of each genotype in a continuous-time age-structured population is the definition of fitness used in Fisher's (1930) FTNS. This is shown by considering an age-structured asexual haploid population with constant age-specific birth and death (or survival) parameters for each type. Although the original statement of the FTNS is for a diploid population, this simplified haploid model allows us to address the definition of fitness meant in this theorem without the complexities and effects of a changing genic environment. In this simplified framework, the rate of change in mean fitness in continuous time is expected to be exactly equal to the genetic variance in fitness (or to the genetic variance in fitness divided by the mean fitness in discrete time), which can

  2. [Intergenerational communication by age-integrating structures? Remarks on on gerontologic utopia].

    PubMed

    Amrhein, L

    2002-08-01

    In their "aging and society" paradigm Riley and collaborators conceptualize the ideal type of an age-integrated society in which the social segregation of different age groups is removed. They claim that in the future the life-world areas of education, work and leisure will no longer exclusively follow the triple division of the life course but will be visited repeatedly in different phases of life. Therefore, they argue, age barriers would be dissolved in many areas, which would lead to more contact and cooperation and to a greater solidarity between the generations. This conception shall be rejected as an utopia because it contradicts central functional mechanisms of modern societies; at best it might be imagined as a "reflexive modernization" of age-segregated structures. A certain distance and alienation between the generations remains a direct, though unintended product of the modernization process and cannot be reversed without welfare losses. A dialogue of generations as a societal project, therefore, implies that the functional differentiation into age groups and life stages will be accepted without referring to pre-modern idealizations of generational relationships.

  3. Age and disease-related structural changes in the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Vera L

    2008-01-01

    As the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) ages, a number of structural changes occur, including loss of melanin granules, increase in the density of residual bodies, accumulation of lipofuscin, accumulation of basal deposits on or within Bruch’s membrane, formation of drusen (between the basal lamina of the RPE and the inner collagenous layer of Bruch’s membrane), thickening of Bruch’s membrane, microvilli atrophy and disorganization of the basal infoldings. Although these changes are well known, the basic mechanisms involved in them are frequently poorly understood. These age-related changes progress slowly and vary in severity in different individuals. These changes are also found in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a late onset disease that severely impacts the RPE, but they are much more pronounced than during normal aging. However, the changes in AMD lead to severe loss of vision. Given the many supporting functions which the RPE serves for the retina, it is important to decipher the age-related changes in this epithelium in order to understand age-related changes in vision. PMID:19668732

  4. ALPS: The Age-Layered Population Structure for Reducing the Problem of Premature Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    To reduce the problem of premature convergence we define a new attribute of an individual, its age, and propose the Age-Layered Population Structure (ALPS), in which age is used to restrict competition and breeding between members of the population. ALPS differs from a typical EA by segregating individuals into different age-layers by their age - a measure of how long the genetic material has been in the population - and by regularly replacing all individuals in the bottom layer with randomly generated ones. The introduction of new, randomly generated individuals at regular intervals results in an EA that is never completely converged and is always looking at new parts of the fitness landscape. By using age to restrict competition and breeding search is able to develop promising young individuals without them being dominated by older ones. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the ALPS algorithm on an antenna design problem in which evolution with ALPS produces antennas more than twice as good as does evolution with two other types of EAs. Further analysis shows that the ALPS model does allow the offspring of newly generated individuals to move the population out of mediocre local-optima to better parts of the fitness landscape.

  5. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection of Flux-rope Structures as a Precursor to an Eruptive X-class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Yang, Kai; Hou, Yijun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We present the quasi-periodic slipping motion of flux-rope structures prior to the onset of an eruptive X-class flare on 2015 March 11, obtained by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The slipping motion occurred at the north part of the flux rope and seemed to successively peel off the flux rope. The speed of the slippage was 30-40 km s-1, with an average period of 130 ± 30 s. The Si iv λ1402.77 line showed a redshift of 10-30 km s-1 and a line width of 50-120 km s-1 at the west legs of slipping structures, indicative of reconnection downflow. The slipping motion lasted about 40 minutes, and the flux rope started to rise up slowly at the late stage of the slippage. Then an X2.1 flare was initiated, and the flux rope was impulsively accelerated. One of the flare ribbons swept across a negative-polarity sunspot, and the penumbral segments of the sunspot decayed rapidly after the flare. We studied the magnetic topology at the flaring region, and the results showed the existence of a twisted flux rope, together with quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) structures binding the flux rope. Our observations imply that quasi-periodic slipping magnetic reconnection occurs along the flux-rope-related QSLs in the preflare stage, which drives the later eruption of the flux rope and the associated flare.

  6. Analysis of the mechanism of action of potent antibacterial hetero-tri-organometallic compounds: a structurally new class of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Michaela; Patra, Malay; Senges, Christoph Helmut Rudi; Ott, Ingo; Stepanek, Jennifer Janina; Pinto, Antonio; Prochnow, Pascal; Vuong, Cuong; Langklotz, Sina; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2013-07-19

    Two hetero-tri-organometallic compounds with potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria including multi-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were identified. The compounds consist of a peptide nucleic acid backbone with an alkyne side chain, substituted with a cymantrene, a (dipicolyl)Re(CO)3 moiety, and either a ferrocene (FcPNA) or a ruthenocene (RcPNA). Comparative proteomic analysis indicates the bacterial membrane as antibiotic target structure. FcPNA accumulation in the membrane was confirmed by manganese tracing with atomic absorption spectroscopy. Both organometallics disturbed several essential cellular processes taking place at the membrane such as respiration and cell wall biosynthesis, suggesting that the compounds affect membrane architecture. Correlating with enhanced antibacterial activity, oxidative stress was induced only by the ferrocene-substituted compound. The organometallics described here target the cytoplasmic membrane, a clinically proven antibacterial target structure, feature a bactericidal but non-bacteriolytic mode of action and limited cytotoxicity within the limits of solubility. Thus, FcPNA represents a promising lead structure for the development of a new synthetic class of antibiotics.

  7. Expression, purification, kinetic, and structural characterization of an alpha-class carbonic anhydrase from Aedes aegypti (AaCA1).

    PubMed

    Fisher, S Zoë; Tariku, Iyerus; Case, Nicolette M; Tu, Chingkuang; Seron, Teri; Silverman, David N; Linser, Paul J; McKenna, Robert

    2006-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are zinc-containing metalloenzymes that catalyze the interconversion of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate. The alpha-class CAs are found predominantly in vertebrates, but they are also expressed in insects like mosquitoes. Recently, an alpha-CA from the midgut of Aedes aegypti larvae (AaCA1) was identified, cloned, and subsequently shown to share high sequence homologous to human CA I (HCA I). This paper presents the bacterial expression, purification, and kinetic characterization of the soluble CA domain of AaCA1. The data show AaCA1 is a highly active CA that displays inhibition by methazolamide and ethoxzolamide with nM affinity. Additionally, a homology model of AaCA1, based on the crystal structure of HCA I, is presented and the overall structure, active site, and surface charge properties are compared to those of HCA I and II. Measurements of catalysis show that AaCA1 is more like HCA II in terms of proton transfer, but more similar to HCA I in terms of conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate, and these differences are rationalized in terms of structure. These results also indicate that amino acid differences in the active site of AaCA1 compared to human CAs could be used to design specific CA inhibitors for the management of mosquito populations.

  8. Structure of the GAF domain, a ubiquitous signaling motif and a new class of cyclic GMP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yew-Seng J.; Burden, Lisa M.; Hurley, James H.

    2000-01-01

    GAF domains are ubiquitous motifs present in cyclic GMP (cGMP)-regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, certain adenylyl cyclases, the bacterial transcription factor FhlA, and hundreds of other signaling and sensory proteins from all three kingdoms of life. The crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YKG9 protein was determined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structure revealed a fold that resembles the PAS domain, another ubiquitous signaling and sensory transducer. YKG9 does not bind cGMP, but the isolated first GAF domain of phosphodiesterase 5 binds with Kd = 650 nM. The cGMP binding site of the phosphodiesterase GAF domain was identified by homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis, and consists of conserved Arg, Asn, Lys and Asp residues. The structural and binding studies taken together show that the cGMP binding GAF domains form a new class of cyclic nucleotide receptors distinct from the regulatory domains of cyclic nucleotide-regulated protein kinases and ion channels. PMID:11032796

  9. Structural Basis for the Presentation of Tumor-Associated MHC Class II-Restricted Phosphopeptides to CD4+ T Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Depontieu, F; Sidney, J; Salay, T; Engelhard, V; Hunt, D; Sette, A; Topalian, S; Mariuzza, R

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulated protein phosphorylation is a hallmark of malignant transformation. Transformation can generate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound phosphopeptides that are differentially displayed on tumor cells for specific recognition by T cells. To understand how phosphorylation alters the antigenic identity of self-peptides and how MHC class II molecules present phosphopeptides for CD4{sup +} T-cell recognition, we determined the crystal structure of a phosphopeptide derived from melanoma antigen recognized by T cells-1 (pMART-1), selectively expressed by human melanomas, in complex with HLA-DR1. The structure revealed that the phosphate moiety attached to the serine residue at position P5 of pMART-1 is available for direct interactions with T-cell receptor (TCR) and that the peptide N-terminus adopts an unusual conformation orienting it toward TCR. This structure, combined with measurements of peptide affinity for HLA-DR1 and of peptide-MHC recognition by pMART-1-specific T cells, suggests that TCR recognition is focused on the N-terminal portion of pMART-1. This recognition mode appears to be distinct from that of foreign antigen complexes but is remarkably reminiscent of the way autoreactive TCRs engage self- or altered self-peptides, consistent with the tolerogenic nature of tumor-host immune interactions.

  10. Structural Basis for Different Substrate Profiles of Two Closely Related Class D β-Lactamases and Their Inhibition by Halogens.

    PubMed

    Stojanoski, Vlatko; Chow, Dar-Chone; Fryszczyn, Bartlomiej; Hu, Liya; Nordmann, Patrice; Poirel, Laurent; Sankaran, Banumathi; Prasad, B V Venkataram; Palzkill, Timothy

    2015-06-02

    OXA-163 and OXA-48 are closely related class D β-lactamases that exhibit different substrate profiles. OXA-163 hydrolyzes oxyimino-cephalosporins, particularly ceftazidime, while OXA-48 prefers carbapenem substrates. OXA-163 differs from OXA-48 by one substitution (S212D) in the active-site β5 strand and a four-amino acid deletion (214-RIEP-217) in the loop connecting the β5 and β6 strands. Although the structure of OXA-48 has been determined, the structure of OXA-163 is unknown. To further understand the basis for their different substrate specificities, we performed enzyme kinetic analysis, inhibition assays, X-ray crystallography, and molecular modeling. The results confirm the carbapenemase nature of OXA-48 and the ability of OXA-163 to hydrolyze the oxyimino-cephalosporin ceftazidime. The crystal structure of OXA-163 determined at 1.72 Å resolution reveals an expanded active site compared to that of OXA-48, which allows the bulky substrate ceftazidime to be accommodated. The structural differences with OXA-48, which cannot hydrolyze ceftazidime, provide a rationale for the change in substrate specificity between the enzymes. OXA-163 also crystallized under another condition that included iodide. The crystal structure determined at 2.87 Å resolution revealed iodide in the active site accompanied by several significant conformational changes, including a distortion of the β5 strand, decarboxylation of Lys73, and distortion of the substrate-binding site. Further studies showed that both OXA-163 and OXA-48 are inhibited in the presence of iodide. In addition, OXA-10, which is not a member of the OXA-48-like family, is also inhibited by iodide. These findings provide a molecular basis for the hydrolysis of ceftazidime by OXA-163 and, more broadly, show how minor sequence changes can profoundly alter the active-site configuration and thereby affect the substrate profile of an enzyme.

  11. [Colombia: effects of a structured educational program on the attitude of the elderly to old age].

    PubMed

    Becerra Moncayo, E; Cerna Barba, M; Lerma González, J; Barona de Infante, N

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-nine elderly were assessed on the attitudes toward aging before and after attending to an Estructural Educational Program (EEP), with a participative methodology. The program's objective was to strength and reorient the attitudes of aceptation, integration and communication. Subjects have been part of an urban sector of low social economical status from Cali, Colombia. A quasiexperimental research design, with a convenient sample was used. It was applied a questionnaire to each subject to collect biopsychosocial data, a Lickert scale before and after the EEP to measure attitudes, as well as an observational guide to measure individual and group behavior before and after each class. A statistical significative growth was observed on the attitudes toward integration, aceptation and communication (t22 = 2.46 p less than 0.05). Data indicated that elderly attitudes can be strengthened and reoriented through a EEP adjusted to the biopsychosocial characteristics of the group.

  12. On the structure of solutions to a class of quasilinear elliptic Neumann problems. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunshan; Li, Yi

    2010-01-01

    We continue our work (Y. Li, C. Zhao in J Differ Equ 212:208–233, 2005) to study the structure of positive solutions to the equation εm Δmu − um−1 + f(u) = 0 with homogeneous Neumann boundary condition in a smooth bounded domain of RN (N ≥ 2). First, we study subcritical case for 2 < m < N and show that after passing by a sequence positive solutions go to a constant in C1, α sense as ε → ∞. Second, we study the critical case for 1 < m < N and prove that there is a uniform upper bound independent of ε ∈ [1, ∞) for the least-energy solutions. Third, we show that in the critical case for 1 < m ≤ 2 the least energy solutions must be a constant if ε is sufficiently large and for 2 < m < N the least energy solutions go to a constant in C1, α sense as ε → ∞. PMID:20700388

  13. Structure elucidation of hexabromocyclododecanes--a class of compounds with a complex stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Schweizer, W Bernd; Kohler, Martin; Gerecke, Andreas C

    2005-09-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) are high production volume chemicals (16700 t worldwide in 2001) used as flame-retardants for plastics and textiles. HBCDs exhibit typical properties of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). They are highly lipophilic and accumulate in biota. Increasing environmental concentrations of HBCDs, mostly reported as sum values, have been observed. As such, HBCDs have to be considered as potential emerging POPs, but their occurrence and environmental fate have not yet been addressed at the level of individual HBCD stereoisomers. Considering the six stereogenic centers of HBCDs, 16 stereoisomers, six diastereomeric pairs of enantiomers as well as four meso forms, can be deduced. Herein, we report spectroscopic and chromatographic data for eight out of 16 possible HBCD stereoisomers, which were isolated from a technical product. Six stereoisomers were identified as three pairs of enantiomers ((+/-) alpha-, beta-, and gamma-HBCDs), differing in optical rotation and chromatographic retention on a chiral phase. The crystal structures of these pairs of enantiomers were determined. Another two of these eight HBCD stereoisomers, not yet described in the literature, showed no optical rotation and are tentatively assigned as meso forms (delta- and epsilon-HBCD). The given spectroscopic and chromatographic information allows the unambiguous identification of eight HBCD stereoisomers and the occurrence, fate, and toxicology of these individual stereoisomers can now be studied.

  14. Mixing times towards demographic equilibrium in insect populations with temperature variable age structures.

    PubMed

    Damos, Petros

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we use entropy related mixing rate modules to measure the effects of temperature on insect population stability and demographic breakdown. The uncertainty in the age of the mother of a randomly chosen newborn, and how it is moved after a finite act of time steps, is modeled using a stochastic transformation of the Leslie matrix. Age classes are represented as a cycle graph and its transitions towards the stable age distribution are brought forth as an exact Markov chain. The dynamics of divergence, from a non equilibrium state towards equilibrium, are evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Moreover, Kullback-Leibler distance is applied as information-theoretic measure to estimate exact mixing times of age transitions probabilities towards equilibrium. Using empirically data, we show that on the initial conditions and simulated projection's trough time, that population entropy can effectively be applied to detect demographic variability towards equilibrium under different temperature conditions. Changes in entropy are correlated with the fluctuations of the insect population decay rates (i.e. demographic stability towards equilibrium). Moreover, shorter mixing times are directly linked to lower entropy rates and vice versa. This may be linked to the properties of the insect model system, which in contrast to warm blooded animals has the ability to greatly change its metabolic and demographic rates. Moreover, population entropy and the related distance measures that are applied, provide a means to measure these rates. The current results and model projections provide clear biological evidence why dynamic population entropy may be useful to measure population stability.

  15. Structural and functional rejuvenation of the aged brain by an approved anti-asthmatic drug

    PubMed Central

    Marschallinger, Julia; Schäffner, Iris; Klein, Barbara; Gelfert, Renate; Rivera, Francisco J.; Illes, Sebastian; Grassner, Lukas; Janssen, Maximilian; Rotheneichner, Peter; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Coras, Roland; Boccazzi, Marta; Chishty, Mansoor; Lagler, Florian B.; Renic, Marija; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Singewald, Nicolas; Blümcke, Ingmar; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Lie, D. Chichung; Abbracchio, Maria P.; Aigner, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    As human life expectancy has improved rapidly in industrialized societies, age-related cognitive impairment presents an increasing challenge. Targeting histopathological processes that correlate with age-related cognitive declines, such as neuroinflammation, low levels of neurogenesis, disrupted blood–brain barrier and altered neuronal activity, might lead to structural and functional rejuvenation of the aged brain. Here we show that a 6-week treatment of young (4 months) and old (20 months) rats with montelukast, a marketed anti-asthmatic drug antagonizing leukotriene receptors, reduces neuroinflammation, elevates hippocampal neurogenesis and improves learning and memory in old animals. By using gene knockdown and knockout approaches, we demonstrate that the effect is mediated through inhibition of the GPR17 receptor. This work illustrates that inhibition of leukotriene receptor signalling might represent a safe and druggable target to restore cognitive functions in old individuals and paves the way for future clinical translation of leukotriene receptor inhibition for the treatment of dementias. PMID:26506265

  16. Fine structural changes in the lateral vestibular nucleus of aging rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Miquel, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fine structure of the lateral vestibular nucleus was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, that were sacrified at 4 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 6-8 months, and 18-20 months of age. In the neuronal perikaria, the following age-associated changes were seen with increasing frequency with advancing age: rodlike nuclear inclusions and nuclear membrane invaginations; cytoplasmic dense bodies with the characteristics of lipofuscin; and moderate disorganization of the granular endoplasmic reticulum. Dense bodies were also seen in glial cells. Rats 18 to 20 months old showed dendritic swellings, axonal degeneration, and an apparent increase in the number of axosomatic synaptic terminals containing flattened vesicles (presumed to be inhibitory in function).

  17. Parametric Geometry, Structured Grid Generation, and Initial Design Study for REST-Class Hypersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlemann, Paul G.; Gollan, Rowan J.

    2010-01-01

    Computational design and analysis of three-dimensional hypersonic inlets with shape transition has been a significant challenge due to the complex geometry and grid required for three-dimensional viscous flow calculations. Currently, the design process utilizes an inviscid design tool to produce initial inlet shapes by streamline tracing through an axisymmetric compression field. However, the shape is defined by a large number of points rather than a continuous surface and lacks important features such as blunt leading edges. Therefore, a design system has been developed to parametrically construct true CAD geometry and link the topology of a structured grid to the geometry. The Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) constitutes the underlying framework that is used to build the geometry and grid topology. Parameterization of the CAD geometry allows the inlet shapes produced by the inviscid design tool to be generated, but also allows a great deal of flexibility to modify the shape to account for three-dimensional viscous effects. By linking the grid topology to the parametric geometry, the GridPro grid generation software can be used efficiently to produce a smooth hexahedral multiblock grid. To demonstrate the new capability, a matrix of inlets were designed by varying four geometry parameters in the inviscid design tool. The goals of the initial design study were to explore inviscid design tool geometry variations with a three-dimensional analysis approach, demonstrate a solution rate which would enable the use of high-fidelity viscous three-dimensional CFD in future design efforts, process the results for important performance parameters, and perform a sample optimization.

  18. Halophilic class I aldolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: some salt-dependent structural features.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, G; Altekar, W

    1993-01-26

    Aldolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the extremely halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula vallismortis are stable only in high concentrations of KCl present within the physiological environment. Data concerning the structural changes in the two enzymes as a result of lowering of salt concentration and changes in pH were obtained by monitoring the intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of quenchers. When the KCl concentrations were lowered below 2 M or in the presence of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, the emission maximum shifted to a longer wavelength, indicating enhanced exposure of tryptophyl residues to the solvent. The spectral characteristics of the two proteins in guanidine hydrochloride and 0.4 M KCl were identical. However, these denatured states appear to be different than those observed after acid denaturation. Further perturbation of fluorescence was observed due to I-, and application of the Stern-Volmer law showed that the total fluorescence was available to the quenchers only in 0.4 M KCl solutions. The unfolding of proteins in 0.4 M KCl was a gradual process which was accompanied by a time-dependent loss in enzyme activity. The activity loss was complete within 30 min for aldolase whereas in the case of GAPDH nearly 3 h was required for the destruction of activity. For both enzymes, inactivation and protein denaturation were strongly correlated. The data on activity and thermostability measurements of the two enzymes in varying concentrations of KCl and potassium phosphate revealed that though both proteins are halophilic, the forces in the maintenance of their stability could be different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. The Canalicular Structure of Compact Bone in the Rat at Different Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shigenori; Yoshida, Shigemitsu; Ashrafi, Shahid H.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2002-04-01

    Osteocytes communicate through a canalicular system that maintains the vitality and mineral metabolism of bone. Casting the vascular canals and canaliculi of compact bone with methacrylate and viewing them with scanning electron microscopy shows their extent and relationships. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of the same specimen before corrosion establishes the degree of calcification of the different tissue components. These methods were used to compare basal with alveolar compact bone in the rat mandible at different ages. Sections of the mandibular molar region were placed in a methacrylate resin. After polymerization and study with confocal microscopy, the organic matrix was removed. Juvenile rats had large irregular central vascular canals and lacunae that were more concentric in the basal than the alveolar bone. Cast lacunae were round, and the canaliculi from these lacunae were short and thick in both bones. Adult rats had regular concentrically arranged lacunae in the basal bone. Cast lacunae were ellipsoid and flatter in the basal bone than in the alveolar bone. The intercommunicating canaliculi were increased and canaliculi had more branching than the juvenile rats. The aged rats had fewer vascular canals, lacunae, and canaliculi and had osteoporotic changes. The cast lacunae were slender and flat especially in the basal bone. The porosity of the mandible became more pronounced in the alveolar than in the basal bone with aging. The canaliculi of mandibular compact bone thinned and developed extensive branching with adulthood but decreased in size and number with advanced age. Lacunae proceed from the large circular structures of youth to the flat forms of the aged. These studies show that the internal structure of compact bone changes with age and mirrors its functional state.

  20. From chaos to chaos. An analysis of a discrete age-structured prey-predator model.

    PubMed

    Wikan, A

    2001-12-01

    Discrete age-structured density-dependent one-population models and discrete age-structured density-dependent prey-predator models are considered. Regarding the former, we present formal proofs of the nature of bifurcations involved as well as presenting some new results about the dynamics in unstable and chaotic parameter regions. Regarding the latter, we show that increased predation may act both as a stabilizing and a destabilizing effect. Moreover, we find that possible periodic dynamics of low period, either exact or approximate, may not be generated by the predator, but it may be generated by the prey. Finally, what is most interesting from the biological point of view, is that given that the prey, in absence of the predator, exhibits periodic or almost periodic oscillations of low period, then the introduction of the predator does not alter this periodicity in any substantial way until the stabilizing effect of increased predation becomes so strong that a stable equilibrium is achieved.