Science.gov

Sample records for age dating techniques

  1. Cation-ratio dating: A new rock varnish age-determination technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Ronald I.

    1983-07-01

    Rock varnish coats many surfaces of geomorphic and archaeologic interest in arid lands. All varnish dating techniques are limited by the time lag between the exposure of a surface to subaerial processes and the onset of varnishing. They are valid only where manganese is not remobilized after deposition, for example, in most arid environments. The premise of a new age-determination method, cation-ratio dating, is that the ratio of the more mobile cations (e.g., K and Ca) to titanium in varnish decreases with time. Although there are many inherent assumptions and potential limitations, cation-ratio dating has been verified on relative age-sequences from a Death Valley debris cone, Negev Desert talus flatirons, and prehistoric lake levels at Searles Lake in California. Varnish cation ratios have been calibrated to independently dated surfaces in the Coso volcanic field and vicinity in California. Tentative absolute dates have been assigned to geomorphic surfaces in the Coso area. Cation ratios have been used to distinguish relative ages of archaeologic artifacts in southwestern North America and to demonstrate that varnish at the South Stoddard locality, Mojave Desert, did not form in 25 yr.

  2. Age validation of canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) using two independent otolith techniques: lead-radium and bomb radiocarbon dating.

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A; Lundstrom, C C; Stanley, R D

    2007-11-04

    Canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) have long been an important part of recreational and commercial rockfish fishing from southeast Alaska to southern California, but localized stock abundances have declined considerably. Based on age estimates from otoliths and other structures, lifespan estimates vary from about 20 years to over 80 years. For the purpose of monitoring stocks, age composition is routinely estimated by counting growth zones in otoliths; however, age estimation procedures and lifespan estimates remain largely unvalidated. Typical age validation techniques have limited application for canary rockfish because they are deep dwelling and may be long lived. In this study, the unaged otolith of the pair from fish aged at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada was used in one of two age validation techniques: (1) lead-radium dating and (2) bomb radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) dating. Age estimate accuracy and the validity of age estimation procedures were validated based on the results from each technique. Lead-radium dating proved successful in determining a minimum estimate of lifespan was 53 years and provided support for age estimation procedures up to about 50-60 years. These findings were further supported by {Delta}{sup 14}C data, which indicated a minimum estimate of lifespan was 44 {+-} 3 years. Both techniques validate, to differing degrees, age estimation procedures and provide support for inferring that canary rockfish can live more than 80 years.

  3. Plutonium age dating reloaded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Monika; Richter, Stephan; Aregbe, Yetunde; Wellum, Roger; Mayer, Klaus; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Although the age determination of plutonium is and has been a pillar of nuclear forensic investigations for many years, additional research in the field of plutonium age dating is still needed and leads to new insights as the present work shows: Plutonium is commonly dated with the help of the 241Pu/241Am chronometer using gamma spectrometry; in fewer cases the 240Pu/236U chronometer has been used. The age dating results of the 239Pu/235U chronometer and the 238Pu/234U chronometer are scarcely applied in addition to the 240Pu/236U chronometer, although their results can be obtained simultaneously from the same mass spectrometric experiments as the age dating result of latter. The reliability of the result can be tested when the results of different chronometers are compared. The 242Pu/238U chronometer is normally not evaluated at all due to its sensitivity to contamination with natural uranium. This apparent 'weakness' that renders the age dating results of the 242Pu/238U chronometer almost useless for nuclear forensic investigations, however turns out to be an advantage looked at from another perspective: the 242Pu/238U chronometer can be utilized as an indicator for uranium contamination of plutonium samples and even help to identify the nature of this contamination. To illustrate this the age dating results of all four Pu/U clocks mentioned above are discussed for one plutonium sample (NBS 946) that shows no signs of uranium contamination and for three additional plutonium samples. In case the 242Pu/238U chronometer results in an older 'age' than the other Pu/U chronometers, contamination with either a small amount of enriched or with natural or depleted uranium is for example possible. If the age dating result of the 239Pu/235U chronometer is also influenced the nature of the contamination can be identified; enriched uranium is in this latter case a likely cause for the missmatch of the age dating results of the Pu/U chronometers.

  4. Age of Barrier Canyon-style rock art constrained by cross-cutting relations and luminescence dating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, Joel L.; Chapot, Melissa S.; Simms, Steven R.; Sohbati, Reza; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Murray, Andrew S.; Cox, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Rock art compels interest from both researchers and a broader public, inspiring many hypotheses about its cultural origin and meaning, but it is notoriously difficult to date numerically. Barrier Canyon-style (BCS) pictographs of the Colorado Plateau are among the most debated examples; hypotheses about its age span the entire Holocene epoch and previous attempts at direct radiocarbon dating have failed. We provide multiple age constraints through the use of cross-cutting relations and new and broadly applicable approaches in optically stimulated luminescence dating at the Great Gallery panel, the type section of BCS art in Canyonlands National Park, southeastern Utah. Alluvial chronostratigraphy constrains the burial and exhumation of the alcove containing the panel, and limits are also set by our related research dating both a rockfall that removed some figures and the rock's exposure duration before that time. Results provide a maximum possible age, a minimum age, and an exposure time window for the creation of the Great Gallery panel, respectively. The only prior hypothesis not disproven is a late Archaic origin for BCS rock art, although our age result of A.D. ∼1-1100 coincides better with the transition to and rise of the subsequent Fremont culture. This chronology is for the type locality only, and variability in the age of other sites is likely. Nevertheless, results suggest that BCS rock art represents an artistic tradition that spanned cultures and the transition from foraging to farming in the region.

  5. Age of Barrier Canyon-style rock art constrained by cross-cutting relations and luminescence dating techniques.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Joel L; Chapot, Melissa S; Simms, Steven R; Sohbati, Reza; Rittenour, Tammy M; Murray, Andrew S; Cox, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Rock art compels interest from both researchers and a broader public, inspiring many hypotheses about its cultural origin and meaning, but it is notoriously difficult to date numerically. Barrier Canyon-style (BCS) pictographs of the Colorado Plateau are among the most debated examples; hypotheses about its age span the entire Holocene epoch and previous attempts at direct radiocarbon dating have failed. We provide multiple age constraints through the use of cross-cutting relations and new and broadly applicable approaches in optically stimulated luminescence dating at the Great Gallery panel, the type section of BCS art in Canyonlands National Park, southeastern Utah. Alluvial chronostratigraphy constrains the burial and exhumation of the alcove containing the panel, and limits are also set by our related research dating both a rockfall that removed some figures and the rock's exposure duration before that time. Results provide a maximum possible age, a minimum age, and an exposure time window for the creation of the Great Gallery panel, respectively. The only prior hypothesis not disproven is a late Archaic origin for BCS rock art, although our age result of A.D. ∼ 1-1100 coincides better with the transition to and rise of the subsequent Fremont culture. This chronology is for the type locality only, and variability in the age of other sites is likely. Nevertheless, results suggest that BCS rock art represents an artistic tradition that spanned cultures and the transition from foraging to farming in the region. PMID:25157162

  6. Age of Barrier Canyon-style rock art constrained by cross-cutting relations and luminescence dating techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Joel L.; Chapot, Melissa S.; Simms, Steven R.; Sohbati, Reza; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Murray, Andrew S.; Cox, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Rock art compels interest from both researchers and a broader public, inspiring many hypotheses about its cultural origin and meaning, but it is notoriously difficult to date numerically. Barrier Canyon-style (BCS) pictographs of the Colorado Plateau are among the most debated examples; hypotheses about its age span the entire Holocene epoch and previous attempts at direct radiocarbon dating have failed. We provide multiple age constraints through the use of cross-cutting relations and new and broadly applicable approaches in optically stimulated luminescence dating at the Great Gallery panel, the type section of BCS art in Canyonlands National Park, southeastern Utah. Alluvial chronostratigraphy constrains the burial and exhumation of the alcove containing the panel, and limits are also set by our related research dating both a rockfall that removed some figures and the rock’s exposure duration before that time. Results provide a maximum possible age, a minimum age, and an exposure time window for the creation of the Great Gallery panel, respectively. The only prior hypothesis not disproven is a late Archaic origin for BCS rock art, although our age result of A.D. ∼1–1100 coincides better with the transition to and rise of the subsequent Fremont culture. This chronology is for the type locality only, and variability in the age of other sites is likely. Nevertheless, results suggest that BCS rock art represents an artistic tradition that spanned cultures and the transition from foraging to farming in the region. PMID:25157162

  7. Paleointensity record in zero-age submarine basalt glasses: testing a new dating technique for recent MORBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlut, J.; Kent, D. V.

    2000-12-01

    Thellier-Thellier paleointensity experiments were conducted on a collection of glasses from three very recent submarine axial flows. Two were erupted along the Juan de Fuca ridge at around 46°N and one along the East Pacific Rise South at around 18°S. The within-sample dispersion of paleointensity results from the 'Animal Farm' flow (EPR south) is very low and leads to a well-defined mean value of 35.6±1 μT (95% error on the mean) based on 11 glass chips from four independent samples. Today's geomagnetic field intensity in the area is 31.2 μT. Comparing Animal Farm results with published field model reference curves developed for the past 400 yr suggests an eruptive date estimated between 1880 A.D. and 1950 A.D. (taking into account different sources of errors). This is consistent with qualitative evidence for the age of this flow and constitutes the first precise demonstration of using paleointensity as a dating tool for very recent mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs). However in the Juan de Fuca area results show a more erratic pattern with samples varying by up to 30% higher and lower from the expected value of about 55 μT. The dispersion is attributed to the large local crustal magnetic anomalies in this area that can lead to inconsistent intensity values over the same unit. Local magnetic anomalies should thus always be checked when doing paleointensity on MORB samples which should also be distributed as widely as possible in a flow unit. When no significant magnetic anomalies are detected the paleointensity dating tool is anticipated to be especially efficient to investigate the volcanic cyclicity along the EPR axis during the last several hundred years.

  8. Microstructures and Argon age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Marnie; Fitz Gerald, John; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Microstructures can be dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but certain conditions apply. In particular the nature of the physical processes that took place during development of need be identified, and the pattern of gas release (and/or retention) during their evolution in nature, and subsequently in the mass spectrometer, during the measurement process. Most researchers cite temperature as the sole variable of importance. There is a belief that there is a single "closure temperature" or a "closure interval" above which the mineral is incapable of retaining radiogenic argon. This is a false conception. Closure is practically relevant only in circumstances that see a rock cooled relatively rapidly from temperatures that were high enough to prevent significant accumulation of radiogenic argon, to temperatures below which there is insignificant loss of radiogenic argon through the remainder of the geological history. These conditions accurately apply only to a limited subset - for example to rocks that cool rapidly from a melt and thereafter remain at or close to the Earth's surface, without subsequent ingress of fluids that would cause alteration and modification of microstructure. Some minerals in metamorphic rocks might display such "cooling ages" but in principle these data are difficult to interpret since they depend on the rate of cooling, the pressures that applied, and the subsequent geological history. Whereas the science of "cooling ages" is relatively well understood, the science of the Argon Partial Retention Zone is in its infancy. In the Argon PRZ it is evident that ages should (and do) show a strong correlation with microstructure. The difficulty is that, since diffusion of Argon is simultaneously multi-path and multi-scale, it is difficult to directly interrogate the distinct reservoirs that store gas populations and thus the age information that can be recorded as to the multiple events during the history of an individual microstructure. Laser

  9. Dating techniques in archaeology and paleoanthropology

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.E.

    1987-02-15

    Archaeologists have an increasing array of physical dating methods at their disposal. R.E. Taylor of the University of California discusses available techniques, recent advances in radiocarbon dating, and current developments in radiocalcium dating.

  10. Dating Techniques in Archaeology and Paleoanthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the new physical dating methods being used by archaeologists and paleoanthropologists to study the material remains of ancient primates. Describes the quaternary physical dating techniques, advances in radiocarbon dating, and the radiocalcium data method. (TW)

  11. Developing 226Ra and 227Ac age-dating techniques for nuclear forensics to gain insight from concordant and non-concordant radiochronometers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kayzar, Theresa M.; Williams, Ross W.

    2015-09-26

    The model age or ‘date of purification’ of a nuclear material is an important nuclear forensic signature. In this study, chemical separation and MC-ICP-MS measurement techniques were developed for 226 Ra and 227Ac: grand-daughter nuclides in the 238U and 235U decay chains respectively. The 230Th-234U, 226Ra-238U, 231Pa-235U, and 227Ac-235U radiochronometers were used to calculate model ages for CRM-U100 standard reference material and two highly-enriched pieces of uranium metal from the International Technical Working Group Round Robin 3 Exercise. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the accuracy of the 226Ra-238U and 227Ac-235U chronometers and provide information about nuclide migration during uranium processing.

  12. Teen-Age Dating Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Karla J.

    It has been estimated that one out of three teenage girls will be involved in an abusive relationship or experience violence in their relationships. Given the fact that studies are showing higher incidence of dating violence reported among teenagers, the importance and usefulness of this topic for anyone who works with adolescents cannot be…

  13. Thermochronology of economic mineral deposits: dating the stages of mineralization at Panasqueira, Portugal, by high-precision 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectrum techniques on muscovite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snee, L.W.; Sutter, J.F.; Kelly, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study is an example of a new and powerful application of 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum dating of muscovite. It is now possible to establish time constraints necessary for solving some of the long-standing problems in economic geology. Beyond this, the unique geologic situation of Panasqueira has allowed us to quantify the thermal characteristics of muscovite. Published fluid inclusion data have been used to estimate a muscovite argon closure temperature of ~325??C during rapid cooling or short reheating and a temperature of ~270??C during slow cooling or extended reheating. Argon-loss patterns displayed by all dated muscovites resulted from reheating after original closure; the mechanism for this argon loss appears to have been argon transport by volume diffusion. Thus, 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum dating of muscovite can be used to evaluate thermal conditions controlling argon diffusion as well as age, duration, and number of episodes of mineralization. -from Authors

  14. Computational Age Dating of Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-06-30

    This slide-show presented an overview of the Constrained Progressive Reversal (CPR) method for computing decays, age dating, and spoof detecting. The CPR method is: Capable of temporal profiling a SNM sample; Precise (compared with known decay code, such a ORIGEN); Easy (for computer implementation and analysis). We have illustrated with real SNM data using CPR for age dating and spoof detection. If SNM is pure, may use CPR to derive its age. If SNM is mixed, CPR will indicate that it is mixed or spoofed.

  15. Calibration age and quartet divergence date estimation.

    PubMed

    Brochu, Christopher A

    2004-06-01

    The date of a single divergence point--between living alligators and crocodiles--was estimated with quartet dating using calibrations of widely divergent ages. For five mitochondrial sequence datasets, there is a clear relationship between calibration age and quartet estimate--quartets based on two relatively recent calibrations support younger divergence estimates than do quartets based on two older calibrations. Some of the estimates supported by young quartets are impossibly young and exclude the first appearance of the group in the fossil record as too old. The older estimates--those based on two relatively old calibrations--may be overestimates, and those based on one old and one recent calibration support divergence estimates very close to fossil data. This suggests that quartet dating methods may be most effective when calibrations are applied from different parts of a clade's history. PMID:15266985

  16. Calibration of cosmogenic noble gas production based on 36Cl-36Ar ages. Part 2. The 81Kr-Kr dating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Dalcher, N.; Vogel, N.; Wieler, R.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2015-11-01

    We calibrated the 81Kr-Kr dating system for ordinary chondrites of different sizes using independent shielding-corrected 36Cl-36Ar ages. Krypton concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured in bulk samples from 14 ordinary chondrites of high petrologic type and the cosmogenic Kr component was obtained by subtracting trapped Kr from phase Q. The thus-determined average cosmogenic 78Kr/83Kr, 80Kr/83Kr, 82Kr/83Kr, and 84Kr/83Kr ratiC(Lavielle and Marti 1988; Wieler 2002). The cosmogenic 78Kr/83Kr ratio is correlated with the cosmogenic 22Ne/21Ne ratio, confirming that 78Kr/83Kr is a reliable shielding indicator. Previously, 81Kr-Kr ages have been determined by assuming the cosmogenic production rate of 81Kr, P(81Kr)c, to be 0.95 times the average of the cosmogenic production rates of 80Kr and 82Kr; the factor Y = 0.95 therefore accounts for the unequal production of the various Kr isotopes (Marti 1967a). However, Y should be regarded as an empirical adjustment. For samples whose 80Kr and 82Kr concentrations may be affected by neutron-capture reactions, the shielding-dependent cosmogenic (78Kr/83Kr)c ratio has been used instead to calculate P(81Kr)/P(83Kr), as for some lunar samples, this ratio has been shown to linearly increase with (78Kr/83Kr)c (Marti and Lugmair 1971). However, the 81Kr-Kr ages of our samples calculated with these methods are on average ~30% higher than their 36Cl-36Ar ages, indicating that most if not all the 81Kr-Kr ages determined so far are significantly too high. We therefore re-evaluated both methods to determine P(81Kr)c/P(83Kr)c. Our new Y value of 0.70 ± 0.04 is more than 25% lower than the value of 0.95 used so far. Furthermore, together with literature data, our data indicate that for chondrites, P(81Kr)c/P(83Kr)c is rather constant at 0.43 ± 0.02, at least for the shielding range covered by our samples ([78Kr/83Kr]c = 0.119-0.185; [22Ne/21Ne]c = 1.083-1.144), in contrast to the observations on lunar samples. As expected

  17. Surface dating of dynamic landforms: young boulders on aging moraines.

    PubMed

    Hallet, B; Putkonen, J

    1994-08-12

    The dating of landforms is crucial to understanding the evolution, history, and stability of landscapes. Cosmogenic isotope analysis has recently been used to determine quantitative exposure ages for previously undatable landform surfaces. A pioneering application of this technique to date moraines illustrated its considerable potential but suggested a chronology partially inconsistent with existing geological data. Consideration of the dynamic nature of landforms and of the ever-present processes of erosion, deposition, and weathering leads to a resolution of this inconsistency and, more generally, offers guidance for realistic interpretation of exposure ages. PMID:17782145

  18. U-Pb dating of a speleothem of Quaternary age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, David A.; Bottrell, Simon H.; Cliff, Robert A.; Ströhle, Klaus; Rowe, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    We demonstrate that U-Pb dating is a promising method for secondary carbonate materials of Quaternary age and older by obtaining a 206Pb∗/ 238U age for a speleothem with high U (>10 μg g -1) and very low Pb (<10 ng g -1) that is supported by an independent 230Th age. Thermal ionisation mass-spectrometry was used to determine the U and Pb isotopic ratios and concentrations for subsamples of a stalactite from Winnats Head Cave, Peak District, UK. We obtained 206Pb/ 204Pb ratios up to 50, and determined a 206Pb∗/ 238U age of 248 ± 10 ka, which is within error of the 207Pb∗/ 235U age of 333 ± 79 ka and a-spectrometric U-Th age of ˜255 ka. For samples of Tertiary and Quaternary age, the initial state of U-series disequilibrium is an important consideration and, as with most radiometric dating techniques, the mineral must have remained closed to U, Th, Pb, and all intermediate daughters. We show that dense calcite speleothems are ideal in this respect and that no loss of Rn has occurred. Unlike U-series disequilibrium methods, U-Pb dating has no upper limit and, hence, materials of Quaternary age older than 0.6 Ma can be analysed to investigate landscape development, paleoclimate, hominid evolution or hydrogeochemistry in carbonate terrains.

  19. 27 CFR 19.410 - Age and fill date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Age and fill date. 19.410... Spirits from Customs Custody § 19.410 Age and fill date. For purposes of this part, the age and fill date for spirits imported or brought into the United States will be: (a) The claimed age, as shown on...

  20. 27 CFR 19.410 - Age and fill date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Age and fill date. 19.410... Spirits from Customs Custody § 19.410 Age and fill date. For purposes of this part, the age and fill date for spirits imported or brought into the United States will be: (a) The claimed age, as shown on...

  1. 27 CFR 19.410 - Age and fill date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Age and fill date. 19.410... Spirits from Customs Custody § 19.410 Age and fill date. For purposes of this part, the age and fill date for spirits imported or brought into the United States will be: (a) The claimed age, as shown on...

  2. 27 CFR 19.410 - Age and fill date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Age and fill date. 19.410... Spirits from Customs Custody § 19.410 Age and fill date. For purposes of this part, the age and fill date for spirits imported or brought into the United States will be: (a) The claimed age, as shown on...

  3. Age-dating of rockslides: Methods and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, M.; Sanders, D.; Prager, C.

    2009-04-01

    Age-dating of deposits of catastrophic rockslides is prerequisite to unravel the potential relation between the frequency of mass-wasting events with climatic change or earthquakes. In the Alps, about 250 rockslides exceeding 106 m3 in volume are known, but the age as yet is determined only for a comparatively small number of events. For age determination of rockslide events, different methods are available (e. g. Lang et al., 1999). Radiocarbon Dating In the past few decades, rockslide deposits commonly were proxy-dated by 14C age determination of organic remnants preserved (a) in glacial, fluvio-glacial sediments overridden by the rockslide, (b) within the rockslide mass, or (c) in rockslide-dammed backwater deposits or lakes situated atop the rockslide mass. In each case, the 14C age provides a different constraint on the age of the rockslide event: in case (a), the 14C age represents a maximum age of the event; in case (b), which is quite rare, the 14C age is generally considered as a good proxy of the event age; in case (c) the 14C age represents a minimum age for the rockslide event. Unfortunately, radiocarbon dating often cannot be applied because of absence of suited deposits or exposures thereof, lack of organic remnants or of remnants suited for age-dating, and/or because determined 14C ages are substantially biased. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) Proxy-dating of rockslide events by OSL can be applied to silt- to sand-sized quartzose sediments present (a) directly below, (b) within, or (c) above/laterally aside a rockslide mass. For each case (a) to (c), the determined ages are subject to the same constraints as outlined for radiocarbon dating. Unfortunately, situations allowing for application of OSL to rockslide event dating are comparatively rare, and the resulting ages tend to have a wide error range. Surface Exposure Dating with cosmogenic radionuclides Surface exposure ages can be determined for rock samples taken from the sliding planes at

  4. Developing 226Ra and 227Ac age-dating techniques for nuclear forensics to gain insight from concordant and non-concordant radiochronometers

    SciTech Connect

    Kayzar, Theresa M.; Williams, Ross W.

    2015-09-26

    The model age or ‘date of purification’ of a nuclear material is an important nuclear forensic signature. In this study, chemical separation and MC-ICP-MS measurement techniques were developed for 226 Ra and 227Ac: grand-daughter nuclides in the 238U and 235U decay chains respectively. The 230Th-234U, 226Ra-238U, 231Pa-235U, and 227Ac-235U radiochronometers were used to calculate model ages for CRM-U100 standard reference material and two highly-enriched pieces of uranium metal from the International Technical Working Group Round Robin 3 Exercise. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the accuracy of the 226Ra-238U and 227Ac-235U chronometers and provide information about nuclide migration during uranium processing.

  5. Spectral Age Dating of Volcanic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, N.; Calvin, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the HyspIRI preparatory airborne campaign, high spectral resolution data of the Mono-Inyo craters had been collected. The Mono-Inyo Craters are a chain of geologically young craters that have been erupted over the past 40,000 years. We show a spectral variation in the 2.21μm absorption band depth (commonly associated with the Si-OH stretch) between craters of different ages. To explain this we propose the devitrification of the surface of the volcanic materials creating a weathering rind that thickens with age. A definite linear correlation between age and band depth is shown for craters less than 5,000 years old and potential logarithmic correlation for older craters. To help test this, hand samples from the craters were collected from several of the volcanic craters and the weathering rind thickness measured using a scanning electron microprobe. This correlation combined with a HyspIRI like dataset could be used to define volcanic hazards in large or remote regions, such as the Aleutian Island Arc or Kamchatka Peninsula.

  6. Proton-beam technique dates fine wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear physicists in France have invented a way to authenticate the vintage of rare wine without needing a sommelier's keen nose or even a corkscrew. The technique, which involves firing high-energy protons at wine bottles, can determine how old the bottles are and even where they come from. The new method could help unmask counterfeit wines - a growing problem in the fine-wine industry, where a bottle can sell for thousands of Euros.

  7. Testing a luminescence surface-exposure dating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliganic, Luke A.; Meyer, Michael; Gehring, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has shown that the relationship between the luminescence signal (optically stimulated [OSL] and infra-red stimulated [IRSL]) and depth into a rock surface can be used to estimate the length of time since that rock surface has been exposed to sunlight (Sohbati et al., 2012), thus serving as a means for surface-exposure dating. Despite the potential of this new dating tool, few published studies have tested or used this technique. Here, we present the results of two tests of the method. First, we perform laboratory bleaching experiments using two unexposed bedrock samples of different lithologies (granite and quartzite). Sub-samples were bleached for various durations (0 to 100,000 s) in a solar simulator, and IRSL/OSL-depth profiles were measured and fitted using the model of Sohbati et al. (2012). Results of fitting for each sub-sample were then compared. Second, we used a granite boulder from a known age moraine (1850 CE) to test the reproducibility of bleaching depth curves. Multiple cores were collected from the same ~5 cm2 surface area of the boulder, and IRSL-depth profiles were measured and modelled. While our systematic tests confirm the general physical basis of luminescence surface-exposure dating method, we found unexpected scatter in both adjacent bleaching depth curves and the fitting parameters of isochronous rock surfaces for some of our samples. Potential sources of error, including small-scale lithological variabilities and implications for accuracy and precision of the method are discussed. Sohbati, R., Murray, A.S., Chapot, M.S., Jain, M., Pederson, J. (2012) Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) as a chronometer for surface exposure dating. Journal of Geophysical Research 117 (B9), B09202. doi.org/10.1029/2012JB009383.

  8. Application of paleomagnetic techniques for dating hydrocarbon migration events

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    Establishing a relationship between hydrocarbon migration and the precipitation of authigenic magnetite is important for the development of a method to date hydrocarbon migration using paleomagnetic techniques. Important evidence for the relationship comes from a study of light and dark-banded calcite speleothems that occur in Ordovician limestones in southern Oklahoma. The speleothems are Permian in age, based on interbedded fossils. The dark bands contain primary fluid inclusions filled with hydrocarbons that are not extensively biograded. They also possess over an order of magnitude stronger magnetization than light bands. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data indicate that the magnetization in the dark bands was acquired during the Early Permian and resides in magnetite. Spheres, interpreted to be authigenic magnetite, are also found in magnetic extracts from the dark calcite. The results from the light and dark bands suggest that chemical conditions created by the hydrocarbons caused precipitation of authigenic magnetite and acquisition of the associated chemical remanent magnetization.

  9. Age Dating of Mixed SNM--Preliminary Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, D., Guss, P. P., Yfantis, E., Klingensmith, A., Emer, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recently we investigated the nuclear forensics problem of age determination for mixed special nuclear material (SNM). Through limited computational mixing experiments and interactive age analysis, it was observed that age dating results are generally affected by the mixing of samples with different assays or even by small radioactive material contamination. The mixing and contamination can be detected through interactive age analysis, a function provided by the Decay Interaction, Visualization and Analysis (DIVA) software developed by NSTec. It is observed that for mixed SNM with two components, the age estimators typically fall into two distinct clusters on the time axis. This suggests that averaging or other simple statistical methods may not always be suitable for age dating SNM mixtures. Instead, an interactive age analysis would be more suitable for age determination of material components of such SNM mixtures. This work was supported by the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS).

  10. Radiocarbon dating of marine material: mollusc versus foraminifera ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callard, L.; Long, A. J.; Plets, R. M.; Cooper, A.; Belknap, D. F.; Edwards, R.; Jackson, D.; Kelley, J. T.; Long, D.; Milne, G. A.; Monteys, X.; Quinn, R.

    2013-12-01

    A key challenge in reconstructing Quaternary environmental change from marine archives is developing a robust chronology. During the last ~50k a-1, radiocarbon dating is the mainstay for many studies. Often investigators are restricted in the material that is available for dating, with studies relying on AMS dating of either mono-specific or mixed assemblages of foraminifera. In some instances, marine molluscs (broken or whole, articulated or disarticulated) may also be present and can provide an alternative or complementary dating target. Previous radiocarbon dating of paired foraminiferal and marine molluscan samples from the Kattegat (Denmark) revealed significant age offsets between these materials, inferred to reflect greater reworking of foraminifera compared to the marine molluscs (Heier-Nielsen et al., 1995). Here we present the results of a comparable study from the Irish Sea Basin, which forms part of a wider investigation into the evidence for the Late Glacial sea-level minima at offshore sites from around Britain and Ireland. We have collected and AMS 14C-dated twelve paired samples of foraminifera and marine shells. The results shows a systematic age offset with the monospecific foraminifera samples consistently giving older ages than their shell counterparts. This offset increases with sample age, reaching a maximum offset of 3000 years in the oldest sample (~ 13 ka cal a BP). These results are consistent with the observations of Heier-Nielsen et al. (1995), and we hypothesize that foraminifera may be more susceptible to reworking from older deposits because of their lower effective density than the shell samples. However, foraminifera size and shape may also be contributing factors. These findings are potentially significant for studies that develop chronologies based on radiocarbon dating of foraminifera alone, since the resulting dates may over-estimate sample age by several thousand years. We conclude by outlining an experimental design that seeks

  11. Age constraints for Palaeolithic cave art by U-Th dating of thin carbonate crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dirk; Pike, Alistair; Garcia-Diez, Marcos; Pettitt, Paul; Zilhão, João

    2015-04-01

    U-series dating is an important geochronological tool which is widely applied for instance in speleothem based palaeoclimate research. It has also great potential to provide age constraints for Archaeology, especially for sites or artefacts in cave environments. We present our methods to conduct precise U-Th dating of calcite crusts that formed on top of cave paintings. Recent developments in multi-collector (MC) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) U-series dating greatly improved the precision of this method, and sample sizes needed to obtain reliable results were significantly reduced. Based on these developments the U-series technique can be applied for accurate dating of thin calcite crusts covering cave art at many sites, while taking care not to harm the art underneath. The method provides minimum ages for the covered art and, where possible, also maximum ages by dating the flowstone layer the art is painted on. The U-Th method has been used in a number of recent projects to date calcite precipitates above and occasionally below cave paintings in Spain. Initial results from Cantabria have shown that the earliest dated paintings are older than 41.4 ± 0.6 ka, dating at least to the Early Aurignacian period and present a far longer chronology than that based so far on radiocarbon dating. Here we outline our methodology and the steps we take to demonstrate the reliability of U-Th dates, and present some recent results of our ongoing U-Th dating programme.

  12. Thermoluminescence dating of sediments: a re-extension of age range for loess

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.J.; Stipp, J.J.; Wintle, A.G.; Tamers, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating of wind blown minerals provides a technique whereby non-carbonaceous sediments could be dated to several hundred thousand years. Two recent reports, however, indicate age underestimates on feldspar in some European loesses older than 50 ka, the effect increasing in severity with age. Suggested causes include decay of luminescence centers, or does dependent sensitivity changes. Data presented in this paper do not support these limitations or explanations. TL provides 3 separate techniques of dating sediments, which, when used together, prove to be efficient internal cross checks for mineralogical anomalies or inconsistencies created by any of the individual methods. In the authors studies each sample was dated by all 3 methods whereas the Europeans analyses employed only the Regeneration technique. This work presents results from loess sections in Mississippi, Illinois and Alaska. These show excellent internal consistency, and consistency with both independent dating methods and stratigraphy, with 2 exceptions. Both exceptions were by the Regen technique giving age underestimates up to 30%. The underestimates were found to be caused by a change in mineral sensitivity resulting from the Regen requirements of strong laboratory light-bleaching followed by irradiations. A simple method to test and correct for this condition is presented. TL thus appears to remain a powerful and increasingly flexible method of sediment dating.

  13. Surface dating of bricks, an application of luminescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Anna; Martini, Marco; Maspero, Francesco; Panzeri, Laura; Sibilia, Emanuela

    2014-05-01

    Luminescence techniques are a powerful tool to date archaeological ceramic materials and geological sediments. Thermoluminescence (TL) is widely used for bricks dating to reconstruct the chronology of urban complexes and the development of human cultures. However, it can sometimes be inconclusive, since TL assesses the firing period of bricks, which can be reused, even several centuries later. This problem can be circumvented using a dating technique based on a resetting event different from the last heating. OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) exploits the last light exposition of the brick surface, which resets the light-sensitive electron traps until the surface is definitely shielded by mortar and superimposed bricks. This advanced application (surface dating) has been successfully attempted on rocks, marble and stone artifacts, but not yet on bricks. A recent conservation campaign at the Certosa di Pavia gave the opportunity to sample some bricks belonging to a XVII century collapsed wall, still tied to their mortars. This was an advantageous condition to test this technique, comparing the dating results with precise historical data. This attempt gave satisfactory results, allowing to identify bricks surely reused and to fully confirm that the edification of the perimetral wall occurred at the end of XVII century.

  14. Tectonic structures on Mercury: kinematics and age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Rothery, David; Di Achille, Gaetano; Marchi, Simone; Galluzzi, Valentina; Ferrari, Sabrina; Fassett, Caleb; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    At a global scale, Mercury is dominated by contractional features manifested as lobate scarps, wrinkle ridges and high-relief ridges. Here, we show that some of these features are associated with strike-slip kinematic indicators, which we identified using flyby and orbital Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) data and digital terrain models. We recognize oblique-shear kinematics along lobate scarps and high-relief ridges by means of (1) map geometries of fault patterns (frontal thrusts bordered by lateral ramps, strike-slip duplexes, restraining bends); (2) structural morphologies indicating lateral shearing (en echelon folding, pop-ups, pull-aparts); and (3) estimates of offsets based on displaced crater rims and differences in elevation between pop-up structures and pull-apart basins and their surroundings. Transpressional faults, documented across a wide range of latitudes, are found associated with reactivated rims of ancient buried basins and, in most cases, linked to frontal thrusts as lateral ramps hundreds of kilometres long. This latter observation suggests stable directions of tectonic transport over wide regions of Mercury's surface. In contrast, global cooling would imply an overall isotropic contraction with limited processes of lateral shearing induced by pre-existent lithospheric heterogeneities. Mantle convection therefore may have played an important role during the early tectonic evolution of Mercury. Estimating absolute model ages for compressional features and comparing it from what it is envisaged with thermal modeling based on cooling alone can be useful in determining if other processes could have been responsible for lobate scarps nucleation. In particular, ages more ancient that the one predicted by the models would imply other kind of tectonic processes ongoing during the early evolution of Mercury . For this reason, we date an extended thrust system, which we term the Blossom Thrust System, located between 80°E and 100°E, and 30°N and 15

  15. Estimation of submarine mass failure probability from a sequence of deposits with age dates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.; Chaytor, Jason D.; Parsons, Thomas E.; ten Brink, Uri S.

    2013-01-01

    The empirical probability of submarine mass failure is quantified from a sequence of dated mass-transport deposits. Several different techniques are described to estimate the parameters for a suite of candidate probability models. The techniques, previously developed for analyzing paleoseismic data, include maximum likelihood and Type II (Bayesian) maximum likelihood methods derived from renewal process theory and Monte Carlo methods. The estimated mean return time from these methods, unlike estimates from a simple arithmetic mean of the center age dates and standard likelihood methods, includes the effects of age-dating uncertainty and of open time intervals before the first and after the last event. The likelihood techniques are evaluated using Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC) and Akaike’s Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) to select the optimal model. The techniques are applied to mass transport deposits recorded in two Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) drill sites located in the Ursa Basin, northern Gulf of Mexico. Dates of the deposits were constrained by regional bio- and magnetostratigraphy from a previous study. Results of the analysis indicate that submarine mass failures in this location occur primarily according to a Poisson process in which failures are independent and return times follow an exponential distribution. However, some of the model results suggest that submarine mass failures may occur quasiperiodically at one of the sites (U1324). The suite of techniques described in this study provides quantitative probability estimates of submarine mass failure occurrence, for any number of deposits and age uncertainty distributions.

  16. Luminescence dating and palaeomagnetic age constraint on hominins from Sima de los Huesos, Atapuerca, Spain.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lee J; Demuro, Martina; Parés, Josep M; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Aranburu, Arantza; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2014-02-01

    Establishing a reliable chronology on the extensive hominin remains at Sima de los Huesos is critical for an improved understanding of the complex evolutionary histories and phylogenetic relationships of the European Middle Pleistocene hominin record. In this study, we use a combination of 'extended-range' luminescence dating techniques and palaeomagnetism to provide new age constraint on sedimentary infills that are unambiguously associated with the Sima fossil assemblage. Post-infrared-infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IR) dating of K-feldspars and thermally transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) dating of individual quartz grains provide weighted mean ages of 433 ± 15 ka (thousands of years) and 416 ± 19 ka, respectively, for allochthonous sedimentary horizons overlying the hominin-bearing clay breccia. The six replicate luminescence ages obtained for this deposit are reproducible and provide a combined minimum age estimate of 427 ± 12 ka for the underlying hominin fossils. Palaeomagnetic directions for the luminescence dated sediment horizon and underlying fossiliferous clays display exclusively normal polarities. These findings are consistent with the luminescence dating results and confirm that the hominin fossil horizon accumulated during the Brunhes Chron, i.e., within the last 780 ka. The new bracketing age constraint for the Sima hominins is in broad agreement with radiometrically dated Homo heidelbergensis fossil sites, such as Mauer and Arago, and suggests that the split of the H. neanderthalensis and H. sapiens lineages took place during the early Middle Pleistocene. More widespread numerical dating of key Early and Middle Pleistocene fossil sites across Europe is needed to test and refine competing models of hominin evolution. The new luminescence chronologies presented in this study demonstrate the versatility of TT-OSL and pIR-IR techniques and the potential role they could play in helping to refine evolutionary

  17. New twist on dating: radiocarbon dating techniques applied to air pollution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G.

    1981-05-01

    This paper deals with the problem of urban air pollution and to what extent it is caused by the burning of fossil fuels at factories or in cars, and to what extent it is due to the breathing processes of trees or the burning of natural fuels like wood. With the use of radiocarbon dating techniques the distinction between the pollutants can be made. The article describes the design of the gas proportional counter used to measure the extremely small samples of carbon in polluted air. (KRM)

  18. Genetic ages for Quaternary topographic evolution: A new dating tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, Dave; Burridge, Chris; Norris, Richard; Waters, Jon

    2008-01-01

    All eukaryote populations accumulate mutations in their mitochondrialDNA (mtDNA) over time, so reproductively isolated populationsbecome characterized by distinct mtDNA lineages. In addition,the degree of genetic differentiation among distinct populationscan be used to estimate time elapsed since their isolation.We have identified an informative system for calibrating themtDNA "clock" by genetically comparing freshwater galaxiid fishpopulations isolated in different river drainages. Calibrationusing a range of Quaternary geological events in southern NewZealand shows that the mtDNA divergence rate in galaxiid fishesis between 1% and 2%/100 k.y. up to 250 k.y., with the ratedecreasing with increasing age. The estimated divergence rateslows to around 4%/m.y. for the middle Quaternary, althoughcalibration is poor. A calibration curve has been fitted toall data: divergence (%) = -2.2e-9t + 2.5t + 2.2,where t is isolation age (in m.y.). This molecular clock haspotential as a dating tool for glacially related and activetectonic events that have caused river drainage changes in thelate Quaternary in the Southern Hemisphere, where galaxiidsare widespread. An application of this dating tool to an examplein northern South Island uses three different species of freshwater-limitedfish, and all three data sets imply formation of a drainagedivide at 320 ± 110 ka, at about the time of a majorglacial advance though the divide (oxygen isotope stage 8).

  19. Archaeomagnetic Dating of Bronze Age Pottery in Syria: New Intensity Data for 2300 to 1000 BCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillinger, M. D.; Feinberg, J. M.; Frahm, E.

    2013-12-01

    In order to construct meaningful site chronologies, Near Eastern archaeologists have traditionally relied on relative dating techniques, such as ceramic seriation and textual/glyptic evidence. The introduction of radiocarbon dating provided archaeologists with an absolute dating tool to address age discrepancies. However, many sites do not contain sufficient or suitable materials for radiocarbon analysis, requiring the need for an alternative absolute dating tool. Archaeomagnetic dating provides such an alternative. Excavations at Tell Mozan (Bronze-Age Urkesh) in northeastern Syria have revealed evidence for nearly 5000 years of occupation in strata containing a variety of diagnostic ceramic artifacts, which form the basis for a well-established relative site chronology. In order to test the agreement between seriation ages and paleomagnetic-derived ages, archaeointensity experiments were conducted on pottery specimens from six well-stratified occupational layers spanning more than a thousand years of the site's primary occupation. Archaeointensity was determined using the IZZI paleointensity protocol of Tauxe and Staudigel (2004), and all estimates were corrected for remanence anisotropy and cooling rate effects, resulting in an 88% success rate (n = 51). The magnetic mineral assemblage of each sample was also characterized using a comprehensive suite of rock magnetic techniques. Final results were compared with previous archaeointensity studies in the region, and 70% of the magnetically-derived ages agree with the archaeologically-derived dates within a 1σ confidence interval, while 76% agreed within 2σ. Artifacts showing disagreement with the seriation chronology are most likely objects in use long after their original firing or the result of contamination of strata from the re-use of previous occupational materials in construction. One specimen appears to confirm the presence of a geomagnetic spike around 1000 BCE previously identified in Syria, Israel

  20. Archaeomagnetic Dating of Bronze Age Pottery from Tell Mozan, Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillinger, Michele D.

    The ancient city-state of Urkesh, located at Tell Mozan, Syria, was the political and religious center of the Hurrians, a unique culture that inhabited the northern Syro-Mesopotamian region during the 3rd millennium BCE. The chronology of Urkesh has been divided into seven primary occupational phases, dating from the Early Dynastic II period (2800--2500 BCE) to the Middle Babylonian/ Mitanni Period (1500--1300 BCE). The site has provided an abundance of distinguishing ceramics, seals, seal impressions, and cuneiform tablets, which serve as the foundation for the Urkesh chronology. Working under the assumption that the archaeologically derived chronology at Mozan was reliable, this research tested the accuracy of archaeomagnetic dating using pottery samples from six successive occupational phases. Samples underwent a suite of magnetic mineral characterization tests and archaeointensity measurements using the Thellier-style absolute paleointensity technique of Tauxe and Staudigel (2004). Archaeointensity experiments displayed an 88% success rate and 80% of the samples correlated well with their archaeologically determined dates. A small subset of samples appeared to indicate a possible intensity spike occurring around 2000 BCE. The final results refine the archaeointensity curve for Syria between 2350 and 1200 BCE.

  1. Rewriting the Central European Early Bronze Age Chronology: Evidence from Large-Scale Radiocarbon Dating

    PubMed Central

    Knipper, Corina; Friedrich, Ronny; Kromer, Bernd; Lindauer, Susanne; Radosavljević, Jelena; Wittenborn, Fabian; Krause, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The transition from the Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe has often been considered as a supra-regional uniform process, which led to the growing mastery of the new bronze technology. Since the 1920s, archaeologists have divided the Early Bronze Age into two chronological phases (Bronze A1 and A2), which were also seen as stages of technical progress. On the basis of the early radiocarbon dates from the cemetery of Singen, southern Germany, the beginning of the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe was originally dated around 2300/2200 BC and the transition to more complex casting techniques (i.e., Bronze A2) around 2000 BC. On the basis of 140 newly radiocarbon dated human remains from Final Neolithic, Early and Middle Bronze Age cemeteries south of Augsburg (Bavaria) and a re-dating of ten graves from the cemetery of Singen, we propose a significantly different dating range, which forces us to re-think the traditional relative and absolute chronologies as well as the narrative of technical development. We are now able to date the beginning of the Early Bronze Age to around 2150 BC and its end to around 1700 BC. Moreover, there is no transition between Bronze (Bz) A1 and Bronze (Bz) A2, but a complete overlap between the type objects of the two phases from 1900–1700 BC. We thus present a revised chronology of the assumed diagnostic type objects of the Early Bronze Age and recommend a radiocarbon-based view on the development of the material culture. Finally, we propose that the traditional phases Bz A1 and Bz A2 do not represent a chronological sequence, but regionally different social phenomena connected to the willingness of local actors to appropriate the new bronze technology. PMID:26488413

  2. Rewriting the Central European Early Bronze Age Chronology: Evidence from Large-Scale Radiocarbon Dating.

    PubMed

    Stockhammer, Philipp W; Massy, Ken; Knipper, Corina; Friedrich, Ronny; Kromer, Bernd; Lindauer, Susanne; Radosavljević, Jelena; Wittenborn, Fabian; Krause, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The transition from the Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe has often been considered as a supra-regional uniform process, which led to the growing mastery of the new bronze technology. Since the 1920s, archaeologists have divided the Early Bronze Age into two chronological phases (Bronze A1 and A2), which were also seen as stages of technical progress. On the basis of the early radiocarbon dates from the cemetery of Singen, southern Germany, the beginning of the Early Bronze Age in Central Europe was originally dated around 2300/2200 BC and the transition to more complex casting techniques (i.e., Bronze A2) around 2000 BC. On the basis of 140 newly radiocarbon dated human remains from Final Neolithic, Early and Middle Bronze Age cemeteries south of Augsburg (Bavaria) and a re-dating of ten graves from the cemetery of Singen, we propose a significantly different dating range, which forces us to re-think the traditional relative and absolute chronologies as well as the narrative of technical development. We are now able to date the beginning of the Early Bronze Age to around 2150 BC and its end to around 1700 BC. Moreover, there is no transition between Bronze (Bz) A1 and Bronze (Bz) A2, but a complete overlap between the type objects of the two phases from 1900-1700 BC. We thus present a revised chronology of the assumed diagnostic type objects of the Early Bronze Age and recommend a radiocarbon-based view on the development of the material culture. Finally, we propose that the traditional phases Bz A1 and Bz A2 do not represent a chronological sequence, but regionally different social phenomena connected to the willingness of local actors to appropriate the new bronze technology. PMID:26488413

  3. The 40Ar/39Ar dating technique applied to planetary sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, F.

    2012-12-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar technique is a powerful geochronological method that can help to unravel the evolution of the solar system. The 40Ar/39Ar system can not only record the timing of volcanic and metamorphic processes on asteroids and planets, it finds domain of predilection in dating impact events throughout the solar system. However, the 40Ar/39Ar method is a robust analytical technique if, and only if, the events to be dated are well understood and data are not over interpreted. Yet, too many 'ages' reported in the literature are still based on over-interpretation of perturbed age spectra which tends to blur the big picture. This presentation is centred on the most recent applications of the 40Ar/39Ar technique applied to planetary material and through several examples, will attempt to demonstrate the benefit of focusing on statistically robust data. For example, 40Ar/39Ar dating of volcanic events on the Moon suggests that volcanism was mostly concentrated between ca. 3.8 and 3.1 Ga but statistical filtering of the data allow identifying a few well-defined eruptive events. The study of lunar volcanism would also benefit from dating of volcanic spherules. Rigorous filtering of the 40Ar/39Ar age database of lunar melt breccias yielded concordant and ages with high precision for two major basins (i.e. Imbrium & Serenitatis) of the Moon. 40Ar/39Ar dating of lunar impact spherules recovered from four different sites and with high- and low-K compositions shows an increase of ages younger than 400 Ma suggesting a recent increase in the impact flux. The impact history of the LL parent body (bodies?) has yet to be well constrained but may mimic the LHB observed on the Moon, which would indicate that the LL parent body was quite large. 40Ar/39Ar dating (in progress) of grains from the asteroid Itokawa recovered by the japanese Hayabusa mission have the potential to constrain the formation history and exposure age of Itokawa and will allow us to compare the results with the

  4. THE IMPACT OF ENHANCED He AND CNONa ABUNDANCES ON GLOBULAR CLUSTER RELATIVE AGE-DATING METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    MarIn-Franch, Antonio; Aparicio, Antonio; Cassisi, Santi; Pietrinferni, Adriano E-mail: antapaj@iac.e E-mail: pietrinferni@oa-teramo.inaf.i

    2010-05-10

    The impact that unrecognized differences in the chemical patterns of Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) have on their relative age determinations is studied. The two most widely used relative age-dating methods, horizontal and vertical, together with the more recent relative MS-fitting method, were carefully analyzed on a purely theoretical basis. The BaSTI library was adopted to perform the present analysis. We find that relative ages derived using the horizontal and vertical methods are largely dependent on the initial He content and heavy element distribution. Unrecognized cluster-to-cluster chemical abundance differences can lead to an error in the derived relative ages as large as {approx}0.5 (or {approx}6 Gyr if an age of 12.8 Gyr is adopted for normalization) and even larger for some extreme cases. It is shown that the relative MS-fitting method is by far the age-dating technique for which undetected cluster-to-cluster differences in the He abundance have less impact. Present results are used in order to pose constraints on the maximum possible spread in the He and CNONa elements abundances on the basis of the estimates-taken from the literature-of the GGCs relative age dispersion obtained with the various relative age-dating techniques. Finally, it is shown that the age-metallicity relation found for young GGCs by the GC Treasury program is a real age sequence and cannot be produced by variations in the He and/or heavy element distribution.

  5. Geophysical Age Dating of Seamounts using Dense Core Flexure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gyuha; Kim, Seung-Sep

    2016-04-01

    Lithospheric flexure of oceanic plate is thermo-mechanical response of an elastic plate to the given volcanic construct (e.g., seamounts and ocean islands). If the shape and mass of such volcanic loads are known, the flexural response is governed by the thickness of elastic plate, Te. As the age of oceanic plate increases, the elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere becomes thicker. Thus, we can relate Te with the age of plate at the time of loading. To estimate the amount of the driving force due to seamounts on elastic plate, one needs to approximate their density structure. The most common choice is uniform density model, which utilizes constant density value for a seamount. This approach simplifies computational processes for gravity prediction and error estimates. However, the uniform density model tends to overestimate the total mass of the seamount and hence produces more positive gravitational contributions from the load. Minimization of gravity misfits using uniform density, therefore, favors thinner Te in order to increase negative contributions from the lithospheric flexure, which can compensate for the excessive positives from the seamount. An alternative approach is dense core model, which approximate the heterogeneity nature of seamount density as three bodies of infill sediment, edifice, and dense core. In this study, we apply the dense core model to the Louisville Seamount Chain for constraining flexural deformation. We compare Te estimates with the loading time of the examined seamounts to redefine empirical geophysical age dating of seamounts.

  6. Developing OSL Geological Dating Techniques for Use on Future Missions to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, M. W.; Kalchgruber, R.; Deo, S.; McKeever, S. W. S.

    2005-01-01

    The surface of Mars has been subject to aeolian, fluvial, and periglacial activity in the (relatively) recent past. Unfortunately, chronological dating of recent events on Mars is difficult as the errors associated with crater counting are comparable to younger ages (approx. 1 Ma). Consequently, techniques to quantify the ages of geological processes on Mars have become an important area of research. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is one candidate technique for in-situ dating of the deposition of Martian surface sediments. This method can aid in developing a geological and climatic history of the last million years on Mars. The current paper addresses some of the challenges and progress associated with developing OSL as a viable in-situ dating technique for Mars. Some of the challenges include the mineral composition, the effectiveness of solar resetting under Martian conditions, the temperature regime, and determining the natural dose rate on Mars. All of these topics are currently under investigation, and some preliminary results are presented.

  7. Age dates of valley network drainage basins and subbasins within Sabae and Arabia Terrae, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouley, Sylvain; Craddock, Robert A.

    2014-06-01

    The precise timing of valley network drainage basin formation is critical to understanding the history of water and climate on Mars. To determine whether there are any variations in ages within separate drainage basins and subbasins that may reflect local or regional variations in climate or resetting from resurfacing (e.g., impact ejecta or lava flows), we dated 27 basins and subbasins in Sabaea and Arabia Terrae. The age-dating basin technique we employed allowed sufficient precision to give accurate ages and shows that fluvial activity within the basins and subbasins ceased at approximately the same time around the Early Hesperian/Late Hesperian transition. Our results support the hypothesis that valley networks formed during a unique "fluvial optimum" that may have shut off gradually because of a global climate change that affected all areas simultaneously on Mars.

  8. The ID-KArD technique: In-situ dating on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Farley, K. A.; Hurowitz, J.; Asimow, P. D.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to measure absolute ages on the Martian surface is crucial for understanding the planet's evolution. A detailed geological history of the Moon has been determined through analysis of returned samples from specific units, and relative ages calculated by crater counting techniques. However, without returned samples or in-situ dating analyses, we lack absolute age markers for Mars and thus cannot accurately or precisely date its well-documented surface. Instead, we have relied on an estimated Mars/Moon cratering ratio and relative crater counting techniques in an attempt to calculate surface ages and classify geological units. The use of such relative parameters diminishes the precision and accuracy for surface age calculations, and thus highlights the need for independent age determinations from returned samples or in-situ dating. In this research, we describe our technique - ID-KArD (Isotope Dilution K-Ar Dating) - intended for in-situ age dating of geological units on the Martian surface. ID-KArD resolves two challenges that have previously obstructed in-situ age dating on Mars: 1) High fusion temperatures are avoided with the use of a lithium-borate flux; 2) Sample mass measurement is not required, due to the addition of an isotope dilution doubly-spiked glass. The glass has a known 39Ar/41K ratio, which removes the need for concentration measurements. Thus, only isotope ratios are required for a K-Ar age determination. ID-KArD has the potential to address Mars chronology inaccuracies, and would be a suitable technique for consideration on future missions. In the first phase of ID-KArD proof of concept, we selected a Viluy trap basalt (K2O ~ 0.7 wt%), with concordant K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages of 354.3 × 3.5 and 357.7 × 1.4 Ma respectively (Courtillot et al., 2010). An aliquot was combined into a crucible with the flux and the spike glass for separate Ar (MAP 215:50, Caltech), followed by K (KEMS, GRC) isotopic analysis. Combining our results, we obtained

  9. Age-Dating Drainage Basins in Sabae and Arabia Terrae, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouley, S.; Craddock, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The precise timing of drainage basins is critical to understanding the climate history on Mars. One of the obvious problems with age-dating valley networks is the fact that they are small, linear features that are easily destroyed by large impact craters, thus counting craters on valley networks themselves is difficult at best. We proposed a new global study dating 27 drainage basins and subbasins in Sabaea and Arabia Terrae with the basin age-dating technique. Valley networks are contained within drainage basins, which is defined as the area that contributes water to a particular channel or set of channels . For our study, we used THEMIS (Thermal Emission Imaging System) visible images with a spatial resolution of 100 m/pixel which allow us to count craters with diameter of 1 km and larger. A digital elevation model (DEM) using 1/128 gridded Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) helped us to extract the 26 basins and sub-basins drainage divides From these measurements, our study shows: (1) that all the drainages basins of a large region seem to cease their main fluvial activity at the same time at the end of the Early Hesperian epoch (~3.54 Gyr); (2) that the basin technique is the most reliable technique to do global age-dating; and (3) that there is a possible correlation between the degradation rate and the elevation. Our conclusions suggest that the main fluvial activity ceased because of a global climate change. We suppose that most of valley networks on Mars we observed today formed during the Early Hesperian and post-dated the early and late Noachian topographic features.

  10. Dating intramontane alluvial deposits from NW Argentina using luminescence techniques: Problems and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Joel Q. G.; Robinson, Ruth A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Intramontane basin sediments are an archive of the interaction between basin bounding faults, and alluvial fan and fluvial systems. The chronologies of intramontane basin sedimentation enable an understanding of the cycling of sediments within a basin through time, can be interrogated to identify periods of alluvial storage and erosion, provide rates of sediment accumulation and storage and date fault movement. If suitable dating methods (in terms of resolution and timescale) are applied to develop the chronologies of alluvial archives, it is then possible to discriminate between climate and tectonic forcing mechanisms on long-term basin behaviour. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of quartz grains from alluvial sediments is an ideal technique for establishing a chronological framework of basin sedimentation as the method directly dates sedimentation events. However, our experience of OSL dating of quartz minerals extracted from Late Quaternary alluvial sequences in the quebradas of the Eastern Cordillera of NW Argentina has presented a number of challenges concerning selection of appropriate facies to analyse, mineral contamination, failure of fundamental protocol tests, proximity to saturation, and broad and multi-modal age distributions. Through careful analysis of the alluvial sedimentology and choice of sampling environments we have been able to locate suitable samples in most vertical sequences studied. A post-infrared-OSL approach demonstrated that contaminant signals were resulting in protocol test failure and, conversely, circumvention of this problem has increased confidence and reliability in the dating results. Assessment of dose-response characteristics suggests that the luminescence for the oldest samples is not likely to be saturated and in turn ages are not considered to be underestimated. Finally, different statistical tests have enabled objective identification of single low-dose populations in complex distributions and confirmed that

  11. A comparative study of Quaternary dating techniques applied to sedimentary deposits in southwest Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, J.; Barbetti, M.; Ditchburn, R.; Kimber, R. W. L.; McCabe, W.; Murray-Wallace, C. V.; Prescott, J. R.; Whitehead, N.

    At five sites in western Victoria a total of five Quaternary dating techniques have been applied to shell beds varying in age from Holocene to beyond the last interglacial. To examine the age concordancy of the methods, 89 analyses were conducted—16 by radiocarbon, 26 by uranium series disequilibrium, 26 by amino acid racemisation, 5 by thermoluminescence and 16 by electron spin resonance, the latter previously reported by Goede (1989). Uncertainties associated with diagenetic environments of samples precluded reliable numerical age assignments for beds older than Holocene. Instead, relative dating of shell beds was based on a reference site (Goose Lagoon) which was assigned to the last interglacial based on its morphostratigraphic setting and concordant results of three of the dating methods (amino acid racemisation, uranium series disequilibrium and electron spin resonance). Overall there was considerable agreement between methods although not all were applied to each site. Uranium series dating proved most problematical. Migration of radionuclides between groundwater and shells introduced large errors at one site and led to appreciable uncertainties at others.

  12. Theoretical constraints on the precision and age range of rehydroxylation dating

    PubMed Central

    Hare, V. J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and precise dating methods are of central importance to archaeology, palaeontology and earth science. This paper investigates the expected precision and age range of rehydroxylation dating, a recently proposed technique for fired clays. An expression for combined measurement uncertainty is presented, which takes into account all significant sources of experimental uncertainty. Numerical simulations are performed for comparison. Combined measurement uncertainties of approximately 5% with respect to the age of the ceramic should be possible given well-designed experiments. In this case, the most significant contribution to combined measurement uncertainty is from effective lifetime temperature. In addition, it is shown that precision should be acceptable for recently fired material (less than 1 year). Mismatch of balance resolution to sample mass results in large variation in combined relative uncertainties, which vary by four orders of magnitude (approx. 1–1160%) across recent experimental studies, rendering some recently reported dates meaningless. It is recommended that this ratio be less than 10−6 for a combined relative uncertainty of less than 1%. The age limits of the technique are set by the value of the rate constant and individual sample mineralogy. This theoretical framework should help future interlaboratory comparison as well as optimizing instrument design. PMID:26064631

  13. Theoretical constraints on the precision and age range of rehydroxylation dating.

    PubMed

    Hare, V J

    2015-04-01

    Accurate and precise dating methods are of central importance to archaeology, palaeontology and earth science. This paper investigates the expected precision and age range of rehydroxylation dating, a recently proposed technique for fired clays. An expression for combined measurement uncertainty is presented, which takes into account all significant sources of experimental uncertainty. Numerical simulations are performed for comparison. Combined measurement uncertainties of approximately 5% with respect to the age of the ceramic should be possible given well-designed experiments. In this case, the most significant contribution to combined measurement uncertainty is from effective lifetime temperature. In addition, it is shown that precision should be acceptable for recently fired material (less than 1 year). Mismatch of balance resolution to sample mass results in large variation in combined relative uncertainties, which vary by four orders of magnitude (approx. 1-1160%) across recent experimental studies, rendering some recently reported dates meaningless. It is recommended that this ratio be less than 10(-6) for a combined relative uncertainty of less than 1%. The age limits of the technique are set by the value of the rate constant and individual sample mineralogy. This theoretical framework should help future interlaboratory comparison as well as optimizing instrument design. PMID:26064631

  14. Age, Personality, and the Holtzman Inkblot Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Paul T., Jr.; McCrae, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated age changes and differences in personality as measured by the Holtzman Inkblot Technique (HIT). Concluded that the HIT measures perceptual-cognitive variables that are moderately stable in adulthood. (Author/ABB)

  15. Adolescents' Age Preferences for Dating Partners: Support for an Evolutionary Model of Life-History Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenrick, Douglas T.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Explored sex differences in adolescent preference for older versus younger mates. Found that teenage males were willing to date females of a wide age range, whereas teenage females prefer dating males from their own age to several years older. Data suggested viewing development of sex differences in dating partner preference from the perspective…

  16. Allanite age-dating: Non-matrix-matched standardization in quadrupole LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, M.; Lanari, P.; Pettke, T.; Engi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Allanite Th-U-Pb age-dating has recently been found to be powerful in unraveling the timing of geological processes such as the metamorphic dynamics in subduction zones and crystallization velocity of magmas. However, inconsistencies among analytical techniques have raised doubts about the accuracy of allanite age data. Spot analysis techniques such as LA-ICP-MS are claimed to be crucially dependent on matrix-matched standards, the quality of which is variable. We present a new approach in LA-ICP-MS data reduction that allows non-matrix-matched standardization via well constrained zircon reference materials as primary standards. Our data were obtained using a GeoLas Pro 193 nm ArF excimer laser ablation system coupled to an ELAN DRC-e quadrupole ICP-MS. We use 32 μm and 24 μm spot sizes; laser operating conditions of 9 Hz repetition rate and 2.5 J/cm2 fluence have proven advantageous. Matrix dependent downhole fractionation evolution is empirically determined by analyzing 208Pb/232Th and 206Pb/238U and applied prior to standardization. The new data reduction technique was tested on three magmatic allanite reference materials (SISSb, CAPb, TARA); within error these show the same downhole fractionation evolution for all allanite types and in different analytical sessions, provided measurement conditions remain the same. Although the downhole evolution of allanite and zircon differs significantly, a link between zircon and allanite matrix is established by assuming CAPb and TARA to be fixed at the corresponding reference ages. Our weighted mean 208Pb/232Th ages are 30.06 ± 0.22 (2σ) for SISSb, 275.4 ± 1.3 (2σ) for CAPb, and 409.9 ± 1.8 (2σ) for TARA. Precision of single spot age data varies between 1.5 and 8 % (2σ), dependent on spot size and common lead concentrations. Quadrupole LA-ICP-MS allanite age-dating has thus similar uncertainties as do other spot analysis techniques. The new data reduction technique is much less dependent on quality and homogeneity

  17. Summary of potassium/argon age dating, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.H. Jr.; Brown, F.H.

    1980-11-01

    A significant improvement in efficiency of the K-Ar laboratory was brought about by completion of a second extraction line. Two extractions can now be done routinely each day and the /sup 38/Ar spike ratios of the new table will permit dating of much younger samples than previously. Extensive K-Ar dating of samples from the Mineral Mountains shows intervals of silicic volcanism at 0.5, 0.8 and 7.5 m.y. K-Ar dating of plutonic units does not present a consistent picture, however. Plutonic events 35 to 40 m.y., 29 m.y. and 19 to 21 m.y. ago are suggested but interpretation must be considered preliminary. Joint programs with the US Geological Survey now underway to study the Rb-Sr and U-Pb systematics of the Mineral Mountains pluton should aid in unravelling its history. Dating of basalts from the Cove Creek Domes/Twin Peaks area, Utah, has aided in delineating the timing of basaltic volcanism. This adds to the already extensive data on the chronology of volcanic activity in the area. Dating of samples from the Beowawe Known Geothermal Resources Area, Nevada have confirmed earlier dates indicating major volcanism took place 38 m.y. ago and 17 to 16 m.y. ago.

  18. Age-Sensitive Effect of Adolescent Dating Experience on Delinquency and Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Ryang Hui

    2013-01-01

    This study uses a developmental perspective and focuses on examining whether the impact of adolescent dating is age-sensitive. Dating at earlier ages is hypothesized to have a stronger effect on adolescent criminal behavior or substance use, but the effect would be weaker as one ages. The data obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of…

  19. Dating and sourcing fuel ash residues from Cladh Hallan, South Uist, Scotland, using magnetic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C.; Batt, C. M.

    Mineral magnetic and archaeomagnetic measurements have been carried out on fire ash deposits from a central hearth within a circular dwelling at the Late Bronze/Early Iron Age settlement site of Cladh Hallan on South Uist, Scotland. Archaeomagnetic methods date the hearths to 560-700 BC and 650-850 BC, the earliest archaeomagnetic dates produced for the Western Isles of Scotland. A range of mineral magnetic measurements have been carried out on a continually sampled profile through the hearths/ash build-ups displaying differences between the two main ash build-ups and floors. The mineral magnetic results have also been used to assess fuel sources through the application of techniques based on modern ash residues. The results show a marked change in fuel source from well-humified peat to a more mixed fuel, with a high proportion of fibrous-upper peat/peat turf.

  20. Comparison of techniques for dating of subsurface ice from Monlesi ice cave, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luetscher, Marc; Bolius, David; Schwikowski, Margit; Schotterer, Ulrich; Smart, Peter L.

    The presence of cave ice is documented in many karst regions but very little is known about the age range of this potential paleoclimate archive. This case study from the Monlesi ice cave, Swiss Jura Mountains, demonstrates that dating of cave ice is possible using a multi-parameter approach. Ice petrography, debris content and oxygen isotope composition have the potential for identification of annual growth layers, but require a continuous core from the ice deposits, limiting application of this approach. Furthermore, complete melting of ice accumulations from individual years may occur, causing amalgamation of several annual bands. Use of3H content of the ice and14C dating of organic debris present in the ice proved to be of limited utility, providing rather broad bounds for the actual age. Initial estimates based on 210Pb analyses from clear ice samples gave results comparable to those from other methods. The most reliable techniques applied were the determination of ice turnover rates, and the dating of anthropogenic inclusions (a roof tile) in the ice. These suggest, respectively, that the base of the cave ice was a minimum of 120 and a maximum of 158 years old. Therefore, our data support the idea that mid-latitude and low-altitude subsurface ice accumulations result from modern deposition processes rather than from presence of Pleistocene relict ice.

  1. Terrestrial Ages of Antarctic Meteorites: Up Date 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.

    2000-01-01

    We are continuing our ongoing study of cosmogenic nuclides in Antarctic meteorites. In addition to the studies of exposure histories of meteorites, we study terrestrial ages and pairing of Antarctic meteorites and desert meteorites. Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites provide information on meteorite accumulation mechanisms, mean weathering lifetimes, and influx rates. The determination of Cl-36 (half-life=3.01 x 10(exp 5) y) terrestrial ages is one of our long-term on-going projects, however, in many instances neither Cl-36 or C-14 (5,730 y) yields an accurate terrestrial age. Using Ca-41 (1.04 x 10(exp 5) y) for terrestrial age determinations solves this problem by filling the gap in half-life between C-14 and Cl-36 ages. We are now applying the new Ca-41 - Cl-36 terrestrial age method as well as the Cl-36 - Be-10 method to Antarctic meteorites. Our measurements and C-14 terrestrial age determinations by the University of Arizona group are always complementary.

  2. 40Ar/39Ar technique of KAr dating: a comparison with the conventional technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1971-01-01

    K-Ar ages have been determined by the 40Ar/39Ar total fusion technique on 19 terrestrial samples whose conventional K-Ar ages range from 3.4 my to nearly 1700 my. Sample materials included biotite, muscovite, sanidine, adularia, plagioclase, hornblende, actinolite, alunite, dacite, and basalt. For 18 samples there are no significant differences at the 95% confidence level between the KAr ages obtained by these two techniques; for one sample the difference is 4.3% and is statistically significant. For the neutron doses used in these experiments (???4 ?? 1018 nvt) it appears that corrections for interfering Ca- and K-derived Ar isotopes can be made without significant loss of precision for samples with K/Ca > 1 as young as about 5 ?? 105 yr, and for samples with K/Ca < 1 as young as about 107 yr. For younger samples the combination of large atmospheric Ar corrections and large corrections for Ca- and K-derived Ar may make the precision of the 40Ar/39Ar technique less than that of the conventional technique unless the irradiation parameters are adjusted to minimize these corrections. ?? 1971.

  3. Dating, Sex, and Substance Use Predict Increases in Adolescents' Subjective Age across Two Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Nancy L.; Albrecht, Arne K.; Jansson, S. Mikael

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the nature of the relationship between adolescents' subjective age (how old they feel) and chronological age, and explored whether dating, sex, and substance use predicted increases in adolescents' subjective age across a two-year period. The participants were 570 adolescents who were interviewed when they were first ages 12-19…

  4. Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to date the Minoan Tuff, Santorini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijbrans, J. R.; Kuiper, K.; Morgan, L. E.; Klaver, M.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The age of the catastrophic eruption of the volcano of Santorini during the Bronze Age is well established from 14C dating at 3344.9 ± 7.5 a1 (uncertainties quoted as 1-σ). Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to products from this eruption is used here to (1) investigate the limits of the technique using conventional single collector mass spectrometry on a MAP215-50 instrument, (2) analyse sources of uncertainty to identify major contributing factors for the uncertainty of young 40Ar/39Ar ages, and (3) provide 40Ar/39Ar ages for a sample that has been previously dated via 14C and dendrochronology to further investigate issues with the accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating in the late Quaternary. We have separated the plagioclase fraction from the lower Minoan Tuff that immediately overlies the Cape Riva (rp6) tuff in a bay on the west coast of Thira, NW of the town of Oia. Using the calibration of 40Ar/36Ar of Lee et al.2, the decay constant recommended by Min at al.3, and the FCs age of Kuiper et al.4, we calculate an inverse isochron age of 3.7 ± 1.6 ka and a trapped 40Ar/36Ar intercept of 299.8 ± 1.2, slightly higher than the ratio for atmospheric argon of 298.56 ± 0.31, when all steps with ages > 50 ka are included in the regression. Enrichment in radiogenic 40Ar in the steps used for the isochron is extremely low, given the low concentration of K2O in plagioclase and the extremely young age. The stepwise heating approach proved useful because in all 5 replicate experiments unexpectedly high ages showed up at higher step temperatures, suggesting that in each separate some older contaminant was present. The plateaus of each of the replicate experiments had quite reproducible ages, however, and a pooled age was calculated for 23 out of 48 individual steps. The pooled age for the plateau was 17.6 ± 4.1 ka, which is high due to the slight component of excess 40Ar in the non-radiogenic component, as revealed from regression analysis. refs: 1SW Manning et al. (2006

  5. Evaluating the reliability of Late Quaternary landform ages: Integrating 10Be cosmogenic surface exposure dating with U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate on alluvial and fluvial deposits, Sonoran desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, K.; Sharp, W. D.

    2015-12-01

    To assess the reliability of Quaternary age determinations of alluvial and fluvial deposits across the Sonoran Desert (Coachella Valley and Anza Borrego) in southern California, we applied both 10Be exposure age dating of surface clasts and U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate from subsurface clast-coatings to the same deposits. We consider agreement between dates from the two techniques to indicate reliable age estimates because each technique is subject to distinct assumptions and therefore their systematic uncertainties are largely independent. 10Be exposure dates should yield maximum ages when no correction is made for inheritance and post-depositional erosion is negligible. U-series dating, in contrast, provides minimum dates because pedogenic carbonate forms after deposition. Our results show that: (1) For deposits ca. 70 ka or younger, 10Be and U-series dates were generally concordant. We note, however, that in most cases U-series soil dates exceed 10Be exposure dates that are corrected for inheritance when using 10Be in modern alluvium. This suggests that 10Be concentrations of modern alluvium may exceed the 10Be acquired by late Pleistocene deposits during fluvial transport and hillslope residence (i.e., Pleistocene inherited 10Be). (2) For deposits older than ~70 ka, U-series dates are significantly younger than the 10Be dates. This implies that U-series dates in this region may significantly underestimate the depositional age of older alluvium, probably because of delayed onset of deposition, slow accumulation, or poor preservation of secondary carbonate in response to climatic controls. Thus, whenever possible, multiple dating methods should be applied to obtain reliable ages for late Quaternary deposits.

  6. The evolutionary relationships and age of Homo naledi: An assessment using dated Bayesian phylogenetic methods.

    PubMed

    Dembo, Mana; Radovčić, Davorka; Garvin, Heather M; Laird, Myra F; Schroeder, Lauren; Scott, Jill E; Brophy, Juliet; Ackermann, Rebecca R; Musiba, Chares M; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Mooers, Arne Ø; Collard, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Homo naledi is a recently discovered species of fossil hominin from South Africa. A considerable amount is already known about H. naledi but some important questions remain unanswered. Here we report a study that addressed two of them: "Where does H. naledi fit in the hominin evolutionary tree?" and "How old is it?" We used a large supermatrix of craniodental characters for both early and late hominin species and Bayesian phylogenetic techniques to carry out three analyses. First, we performed a dated Bayesian analysis to generate estimates of the evolutionary relationships of fossil hominins including H. naledi. Then we employed Bayes factor tests to compare the strength of support for hypotheses about the relationships of H. naledi suggested by the best-estimate trees. Lastly, we carried out a resampling analysis to assess the accuracy of the age estimate for H. naledi yielded by the dated Bayesian analysis. The analyses strongly supported the hypothesis that H. naledi forms a clade with the other Homo species and Australopithecus sediba. The analyses were more ambiguous regarding the position of H. naledi within the (Homo, Au. sediba) clade. A number of hypotheses were rejected, but several others were not. Based on the available craniodental data, Homo antecessor, Asian Homo erectus, Homo habilis, Homo floresiensis, Homo sapiens, and Au. sediba could all be the sister taxon of H. naledi. According to the dated Bayesian analysis, the most likely age for H. naledi is 912 ka. This age estimate was supported by the resampling analysis. Our findings have a number of implications. Most notably, they support the assignment of the new specimens to Homo, cast doubt on the claim that H. naledi is simply a variant of H. erectus, and suggest H. naledi is younger than has been previously proposed. PMID:27457542

  7. Age determination of mid-ocean ridge basalts by radiocarbon dating of lithified carbonate crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuptsov, V.M.; Bogdanov, Yu.A.; Palkina, A.M.; Lisitsyn, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    The processes that take place in the mid-ocean ridges are the key to their understanding of the evolution of the earth's crust and mantle. Mid-ocean ridge volcanism supplies vast masses of mantle material, forming new oceanic crust. In recent years, comprehensive study has been made of such processes. The problems of geochronology have an important place in these investigations, since only a study of the events in their time sequence will enable them to make a valid estimate of the intensity of these global processes. In 1980, crusts were obtained by the Pikar combined expedition in the Red Sea rift in the 18/sup 0/ study area on the lower tectonic terrace, in the axial zone, and in three deep water basins. Manned deep water submersible, dredges, trawls, bottom samplers, and impact tubes brought up basalts covered with lithified crusts, and also separate lithified crusts, collected from the basalt basement during sampling. The authors have dated the crusts by the radiocarbon method using the benzene technique. Results of the analysis give ages ranging from 2980 to 20,700 years. Results are discussed. The use of lithified carbonate crusts for determining the age of the basalts is effective within the range of the radiocarbon dating method (up to 40,000-45,000 years). This time interval is inaccessible for determinations by other methods of nuclear geochronology, which makes the method especially valuable. 1 reference, 2 figures, 1 table.

  8. Stellar age dating with thorium, uranium and lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frebel, Anna; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig

    2009-06-01

    We present HE 1523-0901, a metal-poor star in which the radioactive elements Th and U could be detected. Only three stars have measured U abundances, of which HE 1523-0901 has the most confidently determined value. From comparing the stable Eu, Os, and Ir abundances with measurements of Th and U, stellar ages can be derived. Based on seven such chronometer abundance ratios, the age of HE 1523-0901 was found to be ~13 Gyr. Only an upper limit for Pb could be measured so far. Knowing all three abundances of Th, U, and Pb would provide a self-consistent test for r-process calculations. Pb is the beta- plus alpha-decay end-product of all decay chains in the mass region between Pb and the onset of dominant spontaneous fission above Th and U. Hence, in addition to Th/U also Th, U/Pb should be used to obtain a consistent picture for actinide chronometry. From recent r-process calculations within the classical “waiting-point” model, for a 13 Gyr old star we predict the respective abundance ratios of logγ(Th/U) = 0.84, logγ(Th/Pb) = -1.32 and logγ(U/Pb) = -2.16. We compare these values with the measured abundance ratios in HE 1523-0901 of logγ(Th/U) = 0.86, logγ(Th/Pb) > -1.0 and logγ(U/Pb) > -1.9. With this good level of agreement, HE 1523-0901 is already a vital probe for observational “near-field” cosmology by providing an independent lower limit for the age of the Universe.

  9. Reconstruction of settlement phases at Intermediate Bronze Age structures in the Negev Highlands (Israel) using luminescence dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junge, Andrea; Lomax, Johanna; Shahack-Gross, Ruth; Dunseth, Zachary C.; Finkelstein, Israel; Fuchs, Markus

    2016-04-01

    OSL dating is usually applied to sediments in paleoenvironmental sciences. However, there is only limited experience with determining the age of archaeological stone structures by OSL using dust deposits associated with these structures. The age of trapped dust deposits may be used to date the onset of settlement (sediment below structures), settlement activity (occupation layer), or the time after settlement (sediment between collapsed walls and roofs). In this study, OSL dating is applied for establishing a chronology of settlement structures situated in the Negev Highlands, Israel. Two archaeological sites are investigated to identify the occupation history, by dating the aeolian dust trapped within the remains of ancient buildings. OSL dating techniques are applied using coarse grain quartz and a standard SAR protocol. First results indicate that the luminescence properties of the trapped sediments are suitable for OSL dating. Therefore, it was possible to date the onset of sedimentation in a later phase of the human occupation or shortly after the settlement was abandoned, which is supported by archaeological evidence gained from pottery finds and the architecture of the buildings.

  10. Dating, Sex, and Substance Use as Correlates of Adolescents' Subjective Experience of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbeau, Kelly J.; Galambos, Nancy L.; Jansson, S. Mikael

    2007-01-01

    This study examined in a random community-based sample of 664 12-19-year-olds, the relation of subjective experience of age (SEA) with chronological age, dating experience, sexual activity, and substance use. The results revealed a positive linear relation between SEA and chronological age: individuals who were chronologically older felt…

  11. Common-Lead Corrected U-Pb Age Dating of Perovskite by LA-SF-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, D.

    2014-12-01

    Perovskite is a very useful mineral for dating the age of emplacement of kimberlites and associated rocks. Conventionally, U-Pb dating of perovskite is achieved using isotope dilution (ID-TIMS) or ion-probe (SHRIMP) techniques, which are time- and cost-intensive. The potential of the rapid and inexpensive laser ablation ICP-MS technique for U-Pb dating of perovskite has been demonstrated recently. We investigated the benefits of single collector magnetic sectorfield ICP-MS (SF-ICP-MS) instruments for U-Pb dating of perovskite by laser ablation. To this end perovskites from two kimberlites from Garnet Lake, W Greenland, and Pyramidefjeld, SW Greenland, have been separated. Multigrain aliquots of both perovskite separates were U-Pb dated by ID-TIMS, yielding emplacement ages of 568 ±11 Ma for the Garnet Lake kimberlite and 151 ±2 Ma for the Pyramidefjeld kimberlite. Subsequently both samples have been dated in-situ by laser ablation employing a ThermoFinnigan Element2 SF-ICP-MS coupled to a NewWave UP 213 laser system. A common lead correction was applied based on the measured 204Pb intensity (after correction for the measured 204(Pb+Hg) gas blank). Perovskite from the Ice River Complex, British Columbia, was used as a secondary standard for quality control purposes. Multiple in-situ measurements of the Ice River perovskite in two different analytical sessions yielded concordia ages of 359 ±3 Ma and 357 ±3 Ma, in excellent agreement with the age of 356 Ma determined by ID-TIMS (Heaman, pers. comm.). Nineteen in-situ analyses of perovskite grains extracted from the Garnet Lake kimberlite yielded a concordia age of 566 ±5 Ma, also in excellent agreement with the age obtained by ID-TIMS. Because of the very low Pb contents in perovskites from the Pyramidefjeld (around 1 ppm) and the associated large uncertainties of the common lead correction, no concordia age could be obtained. However, the in-situ laser ablation analysis yielded a common lead corrected weighted

  12. First dating of groundwater with Atom Trap Trace Analysis of 39Ar - technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritterbusch, Florian; Ebser, Sven; Welte, Joachim; Reichel, Thomas; Kersting, Arne; Purtschert, Roland; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2013-04-01

    The importance of 39Ar as a dating tracer for the time range between 50 and 1000 years has clearly been identified [1]. So far, it has been routinely accessible only by Low-Level-Counting (LLC) in the underground laboratory in Bern requiring a sample size of several tons of water and a measuring time of several weeks [2]. Here we report on the first dating results with 39Ar using an atom optical technique known as Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). This method has been developed for rare krypton isotopes in the past decade and is now available for routine analysis [3]. However, the applicability of ATTA to 39Ar has only been demonstrated in a proof of principle experiment [4]. We will discuss the essential experimental improvements that were necessary for bringing this method to the level of dating real samples. Our apparatus achieves an atmospheric 39Ar-count-rate of 4.1(3) atoms/h, which corresponds to an 18-fold improvement over the reported results in [4]. Based on that, we dated a groundwater sample of the upper Rhine Graben to 360(68) years within one day of measurement. Further samples of the investigated aquifer system are dated similarly in order to obtain the age information for a comprehensive hydrological study. The apparatus has the potential to measure 39Ar-concentrations on small samples down to less than 1 ccSTP of Argon, corresponding to about 100 ml of air, 2.5 l of water or 1 kg of ice. This opens up the way for a broader application of 39Ar as a tracer e.g. in oceanography or glaciology, where the sample sizes are typically limited to 10 l of water or 1 kg of ice respectively. [1] Loosli, H. H. (1983), A dating method with 39Ar, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 63, 51-62. [2] P. Collon, W. Kutschera, and Z.-T. Lu. Tracing noble gas radionuclides in the environment. Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science, 54(1): 39-67, 2004. [3] W. Jiang et al., An atom counter for measuring 81Kr and 85Kr in environmental samples. Geochimica et

  13. Direct Comparison of Monazite Ages Obtained By in situ Techniques: Ion-Probe Isotopic Ages Versus Electron Microprobe Chemical Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, R. J.; Loehn, C. W.; Dahl, P. S.; Aleinikoff, J. N.; Wooden, J. L.; Hamilton, M.; Mazdab, F.; Jones, C.

    2005-12-01

    In situ analytical techniques for geochronology are rapidly becoming the method of choice for characterizing compositionally and chronologically complex minerals, including monazite (mnz) and zircon (zrc). Two such techniques include Ion Microprobe (IMP) (esp. SHRIMP) for both mnz and zrc, and electron microprobe (EMP) for mnz. Debate remains concerning comparability of ages obtained by the two different techniques: U-Pb isotopic dating (IMP) versus Th-total U-total Pb (EMP). The IMP has an advantage in analytical precision whereas the EMP has an advantage in spatial resolution. We report 6 examples of individual monazite grains that have been dated by both techniques, covering a range of ages from 300 to 2850 Ma. Three of our examples are grains that have been used as IMP standards at the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) or at the USGS-Stanford SHRIMP lab; the other grains are from research samples. Most grains display complex zoning in Y, Th and U, both in BSE images and in compositional maps, reflecting complex growth and recrystallization histories. In all cases, the ages obtained by the two techniques agree within their 2-sigma associated error, except where IMP ablation pits cross age boundaries and resolve a mixed age of the two domains, or where EMP spots fall near cracks or pits in the grain surface. One prominent example is a 100-micron mnz from the Tobacco Root Mountains, Montana. It contains a low-Th older core (ca. 2.85 Ga), a higher-Th mantle domain of about 2.45 Ga, and a low-Th rim of 1.78 Ga. This grain has 6 IMP spots that range in age from 1880 Ma (near-rim) to 2785 Ma (core). Only two IMP pits fall totally within a single chemical and age zone delineated by EMP analyses or compositional maps (the medial age zone): 2451 (+/-4) and 2432 (+/-10). The weighted mean EMP age of this domain is 2452 (+/-6). IMP spots aimed at the older core are 2619 (+/-11) and 2785 (+/-9); the weighted mean core age from EMP analyses is 2859 (+/-14). This suggests

  14. Dating and context of three middle stone age sites with bone points in the Upper Semliki Valley, Zaire.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A S; Helgren, D M; Cramer, J S; Franklin, A; Hornyak, W; Keating, J M; Klein, R G; Rink, W J; Schwarcz, H; Smith, J N

    1995-04-28

    The extent to which the earliest anatomically modern humans in Africa exhibited behavioral and cognitive traits typical of Homo sapiens sapiens is controversial. In eastern Zaire, archaeological sites with bone points have yielded dates older than 89(-15)+22 thousand years ago by several techniques. These include electron spin resonance, thermoluminescence, optically stimulated luminescence, uranium series, and amino acid racemization. Faunal and stratigraphic data are consistent with this age. PMID:7725099

  15. Age dating of shallow groundwater with chlorofluorocarbons, tritium/helium 3, and flow path analysis, southern New Jersey coastal plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, Z.; Rice, D.E.; Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.; Drenkard, S.; Schlosser, P.

    1996-01-01

    Groundwater age dating through the combination of transient tracer methods (chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and tritium/helium 3 (3H/3He)) and groundwater flow path analysis is useful for investigating groundwater travel times, flow patterns, and recharge rates, as demonstrated by this study of the homogeneous shallow, unconfined Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system in the southern New Jersey coastal plain. Water samples for age dating were collected from three sets of nested observation wells (10 wells) with 1.5-m-long screens located near groundwater divides. Three steady state finite difference groundwater flow models were calibrated by adjusting horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities to match measured heads and head differences (range, 0.002-0.23 m) among the nested wells, with a uniform recharge rate of 0.46 m per year and porosities of 0.35 (sand) and 0.45 (silt) that were assumed constant for all model simulations and travel time calculations. The simulated groundwater travel times increase with depth in the aquifer, ranging from about 1.5 to 6.5 years for the shallow wells (screen bottoms 3-4 m below the water table), from about 10 to 25 years for the medium-depth wells (screen bottoms 8-19 m below the water table), and from about 30 to more than 40 years for the deep wells (screen bottoms 24-26 m below the water table). Apparent groundwater ages based on CFC- and 3H/3He-dating techniques and model-based travel times could not be statistically differentiated, and all were strongly correlated with depth. Confinement of 3He was high because of the rapid vertical flow velocity (of the order of 1 m/yr), resulting in clear delineation of groundwater travel times based on the 3H/3He-dating technique. The correspondence between the 3H/3He and CFC ages indicates that dispersion has had a minimal effect on the tracer-based ages of water in this aquifer. Differences between the tracer-based apparent ages for seven of the 10 samples were smaller than the error values

  16. A prospective study to compare serum human placental lactogen and menstrual dates for determining gestational age.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, P G; Lind, T; Lawson, J Y

    1987-01-01

    In a group of 575 healthy pregnant women with certain menstrual dates the estimation of the length of gestation from maternal serum human placental lactogen concentrations has been compared with gestational age calculated from the last menstrual period and ultrasonic measurements of the fetal biparietal diameter. In 412 of these patients labor started spontaneously, and the estimated dates of delivery determined by these three methods were also compared. In the range of 9 to 17 weeks of pregnancy, gestational age can be determined by human placental lactogen measurement to within 7 days (+/- 1 SD) which compares favorably with other methods. Regarding the prediction of the expected date of delivery, 88% were delivered within 2 weeks of the date predicted by last menstrual period, 82% within 2 weeks of the sonar date, and 80% by the date determined by human placental lactogen assessment. Prediction of delivery in a further group of 139 women with uncertain dates gave 73% within 2 weeks by sonar date and 69% within 2 weeks by human placental lactogen determination. We suggest human placental lactogen measurements should become part of routine antenatal care complementing rather than replacing the role of ultrasonic scanning. For those doctors and patients who wish to avoid more exposure to ultrasonic scanning than absolutely necessary, human placental lactogen estimates offer an alternative method for assessing the length of gestation. PMID:3541617

  17. Round-robin 230Th–234U age dating of bulk uranium for nuclear forensics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gaffney, Amy M.; Hubert, Amélie; Kinman, William S.; Magara, Masaaki; Okubo, Ayako; Pointurier, Fabien; Schorzman, Kerri C.; Steiner, Robert E.; Williams, Ross W.

    2015-07-30

    In an inter-laboratory measurement comparison study, four laboratories determined 230Th–234U model ages of uranium certified reference material NBL U050 using isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The model dates determined by the participating laboratories range from 9 March 1956 to 19 October 1957, and are indistinguishable given the associated measurement uncertainties. As a result, these model ages are concordant with to slightly older than the known production age of NBL U050.

  18. Dating earthquakes with high-precision thorium-230 ages of very young corals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, R. Lawrence; Wasserburg, G. J.; Taylor, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Three corals from Vanuatu Islands, whose ages were known from counting annual growth bands, were analyzed by Th-230 age analysis to asses the accuracy of the Th-230 method. The comparison of Th-230 ages with the growth-band ages showed that the Th-230 ages were accurate within an error of + or - 3-5 y. Th-230 dates were then determined for two adjacent emerged heads from Santo Island; the dates were the same, indicating that the heads died at the same time, and consistent with the theory that they were killed by coseismic emergence around 1865 AD. The difference between this data and the data of the only major historically documented earthquake that caused an uplift (1973) suggests a seismic recurrence interval of 108 + or - 4 y for Santo. It is suggested that this approach may be extended back in time and to other localities.

  19. Carbon dioxide respiration in the deep vadose zone: Implications for groundwater age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Diana Holford; Keller, C. Kent

    1998-11-01

    In the deep vadose zone at the Dalmeny site, subsurface gas samples were collected and analyzed for CO2 and the 13C and 14C ratios of that CO2. High concentrations of CO2 depleted in 14C near the water table necessitate the use of an open-system model of calcite dissolution to match observed dissolved inorganic carbon 14C ratios just below the water table. Groundwater age-dating models assuming closed-system calcite dissolution predict incorrect groundwater age dates at the Dalmeny site. These results and our field observations suggest that such errors may generally occur where deep-vadose generation of nonmodern CO2 is not accounted for in groundwater age-dating exercises.

  20. Age Dating Fluvial Sediment Storage Reservoirs to Construct Sediment Waiting Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalak, K.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Benthem, A.; Karwan, D. L.; Mahan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Suspended sediment transport is an important geomorphic process that can often control the transport of nutrients and contaminants. The time a particle spends in storage remains a critical knowledge gap in understanding particle trajectories through landscapes. We dated floodplain deposits in South River, VA, using fallout radionuclides (Pb-210, Cs-137), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and radiocarbon dating to determine sediment ages and construct sediment waiting time distributions. We have a total of 14 age dates in two eroding banks. We combine these age dates with a well-constrained history of mercury concentrations on suspended sediment in the river from an industrial release. Ages from fallout radionuclides document sedimentation from the early 1900s to the present, and agree with the history of mercury contamination. OSL dates span approximately 200 to 17,000 years old. We performed a standard Weibull analysis of nonexceedance to construct a waiting time distribution of floodplain sediment for the South River. The mean waiting time for floodplain sediment is 2930 years, while the median is approximately 710 years. When the floodplain waiting time distribution is combined with the waiting time distribution for in-channel sediment storage (available from previous studies), the mean waiting time shifts to approximately 680 years, suggesting that quantifying sediment waiting times for both channel and floodplain storage is critical in advancing knowledge of particle trajectories through watersheds.

  1. In Situ Geochemical Analysis and Age Dating of Rocks Using Laser Ablation-Miniature Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Hurowitz, Joel A.

    2012-01-01

    A miniaturized instrument for performing chemical and isotopic analysis of rocks has been developed. The rock sample is ablated by a laser and the neutral species produced are analyzed using the JPL-invented miniature mass spectrometer. The direct sampling of neutral ablated material and the simultaneous measurement of all the elemental and isotopic species are the novelties of this method. In this laser ablation-miniature mass spectrometer (LA-MMS) method, the ablated neutral atoms are led into the electron impact ionization source of the MMS, where they are ionized by a 70-eV electron beam. This results in a secondary ion pulse typically 10-100 microsecond wide, compared to the original 5-10-nanosecond laser pulse duration. Ions of different masses are then spatially dispersed along the focal plane of the magnetic sector of the miniature mass spectrometer and measured in parallel by a modified CCD (charge-coupled device) array detector capable of detecting ions directly. Compared to conventional scanning techniques, simultaneous measurement of the ion pulse along the focal plane effectively offers a 100% duty cycle over a wide mass range. LAMMS offers a more quantitative assessment of elemental composition than techniques that detect laser-ionized species produced directly in the ablation process because the latter can be strongly influenced by matrix effects that vary with the structure and geometry of the surface, the laser beam, and the ionization energies of the elements. The measurement of high-precision isotopic ratios and elemental composition of different rock minerals by LAMMS method has been demonstrated. The LA-MMS can be applied for the absolute age determination of rocks. There is no such instrument available presently in a miniaturized version that can be used for NASA space missions. Work is in progress in the laboratory for geochronology of rocks using LA-MMS that is based on K-Ar radiogenic dating technique.

  2. Maximum Age Predictions for Optical Dating on Mars Based on Dose/Depth Models and Martian Meteorite Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklund, R. T.; Lepper, K.

    2004-12-01

    A fundamental need in the Mars exploration portfolio is in-situ absolute dating. Optical dating has been proposed for determining the age of Mars surface features and landforms as well as the rates of martian surface processes. On Earth, the method is employed for Quaternary studies because the technique currently has a terrestrial maximum age limit of approximately 350 ka. This maximum age limit is a function of the saturation dose of the dosimeter material (silicate sediments) and the local ionizing radiation dose rate. The sources of ionizing radiation germane to optical dating are K, Rb, U, Th in the sediment/soil environment and cosmic rays. On Mars the near surface dose rate will be dominated by cosmic rays, however, at depth the decay of radioisotopes will be the principle contributor of ionizing radiation. In this work we present an evaluation of the maximum age limits for OSL dating on Mars as a function of depth. At this time we have considered only static burial. Our calculations are based on published models of and data for: (i) Mars surface cosmic dose rate and its attenuation by martian regolith, (ii) elemental analyses of Mars meteorites, (iii) an experimental evaluation of the saturation dose for the martian soil simulant JSC Mars-1. Our analysis confirms earlier inferences that optical dating should have a greater effective age range on Mars than on Earth. At depths easily accessible by penetrators or moles (1-3 m), maximum optical ages greater than 600 ka are possible. Geochronology on this scale would include at least two stadial/interstadial cycles within Mars' last "Glacial Epoch" (synchronized insolation variations between the poles). A wide range of landforms and surface processes associated with climate variability -- e.g. outwash and lacustrine deposition, large-scale eolian activation -- could potentially be optically dated. At greater depths, that could be reached by mobile drilling rigs or cryobots (10-30m), optical age maximums of 4

  3. Age-dating of highly enriched Uranium by γ-spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam Nguyen, Cong

    2005-02-01

    A non-destructive, γ-spectrometric method for uranium age-dating is reported for the first time. The method relies on measuring the daughter/parent activity ratio 214Bi/ 234U by low-background, high-resolution γ-spectrometry and does not require the use of reference samples of known ages. The initial methodology was derived during a "Round-Robin" exercise, in which the properties of a HEU material relevant to nuclear forensics were assessed by several laboratories. The Uranium-age obtained by this γ-spectrometric method is in agreement with the results reported by other participating laboratories, which used mass-spectrometry for age dating.

  4. Age calibration of weathering fractures in desert clasts: A new approach to dating geomorphic surfaces in arid landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda Boluda, Duna; Whittaker, Alex

    2014-05-01

    Advances in geomorphological and sedimentological research depend on the availability of reliable exposure age constraints. Establishing robust age models at a high spatial and temporal resolution is crucial for measuring rates of geomorphological change and decoding complex landscapes shaped by time-dependent forces, e.g. climate fluctuations. A number of isotopic and luminescence techniques are now available for dating geomorphic surfaces, however they remain expensive and time-consuming to deploy with detailed coverage over space and time in many study areas. For this reason, quick and accessible methods for correlating and extrapolating these chronologies are needed. In arid landscapes, among others, a variety of weathering-induced changes occur to geomorphic and sedimentary surfaces, and many of these processes occur at predictable rates and can be quantified using objective, field based measurements. One example is the gradual widening of fractures that exist within boulders on desert surfaces, by a combination of processes including salt weathering and freeze-thaw cycles. The recent emergence of very detailed exposure age models in a number of locations means it is now possible to measure the rates of desert weathering processes, and use them as fully calibrated age indicators themselves. With the potential to significantly extend the coverage of existing age constraints, this kind of quantitative age correlation would enable a broad range of geomorphological and sedimentological research that depends on detailed absolute age models. We have measured the mean widths of hundreds of vertical fractures that dissect granitic boulders, on a variety of alluvial surfaces in Owens Valley, California, which have themselves been independently dated in detail using cosmogenic nuclides. Our data demonstrates for the first time that these fractures widen at a predictable, steady rate of approximately 1 mm ka-1 for at least the last 150 ka, in this arid study area in the

  5. A revised burial dose estimation procedure for optical dating of youngand modern-age sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, L.J.; Roberts, R.G.; Galbraith, R.F.; DeLong, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of genuinely zero-age or near-zero-age grains in modern-age and very young samples poses a problem for many existing burial dose estimation procedures used in optical (optically stimulated luminescence, OSL) dating. This difficulty currently necessitates consideration of relatively simplistic and statistically inferior age models. In this study, we investigate the potential for using modified versions of the statistical age models of Galbraith et??al. [Galbraith, R.F., Roberts, R.G., Laslett, G.M., Yoshida, H., Olley, J.M., 1999. Optical dating of single and multiple grains of quartz from Jinmium rock shelter, northern Australia: Part I, experimental design and statistical models. Archaeometry 41, 339-364.] to provide reliable equivalent dose (De) estimates for young and modern-age samples that display negative, zero or near-zero De estimates. For this purpose, we have revised the original versions of the central and minimum age models, which are based on log-transformed De values, so that they can be applied to un-logged De estimates and their associated absolute standard errors. The suitability of these 'un-logged' age models is tested using a series of known-age fluvial samples deposited within two arroyo systems from the American Southwest. The un-logged age models provide accurate burial doses and final OSL ages for roughly three-quarters of the total number of samples considered in this study. Sensitivity tests reveal that the un-logged versions of the central and minimum age models are capable of producing accurate burial dose estimates for modern-age and very young (<350??yr) fluvial samples that contain (i) more than 20% of well-bleached grains in their De distributions, or (ii) smaller sub-populations of well-bleached grains for which the De values are known with high precision. Our results indicate that the original (log-transformed) versions of the central and minimum age models are still preferable for most routine dating applications

  6. Deep Springs fault, Inyo County, California: An example of the use of relative-dating techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, W.A.

    1989-11-01

    This article summarizes faulting in the Deep Springs Valley area, which was studied as part of a systematic evaluation of potentially active faults throughout California by the Division of Mines and Geology. Evaluation of surface fault-rupture hazard is authorized by the Alquist-Priolo Special Studies Zones Act of 1972. This act requires the State Geologist to delineate regulatory zones for faults that are well defined and show that displacement occurred during the last 11,000 years. Fault evaluations for the Division of Mines and Geology Fault Evaluation and Zoning Project are conducted at a detailed reconnaissance level. Evaluations are mainly based on aerial photographic interpretation in which ephemeral fault-produced landforms are identified and mapped. Young alluvial deposits and geomorphic surfaces are identified as either offset or not offset by faults. Field mapping is conducted to verify fault-related geomorphic features and to estimate ages of faulted and unfaulted deposits. The section on scarp degradation and relative dating techniques provides a brief survey of methods used in studies of the Basin and Range province. In these investigations geomorphic evidence is applied to determine the recency of faulting.

  7. 14C dating of small archaeological samples: neolithic to iron age in the central alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, J.; Keller, W. A.; Erne, R.; Bonani, G.; Wölfli, W.

    1984-11-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon 14C dating will widen enormously the range and scope of archaeological investigations. This is due mainly to 100- to 1000-fold sample size reduction over conventional dating. In order to determine the size and the quality of samples that can be accepted for AMS 14C dating, we have selected archaeological samples relating to the Neolithic to Iron Age. The basis of our AMS target preparations is the coking (pyrolysis) of organic matter after elimination of impurities by various physical and chemical treatments. The effect of the morphology as well as of the grain size distribution of the charcoal particles was determined in order to achieve optimal conditions for accelerator dating.

  8. Deep-ocean basalts: inert gas content and uncertainties in age dating.

    PubMed

    Noble, C S; Naughton, J J

    1968-10-11

    The radiogenic argon and helium contents of three basalts erupted into the deep ocean from an active volcano (Kilauea) have been measured. Ages calculated from these measurements increase with sample depth up to 22 million years for lavas deduced to be recent. Caution is urged in applying dates from deep-ocean basalts in studies on ocean-floor spreading. PMID:17779379

  9. ENHANCED RECOVERY METHODS FOR 85KR AGE-DATING GROUNDWATER: ROYAL WATERSHED, MAINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potential widespread use of 85Kr, having a constant input function in the northern hemisphere, for groundwater age-dating would advance watershed investigations. The current input function of tritium is not sufficient to estimate young modern recharge waters. While tri...

  10. What is the true age uncertainty of radiocarbon dated Holocene records?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Sze Ling; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Refeld, Kira; Mollenhauer, Gesine; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Nürnberg, Dirk; Laepple, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon-based age-depth models are the backbone of the chronology of Holocene sediment records. The uncertainty of such age-depth models is often estimated from the uncertainty of the calibrated radiocarbon samples. A necessary assumption hereby is that the age of the samples is representative for the proxies in the same sediment layer they originate from. Here we generate radiocarbon and multiple temperature proxy data in three Holocene sediment cores from the same multi-corer employed in the Southwest Pacific. Surprisingly, whilst radiocarbon ages at the same sediment depth strongly differ between the tubes, multiple independent proxy time-series measured in each of the sediment cores suggest stratified sediments at the site. This is based on the finding that proxy time-series correlate significantly better between sediment cores when analyzed over depth, rather than against core-specific age-depth models based on the radiocarbon dates. If our site is not a pathological special case - an argument which we have no evidence for - our finding has important implications for age-depth modeling and the interpretations of paleoclimate time-series. It suggests that the true age uncertainty of a sediment layer can be much higher than the uncertainty obtained from the radiocarbon dates. An alternative but less likely hypothesis is that the proxy values are modified post-deposition in the sediments, resulting in more consistent stratification than the original climate signal time-series. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of replication of the proxy time series and radiocarbon dates in the quest for chronologic precision and proxy reliability, which are crucial for a more quantitative understanding of Holocene climate evolution.

  11. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Virginia L; Egerton, Victoria M; Chamberlain, Andrew T; Manning, Phillip L; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six (14)C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated (14)C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 1(4)C analysis. PMID:26938469

  12. Collagen Fingerprinting: A New Screening Technique for Radiocarbon Dating Ancient Bone

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Virginia L.; Egerton, Victoria M.; Chamberlain, Andrew T.; Manning, Phillip L.; Buckley, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but dating is relatively expensive compared to other biochemical techniques. Numerous analytical methods have previously been investigated for the purpose of screening out samples that are unlikely to yield reliable dates including histological analysis, UV-stimulated fluorescence and, most commonly, the measurement of percentage nitrogen (%N) and ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N). Here we propose the use of collagen fingerprinting (also known as Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry, or ZooMS, when applied to species identification) as an alternative screening method for radiocarbon dating, due to its ability to provide information on collagen presence and quality, alongside species identification. The method was tested on a series of sub-fossil bone specimens from cave systems on Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands), chosen due to the observable range in diagenetic alteration, and in particular, the extent of mineralisation. Six 14C dates, of 18 initial attempts, were obtained from remains of extinct hutia, Capromys sp. (Rodentia; Capromyidae), recovered from five distinct caves on Cayman Brac, and ranging from 393 ± 25 to 1588 ± 26 radiocarbon years before present (yr BP). All of the bone samples that yielded radiocarbon dates generated excellent collagen fingerprints, and conversely those that gave poor fingerprints also failed dating. Additionally, two successfully fingerprinted bone samples were screened out from a set of 81. Both subsequently generated 14C dates, demonstrating successful utilisation of ZooMS as an alternative screening mechanism to identify bone samples that are suitable for 14C analysis. PMID:26938469

  13. Gamma-spectrometric uranium age-dating using intrinsic efficiency calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Cong Tam; Zsigrai, József

    2006-01-01

    A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for uranium age-dating is presented which is applicable to material of any physical form and geometrical shape. It relies on measuring the daughter/parent activity ratio 214Bi/234U by low-background, high-resolution gamma-spectrometry using intrinsic efficiency calibration. The method does not require the use of any reference materials nor the use of an efficiency calibrated geometry.

  14. Geoarchaeological dating of Holocene-age, earthquake-induced paleoliquefaction features in southwestern Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, C.A. ); Munson, P.J.; Garniewicz, R.C. . Dept. of Anthropology)

    1992-01-01

    Although archaeological geology generally involves the application of geological methods to archaeological research questions, recent research on earthquake-induced paleoliquefaction in Indiana provides an example off archeological methods applied to geological questions. Surveys in 1990-1992 have documented numerous paleoliquefaction features in Holocene-age alluvial sediments in the Wabash Valley region of southwestern Indiana that resulted from strong-earthquake shaking. A combination of archaeological and geological dating is critical to the study of prehistoric earthquakes in this region, where evidence of surface faulting is absent. Both direct dating and cross-dating are being used to develop a chronology for stratigraphic sequences within the alluvial facies of the Martinsville Formation. Temporally diagnostic artifacts and archaeological features such as hearths add significantly to the traditional array of datable samples from strata that underlie, overlie, or are penecontemporary with the sand- or gravel-filled dikes and buried sand blows that resulted from liquefaction. Dating of stratigraphic sequences and paleoliquefaction features is essential for estimating the recurrence intervals of prehistoric earthquakes and the geographic extents, epicentral locations, and magnitudes of specific events. Dating of stratigraphic sequences is also relevant to reconstructions of the prehistoric landscapes that were used for human settlement throughout the last 11,000 years.

  15. A practical method of estimating standard error of age in the fission track dating method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, N.M.; McGee, V.E.; Naeser, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    A first-order approximation formula for the propagation of error in the fission track age equation is given by PA = C[P2s+P2i+P2??-2rPsPi] 1 2, where PA, Ps, Pi and P?? are the percentage error of age, of spontaneous track density, of induced track density, and of neutron dose, respectively, and C is a constant. The correlation, r, between spontaneous are induced track densities is a crucial element in the error analysis, acting generally to improve the standard error of age. In addition, the correlation parameter r is instrumental is specifying the level of neutron dose, a controlled variable, which will minimize the standard error of age. The results from the approximation equation agree closely with the results from an independent statistical model for the propagation of errors in the fission-track dating method. ?? 1979.

  16. 14C dating of the Early to Late Bronze Age stratigraphic sequence of Aegina Kolonna, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, E. M.; Gauß, W.; Forstenpointner, G.; Lindblom, M.; Smetana, R.; Steier, P.; Thanheiser, U.; Weninger, F.

    2010-04-01

    Aegina Kolonna, located in the center of the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Mediterranean (Greece), is one of the major archaeological sites of the Aegean Bronze Age with a continuous stratigraphic settlement sequence from the Late Neolithic to the Late Bronze Age. Due to its position next to the maritime cross roads between central mainland Greece, the northeast Peloponnese, the Cyclades and Crete, the island played an important role in the trade between these regions. In the course of new excavations, which focused on the exploration of the Early, Middle and Late Bronze Age at Kolonna, several short lived samples from different settlement phases have been 14C-dated with the AMS method at the VERA laboratory. Bayesian sequencing of the 14C data according to the stratigraphic position of the samples in the profile was performed to enable estimates of the transition time between the cultural phases. The Aegina Kolonna 14C sequence is one of the longest existing so far for the Aegean Bronze Age, and therefore of major importance for the absolute Bronze Age chronology in this region. Preliminary results indicate that the Middle Helladic period seems to have started earlier and lasted longer than traditionally assumed. Further, at the present stage of our investigation we can give also a very tentative time frame for the Santorini volcanic eruption which seems to be in agreement with the science derived VDL date.

  17. Uranium-series Comminution Ages for Dating Detrital Sediments: Investigating the Methodological Underpinnings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, V. E.; DePaolo, D. J.; Christensen, J. N.; Huber, C.; Henderson, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    The uranium-series comminution age method can be utilized to directly date fine-grained detrital clasts, which are nearly ubiquitous throughout the sediments and soils blanketing the Earth's surface environment. In addition to yielding the comminution age (which is the elapsed time since the detrital particle was reduced below a critical threshold grain size (~50 microns)), sediment transport timescales can also be obtained in settings where the depositional age can be determined using independent dating methods. Therefore, the comminution age method is a powerful approach for investigating the timescales and associated Earth surface processes of a broad range of terrestrial deposits. The basic model for how the comminution age method works is that for grains that have been reduced below the critical threshold size, there is a measurable decrease in the (234U/238U) activity ratio due to time-dependent alpha recoil loss of the 234U daughter following decay of the 238U parent isotope. The magnitude of this decrease yields the comminution age, when information is also taken into account regarding the initial (234U/238U) ratio, as well as the grain surface area over which recoiled 234U daughters are lost (described by a constant termed the recoil loss parameter fα). Although the fundamental concepts underlying the use of the comminution age method as a chronometer are simple and well-established, the complexity of natural samples requires that careful attention be paid to methodological details that can affect the accuracy of the comminution ages obtained from U isotope measurements. Of particular interest for terrestrial samples are potential impacts of both physical and chemical weathering on the U isotope composition of bulk sediments. Weathering processes can potentially obscure and/or alter the U isotopic composition of the detrital fraction by mechanisms such as the production of secondary phases with different U isotope compositions, dissolution-induced removal

  18. Ages, durations and behavioural implications of Middle Stone Age industries in southern Africa: advances in optical dating of individual grains of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Z.

    2009-04-01

    Recent developments in OSL dating have focussed on the measurement of individual sand-sized grains of quartz. Single-grain dating allows the identification of contaminant grains in a sample and their exclusion before final age determination, and the ability to directly check the stratigraphic integrity of archaeological sequences and address concerns about post-deposition sediment mixing. These benefits result in single-grain OSL ages being both accurate and precise. Even greater precision can be attained by adopting a systematic approach to the collection and analysis of OSL data. This involves one operator using the same OSL stimulation and detection instrument, laboratory radiation sources, calibration standards, and analytical procedures for all samples. By holding these experimental parameters constant, sources of error common to all samples are removed, enabling far greater resolution of the true age structure. This approach was recently used to determine the timing and duration of two bursts of Middle Stone Age technological and behavioural innovation - the Still Bay (SB) and Howieson's Poort (HP) - in southern Africa. These distinctive artefacts are associated with the first evidence for symbols and personal ornaments, and may have been the catalyst for the expansion of Homo sapiens populations in Africa 80,000-60,000 years ago and for the subsequent migration of modern humans out of Africa. Testing such hypotheses, and the putative role of climate change, has been hampered by poor age constraints for the HP and SB industries. Previous attempts to resolve the start and end dates of these industries had been largely obscured by the chronological' haze' arising from a variety of different materials being dated by different methods using different equipment, calibration standards, measurement procedures and techniques of data analysis. By clearing this haze and placing all ages on a common timescale, we were able to constrain the timing of the SB and HP, and

  19. Lichenometric Dating of Little Ice Age Moraines in the Cordillera Vilcabamba, Southern Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taggart, J. R.; Licciardi, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Lateral and end moraines deposited by two valley glaciers were mapped on the south side of Nevado Tucarhuay (5910 m asl) and on the east side of Nevado Salcantay (6271 m asl) in the Cordillera Vilcabamba in the southern Peruvian Andes (~13°S latitude). The geomorphic expression of outer and inner moraine sequences in these two drainages mimics that of a previously studied pair of moraines in the upper Rio Blanco valley on the south side of Nevado Salcantay. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating has yielded ages of 9.0 ± 0.3 ka and 195 ± 24 years, respectively, for these outer and inner Rio Blanco moraines. In all three valleys, prominent outer moraines occur ~3-5 km from headwalls and inner moraine ridges are found ~2.5-3 km from headwalls. Recessional moraines found exclusively on the east side of Salcantay indicate multiple early- to late-Holocene glacier pauses, rather than continuous retreat, prior to the latest Holocene glacier readvance. Diameters of the lichen Rhizocarpon subgenus Rhizocarpon were measured on moraine boulders from the inner moraines in all three valleys. Lichen diameters on the two undated inner moraines are consistent with diameters on the inner 10Be-dated Rio Blanco moraine, which signifies similar lichenometric ages and supports synchronous glacier culminations in all three drainages during the Little Ice Age. The new lichen measurements and age estimates provide a critical link between previous lichen studies in the Cordillera Blanca to the north and in the Cordillera Real to the south, thereby increasing spatial coverage of terrestrial paleoclimate information. Moreover, the extensive lichen measurements gathered on the inner 10Be-dated Rio Blanco moraine define a new control point for the Rhizocarpon subgenus Rhizocarpon growth curve in the tropical Peruvian- Bolivian Andes, which will increase the accuracy of lichenometric age estimates in this region. 10Be exposure dating of the inner moraines in adjacent valleys is underway

  20. Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits through geological time: Implications from recent age-dating research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, D.L.; Bradley, D.; Lewchuk, Michael T.; Symons, David T. A.; De Marsily, G.; Brannon, J.

    2001-01-01

    Remarkable advances in age dating Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) lead-zinc deposits provide a new opportunity to understand how and where these deposits form in the Earth's crust. These dates are summarized and examined in a framework of global tectonics, paleogeography, fluid migration, and paleoclimate. Nineteen districts have been dated by paleomagnetic and/or radiometric methods. Of the districts that have both paleomagnetic and radiometric dates, only the Pine Point and East Tennessee districts have significant disagreements. This broad agreement between paleomagnetic and radiometric dates provides added confidence in the dating techniques used. The new dates confirm the direct connection between the genesis of MVT lead-zinc ores with global-scale tectonic events. The dates show that MVT deposits formed mainly during large contractional tectonic events at restricted times in the history of the Earth. Only the deposits in the Lennard Shelf of Australia and Nanisivik in Canada have dates that correspond to extensional tectonic events. The most important period for MVT genesis was the Devonian to Permian time, which corresponds to a series of intense tectonic events during the assimilation of Pangea. The second most important period for MVT genesis was Cretaceous to Tertiary time when microplate assimilation affected the western margin of North America and Africa-Eurasia. There is a notable paucity of MVT lead-zinc ore formation following the breakup of Rodinia and Pangea. Of the five MVT deposits hosted in Proterozoic rocks, only the Nanisivik deposit has been dated as Proterozoic. The contrast in abundance between SEDEX and MVT lead-zinc deposits in the Proterozoic questions the frequently suggested notion that the two types of ores share similar genetic paths. The ages of MVT deposits, when viewed with respect to the orogenic cycle in the adjacent orogen suggest that no single hydrologic model can be universally applied to the migration of the ore fluids

  1. A new technique for precise uranium-series dating of travertine micro-samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Ronzon; Frank, Norbert

    2002-12-01

    Secondary carbonate formations, such as travertine and calcareous tufa deposits, are important archives for quaternary continental climate studies and archaeology. The extremely complex growth mechanisms result in some serious problems for precise mass spectrometric uranium-series dating. Often, detrital and organic particles contaminate the carbonate and large pore volumes yield a great potential for open system behavior. We utilized microscopic, mineralogical and geochemical methods prior to sample selection to determine the abundance of primary calcite, i.e. micrite and spar. Furthermore, the state of alteration was characterized by cathodoluminescence and trace-element analysis. We conclude that travertine and calcareous tufa are appropriate for precise U-series age determination if a) micrite and/or spar are the dominant phases; b) cathodoluminescence of both phases is weak or absent; c) Fe and Al levels are low; and d) Sr concentrations are close to the average of the studied site. We mapped and sampled solely areas of major micrite/spar abundance having minor alteration for accurate U-series dating. When this new method was applied, travertines located in eastern Germany (sites Bad Langensalza, Burgtonna and Weimar-Ehringsdorf) gave single 230Th/ 238U-ages consistent with the lithological growth sequence and greatly improved compared to previously published chronologies. In addition, we determined 230Th/U isochron ages on bulk samples that confirm our single ages. In contrast to primary calcite, pore cements are homogeneously distributed throughout the travertine fabric and reflect early diagenetic processes and/or weathering.

  2. Age preferences in dating advertisements by homosexuals and heterosexuals: from sociobiological to sociological explanations.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Kathryn

    2013-02-01

    Current sociobiological thought suggests that significant components of mate selection are based on indicators that correlate with the ability to produce and support offspring. Theorists have suggested that men tend to be attracted to and marry younger women, while women tend to be attracted to and marry older men. This behavior is referred to as age hypergamy. I complicate this picture by using gay men as a population in which to explore alternative components of mate selection as reflected in our behavior. Analyses of 120 dating advertisements from gay men and heterosexual men and women indicated that there exists a good measure of hypergamic age preference that is comparable to the heterosexual population and that relates to subjects' gender presentation. Data suggest that the biological-reproductive theory of age hypergamy is incomplete and support a cultural reproduction model of gender role behavior and preference in both heterosexuals and homosexuals. PMID:23179236

  3. 10Be depth profile dating in the Swiss Midlands: deposition ages versus erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, Lorenz; Zech, Roland; Haghipour, Negar; Terrizzano, Carla; Christl, Marcus; Gnägi, Christian; Veit, Heinz; Ivy-Ochs, Susan

    2015-04-01

    During the Pleistocene, glaciers advanced repeatedly from the Alps into the Swiss Midlands. The exact extents and timing are still under debate, even for the last glacial advances. Decalcification depths, for example, increase from west to east in the western Swiss Midlands and have been interpreted to indicate that the Rhone glacier may have been less extensive during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 20 ka than assumed so far [1]. In an attempt to provide more quantitative age control, we applied 10Be depth profile dating [2] on till at five locations in the western part of Switzerland. Two of them lie outside the assumed LGM extent of the Rhone glacier (Niederbuchsiten, St.Urban), two inside the extent of the LGM Rhone glacier (Steinhof, Deisswil) and one profile was taken from the Berne stade (LGM) of the Aare glacier [3]. All surface concentrations are relatively low and indicate massive erosion. Without constrains for age and erosion, depth profile dating yields ages between roughly 15 ka up to more than 1 Ma for the profiles in St. Urban, Niederbuchsiten and Deisswil whereas the profiles in Steinhof and Bern yields only last glacial ages. The wide range of possible exposure ages illustrates, that independent estimates for erosion would be needed to precisely determine the deposition ages of the investigated tills. However, at this point, we interpret the best model fits to our depth profile concentrations as tentative verification of the assumed LGM extent [3]. The spatial patterns of decalcification depths and soil development in the Swiss Midlands deserves further evaluation. [1] Bitterli et al. (2011) Geologischer Atlas der Schweiz, Blatt 1108, Swisstopo [2] Hidy et al. (2010) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 11, doi:10.1029/2010GC003084 . [3] Bini et al. (2009) Switzerland during the Last Glacial Maximum, Swisstopo

  4. Relation of Chlorofluorocarbon Ground-Water Age Dates to Water Quality in Aquifers of West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy; Kurt, J.; Kozar, Mark D.

    2007-01-01

    The average apparent age of ground water in fractured-bedrock aquifers in West Virginia was determined using chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) dating methods. Since the introduction of CFC gases as refrigerants in the late 1930s, atmospheric concentrations have increased until production ceased in the mid-1990s. CFC dating methods are based on production records that date to the early 1940s, and the preservation of atmospheric CFC concentrations in ground water at the time of recharge. As part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) and Ambient Ground-Water Monitoring Network (AGN) programs in West Virginia from 1997 to 2005, 80 samples from the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province, 27 samples from the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province, and 5 samples from the Ohio River alluvial aquifers were collected to estimate ground-water ages in aquifers of West Virginia. Apparent CFC ages of water samples from West Virginia aquifers ranged from 5.8 to 56 years. In the Appalachian Plateaus, topographically driven ground-water flow is evident from apparent ages of water samples from hilltop, hillside, and valley settings (median apparent ages of 12, 14, and 25 years, respectively). Topographic setting was the only factor that was found to be related to apparent ground-water age in the Plateaus at the scale of this study. Similar relations were not found in Valley and Ridge aquifers, indicating that other factors such as bedding or geologic structure may serve larger roles in controlling ground-water flow in that physiographic province. Degradation of CFCs was common in samples collected from methanogenic/anoxic aquifers in the Appalachian Plateaus and suboxic to anoxic aquifers in the Valley and Ridge. CFC contamination was most common in Ohio River alluvial aquifers and carbonate units of the Valley and Ridge, indicating that these highly transmissive surficial aquifers are the most vulnerable to water-quality degradation and may

  5. A simple-rapid method to separate uranium, thorium, and protactinium for U-series age-dating of materials.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew W; Eitrheim, Eric S; Nelson, Andrew W; Nelson, Steven; Schultz, Michael K

    2014-08-01

    Uranium-series dating techniques require the isolation of radionuclides in high yields and in fractions free of impurities. Within this context, we describe a novel-rapid method for the separation and purification of U, Th, and Pa. The method takes advantage of differences in the chemistry of U, Th, and Pa, utilizing a commercially-available extraction chromatographic resin (TEVA) and standard reagents. The elution behavior of U, Th, and Pa were optimized using liquid scintillation counting techniques and fractional purity was evaluated by alpha-spectrometry. The overall method was further assessed by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry for the preliminary age determination of an ancient carbonate sample obtained from the Lake Bonneville site in western Utah (United States). Preliminary evaluations of the method produced elemental purity of greater than 99.99% and radiochemical recoveries exceeding 90% for U and Th and 85% for Pa. Excellent purity and yields (76% for U, 96% for Th and 55% for Pa) were also obtained for the analysis of the carbonate samples and the preliminary Pa and Th ages of about 39,000 years before present are consistent with (14)C-derived age of the material. PMID:24681438

  6. Impacts of age-dependent tree sensitivity and dating approaches on dendrogeomorphic time series of landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šilhán, Karel; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Different approaches and thresholds have been utilized in the past to date landslides with growth ring series of disturbed trees. Past work was mostly based on conifer species because of their well-defined ring boundaries and the easy identification of compression wood after stem tilting. More recently, work has been expanded to include broad-leaved trees, which are thought to produce less and less evident reactions after landsliding. This contribution reviews recent progress made in dendrogeomorphic landslide analysis and introduces a new approach in which landslides are dated via ring eccentricity formed after tilting. We compare results of this new and the more conventional approaches. In addition, the paper also addresses tree sensitivity to landslide disturbance as a function of tree age and trunk diameter using 119 common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and 39 Crimean pine (Pinus nigra ssp. pallasiana) trees growing on two landslide bodies. The landslide events reconstructed with the classical approach (reaction wood) also appear as events in the eccentricity analysis, but the inclusion of eccentricity clearly allowed for more (162%) landslides to be detected in the tree-ring series. With respect to tree sensitivity, conifers and broad-leaved trees show the strongest reactions to landslides at ages comprised between 40 and 60 years, with a second phase of increased sensitivity in P. nigra at ages of ca. 120-130 years. These phases of highest sensitivities correspond with trunk diameters at breast height of 6-8 and 18-22 cm, respectively (P. nigra). This study thus calls for the inclusion of eccentricity analyses in future landslide reconstructions as well as for the selection of trees belonging to different age and diameter classes to allow for a well-balanced and more complete reconstruction of past events.

  7. First direct dating of a presumed Pleistocene hominid from China: AMS radiocarbon age of a femur from the Ordos Plateau.

    PubMed

    Keates, Susan G; Hodgins, Gregory W L; Kuzmin, Yaroslav V; Orlova, Lyobov A

    2007-07-01

    Human remains from the Xarusgol Valley, Ordos Plateau, northwestern China, have been considered to date to the Late Pleistocene. In order to ascertain their true age, direct AMS (14)C dating of a femur collected in the early 1920s was conducted. The results demonstrate that the femur is very young, with one sample of 'post-bomb' age and the other sample c. 200 years old. This first direct dating of a Chinese fossil hominid underscores the need to apply the same methodology to other Chinese modern human fossils currently believed to be of Pleistocene age. PMID:17490725

  8. Modeling Magma Mixing: Evidence from U-series age dating and Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, R.; Cooper, K. M.; Bergantz, G. W.

    2007-12-01

    -pairs, heterogeneity of particle populations is large. After one overturn event, even the "thin section scale" can contain phenocrysts that derive from the entire magmatic system. We combine these results with time scale information from U-series plagioclase age dating. Apparent crystal residence times from the most evolved and therefore least hybridized rocks for the 1846/47 and 1932 eruptions of Volcan Quizapu are about 5000 and about 3000 yrs, respectively. Based on whole rock chemistry as well as textural and crystal-chemical data, both eruptions tapped the same reservoir and therefore should record similar crystal residence times. Instead, the discordance of these two ages can be explained by magma mixing as modeled above, if some young plagioclase derived from the andesitic recharge magma which triggered the 1846/47 AD eruption got mixed into the dacite remaining in the reservoir after eruption, thus lowering the apparent crystal residence time for magma that was evacuated from the reservoir in 1932.

  9. Constraints on the age of the Great Sand Dunes, Colorado, from subsurface stratigraphy and OSL dates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madole, Richard F.; Mahan, Shannon; Romig, Joe H.; Havens, Jeremy C.

    2013-01-01

    The age of the Great Sand Dunes has been debated for nearly 150 yr. Seven ages ranging from Miocene to late Holocene have been proposed for them. This paper presents new information—chiefly subsurface stratigraphic data, OSL dates, and geomorphic evidence—that indicates that the Great Sand Dunes began to form in the latter part of the middle Pleistocene. The dunes overlie a thick wedge of piedmont-slope deposits, which in turn overlies sediment of Lake Alamosa, a paleolake that began to drain about 440 ka. The wedge of piedmont-slope deposits extends westward for at least 23 km and is as much as 60 m thick at a distance of 10 km from the Sangre de Cristo Range. Ostracodes from one well indicate that the eastern shoreline of Lake Alamosa extended to within 4.3 km of where the Great Sand Dunes eventually formed. The time represented by the wedge of piedmont-slope deposits is not known exactly, but the wedge post-dates 440 ka and was in place prior to 130 ka because by then the dunes overlying it were sufficiently close and tall enough to obstruct streams draining from the Sangre de Cristo Range.

  10. Age Dating from Electron Microprobe Analyses of U, Th, and Pb: Geological Advantages and Analytical Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Bowles, John F W

    2015-10-01

    Electron microprobe analysis of U, Th, and Pb in naturally occurring minerals can indicate their age. Where the Pb is entirely due to the radioactive decay of U and Th, the time since mineral formation or equilibration can be calculated. Uraninite (UO2), monazite (REE PO4), zircon (ZrSiO4), and xenotime (YPO4) have been used, the latter containing U and/or Th in minor proportions. Any stable U- or Th-bearing phase can be considered. Careful analysis is required with attention to interferences, background measurement, detection limits, and Pb-free sample preparation. Extended counting times (600 s) at a probe current >200 nA are recommended. Ages can be determined from uraninite older than 2 Ma for a Pb detection limit of 0.02% and up to 700-1,000 Ma, after which Pb can be lost from the structure. The youngest monazite ages permitted by the Pb detection limit are 50-100 Ma and ages greater than 3,000 Ma have been determined. The method does not provide the detail of isotopic methods, but results can be obtained more readily. Examples show dating of cheralite ((Ca,Ce)(Th,Ce)(PO4)2), a rock containing primary and secondary UO2, and a suite of detrital uraninite grains that formed a part of a mineral exploration program. PMID:25936439

  11. Accurate and Precise in Situ Zircon U-Pb age Dating With High Sample Throughput by Automated LA-SF-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, D.; Gerdes, A.; Schersten, A.; Hollis, J. A.; Martina, F.; Knudsen, C.

    2006-12-01

    Zircon is an ubiquitous mineral in most crystalline rocks as well as clastic sediments. The high resistance to thermal resetting and physical erosion makes zircon an exceptionally useful mineral for precise and accurate dating of thermal geological events. For example, the analysis of the U-Pb ages of detrital zircon grains in clastic sediments is a powerful tool in sedimentary provenance studies. Accurate and precise U-Pb ages of > 100 zircon grains in a sample usually allow to detect all major sedimentary source age components with statistical confidence. U-Pb age dating of detrital zircons is generally the domain of high resolution ion microprobe techniques (high resolution SIMS), where relatively rapid in situ analysis can be achieved. The major limitations of these techniques are sample throughput (about 75 zircon age dates per 24 hours), the very high purchasing and operating costs of the equipment and the need for highly specialised personnel, resulting in high cost. These high costs usually impose uncomfortable restrictions on the number of samples that can be analysed in a provenance study. Here, we present a high sample throughput technique for highly accurate and precise U-Pb dating of zircons by laser ablation magnetic sectorfield inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-SF-ICP-MS). This technique takes advantage of recent progress in laser technology and the introduction of magnetic sectorfield ICP-MS instruments. Based on a ThermoFinnigan Element2 magnetic sctorfield ICP-MS and a New Wave UP 213 laser ablation system, this techniques allows U-Pb dating of zircon grains with precision, accuray and spatial resolution comparable to high resolution SIMS. Because an individual analysis is carried out in less than two minutes and all data is acquired automated in pre-set mode with only minimal operator presence, the sample throughput is an order of magnitude higher compared to high resolution SIMS. Furthermore, the purchasing and operating costs of

  12. Radiocarbon Dating and age Inversions in Lake Chapala Late Holocene Sediments, Western Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarate-Del Valle, P.; Israde-Alcantara, I.; Ramírez-Sánchez, H.; Gómez-Salazar, S.; Ríos-Donato, N.

    2006-12-01

    Neotectonic Lake Chapala, the major Mexican freshwater reservoir lies at the north and northeast of the Citala Rift and is linked to history of the active Plio-Quaternary Transmexican Volcanic Belt geological province. Eight radiocarbon 14C dates were obtained on shallow sediment samples from a gravity corer (T46) of 5 cm in diameter and 1.7 m long. The core was collected from the western sector of Lake Chapala (103° 15.43' W, 20° 14.45' N) at water depth of 3.7 m (june 2000). In general, shallow sediments (<2m deep) in Lake Chapala are dark and silty with granulometric median ranging from 10 to 50 μm. Major oxides in sediments are: SiO2 (54.05%), Al2O3 (18.94%), Fe2O3 (6.75%) and CaO (2.57%). The major mineralogical composition of sediments is as follows: plagioclases (25.86%), quartz (20.92%), clays (38.5%), carbonates (2.99%) and TiO2 (1.05%). Radiocarbon ages were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and were obtained through the organic carbon fraction extracted from the bulk sediment samples sliced every 20 cm taken from the whole core. Stratigraphically ordered from highest to lowest, the eight ages reported are: 1) 2,000 ±40 yr on sediments at 30 cm deep; 2) 1,920 ±35 yr on sediments at 50 cm deep; 3) 1,900 ±35 yr on sediments at 70 cm deep; 4) 2,080 ±35 yr on sediments at 90 cm deep; 5) 2,090 ±50 yr on sediments at 110 cm deep; 6) 2,190 ±35 yr on sediments at 130 cm deep; 7) 2,050 ±35 yr on sediments at 150 cm deep and, 8) 1,500 ±35 yr on sediments at 170 cm deep. From the top until 70 cm and from 130 to bottom we observe two age inversions; the interval apparently with no age inversions is from 70cm to 130cm. As it is known the age inversions observed may be due to a) ancient carbon being incorporated into the sediment during deposition; b) unrecognized bioturbation, c) Postdepositional alteration and, d) variations in the apparent geological ages of the different chemical phases comprising the total sediment. Basically, the factors

  13. 187Re - 187Os nuclear geochronometry: age dating with permil precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, Goetz

    2016-04-01

    Recently, 187Re - 187Os nuclear geochronometry, a new dating method combining ideas of nuclear astrophysics with geochronology, has successfully been used to calculate two-point-isochron (TPI) ages for Devonian black gas shales using the isotopic signature of an r-process geochronometer as one data point in a TPI diagram [1]. Based upon a nuclear production ratio 187Re/188Os = 5.873, TPI ages were calculated for 12 SDO-1 (Devonian Ohio Shale, Appalachian Basin) aliquants, for which repeated Re-Os measurements are reported in the literature [2]. TPI ages range from 384.5 ± 2.7 Ma (187Os/188Osi = 0.29413 ± 0.00023) to 387.7 ± 2.1 Ma (187Os/188Osi = 0.29407 ± 0.00019) with a mean of 386.67 ± 1.79 Ma). The result is consistent with the isochronous age from the 12 aliquants alone (386 ± 16 Ma, 187Os/188Osi = 0.31±0.31), which is bracketed by U-Pb ages for the Belpre Ash (381.1 ± 3.3 Ma) and the Tioga Ash bed (390.0 ± 2.5 Ma) [3] from the Appalachian Basin. Hence, SDO-1 can be assigned to the Givetian stage (varcus-zone) of the Middle Devonian, close to the Eifelian/Givetian boundary (using the time-scale of [3] or [4]). If an age is calculated from an isochron diagram for the 12 aliquants including the nuclear geochronometer, a permil precision can be achieved, an interesting feature with respect to any effort towards calibrating the Geologic Timescale. Additionally, a Th/U evolution (or: Th/U-time) diagram can be plotted using U-Pb zircon age data and Th/U ratios from volcanic rocks and ashes reported in the literature [3] for specific Devonian samples from the Appalachian Basin. Since the Re-Os age obtained for SDO-1 can also be connected to its Th/U ratio, it turns out, that Th/U ratios might be helpful age indicators, as demonstrated for the Devonian using the U-Pb and Re-Os datasets. [1] Roller (2015), GSA Abstr. with Programs 47, #248-14. [2] Du Vivier et al. (2014), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 389, 23 - 33. [3] Tucker et al. (1998), Earth Planet. Sci. Lett

  14. Automated curve matching techniques for reproducible, high-resolution palaeomagnetic dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurcock, Pontus; Channell, James

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution relative palaeointensity (RPI) and palaeosecular variation (PSV) data are increasingly important for accurate dating of sedimentary sequences, often in combination with oxygen isotope (δ18O) measurements. A chronology is established by matching a measured downcore signal to a dated reference curve, but there is no standard methodology for performing this correlation. Traditionally, matching is done by eye, but this becomes difficult when two parameters (e.g. RPI and δ18O) are being matched simultaneously, and cannot be done entirely objectively or repeatably. More recently, various automated techniques have appeared for matching one or more signals. We present Scoter, a user-friendly program for dating by signal matching and for comparing different matching techniques. Scoter is a cross-platform application implemented in Python, and consists of a general-purpose signal processing and correlation library linked to a graphical desktop front-end. RPI, PSV, and other records can be opened, pre-processed, and automatically matched with reference curves. A Scoter project can be exported as a self-contained bundle, encapsulating the input data, pre-processing steps, and correlation parameters, as well as the program itself. The analysis can be automatically replicated by anyone using only the resources in the bundle, ensuring full reproducibility. The current version of Scoter incorporates an experimental signal-matching algorithm based on simulated annealing, as well as an interface to the well-established Match program of Lisiecki and Lisiecki (2002), enabling results of the two approaches to be compared directly.

  15. UPb ages of zircon rims: A new analytical method using the air-abrasion technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Winegarden, D.L.; Walter, M.

    1990-01-01

    We present a new technique for directly dating, by conventional techniques, the rims of zircons. Several circumstances, such as a xenocrystic or inherited component in igneous zircon and metamorphic overgrowths on igneous cores, can result in grains with physically distinct age components. Pneumatic abrasion has been previously shown by Krogh to remove overgrowths and damaged areas of zircon, leaving more resistant and isotopically less disturbed parts available for analysis. A new abrader design, which is capable of very gently grinding only tips and interfacial edges of even needle-like grains, permits easy collection of abraded material for dating. Five examples demonstrate the utility of the "dust-collecting" technique, including two studies that compare conventional, ion microprobe and abrader data. Common Pb may be strongly concentrated in the outermost zones of many zircons and this Pb is not easily removed by leaching (even in weak HF). Thus, the benefit of removing only the outermost zones (and avoiding mixing of age components) is somewhat compromised by the much higher common Pb contents which result in less precise age determinations. A very brief abrasion to remove the high common Pb zones prior to collection of material for dating is selected. ?? 1990.

  16. Using Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopes for Groundwater Age Dating in Southern Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, James; Hershey, Ronald; Fereday, Wyatt

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C offers a method to calculate groundwater ages that is more straightforward than dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) 14C. To obtain corrected DIC 14C groundwater ages requires models that account for chemical and physical processes that affect both 13C and 14C. This is especially true in carbonate-rock aquifers where a fair amount of dissolution and precipitation of carbonate minerals can occur. A first important step in calculating 14C DOC groundwater ages is to determine the initial 14C DOC (A0) values of the groundwater recharge. For this study, recharge area groundwater samples of DOC 14C, collected from 14 different sites, were used to determine the recharge DOC 14C values. These values ranged from 96 to 120 percent modern carbon (pmc), with an average value of 106.2 pmc. These 14C A0 values support the use of a 100 pmc 14C A0 pre-bomb value to calculate DOC 14C groundwater ages for southern Nevada. Several conditions to successfully use DOC 14C to date groundwater need to be met. First, soluble organic carbon content of aquifers needs to be low, so that little DOC is added to the groundwater as it flows from recharge areas down gradient in an aquifer. For this study, volcanic and carbonate aquifer outcrop rocks showed that these rocks contained low soluble organic carbon. Second, it is important that the DOC does not change character down a flow path, which could indicate transformation of DOC along a flow path and/or addition of DOC to the groundwater. Although specific DOC compounds could not be identified for samples collected at four sites, all four groundwater sample spectra show the same general shape over the duration of the HPLC run indicating that the DOC compound composition of groundwater does not significantly change from up-gradient to down-gradient. Third, another factor that could greatly affect DOC 14C groundwater age calculations is matrix diffusion/adsorption of DOC 14C. Laboratory experiments showed that

  17. Age estimation based on Kvaal's technique using digital panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Samta; Nagendrareddy, Suma Gundareddy; Sharma, Manisha Lakhanpal; Agnihotri, Poornapragna; Chaudhary, Sunil; Dhillon, Manu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Age estimation is important for administrative and ethical reasons and also because of legal consequences. Dental pulp undergoes regression in size with increasing age due to secondary dentin deposition and can be used as a parameter of age estimation even beyond 25 years of age. Kvaal et al. developed a method for chronological age estimation based on the pulp size using periapical dental radiographs. There is a need for testing this method of age estimation in the Indian population using simple tools like digital imaging on living individuals not requiring extraction of teeth. Aims and Objectives: Estimation of the chronological age of subjects by Kvaal's method using digital panoramic radiographs and also testing the validity of regression equations as given by Kvaal et al. Materials and Methods: The study sample included a total of 152 subjects in the age group of 14-60 years. Measurements were performed on the standardized digital panoramic radiographs based on Kvaal's method. Different regression formulae were derived and the age was assessed. The assessed age was then correlated to the actual age of the patient using Student's t-test. Results: No significant difference between the mean of the chronological age and the estimated age was observed. However, the values of the mean age estimated by using regression equations as given previously in the study of Kvaal et al. significantly underestimated the chronological age in the present study sample. Conclusion: The results of the study give an inference for the feasibility of this technique by calculation of regression equations on digital panoramic radiographs. However, it negates the applicability of same regression equations as given by Kvaal et al. on the study population.

  18. Dating violence victimization across the teen years: Abuse frequency, number of abusive partners, and age at first occurrence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prior longitudinal studies have shown high cumulative dating violence exposure rates among U.S adolescents, with 36 percent of males and 44 percent to 88 percent of females experiencing victimization across adolescence/young adulthood. Despite promising information characterizing adolescents’ dating violence experiences longitudinally, prior studies tended to concentrate on physical and sexual types of violence only, and did not report information on the number of times dating violence was experienced across multiple abusive partners. We used a method similar to the timeline follow-back interview to query adolescents about dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19—including dating violence types (physical, sexual, and psychological), frequency, age at first occurrence, and number of abusive partners. Methods A total of 730 subjects were randomly sampled from university registrar records and invited to complete an online survey, which utilized methods similar to the timeline follow-back interview, to retrospectively assess relationship histories and dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19 (eight questions adapted from widely-used surveys covering physical, sexual, and psychological abuse). Then, for each dating violence type, we asked about the number of occurrences, number of abusive partners, and age at first occurrence. Of 341 subjects who completed the survey, we included 297 (64 percent females; 36 percent males) who had a dating partner from age 13 to 19. Results Fully 64.7 percent of females and 61.7 percent of males reported dating violence victimization between age 13 and 19, with most experiencing multiple occurrences. More than one-third of abused females had two or more abusive partners: controlling behavior (35.6 percent); put downs/name calling (37.0); pressured sex (42.9); insults (44.3); slapped/hit (50.0); and threats (62.5). Males also had two or more abusive partners, as follows: controlling behavior (42.1 percent

  19. Dating loess with high temperature IRSL signals from polymineral fine grains: luminescence characteristics and comparison with conventional techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, C.; Buylaert, J.-P.; Murray, A. S.; Tsukamoto, S.; Jain, M.; Frechen, M.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that loess deposits contain detailed terrestrial archives of palaeoenvironmental changes. Unfortunately, loess sequences often lack a reliable absolute chronology, and thus these changes are difficult to constrain in time. Luminescence dating is the technique of choice to address this issue. Quartz and feldspar are the most commonly used dosimeters in luminescence dating. The age range of standard quartz OSL is usually limited by the saturation level of ~200 Gy (corresponding to ~50 ka). In contrast, the age range of feldspar IRSL signals - which usually have a more extended growth curve (up to ~2000 Gy) - is hampered by anomalous fading for which a reliable correction is still not available. Recently, Thomsen et al. (2008) identified several laboratory-induced feldspar signals which show less anomalous fading than the standard IRSL signal stimulated at 50°C. Based on this work, Buylaert et al. (accepted) tested a post-IR IR signal, i.e. IR bleach at 50°C and subsequent IRSL measurement at 225°C, and observed significantly lower fading rates in nature for a number of coarse-grained K-feldspar samples. In this study we explore the possibility of using such a post-IR IR signal from polymineral fine grains extracted from loess. Murray et al. (accepted) showed that a more stringent preheat treatment (320°C for 60 s) can be safely used for feldspar; as a result, we have been able to use a post-IR IR measurement temperature of 290°C, higher than that in the study of Buylaert et al. (accepted), with the expectation that this might further reduce the observed fading rate. The results of the elevated temperature IRSL signal fading measurements clearly indicate a significantly lower fading rate (g2days values typically 1-1.5 %/decade) than the standard IRSL measured at 50°C (g2days values typically 3 %/decade). Results of the performance in the SAR protocol (recycling ratios, recuperation and dose recovery) are very encouraging (measured dose within 15

  20. Dating of the time of sedimentation using U-Pb ages for paleosol calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Rasbury, E.T.; Hanson, G.N.; Meyers, W.J.

    1997-04-01

    We have sampled paleosol horizons from a continuous core of a rapidly deposited Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian marine shelf section in Texas. USA. The paleosols occur on the tops of shoaling upward cycles and, based on current time constraints, these cycles average 250 ka and cannot represent longer than 400 ka. As the unconformity which is represented by the paleosol can only be a fraction of the time allowed for deposition of the cycle, the age of minerals that form in the paleosol is effectively the time of sedimentation. The uncertainty on the {sup 238}U-{sup 206}Pb age of brown paleosol calcite from one exposure surface is only 1 Ma. Reported uncertainties on Paleozoic boundaries are greater than 10 Ma. Our early results suggest that the marine sedimentary record may be dated to a precision of 1 Ma with U-Pb analyses of carefully selected paleosol calcite. These results have implications for vastly improving time resolution of the rock record. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Radiation-induced signals of gypsum crystals analysed by ESR and TL techniques applied to dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydaş, Canan; Engin, Birol; Aydın, Talat

    2011-02-01

    Natural crystals of terrestrial gypsum were investigated concerning the radiation effects on Electron spin resonance (ESR) and Thermoluminescence (TL) properties and their application for geological dating. ESR signals of Fe 3+, Mn 2+, G1 ( SO3-, g = 2.003) and G2 ( SO4-, g∥=2.018g⊥=2.009) centers were observed. The thermal stability and dose response of the ESR signals were found to be suitable for an age determination using a signal at g = 2.009. The intensity of this center increased with γ-radiation and the additive dose method for this ESR center yielded accumulated dose GD of 67.4 ± 10.1 Gy. Using U, Th and K contents plus the cosmic-ray contribution, a dose rate of 1.92 ± 0.22 mGy/year has been obtained. We have determined the ESR age of the gypsums to be (35 ± 4) × 10 3 years. TL peaks at 157 and 278 °C were observed. By using initial rise method the thermal activation energy of 278 °C TL peak was found to be underestimated, probably due to the thermal quenching. Activation energies and frequency factors obtained by the method of varying the heating rate indicate lifetime of 4.09 × 10 7 years (at 15 °C) for 278 °C peak. The additive dose method applied to this TL peak yielded GD of 75 ± 11 Gy. The corresponding TL age using the 278 °C TL peak was found to be (39 ± 5) × 10 3 years for gypsum sample. The TL age of this sample is consistent with the ESR age within experimental error limits. The obtained ESR and TL ages are not consistent with the expectations of geologists. This contradiction is probably due to the repeatedly recrystallisation of gypsum samples under the environmental conditions after their formation in the upper Miocene-Pliocene Epoch.

  2. Aging of target lipid parameters in fingermark residue using GC/MS: Effects of influence factors and perspectives for dating purposes.

    PubMed

    Girod, Aline; Spyratou, Alexandra; Holmes, David; Weyermann, Céline

    2016-05-01

    Despite the recurrence of fingermark dating issues and the research conducted on fingermark composition and aging, no dating methodology has yet been developed and validated. In order to further evaluate the possibility of developing dating methodologies based on the fingermark composition, this research proposed an in-depth study of the aging of target lipid parameters found in fingermark residue and exposed to different influence factors. The selected analytical technique was gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The effects of donor, substrate and enhancement techniques on the selected parameters were firstly evaluated. These factors were called known factors, as their value could be obtained in real caseworks. Using principal component analysis (PCA) and univariate exponential regression, this study highlighted the fact that the effects of these factors were larger than the aging effects, thus preventing the observation of relevant aging patterns. From a fingermark dating perspective, the specific value of these known factors should thus be included in aging models newly built for each case. Then, the effects of deposition moment, pressure, temperature and lighting were also evaluated. These factors were called unknown factors, as their specific value would never be precisely obtained in caseworks. Aging models should thus be particularly robust to their effects and for this reason, different chemometric tools were tested: PCA, univariate exponential regression and partial least square regression (PLSR). While the first two models allowed observing interesting aging patterns regardless of the value of the applied influence factors, PLSR gave poorer results, as large deviations were obtained. Finally, in order to evaluate the potential of such modelling in realistic situations, blind analyses were carried out on eight test fingermarks. The age of five of them was correctly estimated using soft independent modelling of class analogy analysis

  3. U-Pb Dating of CA/non-CA Treated Zircons Obtained by LA-ICP-MS and CA-TIMS Techniques: Impact for their Geological Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Quadt, A.; Gallhofer, D.; Guillong, M.; Peytcheva, I.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical Abrasion Isotope-Dilution Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CA-ID-TIMS) is known as a high precision technique for resolving lead loss and improving the interpretation of U-Pb zircon age data. We argue that combining CA with the widely applied Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) improves the precision and accuracy of zircon dates, while removing the substantial parts with lead loss, reducing data scatter, and providing meaningful geological interpretations. The samples are magmatic rocks chosen from different geological time periods (Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic time). All zircon separates are analysed by LA-ICP-MS before and after CA, and all age data are compared with CA-ID-TIMS 206Pb/238U dates that are considered as the most accurately age. All CA-treated zircon crystals show up to 50% less data scatter compared to the non-CA treated zircon grains and thus a reduction of the calculated uncertainties is apparent. The obtained wt average LA-ICP-MS 206Pb/238U ages of the CA-treated zircon grains are up to 4-6% higher than those of the non-CA treated crystals, exceeding the analytical uncertainties of the LA-ICP-MS dating technique of 1-2%. The damaged crystal parts, caused by U-decay, with lead loss are removed, so that we can exclude younging from the possible geological scenarios. CA-LA-ICP-MS age data are in good agreement with the CA-ID-TIMS dates and suggest advantages of using CA-LA-ICP-MS in order to define accurate ages. The use of the CA technique for very young zircons (~0.2 Ma, Kos rhyolitic tuff, Greece) seems optional; as the obtained mean 206Pb/238U ages of non-CA and CA treated zircons coincide within the uncertainty. The negligible time to produce the lattice damage (based on alpha decay or spontaneous fission) makes lead loss less important for age dating and data interpretation of very young zircons (<1 Ma). Von Quadt, A. et al., 2014, JAAS, doi: 10.1039/c4ja00102h.

  4. Archaeomagnetic dating of a High Middle Age likely iron working site in Corroy-le-Grand (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassov, Simo; Hus, Jozef; Geeraerts, Raoul; Heller, Frédéric

    Archaeological burnt materials and structures provide unique records of direction and intensity of the Earth’s magnetic field in the past, elements that can be absolutely determined applying the archaeomagnetic method. At present, such records within Europe are irregular in both space and time. Presented here is the archaeomagnetic investigation of three kilns that were discovered during a preventive excavation of an archaeological site considered of High Middle Age in Corroy-le-Grand (Belgium) and that are assumed to be related to iron working activities. Archaeological context dating points to kiln operation between the second half of the 10th century until the 12th century AD. As the site is not far from Paris, declination and inclination of the characteristic remanent magnetisation of the kilns were compared with the standard directional secular variation curve for France in order to propose archaeomagnetic dates for the cessation of kiln operation by using probability densities [Lanos, Ph., 2004. Bayesian inference of calibration curves, application to archaeomagnetism. In: Buck, C.E., Millard, A.R. (Eds.), Tools for Constructing Chronologies: Crossing Disciplinary Boundaries. Lecture Notes in Statistics. Springer Verlag, London, pp. 43-82; Lanos, Ph., Le Goff, M., Kovacheva, M., Schnepp, E., 2005. Hierarchical modelling of archaeomagnetic data and curve estimation by moving average technique. Geophysical Journal International 160 (2), 440-476]. This confirms the presumed archaeological age and resulted in more precise time constraints for the last kiln operation. Rock magnetic techniques, proposed by Spassov and Hus [Spassov, S., Hus, J., 2006. Estimating baking temperatures in a Roman pottery kiln by rock magnetic properties: implications of thermochemical alteration for archaeointensity determinations. Geophysical Journal International 167, 592-604], were applied to examine the suitability of the burnt materials from the kilns for archaeointensity

  5. 230Th-234U Age-Dating Uranium by Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R W; Gaffney, A M

    2012-04-18

    This is the standard operating procedure used by the Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Group of the Chemical Sciences Division at LLNL for the preparation of a sample of uranium oxide or uranium metal for {sup 230}Th-{sup 234}U age-dating. The method described here includes the dissolution of a sample of uranium oxide or uranium metal, preparation of a secondary dilution, spiking of separate aliquots for uranium and thorium isotope dilution measurements, and purification of uranium and thorium aliquots for mass spectrometry. This SOP may be applied to uranium samples of unknown purity as in a nuclear forensic investigation, and also to well-characterized samples such as, for example, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and U-metal certified reference materials. The sample of uranium is transferred to a quartz or PFA vial, concentrated nitric acid is added and the sample is heated on a hotplate at approximately 100 C for several hours until it dissolves. The sample solution is diluted with water to make the solution approximately 4 M HNO{sub 3} and hydrofluoric acid is added to make it 0.05 M HF. A secondary dilution of the primary uranium solution is prepared. Separate aliquots for uranium and thorium isotope dilution measurements are taken and spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 229}Th, respectively. The spiked aliquot for uranium isotope dilution analysis is purified using EiChrom UTEVA resin. The spiked aliquot for thorium isotope dilution analysis is purified by, first, a 1.8 mL AG1x8 resin bed in 9 M HCl on which U adsorbs and Th passes through; second, adsorbing Th on a 1 mL AG1x8 resin bed in 8 M HNO{sub 3} and then eluting it with 9 M HCl followed by 0.1 M HCl + 0.005 M HF; and third, by passing the Th through a final 1.0 mL AG1x8 resin bed in 9 M HCl. The mass spectrometry is performed using the procedure 'Th and U Mass Spectrometry for {sup 230}Th-{sup 234}U Age Dating'.

  6. Radiocarbon Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-20

    Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of objects that contain components that were once alive. In the case of human remains, a radiocarbon date can distinguish between a crime scene and an archeological site. Documents, museum artifacts and art objects can be dated to determine if their age is correct for the historical context. A radiocarbon date does not confirm authenticity, but it can help identify a forgery.

  7. Revised age for the Gosses Bluff impact structure, Northern Territory, Australia, based on Ar-40Ar-39 dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Daniel J.; Sutter, John F.

    1987-09-01

    Ar-40Ar-39 dating of a pumiceous suevite clast from the melt breccia at Gosses Bluff consisting largely of extremely fine-grained sanidine yields a discordant age spectrum, probably reflecting some diffusional loss of argon. High-temperature increments that together yield a near-plateau age of 142.5 Ma are apparently not affected by argon loss and offer the best estimate of the date of the Gosses Bluff event. The event may fall in the latest Jurassic Period, but more likely falls in the earliest Cretaceous, probably in one of the reverse-polarity magnetochrons M16, M17, or M18.

  8. Evaluations of mosquito age grading techniques based on morphological changes.

    PubMed

    Hugo, L E; Quick-Miles, S; Kay, B H; Ryan, P A

    2008-05-01

    Evaluations were made of the accuracy and practicality of mosquito age grading methods based on changes to mosquito morphology; including the Detinova ovarian tracheation, midgut meconium, Polovodova ovariole dilatation, ovarian injection, and daily growth line methods. Laboratory maintained Aedes vigilax (Skuse) and Culex annulirostris (Skuse) females of known chronological and physiological ages were used for these assessments. Application of the Detinova technique to laboratory reared Ae. vigilax females in a blinded trial enabled the successful identification of nulliparous and parous females in 83.7-89.8% of specimens. The success rate for identifying nulliparous females increased to 87.8-98.0% when observations of ovarian tracheation were combined with observations of the presence of midgut meconium. However, application of the Polovodova method only enabled 57.5% of nulliparous, 1-parous, 2-parous, and 3-parous Ae. vigilax females to be correctly classified, and ovarian injections were found to be unfeasible. Poor correlation was observed between the number of growth lines per phragma and the calendar age of laboratory reared Ae. vigilax females. In summary, morphological age grading methods that offer simple two-category predictions (ovarian tracheation and midgut meconium methods) were found to provide high-accuracy classifications, whereas methods that offer the separation of multiple age categories (ovariolar dilatation and growth line methods) were found to be extremely difficult and of low accuracy. The usefulness of the morphology-based methods is discussed in view of the availability of new mosquito age grading techniques based on cuticular hydrocarbon and gene transcription changes. PMID:18533427

  9. An evaluation of fossil tip-dating versus node-age calibrations in tetraodontiform fishes (Teleostei: Percomorphaceae).

    PubMed

    Arcila, Dahiana; Alexander Pyron, R; Tyler, James C; Ortí, Guillermo; Betancur-R, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Time-calibrated phylogenies based on molecular data provide a framework for comparative studies. Calibration methods to combine fossil information with molecular phylogenies are, however, under active development, often generating disagreement about the best way to incorporate paleontological data into these analyses. This study provides an empirical comparison of the most widely used approach based on node-dating priors for relaxed clocks implemented in the programs BEAST and MrBayes, with two recently proposed improvements: one using a new fossilized birth-death process model for node dating (implemented in the program DPPDiv), and the other using a total-evidence or tip-dating method (implemented in MrBayes and BEAST). These methods are applied herein to tetraodontiform fishes, a diverse group of living and extinct taxa that features one of the most extensive fossil records among teleosts. Previous estimates of time-calibrated phylogenies of tetraodontiforms using node-dating methods reported disparate estimates for their age of origin, ranging from the late Jurassic to the early Paleocene (ca. 150-59Ma). We analyzed a comprehensive dataset with 16 loci and 210 morphological characters, including 131 taxa (95 extant and 36 fossil species) representing all families of fossil and extant tetraodontiforms, under different molecular clock calibration approaches. Results from node-dating methods produced consistently younger ages than the tip-dating approaches. The older ages inferred by tip dating imply an unlikely early-late Jurassic (ca. 185-119Ma) origin for this order and the existence of extended ghost lineages in their fossil record. Node-based methods, by contrast, produce time estimates that are more consistent with the stratigraphic record, suggesting a late Cretaceous (ca. 86-96Ma) origin. We show that the precision of clade age estimates using tip dating increases with the number of fossils analyzed and with the proximity of fossil taxa to the node under

  10. Dating a Small Impact Crater: An Age of Kaali Crater (Estonia) Based on Charcoal Emplaced Within Proximal Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, A.; Wild, E. M.; Geppert, W. D.; Huber, M. S.; Jõeleht, A.; Kriiska, A.; Kulkov, A.; Paavel, K.; Pirkovic, I.; Plado, J.; Steier, P.; Välja, R.; Wilk, J.; Wisniowski, T.; Zanetti, M.

    2015-09-01

    The Kaali crater was formed shortly after (tpq) 1530-1455 BC (3237 ± 10 14C yr BP). This age is based on dating charcoal within the ejecta blanket that makes it directly related to the impact, and not susceptible to potential reservoir effects.

  11. Comparing OSL and CN techniques for dating fluvial terraces and estimating surface process rates in Pamir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Margret; Gloaguen, Richard; Pohl, Eric; Sulaymonova, Vasila; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of surface process rates is crucial for understanding the topographic evolution of high mountains. Spatial and temporal variations in fluvial incision and basin-wide erosion enable to decipher the role of tectonic and climatic drivers. The Pamir is peculiar in both aspects because of its location at the western end of the India-Asia collision zone, and its position at the edge of two atmospheric circulation systems, the Westerlies and the Indian Summer Monsoon. The architecture of the Panj river network indicates prominent variations across the main tectonic structures of the Pamir. The trunk stream, deflects from the predominantly westward river orientation and cuts across the southern and central Pamir domes before doubling back to the west and leaving the orogen. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of fluvial terraces reveals short-term sedimentation along the trunk stream during the last ~25 kyr. The agreement of OSL results to new exposure ages based on the cosmogenic nuclide (CN) 10Be confirms accurate terrace age modelling and treatment of incomplete bleaching. The consistent terrace sedimentation and exposure ages suggest also fast terrace abandonment and rapid onset of incision. Considerable differences in terrace heights reflect high spatial variations of fluvial incision, independent of time interval, change in rock type or catchment increase. Highest rates of (5.9 ± 1.1) mm/yr to (10.0 ± 2.0) mm/yr describe the fluvial dynamic across the Shakhdara Dome and that related to the Darvaz Fault Zone. Lower rates of (3.9 ± 0.6) mm/yr to (4.5 ± 0.7) mm/yr indicate a transient stage north of the Yazgulom Dome. Fluvial incision decreases to rates ranging from (1.7 ± 0.3) mm/yr to (3.9 ± 0.7) mm/yr in graded river reaches associated to southern dome boundaries. The pattern agrees to the interpretation of successive upstream river captures across the southern and central Pamir domes inferred from morphometric analyses of river

  12. Use of radiometric (Cs-137, Pb-210), geomorphic, and stratigraphic techniques to date recent oxbow sediments in the Rio Puerco drainage Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, C.J.; Dehn, M. ); Hawley, J.W.; Love, D.W. )

    1988-06-01

    In the absence of historic geochemical baseline data for the Grants uranium region, environmental changes resulting from uranium mine-mill activities can be determined only by indirect methods. A methodology for determining the age of recent sediments in streams draining the region has been established based on combined geomorphic, stratigraphic, and radiometric dating techniques. Because clay-rich sediments retain possible radionuclides and heavy metals derived from mineralization and mined sources, sample sites which contain fine-grained deposits that both predate and postdate mine-mill activity were located in abandoned-channel segments (oxbows) of major streams draining the eastern Grants uranium region. Aerial photographs (and derivative maps) taken between 1935 and 1971 provided the historical and geomorphic documentation of approximate dates of oxbow formation and ages of alluvial fills in the abandoned-channel segments. Pits were dug at these oxbow sites to determine stratigraphy and composition of the deposits. Samples collected from pit walls and auger holes below the pits were subjected to radiometric analysis by gamma ray spectrometry for the artificial radionuclide Cs-137 and the natural radionuclide Pb-210 as well as other U-238 and Th-232 daughters. Because of the dynamic nature of the system, absolute dating with Cs-137 was not possible but samples could be dated as either pre- or post-1950. The 1950 date is important because it marked the beginning of the uranium exploitation in the region. The Pb-210 dating was not possible because background Pb-210 was very high relative to fallout Pb-210.

  13. Uranium-series dating of mollusks and corals, and age of Pleistocene deposits, Chesapeake Bay area, Virginia and Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mixon, Robert B.; Szabo, B. J.; Owens, James Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Geologic mapping in conjunction with uranium-series dating of fossil mollusks and corals suggests that the low-lying ( < 17 m in altitude) terrace deposits in the central and southern Chesapeake Bay area include two main depositional sequences, each of which represents a high stand of the sea in late Pleistocene time. The older depositional sequence includes the Accomack and Omar beds of the Delmarva area, the fossiliferous deposits along the lower Rappahannock River, and the Norfolk Formation deposits west of the Suffolk scarp. These beds have yielded a single reliable coral age estimate of 184,000?20,000 years B.P., suggesting an early late Pleistocene age. The younger sequence, including the type beds of the Norfolk Formation and equivalent strata east of the Suffolk scarp, has yielded several coral ages ranging from about 62,000 to 86,000 years B.P. (including ages from our samples and previously reported age estimates); thus, it is clearly late Pleistocene in age. Groupings of ages obtained from our quahog analyses also suggest two transgressive sequences; however, the estimated quahog ages are consistently younger than ages based on coral samples from the same and equivalent stratigraphic units. Stratigraphic, paleoclimatic, and geomorphic data suggest that the estimated uranium-series age of 71,000?7,000 years B.P. for the type beds of the Norfolk, obtained by averaging our coral dates, may be too young by as much as several tens of thousands of years. A postulated equivalency of the type Norfolk beds, upper Pleistocene deposits near Charleston, S.C. (apparent uranium-series age = 95,000?5,000 years), and deposits in the Caribbean area thought to represent the highest sea stand during the last interglacial period (apparent age, 125,000?10,000 years) implies diagenetic modification of coralline material possibly in part because of regional differences in depositional and postdepositional environments.

  14. New uppermost Cambrian U-Pb date from Avalonian Wales and age of the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davidek, K.; Landing, E.; Bowring, S.A.; Westrop, S.R.; Rushton, A.W.A.; Fortey, R.A.; Adrain, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    A crystal-rich volcaniclastic sandatone in the lower Peltura scarabaeoides Zone at Ogof-odi near Criccieth, North Wales, yields a U-Pb zircon age of 491 ?? 1 Ma. This late Late Cambrian date indicates a remarkably young age for the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary whose age must be less than 491 Ma. Hence the revised duration of the post-Placentian (trilobite-bearing) Cambrian indicates that local trilobite zonations allow a biostratigraphic resolution comparble to that provided by Ordovician graptolites and Mesozoic ammonites.

  15. Radiocarbon Dating.

    PubMed

    Van Strydonck, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Although most historians and art historians consider the radiocarbon dating technique not to be very precise by their criteria, the method has gained much importance over the last decades. Radiocarbon dating is increasingly used in the field of textile research and old polychrome statues, but also objects made of ivory, stucco, paper, and parchment are dated with the technique. Especially after the introduction of the AMS technique, a boom of this type of research has been noticed. PMID:27573138

  16. Redundant 230Th/ 234U/ 238U, 231Pa/ 235U and 14C dating of fossil corals for accurate radiocarbon age calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Tzu-Chien; Fairbanks, Richard G.; Mortlock, Richard A.; Cao, Li; Fairbanks, Todd W.; Bloom, Arthur L.

    2006-09-01

    230Th/ 234U/ 238U dating of fossil corals by mass spectrometry is remarkably precise, but some samples exposed to freshwater over thousands of years may gain and/or lose uranium and/or thorium and consequently yield inaccurate ages. Although a δ 234U initial value equivalent to modern seawater and modern corals has been an effective quality control criterion, for samples exposed to freshwater but having δ 234U initial values indistinguishable from modern seawater and modern corals, there remains a need for additional age validation in the most demanding applications such as the 14C calibration (Fairbanks et al., 2005. Radiocarbon calibration curve spanning 0 to 50,000 years BP based on paired 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 14C dates on pristine corals. Quaternary Science Reviews 24(16-17), 1781-1796). In this paper we enhance screening criteria for fossil corals older than 30,000 years BP in the Fairbanks0805 radiocarbon calibration data set (Fairbanks et al., 2005) by measuring redundant 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U dates via multi-collector magnetic sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-MS-ICPMS) using techniques described in Mortlock et al. (2005. 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U ages from a single fossil coral fragment by multi-collector magnetic-sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 69(3), 649-657.). In our present study, we regard paired 231Pa/ 235U and 230Th/ 234U/ 238U ages concordant when the 231Pa/ 235U age (±2 σ) overlaps with the associated 230Th/ 234U/ 238U age (±2 σ). Out of a representative set of 11 Fairbanks0805 (Fairbanks et al., 2005) radiocarbon calibration coral samples re-measured in this study, nine passed this rigorous check on the accuracy of their 230Th/ 234U/ 238U ages. The concordancy observed between 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 231Pa/ 235U dates provides convincing evidence to support closed system behavior of these fossil corals and validation of their 230Th/ 234U/ 238U

  17. Building on previous OSL dating techniques for gypsum: a case study from Salt Basin playa, New Mexico and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, Shannon; Kay, John

    2012-01-01

    The long term stability and reliability of the luminescence signal for gypsum has not been well documented or systematically measured until just recently. A review of the current literature for luminescence dating of gypsum is compiled here along with original efforts at dating an intact and in-situ bed of selenite gypsum at Salt Basin Playa, New Mexico and Texas. This effort differs from other documented luminescence dating efforts because the gypsum is not powdery or redistributed from its original growth patterns within the playa basin but is instead of a crystalline form. Sixteen ages from eight cores were ultimately produced with seven of the ages coming from rare detrital quartz encased in or with the gypsum crystals while the remaining ages are from the crystalline gypsum. As far as can be ascertained, the quartz was measured separately from the gypsum and no contaminants were noted in any of the aliquots. Some basic and preliminary tests of signal stability were measured and found to be mitigated by lessening of pre-heat protocols. Ages ranged from 8 ka to 10 ka in the shallow cores and 16 ka to 22 ka in the deeper cores. These ages will be useful in determining rates of gypsum growth within a sequence of evaporates which, in turn, will help to better document historic rates of evaporation and thus estimate, with more precision, the corresponding annual evaporation rates.

  18. Age Dating Merger Events in Early Type Galaxies via the Detection of AGB Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thorough statistical analysis of the J-H vs. H-K color plane of all detected early type galaxies in the 2MASS catalog with velocities less than 5000 km/s has been performed. This all sky survey is not sensitive to one particular galactic environment and therefore a representative range of early type galaxy environments have been sampled. Virtually all N-body simulation so major mergers produces a central starburst due to rapid collection of gas. This central starburst is of sufficient amplitude to change the stellar population in the central regions of the galaxy. Intermediate age populations are given away by the presence of AGB stars which will drive the central colors redder in H-K relative to the J- H baseline. This color anomaly has a lifetime of 2-5 billion years depending on the amplitude of the initial starburst Employing this technique on the entire 2MASS sample (several hundred galaxies) reveals that the AGB signature occurs less than 1% of the time. This is a straightforward indication that virtually all nearby early type galaxies have not had a major merger occur within the last few billion years.

  19. Confirmation of a late middle Pleistocene age for the Omo Kibish 1 cranium by direct uranium-series dating.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Maxime; Pike, Alistair W G; Stringer, Chris; Bartsiokas, Antonis; Kinsley, Les; Eggins, Stephen; Day, Michael; Grün, Rainer

    2012-11-01

    While it is generally accepted that modern humans evolved in Africa, the specific physical evidence for that origin remains disputed. The modern-looking Omo 1 skeleton, discovered in the Kibish region of Ethiopia in 1967, was controversially dated at ~130 ka (thousands of years ago) by U-series dating on associated Mollusca, and it was not until 2005 that Ar-Ar dating on associated feldspar crystals in pumice clasts provided evidence for an even older age of ~195 ka. However, questions continue to be raised about the age and stratigraphic position of this crucial fossil specimen. Here we present direct U-series determinations on the Omo 1 cranium. In spite of significant methodological complications, which are discussed in detail, the results indicate that the human remains do not belong to a later intrusive burial and are the earliest representative of anatomically modern humans. Given the more archaic morphology shown by the apparently contemporaneous Omo 2 calvaria, we suggest that direct U-series dating is applied to this fossil as well, to confirm its age in relation to Omo 1. PMID:22959819

  20. 40K- 40Ar dating of the Main Deccan large igneous province: Further evidence of KTB age and short duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenet, Anne-Lise; Quidelleur, Xavier; Fluteau, Frédéric; Courtillot, Vincent; Bajpai, Sunil

    2007-11-01

    Most mass extinctions coincide in time with outpourings of continental flood basalts (CFB). Some 20 years ago, it was shown [Courtillot, V., Besse, J., Vandamme, D., Montigny, R., Jaeger, J.-J., Cappetta, H., 1986. Deccan flood basalts at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary? Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 80, 361-374; Courtillot, V., Feraud, G., Maluski, H., Vandamme, D., Moreau, M.G., Besse, J., 1988. Deccan flood basalts and the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. Nature 333, 843-846; Duncan, R.A., Pyle, D.G., 1988. Rapid eruption of the Deccan flood basalts at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. Nature 333 841-843] that the age of the Deccan traps was close to the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) boundary and its duration under 1 Myr. We have undertaken a new geochronological study, using the (unconventional) 40K- 40Ar Cassignol-Gillot technique which is particularly well suited to the potassium-poor Deccan lavas. The mean of 4 determinations from the topmost (Ambenali and Mahabaleshwar) Formations is 64.5 ± 0.6 Ma. They straddle the C29r/C29n reversal boundary for which they provide a new constraint. The mean age of 3 determinations from the oldest (Jawhar) Formation is 64.8 ± 0.6 Ma. The difference in age between top and bottom of a 3500 m composite section, probably comprising 80% of the total Deccan volume, is statistically insignificant, with the overall mean age being 64.7 ± 0.6 Ma ( N = 7). Our results are consistent with the most recent 40Ar/ 39Ar determinations [Knight, K.B., Renne, P.R., Halkett, A., White, N., 2003. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of the Rajahmundry Traps, eastern India and their relationship to the Deccan traps. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 208, 85-99; Knight, K.B., Renne, P.R., Baker, J., Waight, T., White, N., 2005. Reply to '40Ar/39Ar dating of the Rajahmundry Traps, Eastern India and their relationship to the Deccan Traps: Discussion' by A.K. Baksi. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 239, 374-382], confirming that there should be no systematic difference between the two methods

  1. Comparative 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar dating of illite-type clay minerals: A tentative explanation for age identities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, Norbert; Zwingmann, Horst; Liewig, Nicole; Wendling, Raymond

    2012-10-01

    The 40K/40Ar (K-Ar) and 40Ar/39Ar dating methods are applied here to the same, very small, micrometric illite-type particles that crystallized under low-temperature (< 175 °C) hydrothermal conditions in deeply buried Rotliegend (Permian) gas-bearing sandstones of NW Germany. Four samples with a total of fifteen size fractions from < 2 to 20-40 μm yield K-Ar ages that range from 166.0 ± 3.4 to 214.0 ± 5.9 Ma. The same size fractions dated by the 40Ar/39Ar method give total-gas ages ranging from 173.3 ± 2.0 to 228.8 ± 1.6 Ma. Nearly all 40Ar/39Ar total-gas ages are slightly older, which cannot be explained by the recoil effect only, the impact of which being amplified by the inhomogeneous shape of the clay minerals and their crystallographic characteristics, with varied crystallinity indices, and a particle width about 10 times large than thickness. The 40Ar/39Ar data outline some advantages, such as the plateaus obtained by incremental step heating of the various size fractions, even if not translatable straight as ages of the illite populations; they allow identification of two generations of authigenic illite that formed at about 200 and 175 Ma, and one detrital generation. However, 40Ar/39Ar dating of clay minerals remains challenging as technical factors, such as the non-standardized encapsulation, may have potential unexpected effects. Both dating methods have their limitations: (1) K-Ar dating requires relatively large samples (ca. 10-20 mg) incurring potential sample homogeneity problems, with two aliquots required for K and Ar analysis for an age determination, also inducing a higher analytical uncertainty; (2) an identified drawback of 40Ar/39Ar dating is Ar recoil and therefore potential loss that occurs during neutronic creation of 39Ar from 39K, mostly in the finer mineral particles. If all the recoiled 39Ar is redistributed into adjacent grains/minerals, the final 40Ar/39Ar age of the analyzed size fraction remains theoretically identical, but it

  2. Quaternary estimates of average slip-rates for active faults in the Mongolian Altay Mountains: the advantages and assumptions of multiple dating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, L. C.; Walker, R. T.; Thomas, A. L.; Amgaa, T.; Bayasgalan, G.; Amgalan, B.; West, A.

    2010-12-01

    Active faults in the Altay Mountains, western Mongolia, produce surface expressions that are generally well-preserved due to the arid central-Asian climate. Motion along the right-lateral strike-slip and oblique-reverse faults has displaced major river systems by kilometres over millions of years and there are clear scarps and linear features in the landscape along the surface traces of active fault strands. With combined remote sensing and field work, we have identified sites with surface features that have been displaced by tens of metres as a result of cumulative motion along faults. In an effort to accurately quantify an average slip-rate for the faults, we used multiple dating techniques to provide an age constraint for the displaced landscapes. At one site on the Olgiy fault, we applied 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCN) and uranium-series geochronology on boulder tops and in-situ formed carbonate rinds, respectively. Based on a displacement of approximately 17m, and geochronology results that range from 20-60ky, we resolve a slip-rate of less than 1 mm/yr. We have also applied optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), 10Be TCN, and U-series methods on the Ar Hotol fault. Each of these dating techniques provides unique constraints on the relationship between the ‘age’ of a displaced surface and the actual amount of displacement, and each has inherent assumptions. We will consider the advantages and assumptions made in utilising these techniques in western Mongolia- e.g. U-series dating of carbonate rinds can provide a minimum age for alluvial fan deposition, and inheritance must be considered when using TCN techniques on boulder tops. This will be put into the context of estimating accurate and geologically relevant slip-rates, and improving our understanding of the active deformation of the Mongolian Altay.

  3. 235U–231Pa age dating of uranium materials for nuclear forensic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Eppich, Gary R.; Williams, Ross W.; Gaffney, Amy M.; Schorzman, Kerri C.

    2013-04-03

    Here, age dating of nuclear material can provide insight into source and suspected use in nuclear forensic investigations. We report here a method for the determination of the date of most recent chemical purification for uranium materials using the 235U-231Pa chronometer. Protactinium is separated from uranium and neptunium matrices using anion exchange resin, followed by sorption of Pa to an SiO2 medium. The concentration of 231Pa is measured by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using 233Pa spikes prepared from an aliquot of 237Np and calibrated in-house using the rock standard Table Mountain Latite and the uranium isotopic standard U100. Combined uncertainties of age dates using this method are 1.5 to 3.5 %, an improvement over alpha spectrometry measurement methods. Model ages of five uranium standard reference materials are presented; all standards have concordant 235U-231Pa and 234U-230Th model ages.

  4. Using age of colonizing douglas-fir for the dating of young geomorphic surfaces: a case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dating of many types of young (<500 year), dynamic, geomorphic landforms (e.g. mass-movement erosional tracks and deposits, alluvial terraces, flood plains, etc.) for purposes of hazard assessment and mitigation commonly requires greater dating precision than is available through radiocarbon dating or other methods. Ages of trees growing on landform surfaces have been used in a number of studies to estimate the time of landform creation or surface clearing, but the time lag between surface formation or disturbance and the reestablishment of trees can vary from 1 to more than 200 years (Desloges and Ryder 1990; Frenzen et al. 1988, 2005; Larsen and Bliss 1998; McCarthy and Luckman 1993; Sigafoos and Hendricks 1969; Winter et al. 2002). Appropriate lag times for selected tree species and for particular climatic and altitudinal ranges must be determined for the method to be useful.

  5. Dating young geomorphic surfaces using age of colonizing Douglas fir in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, T.C.

    2007-01-01

    Dating of dynamic, young (<500 years) geomorphic landforms, particularly volcanofluvial features, requires higher precision than is possible with radiocarbon dating. Minimum ages of recently created landforms have long been obtained from tree-ring ages of the oldest trees growing on new surfaces. But to estimate the year of landform creation requires that two time corrections be added to tree ages obtained from increment cores: (1) the time interval between stabilization of the new landform surface and germination of the sampled trees (germination lag time or GLT); and (2) the interval between seedling germination and growth to sampling height, if the trees are not cored at ground level. The sum of these two time intervals is the colonization time gap (CTG). Such time corrections have been needed for more precise dating of terraces and floodplains in lowland river valleys in the Cascade Range, where significant eruption-induced lateral shifting and vertical aggradation of channels can occur over years to decades, and where timing of such geomorphic changes can be critical to emergency planning. Earliest colonizing Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) were sampled for tree-ring dating at eight sites on lowland (<750 m a.s.l.), recently formed surfaces of known age near three Cascade volcanoes - Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens and Mount Hood - in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Increment cores or stem sections were taken at breast height and, where possible, at ground level from the largest, oldest-looking trees at each study site. At least ten trees were sampled at each site unless the total of early colonizers was less. Results indicate that a correction of four years should be used for GLT and 10 years for CTG if the single largest (and presumed oldest) Douglas fir growing on a surface of unknown age is sampled. This approach would have a potential error of up to 20 years. Error can be reduced by sampling the five largest Douglas fir instead of the

  6. Dating the End of the Greek Bronze Age: A Robust Radiocarbon-Based Chronology from Assiros Toumba

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, Kenneth; Higham, Thomas; Kromer, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Over 60 recent analyses of animal bones, plant remains, and building timbers from Assiros in northern Greece form an unique series from the 14th to the 10th century BC. With the exception of Thera, the number of 14C determinations from other Late Bronze Age sites in Greece has been small and their contribution to chronologies minimal. The absolute dates determined for Assiros through Bayesian modelling are both consistent and unexpected, since they are systematically earlier than the conventional chronologies of southern Greece by between 70 and 100 years. They have not been skewed by reference to assumed historical dates used as priors. They support high rather than low Iron Age chronologies from Spain to Israel where the merits of each are fiercely debated but remain unresolved. PMID:25222862

  7. Dating the end of the Greek Bronze Age: a robust radiocarbon-based chronology from Assiros Toumba.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Kenneth; Higham, Thomas; Kromer, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Over 60 recent analyses of animal bones, plant remains, and building timbers from Assiros in northern Greece form an unique series from the 14th to the 10th century BC. With the exception of Thera, the number of 14C determinations from other Late Bronze Age sites in Greece has been small and their contribution to chronologies minimal. The absolute dates determined for Assiros through Bayesian modelling are both consistent and unexpected, since they are systematically earlier than the conventional chronologies of southern Greece by between 70 and 100 years. They have not been skewed by reference to assumed historical dates used as priors. They support high rather than low Iron Age chronologies from Spain to Israel where the merits of each are fiercely debated but remain unresolved. PMID:25222862

  8. 40Ar- 39Ar laser dating of tektites from the Cheb Basin (Czech Republic): Evidence for coevality with moldavites and influence of the dating standard on the age of the Ries impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vincenzo, Gianfranco; Skála, Roman

    2009-01-01

    Moldavites (Central European tektites) are genetically related to the impact event that produced the ˜24-km diameter Ries crater in Germany, representing one of the youngest large impact structures on Earth. Although several geochronological studies have been completed, there is still no agreement among 40Ar- 39Ar ages on both moldavites and glasses from Ries suevites. Even recently published data yielded within-sample mean ages with a nominal spread of more than 0.6 Ma (14.24-14.88 Ma). This age spread, which significantly exceeds current internal errors, must be in part ascribed to geological and/or analytical causes. This study reports the results of a detailed geochronological investigation of moldavites from the Cheb area (Czech Republic), which have never been dated before, and, for comparison, of two samples from type localities, one in southern Bohemia and the other in western Moravia. We used 40Ar- 39Ar laser step-heating and total fusion techniques in conjunction with microscale petrographic and chemical characterization. In addition, with the purpose of ascertaining the influence of the dating standards on the age of the Ries impact and making data from this study and literature consistent with the now widely used Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) standard, we performed a direct calibration of multi-grain splits of the Fish Canyon biotite (FCT-3) with FCs. The intercalibration factors ( RFCsFCT-3), determined for eight stack positions in one of the three performed irradiations, were indistinguishable within errors and gave an arithmetic mean and a standard deviation of 1.0086 ± 0.0031 (±2 σ), in agreement with previous works suggesting that biotite from the Fish Canyon Tuff is somewhat older (˜0.8%) than the coexisting sanidine. Laser total fusion analysis of milligram to sub-milligram splits of five tektite samples from the Cheb area yielded mostly concordant intrasample 40Ar- 39Ar ages, and within-sample weighted mean ages of 14.66 ± 0.08-14.75 ± 0

  9. Dating the age of admixture via wavelet transform analysis of genome-wide data.

    PubMed

    Pugach, Irina; Matveyev, Rostislav; Wollstein, Andreas; Kayser, Manfred; Stoneking, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We describe a PCA-based genome scan approach to analyze genome-wide admixture structure, and introduce wavelet transform analysis as a method for estimating the time of admixture. We test the wavelet transform method with simulations and apply it to genome-wide SNP data from eight admixed human populations. The wavelet transform method offers better resolution than existing methods for dating admixture, and can be applied to either SNP or sequence data from humans or other species. PMID:21352535

  10. Dating the age of admixture via wavelet transform analysis of genome-wide data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We describe a PCA-based genome scan approach to analyze genome-wide admixture structure, and introduce wavelet transform analysis as a method for estimating the time of admixture. We test the wavelet transform method with simulations and apply it to genome-wide SNP data from eight admixed human populations. The wavelet transform method offers better resolution than existing methods for dating admixture, and can be applied to either SNP or sequence data from humans or other species. PMID:21352535

  11. A new Application of Ar-40/Ar-39 Dating: A Provenance Study of Middle Stone Age Obsidian Tools from Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomade, S.; Vogel, N.; Renne, P. R.; Negash, A.

    2004-12-01

    The identification and geographic origin of potential sources for obsidian tools manufactured by MSA (Middle Stone Age) hominid groups is important to reconstruct source utilization and trade routes. Obsidian sourcing is done by geochemical investigation of obsidian artifacts and potential source materials and the identification of possible matches between them [e.g., 1]. Due to uncertainties arising, e.g., from intrasource inhomogeneities [2] additional methods are desirable. As a part of a pilot study, we dated by Ar-40/Ar-39 stepwise heating numerous debitage pieces of obsidian artifacts from an MSA excavation site and several potential source rock samples from a nearby obsidian outcrop in the Gademotta-Kulkuletti area near Ziway lake, Ethiopia. The ages were used, along with chemical data, to trace possible source rocks used to manufacture the artifacts. Most of the debitage samples show ages around 1.29 Ma and exhibit flat, well behaved spectra. Less well behaved spectra are obtained for two debitage samples with ages of about 1.26 Ma, and two with ages of about 0.62 Ma. We point out that despite this significant spread in the ages found, all debitage samples as well as the potential source rocks show homogeneous major and trace elemental compositions generally indicating a positive match in archeological sourcing. The ages of two potential source rocks are about 1.26 and 0.87 Ma. Thus, while there is a match with the two debitage pieces dated at 1.26 Ma, the exact outcrop of the major source for the 1.29 Ma old artifacts has not been identified yet. A second set of samples with further possible source materials for the Kulkuletti artifacts as well as another potential debitage-source material pair from a second excavation site in the Ziway lake area, Porc Epic, are currently being dated and will be presented at the conference. Already this first set of data shows not only the general applicability of Ar-40/Ar-39 dating to archeological obsidian sourcing, but

  12. Effect of age at puberty/conception date on cow longevity.

    PubMed

    Perry, George A; Cushman, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Age at puberty is a critical trait, because pregnancy success during the breeding season is correlated with the percentage of heifers that reach puberty before or early in the breeding season. A negative genetic correlation between age at puberty and heifer pregnancy rate indicate that selection to decrease age at puberty would increase heifer pregnancy rates. Calving late has been reported to increase the chance of calving late or not calving the following year, and heifers need to wean 3 to 5 calves to pay for development costs. Therefore, puberty is important to the sustainability and profitability of beef operations. PMID:24182436

  13. Effect of artificial accelerated aging on the optical properties and monomeric conversion of composites used after expiration date.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Mundim, Fabricio Mariano; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; Puppin Rontani, Regina Maria; Consani, Simonides

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate how artificial accelerated aging (AAA) affected color stability (ΔE), opacity (ΔOP), and degree of conversion (DOC) for 3 composite materials (Tetric Ceram, Tetric Ceram HB, and Tetric Flow) used both 180 days before and 180 days after their expiration dates. To evaluate the materials' optical properties, 10 specimens of each composite-5 prior to expiration and 5 after the materials' expiration date-were made in a teflon matrix. After polishing, the specimens were submitted to initial color and opacity readings and submitted to AAA for 384 hours; at that point, new readings were taken to determine ΔE and ΔOP. To evaluate monomeric conversion evaluation, 6 specimens from each composite and expiration date-3 prior to AAA and 3 after-were submitted to DOC analysis. Results of the 2-way ANOVA and Bonferroni's tests (P < 0.05) demonstrated that all composites had ΔE values above the clinically acceptable level (ΔE ≥ 3.3). When expiration dates were compared, only Tetric Flow showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). Regardless of the expiration date, ΔOP values for all composites increased after AAA, but not significantly (P > 0.05). The expired Tetric Flow had the highest DOC values (71.42% ± 4.21) before AAA, significantly different than that of the other composites (P > 0.05). It was concluded that both expiration date and AAA affected the properties of the composites tested. PMID:24192739

  14. Using Hα Morphology and Surface Brightness Fluctuations to Age-date Star Clusters in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, Rupali; Kim, Hwihyun; Kaleida, Catherine; Mutchler, Max; Stankiewicz, Matt; Calzetti, Daniela; Saha, Abhijit; O'Connell, Robert; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Paresce, Francesco; Silk, Joseph I.; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Young, Erick T.

    2011-03-01

    We use new WFC3 observations of the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M83 to develop two independent methods for estimating the ages of young star clusters. The first method uses the physical extent and morphology of Hα emission to estimate the ages of clusters younger than τ ≈ 10 Myr. It is based on the simple premise that the gas in very young (τ< a few Myr) clusters is largely coincident with the cluster stars, is in a small, ring-like structure surrounding the stars in slightly older clusters since massive star winds and supernovae have had time to push out the natal gas (e.g., τ ≈ 5 Myr), and is in a larger ring-like bubble for still older clusters (i.e., ≈5-10 Myr). If no Hα is associated with a cluster it is generally older than ≈10 Myr. The second method is based on an observed relation between pixel-to-pixel flux variations within clusters and their ages. This method relies on the fact that the brightest individual stars in a cluster are most prominent at ages around 10 Myr, and fall below the detection limit (i.e., M V < -3.5) for ages older than about 100 Myr. Older clusters therefore have a smoother appearance and smaller pixel-to-pixel variations. The youngest clusters also have lower flux variations, hence the relationship is double valued. This degeneracy in age can be broken using other age indicators such as Hα morphology. These two methods are the basis for a new morphological classification system which can be used to estimate the ages of star clusters based on their appearance. We compare previous age estimates of clusters in M83 determined from fitting UBVIHα measurements using predictions from stellar evolutionary models with our new morphological categories and find good agreement, at the ≈95% level. The scatter within categories is ≈0.1 dex in log τ for young clusters (<10 Myr) and ≈0.5 dex for older (>10 Myr) clusters. A by-product of this study is the identification of 22 "single-star" H II regions in M83, with

  15. The SEEDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey: Exoplanet and Brown Dwarf Survey for Nearby Young Stars Dated with Gyrochronology and Activity Age Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Helminiak, Kris; Mede, Kyle; Brandt, Timothy; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The SEEDS campaign has successfully discovered and characterized exoplanets, brown dwarfs, and circumstellar disks since it began in 2009, via the direct imaging technique. The survey has targeted nearby young stars, as well as stars associated to star-forming regions, the Pleiades open cluster, moving groups, and debris disks. We selected the nearby young stars that have been dated with age indicators based on stellar rotation periods (i.e., gyrochronology) and chromoshperic/coronal activities. Of these, nearly 40 were observed, with ages mainly between 100 and 1000 Myr and distances less than 40 pc. Our observations typically attain the contrast of ~6 x 10-6 at 1'' and better than ~1 x 10-6 beyond 2'', enabling us to detect a planetary-mass companion even around such old stars. Indeed, the SEEDS team reported the discovery that the nearby Sun-like star GJ 504 hosts a Jovian companion GJ 504b, which has a mass of 3-8.5 Jupiter masses that is inferred according to the hot-start cooling models and our estimated system age of 100-510 Myr. The remaining observations out of the selected ~40 stars have resulted in no detection of additional planets or brown dwarf companions. Meanwhile, we have newly imaged a low-mass stellar companion orbiting the G-type star HIP 10321, for which the presence of companion was previously announced via radial velocity technique. The astrometry and radial velocity measurements are simultaneously analyzed to determine the orbit, providing constraints on the dynamical mass of both objects and stellar evolution models. Here we summarize our direct imaging observations for the nearby young stars dated with gyrochrolorogy and activity age indicators. Furthermore, we report the analysis for the HIP 10321 system with the imaged low-mass companion.

  16. Dating Red Dwarfs: Determining the Ages of Red Dwarf Stars and their Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.; Kullberg, Evan; Watson, William; Michener, Scott

    2014-06-01

    Red Dwarf (dwarf M=dM) stars comprise over 75% of the stars in the Galaxy. The recent statistical analysis of exoplanet systems from the Kepler Mission indicates that about 15% of red dwarf stars host Earth-size planets orbiting in the liquid water Habitable Zones (HZ) of their host stars. This indicates that within 10 pc 33 Ly) of the Sun (which contains ~240 dM stars), there should be about 35 potentially habitable Earth-size planets. Extrapolating to the entire Galaxy indicates that about 50-100 billion earth-size planets may be orbiting within the HZs of red dwarfs.Determining the ages and radiation/plasma properties of these planet hosting dM stars is crucial in assessing the potential for life on their HZ exoplanets. With these aims in mind we have been carrying out multi-wavelength (X-ray - IR) studies of dM stars as part of our NSF/NASA sponsored “Living with a Red Dwarf” Program. Due to their low masses, nuclear evolution of red dwarfs is very slow and their physical properties (e.g. L/Lo, Teff, R/Ro) do not significantly change over the age of the universe This makes it nearly impossible to determine (nuclear) evolutionary ages as is done with more massive stars. However, their rotation-related magnetic dynamo properties such as- coronal X-ray and chromospheric emissions and star spots coverage dramatically decrease with time as the stars spin down from angular momentum loss via magnetic winds We report on the ongoing calibration of Age-Rotation and (magnetic) Activity relations of dM stars. The ages of the calibrator stars are found from memberships in clusters, & moving groups as well as memberships in wide binaries - ages known from white dwarf & main sequence star components. Kinematical ages are used for old high velocity stars. Using these relations, the ages of a dM stars can be estimated from their measured rotation periods, and/or from coronal & chromospheric emissions. We apply these relations to determine ages of nearby dM stars that host

  17. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Pleistocene tuffs: an accurate age for the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal (MBGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D. F.; Renne, P. R.; Morgan, L. E.; Deino, A.; Smith, V. C.; Ellis, B. S.; Pearce, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent recalibrations of the 40Ar/39Ar system [1,2] reveal inconsistencies with some previous ages inferred for the MBGR. An Ar/Ar age [3] for the Bishop Tuff (BT) (which post-dates the MBGR by at least 15.3 ± 2.2 ka [3]) recalculated [2] yields an age of 778.0 ± 3.8 ka (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). The age is c. 10 ka older than the BT zircon ID-TIMS U-Pb age [4] and places the MBGR at c. 793 ka, c. 13 and 20 ka older than astronomical ages for the MBGR of 780 ka [5] and 773 ka [6], respectively. To determine an accurate age for the MBGR, we have made a series of 40Ar/39Ar age determinations for Pleistocene tuffs from both Indonesia and North America that have direct relationships to the MBGR. Blind analyses were conducted at SUERC and BGC. We observed excellent inter-laboratory agreement and no systematic offset in data. Ar/Ar ages are reported relative to [2] (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). Drill cores from ODP Site 758 show the precise location of the MBGR. Below the MBGR are two distal tephra horizons that we have identified as products of two temporally distinct Old Toba Tuff (OTT) eruptions (layer d OTT1 and layer D OTT2). Continuous sedimentation between OTT1 (802.8 ± 0.7 ka, n = 100, MSWD 1.2) and OTT2 (796.2 ± 0.8 ka, n = 62, MSWD 1.3) allows for calculation of an accurate sedimentation rate and for extrapolation of an age from OTT2 to the MBGR. Data define an age for the MBGR of 795.2 ± 0.9 ka. Using tephra above the MBGR boundary, the Middle Toba Tuff (layer C) and Young Toba Tuff (layer A), extrapolation down core supports a MBGR age of c. 795 ka. Recent age data for BT sanidine reported relative to FCs at 28.172 Ma (767.4 ± 1.1 Ma) [7] oddly yielded an Ar/Ar age that was indistinguishable from the BT zircon U-Pb age [4], which is consistent with previous 40Ar/39Ar age measurements made relative to FCs at 28.02 Ma [3]. Thus we made a series of 40Ar/39Ar measurements on the exact same sample as used by Rivera et al. [7] and observed

  18. Luminescence- and Infrared-Radiofluorescence dating of the Acheulean- to Middle Stone Age sedimentary sequence at Montagu Cave, Western Cape Provence, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Tobias; Archer, Will; Sumner, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Montagu Cave is an archaeological site located on the edge of the Langeberg mountain range, about 160 km NE of Cape Town, in South Africa. The archaeological and sedimentary units at Montagu Cave comprise two Acheulean sequences which are separated from one another by a substantial archaeological hiatus. There is an additional Middle Stone Age sequence which overlies the Acheulean horizons, and contains layers attributed to the Howiesons Poort, as well as multiple other Middle Stone Age sub-stages. Hence, Montagu Cave provides a unique opportunity to investigate quite complex population level questions concerning the behavioral differences between modern and pre-modern populations in southern Africa. However, thus far, the chronological context of the sediment-layers at the site remains unclear. It is therefore critical to provide a resilient chronological framework for the timing of human activity at the site. This study concerns the potential of luminescence dating for the sedimentary sequence preserved at Montagu cave. The collected samples are tested on their quartz- and feldspar luminescence signal properties. Various optical dating techniques (quartz OSL; pIRIR290) will be applied, and the results of each compared in order to obtain information on the suitability of the material for luminescence dating, and to establish a chronological framework for this important archaeological site. Furthermore, the infrared-radiofluorescence (IR-RF) signal behavior will be tested on potassium feldspars, as IR-RF is a method being able to date back up to > 600 ka. IR-RF therefore has the potential to cover the expected time-frame of the sediments at Montagu-cave.

  19. A new U/Pb date for the basal Meishucun section and implications for the age of the Cambrian explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, B. J.; Crowley, J. L.; Bowring, S. A.; Cervato, C.; Jin, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Early Cambrian of southern China has long been recognized to record the spectacular transition from microscopic small shelly fossils to a fauna characterized by large, diverse higher bilaterians during part of the Early Cambrian evolutionary explosion. Understanding the timing and rate of this evolutionary transition has been aided through the integration of U/Pb geochronology into Cambrian fossil biozones, which has established strong tie-points between platforms. The Meishucun section (Yunnan, China) is one of the units that best preserves what could be considered the prelude to the Cambrian explosion. Several attempts at dating volcanic horizons within this section have resulted in U/Pb zircon dates that range from 538 to 525 Ma, making correlations to sections further afield problematic. This new high-precision U/Pb date of 533 Ma for Meishucun's Bed 5 is in broad agreement but considerably more precise than previous U/Pb ages. This indicates that the low diversity fauna of the Anabarites trisulcatus--Protohertzina anabarica zone persisted for no less than the first 9 m.y. of the Cambrian in China, and sets an additional lower bracket age for the emergence of higher bilaterians (e.g. trilobites, soft-bodied fauna).

  20. Towards an absolute chronology for the Aegean iron age: new radiocarbon dates from Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth.

    PubMed

    Toffolo, Michael B; Fantalkin, Alexander; Lemos, Irene S; Felsch, Rainer C S; Niemeier, Wolf-Dietrich; Sanders, Guy D R; Finkelstein, Israel; Boaretto, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The relative chronology of the Aegean Iron Age is robust. It is based on minute stylistic changes in the Submycenaean, Protogeometric and Geometric styles and their sub-phases. Yet, the absolute chronology of the time-span between the final stages of Late Helladic IIIC in the late second millennium BCE and the archaic colonization of Italy and Sicily toward the end of the 8(th) century BCE lacks archaeological contexts that can be directly related to events carrying absolute dates mentioned in Egyptian/Near Eastern historical sources, or to well-dated Egyptian/Near Eastern rulers. The small number of radiocarbon dates available for this time span is not sufficient to establish an absolute chronological sequence. Here we present a new set of short-lived radiocarbon dates from the sites of Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth in Greece. We focus on the crucial transition from the Submycenaean to the Protogeometric periods. This transition is placed in the late 11(th) century BCE according to the Conventional Aegean Chronology and in the late 12(th) century BCE according to the High Aegean Chronology. Our results place it in the second half of the 11(th) century BCE. PMID:24386150

  1. Large impact crater histories of Mars: The effect of different model crater age techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Stuart J.; Hynek, Brian M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Bottke, William F.

    2013-07-01

    Impact events that produce large craters primarily occurred early in the Solar System's history because the largest bolides were remnants from planetary formation. Determining when large impacts occurred on a planetary surface such as Mars can yield clues to the flux of material in the early inner Solar System which, in turn, can constrain other planetary processes such as the timing and magnitude of resurfacing and the history of the martian core dynamo. We have used a large, global planetary database in conjunction with geomorphologic mapping to identify craters superposed on the rims of 78 larger craters with diameters D ⩾ 150 km on Mars, ≈78% of which have not been previously dated in this manner. The densities of superposed craters with diameters larger than 10, 16, 25, and 50 km, as well as isochron fits were used to derive model crater ages of these larger craters and basins from which we derived an impact flux. In discussing these ages, we point out several internal inconsistencies of crater-age modeling techniques and chronology systems and, all told, we explain why we think isochron-fitting is the most reliable indicator of an age. Our results point to a mostly obliterated crater record prior to ˜4.0 Ga with the oldest preserved mappable craters on Mars dating to ˜4.3-4.35 Ga. We have used our results to constrain the cessation time of the martian core dynamo which we found to have occurred between the formation of Ladon and Prometheus basins, approximately 4.06-4.09 Ga. We also show that, overall, surfaces on Mars older than ˜4.0-4.1 Ga have experienced >1 km of resurfacing, while those younger than ˜3.8-3.9 Ga have experienced significantly less.

  2. Precise Surface Exposure Dating of Early Holocene and Little Ice Age Moraines in the Cordillera Vilcabamba of Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Schaefer, J. M.; Lund, D. C.; Taggart, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    We have established precise ages of two glacial events in the tropical Andean highlands of southern Peru. The field site is located on the flanks of Nevado Salcantay (6271 m asl; 13°20'S latitude), the highest peak in the Cordillera Vilcabamba. A two-fold sequence of nested lateral and end moraines was mapped in a glacial trough emanating from the south face of Salcantay. Well-defined outer and inner moraines were deposited by valley glaciers that terminated 5 km and 3 km, respectively, from their head on the Salcantay massif. Cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure dating of boulders on the outer (n = 7) and inner (n = 7) moraine crests expands upon initial age control for these deposits and improves substantially on the precision of earlier 10Be measurements. The new results yield mean ages of 9.0 ± 0.3 ka for the outer moraine and 195 ± 24 years for the inner moraine, corresponding to glacial events during the early and latest Holocene. These ages are derived using the CRONUS-Earth 10Be exposure age calculator with Lal-Stone production rate scaling and the default height-pressure relationship. The inner moraine age correlates with the timing of the Little Ice Age as defined from northern mid- and high latitude records, and indicates considerable expansion of glaciers heading on Nevado Salcantay during this climatic minimum. Recent geomorphic mapping has identified similar sequences of moraines in adjacent drainages on and near Salcantay, suggesting a broader regional signal of two prominent Holocene glacial events in this segment of the southern Peruvian Andes; 10Be dating of these additional moraines is underway. Our new glacier chronologies complement ice core and lacustrine paleoclimate records in the vicinity, thereby increasing spatial and temporal coverage for identifying patterns of climate change in the tropical Andes during the Holocene. Apart from their paleoclimatic significance, the results also demonstrate a newly- developed capability of 10Be exposure

  3. New ages for Middle and Later Stone Age deposits at Mumba rockshelter, Tanzania: optically stimulated luminescence dating of quartz and feldspar grains.

    PubMed

    Gliganic, Luke A; Jacobs, Zenobia; Roberts, Richard G; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Mabulla, Audax Z P

    2012-04-01

    The archaeological deposits at Mumba rockshelter, northern Tanzania, have been excavated for more than 70 years, starting with Margit and Ludwig Köhl-Larsen in the 1930s. The assemblages of Middle Stone Age (MSA) and Later Stone Age (LSA) artefacts collected from this site constitute the type sequences for these cultural phases in East Africa. Despite its archaeological importance, however, the chronology of the site is poorly constrained, despite the application since the 1980s of several dating methods (radiocarbon, uranium-series and amino acid racemisation) to a variety of materials recovered from the deposits. Here, we review these previous chronologies for Mumba and report new ages obtained from optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) measurements on single grains of quartz and multi-grain aliquots of potassium (K) feldspar from the MSA and LSA deposits. Measurements of single grains of quartz allowed the rejection of unrepresentative grains and the application of appropriate statistical models to obtain the most reliable age estimates, while measurements of K-feldspars allowed the chronology to be extended to older deposits. The seven quartz ages and four K-feldspar ages provide improved temporal constraints on the archaeological sequence at Mumba. The deposits associated with the latest Kisele Industry (Bed VI-A) and the earliest Mumba Industry (Bed V) are dated to 63.4 ± 5.7 and 56.9 ± 4.8 ka (thousands of years ago), respectively, thus constraining the time of transition between these two archaeological phases to ~60 ka. An age of 49.1 ± 4.3 ka has been obtained for the latest deposits associated with the Mumba Industry, which show no evidence for post-depositional mixing and contain ostrich eggshell (OES) beads and abundant microlithics. The Nasera Industry deposits (Bed III) contain large quantities of OES beads and date to 36.8 ± 3.4 ka. We compare the luminescence ages with the previous chronologies for

  4. The Couple Who Facebooks Together, Stays Together: Facebook Self-Presentation and Relationship Longevity Among College-Aged Dating Couples.

    PubMed

    Toma, Catalina L; Choi, Mina

    2015-07-01

    Drawing on public commitment theory, this research examined the association between Facebook self-presentations of coupledom and relationship longevity among college-aged dating partners. Using a longitudinal design and a path model analytic approach, this study shows that Facebook self-presentational cues (i.e., being listed as "in a relationship," posting dyadic photographs, writing on the partner's wall) were associated with an increase in relationship commitment for dating couples, which, in turn, increased their likelihood of remaining together after 6 months. Contrary to predictions, the number of mutual Friends and the number of posts written by partners on participants' walls were negatively related to relationship commitment. This study is the first to apply public commitment theory to an online romantic relationship context, and one of the few to examine the effects of Facebook on the state and fate of romantic relationships. PMID:26167834

  5. Characterizing a sewage plume using the 3H-3He dating technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Stephanie Dunkle; LeBlanc, Denis; Schlosser, Peter; Ludin, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    An extensive 3H-3He study was performed to determine detailed characteristics of a regional flow system and a sewage plume over a distance of 4 km in a sand and gravel aquifer at Otis Air Base in Falmouth, Massachusetts. 3H-3He ages increase with depth in individual piezometer clusters and with distance along flowpaths. However, the age gradient with depth (Δt/Δz) is smaller in the plume than that in the regional waters, due to the intense recharge in the infiltration beds. The 1960s bomb peak of tritium in precipitation is archived longitudinally along a flowline through the main axis of the plume and vertically in individual piezometer clusters. On the eastern side of the sampling area, where water from Ashumet Pond forces plume water deeper into the flow system, 3H-3He ages are young at depth because the 3H-3He "clock" is reset due to outgassing of helium in the pond. A reconstruction of the tritium input functions for the regional and plume samples shows that there is no offset in the peak [3H]+[3Hetrit] concentrations for the plume and regional water, indicating that the water from supply wells for use on the base is young. The 3H-3He ages and detergent concentrations in individual wells are consistent with the beginning of use of detergents and the time period when their concentrations in sewage would have been greatest. Ages and hydraulic properties calculated using the 3H-3He data compare well with those from previous investigations and from particle-tracking simulations.

  6. Isotopic composition analysis and age dating of uranium samples by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, A. I.; Pantelica, A.; Sima, O.; Fugaru, V.

    2016-09-01

    Non-destructive methods were applied to determine the isotopic composition and the time elapsed since last chemical purification of nine uranium samples. The applied methods are based on measuring gamma and X radiations of uranium samples by high resolution low energy gamma spectrometric system with planar high purity germanium detector and low background gamma spectrometric system with coaxial high purity germanium detector. The "Multigroup γ-ray Analysis Method for Uranium" (MGAU) code was used for the precise determination of samples' isotopic composition. The age of the samples was determined from the isotopic ratio 214Bi/234U. This ratio was calculated from the analyzed spectra of each uranium sample, using relative detection efficiency. Special attention is paid to the coincidence summing corrections that have to be taken into account when performing this type of analysis. In addition, an alternative approach for the age determination using full energy peak efficiencies obtained by Monte Carlo simulations with the GESPECOR code is described.

  7. In situ radiometric and exposure age dating of the martian surface.

    PubMed

    Farley, K A; Malespin, C; Mahaffy, P; Grotzinger, J P; Vasconcelos, P M; Milliken, R E; Malin, M; Edgett, K S; Pavlov, A A; Hurowitz, J A; Grant, J A; Miller, H B; Arvidson, R; Beegle, L; Calef, F; Conrad, P G; Dietrich, W E; Eigenbrode, J; Gellert, R; Gupta, S; Hamilton, V; Hassler, D M; Lewis, K W; McLennan, S M; Ming, D; Navarro-González, R; Schwenzer, S P; Steele, A; Stolper, E M; Sumner, D Y; Vaniman, D; Vasavada, A; Williford, K; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F

    2014-01-24

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 ± 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced (3)He, (21)Ne, and (36)Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 ± 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation. PMID:24324273

  8. In Situ Radiometric and Exposure Age Dating of the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Malin, M.; Edgett, K. S.; Pavlov, A. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Grant, J. A.; Miller, H. B.; Arvidson, R.; Beegle, L.; Calef, F.; Conrad, P. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Eigenbrode, J.; Gellert, R.; Gupta, S.; Hamilton, V.; Hassler, D. M.; Lewis, K. W.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. M.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Steele, A.; Stolper, E. M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Vaniman, D.; Vasavada, A.; Williford, K.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 +/- 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced 3He, 21Ne, and 36Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 T 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  9. A prospective study of young females' sexual subjectivity: associations with age, sexual behavior, and dating.

    PubMed

    Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Ducat, Wendy H; Boislard-Pepin, Marie-Aude

    2011-10-01

    Sexual self-perceptions are important aspects of sexuality, which can undergo significant change during adolescence and early adulthood. The purpose of this study was to describe these changes among girls (N = 251; ages 16-25) over one year, and to examine associations of sexual self-perceptions (sexual subjectivity) with age, sexual behavior, and romantic status. Sexual body-esteem, perceptions of entitlement to desire and pleasure, sexual efficacy, and sexual self-reflection were investigated as elements of sexual subjectivity. All sexual subjectivity elements were higher among girls who had more sexual experience and/or had steady romantic partners during the study. Perception of entitlement to desire and pleasure increased over time, whereas sexual body-esteem showed the most stability and had minimal associations with sexual or romantic experiences. The greatest increases in sexual subjectivity were found among girls who began the study with the least sociosexual experience and self-reflection also increased for girls who had first coitus after the start of the study. Overall, girls who had sexual intercourse the earliest (before age 16) had the highest sexual subjectivity, but sexual subjectivity increased the most among girls without coital experience or who had more recent first coitus. PMID:21491139

  10. Estimating limiting age for Pleistocene erosional surfaces in central Montana by uranium-series dating of associated travertines.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Lindsey, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of three travertine samples from the southeast side of The Park (central Montana) yield an average uranium-thorium age of 73 000 yr. Another sample from the west side of The Park is 320 000 yr old. These results indicate that travertine deposits may have formed at several intervals. The surface beneath The Park travertine is older than about 320 000 yr. Number 2 pediment gravels that contain travertine downslope from the oldest dated sample may be younger than about 320 000 yr. -Authors

  11. The AMS 14C dating of Iron Age rice chaff ceramic temper from Ban Non Wat, Thailand: First results and its interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higham, Charles F. W.; Kuzmin, Yaroslav V.; Burr, G. S.

    2010-04-01

    Pottery tempered with rice chaff from the early Iron Age cemetery of Ban Non Wat site, northeast Thailand, has been subjected to direct AMS 14C dating, using low temperature combustion with oxygen as originally developed by authors. The carbon yield (0.2-0.5%) testifies the suitability of this pottery for dating. However, not all the results are in agreement with expected archaeological ages and other 14C dates from the studied site and neighboring site of Noen U-Loke. This calls for a thorough analysis and interpretation of pottery temper dates from the region.

  12. Desert varnish: potential for age dating via uranium-series isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.G.; Ku, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Trace metals and natural radioisotopes are measured in an unusually thick and presumed ancient desert varnish from the Colorado Plateau in Utah. Uranium and thorium concentrations in the sequence: varnish-altered rind-heartrock (Shinarump formation sandstone) indicate that uranium with little accompanying thorium is derived from external sources. The varnish forms a closed system for /sup 230/Th and /sup 231/Pa with equilibrium values for both /sup 230/Th//sup 234/U and /sup 231/Pa//sup 235/U. Selective leaching of the ferromanganese oxides followed by analysis of both the leachate and silicate residue is proposed to allow age determinations.

  13. Desert varnish: potential for age dating via uranium-series isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.G.; Ku, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Trace metals and natural radioisotopes are measured in an unusually thick and presumed ancient desert varnish from the Colorado Plateau in Utah. Uranium and thorium concentrations in the sequence: varnish--altered rind--heartrock (Shinarump formation sandstone) indicate that uranium with little accompanying thorium is derived from external sources. The varnish forms a closed system for /sup 230/Th and /sup 231/Pa with equilibrium values for both /sup 230/Th//sup 234/U and /sup 231/Pa//sup 235/U. Selective leaching of the ferromanganese oxides followed by analysis of both the leachate and silicate residue is proposed to allow age determinations.

  14. Groundwater contributions and age dating in an alpine basin in the Colorado Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, D. W.; Michel, R.

    2005-12-01

    Groundwater occurrence, age, and its contribution to streamflow were investigated in Loch Vale, an alpine catchment in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Hydro-geomorphologic mapping, seismic refraction measurements, and porosity estimates indicate that talus slopes are the primary groundwater reservoir, with a storage capacity of 5 to 17 x 106 m3. Ice stored in permafrost is the second largest groundwater reservoir in Loch Vale, accounting for 2 to 4 x 106 m3 of water. The estimated storage capacity of bedrock fractures is comparatively small (0.007 to 0.013 x 106 m3). Although snowmelt provides the majority of annual water flux from the basin, tracer tests and gaging along a stream transect indicate that groundwater flowing from talus can account for ?75% of streamflow at certain times. Talus springs respond quickly to storms, then slowly recede, reflecting rapid transmittal of water through coarse debris at the talus surface and slower release of water from finer-grained sediments at depth. CFC and tritium (3H) data permit setting bounds on mean residence times and on the relative contributions of "new" (< 1year old) and "older" (45 - 50 years old) water under two different simplifying scenarios. The first scenario assumes piston subsurface flow, and the second assumes water is a mixture of "new" and "older" water. CFC samples collected from two springs in Loch Vale during August 2003 had piston-flow model ages of 17 to 22 years, based on CFC-12 and CFC-113 results. Under the old water - new water mixture scenario, 55 to 65% of the water was "new". Monthly samples collected from one of the springs and a nearby creek had 3H concentrations ranging from 9.6 (near current precipitation values) to 17.1 TU. Minimum values occurred during snowmelt and peak values occurred during winter baseflow; this pattern indicates a large new water influence during snowmelt, with a noticeable component of older water during winter. Piston-flow model 3H ages are poorly constrained due to

  15. Up-to-date state of storage techniques used for large numerical data files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chlouba, V.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for data storage and output in data banks and memory files are discussed along with a survey of equipment available for this. Topics discussed include magnetic tapes, magnetic disks, Terabit magnetic tape memory, Unicon 690 laser memory, IBM 1360 photostore, microfilm recording equipment, holographic recording, film readers, optical character readers, digital data storage techniques, and photographic recording. The individual types of equipment are summarized in tables giving the basic technical parameters.

  16. A double-spike method for K-Ar measurement: A technique for high precision in situ dating on Mars and other planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Asimow, P. D.; Jacobson, N. S.; Cartwright, J. A.

    2013-06-01

    A new method for K-Ar dating using a double isotope dilution technique is proposed and demonstrated. The method is designed to eliminate known difficulties facing in situ dating on planetary surfaces, especially instrument complexity and power availability. It may also have applicability in some terrestrial dating applications. Key to the method is the use of a solid tracer spike enriched in both 39Ar and 41K. When mixed with lithium borate flux in a Knudsen effusion cell, this tracer spike and a sample to be dated can be successfully fused and degassed of Ar at <1000 °C. The evolved 40Ar∗/39Ar ratio can be measured to high precision using noble gas mass spectrometry. After argon measurement the sample melt is heated to a slightly higher temperature (˜1030 °C) to volatilize potassium, and the evolved 39K/41K ratio measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Combined with the known composition of the tracer spike, these two ratios define the K-Ar age using a single sample aliquot and without the need for extreme temperature or a mass determination. In principle the method can be implemented using a single mass spectrometer. Experiments indicate that quantitative extraction of argon from a basalt sample occurs at a sufficiently low temperature that potassium loss in this step is unimportant. Similarly, potassium isotope ratios measured in the Knudsen apparatus indicate good sample-spike equilibration and acceptably small isotopic fractionation. When applied to a flood basalt from the Viluy Traps, Siberia, a K-Ar age of 351 ± 19 Ma was obtained, a result within 1% of the independently known age. For practical reasons this measurement was made on two separate mass spectrometers, but a scheme for combining the measurements in a single analytical instrument is described. Because both parent and daughter are determined by isotope dilution, the precision on K-Ar ages obtained by the double isotope dilution method should routinely approach that of a pair of

  17. Dating a small impact crater: An age of Kaali crater (Estonia) based on charcoal emplaced within proximal ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, A.; Wild, E. M.; Geppert, W. D.; Huber, M. S.; Jõeleht, A.; Kriiska, A.; Kulkov, A.; Paavel, K.; Pirkovic, I.; Plado, J.; Steier, P.; VäLja, R.; Wilk, J.; Wisniowski, T.; Zanetti, M.

    2016-04-01

    The estimates of the age of the Kaali impact structure (Saaremaa Island, Estonia) provided by different authors vary by as much as 6000 years, ranging from ~6400 to ~400 before current era (BCE). In this study, a new age is obtained based on 14C dating charred plant material within the proximal ejecta blanket, which makes it directly related to the impact structure, and not susceptible to potential reservoir effects. Our results show that the Kaali crater was most probably formed shortly after 1530-1450 BCE (3237 ± 10 14C yr BP). Saaremaa was already inhabited when the bolide hit the Earth, thus, the crater-forming event was probably witnessed by humans. There is, however, no evidence that this event caused significant change in the material culture (e.g., known archeological artifacts) or patterns of human habitation on Saaremaa.

  18. Application of a New Method for Lunar Crater Age Dating to Copernican Impact Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazrouei, S.; Ghent, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Moon's surface, without any substantial atmosphere, weather, or tectonic activity, is a genuine time capsule for events taking place in our region of the Solar System. Previously, geological maps and crater counting methods were used for age determination for terrains and individual features, such as large craters and basins; however, those methods are extremely time consuming, are limited by image quality and availability and the need to identify small craters over datable regions, and are subject to systematic errors derived from uncertainty in the cratering function and small number statistics. We have recently shown that the rockiness of large craters' ejecta, derived from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's Diviner thermal radiometer data, provides a new method for determining the ages of Copernican craters (younger than roughly one billion years old). This method is not subject to the constraints of traditional crater counting methods using visible images. Here, we apply this new method to search for variations in the impact flux over the Copernican period. We investigate the size-frequency distributions and ejecta rock abundances of rocky craters five kilometers and larger, and compare the results to canonical relationships for Copernican craters. Because the lunar impact cratering rate is directly related to interactions among near-Earth objects and main belt asteroids, our results will provide a new platform for testing various dynamical hypotheses about the evolution of the asteroid belt and interactions within it.

  19. Age and Date for Early Arrival of the Acheulian in Europe (Barranc de la Boella, la Canonja, Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Vallverdú, Josep; Saladié, Palmira; Rosas, Antonio; Huguet, Rosa; Cáceres, Isabel; Mosquera, Marina; Garcia-Tabernero, Antonio; Estalrrich, Almudena; Lozano-Fernández, Iván; Pineda-Alcalá, Antonio; Carrancho, Ángel; Villalaín, Juan José; Bourlès, Didier; Braucher, Régis; Lebatard, Anne; Vilalta, Jaume; Esteban-Nadal, Montserrat; Bennàsar, Maria Lluc; Bastir, Marcus; López-Polín, Lucía; Ollé, Andreu; Vergés, Josep Maria; Ros-Montoya, Sergio; Martínez-Navarro, Bienvenido; García, Ana; Martinell, Jordi; Expósito, Isabel; Burjachs, Francesc; Agustí, Jordi; Carbonell, Eudald

    2014-01-01

    The first arrivals of hominin populations into Eurasia during the Early Pleistocene are currently considered to have occurred as short and poorly dated biological dispersions. Questions as to the tempo and mode of these early prehistoric settlements have given rise to debates concerning the taxonomic significance of the lithic assemblages, as trace fossils, and the geographical distribution of the technological traditions found in the Lower Palaeolithic record. Here, we report on the Barranc de la Boella site which has yielded a lithic assemblage dating to ∼1 million years ago that includes large cutting tools (LCT). We argue that distinct technological traditions coexisted in the Iberian archaeological repertoires of the late Early Pleistocene age in a similar way to the earliest sub-Saharan African artefact assemblages. These differences between stone tool assemblages may be attributed to the different chronologies of hominin dispersal events. The archaeological record of Barranc de la Boella completes the geographical distribution of LCT assemblages across southern Eurasia during the EMPT (Early-Middle Pleistocene Transition, circa 942 to 641 kyr). Up to now, chronology of the earliest European LCT assemblages is based on the abundant Palaeolithic record found in terrace river sequences which have been dated to the end of the EMPT and later. However, the findings at Barranc de la Boella suggest that early LCT lithic assemblages appeared in the SW of Europe during earlier hominin dispersal episodes before the definitive colonization of temperate Eurasia took place. PMID:25076416

  20. Age and date for early arrival of the Acheulian in Europe (Barranc de la Boella, la Canonja, Spain).

    PubMed

    Vallverdú, Josep; Saladié, Palmira; Rosas, Antonio; Huguet, Rosa; Cáceres, Isabel; Mosquera, Marina; Garcia-Tabernero, Antonio; Estalrrich, Almudena; Lozano-Fernández, Iván; Pineda-Alcalá, Antonio; Carrancho, Ángel; Villalaín, Juan José; Bourlès, Didier; Braucher, Régis; Lebatard, Anne; Vilalta, Jaume; Esteban-Nadal, Montserrat; Bennàsar, Maria Lluc; Bastir, Marcus; López-Polín, Lucía; Ollé, Andreu; Vergés, Josep Maria; Ros-Montoya, Sergio; Martínez-Navarro, Bienvenido; García, Ana; Martinell, Jordi; Expósito, Isabel; Burjachs, Francesc; Agustí, Jordi; Carbonell, Eudald

    2014-01-01

    The first arrivals of hominin populations into Eurasia during the Early Pleistocene are currently considered to have occurred as short and poorly dated biological dispersions. Questions as to the tempo and mode of these early prehistoric settlements have given rise to debates concerning the taxonomic significance of the lithic assemblages, as trace fossils, and the geographical distribution of the technological traditions found in the Lower Palaeolithic record. Here, we report on the Barranc de la Boella site which has yielded a lithic assemblage dating to ∼1 million years ago that includes large cutting tools (LCT). We argue that distinct technological traditions coexisted in the Iberian archaeological repertoires of the late Early Pleistocene age in a similar way to the earliest sub-Saharan African artefact assemblages. These differences between stone tool assemblages may be attributed to the different chronologies of hominin dispersal events. The archaeological record of Barranc de la Boella completes the geographical distribution of LCT assemblages across southern Eurasia during the EMPT (Early-Middle Pleistocene Transition, circa 942 to 641 kyr). Up to now, chronology of the earliest European LCT assemblages is based on the abundant Palaeolithic record found in terrace river sequences which have been dated to the end of the EMPT and later. However, the findings at Barranc de la Boella suggest that early LCT lithic assemblages appeared in the SW of Europe during earlier hominin dispersal episodes before the definitive colonization of temperate Eurasia took place. PMID:25076416

  1. Conception rates in farm mink (Neovison vison) in relation to first mating date, age and color variety.

    PubMed

    Felska-Błaszczyk, Lidia; Lasota, Bogdan; Seremak, Beata

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of the first mating date, age and color variety on the conception rates in farm mink. We analyzed female mink reproductive performance in 492 Sapphire and 463 Standard Black females over 3 or 4 years. The analysis included the number of inefficient matings, the interval between the first inefficient mating and the efficient mating (copulation) and the conception rates. The results show a significant effect of female's age and color variety on the conception rates. The youngest, yearling females of either color needed a higher number of matings per conception, as compared to older, 2- and 3-year-old females. Black females demonstrated a higher number of inefficient matings (1.066), as compared with Sapphires (0.730). Yearling females were most often mated from 1 to 10 March, and older females from 11 to 20 March. Older females achieved better conception rates than the yearlings. Dates between 11 and 25 March proved to be the optimum for the first mating, since the highest conception rates were observed if the females had mated during this period. PMID:26434936

  2. Dating the Stars Next Door: Ages and Coronal X-Ray Activities of Local K-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katynski, Marcus; Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.

    2016-01-01

    Age is one of the most difficult (but important) basic stellar physical property to determine. One possible means to estimate stellar age is from rotational period; it is known that as cool stars age, they lose angular momentum from magnetic braking and slow-down. Thus, good Rotation-Age relationships exist, which are calibrated with stars possessing reliable ages from: evolutionary tracks and/or memberships in clusters/moving groups or binary star systems. Further, ages of older stars can be estimated from (low) metal abundances and kinematics (high space motions). More recently, age determinations from asteroseismology are also becoming more reliable. Except for the many G, K, M stars in the Kepler/K2 fields, rotational periods are difficult to measure photometrically for older, less active stars since star spots and active regions are smaller & less prominent. Thus measuring the coronal X-ray activity of a star is an appealing alternative. Coronal X-ray emission is generated by the stellar dynamo, and so is directly related to the stars' rotation (and age). Measurement of X-ray fluxes (or upper limits) have been made for most of the nearby stars (within ~20 pc) with data available in the HEASARC archives. During the 1990's the ROSAT X-Ray Satellite carried out an all-sky survey of thousands of X-ray sources, including hundreds of nearby stars, producing a large archival database. Using these and other available X-ray data from XMM-Newton & Chandra, we explore the relation between coronal X-ray activity and stellar age of all stars within 10 pc (32.6 LY), with special emphasis on dK and early dM stars that make up ~85% of the sample. Here we report the progress made in determination the ages these nearby stars. We focused on nearby dK-stars, due to their long lifetimes (>20 Gyr) and habitable zones that lie ~0.5 -1.5 AU from their host stars. They appear to be ideal candidates for hosting potentially habitable planets, making them interesting targets. We present

  3. Summary of Age-Dating Analysis in the Fenner Basin, Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.

    2000-06-01

    Stable isotopes of oxygen (oxygen-18) and hydrogen (deuterium) in water were measured to determine recharge sources for Fenner Basin groundwater. The deuterium and oxygen-18 signatures (reported as {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O values) ranged from -11.9 to -9.3 per mil. The more negative values originate from high elevation recharge in the New York Mountains and were also observed in the northern and eastern parts of the groundwater basin. less negative values were observed in the Providence Mountains along the western part of the basin. Groundwater collected in the Fenner Gap (i.e. Project Area) had signatures between -10.6 and -10.9 per mil, suggesting a mixture of recharge from both northern, western, and probably local recharge areas in the basin. The annual contribution of groundwater recharge to Fenner Gap from the Clipper, Marble, and Old Woman mountains is still inconclusive due to lack of isotopic data. Isotopic signatures of mean annual precipitation collected by Friendman and others (1992) at Mitchell Caverns, as well as recently recharged groundwater in the Providence and New York mountains, are similar to the isotopic values in Fenner Gap groundwater. This indicates that this groundwater has a Holocene age (less than 10,000 years old), since groundwater recharged during the Pleistocene had isotopic signatures significantly more negative than today due to past global cooling.

  4. [Changes in olfaction during ageing and in certain neurodegenerative diseases: up-to-date].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A-J; Guépet-Sordet, H; Manckoundia, P

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction is a complex sensory system, and increasing interest is being shown in the link between olfaction and cognition, notably in the elderly. In this literature review, we revisit the specific neurophysiological features of the olfactory system and odorants that lead to a durable olfactory memory and an emotional memory, for which the implicit component produces subconscious olfactory conditioning. Olfaction is known to affect cognitive abilities and mood. We also consider the impairment of olfactory function due to ageing and to neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, through anatomopathological changes in the peripheral and central olfactory structures. The high frequency of these olfactory disorders as well as their early occurrence in Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease are in favour of their clinical detection in subjects suffering from these two neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we analyse the impact of olfactory stimulation on cognitive performance and attention. Current observational data from studies in elderly patients with Alzheimer-type dementia are limited to multiple sensory stimulation methods, such as the Snoezelen method, and aromatherapy. These therapies have shown benefits for dementia-related mood and behaviour disorders in the short term, with few side effects. Since olfactory chemosensory stimulation may be beneficial, it may be proposed in patients with dementia, especially Alzheimer-type dementia, as a complementary or even alternative therapy to existing medical strategies. PMID:25304170

  5. Comparison of chlorofluorocarbon-age dating with particle-tracking results of a regional ground-water flow model of the Portland Basin, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Snyder, Daniel T.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the results of a study in which chlorofluorocarbon-age dating was used to evaluate the results of a ground-water particle tracker for the Portland Basin in Oregon and Washington.

  6. Inter-comparison exercises on dissolved gases for groundwater dating (GDAT 2012) : analytical uncertainties, apparent ages and other derived parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labasque, Thierry; Aquilina, Luc; Visser, Ate; Vergnaud, Virginie

    2014-05-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison exercise dedicated to environmental tracers used for groundwater dating was organized in 2012 in France. The goal was to compare sampling and analytical protocols through results obtained by the community of groundwater dating laboratories. Sampling and analytical protocols were compared through three different exercises on various supports : (1) on groundwater from a homogeneous aquifer, (2) on groundwater from a fractured heterogeneous aquifer and (3) on an air standard. The two tests allowed 31 Laboratories from 14 countries to compare their protocols for both sampling and analyses. It allows discussing the uncertainties related to sampling protocols issuing from each laboratory methods. The results show a good agreement between laboratories on the aquifers and the air standard. The dispersion of SF6 results in air standard is low (rsd 2%) compared to CFCs (rsd 3 to 7%), even if its concentration is two orders of magnitude lower. Results obtained in recent groundwater (recharge after 1980) show that the uncertainty on groundwater dating with SF6 is between 3 and 4 years. This large uncertainty is mainly due to sampling and/or analytical problems. For CFCs, uncertainties obtained over all the laboratories are less than 2 years for groundwater with recharge between 1965 and 1996. The goal of the inter-laboratory comparison exercise was also to quantify the analytical uncertainty of the 3H and noble gas measurements and to assess whether they meet the requirements for 3H/3He dating and noble gas paleotemperature reconstruction. The reproducibility of the tritium measurements was 13.5%. The reproducibility of the 3He/4He ratio and 4He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe concentrations was 1.4%, 1.8%, 1.5%, 2.2%, 2.9%, and 2.4%. The propagated uncertainty of the tritium and noble gas measurements meets the desired precision for typical 3H/3He dating applications. However, the measurement uncertainties for the noble gas concentrations are insufficient to

  7. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Up-to-Date on Genetic Landmarks

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Sorrentino, Francesco S.; Romano, Mario R.; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Bonomo Roversi, Elia; Franceschelli, Paola; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over 50 years of age, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of legal blindness in Western countries. Although the aging represents the main determinant of AMD, it must be considered a multifaceted disease caused by interactions among environmental risk factors and genetic backgrounds. Mounting evidence and/or arguments document the crucial role of inflammation and immune-mediated processes in the pathogenesis of AMD. Proinflammatory effects secondary to chronic inflammation (e.g., alternative complement activation) and heterogeneous types of oxidative stress (e.g., impaired cholesterol homeostasis) can result in degenerative damages at the level of crucial macular structures, that is photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch's membrane. In the most recent years, the association of AMD with genes, directly or indirectly, involved in immunoinflammatory pathways is increasingly becoming an essential core for AMD knowledge. Starting from the key basic-research notions detectable at the root of AMD pathogenesis, the present up-to-date paper reviews the best-known and/or the most attractive genetic findings linked to the mechanisms of inflammation of this complex disease. PMID:24369445

  8. Borehole magnetostratigraphy, absolute age dating, and correlation of sedimentary rocks, with examples from the Paris Basin, France

    SciTech Connect

    Bouisset, P.M. ); Augustin, A.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Total and CEA have conceived and developed two new logging tools which allow continuous, precise, and accurate in-situ magnetic measurements within weakly magnetized sedimentary rocks encountered in uncased industry drilled wells. The combination of these magnetic measurements permits for the first time continuous determination of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) polarities occurring in the logged section. The resulting well magnetostratigraphic sequence (WMS) which may be recognized from well to well (magnetostratigraphic correlations), may also be correlative to a geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS) of reference magnetostratigraphic scale (RMS), given adequate dating tie points and lack of noticeable remagnetizations. Application of this method to the Upper Jurrasic formation in four wells of the Paris basin has yielded promising results for both stratigraphic and near absolute age correlations as well as determination of facies diachronisms. The comparison of results obtained from magnetic measurements and from sequence stratigraphy analysis shows that third-order sequence boundaries may be correlative to geomagnetic reversals, but may also be diachronous in wells 80 km or less apart. The potential of borehole magnetic measurements as presented in this paper is still under investigation. However, these encouraging initial results show that this new investigating and dating method could be of great help in the analysis of subsurface stratigraphy by extending the concepts of magnetostratigraphy from the outcrops and laboratory directly into borehole logging. 81 refs., 18 figs.

  9. Tracing and age-dating recycled waste water recharged for potable reuse in a seawater injection barrier, southern California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M L; Esser, B K; Herndon, R L; Hudson, G B

    1998-12-02

    In this report we outline an investigative approach that combines isotopic tracers and tritium-helium-3 (3H-3He) dating to directly measure groundwater mixing and ages. These data can be used to test regulatory compliance in potable water reuse projects (Davisson et al., 1998). We provide an example from a seawater injection barrier located in Orange County, California, which has been injecting advanced- treated waste water into a coastal aquifer for the past 25 years to prevent seawater intrusion. Treatment comprises lime coagulation of secondary waste effluents, followed by re-carbonation, sand filtration, and reverse osmosis. The finished water has a very low TDS (-100 mg/L), which is blended -50% with a low TDS (288 mg/L) native groundwater, making an injection water of -200 mg/L.

  10. Age and evolution of the Grand Canyon revealed by U-Pb dating of water table-type speleothems.

    PubMed

    Polyak, Victor; Hill, Carol; Asmerom, Yemane

    2008-03-01

    The age and evolution of the Grand Canyon have been subjects of great interest and debate since its discovery. We found that cave mammillaries (water table indicator speleothems) from nine sites in the Grand Canyon showed uranium-lead dating evidence for an old western Grand Canyon on the assumption that groundwater table decline rates are equivalent to incision rates. Samples in the western Grand Canyon yielded apparent water table decline rates of 55 to 123 meters per million years over the past 17 million years, in contrast to eastern Grand Canyon samples that yielded much faster rates (166 to 411 meters per million years). Chronology and inferred incision data indicate that the Grand Canyon evolved via headward erosion from west to east, together with late-stage ( approximately 3.7 million years ago) accelerated incision in the eastern block. PMID:18323451

  11. Laser Ablation in situ (U-Th-Sm)/He and U-Pb Double-Dating of Apatite and Zircon: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, B.; Danišík, M.; Evans, N.; McDonald, B.; Becker, T.; Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new laser-based technique for rapid, quantitative and automated in situ microanalysis of U, Th, Sm, Pb and He for applications in geochronology, thermochronometry and geochemistry (Evans et al., 2015). This novel capability permits a detailed interrogation of the time-temperature history of rocks containing apatite, zircon and other accessory phases by providing both (U-Th-Sm)/He and U-Pb ages (+trace element analysis) on single crystals. In situ laser microanalysis offers several advantages over conventional bulk crystal methods in terms of safety, cost, productivity and spatial resolution. We developed and integrated a suite of analytical instruments including a 193 nm ArF excimer laser system (RESOlution M-50A-LR), a quadrupole ICP-MS (Agilent 7700s), an Alphachron helium mass spectrometry system and swappable flow-through and ultra-high vacuum analytical chambers. The analytical protocols include the following steps: mounting/polishing in PFA Teflon using methods similar to those adopted for fission track etching; laser He extraction and analysis using a 2 s ablation at 5 Hz and 2-3 J/cm2fluence; He pit volume measurement using atomic force microscopy, and U-Th-Sm-Pb (plus optional trace element) analysis using traditional laser ablation methods. The major analytical challenges for apatite include the low U, Th and He contents relative to zircon and the elevated common Pb content. On the other hand, apatite typically has less extreme and less complex zoning of parent isotopes (primarily U and Th). A freeware application has been developed for determining (U-Th-Sm)/He ages from the raw analytical data and Iolite software was used for U-Pb age and trace element determination. In situ double-dating has successfully replicated conventional U-Pb and (U-Th)/He age variations in xenocrystic zircon from the diamondiferous Ellendale lamproite pipe, Western Australia and increased zircon analytical throughput by a factor of 50 over conventional methods

  12. Using H-Alpha Morphology and Surface Brightness Fluctuations to Age-Date Star Clusters in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Chandar, R.; Kim, H.; Kaleida, C.; Stankiewicz, M.; O'Connell, R.; SOC, WFC3

    2011-01-01

    We use WFC3 observations of the nearby grand design spiral galaxy M83 to develop two independent methods for estimating the ages of young star clusters. The first method uses the physical extent and morphology of H-alpha emission to estimate the ages of clusters younger than 10 Myr. It is based on the simple premise that the gas in very young (< few Myr) clusters is largely coincident with the cluster stars, is in a small, ring-like structure surrounding the stars in slightly older clusters (i.e., 5 Myr), and is in larger ring-like bubbles for older clusters (i.e., 5 - 10 Myr). The second method is based on an observed relation between pixel-to-pixel flux variations within clusters and their ages. This method relies on the fact that the brightest individual stars in a cluster are most prominent at ages around 3 - 10 Myr, and fall below the detection limit (i.e., Mv < -3.5) for ages older than 100 Myr old. The older clusters therefore have a smoother appearance and smaller pixel-to-pixel variations. We compare age estimates of clusters in M83 derived from these two techniques with estimates determined from fitting UBVIHalpha observations with model predictions, and find good agreement at the 90 % level, with an scatter of 0.2 dex in log age for young clusters (< 10 Myr) and 0.5 dex for older (> 10 Myr) clusters. This project is based on Early Release Science observations made by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this program. Support for program #11360 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  13. Isotopic age of the Black Forest Bed, Petrified Forest Member, Chinle Formation, Arizona: An example of dating a continental sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, N.R.; Ash, S.R.; Barth, A.P.; Gehrels, G.E.; Wooden, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Zircons from the Black Forest Bed, Petrified Forest Member, Chinle Formation, in Petrified Forest National Park, yield ages that range from Late Triassic to Late Archean. Grains were analyzed by multigrain TIMS (thermal-ionization mass spectrometry), single-crystal TIMS, and SHRIMP (sensitive, high-resolution ion-microprobe). Multiple-grain analysis yielded a discordia trajectory with a lower intercept of 207 ?? 2 Ma, which because of the nature of multiple-grain sampling of a detrital bed, is not considered conclusive. Analysis of 29 detrital-zircon grains by TIMS yielded U-PB ages of 2706 ?? 6 Ma to 206 ?? 6 Ma. Eleven of these ages lie between 211 and 216 ?? 6.8 Ma. Our statistical analysis of these grains indicates that the mean of the ages, 213 ?? 1.7 Ma, reflects more analytical error than geologic variability in sources of the grains. Grains with ages of ca. 1400 Ma were derived from the widespread plutons of that age exposed throughout the southwestern Cordillera and central United States. Twelve grains analyzed by SHRIMP provide 206Pb*/238U ages from 214 ?? 2 Ma to 200 ?? 4 Ma. We use these data to infer that cores of inherited material were present in many zircons and that single-crystal analysis provides an accurate estimation of the age of the bed. We further propose that, even if some degree of reworking has occurred, the very strong concentration of ages at ca. 213 Ma provides a maximum age for the Black Forest Bed of 213 ?? 1.7 Ma. The actual age of the bed may be closer to 209 Ma. Dating continental successions is very difficult when distinct ash beds are not clearly identified, as is the case in the Chinle Formation. Detrital zircons in the Black Forest Bed, however, are dominated by an acicular morphology with preserved delicate terminations. The shape of these crystals and their inferred environment of deposition in slow-water settings suggest that the crystals were not far removed from their site of deposition in space and likely not far in time

  14. Dating of the late Quaternary volcanic events using Uranium-series technique on travertine deposit: A case study in Ihlara, Central Anatolia Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Volkan; Tonguç Uysal, İ.; Ünal-İmer, Ezgi

    2016-04-01

    Dating of late Quaternary volcanism is crucial to understanding of the recent mechanism of crustal deformation and future volcanic explosivity risk of the region. However, radiometric dating of volcanic products has been a major challenge because of high methodological error rate. In most cases, there are difficulties on discrimination of the volcanic lava flow relations in the field. Furthermore, there would be unrecorded and unpreserved volcanoclastic layers by depositional and erosional processes. We present a new method that allows precise dating of late Quaternary volcanic events (in the time range of 0-500,000 years before present) using the Uranium-series technique on travertine mass, which is thought to be controlled by the young volcanism. Since the high pressure CO2 in the spring waters are mobilized during crustal strain cycles and the carbonates are precipitated in the fissures act as conduit for hot springs, thus, travertine deposits provide important information about crustal deformation. In this study we studied Ihlara fissure ridge travertines in the Central Anatolia Volcanic Province. This region is surrounded by many eruption centers (i.e. Hasandaǧı, Acıgöl and Göllüdaǧı) known as the late Quaternary and their widespread volcanoclastic products. Recent studies have suggested at least 11 events at around Acıgöl Caldera for the last 180 ka and 2 events at Hasandaǧı Stratovolcano for the last 30 ka. Active travertine masses around Ihlara deposited from hotwaters, which rise up through deep-penetrated fissures in volcanoclastic products of surrounding volcanoes. Analyses of the joint systems indicate that these vein structures are controlled by the crustal deformation due to young volcanism in the vicinity. Thus, the geological history of Ihlara travertine mass is regarded as a record of surrounding young volcanism. We dated 9 samples from 5 ridge-type travertine masses around Ihlara region. The age distribution indicates that the crustal

  15. A comparison of rating and dating techniques to estimate the threat of soil erosion to archaeological monuments under agricultural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, Maud; Huisman, Hans; Schoorl, Jeroen; Reimann, Tony; Temme, Arnaud; Wallinga, Jakob; de Kort, Jan-Willem; van der Heiden, Menno; van Os, Bertil; van Egmond, Fenny; Ketteren, Michael

    2015-04-01

    For the protection of Dutch archaeological sites against degradation, the TOPsites project is investigating the rate, extent and mitigation of the most important processes involved. One of these processes is soil translocation or soil redistribution. For many Dutch archaeological sites the actual extent and rate of soil erosion is not yet known. In this study different techniques for dating and estimating rates have been compared on three archaeological sites on tilled fields with gentle slopes: (multi-temporal LiDar, profiles and spatial distribution of 137Cs, anthropogenic Pb, and 239+240Pu, and moreover OSL. In addition, the added value of the combination of several of these techniques together will be evaluated. Preliminary results show evidence for colluvium formation (deposition) on two of the sites. Lead contents in a buried soil on one of these sites suggest a subrecent to recent date. 137Cs profiles and spatial mapping, however, do not show clear evidence for recent erosion or re-deposition patterns. These first results suggest that in these agricultural settings with typical Dutch gentle slopes, erosion may only occur in rare, catastrophic, events with local high erosion and re-deposition rates instead of a more or less continuous process with lower rates. Consequently, the impact of ploughing might be limited to mixing of the plough layer, while the effect of damaging soil translocation, for these selected archaeological sites, seems less important. Forthcoming analysis and results of Pu and OSL will provide enough data for further discussion and possible falsification of these preliminary conclusions.

  16. Age of the North Anatolian Fault Segments in the Yalova with U/Th Dating Method by Travertine Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, Haluk; Ömer Taş, K.

    2016-04-01

    Travertine occurrences developed along the segments of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) in the south of Yalova. Travertines outcrop approximately 1 km2 area. These are middle-thick bedded approximately 20-40 m and back-tilted southward or horizontally. Lithology of travertines deposited such as physolite, stalactites-stalagmites, cave pearls, sharp pebble carbonate nodules, spherical-roller-intricate shapes or laminated banded travertine. Geochemical analyses were performed on the six samples of the travertines. X-ray analysis indicates that all samples are entirely composed of low-Mg calcite. Banded travertines with some tubular structures formed by precipitation from rising hot water are best developed near the toes of the large, hanging-wall-derived alluvial fans, whereas phreatic cement preferentially exists in footwall-derived, alluvial-fan conglomerates. The unit developed clarity which is controlled by normal fault as the structural and morphological, relationship with active tectonics. The travertines are a range-front type. U/Th series age dating results indicate that the travertine deposition extends back to 155 ka and yields ages of 60.000 (± 3, 091) to 153.149 (±13,466) from the range-front type travertines.

  17. Noble Gas Analysis for Mars Robotic Missions: Evaluating K-Ar Age Dating for Mars Rock Analogs and Martian Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Ming, D. W.; Garrison, D. H.; Jones, J. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Nagao, K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this noble gas investigation was to evaluate the possibility of measuring noble gases in martian rocks and air by future robotic missions such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission has, as part of its payload, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument, which consists of a pyrolysis oven integrated with a GCMS. The MSL SAM instrument has the capability to measure noble gas compositions of martian rocks and atmosphere. Here we suggest the possibility of K-Ar age dating based on noble gas release of martian rocks by conducting laboratory simulation experiments on terrestrial basalts and martian meteorites. We provide requirements for the SAM instrument to obtain adequate noble gas abundances and compositions within the current SAM instrumental operating conditions, especially, a power limit that prevents heating the furnace above approx.1100 C. In addition, Martian meteorite analyses from NASA-JSC will be used as ground truth to evaluate the feasibility of robotic experiments to constrain the ages of martian surface rocks.

  18. Potentials and pitfalls of depth profile (10Be), burial isochron (26Al/10Be) and palaeomagnetic techniques for dating Early Pleistocene terrace deposits of the Moselle valley (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Cordier, Stéphane; May, Simon Matthias; Kelterbaum, Daniel; Szemkus, Nina; Keulertz, Rebecca; Dunai, Tibor; Binnie, Steven; Hambach, Ulrich; Scheidt, Stephanie; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the river network of the Rhenish Massif the so-called main terraces complex (MTC) forms the morphological transition between a wide upper palaeovalley and a deeply incised lower valley. The youngest level of this complex (YMT), directly located at the edge of the incised valley, represents a dominant geomorphic feature; it is often used as a reference level to identify the beginning of the main middle Pleistocene incision episode (Demoulin & Hallot, 2009). Although the main terraces are particularly well preserved in the lower Moselle valley, a questionable age of ca. 800 ka is assumed for the YMT, mainly based on the uncertain extrapolation of controversially interpreted palaeomagnetic data obtained in the Rhine valley. In this study, we applied terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating (10Be/26Al) and palaeomagnetic dating to Moselle fluvial sediments of the MTC. To unravel the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Pleistocene evolution of the valley, several sites along the lower Moselle were sampled following two distinct TCN dating strategies: depth profiles where the original terrace (palaeo-) surface is well preserved and did not experience a major post-depositional burial (e.g., loess cover); and the isochron technique, where the sediment thickness exceeds 4.5-5 m. One terrace deposit was sampled for both approaches (reference site). In addition, palaeomagnetic sampling was systematically performed in each terrace sampled for TCN measurements. The TCN dating techniques show contrasting results for our reference site. Three main issues are observed for the depth profile method: (i) an inability of the modeled profile to constrain the 10Be concentration of the uppermost sample; (ii) an overestimated density value as model output; and (iii) a probable concentration steady state of the terrace deposits. By contrast, the isochron method yields a burial age estimate of 1.26 +0.29/-0.25 Ma, although one sample showed a depleted 26Al/10Be ratio

  19. Sandia LSI accelerated aging and data acquisition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.E.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of the Microelectronic Evaluation Laboratory at Sandia is to develop a program for evaluating CMOS LSI (complementary metal oxide silicon - large scale integrated) technology devices which are being used for the first time in a weapon system. These evaluations are based on accelerated aging studies and electrical tests to determine the reliability and life of the devices. In accelerated aging, specific, controlled stresses are applied to the device to accelerate time-to-failure. Data are used tin mathematical models to estimate life in acutal use. The stresses used for this technology are temperature and voltage. The devices are stored at temperatures with or without voltage applied (steady-state or cyclical) and periodically tested until at least 50% failures are encountered. Since most current technologies use epoxy-die-attachment, aging temperatures must be under 200/sup 0/C. This delays device failure, and a 16% failure level is used when this extrapolation is considered valid. Statistical analysis is performed on the resultant data to predict reliability with time. The equipment and procedures used for accelerated aging tests are described in detail. The data acquisition system and its use are discussed. All devices, after functional failure has occurred, are given to the failure analysis group for failure evaluations. In order to improve reliability predictions, failure analysis is most concerned with the separation of freak and main life mechanisms. Through these evaluations, higher reliability and longer device life have become a milestone of the future. (LCL)

  20. Asteroseismology for "à la carte" stellar age-dating and weighing. Age and mass of the CoRoT exoplanet host HD 52265

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, Y.; Goupil, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Context. In the context of the space missions CoRoT, Kepler, Gaia, TESS, and PLATO, precise and accurate stellar ages, masses, and radii are of paramount importance. For instance, they are crucial for constraining scenarii of planetary formation and evolution. Aims: We aim at quantifying how detailed stellar modelling can improve the accuracy and precision on age and mass of individual stars. To that end, we adopt a multifaceted approach where we carefully examine how the number of observational constraints as well as the uncertainties on observations and on model input physics affect the results of age-dating and weighing. Methods: We modelled in detail the exoplanet host-star HD 52265, a main-sequence, solar-like oscillator that CoRoT observed for four months. We considered different sets of observational constraints (Hertzsprung-Russell data, metallicity, various sets of seismic constraints). For each case, we determined the age, mass, and properties of HD 52265 inferred from stellar models, and we quantified the impact of the model input physics and free parameters. We also compared model ages with ages derived by empirical methods or Hertzsprung-Russell diagram inversion. Results: For our case study HD 52265, our seismic analysis provides an age A = 2.10-2.54 Gyr, a mass M = 1.14-1.32 M⊙, and a radius R = 1.30-1.34 R⊙, which corresponds to age, mass, and radius uncertainties of ~10, ~7, and ~1.5 per cent, respectively. These uncertainties account for observational errors and current state-of-the-art stellar model uncertainties. Our seismic study also provides constraints on surface convection properties through the mixing-length, which we find to be 12-15 per cent lower than the solar value. On the other hand, because of helium-mass degeneracy, the initial helium abundance is determined modulo the mass value. Finally, we evaluate the seismic mass of the exoplanet to be Mpsini = 1.17-1.26 MJupiter, much more precise than what can be derived by Hertzsprung

  1. Dating sediments using luminescence signals

    SciTech Connect

    Wintle, A. )

    1993-05-01

    Before siting a nuclear power station or a nuclear waste repository, it is necessary to establish that the area has been free of earthquake activity for a sufficient period of time. Evidence of past earthquake activity is often provided by faults in surface sediments. Age limits for fault formation can be set by obtaining the depositional ages of the sediment unit in which the fault was formed and the overlying sediment. A useful technique would be one that dating could be applied to the mineral grains that make up the sediments and that would give the time that has passed since the grains were blown or washed into position. Luminescence dating techniques, of which the most well known is thermo-luminescence (TL), provide such information. This approach has been successful in dating movement on the Wasatch Fault in Utah. A combination of TL and radiocarbon dates indicated that three faulting events had occurred within the past 5000 years. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Round-robin 230Th–234U age dating of bulk uranium for nuclear forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, Amy M.; Hubert, Amélie; Kinman, William S.; Magara, Masaaki; Okubo, Ayako; Pointurier, Fabien; Schorzman, Kerri C.; Steiner, Robert E.; Williams, Ross W.

    2015-07-30

    In an inter-laboratory measurement comparison study, four laboratories determined 230Th–234U model ages of uranium certified reference material NBL U050 using isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The model dates determined by the participating laboratories range from 9 March 1956 to 19 October 1957, and are indistinguishable given the associated measurement uncertainties. As a result, these model ages are concordant with to slightly older than the known production age of NBL U050.

  3. Collection, analysis, and age-dating of sediment cores from 56 U.S. lakes and reservoirs sampled by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1992-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Callender, Edward; Mahler, Barbara J.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Reconstructed Trends National Synthesis study collected sediment cores from 56 lakes and reservoirs between 1992 and 2001 across the United States. Most of the sampling was conducted as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The primary objective of the study was to determine trends in particle-associated contaminants in response to urbanization; 47 of the 56 lakes are in or near one of 20 U.S. cities. Sampling was done with gravity, piston, and box corers from boats and push cores from boats or by wading, depending on the depth of water and thickness of sediment being sampled. Chemical analyses included major and trace elements, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, cesium-137, and lead-210. Age-dating of the cores was done on the basis of radionuclide analyses and the position of the pre-reservoir land surface in the reservoir and, in a few cases, other chemical or lithologic depth-date markers. Dates were assigned in many cores on the basis of assumed constant mass accumulation between known depth-date markers. Dates assigned were supported using a variety of other date markers including first occurrence and peak concentrations of DDT and polychlorinated biphenyls and peak concentration of lead. A qualitative rating was assigned to each core on the basis of professional judgment to indicate the reliability of age assignments. A total of 122 cores were collected from the 56 lakes and age dates were assigned to 113 of them, representing 54 of the 56 lakes. Seventy-four of the 122 cores (61 percent) received a good rating for the assigned age dates, 28 cores (23 percent) a fair rating, and 11 cores (9 percent) a poor rating; nine cores (7 percent) had no dates assigned. An analysis of the influence of environmental factors on the apparent quality of age-dating of the cores concluded that the most important factor was the mass accumulation rate (MAR) of sediment: the

  4. Chemical Principles Revisited: Archaeological Dating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses methods used to date archaeological artifacts and other remains. They include: (1) nuclear dating techniques (radiocarbon dating, accelerator radiocarbon dating, thermoluminescence, and others); (2) chemical dating techniques (amino acid racemization, obsidian hydration dating, elemental content changes, and thermal analysis dating); and…

  5. Electrochemical migration technique to accelerate ageing of cementitious materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaahmadi, A.; Tang, L.; Abbas, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Durability assessment of concrete structures for constructions in nuclear waste repositories requires long term service life predictions. As deposition of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) takes up to 100 000 years, it is necessary to analyze the service life of cementitious materials in this time perspective. Using acceleration methods producing aged specimens would decrease the need of extrapolating short term data sets. Laboratory methods are therefore, needed for accelerating the ageing process without making any influencing distortion in the properties of the materials. This paper presents an electro-chemical migration method to increase the rate of calcium leaching from cementitious specimens. This method is developed based on the fact that major long term deterioration process of hardened cement paste in concrete structures for deposition of LILW is due to slow diffusion of calcium ions. In this method the cementitious specimen is placed in an electrochemical cell as a porous path way through which ions can migrate at a rate far higher than diffusion process. The electrical field is applied to the cell in a way to accelerate the ion migration without making destructions in the specimen's micro and macroscopic properties. The anolyte and catholyte solutions are designed favoring dissolution of calcium hydroxide and compensating for the leached calcium ions with another ion like lithium.

  6. Managing Age Discrimination: An Examination of the Techniques Used when Seeking Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Ellie D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines the age-related management techniques used by older workers in their search for employment. Design and Methods: Data are drawn from interviews with individuals aged 45-65 years (N = 30). Results: Findings indicate that participants develop "counteractions" and "concealments" to manage perceived age discrimination.…

  7. Age of the Druksiai-Polotsk deformation zone, Lithuania: a U-Pb dating of metamorphic titanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vejelyte, Irma; Bogdanova, Svetlana; Salnikova, Ekaterina

    2010-05-01

    The studied Druksiai-Polotsk deformation zone (DPDZ) transects the East Lithuanian Domain (ELD), representing the southern margin of the major Polotsk-Kurzeme zone of faulting in the Baltic-Belarus region. The DPDZ is of 35-40 km wide, E-W trending, and marked well by linear gravity and magnetic anomalies. The crystalline rocks within the DPDZ are granulites, biotite granites, and migmatites, the latter consisting of amphibole-plagioclase paleo- and mesosomes, and plagioclase-quartz-biotite±microcline±amphibole neosomes. Because of ductile shearing gneisses, augen mylonites, mylonites and ultramylonites were produced while tectonic breccias and pseudotachyllite were formed by later brittle deformation. According to geophysical data and the surface morphology of the crystalline basement, a horst-graben structure have recognized along the DPDZ. The graben is filled with Vendian, Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian deposits. A U-Pb dating of titanite from an augen granitoid mylonite in the DPDZ has yielded a concordant age of 1534±9 Ma. This light brown titanite follows the folation in the host rock and was obviously formed during retrogression from amphibolite- to epidote-amphibolite facies and coeval mylonitization. Shear zones of the same age are known in southern and central Sweden and in NE Poland. These E-W trending deformation zones accommodate both mafic and granitoid intrusions and are probably related to an extensional period in the Mesoproterozoic evolution in the western part of the East European Craton. This is a contribution to the project "The Precambrian structure of Baltica as a control of its recent environment and evolution" of the Visby Programme supported by the Swedish Institute and the Lithuanian State Science and Studies Foundation.

  8. Geochemical analyses, age dates, and flow-volume estimates for quaternary volcanic rocks, Southern Cascade Mountains, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P.E.; Korosec, M.A.

    1983-12-01

    Data collected over the last three years as part of a continuing study of the Quaternary volcanic rocks of the southern Cascade Mountains are presented. Whole-rock chemical analyses, selected trace element geochemistry, volume approximations, specific gravity determinations, and locations are provided for most of the 103 samples collected, and 21 radiometric age dates are included. In addition, partial information, including names and flow-volumes, are presented for 98 additional samples, collected for related studies. The study extends from the Columbia River north to the Cowlitz River and Goat Rocks Wilderness area, and from the Klickitat River west to the Puget-Willamette Trough. The volcanic rocks are all younger than 3 million years and consist primarily of tholeiitic and high-alumina basalts and basaltic-andesites erupted from numerous shield volcanoes and cinder cones. A few analyses of more silicic rocks, including hornblende and/or pyroxene andesites and dacites characteristic of the stratovolcanoes of the region, are also presented. However, systematic sampling of the stratovolcanoes in the study area, Mount Adams and Mount St. Helens, was not conducted. A map of the areal extent of Quaternary volcanic units and sample locations is included. It has been based on the 1:125,000 reconnaissance geologic map of the southern Cascade Range by Hammond (1980).

  9. The penetrometer - A technique for monitoring composite propellant ageing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, G. S.

    The monitoring of the natural and accelerated aging of rubbery composite propellants by using a non-destructive mechanical properties tester, the 'penetrometer', is presented. This capability facilitates predictions of rocket-motor service life and also detects motors that may not have been stored correctly. The probe is inserted into the conduit of a motor and held in place by an integral, motor-specific, air-bag. The indenter is then driven into the charge in a low-stress region. Information obtained from the test is displayed graphically on a microcomputer, analyzed, and stored. It is concluded that, because not all of the rocket motors will have seen the same environment depending on the individual motor history, it will be possible to extend the lifetime before disposal since the charge can now be tested. This in turn will lead to financial savings if the charge's life can be said to have 'X' years of life left and does not need to be withdrawn from service.

  10. Investigations on alluvial deposits through borehole stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating and passive seismic technique (Carnic Alps, NE Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Alessia; Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco; Crema, Stefano; Fontana, Alessandro; Mozzi, Paolo; Venturini, Corrado

    2016-04-01

    Alluvial sediment investigations provide fundamental tools to infer the processes that control geomorphological evolution of mountain environments. By analyzing sediment stratigraphy in depth, it is possible to retrieve the source, the geology, the time of deposition, the relative distance travelled by material as well as to distinguish among different type of transport (i.e., gravitational, fluvial or glacial). In this work, we present a combination of log stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating and geophysical surveys carried out on the valley floor of the But River (Carnic Alps, North East Italy). The But River basin drains an area of 326 km2 with a range in elevation from 2769 to 323 m a.s.l.; the bedrock mainly consists of carbonates and quartz arenites with minor inclusions of effusive rocks. After Pleistocene the gravitational deposits from mountain slopes have impounded the But River several times. In particular, we analyzed a sector of the upper portion of the But valley close to the confluence of the Moscardo Torrent, frequently affected by debris flows. A borehole was drilled in the But River floodplain, at the intersection with the Moscardo Torrent alluvial fan, down to a depth of 80 m. The analysis of the core samples allowed discerning three sedimentary levels rich in clay and organic materials, which testify the presence of small dam lakes, originated from the Moscardo debris-flow deposits. Three samples of wood and plant debris were collected from 13, 14 and 23 m of depth, respectively. They were analyzed through radiocarbon dating in order to determine the age of the lakes and, thus, to infer the activity of the debris flows building the Moscardo cone. The calibrated ages of the 3 samples are close to the younger limit of the radiocarbon method indicating a fast aggradation of the valley floor, starting from a period ranging between 1450 - 1632 AD. Historical maps and documents confirm the presence of the lakes until 19th century and they permit to assess

  11. Concordant ages for the Lava Creek Tuff from high-spatial-resolution U-Pb dating of zircon rim faces and single-crystal sanidine 40Ar/39Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, N. E.; Vazquez, J. A.; Calvert, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    The last great explosive supereruption from the Yellowstone Plateau formed present-day Yellowstone caldera and ejected the >1000 km3 of rhyolite that composes the Lava Creek Tuff (LCT). The LCT eruption blanketed much of the western United States in ash, and consequently is a key chronostratigraphic marker bed for delimiting Quaternary uplift rates, the age of middle Pleistocene glacial and pluvial deposits, and tephra correlation in North America. Previous 40Ar/39Ar dating of the two mineralogically distinct LCT members (A & B) yield ages ranging from ca. 600 ka (Gansecki et al., 1998) to ca. 640 ka (Lanphere et al., 2002). To resolve the timing of eruption and crystallization timescale for the LCT magma, we dated both LCT members using a dual-method approach as follows: (1) ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG) U-Pb dating and trace-element characterization of the final few micrometers of zircon crystallization by analysis of unpolished rims on indium-mounted crystals, and dating of the onset of zircon crystallization by traditional analysis of sectioned crystal interiors, and (2) laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar dating of single sanidine crystals from bulk LCT ignimbrite and pumice. The unpolished rims of zircon from LCT members A & B yield indistinguishable ages, with a mean age of 621.8 × 2.5 ka (1σ) after correction for initial 230Th disequilibrium as constrained by ion-probe analyses of LCT melt inclusions. Single sanidine crystals from LCT-B yield a mean age of 624.9 × 2.6 ka (FCT=28.17 Ma) that is indistinguishable from the zircon rim ages for both members. These results indicate that LCT members A & B erupted over a geologically brief interval, which is supported by the direct and gradational contact of their equivalent fallout in distal lacustrine deposits and a lack of field evidence for a significant time-break between the LCT A & B in proximal deposits (Christiansen, 2001), but contrasts with older Yellowstone ignimbrite (e.g., Huckleberry Ridge) that may have erupted

  12. Aging.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Choon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2013-09-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  13. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  14. An extended magnetic viscous relaxation dating for calibrating an older age: an example of tsunamigenic coral boulders in Ishigaki Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Nakamura, N.; Goto, K.; Kumagai, Y.; Minoura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    2015-12-01

    A key to the understanding of past tsunami events is the ability to accurately date them. Analysis of past tsunami sediments is one of the most important tools for past tsunami reconstruction. A typical example of such tsunami sediment is tsunamigenic boulders. In Ishigaki Island, Japan, coral boulders that had been transported by tsunamis were distributed on the beach and land areas. Although the historical occurrences of several huge tsunamis were estimated based on large numbers of radiocarbon dating for coral boulders, radiocarbon dating can not determine a multiple rotational history by multiple tsunamis. A viscous remanet magnetization (VRM) dating method can be used to date any geological event that results in significant movements of a rock. Sato et al. (2014) applied VRM dating for comparing the radiocarbon age of these boulders. If a magnetic-mineral bearing rock is moved or re-oriented, the magnetism of the smaller magnetic grains re-aligns to the direction of the ambient magnetic field with time. This phenomenon is well known as Néel's (1949, 1955) single-domain (SD) relaxation theory. Pullaiah et al. (1975) derived a time-temperature (t-T relation) relation by assuming Néel's (1949, 1955) theory of magnetite. In principle, an experimental combination of short relaxation time and high temperature for removing VRM can determine the unknown relaxation time (tsunami age) at room temperature. We have been applied t-T relation to the coral boulders on Ishigaki Island, but their estimated ages showed older than radiocarbon dating. The longer relaxation time means that the observed magnetic relaxation is slower than the original Néel's theory. Such slow relaxation has been described by a stretched exponential function. The stretched exponential law provided a reasonable fit to the published experimental data. Thus, in this study, we revisit Néel's theory to provide a new t-T relation based on stretched exponential function.

  15. Age measurements of potassium-bearing sulfide minerals by the 40Ar/39Ar technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Lanphere, M.A.; Erd, Richard C.; Blake, M.C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    K-Ar ages have been determined for sulfide minerals for the first time. The occurrence of adequate amounts of potassium-bearing sulfides with ideal compositions K3Fe10S14 (???10 wt.% K) and KFe2S3 (???16 wt.% K) in samples from a mafic alkalic diatreme at Coyote Peak, California, prompted an attempt to date these materials. K3Fe10S14, a massive mineral with conchoidal fracture, gives an age of 29.4 ?? 0.5 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar), indistinguishable from the 28.3 ?? 0.4 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar) and 30.2 ?? 1.0 m.y.8 (conventional K-Ar) ages obtained for associated phlogopite (8.7 wt.% K). KFe2S3, a bladed, fibrous sulfide, gives a younger age, 26.5 ?? 0.5 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar), presumably owing to Ar loss. ?? 1978.

  16. Resolving the age of Wilson Creek Formation tephras and the Mono Lake excursion using high-resolution SIMS dating of allanite and zircon rims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Lidzbarski, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    Sediments of the Wilson Creek Formation surrounding Mono Lake preserve a high-resolution archive of glacial and pluvial responses along the eastern Sierra Nevada due to late Pleistocene climate change. An absolute chronology for the Wilson Creek stratigraphy is critical for correlating the paleoclimate record to other archives in the western U.S. and the North Atlantic region. However, multiple attempts to date the Wilson Creek stratigraphy using carbonates and interbedded rhyolitic tephras yield discordant 14C and 40Ar/39Ar results due to open-system effects, carbon reservoir uncertainties, as well as abundant xenocrysts entrained during eruption. Ion microprobe (SIMS) 238U-230Th dating of the final increments of crystallization recorded by allanite and zircon autocrysts from juvenile pyroclasts yields ages that effectively date eruption of key tephra beds and resolve age uncertainties about the Wilson Creek stratigraphy. To date the final several micrometers of crystal growth, individual allanite and zircon crystals were embedded in soft indium to allow sampling of unpolished rims. Isochron ages derived from rims on coexisting allanite and zircon (± glass) from hand-selected pumiceous pyroclasts delimit the timing of Wilson Creek sedimentation between Ashes 7 and 19 (numbering of Lajoie, 1968) to the interval between ca. 27 to ca. 62 ka. The interiors of individual allanite and zircon crystals sectioned in standard SIMS mounts yield model 238U-230Th ages that are mostly <10 k.y. older than their corresponding rim age, suggesting a relatively brief interval of allanite + zircon crystallization before eruption. A minority of allanite and zircon crystals yield rim and interior model ages of ca. 90-100 ka, and are likely to be antecrysts recycled from relatively early Mono Craters volcanism and/or intrusions. Tephra (Ash 15) erupted during the geomagnetic excursion originally designated the Mono Lake excursion yields a rim isochron age of ca. 41 ka indicating that

  17. Robust date for the Bronze Age Avellino eruption (Somma-Vesuvius): 3945 ± 10 calBP (1995 ± 10 calBC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevink, Jan; van Bergen, Manfred J.; van der Plicht, Johannes; Feiken, Hendrik; Anastasia, Carmela; Huizinga, Annika

    2011-05-01

    We found Bronze Age lake sediments from the Agro Pontino graben (Central Italy) to contain a thin (2-3 cm) continuous tephra layer composed of lithics, crystals and minor volcanic glass. Tephrochronological and compositional constraints strongly suggest that this layer represents the Avellino pumice eruption, which has also been identified in Central Italian lake cores. Its provenance is corroborated by electron-microprobe analyses performed on juvenile pumice grains, showing that the tephra layer is probably the distal equivalent of the EU2 event of the Avellino eruption. We used multiple 14C age estimations of two lacustrine sequences with intercalated tephra layer, from the western border zone (Migliara 44.5) and the centre of the former lake (Campo Inferiore), for in tandem dating of this eruption, employing the OxCal code, which yielded a robust age of 3945 ± 10 calBP (1995 ± 10 calBC). To date, this is the only study providing both a terminus post and terminus ante quem of this precision, also demonstrating the advantage of dating distal tephra layers in a clear stratigraphic context over proximal deposits in sequences with major stratigraphic hiatuses. Our new results underscore the importance of the Avellino tephra layer as a precise time marker for studies on the Early Bronze Age of Central Italy.

  18. Age of the Lava Creek supereruption and magma chamber assembly at Yellowstone based on 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dating of sanidine and zircon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Naomi E.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2015-09-01

    The last supereruption from the Yellowstone Plateau formed Yellowstone caldera and ejected the >1000 km3 of rhyolite that composes the Lava Creek Tuff. Tephra from the Lava Creek eruption is a key Quaternary chronostratigraphic marker, in particular for dating the deposition of mid Pleistocene glacial and pluvial deposits in western North America. To resolve the timing of eruption and crystallization history for the Lava Creek magma, we performed (1) 40Ar/39Ar dating of single sanidine crystals to delimit eruption age and (2) ion microprobe U-Pb and trace-element analyses of the crystal faces and interiors of single zircons to date the interval of zircon crystallization and characterize magmatic evolution. Sanidines from the two informal members composing Lava Creek Tuff yield a preferred 40Ar/39Ar isochron date of 631.3 ± 4.3 ka. Crystal faces on zircons from both members yield a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 626.5 ± 5.8 ka, and have trace element concentrations that vary with the eruptive stratigraphy. Zircon interiors yield a mean 206Pb/238U date of 659.8 ± 5.5 ka, and reveal reverse and/or oscillatory zoning of trace element concentrations, with many crystals containing high U concentration cores that likely grew from highly evolved melt. The occurrence of distal Lava Creek tephra in stratigraphic sequences marking the Marine Isotope Stage 16-15 transition supports the apparent eruption age of ˜631 ka. The combined results reveal that Lava Creek zircons record episodic heating, renewed crystallization, and an overall up-temperature evolution for Yellowstone's subvolcanic reservoir in the 103-104 year interval before eruption.

  19. Age of the Lava Creek supereruption and magma chamber assembly at Yellowstone based on 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dating of sanidine and zircon crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matthews, Naomi E.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    The last supereruption from the Yellowstone Plateau formed Yellowstone caldera and ejected the >1000 km3 of rhyolite that composes the Lava Creek Tuff. Tephra from the Lava Creek eruption is a key Quaternary chronostratigraphic marker, in particular for dating the deposition of mid Pleistocene glacial and pluvial deposits in western North America. To resolve the timing of eruption and crystallization history for the Lava Creek magma, we performed (1) 40Ar/39Ar dating of single sanidine crystals to delimit eruption age and (2) ion microprobe U-Pb and trace-element analyses of the crystal faces and interiors of single zircons to date the interval of zircon crystallization and characterize magmatic evolution. Sanidines from the two informal members composing Lava Creek Tuff yield a preferred 40Ar/39Ar isochron date of 631.3 ± 4.3 ka. Crystal faces on zircons from both members yield a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 626.5 ± 5.8 ka, and have trace element concentrations that vary with the eruptive stratigraphy. Zircon interiors yield a mean 206Pb/238U date of 659.8 ± 5.5 ka, and reveal reverse and/or oscillatory zoning of trace element concentrations, with many crystals containing high U concentration cores that likely grew from highly evolved melt. The occurrence of distal Lava Creek tephra in stratigraphic sequences marking the Marine Isotope Stage 16–15 transition supports the apparent eruption age of ∼631 ka. The combined results reveal that Lava Creek zircons record episodic heating, renewed crystallization, and an overall up-temperature evolution for Yellowstone's subvolcanic reservoir in the 103−104 year interval before eruption.

  20. Direct Dating of Brittle Faults and Episodic Orogeny, illustrated by Illite Age Analysis of Major Thrusts in the Canadian Rocky Mountains (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, B.; Pana, D.

    2013-12-01

    Illitization is a common process in shallow fault rocks, which allows direct dating of faulting through a combination of illite polytype quantification from XRD analysis and Ar-Ar encapsulation dating of multiple grain size fractions of clay gouge. The application of Illite Age Analysis (IAA) to fault rocks has the benefit that very small sample volumes can be analyzed, that potassium and argon are measured simultaneously, and that it has high precision. Grain size fraction separation into 3-4 subsamples, typically in the range of <2.0 μm to <0.02 μm, and illite characterization and quantification using modeling of XRD spectra that determines the relative abundance of detrital (2M1) and authigenic (1M/1Md) polytypes, are key to obtaining geologically meaningful results. Both a total gas age, incorporating the recoiled argon fraction after irradiation, and a retention age, omitting the recoiled fraction, are determined for each grain size population. The respective application of these ages is a function of effective illite crystallite thickness, which is determined from XRD patterns and the Scherrer equation. Total gas ages are representative of crystallite sizes on the order of thicknesses obtained from the Ar recoil percentage (<10-15nm), while retention ages are representative of thicker crystallites. Plotting [apparent age] v. [authigenic/detrital illite ratio] for each size fraction and using York data regression produces a lower intercept and error that dates gouge formation (authigenic illite), and an upper intercept and error that reflects phyllosilicate ages in the host rock (detrital illite). Regional application of IAA to 18 fault gouge sites along major thrusts in addition to selected host rocks in the Canadian Rocky Mountains shows that this fold-thrust belt formed through a series of four, eastward-propagating orogenic pulses. In the Main ranges, thrust range from 158-149 Ma, coinciding with Late Jurassic deposition of Kootenay

  1. Potential for timing high-energy marine inundation events in the recent geological past through age-dating of reef boulders in Fiji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, James P.; Etienne, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    Transported coastal boulders have increasingly come to represent a valuable element of investigations within the broader framework of multi-proxy approaches applied to coastal hazard studies. Through a case study on Taveuni Island in Fiji, this paper outlines some approaches and hindrances to effective timing of prehistorical high-energy marine inundation events (storms and tsunamis) on tropical coastlines from the evidence of reef-platform carbonate boulders. Various sources of errors are outlined that investigators must consider when attempting to use carbonate boulder ages as a surrogate for timing past events. On Taveuni, uranium : thorium dates with a high level of precision (1-7 years) suggest that major inundation events have a return period of approximately 40-45 years since 1650 AD. Of particular importance, considerably different age dates are provided by coral samples sourced from the top and bottom (i.e. opposite faces) of individual boulders, so highlighting interpretation biases that must be avoided.

  2. Age determination of nephrite by in-situ SIMS U-Pb dating syngenetic titanite: A case study of the nephrite deposit from Luanchuan, Henan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xiao-Xiao; Schmädicke, Esther; Li, Qiu-Li; Gose, Jürgen; Wu, Rui-Hua; Wang, Shi-Qi; Liu, Yu; Tang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xian-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Nephrite is a kind of valuable jade which forms during metamorphism under greenschist facies conditions. Most investigations focus on the genesis of nephrite, however, the formation age of nephrite remains poorly constrained due to the lack of suitable dating methods. In this paper, the petrological, chemical characteristics, and mineral inclusions of nephrite collected from Luanchuan, Henan, China have been studied by optical and electron microscopy and wavelength-dispersive electron microprobe (EMP). The petrological observations show that nephrite consists mainly of tremolite, minor calcite and titanite, occasionally with rutile, quartz, serpentine, chlorite, pyrite, and apatite. The titanite and tremolite which are intergrown with each other share low-energy grain boundaries. It indicates that the two phases are equilibrated and can be considered as cogenetic. The chemical composition of tremolite is high in Si, Mg, Ca, but low in Fe, Cr, and Ni, which indicates that the nephrite from Luanchuan belongs to the dolomite type rather than the serpentinite type. The petrography of different nephrite structures suggests that the grain size of tremolite was determined by the stress intensity undergone during the nephrite formation progress. In-situ Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) U-Pb dating of titanite from nephrite yielded an age of 361 ± 4 Ma, which is the first estimate for the time of formation of the Luanchuan nephrite deposit. This investigation provides a powerful in-situ dating method to unravel the age of nephrite, which could be served as a tool for future research on other nephrite deposits.

  3. Testing the applicability of six macroscopic skeletal aging techniques on a modern Southeast Asian sample.

    PubMed

    Gocha, Timothy P; Ingvoldstad, Megan E; Kolatorowicz, Adam; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Meghan-Tomasita J; Sciulli, Paul W

    2015-04-01

    Most macroscopic skeletal aging techniques used by forensic anthropologists have been developed and tested only on reference material from western populations. This study examined the performance of six aging techniques on a known age sample of 88 Southeast Asian individuals. Methods examined included the Suchey-Brooks method of aging the symphyseal face of the os pubis (Brooks and Suchey, Hum. Evol. 5 (1990) 227), Buckberry and Chamberlain's, Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 119 (2002) 231 and Osborne et al.'s, J. Forensic Sci. 49 (2004) 1 revisions of the Lovejoy et al., Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 68 (1985) 15 method of aging the auricular surface of the ilium, İşcan et al.'s, J. Forensic Sci. 29 (1984) 1094, İşcan et al.'s, J. Forensic Sci. 30 (1985) 853 method of aging the sternal end of the fourth rib, and Meindl and Lovejoy's, Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 68 (1985) 57 methods for aging both lateral-anterior and vault sutures on the cranium. The results of this study indicate that application of aging techniques commonly used in forensic anthropology to individuals identified as Asian, and more specifically Southeast Asian, should not be undertaken injudiciously. Of the six individual methods tested here, the Suchey-Brooks pubic symphysis aging method performs best, though average age estimates were still off by nearly 10 years or greater. Methods for aging the auricular surface perform next best, though the Osborne et al. method works better for individuals below 50 years and the Buckberry and Chamberlain method works better for those above 50 years. Methods for age estimation from the sternal ends of the fourth rib and vault and lateral-anterior cranial sutures perform poorly and are not recommended for use on remains of Southeast Asian ancestry. Combining age estimates from multiple indicators, specifically the pubic symphysis and one auricular surface method, was superior to individual methods. Data and a worked example are provided for calculating the conditional

  4. No Relative Age Effect in the Birth Dates of Award-Winning Athletes in Male Professional Team Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Paul R.; Williams, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Athletes born early within an annual youth age-group selection year are probably more likely to be selected for sports teams and talent development programs than those born later in that year. Overrepresentation of these relatively older athletes in youth and adult sport is known as the relative age effect (RAE). RAEs were found in these popular…

  5. An in-situ K-Ar isochron dating method for planetary landers using a spot-by-spot laser-ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yuichiro; Sugita, Seiji; Miura, Yayoi N.; Okazaki, Ryuji; Iwata, Naoyoshi; Morota, Tomokatsu; Kameda, Shingo

    2016-09-01

    Age is essential information for interpreting the geologic record on planetary surfaces. Although crater counting has been widely used to estimate the planetary surface ages, crater chronology in the inner solar system is largely built on radiometric age data from limited sites on the Moon. This has resulted in major uncertainty in planetary chronology. Because opportunities for sample-return missions are limited, in-situ geochronology measurements from one-way lander/rover missions are extremely valuable. Here we developed an in-situ isochron-based dating method using the K-Ar system, with K and Ar in a single rock sample extracted locally by laser ablation and measured using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), respectively. We built an experimental system combining flight-equivalent instruments and measured K-Ar ages for mineral samples with known ages (~1.8 Ga) and K contents (1-8 wt%); we achieved precision of 20% except for a mineral with low mechanical strength. Furthermore, validation measurements with two natural rocks (gneiss slabs) obtained K-Ar isochron ages and initial 40Ar consistent with known values for both cases. This result supports that our LIBS-MS approach can derive both isochron ages and contributions of non-in situ radiogenic 40Ar from natural rocks. Error assessments suggest that the absolute ages of key geologic events including the Noachian/Hesperian- and the Hesperian/Amazonian-transition can be dated with 10-20% errors for a rock containing ~1 wt% K2O, greatly reducing the uncertainty of current crater chronology models on Mars.

  6. State of the Art Assessment of NDE Techniques for Aging Cable Management in Nuclear Power Plants FY2015

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, Samuel W.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Dib, Gerges; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Jones, Anthony M.; Hartman, Trenton S.

    2015-09-08

    This milestone report presents an update on the state-of-the-art review and research being conducted to identify key indicators of in-containment cable aging at nuclear power plants (NPPs), and devise in-situ measurement techniques that are sensitive to these key indicators. The motivation for this study stems from the need to address open questions related to nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aging cables for degradation detection and estimation of condition-based remaining service life. These questions arise within the context of a second round of license extension for NPPs that would extend the operating license to 60 and 80 years. Within the introduction, a review of recently published U.S. and international research and guidance for cable aging management programs including NDE technologies is provided. As with any “state-of-the-art” report, the observations are deemed accurate as of the publication date but cannot anticipate evolution of the technology. Moreover, readers are advised that research and development of cable NDE technology is an ongoing issue of global concern.

  7. Using an independent geochronology based on palaeomagnetic secular variation (PSV) and atmospheric Pb deposition to date Baltic Sea sediments and infer 14C reservoir age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougheed, Bryan C.; Snowball, Ian; Moros, Matthias; Kabel, Karoline; Muscheler, Raimund; Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Wacker, Lukas

    2012-05-01

    Dating of sediment cores from the Baltic Sea has proven to be difficult due to uncertainties surrounding the 14C reservoir age and a scarcity of macrofossils suitable for dating. Here we present the results of multiple dating methods carried out on cores in the Gotland Deep area of the Baltic Sea. Particular emphasis is placed on the Littorina stage (8 ka ago to the present) of the Baltic Sea and possible changes in the 14C reservoir age of our dated samples. Three geochronological methods are used. Firstly, palaeomagnetic secular variations (PSV) are reconstructed, whereby ages are transferred to PSV features through comparison with varved lake sediment based PSV records. Secondly, lead (Pb) content and stable isotope analysis are used to identify past peaks in anthropogenic atmospheric Pb pollution. Lastly, 14C determinations were carried out on benthic foraminifera (Elphidium spec.) samples from the brackish Littorina stage of the Baltic Sea. Determinations carried out on smaller samples (as low as 4 μg C) employed an experimental, state-of-the-art method involving the direct measurement of CO2 from samples by a gas ion source without the need for a graphitisation step - the first time this method has been performed on foraminifera in an applied study. The PSV chronology, based on the uppermost Littorina stage sediments, produced ten age constraints between 6.29 and 1.29 cal ka BP, and the Pb depositional analysis produced two age constraints associated with the Medieval pollution peak. Analysis of PSV data shows that adequate directional data can be derived from both the present Littorina saline phase muds and Baltic Ice Lake stage varved glacial sediments. Ferrimagnetic iron sulphides, most likely authigenic greigite (Fe3S4), present in the intermediate Ancylus Lake freshwater stage sediments acquire a gyroremanent magnetisation during static alternating field (AF) demagnetisation, preventing the identification of a primary natural remanent magnetisation for

  8. Advantages of conducting in-situ U-Pb age dating of multiple U-bearing minerals from a single complex: Case in point - the Oka Carbonatite Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Simonetti, A.

    2012-12-01

    A detailed radiometric investigation is currently underway focusing on U-bearing accessory minerals apatite, perovskite, and niocalite from the Oka Carbonatite Complex (Canada). One of the main objectives is to obtain a comparative chronology of melt crystallization for the complex. Unlike other commonly adopted U-bearing minerals (e.g., zircon, monazite) for in-situ dating investigations, apatite, perovskite, and niocalite contain relatively high contents of common Pb. Hence, careful assessment of the proportion and composition of the common Pb, and usage of appropriate matrix-matched external standards are imperative. The Madagascar apatite was utilized as the external standard for apatite dating, and the Emerald Lake and Durango apatites were adopted as secondary standards; the latter yield ages of 92.6 ±1.8 and 32.2 ±1.1 Ma, respectively, and these are identical to their accepted ages. Pb/U ages for apatite from Oka were obtained for different rock types, including 8 carbonatites, 4 okaites, 3 ijolites and 3 alnoites, and these define a range of ages between ~105 and ~135 Ma; this result suggests a protracted crystallization history. In total, 266 individual analyses define two peaks at ~115 and ~125Ma. For perovskite dating, the Ice River perovskite standard was utilized as the external standard. The perovskites from one okaite sample yield an age of 112.2 ±1.9 Ma, and is much younger than the previously reported U-Pb perovskite age of 131 ±7 Ma. Hence, the combined U-Pb perovskite ages also suggest a rather prolonged time of melt crystallization. Niocalite is a rare, accessory silicate mineral that occurs within the carbonatites at Oka. The international zircon standard BR266 was selected for use as the external standard and rastering was employed to minimize the Pb-U fractionation. Two niocalite samples give young ages at 110.6 ±1.2 and 115.0 ±1.9 Ma, and are identical to their respective apatite ages (given associated uncertainties) from the same

  9. A test of the 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique on some terrestrial materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1971-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra were determined for 10 terrestrial rock and mineral samples whose geologic history is known from independent evidence. The spectra for six mineral and whole rock samples, including biotite, feldspar, hornblende, muscovite, and granodiorite, that have experienced post-crystallization heating did not reveal the age of crystallization in any obvious way. Minima in the spectra, however, give reasonable maximum ages for reheating and high-temperature maxima can be interpreted as minimum crystallization ages. High-temperature ages of microcline and albite that have not been reheated are approximately 10% younger than the known crystallization age. Apparently there are no domains in these feldspars that have retained radiogenic 40Ar quantitatively. Spectra from two diabase samples that contain significant quantities of excess argon might mistakenly be interpreted as spectra from reheated samples and do not give the age of emplacement. The 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique may be a potentially valuable tool for the study of geologic areas with complex histories, but the interpretation of age spectra from terrestrial samples seems to be more difficult than suggested by some previous studies. ?? 1971.

  10. Interactions between hatch dates, growth rates, and mortality of Age-0 native Rainbow Smelt and nonnative Alewife in Lake Champlain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrish, Donna; Simonin, Paul W.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Pientka, Bernard; Sullivan, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Timing of hatch in fish populations can be critical for first-year survival and, therefore, year-class strength and subsequent species interactions. We compared hatch timing, growth rates, and subsequent mortality of age-0 Rainbow Smelt Osmerus mordax and Alewife Alosa pseudoharengus, two common open-water fish species of northern North America. In our study site, Lake Champlain, Rainbow Smelt hatched (beginning May 26) almost a month earlier than Alewives (June 20). Abundance in the sampling area was highest in July for age-0 Rainbow Smelt and August for age-0 Alewives. Late-hatching individuals of both species grew faster than those hatching earlier (0.6 mm/d versus 0.4 for Rainbow Smelt; 0.7 mm/d versus 0.6 for Alewives). Mean mortality rate during the first 45 d of life was 3.4%/d for age-0 Rainbow Smelt and was 5.5%/d for age-0 Alewives. Alewife mortality rates did not differ with hatch timing but daily mortality rates of Rainbow Smelt were highest for early-hatching fish. Cannibalism is probably the primary mortality source for age-0 Rainbow Smelt in this lake. Therefore, hatching earlier may not be advantageous because the overlap of adult and age-0 Rainbow Smelt is highest earlier in the season. However, Alewives, first documented in Lake Champlain in 2003, may increase the mortality of age-0 Rainbow Smelt in the summer, which should favor selection for earlier hatching.

  11. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  12. Age of the Lava Creek supereruption and magma chamber assembly at Yellowstone based on 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dating of sanidine and zircon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Matthews, N. E.; Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    The last supereruption from the Yellowstone Plateau formed Yellowstone caldera and ejected the >1000 km3 of rhyolite that composes the Lava Creek Tuff (LCT). Tephra from the eruption blanketed much of the western United States, and is a key Quaternary chronostratigraphic marker, in particular for dating deposition of mid-Pleistocene glacial and pluvial deposits in western North America. We performed 40Ar/39Ar dating of single sanidines to delimit eruption age, and ion microprobe U-Pb and trace-element analyses of crystal faces on single zircons to characterize magmatic evolution and date near-eruption crystallization, as well as analyses of crystal interiors to date the interval of zircon crystallization. Sanidines from the two LCT members A and B yield an 40Ar/39Ar isochron date of 631 ± 4 ka (2σ). Crystal faces on zircons from both members yield a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 627 ± 6 ka (2σ) and have trace element concentrations that vary with eruptive stratigraphy. Zircon interiors yield a weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 660 ± 6 ka, and reveal reverse and/or oscillatory zoning of trace element concentrations, with many crystals containing high-U concentrations and dark cathodoluminescence (CL) cores. These crystals with high-U cores are possibly sourced from 'defrosting' of melt-impregnated margins of the growing subvolcanic reservoir. LCT sanidines mirror the variation of zircon composition within the eruptive stratigraphy, with crystals from upper LCT-A and basal LCT-B having bright-CL rims with high Ba concentrations, suggesting late crystallization after addition of less evolved silicic magma. The occurrence of distal LCT in stratigraphic sequences marking the Marine Isotope Stage 16-15 transition supports the apparent eruption age of ca. 631 ka. These results reveal that Lava Creek zircons record episodic heating, renewed crystallization, and an overall up-temperature evolution for Yellowstone's subvolcanic reservoir in the 103-104 year interval

  13. Age determination for Ultracool Dwarfs .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.

    Brown dwarfs are notoriously difficult to age date as they lack stable hydrogen burning hence main-sequence star age-dating techniques are inapplicable for their masses. However precise and accurate ages for individual sources are required to determine masses and disentangle how secondary parameters such as differing metallicity, cloud structure and gravity impact observables. In this contribution, I review age-dating techniques for brown dwarfs as well as ``piggy-back" techniques that rely on co-moving, higher mass, main-sequence stars for which Gaia may substantially increase the sample.

  14. Accuracy and sampling error of two age estimation techniques using rib histomorphometry on a modern sample.

    PubMed

    García-Donas, Julieta G; Dyke, Jeffrey; Paine, Robert R; Nathena, Despoina; Kranioti, Elena F

    2016-02-01

    Most age estimation methods are proven problematic when applied in highly fragmented skeletal remains. Rib histomorphometry is advantageous in such cases; yet it is vital to test and revise existing techniques particularly when used in legal settings (Crowder and Rosella, 2007). This study tested Stout & Paine (1992) and Stout et al. (1994) histological age estimation methods on a Modern Greek sample using different sampling sites. Six left 4th ribs of known age and sex were selected from a modern skeletal collection. Each rib was cut into three equal segments. Two thin sections were acquired from each segment. A total of 36 thin sections were prepared and analysed. Four variables (cortical area, intact and fragmented osteon density and osteon population density) were calculated for each section and age was estimated according to Stout & Paine (1992) and Stout et al. (1994). The results showed that both methods produced a systemic underestimation of the individuals (to a maximum of 43 years) although a general improvement in accuracy levels was observed when applying the Stout et al. (1994) formula. There is an increase of error rates with increasing age with the oldest individual showing extreme differences between real age and estimated age. Comparison of the different sampling sites showed small differences between the estimated ages suggesting that any fragment of the rib could be used without introducing significant error. Yet, a larger sample should be used to confirm these results. PMID:26698389

  15. Data from radar images integrated with information from traditional lithologic and dating techniques improve resolution of surficial geologic units in the central Florida peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    McCartan, L.; Moy, W.S.; Wingard, G.L. Owens, J.P.; Kover, A.N.; Van Valkenburg, S.G.; Mason, D.B. )

    1994-03-01

    Side Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) images provide information useful to 1:100,000-scale surficial geologic mapping across the Florida peninsula from Sarasota to Fort Pierce. The SLAR images show textural patterns, sharp gradients, and certain compositional variations that cause differences in reflectivity. Quaternary and Pliocene beach ridges and marginal marine plains, visible on SLAR images, occupy most of the eastern half of the area; the most prominent beach ridge, which was deposited during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene, is the southern terminus of the central highlands of Florida. Other geologic features detected by radar are a change from iron-poor to moderately iron-rich soil that marks the boundary between two middle Quaternary ( ) units, oyster reefs associated with late Pleistocene bay deposits northwest of Lake Okeechobee, and permanent and ephemeral ponds that reflect the thickness of unconsolidated sediment over weathered carbonate rocks. In addition to the geomorphic and compositional information from SLAR, mineralogic, textural, and age data from drill holes and pits were used to delineate surficial geologic map units. Stratigraphic and numerical age estimates are based on molluscan biostratigraphy, uranium disequilibrium series dates on corals, [sup 87]Sr/[sup 66]Sr dates on molluscs, and [sup 14]C dates on peat and humate.

  16. High precision dating of mass extinction events: a combined zircon geochronology, apatite tephrochronology, and Bayesian age modelling approach of the Permian-Triassic boundary extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baresel, Björn; Bucher, Hugo; Brosse, Morgane; Bagherpour, Borhan; Schaltegger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Chemical abrasion isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (CA-ID-TIMS) U-Pb dating of single-zircon crystals is preferably applied to tephra beds intercalated in sedimentary sequences. By assuming that the zircon crystallization age closely approximate that of the volcanic eruption and ash deposition, U-Pb zircon geochronology is the preferred approach for dating mass extinction events (such as the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinction) in the sedimentary record. As tephra from large volcanic eruptions is often transported over long distances, it additionally provide an invaluable tool for stratigraphic correlation across distant geologic sections. Therefore, the combination of high-precision zircon geochronology with apatite chemistry of the same tephra bed (so called apatite tephrochronology) provides a robust fingerprint of one particular volcanic eruption. In addition we provide coherent Bayesian model ages for the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) mass extinction, then compare it with PTB model ages at Meishan after Burgess et al. (2014). We will present new high-precision U-Pb zircon dates for a series of volcanic ash beds in deep- and shallow-marine Permian-Triassic sections in the Nanpanjiang Basin, South China. In addition, apatite crystals out of the same ash beds were analysed focusing on their halogen (F, Cl) and trace-element (e.g. Fe, Mg, REE) chemistry. We also show that Bayesian age models produce reproducible results from different geologic sections. On the basis of these data, including litho- and biostratigraphic correlations, we can precisely and accurately constrain the Permian-Triassic boundary in an equatorial marine setting, and correlate tephra beds over different sections and facies in the Nanpanjiang Basin independently from litho-, bio- or chemostratigraphic criteria. The results evidence that data produced in laboratories associated to the global EARTHTIME consortium can provide age information at the 0.05% level of 206

  17. Age depth model construction of the upper section of ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project based on the high-resolution 14C dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, H.; Nakamura, T.; Neugebauer, I.; Schwab, M. J.; Brauer, A.; Goldstein, S. L.; Stein, M.

    2014-12-01

    To reconstruct environmental, climatic and tectonic histories of the Levant, a deep drilling has been accomplished in the northern basin of the Dead Sea during the fall winter of 2010-2011 by the Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) in the framework of the ICDP program. The sediment cores from site 5017-1 (water depth of ~300 m) recorded the paleoenvironmental and paleohydrological changes in the Dead Sea and the Levant during the last two glacial-interglacial cycles (Neugebauer et al., QSR in press). To provide precise timing of sedimentological - limnological events in the lake and its watershed, and more critically the relative timing of these events, radiocarbon dating of >70 well-preserved terrestrial plants and some carbonate deposits from the upper 150 m long section of the sediment core were performed. Based on the high-resolution radiocarbon dating, a statistical age-depth model was constructed with assumptions on the deposition condition and the radiocarbon age offset of carbonate samples. We discuss the practicality and the limitation of the age-depth model toward interpreting the high-resolution records of environmental, climatic and tectonic events recorded in the long sediment cores from site 5017-1.

  18. On the age of the Onverwacht Group, Swaziland sequence, South Africa. [radioactive dating of stratified igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, B.-M.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1974-01-01

    Some rocks of the Onverwacht Group, South Africa, have been analyzed for Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr isotopic composition. These rocks include volcanic rocks, layered ultramafic differentiates and cherty sediments. Whole rock data indicate that the Rb-Sr isotopic systems in many samples were open and yield no reasonable isochron relationships. However, the data of mineral separates from a basaltic komatiite define a good isochron of 3.50 (plus or minus .2) b.y. with an initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio of 0.70048 plus or minus 5. The orthodox interpretation of this age is the time of the low grade metamorphism. It is reasonable to assume that the age of 3.50 b.y. might also represent the time of initial Onverwacht volcanism and deposition. The initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio obtained above is important to an understanding of the Sr isotopic composition of the Archean upper mantle.

  19. Dating the incision of the Yangtze River gorge at the First Bend using three-nuclide burial ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhillips, Devin; Hoke, Gregory D.; Liu-Zeng, Jing; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.; Niedermann, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Incision of the Yangtze River gorge is widely interpreted as evidence for lower crustal flow beneath the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Previous work focused on the onset of incision, but the duration of incision remains unknown. Here we present cosmogenic nuclide burial ages of sediments collected from caves on the walls of the gorge that show the gorge was incised ~1 km sometime between 18 and 9 Ma. Thereafter, incision slowed substantially. We resolve middle Miocene burial ages by using three nuclides and accounting for in situ muogenic production. This approach explains the absolute concentrations of 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne, as well as 26Al/10Be and 21Ne/10Be ratios. A declining incision rate challenges existing geodynamic interpretations by suggesting that either (1) surface uplift has ceased immediately south of the plateau margin or (2) gorge incision is not a useful proxy for the timing of surface uplift.

  20. Dating Melt Rock 63545 By Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd: Age of Imbrium; Spa Dress Rehearsal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C. Y.; Reese, Y. D.

    2011-01-01

    Apollo 16 sample 63545 was initially described as one of a group of 19 generally rounded, fine-grained, crystalline rocks that were collected as rake samples [1]. This 16 g "rocklet" was collected at Station 13 on the ejecta blanket of North Ray Crater at the foot of Smoky Mountain [2]. Originally classified as a Very High Alumina (VHA) basalt on geochemical grounds [3], it was later argued to be an impact melt rock [4]. Here we report a Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic study that shows that some portions of the rock failed to reach isotopic equilibrium on last melting in agreement with the impact melt rock interpretation. Nevertheless, by omitting mineral fractions that are discordant with the majority of the data, we arrive at the time of last melting as 3.88 plus or minus 0.05 Ga ago. This age is in agreement with the Ar-39/Ar-40 plateau age of 3839 plus or minus 23 Ma [5], if the latter is adjusted for the 1.4-1.8% revision in the age of the hornblende monitor [6]. This investigation was undertaken in part as proof-of-concept for SPA-basin sample return.

  1. Direct dating of hydrothermal W mineralization: U-Pb age for hübnerite (MnWO 4), Sweet Home Mine, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, Rolf L.; Lüders, Volker

    2006-09-01

    We have investigated the potential of hübnerite for U-Pb dating. Hübnerite forms typically at medium to low-temperatures in a wide range of pneumatolytic-hydrothermal mineral deposits, particularly porphyry molybdenum and Sn-specialized granites. Hübnerite from the Sweet Home Mine (Alma, Colorado) formed in a Pb-rich, U-poor environment, but still developed relatively radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions. The low Pb common contents in hübnerite (0.075 to 0.155 ppm) demonstrate that Pb is efficiently excluded from the crystal lattice. In contrast, U may substitute for Mn. The U-Pb data of hübnerite scatter. Most of the scatter originates from samples with 206Pb/ 204Pb values below 50, where Pb blank contributes up to 30% to Pb total. Using the least radiogenic galena Pb, samples with 206Pb/ 204Pb values above 70 have overlapping 206Pb∗/ 238U and 207Pb∗/ 235U values and yield a 206Pb/ 238U age of 25.7 ± 0.3 Ma (2σ). Late stage apatite from the Sweet Home Mine yields a 206Pb/ 204Pb- 238U/ 204Pb isochron corresponding to an age of 24.8 ± 0.5 Ma (2σ). A comparison of the U-Pb hübnerite ages with literature 40Ar/ 39Ar ages on earlier sericite and the U-Pb age on later apatite suggests that (i) hübnerite yields accurate U-Pb ages and (ii) the evolution of the Sweet Home mineralization from greisen-type mineralization to medium-temperature hydrothermal vein mineralization took place in a few hundred thousand years at most. Aqueous low-N 2-bearing and aqueous inclusions in the dated hübnerite have homogenization temperatures between 325 and 356 °C and moderate salinity (up to 6.7 wt% NaCl equiv.). Thus, hübnerite represents one of the rare examples of a mineral that can be dated accurately and carries petrological information.

  2. 210Pb dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Roughly fifty years ago, a small group of scientists from Belgium and the United States, trying to better constrain ice sheet accumulation rates, attempted to apply what was then know about environmental lead as a potential geochronometer. Thus Goldberg (1963) developed the first principles of the 210Pb dating method, which was soon followed by a paper by Crozaz et al. (1964), who examined accumulation history of Antarctic snow using 210Pb. Shortly thereafter, Koide et al. (1972, 1973) adapted this technique to unravel sediment deposition and accumulation records in deep-sea environments. Serendipitously, they chose to work in a deep basin off California, where an independent and robust age model had already been developed. Krishanswami et al. (1971) extended the use of this technique to lacustrine deposits to reconstruct depositional histories of lake sediment, and maybe more importantly, contaminant inputs and burial. Thus, the powerful tool for dating recent (up to about one century old) sediment deposits was established and soon widely adopted. Today almost all oceanographic or limnologic studies that address recent depositional reconstructions employ 210Pb as one of several possible geochronometers (Andrews et al., 2009; Gale, 2009; Baskaran, 2011; Persson and Helms, 2011). This paper presents a short overview of the principles of 210Pb dating and provides a few examples that illustrate the utility of this tracer in contrasting depositional systems. Potential caveats and uncertainties (Appleby et al., 1986; Binford, 1990; Binford et al., 1993; Smith, 2001; Hancock et al., 2002) inherent to the use and interpretation of 210Pb-derived age-models are also introduced. Recommendations as to best practices for most reliable uses and reporting are presented in the summary.

  3. Zircon U-Pb dating from the mafic enclaves in the Tanzawa Tonalitic Pluton, Japan: Implications for arc history and formation age of the lower-crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazue; Yamamoto, Shinji; Sawaki, Yusuke; Aoki, Kazumasa; Omori, Soichi; Kon, Yoshiaki; Hirata, Takafumi; Li, Yibing; Takaya, Yutaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Kato, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Shigenori

    2014-05-01

    The petro-chemical characteristics of the arc lower-crust, important for understanding continental growth, have been rarely obtained because of their scarcity at the surface of the Earth. To constrain the formation age of the arc lower-crust, U-Pb zircon dating was applied to mafic enclaves in tonalites of the Tanzawa Tonalitic Pluton (TTP), which is regarded as the exposed middle crust of the former Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, using a laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS).

  4. Dating slate belts using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and zircon ages from crosscutting plutons: A case study from east-central Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Hind; Kunk, Michael; Ludman, Allan; Bish, David; Wintsch, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Determining the tectonic significance of slate belts is a persistent problem in many orogenic belts because of the lack of time constraints on the age of deposition and the age(s) of cleavages. We have solved this problem in east-central Maine where the ages of the regional Acadian cleavage (S1) and local ductile fault zone cleavage (S2) were both constrained using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and the ages of crosscutting plutons. Applying 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to rocks with multiple generations of muscovite was possible because each cleavage-forming muscovite records a crystallization age rather than a cooling age due to the low grade of regional metamorphism. Evidence for metamorphic crystallization in rocks dominated by regional Acadian cleavage (S1) comes from the truncations of detrital and authigenic muscovite and chlorite grains by new muscovite and chlorite grains that define the S1 foliation. In rocks that display two foliations, the evidence comes from the truncations of chlorite and muscovite grains defining all earlier fabrics by new muscovite grains in the younger folia (S2). Step-heating experiments using the 40Ar/39Ar technique on twelve samples all yielded sigmoidal age spectra. The low-temperature steps produced a hump in the age spectra, indicating 39Ar recoil into adjacent interlayered chlorite grains, the latter interlayering confirmed by back-scattered electron imaging. Continuing steps climbed steadily from those with minimum apparent ages as young as ~381 Ma to steps with maximum ages as old as 466 Ma. The samples with the lowest minimum apparent age steps are those in which the S2 cleavage-forming mica population dominates. In contrast, the oldest apparent age steps are from samples that have the highest modal abundance of detrital micas. The Middle Ordovician age of the maximum age steps is interpreted to be the minimum cooling age of the detrital micas. The minimum 40Ar/39Ar age steps of muscovite in the samples that display only S1 cleavage

  5. Refined depositional history and dating of the Tongaporutuan reference section, north Taranaki, New Zealand: new volcanic ash U-Pb zircon ages, biostratigraphy and sedimentation rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maier, K.L.; Crundwell, Martin P.; Coble, Matthew A.; Kingsley-Smith, Peter R.; Graham, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents new radiometric ages from volcanic ash beds within a c. 1900 m thick, progradational, deep-water clastic slope succession of late Miocene age exposed along the north Taranaki coast of the North Island, New Zealand. The ash beds yield U–Pb zircon ages ranging from 10.63 ± 0.65 Ma to 8.97 ± 0.22 Ma. The new ages are compatible with and provide corroboration of New Zealand Tongaporutuan Stage planktic foraminiferal and bolboformid biostratigraphic events identified in the same section. The close accord between these two age datasets provides a stratigraphically consistent and coherent basis for examining margin evolution. The arrival of a prograding clastic wedge and ensuing upward shoaling is recorded by sedimentation rates c. 2000 m/Ma–1 that are an order of magnitude higher than sedimentation rates on the precursor deep basin floor. This outcrop study provides new constraints for interpreting analogous subsurface deposits in Taranaki Basin and complements the regional late Miocene biostratigraphic dating framework.

  6. Anomalous radiocarbon ages from a Holocene detrital organic lens in Alaska and their implications for radiocarbon dating and paleoenvironmental reconstructions in the arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, R.E.; Carter, L.D.; Robinson, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven radiocarbon age determinations clearly show that a lens of Holocene fluvial organic debris on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain contains mostly pre-Holocene organic material. Radio-carbon ages of identified plant macrofossils indicate the material was deposited about 9000 to 9500 yr B.P. Radiocarbon analyses of bulk samples from this deposit, however, range from 13,300 to 30,300 yr B.P. Most of the old organic matter seems to be in the smaller size fractions in the deposit, particularly in the fraction between 0.25 and 0.5 mm, but all size fractions are contaminated. Particular caution must be exercised in submitting bulk samples for radiocarbon dating from areas where conditions favor redeposition of isotopically "dead" carbon. ?? 1988.

  7. The effects of acid leaching on 40Ar/39Ar age dating results using samples from the Walvis Ridge hotspot trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klath, J. F.; Koppers, A. A.; Heaton, D. E.; Schnur, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we systematically explore how acid leaching can be used to reduce the negative effects of seawater alteration on the 40Ar/39Ar age dating of submarine basalts. Koppers et al (2000) showed that acid leaching of groundmass samples generated more consistent ages as well as ages more concordant with phenocrystic mineral phases, compared to samples that were left untreated. By studying the effects of progressively increasing the strength and length of acid treatment, we will show how acid leaching of groundmass separates reduces alteration while leaving the initial eruption signature intact. Samples were chosen from the Walvis ridge hotspot trail in the southeast Atlantic. Three samples were selected based on degree and style of alteration. Two samples (basalt and basaltic andesite) appear highly altered in thin section. The basalt contains diffuse iddingsite alteration that is pervasive throughout the groundmass. The basaltic andesite displays focused secondary mineral phases within and around abundant vesicles. The third sample, a trachyte, shows relatively minor degrees of alteration in thin section. These groundmass separates were divided into four splits and treated with a progressively stronger acid and for longer duration. One split from each rock was left untreated to act as a baseline. Of the other three splits from each sample, one was treated with a mild leach (1N HCl and 1N HNO3), one a strong leach (1N HCl, 1N HNO3, 6N HCl, and 3N HNO3), and lastly the strong leach performed twice. The samples were then handpicked to remove any remaining visible alteration. The untreated samples were picked as well, removing the most distinctly altered grains. All splits were analyzed by electron microprobe, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and the incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar dating method. We will report on the results of an image analysis of microprobe backscatter images and elemental maps taken of individual groundmass grains. This analysis will show the location

  8. The Chemistry of Paper Preservation: Part 1. The Aging of Paper and Conservation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Henry A.

    1996-05-01

    This study provides an introduction to the problem of the aging of paper and the conservation techniques that are currently being employed in paper preservation. The chemical reactions that are responsible for the aging of paper are discussed with the conclusion that acid-catalyzed hydrolysis is the predominant mechanism for cellulose degradation and strength loss. A description and the chemistry of a number of mass deacidification methods are presented. The more viable deacidification methods include the DEZ, Wei T'o, FMC, Bookkeeper, Viennese, Book Preservation Associates, Sable and the Batelle processes. A summary of the literature on the evaluations of these processes is presented, and the benefits and limitations of the mass deacidification methods are discussed. Other conservation techniques such as paper strengthening, conservation bleaching, and pest control are briefly introduced, followed by an introduction to alkaline papermaking.

  9. Origins of the Iberomaurusian in NW Africa: new AMS radiocarbon dating of the Middle and Later Stone Age deposits at Taforalt Cave, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Barton, R N E; Bouzouggar, A; Hogue, J T; Lee, S; Collcutt, S N; Ditchfield, P

    2013-09-01

    Recent genetic studies based on the distribution of mtDNA of haplogroup U6 have led to subtly different theories regarding the arrival of modern human populations in North Africa. One proposes that groups of the proto-U6 lineage spread from the Near East to North Africa around 40-45 ka (thousands of years ago), followed by some degree of regional continuity. Another envisages a westward human migration from the Near East, followed by further demographic expansion at ∼22 ka centred on the Maghreb and associated with a microlithic bladelet culture known as the Iberomaurusian. In evaluating these theories, we report on the results of new work on the Middle (MSA) and Later Stone (LSA) Age deposits at Taforalt Cave in Morocco. We present 54 AMS radiocarbon dates on bone and charcoals from a sequence of late MSA and LSA occupation levels of the cave. Using Bayesian modelling we show that an MSA non-Levallois flake industry was present until ∼24.5 ka Cal BP (calibrated years before present), followed by a gap in occupation and the subsequent appearance of an LSA Iberomaurusian industry from at least 21,160 Cal BP. The new dating offers fresh light on theories of continuity versus replacement of populations as presented by the genetic evidence. We examine the implications of these data for interpreting the first appearance of the LSA in the Maghreb and providing comparisons with other dated early blade and bladelet industries in North Africa. PMID:23891007

  10. A new Late Triassic age for the Puesto Viejo Group (San Rafael depocenter, Argentina): SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating and biostratigraphic correlations across southern Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottone, Eduardo G.; Monti, Mariana; Marsicano, Claudia A.; de la Fuente, Marcelo S.; Naipauer, Maximiliano; Armstrong, Richard; Mancuso, Adriana C.

    2014-12-01

    The Puesto Viejo Group crops out in the San Rafael Block, southwest Mendoza, at approximately 35° S and 68°20‧ W. It consists of the basal mainly grayish Quebrada de los Fósiles Formation (QF) overlying by the reddish Río Seco de la Quebrada Formation (RSQ). The basal unit includes both plant remains (pleuromeians and sphenopsids) and vertebrates (scattered fish scales, dicynodont synapsids and remains of an archosauriform). In contrast, the RSQ beds have yielded only tetrapods, although a more diverse fauna. The latter includes cynodonts as Cynognathus, Pascualognathus and Diademodon, and also dicynodonts (Vinceria and Kannemeyeria). Based on the assemblage of tetrapod taxa the bearing levels were correlated to the Cynognathus AZ of South Africa and thus referred to the Middle Triassic (Anisian). We obtained a SHRIMP 238U/206Pb age of 235.8 ± 2.0 Ma from a rhyolitic ignimbrite interdigitated between the QF and RSQ formations at the Quebrada de los Fósiles section. This new radiometric date for the Puesto Viejo Group suggests that the tetrapod fauna in the RSQ beds existed, instead, during the Late Triassic (early Carnian) some 10 Ma later than the currently accepted age. Two scenarios might explain our results: first, the Cynognathus AZ of South Africa is wrongly assigned to the lower Middle Triassic (Anisan) and should be considered younger in age, Late Triassic (Carnian); second, the relative age of the Cynognathus AZ of South Africa is correct but the inferred range of Cynognathus and Diademodon is incorrect as they were present during the Late Triassic (Carnian) at least in South America. In any case, this new date pose serious doubts about the validity of biostratigraphic correlations based solely on tetrapod taxa, a common practice for Triassic continental successions across Gondwana.

  11. Rigid Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures for Patients Age 12 and Younger: Indications and Technique.

    PubMed

    Martus, Jeffrey E

    2016-06-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are common injuries in the pediatric and adolescent age groups. Rigid intramedullary nailing is an excellent treatment option for older children and adolescents, particularly for length-unstable fractures and larger patients (>49 kg). Appropriate indications, contraindications, and preoperative assessment are described. The rigid nailing surgical technique is detailed including positioning, operative steps, pearls, and pitfalls. Complications and the reported outcomes of lateral trochanteric entry nailing are reviewed from the published series. PMID:27100036

  12. Fiber Bragg Gratings, IT techniques and strain gauge validation for strain calculation on aged metal specimens.

    PubMed

    Montero, Ander; de Ocariz, Idurre Saez; Lopez, Ion; Venegas, Pablo; Gomez, Javier; Zubia, Joseba

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of calculating strains in aged F114 steel specimens with Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors and infrared thermography (IT) techniques. Two specimens have been conditioned under extreme temperature and relative humidity conditions making comparative tests of stress before and after aging using different adhesives. Moreover, a comparison has been made with IT techniques and conventional methods for calculating stresses in F114 steel. Implementation of Structural Health Monitoring techniques on real aircraft during their life cycle requires a study of the behaviour of FBG sensors and their wiring under real conditions, before using them for a long time. To simulate aging, specimens were stored in a climate chamber at 70 °C and 90% RH for 60 days. This study is framed within the Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) and Non Destructuve Evaluation (NDE) research lines, integrated into the avionics area maintained by the Aeronautical Technologies Centre (CTA) and the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU). PMID:22346619

  13. Fiber Bragg Gratings, IT Techniques and Strain Gauge Validation for Strain Calculation on Aged Metal Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Ander; de Ocariz, Idurre Saez; Lopez, Ion; Venegas, Pablo; Gomez, Javier; Zubia, Joseba

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of calculating strains in aged F114 steel specimens with Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors and infrared thermography (IT) techniques. Two specimens have been conditioned under extreme temperature and relative humidity conditions making comparative tests of stress before and after aging using different adhesives. Moreover, a comparison has been made with IT techniques and conventional methods for calculating stresses in F114 steel. Implementation of Structural Health Monitoring techniques on real aircraft during their life cycle requires a study of the behaviour of FBG sensors and their wiring under real conditions, before using them for a long time. To simulate aging, specimens were stored in a climate chamber at 70 °C and 90% RH for 60 days. This study is framed within the Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) and Non Destructuve Evaluation (NDE) research lines, integrated into the avionics area maintained by the Aeronautical Technologies Centre (CTA) and the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU). PMID:22346619

  14. A glacial chronology for post Little Ice Age glacier changes based on proglacial geomorphology, tree rings, OSL- and 14C-dating at Mt. Pulongu, southeastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loibl, David; Hochreuther, Philipp; Hülle, Daniela; Zhu, Haifeng; Lehmkuhl, Frank

    2014-05-01

    The remote eastern Nyainqêntanglha Range contains numerous temperate monsoonal glaciers which are highly sensitive to climate change. However, there is still a great lack of information on late Holocene glacier fluctuations and the factors driving these changes. We conducted field work at two large debris covered glaciers on the northern and southern slopes of Mt. Pulongu (~6,300 m a.s.l.). Detailed geomorphological mapping of the proglacial settings revealed similar patterns of two major and three minor/recessional glacial advances. At the northern glacier, tree ring dating for the moraines of the two major advances resulted in minimum ages of ~1670 AD and ~1745 AD, respectively. These Little Ice Age (LIA) ages are supported by geochemical measurements on glacial and glacio-fluvial sediments from these settings showing almost no signs of chemical weathering. Further evidence, including 14C-age and depositional characteristics of a buried tree, and moraine topography, suggest that the second advance was stronger but was hampered by a dead ice relict of the previous advance. At the northern glacier, this obstacle led to an ice tailback and subsequently to lateral moraine oversteepening and breaching, resulting in a large lateral glacier lobe. At the southern glacier, the valley is narrower and hence did not allow the formation of a lateral glacier lobe. However, the proglacial setting, i.e. pronounced push moraines, suggests a similar sequence of events. Furthermore, both settings contain two moraine-dammed lakes in similar positions. A combination of OSL-dating, tree ring based reconstruction of the local climate, and constraints from the proglacial geomorphological setting enabled the inclusion of the 3 minor moraine stages into the glacial chronology. This multiproxy-approach resulted in a well-established morphochronology with multiple direct and indirect dates that allow the reconstruction of the glacial fluctuations at Mt. Pulongu since the LIA. A regional

  15. MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS FOR M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: AGE DATING AND A SURPRISING METALLICITY TREND

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, Jay; Huchra, John P.; Smith, Graeme H.; Brodie, Jean P.

    2009-08-15

    We have obtained velocity dispersions from Keck high-resolution integrated spectroscopy of 10 M31 globular clusters (GCs), including three candidate intermediate-age GCs. We show that these candidates have the same V-band mass-to-light (M/L{sub V} ) ratios as the other GCs, implying that they are likely to be old. We also find a trend of derived velocity dispersion with wavelength, but cannot distinguish between a systematic error and a physical effect. Our new measurements are combined with photometric and spectroscopic data from the literature in a re-analysis of all M31 GC M/L{sub V} values. In a combined sample of 27 GCs, we show that the metal-rich GCs have lower M/L{sub V} than the metal-poor GCs, in conflict with predictions from stellar population models. Fragmentary data for other galaxies support this observation. The M31 GC fundamental plane is extremely tight, and we follow up an earlier suggestion by Djorgovski to show that the fundamental plane can be used to estimate accurate distances (potentially 10% or better)

  16. Using chemical, hydrologic, and age dating analysis to delineate redox processes and flow paths in the riparian zone of a glacial outwash aquifer-stream system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puckett, L.J.; Cowdery, T.K.; McMahon, P.B.; Tornes, L.H.; Stoner, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    A combination of chemical and dissolved gas analyses, chlorofluorocarbon age dating, and hydrologic measurements were used to determine the degree to which biogeochemical processes in a riparian wetland were responsible for removing NO3- from groundwaters discharging to the Otter Tail River in west central Minnesota. An analysis of river chemistry and flow data revealed that NO3- concentrations in the river increased in the lower half of the 8.3 km study reach as the result of groundwater discharge to the river. Groundwater head measurements along a study transect through the riparian wetland revealed a zone of groundwater discharge extending out under the river. On the basis of combined chemical, dissolved gas, age date, and hydrologic results, it was determined that water chemistry under the riparian wetland was controlled largely by upgradient groundwaters that followed flow paths up to 16 m deep and discharged under the wetland, creating a pattern of progressively older, more chemically reduced, low NO3- water the farther one progressed from the edge of the wetland toward the river. These findings pose challenges for researchers investigating biogeochemical processes in riparian buffer zones because the progressively older groundwaters entered the aquifer in earlier years when less NO3- fertilizer was being used. NO3- concentrations originally present in the groundwater had also decreased in the upgradient aquifer as a result of denitrification and progressively stronger reducing conditions there. The resulting pattern of decreasing NO3- concentrations across the riparian zone may be incorrectly interpreted as evidence of denitrification losses there instead of in the upgradient aquifer. Consequently, it is important to understand the hydrogeologic setting and age structure of the groundwaters being sampled in order to avgid misinterpreting biogeochemical processes in riparian zones.

  17. Mobility and age of black carbon in two temperate grassland soils revealed by differential scanning calorimetry and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifeld, Jens; Feng, Xiaojuan; Eglinton, Timothy; Wacker, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a natural component of soil organic matter (SOM) and abundant in many ecosystems. Its stability, due to its relative resistance to microbial decomposition, means it plays an important role in soil C sequestration. A recent review suggests that BC may be mobile in soil; hence, its contribution to a stable SOM pool may change over time due to its lateral or vertical reallocation (Rumpel et al. 2014). However, direct evidence of the mobility of BC, particularly with reference to its vertical mobility, is scarce. We studied the amount of BC in two temperate grassland fields (eutric clayey Camibsol,) that were established in 2001 on former cropland. Volumetric soil samples (0-50 cm, 5 cm increments) were taken at 10 spots in each field in 2001, 2006 and 2011. One of the fields was ploughed in 2007 and the sward was re-sown. BC content was measured by differential scanning calorimetry for a total number of c. 500 samples. The mean BC/OC ratio was 0.10 (±0.05) and reached 0.25 in some samples. Radiocarbon measurements from 24 bulk soil samples revealed relatively small 14C contents in 2001 (92±2.7 pMC) which increased over time (2006: 99.0±1.1 pMC; 2011: 99.1±1.1 pMC). Thermal fractionation of BC by DSC revealed calibrated BC ages of 400 to 1000 years (pMC 87-94), suggesting that BC originates from medieval and post-medieval fire clearings. The change in soil signature may have been caused by a preferential transport of old BC down the soil profile, leading to a selective enrichment of younger soil C over time. In line with this interpretation the DSC measurements suggest that in both fields, BC concentrations significantly decreased for most layers between 2001 and 2006. However, between 2006 and 2011, no further vertical reallocation was observed in the continuous grassland, whereas BC contents of the field ploughed in 2007 significantly increased in the top layers. Together, these data suggest that ploughing in 2001 triggered subsequent

  18. Fine-tuning of age integrating magnetostratigraphy, radiocarbon dating, and carbonate cyclicity: Example of lacustrine sediments from Heqing basin (Yunnan, China) covering the past 1 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shouyun; Goddu, Srinivasa Rao; Appel, Erwin; Verosub, Ken

    2007-05-01

    High-resolution magnetostratigraphy, wavelength spectra of carbonate cyclicities, and AMS radiocarbon dating are integrated to establish an optimum age model for a 168 m long drill core of lacustrine sediments from Heqing basin, Yunnan Province, southwestern China. A 14C age of 51.62 +2.42/-1.85 kyr BP is obtained at a depth of 7.3 m. Remanent magnetization is carried by maghemite and partly in addition by magnetite, both showing the same direction. The polarity sequence clearly reveals the Brunhes/Matuyama (B/M) boundary at 141.5 m. Blake Event is found between 16.3 and 17.5 m, and the upper boundary of Jaramillo is indicated at 167.0 m. Carbonate content and magnetic susceptibility were used for spectral analysis. Fourier analysis was done on the depth section for sliding windows with different window lengths. The spectra within the range of window centers (30-140 m) show a dominant long wavelength, which changes from about 18.5 m in the lower part (>65 m depth) to about 14.5 m in the upper part (<65 m depth) of the core. It is assumed that the long wavelength peak represents the 95-kyr Milankovitch eccentricity cycle. The B/M boundary and Blake Event match very well with this model, but the age of Jaramillo is strongly underestimated. Fourier spectra of sliding windows slightly indicate a drop of the sedimentation rate at the lowermost part of the core. An optimum age model is calculated by cubic spline interpolation using tie points from 14C dating, magnetostratigraphy ('true' ages of Blake Event, B/M boundary, and Jaramillo), and wavelengths of carbonate (change in sedimentation rate at 65 m). Alternative depth-to-age transfer functions were tested, i.e. a wavelength age model (using sedimentation rates with 14C as a tie point), a cyclostratigraphic model (using bandpass-filtered carbonate data corresponding to 95 kyr eccentricity cycles) and correlation of carbonate variations to the marine oxygen isotope curve. However, none of the approaches lead to a

  19. Management of Idiopathic Clubfoot by Ponseti Technique in Children Presenting After One Year of Age.

    PubMed

    Faizan, Mohammad; Jilani, Latif Zafar; Abbas, Mazhar; Zahid, Mohammad; Asif, Naiyer

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a study to determine the effectiveness of the Ponseti technique in the management of idiopathic congenital clubfoot in patients older than 1 year of age. A total of 19 patients with 28 clubfeet (16 males [84.2%], 3 females [15.8%]) were included in the present study. The mean age at presentation was 2.7 (range 1 to 3.5) years. The results of treatment using the Ponseti technique were evaluated using the Pirani and Dimeglio scoring systems. The mean precorrection total Pirani score was 4.84 (range 3.5 to 5.5) and the mean precorrection Dimeglio score was 12.96 (range 10 to 14). The mean postcorrection total Pirani score was 0.55 (range 0 to 1), and the mean postcorrection Dimeglio score was 2.32 (range 2 to 3). These differences were statistically significant (p < .001 and p < .001, respectively). In 92.8% of the feet, satisfactory correction of the deformity was achieved. The mean number of casts applied was 8 (range 5 to 12). All but 1 (3.6%) of the clubfeet required tenotomy to achieve correction. The mean follow-up duration was 2.7 (range 1.5 to 3.5) years. We have concluded that the Ponseti technique is an effective method for the management of idiopathic congenital clubfoot, even in toddlers. PMID:25128311

  20. Age and tectonic setting of Late Archean greenstone-gneiss terrain in Henan Province, China, as revealed by single-grain zircon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Kroener, A.; Compston, W.; Guo-wei, Z.; An-lin, G.; Todt, W.

    1988-03-01

    The authors report precise U-Pb zircon ages for single grains of a metarhyodacite from the Late Archean Dengfeng greenstone belt in Henan Province, China, near the southern margin of the North China craton. Most grains belong to an igneous population whose U-Pb isotopic systematics define a straight line intersecting concordia at 2512 +/- 12 Ma, and this is interpreted as the time of crystallization of the original greenstone volcanics. Several grains are distinctly older, between 2576 +/- 9 and 2945 +/- 44 Ma, and the authors interpret the older grains as xenocrysts of pre-greenstone continental crust that provide evidence for crustal derivation or crustal contamination of the original rhyodacitic lava. The xenocrysts suggest evolution of the Dengfeng greenstone belt in a continental environment that may be represented by the Taihua high-grade gneisses bordering the Dengfeng greenstones and for which the authors obtained ages of 2806 +/- 7 and 2841 +/- 6 Ma. The data add evidence to the now widely held concept that most Archean greenstones developed on or near older continental crust and were therefore prone to crustal contamination. In such cases, conventional zircon dating may not always record the precise age of rock formation.

  1. 10Be dating of the Narsarsuaq moraine in southernmost Greenland: evidence for a late-Holocene ice advance exceeding the Little Ice Age maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsor, K.; Carlson, A. E.; Rood, D. H.

    2014-08-01

    In southernmost Greenland near Narsarsuaq, the terminal Narsarsuaq moraine was deposited well outside of a historical Little Ice Age (LIA) moraine adjacent to the modern ice margin. Using 10Be surface exposure dating, we determine Narsarsuaq moraine abandonment at 1.51 ± 0.11 ka. A second set of 10Be ages from a more ice-proximal position shows that ice has been within or at its historical (i.e., LIA) extent since 1.34 ± 0.15 ka. Notably, Narsarsuaq moraine abandonment was coincident with climate amelioration in southern Greenland. Southern Greenland warming at ˜1.5 ka was also concurrent with the end of the Roman Warm Period as climate along the northern North Atlantic sector of Europe cooled into the Dark Ages. The warming of southern Greenland and retreat of ice from the Narsarsuaq moraine is consistent with studies suggesting possible anti-phase centennial-scale climate variability between northwestern Europe and southern Greenland. Other southernmost Greenland ice-margin records do not preclude a pre-LIA ice-margin maximum, potentially concurrent with a Narsarsuaq advance prior to ˜1.51 ka, but also lack sufficient ice-margin control to confirm such a correlation. We conclude that there is a clear need to further determine whether a late-Holocene pre-LIA maximum was a local phenomenon or a regional southern Greenland ice maximum, and if this advance and retreat reflects a regional fluctuation in climate.

  2. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Woolford, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ˜1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ˜17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ˜17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ˜35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  3. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  4. Dating Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents of Teens Crime, Teens, and Trauma Assault Bullying and Harassment Child Sexual Abuse Dating Violence Sexual ... Parents of Teens Crime, Teens, and Trauma Assault Bullying and Harassment Child Sexual Abuse Dating Violence Sexual ...

  5. Polymer Aging Techniques Applied to Degradation of a Polyurethane Propellant Binder

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, R.A.; Celina, M.; Graham, A.C.; Minier, L.M.

    1999-07-27

    The oxidative thermal aging of a crosslinked hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)/isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) polyurethane rubber, commonly used as the polymeric binder matrix in solid rocket propellants, was studied at temperatures of RT to 125 C. We investigate changes in tensile elongation, mechanical hardening, polymer network properties, density, O{sub 2} permeation and molecular chain dynamics using a range of techniques including solvent swelling, detailed modulus profiling and NMR relaxation measurements. Using extensive data superposition and highly sensitive oxygen consumption measurements, we critically evaluate the Arrhenius methodology, which normally assumes a linear extrapolation of high temperature aging data. Significant curvature in the Arrhenius diagram of these oxidation rates was observed similar to previous results found for other rubber materials. Preliminary gel/network properties suggest that crosslinking is the dominant process at higher temperatures. We also assess the importance of other constituents such as ammonium perchlorate or aluminum powder in the propellant formulation.

  6. Effects of age, system experience, and navigation technique on driving with an advanced traveler information system.

    PubMed

    Dingus, T A; Hulse, M C; Mollenhauer, M A; Fleischman, R N; McGehee, D V; Manakkal, N

    1997-06-01

    This paper explores the effects of age, system experience, and navigation technique on driving, navigation performance, and safety for drivers who used TravTek, an Advanced Traveler Information System. The first two studies investigated various route guidance configurations on the road in a specially equipped instrumented vehicle with an experimenter present. The third was a naturalistic quasi-experimental field study that collected data unobtrusively from more than 1200 TravTek rental car drivers with no in-vehicle experimenter. The results suggest that with increased experience, drivers become familiar with the system and develop strategies for substantially more efficient and safer use. The results also showed that drivers over age 65 had difficulty driving and navigating concurrently. They compensated by driving slowly and more cautiously. Despite this increased caution, older drivers made more safety-related errors than did younger drivers. The results also showed that older drivers benefited substantially from a well-designed ATIS driver interface. PMID:9302887

  7. Dating the Vinland Map

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-07-17

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Smithsonian Institution used carbon-dating technology to determine the age of a controversial parchment that might be the first-ever map of North America.

  8. Dating the Vinland Map

    SciTech Connect

    2013-01-04

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Smithsonian Institution used carbon-dating technology to determine the age of a controversial parchment that might be the first-ever map of North America.

  9. Improving the knowledge of pesticide and nitrate transfer processes using age-dating tools (CFC, SF6, 3H) in a volcanic island (Martinique, French West Indies).

    PubMed

    Gourcy, Laurence; Baran, Nicole; Vittecoq, Benoit

    2009-09-01

    Numerous successful examples of CFC and SF(6) groundwater dating applications were recently published. However the proposed CFC/SF(6) method needs various hydrodynamic parameters that are not always available. In order to predict groundwater-quality trends in areas where the hydrogeological context is poorly known, a dating method using tritium, CFC and SF(6) was successfully implemented in Martinique. Hydrogeological understanding is limited in this volcanic island where groundwater contamination by pesticides and nitrate has been recently proven in various areas. A negative correlation was observed between nitrate concentrations and groundwater ages while pesticide contamination showed a more complex schema. Consequently the presence of old groundwater clearly explained the absence or low pesticide and nitrate concentrations in some areas. However a possible degradation of the water quality is to be feared in the future. In view of the relatively long transfer times and the complexity of the remobilization processes of solutes, the expected effects of any modifications in the use of fertilizers, or of changes in pesticide-use legislation, would take a long time to become apparent. PMID:19631404

  10. Improving the knowledge of pesticide and nitrate transfer processes using age-dating tools (CFC, SF 6, 3H) in a volcanic island (Martinique, French West Indies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourcy, Laurence; Baran, Nicole; Vittecoq, Benoit

    2009-09-01

    Numerous successful examples of CFC and SF 6 groundwater dating applications were recently published. However the proposed CFC/SF 6 method needs various hydrodynamic parameters that are not always available. In order to predict groundwater-quality trends in areas where the hydrogeological context is poorly known, a dating method using tritium, CFC and SF 6 was successfully implemented in Martinique. Hydrogeological understanding is limited in this volcanic island where groundwater contamination by pesticides and nitrate has been recently proven in various areas. A negative correlation was observed between nitrate concentrations and groundwater ages while pesticide contamination showed a more complex schema. Consequently the presence of old groundwater clearly explained the absence or low pesticide and nitrate concentrations in some areas. However a possible degradation of the water quality is to be feared in the future. In view of the relatively long transfer times and the complexity of the remobilization processes of solutes, the expected effects of any modifications in the use of fertilizers, or of changes in pesticide-use legislation, would take a long time to become apparent.

  11. ALPHA SPECTROMETRIC EVALUATION OF SRM-995 AS A POTENTIAL URANIUM/THORIUM DOUBLE TRACER SYSTEM FOR AGE-DATING URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Beals, D.

    2011-12-06

    Uranium-233 (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 1.59E5 years) is an artificial, fissile isotope of uranium that has significant importance in nuclear forensics. The isotope provides a unique signature in determining the origin and provenance of uranium-bearing materials and is valuable as a mass spectrometric tracer. Alpha spectrometry was employed in the critical evaluation of a {sup 233}U standard reference material (SRM-995) as a dual tracer system based on the in-growth of {sup 229}Th (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7.34E3 years) for {approx}35 years following radiochemical purification. Preliminary investigations focused on the isotopic analysis of standards and unmodified fractions of SRM-995; all samples were separated and purified using a multi-column anion-exchange scheme. The {sup 229}Th/{sup 233}U atom ratio for SRM-995 was found to be 1.598E-4 ({+-} 4.50%) using recovery-corrected radiochemical methods. Using the Bateman equations and relevant half-lives, this ratio reflects a material that was purified {approx} 36.8 years prior to this analysis. The calculated age is discussed in contrast with both the date of certification and the recorded date of last purification.

  12. Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) of Lateglacial rock glacier systems near the eastern margin of the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Rock glaciers are widespread permafrost landforms in Austria. Various rock glacier inventories list more than 4500 rock glaciers in the country; some 30-40% of them are intact. Relict (permafrost free) and pseudo-relict rock glaciers (sporadic and isolated permafrost particularly near the root zone) prevail in number. Rock glaciers are commonly formed over a period of several ka. Dating such landforms helps to understand palaeoclimatic conditions. In this study three rock glaciers consisting of gneiss were dated applying the Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) method. The rock glaciers are located at three neighbouring cirques in the Seckauer Tauern Range named Reichart Rock Glacier (RRG, area 1.26 km², length 1800 m, elevation range 1520-1940 m a.s.l.), Schöneben Rock Glacier (SRG, 0.11 km², 750 m, 1715-1905 m a.s.l.), and Dürrtal Rock Glacier (DRG, 0.08 km², 850 m, 1750-1980 m a.s.l.). RRG is one of the largest rock glaciers in Austria. All three landforms are influenced by lenses of permafrost at present (as indicated by ERT). During the LGM the Seckauer Tauern were covered by valley glaciers and deglaciation occurred presumably already early in the Alpine Lateglacial period. An analogue N-type Schmidt-hammer (proceq) was used for measuring the surface strength of stable blocks at the rock glacier surface by recording a rebound value (R-value) of a spring-loaded bolt. The R-value gives a relative measure of the surface hardness and hence time since exposure to weathering. Eight (RRG) or six (SRG, DRG) Schmidt-hammer measurement sites (with 50-100 individual readings) aligned along longitudinal transects (=former central flow line) between a talus slope (with relatively fresh boulders) in the root zone and the frontal ridge were measured. Mean R-value differences of 30.5 at RRG, 25.1 at SRG, and 20.7 at DRG were revealed along the three transects. The differences between the lowest and the highest R-value at the rock glaciers itself were 19.0 at RRG, 15

  13. Dating Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stader, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Dating violence is a form of student-on-student victimization and is a serious school safety issue. Research indicates that at a minimum, 10 percent of high school students are victims of dating violence in one form or another. Among female high school students that date, some data indicate that as many as 30 percent may be victims of dating…

  14. DATE PALM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews date palm biology and cultivation. Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is one of the oldest fruit crops grown in the arid regions of the Arabian Peninsula, North Africa, and the Middle East. The exact origin of the date palm is unknown but most probably the area of origin w...

  15. Techniques for lithium removal from 1040 C aged tantalum alloy, T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahn, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    The liquid ammonia and vacuum distillation techniques were found to be satisfactory for removing lithium from 1040 C aged T-111 (tantalum - 8-percent tungsten- 2-percent hafnium). Results of ductility tests and chemical analysis show that these two methods are adequate for removing lithium without embrittlement or contamination of the T-111. Moist air exposure of T-111 with traces of lithium on the surface produced mixed results. Some specimens were ductile; others were brittle. Brittle T-111 had an increased hydrogen content. Water removal of lithium from T-111 caused brittleness and an increased hydrogen concentration.

  16. Uranium-series dating of pedogenic carbonates from the Livermore Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.G.

    1981-01-07

    A uranium-series dating technique has been applied to pedogenic carbonates from the Livermore Valley in California. The results from geomorphologically distinct Quaternary alluvial units are internally consistent and for one alluvial unit are corroborated by a concordant /sup 14/C age for an associated wood fragment. In appropriate situations, age dates for pedogenic carbonates derived using this technique may provide a time stratigraphy for alluvial units and hence provide some limits (minimum age) for last fault movement.

  17. Age Determination by Back Length for African Savanna Elephants: Extending Age Assessment Techniques for Aerial-Based Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Morgan J.; van Aarde, Rudi J.; Ferreira, Sam M.; Nørgaard, Camilla F.; Fourie, Johan; Lee, Phyllis C.; Moss, Cynthia J.

    2011-01-01

    Determining the age of individuals in a population can lead to a better understanding of population dynamics through age structure analysis and estimation of age-specific fecundity and survival rates. Shoulder height has been used to accurately assign age to free-ranging African savanna elephants. However, back length may provide an analog measurable in aerial-based surveys. We assessed the relationship between back length and age for known-age elephants in Amboseli National Park, Kenya, and Addo Elephant National Park, South Africa. We also compared age- and sex-specific back lengths between these populations and compared adult female back lengths across 11 widely dispersed populations in five African countries. Sex-specific Von Bertalanffy growth curves provided a good fit to the back length data of known-age individuals. Based on back length, accurate ages could be assigned relatively precisely for females up to 23 years of age and males up to 17. The female back length curve allowed more precise age assignment to older females than the curve for shoulder height does, probably because of divergence between the respective growth curves. However, this did not appear to be the case for males, but the sample of known-age males was limited to ≤27 years. Age- and sex-specific back lengths were similar in Amboseli National Park and Addo Elephant National Park. Furthermore, while adult female back lengths in the three Zambian populations were generally shorter than in other populations, back lengths in the remaining eight populations did not differ significantly, in support of claims that growth patterns of African savanna elephants are similar over wide geographic regions. Thus, the growth curves presented here should allow researchers to use aerial-based surveys to assign ages to elephants with greater precision than previously possible and, therefore, to estimate population variables. PMID:22028925

  18. Dating of Modern Human Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, R.

    Dating studies on palaoeanthropological sites is usually carried out on material associ- ated with the human remains, such as the sediment, charcoal or other fauna rather than the human specimen itself. The reason lies in the fact that most dating techniques are destructive and because the hominid remains are too rare to be sacrificed for dating. This indirect dating approach is in many cases not satisfactory, because: (i) the human remains are often buried into the sediments and the association with other materials is uncertain (e.g. Skhul, Qafzeh, etc.); (ii) faunal remains or minerals from the sediment are re-worked from older deposits (see e.g. present discussion of the age of the Homo erectus remains in Indonesia; (iii) the hominid fossils were discovered at a time when no careful excavations were carried out and it is impossible to correlate the specimen with other datable material (which applies tonearly 90% of all palaeoanthropological specimens). For example, the hominid burial site of Qafzeh in Israel has been dated by several independent dating laboratories with a multitude of methods. However, the data are still not accepted by some because the dating has not been carried out on the hominid specimen. Until recently, hominid fossils could only be dated by radiocarbon. This method reaches back to about 40,000 years. As a consequence, all the older fossils could not be analysed and many important questions in our understanding of human evolution could not be addressed. Human remains are scarce and extremely valuable, therefore any sort of destruction has to be kept to an absolute minimum. This is of particular importance in Australia where any human fossils are sacred. Thus, for the analysis of hominid material it was necessary to develop a more or less non-destructive techniques. This has been ac- complished in recent years by the application of ESR dating of tooth enamel and a combination of gamma spectrometric and TIMS U-series dating of bones. The exam

  19. Stellar acoustic radii, mean densities, and ages from seismic inversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldgen, G.; Reese, D. R.; Dupret, M. A.; Samadi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Determining stellar characteristics such as the radius, mass or age is crucial when studying stellar evolution or exoplanetary systems, or when characterising stellar populations in the Galaxy. Asteroseismology is the golden path to accurately obtain these characteristics. In this context, a key question is how to make these methods less model-dependent. Aims: Building on the previous work of Daniel Reese, we wish to extend the Substractive Optimally Localized Averages (SOLA) inversion technique to new stellar global characteristics beyond the mean density. The goal is to provide a general framework in which to estimate these characteristics as accurately as possible in low-mass main-sequence stars. Methods: First, we describe our framework and discuss the reliability of the inversion technique and possible sources of error. We then apply this methodology to the acoustic radius, an age indicator based on the sound speed derivative and the mean density, and compare it to estimates based on the average large and small frequency separations. These inversions are carried out for several test cases including various metallicities, different mixing-lengths, non-adiabatic effects, and turbulent pressure. Results: We observe that the SOLA method yields accurate results in all test cases whereas results based on the large and small frequency separations are less accurate and more sensitive to surface effects and structural differences in the models. If we include the surface corrections of Kjeldsen et al. (2008, ApJ, 683, L175), we obtain results of comparable accuracy for the mean density. Overall, the mean density and acoustic radius inversions are more robust than the inversions for the age indicator. Moreover, the current approach is limited to relatively young stars with radiative cores. Increasing the number of observed frequencies improves the reliability and accuracy of the method. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Paleo-Environment and C-14 Dating: The Key to the Depositional Age of the Tha Chang and Related Sand Pits, Northeastern Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putthapiban, P.; Zolensky, M.; Jull, T.; Demartino, M.; Salyapongse, S.

    2012-01-01

    Tha Chang sand pits, Nakhon Ratchasima Province and many other sand pits in the area adjacent to the Mun River are characterized by their fluviatile environment in association with mass wasting deposits, along the paleo-river channel and the flood plain of the Mun River. Sediments of these deposits are characterized by clasts of various rock types especially the resistant ones with frequent big tree trunks, logs and wood fragments in different sizes and various stages of transformation from moldering stage to lignification and petrification. Widespread pyritization of the lower horizon suggests strongly reducing environment during burial. The Tha Chang deposits have been received much attention from geoscientists especially paleontologist communities, as they contain fragments of some distinct vertebrate species such as Stegadon sp., hominoid primate, rhinoceros Aceratherium and others. Based on the associated mammal fauna and hominoid fossils, the late Miocene ( 9 - 6 Ma) was given for the time of deposition of this sand and gravel unit. Some other reports believed that sediments and materials of these sand and gravel quarries (pits) were deposited by high-energy flood pulses contemporaneous with the tektites forming event during mid-Pleistocene at c. 0.8 Ma. Interpretation from Palynostratigraphical study suggested that the lower horizon of Tha Chang sand pit was deposited during Pliocene/Pleistocene period and the upper horizons are Pleistoncene/Holocene. It is crystal clear that all the fluviatile sediments including tektites and almost all fossil fragments being deposited in these sand pits were, likely a multiple times reworked materials. Only some old bamboo trees, some old crowling trees and fossils grasses observed on the old river bank are considered in situ. C-14 dating of 5 old wood specimens from Tha Chang Sand Pits, 15 old wood specimens from Chumpuang Sand Pits and one sample of old pottery from a Chumpuang Sand Pit were carried out in the NSF

  1. Age dating of mineralization and brittle deformation using rhenium-osmium (Re-Os) geochronology in pyrite-bitumen bearing fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, Robert; Dempsey, Eddie; Selby, David; Dichiarante, Anna; Finlay, Alex; Ogilvie, Steven

    2013-04-01

    The relative ages of different fault rocks are generally established using cross-cutting relationships seen in the field and thin section. However, the absolute dating of fault rock formation events remains a problematic issue. In many Phanerozoic basins, hydrocarbon (mainly bitumen)-bearing fault and fracture systems also carry sulphide minerals such as pyrite. The bitumen and pyrite are commonly enriched with rhenium (Re) so that the 187Re-187Os geochronometer can be used to date mineralization and better constrain the timing of brittle deformation. Furthermore, the determined 187Os/188Os composition of the sulphide minerals at the time of formation can yield insights into the origins of the fracture-hosted fluids. We report 3 cases of Re-Os sulphide geochronology from fracture-hosted hydrocarbon-pyrite systems offshore West of Shetland (UK) and in the nearby onshore Orcadian Basin, N Scotland. Hydrocarbon Re-Os data from the Faroe-Shetland Basin (FSB) show that there are four pulses of increased oil generation at 72 ± 5 Ma, 64 ± 4 Ma, 53 ± 14 Ma and 42 ± 6 Ma. These dates remove the need for large scale oil collection within fractured basement and Late Cretaceous reservoirs before re-migration into later Cenozoic reservoirs and agree with more recent models in which oil generation has been retarded by over pressure and that multiple pulses of generation are associated with regional inversion events that occurred during the Late Cretaceous, Paleocene and Oligocene/Miocene. The Clair oil field lies on the SE side of the FSB and a major part of the reservoir lies in Lewisian basement where hosting fractures are infilled with pyrite, calcite and bitumen. The pyrite contains low abundances of Re and Os, with Re-Os isotope compositions that are too similar to yield an isochron, whilst the associated bitumen is enriched in both Re and Os. Regression of the Re-Os data from other parts of the Clair field with the new pyrite Re-Os data obtained here yields a more

  2. Spatial and temporal variation of the last ice age mega-floods in the Pacific Northwest: Sediment provenance using single-aliquot K/Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombiner, J.; Hendy, I. L.; Hemming, S. R.; Fleisher, M. Q.; Pierce, E.; Mesko, G.; Dale, C. L.; Ages-Argon GeochronologyThe Earth Sciences

    2010-12-01

    Glacial outburst floods (jokulhaups) are important, but poorly understood, drivers of climate change during large-scale deglaciations. Meltwater fluxes are one of the climate forcings with the most uncertain histories included in climate modeling of the last 21 kyr. Outburst flood events are not included in modeled meltwater fluxes due to their small volume, though they are one of the fastest delivery mechanisms for freshwater to the ocean. The most significant outburst floods known to have occurred during the last deglaciation came from glacial Lake Missoula between 18 and 15 kyr BP. Although the volume of meltwater delivered to the North Pacific Ocean was small, the speed of delivery and sediment content of these floods was large. Here we present data that constrain the location and timing of outburst flooding to the N Pacific. Single aliquot bulk K/Ar dates of fine silts and clays from a deep sea core collected off Vancouver Island, British Columbia [MD-02-2496 (48°58’47”N: 127°02’14”W; 2043m water depth)] provide a geochemical fingerprint of the provenance of glacial marine sediments. K/Ar ages, combined with mapped continental geology, allow for the identification of potential source regions for individual flood layers in the core. K/Ar ages in this study represent an integrated age of the entire sediment package delivered to the core site. This includes the Proterozoic Belt-Purcell metasediments (which glacial Lake Missoula covered), the Miocene/Pliocene Columbia Plateau Basalts (which were heavily eroded by the Missoula Floods), and the largely Cenozoic rocks of the coastal and Cascade mountain ranges. Initial results indicate a significant variation in K/Ar ages between background sedimentation and flood deposition events. Missoula Flood outburst sediments appear to have K/Ar ages of around 300 million years while background sediments appear to have K/Ar ages of less than 100 million years. Timing of outburst flood deposits has been determined by

  3. Rare-element granitic pegmatite of Miocene age emplaced in UHP rocks from Visole, Pohorje Mountains (Eastern Alps, Slovenia): accessory minerals, monazite and uraninite chemical dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Pavel; Janák, Marian; Konečný, Patrik; Vrabec, Mirijam

    2014-04-01

    The granitic pegmatite dike intruded the Cretaceous UHP rocks at Visole, near Slovenska Bistrica, in the Pohorje Mountains (Slovenia). The rock consists mainly of K-feldspar, albite and quartz, subordinate muscovite and biotite, while the accessory minerals include spessartine-almandine, zircon, ferrocolumbite, fluorapatite, monazite- (Ce), uraninite, and magnetite. Compositions of garnet (Sps48-49Alm45-46Grs + And3-4 Prp1.5-2), metamict zircon with 3.5 to 7.8 wt. % HfO2 [atom. 100Hf/(Hf + Zr) = 3.3-7.7] and ferrocolumbite [atom. Mn/(Mn + Fe) = 0.27-0.43, Ta/(Ta + Nb) = 0.03-0.46] indicate a relatively low to medium degree of magmatic fractionation, characteristic of the muscovite - rare-element class or beryl-columbite subtype of the rare-element class pegmatites. Monazite-(Ce) reveals elevated Th and U contents (≤11 wt. % ThO2, ≤5 wt. % UO2). The monazite-garnet geothermometer shows a possible precipitation temperature of ~495 ± 30 °C at P~4 to 5 kbar. Chemical U-Th-Pb dating of the monazite yielded a Miocene age (17.2 ± 1.8 Ma), whereas uraninite gave a younger (~14 Ma) age. These ages are comtemporaneous with the main crystallization and emplacement of the Pohorje pluton and adjacent volcanic rocks (20 to 15 Ma), providing the first documented evidence of Neogene granitic pegmatites in the Eastern Alps. Consequently, the Visole pegmatite belongs to the youngest rare-element granitic pegmatite populations in Europe, together with the Paleogene pegmatite occurrences along the Periadriatic (Insubric) Fault System in the Alps and in the Rhodope Massif, as well as the Late Miocene to Pliocene pegmatites in the Tuscany magmatic province (mainly on the Island of Elba).

  4. Use of National and International Growth Charts for Studying Height in European Children: Development of Up-To-Date European Height-For-Age Charts

    PubMed Central

    Bonthuis, Marjolein; van Stralen, Karlijn J.; Verrina, Enrico; Edefonti, Alberto; Molchanova, Elena A.; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C. S.; Schaefer, Franz; Jager, Kitty J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Growth charts based on data collected in different populations and time periods are key tools to assess children’s linear growth. We analyzed the impact of geographic factors and the secular trend on height-for-age charts currently used in European populations, developed up-to-date European growth charts, and studied the effect of using different charts in a sample of growth retarded children. Methods and Findings In an international survey we obtained 18 unique national height-for-age charts from 28 European countries and compared them with charts from the World Health Organization (WHO), Euro-Growth reference, and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). As an example, we obtained height data from 3,534 children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from 13 countries via the ESPN/ERA-EDTA registry, a patient group generally suffering from growth retardation. National growth charts showed a clear secular trend in height (mean height increased on average 0.6 cm/decade) and a North-South height gradient in Europe. For countries without a recent (>1990) national growth chart novel European growth charts were constructed from Northern and Southern European reference populations, reflecting geographic height differences in mean final height of 3.9 cm in boys and 3.8 cm in girls. Mean height SDS of 2- to 17-year-old ESRD patients calculated from recent national or derived European growth charts (−1.91, 95% CI: −1.97 to −1.85) was significantly lower than when using CDC or WHO growth charts (−1.55, 95% CI: −1.61 to −1.49) (P<0.0001). Conclusion Differences between height-for-age charts may reflect true population differences, but are also strongly affected by the secular trend in height. The choice of reference charts substantially affects the clinical decision whether a child is considered short-for-age. Therefore, we advocate using recent national or European height-for-age charts derived from recent national data when monitoring growth

  5. Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappala, J. C.; Jiang, W.; Bailey, K. G.; Lu, Z. T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its simple production and transport in the terrestrial environment, 81Kr (half-life = 230,000 yr) is the ideal tracer for old water and ice with mean residence times in the range of 105-106 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr-dating is now available to the earth science community at large thanks to the development of an efficient and selective atom counter based on the Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) method. ATTA is a laser-based atom counting method where individual neutral atoms of the desired isotope are selectively captured by laser beams, and their fluorescence detected via a CCD camera. ATTA is unique among trace analysis techniques in that it is free of interferences from any other isotopes, isobars, atomic or molecular species. The ATTA instrument at Argonne's Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating is capable of measuring both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios of environmental samples in the range of 10-14-10-10. For 81Kr-dating in the age range of 150 kyr - 1500 kyr, the required sample size is 5 micro-L STP of krypton gas, which can be extracted from approximately 100 kg of water or 40 kg of ice. For 85Kr/Kr analysis, the sample size can be smaller by an order of magnitude. We are continually developing the method towards higher counting efficiency, smaller sample sizes requirements, and higher sample throughput rates. In the past four years, we have performed radiokrypton analysis of over 150 groundwater and ice samples extracted by collaborators from all seven continents. Sample collection and purification was performed by groups including the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois at Chicago, the University of Bern, and the International Atomic Energy Agency. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Should precise numerical dating overrule glacial geomorphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Numerical age dating techniques, namely different types of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND), have achieved an impressive progress in both laboratory precision and regional calibration models during the past few decades. It is now possible to apply precise TCND even to young landforms like Late Holocene moraines, a task seemed hardly achievable just about 15 years ago. An increasing number of studies provide very precise TCND ages for boulders from Late Holocene moraines enabling related reconstruction of glacier chronologies and the interpretation of these glacial landforms in a palaeoclimatological context. These studies may also solve previous controversies about different ages assigned to moraines obtained by different dating techniques, for example relative-age dating techniques or techniques combining relative-age dating with few fixed points derived from numerical age dating. There are a few cases, for example Mueller Glacier and nearby long debris-covered valley glacier in Aoraki/Mt.Cook National Park (Southern Alps, New Zealand), where the apparent "supremacy" of TCND-ages seem to overrule glacial geomorphological principles. Enabled by a comparatively high number of individual boulders precisely dated by TCND, moraine ridges on those glacier forelands have been primarily clustered on basis of these boulder ages rather than on their corresponding morphological position. To the extreme, segments of a particular moraine complex morphologically and sedimentologically proven to be formed during one event have become split and classified as two separate "moraines" on different parts of the glacier foreland. One ledge of another moraine complex contains 2 TCND-sampled boulders apparently representing two separate "moraines"-clusters of an age difference in the order of 1,500 years. Although recently criticism has been raised regarding the non-contested application of the arithmetic mean for calculation of TCND-ages for individual moraines, this

  7. Dating tectonic structures on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, L.; Massironi, M.; Marchi, S.; Cremonese, G.

    2012-09-01

    Mercury surface appears to be interested by several tectonic structures, the most interesting ones being numerous lobate scarps formed mainly thanks to planet cooling and contraction. The Messenger cameras (MDIS WAC and NAC) allowed us to map several structures not previously detected. Among these a 250 km-long thrust has been detected crossing a peak ring basin. The region encircled within the inner ring of the basin is covered by a smooth plain with evidence of a sin-deformational emplacement. Dating this smooth plain with crater counting technique allowed us to give an age constrain of the tectonic structure.

  8. Dating Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dating violence can cause serious harm to your body and your emotions. If you are in an abusive relationship, get help. Leaving an abusive dating relationship See a doctor or nurse to take care of any physical problems. And reach out for support for your emotional ...

  9. Potential improvement of Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) of moraines in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, by application of the new electronic Schmidt-hammer (SilverSchmidt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan; Corbett, David

    2014-05-01

    collected so that the plunger impacts of both instruments were set close together on the rock surface (to avoid any influence of modifications to the surface by consecutive impacts on the same spot). In order to test their performance at the higher and lower end of surface hardness, similar paired sample tests were also made on the full-metal test anvil. The results of paired samples for all sites/moraines reveal that Q-/R-value pairs are closely clustered for young surfaces but more scattered for the older ones with a corresponding moderate R2 for a calculated linear trend. The greater variability of the older, weathered surfaces with greater scatter and hence higher standard deviations and broader confidence intervals has been recognised in numerous previous Schmidt-hammer studies and is elated to the effects of micro-scale lithological variability, which becomes a more pronounced influence with time exposed to subaerial weathering. But most important, Q-values and R-values are closely related and Q-values are systematically higher than R-values by c. 10 - 12 units over most of the operational range of both instruments. Linear conversion equations indicate a conversion factor in the order of + 11 units is applicable when converting R-values to Q-values. These estimates agree well with data obtained on the standard test anvil. Given the apparent interconvertibility of the two instruments, the SilverSchmidt is regarded as a potential replacement for the mechanical Schmidt hammer. This enables, moreover, continuity in study areas with existing R-value data archives. However, when comparing data sets of different age, adjustments must be made for any changes to the instrumental calibration value over time. References: Winkler, S. (2005): The 'Schmidt hammer' as a relative-age dating technique: potential and limitations of its application on Holocene moraines in Mt Cook National Park, Southern Alps, New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics 48, 105 - 116

  10. Age estimation standards for a Western Australian population using the dental age estimation technique developed by Kvaal et al.

    PubMed

    Karkhanis, Shalmira; Mack, Peter; Franklin, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In the present global socio-political scenario, an increasing demand exists for age estimation in living persons, such as refugees and asylum seekers, who seldom have any documentation for proof of identity. Age estimation in the living poses significant challenges because the methods need to be non-invasive, accurate and ethically viable. Methods based on the analysis of the pulp chamber are recommended for age estimation in living adults. There is, however, a paucity of studies of this nature and population specific standards in Western Australia. The aim of the present study is therefore, to test the reliability and applicability of the method developed by Kvaal et al. (1995) for the purpose of developing age estimation standards for an adult Western Australian population. A total of 279 digital orthopantomograms (143 female; and 136 male) of Australian individuals were analysed. A subset of the total sample (50) was removed as a cross-validation (holdout) sample. Following the method described in Kvaal et al. (1995), length and width measurements of the tooth and pulp chamber were acquired in maxillary central and lateral incisors; second premolars, mandibular lateral incisors; canines and first premolars. Those measurements were then used to calculate a series of ratios (length and width), which were subsequently used to formulate age estimation regression models. The most accurate model based on a single tooth was for the maxillary central incisor (SEE ±9.367 years), followed by the maxillary second premolar (SEE ±9.525 years). Regression models based on the measurement of multiple teeth improved age prediction accuracy (SEE ±7.963 years). The regression models presented here have expected accuracy rates comparable (if not higher than) to established skeletal morphoscopic methods. This method, therefore, offers a statistically quantified methodological approach for forensic age estimation in Western Australian adults. PMID:24411636

  11. New developments with Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD): Comparison of mechanical and electronic Schmidt-hammers - towards a conversion factor for Q- and R-values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan; Matthews, John; Corbett, David

    2014-05-01

    Developed as an instrument for in situ destruction-free testing of concrete hardness in construction works, the Schmidt-hammer has subsequently been introduced and applied in various fields of geomorphology and geology. In the context of investigating Late Glacial and Holocene glacier chronologies, the Schmidt-hammer has been widely used as a relative-age dating technique. Such applications have for example successfully separated moraines formed during different glacier advance periods ('Little Ice Age'-type events). Pilot studies combined Schmidt-hammer measurements with available radiocarbon ages in order to achieve age constraints. Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) combining Schmidt-hammer and terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND) has recently been successfully applied in Norway and New Zealand. Schmidt-hammer tests have also been used to ensure the representativeness of boulders selected for TCND sampling. Especially in mountain regions with a high "geomorphological uncertainty" with the dating of Holocene moraines the inherited multi-proxy approach of SHD owns a considerable potential for reliable investigations of Late Glacial/Holocene glacier chronologies and their palaeoclimatic interpretation. An electronic Schmidt-hammer (named SilverSchmidt) was introduced by the manufacturer of the original mechanical Schmidt-hammer (Proceq SA) a few years ago. It offers especially facilities for much easier data processing and constitutes, therefore, a major improvement and potential replacement for the mechanical Schmidt-hammer. However, its different approach to the measurement of surface hardness - based on Q-(velocity) values instead of R-(rebound) values - means that measurements from the two instruments are not easily interconvertible. Prior to any considerations of using the instruments interchangeably or replacing the mechanical Schmidt-hammer in future studies with the SilverSchmidt, comparative tests under field conditions need to be undertaken

  12. Dating violence and girls in the juvenile justice system.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patricia J; Cheng, An-Lin; Peralez-Dieckmann, Esther; Martinez, Elisabeth

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the prevalence and associated behaviors of dating violence among a population of girls in the juvenile justice system. A sample of 590 girls from an urban juvenile justice system completed a questionnaire assessing attitudes and self-efficacy about and occurrence of dating violence. The analysis developed a random effect model to determine a risk profile for dating violence. The strongest predictors of dating violence were (a) initial sexual experience at age 13 or earlier, (b) unwillingness of initial sexual experience, (c) drug use, and (d) low self-efficacy about preventing dating violence. The high prevalence of dating violence and associated behaviors among participants suggests the importance of implementing primary prevention programs to assist preteen girls in delaying initial sexual intercourse and in learning techniques to prevent dating violence. PMID:18768739

  13. Ground water/surface water interactions in Lake Naivasha, Kenya, using delta 18O, delta D, and 3H/3He age-dating.

    PubMed

    Ojiambo, B S; Poreda, R J; Lyons, W B

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed a series of ground water samples from the Lake Naivasha region, Kenya, for their helium isotopic composition. Lake Naivasha is unique among the East Africa Rift Valley lakes in that it is fresh. It has long been thought that the low salinity of this lake is due, in part, to rapid water loss from the lake into the local ground water system. Our results show that the Olkaria geothermal waters, south of the lake, are devoid of tritium and, thus, are more than 50 years old. An important implication of these results is that even if Olkaria geothermal reservoir water originated from Lake Naivasha, it has been underground for a long time, (> 50 years) and is not derived from present-day Lake Naivasha water. This flow time is of the same order of magnitude as conservative major solutes, such as chloride, as determined through residence time calculations. On the north side of Lake Naivasha, deep wells (91 m) have water approximately 20 years old. Water from these wells has stable isotopic values resembling those of nearby rivers, and high-elevation eastern Rift water. This indicates that this water recharges from rains from high eastern Rift Valley escarpments. Many of the shallow wells on the south side of the lake have 3H/3He ages between four and 17 years. The young ages and the delta 18 O-enriched signature of the water from these wells indicate that they are recharged by a mixture of water from the lake, Rift flanks, and water from deep pumping wells that is recharged during irrigation. Water mixing ratio calculations using delta 18O and delta D isotopes show that about 50% to 70% of the southern ground water system is derived from the lake, while the Olkaria geothermal reservoir water shows that 40% to 50% of this water is originally lake water. Calculated mean recharge rates range from 0.10 to 1.59 m/yr with a mean of 0.52 +/- 0.40 m/yr. Estimated horizontal velocity from 3H/3He age dating between Lake Naivasha and a well about 3 km to the south is

  14. Reconstruction of the Late Quaternary Glaciation of the Macha Khola valley (Gorkha Himal, Nepal) using relative and absolute ( 14C, 10Be, dendrochronology) dating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, W.; Glaser, B.; Abramowski, U.; Dittmar, C.; Kubik, P. W.

    2003-11-01

    Late Quaternary glacier fluctuations in the Macha Khola valley (Gorkha Himal, Nepal) were reconstructed using relative and absolute dating techniques. Our results indicate that younger moraine complexes were left by Late Holocene (<1.7 cal. ka BP), mid-Holocene (ca 3 cal. ka BP), and Lateglacial (ca 13 cal. ka BP) ice advances. Older Late Quaternary glacier advances occurred during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stages (MIS) 2 and 3-4. No relics of Middle or Early Pleistocene glaciations could be found. During MIS 3-4, glaciers advanced down to an altitude of at least 2150 m a.s.l., corresponding to an ELA depression of approximately 1300 m. At about 3500 m a.s.l., the MIS 2 Macha Khola glacier reached almost the thickness of the former MIS 3-4 glacier and retreated some time before 17.9 cal. ka BP. The Lateglacial glacier advanced again several times to altitudes between 2450 and 3400 m a.s.l. The mid-Holocene glaciers extended much farther down-valley than the Late Holocene ones. Dendrochronological data of Abies spectabilis suggested several periods of unfavourable growth conditions especially at the beginning of the 19th (1820) and 20th (1905) centuries.

  15. Dating loess up to 800 ka by thermoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, G.W. ); Pillans, B.J. ); Palmer, A.S. )

    1992-05-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) ages agreeing with expected ages have been obtained for 13 loess samples spanning the age range from 20 to 800 ka. The authors samples are from Alaska and North Island, New Zealand, and are unusual in TL dating studies of loess older than 80-100 ka by having independent age assignments that are generally well constrained, from ages of associated tephra beds. With the polymineral fine-silt-sized (4-11 {mu}m) grains the partial-bleach TL technique yielded expected ages up to about 350 ka, whereas the total-bleach method gave accurate ages in the range 100 to 800 ka. Thus, the much disputed upper age limit of 100-150 ka for the TL dating of loess now appears to be sample and worker dependent, rather than a global property of the TL signals in the TL-dominant feldspars.

  16. Geochemistry and Age Dating of Ancient and Modern CO2 -rich Hydrothermal Systems as Natural Analogues for CO2 storage: Examples from Australia and Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, I.; Golding, S.; Esterle, J.; Feng, Y.; Zhao, J.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated physico-chemical conditions during mineral authigenesis in CO2-rich ancient and recent hydrothermal environments in Eastern Australia (Gunnedah and Bowen Basins) and Turkey, respectively. We performed Rb-Sr and U-series dating of clay-carbonate associations and travertine veins respectively to evaluate the degassing and storage history of CO2. Intense carbonate veining and coal seam cleat mineralisation in the Gunnedah Basin took place as a result of heat and CO2 release associated with magmatism during the breakup of Gondwana in the Late Cretaceous. Widespread carbonate veining and cementation in the Bowen Basin occurred as products of basin-wide CO2 rich meteoric hydrothermal fluids during the Late Triassic extension. CO2 has largely been used for carbonate precipitation (calcite, siderite, ankerite and dawsonite) in eastern Australian basins; however, some high proportion of CO2 has been stored in coal seams as adsorbed molecules on coal. Significant CO2 degassing is common in geothermal fields in Turkey, as manifested by recent deposition of travertine pools and terraces as well as travertine vein networks in damage zones of active major fault systems. Trace element geochemistry indicates that transient ascent of CO2-bearing fluids during seismic strain cycles without significant interaction with basement and host rocks resulted in rapid precipitation of the vein travertine near the surface. Such veins and associated breccias formed by hydraulic fracturing in response to overpressure of CO2-rich fluids. Correlation of high-precision U-series ages with global/regional climate events indicates that late Quaternary climate variability may have controlled the geothermal water circulation that regulates CO2 accumulation and the generation of CO2 over-pressurised reservoirs and their behaviour during seismic events.

  17. Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Bailey, K.; Jiang, W.; Müller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Zappala, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Due to its simple production and transport processes in the terrestrial environment, the long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr (half-life = 230 kyr) is the ideal tracer for studying old water and ice in the age range of 10^5-10^6 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr dating, a concept pursued in the past four decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is now available for the first time to the earth science community at large. This is made possible by the development of ATTA-3 (Jiang et al., GCA 91, 1-6; 2012), an efficient and selective atom counter based on the Atom Trap Trace Analysis method (Chen et al., Science 286, 1139-1141; 1999). The instrument is capable of measuring both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios of environmental samples in the range of 10^-14-10^-10. For 81Kr-dating in the age range of 150 - 1,500 kyr, the required sample size is 5 - 10 micro-L STP of krypton gas, which can be extracted from approximately 100 - 200 kg of water or 40 - 80 kg of ice. For 85Kr/Kr analysis, the required sample size is generally smaller by an order of magnitude because of the isotope's higher initial abundance in the atmosphere. The Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating is currently equipped to analyze up to 120 samples per year. With future equipment upgrades, this limit can be increased as demand grows. In the period since November 2011, the Laboratory has measured both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios in over 50 samples that had been extracted by collaborators from six different continents. The samples were from groundwater wells in the Great Artesian Basin (Australia), Guarani Aquifer (Brazil), and Locust Grove (Maryland); from brine wells of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (New Mexico); from geothermal steam vents in Yellowstone National Park; from near-surface ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica; and from deep mines in South Africa. Sample collection and purification was performed by groups including the University of Illinois at Chicago, University

  18. How old is too old? A contribution to the discussion on age limits for assisted reproduction technique access.

    PubMed

    Kocourková, Jiřina; Konečná, Hana; Burcin, Boris; Kučera, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    In 2012, the Czech Republic established the women's age limit for access to assisted reproduction techniques at age 49 years. In this paper, the acceptability of this age limit from the children's perspective in the Czech Republic is assessed. Although the necessity of balancing the interests of parents and children is acknowledged, little research has taken children's interests into account. We have attempted to map out 'children's interests', asking older children and adolescents (aged 11-25 years) how old they would prefer their parents to be: Czech respondents would prefer to have younger parents. This finding is consistent with the optimal biological childbearing age rather than with the current postponement to a later age. So far, assisted reproduction techniques have been largely regarded as a medical treatment justifying the current women's age limit of 49 years. Had the children's perspective been taken into account, this age limit might have been lower than 49 years. We propose that reproductive health policy should adequately reflect multiple perspectives as an integral part of a multi-layered support system of a society. PMID:25773530

  19. Luminescence dating of the Wabar meteorite craters, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, J.R.; Robertson, G.B.; Shoemaker, C.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Wynn, J.

    2004-01-01

    Luminescence dating has been used to find the age of meteorite impact craters at Wabar (Al Hadida) in Saudi Arabia. The luminescence characteristics of the shocked material were determined. Using a variety of luminescence dating techniques applied to impactite formed by the meteorite, and to the underlying sand, the age is found to be 290 ± 38 years. A comparison is made with two possible historically recorded ages. An impact as young as this has implications for the assessment of hazards from the impact on Earth of small meteorites.

  20. Identification of excess 40Ar by the 40Ar 39Ar, age spectrum technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1976-01-01

    40Ar 39Ar incremental heating experiments on igneous plagioclase, biotite, and pyroxene that contain known amounts of excess 40Ar indicate that saddle-shaped age spectra are diagnostic of excess 40Ar in igneous minerals as well as in igneous rocks. The minima in the age spectra approach but do not reach the crystallization age. Neither the age spectrum diagram nor the 40Ar 36Ar versus 39Ar 36Ar isochron diagram reliably reveal the crystallization age in such samples. ?? 1976.

  1. I-Xe Dating: Comparison of I-Xe and Pb-Pb Ages of Richardton Chondrules and Separated Mineral Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdivtseva, O. V.; Amelin, Y.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Meshik, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    I-Xe and Pb-Pb ages of individual Richardton chondrules and different mineral phases were compared in order to test the absolute I-Xe age normalization. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles and characterization of their inhibitory effects on AGEs formation using biophysical techniques.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin M; Ansari, Mohammad Azam; Khan, Haris M; Alzohairy, Mohammad A; Choi, Inho

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) resulting from non-enzymatic glycation are one of the major factors implicated in secondary complications of diabetes. Scientists are focusing on discovering new compounds that may be used as potential AGEs inhibitors without affecting the normal structure and function of biomolecules. A number of natural and synthetic compounds have been proposed as AGE inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of AgNPs (silver nanoparticles) in AGEs formation. AgNPs (~30.5 nm) synthesized from Aloe Vera leaf extract were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), high resolution-transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The inhibitory effects of AgNPs on AGEs formation were evaluated by investigating the degree of reactivity of free amino groups (lysine and arginine residues), protein-bound carbonyl and carboxymethyl lysine (CML) content, and the effects on protein structure using various physicochemical techniques. The results showed that AgNPs significantly inhibit AGEs formation in a concentration dependent manner and that AgNPs have a positive effect on protein structure. These findings strongly suggest that AgNPs may play a therapeutic role in diabetes-related complications. PMID:26829907

  3. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles and characterization of their inhibitory effects on AGEs formation using biophysical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin M.; Ansari, Mohammad Azam; Khan, Haris M.; Alzohairy, Mohammad A.; Choi, Inho

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) resulting from non-enzymatic glycation are one of the major factors implicated in secondary complications of diabetes. Scientists are focusing on discovering new compounds that may be used as potential AGEs inhibitors without affecting the normal structure and function of biomolecules. A number of natural and synthetic compounds have been proposed as AGE inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of AgNPs (silver nanoparticles) in AGEs formation. AgNPs (~30.5 nm) synthesized from Aloe Vera leaf extract were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), high resolution-transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The inhibitory effects of AgNPs on AGEs formation were evaluated by investigating the degree of reactivity of free amino groups (lysine and arginine residues), protein-bound carbonyl and carboxymethyl lysine (CML) content, and the effects on protein structure using various physicochemical techniques. The results showed that AgNPs significantly inhibit AGEs formation in a concentration dependent manner and that AgNPs have a positive effect on protein structure. These findings strongly suggest that AgNPs may play a therapeutic role in diabetes-related complications. PMID:26829907

  4. A Biomechanical Evaluation of the Kinetics for Multiple Pitching Techniques in College-Aged Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Solomito, Matthew J.; Garibay, Erin J.; Õunpuu, Sylvia; Tate, Janet P.; Nissen, Carl W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are a number of studies showing that fastball pitches place greater loads on the shoulder and elbow than the curveball; however, the results of these studies are inconsistent, especially in collegiate-level pitchers. There is also discussion that sliders may produce substantially greater loads than other breaking pitches, but there is little scientific evidence to support this claim. Hypothesis: The curveball and slider/cutter produce greater moments on the shoulder and elbow compared with the fastball and change-up. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Thirty-six collegiate pitchers were evaluated using motion analysis techniques. All subjects pitched a fastball and a change-up, 29 pitched a curveball, and 20 pitched a slider/cutter. Kinematic data were collected, and kinetic (joint moment) data were computed using standard protocols. A random-intercept, mixed-model regression analysis was used to assess differences in joint moments between pitch types. Results: The greatest glenohumeral and elbow moments were found when pitchers were pitching the fastball (mean ± standard deviation: 80.8 ± 15.5 and 79.2 ± 16.9 N·m, respectively) and the lowest when pitching the change-up (73.2 ± 14.5 and 71.6 ± 15.0 N·m, respectively). The moments produced by the slider/cutter and curveball were similar (74.9 ± 16.4 and 75.6 ± 15.5 N·m at the elbow, respectively) and significantly lower than the moments produced by the fastball (P < .0001). Results also indicate that the change-up produced the lowest joint moments compared with other pitch types. Conclusion: This study shows that the fastball and not the curveball or slider/cutter produced the greatest moments on the college pitcher’s glenohumeral and elbow joints, as previously believed. The study also shows that the change-up may be the safest of the 4 pitch types analyzed. Clinical Relevance: There is a long-held belief that throwing breaking pitches, specifically the slider and

  5. Pulse waveform analysis of arterial compliance: relation to other techniques, age, and metabolic variables.

    PubMed

    Resnick, L M; Militianu, D; Cunnings, A J; Pipe, J G; Evelhoch, J L; Soulen, R L; Lester, M A

    2000-12-01

    To assess the physiologic and clinical relevance of newer noninvasive measures of vascular compliance, computerized arterial pulse waveform analysis (CAPWA) of the radial pulse was used to calculate two components of compliance, C1 (capacitive) and C2 (oscillatory or reflective), in 87 normotensive (N1BP, n = 20), untreated hypertensive (HiBP, n = 21), and treated hypertensive (HiBP-Rx, n = 46) subjects. These values were compared with two other indices of compliance, the ratio of stroke volume to pulse pressure (SV/PP) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based aortic distensibility; and were also correlated with demographic and biochemical values. The HiBP subjects displayed lower C1 (1.34 +/- 0.09 v. 1.70 +/- 0.11 mL/mm Hg, significance [sig] = .05) and C2 (0.031 +/- 0.003 v 0.073 +/- 0.02 mL/mm Hg, sig = .005) than N1BP subjects. This was not true for C1 (1.64 +/- 0.08 mL/mm Hg) and C2 (0.052 +/- 0.005 mL/mm Hg) values in HiBP-Rx subjects. The C1 (r = 0.917, P < .0001) and C2 (r = 0.677, P < .0001) were both closely related to SV/PP, whereas C1 (r = 0.748, P = .002), but not C2, was significantly related to MRI-determined aortic distensibility. Among other factors measured, age exerted a strong negative influence on both C1 (r = -0.696, P < .0001) and C2 (r = -0.611, P < .0001) compliance components. Positive correlations were observed between C1 (r = 0.863, P = .006), aortic distensibility (r = 0.597, P = .19) and 24-h urinary sodium excretion, and between C1- and MR spectroscopy-determined in situ skeletal muscle intracellular free magnesium (r = 0.827, P = .006), whereas C2 was inversely related to MRI-determined abdominal visceral fat area (r = -0.512, P = .042) and fasting blood glucose (r = -0.846, P = .001). Altogether, the close correspondence between CAPWA, other compliance techniques, and known cardiovascular risk factors suggests the clinical relevance of CAPWA in the assessment of altered vascular function in hypertension. PMID:11130766

  6. The maximum likelihood dating of magnetostratigraphic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Otakar

    2011-04-01

    In general, stratigraphic sections are dated by biostratigraphy and magnetic polarity stratigraphy (MPS) is subsequently used to improve the dating of specific section horizons or to correlate these horizons in different sections of similar age. This paper shows, however, that the identification of a record of a sufficient number of geomagnetic polarity reversals against a reference scale often does not require any complementary information. The deposition and possible subsequent erosion of the section is herein regarded as a stochastic process, whose discrete time increments are independent and normally distributed. This model enables the expression of the time dependence of the magnetic record of section increments in terms of probability. To date samples bracketing the geomagnetic polarity reversal horizons, their levels are combined with various sequences of successive polarity reversals drawn from the reference scale. Each particular combination gives rise to specific constraints on the unknown ages of the primary remanent magnetization of samples. The problem is solved by the constrained maximization of the likelihood function with respect to these ages and parameters of the model, and by subsequent maximization of this function over the set of possible combinations. A statistical test of the significance of this solution is given. The application of this algorithm to various published magnetostratigraphic sections that included nine or more polarity reversals gave satisfactory results. This possible self-sufficiency makes MPS less dependent on other dating techniques.

  7. The biology behind lichenometric dating curves.

    PubMed

    Loso, Michael G; Doak, Daniel F

    2006-03-01

    Lichenometry is used to date late-Holocene terminal moraines that record glacier fluctuations. Traditionally, it relies upon dating curves that relate diameters of the largest lichens in a population to surface ages. Although widely used, the technique remains controversial, in part because lichen biology is poorly understood. We use size-frequency distributions of lichens growing on well-dated surfaces to fit demographic models for Rhizocarpon geographicum and Pseudophebe pubescens, two species commonly used for lichenometry. We show that both species suffer from substantial mortality of 2-3% per year, and grow slowest when young-trends that explain a long-standing contradiction between the literatures of lichenometry and lichen biology. Lichenometrists interpret the shape of typical dating curves to indicate a period of rapid juvenile "great growth," contrary to the growth patterns expected by biologists. With a simulation, we show how the "great growth" pattern can be explained by mortality alone, which ensures that early colonists are rarely found on the oldest surfaces. The consistency of our model predictions with biological theory and observations, and with dozens of lichenometric calibration curves from around the world, suggests opportunities to assess quantitatively the accuracy and utility of this common dating technique. PMID:16237538

  8. [Aging Law of PAHs in Contaminated Soil and Their Enrichment in Earthworms Characterized by Chemical Extraction Techniques].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-nan; Yang, Xing-lun; Bian, Yong-rong; Gu, Cheng-gang; Liu, Zong-tang; Li, Jiao; Wang, Dai-zhang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of aging on the availability of PAHs, chemical extraction by exhaustive ( ASE extraction) and nonexhaustive techniques (Tenax-TA extraction, hydroxypropyl-p-cyclodextrin ( HPCD ) extraction, n-butyl alcohol ( BuOH) extraction) as well as PAHs accumulation in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were conducted in yellow soil from Baguazhou, Nanjing, China, and red soil from Hainan, China, spiked with phenanthrene, pryene and benzo(a) pyrene and aged 0, 7, 15, 30 and 60 days. The results showed that the concentration of PAHs extracted by ASE and three nonexhaustive techniques and accumulated by earthworms significantly decreased with aging time, except the ASE extracted concentration between 30-and 60-day aging time. Furthermore, the relationships were studied in this experiment between chemical extracted PAHs concentration and accumulated concentration in earthworms. PAHs accumulated concentration in earthworms was not significantly correlated with the exhaustive extracted concentration of PAHs in soil (R² 0.44-0.56), which indicated that ASE extraction techniques could not predict PAHs bioavailability to earthworms because it overestimated the risk of PAHs. However, the PAHs accumulated concentration in earthworms was significantly correlated with the three nonexhaustive extracted concentrations of PAHs in soil, which indicated that all the three nonexhaustive techniques could predict PAHs bioavailability to earthworm to some extent, among which, HPCD extraction (R² 0.94-0.99) was better than Tenax-TA extraction (R² 0.62-0.87) and BuOH extraction (R² 0.69-0.94). So HPCD extraction was a more appropriate and reliable technique to predict bioavailability of PAHs in soil. PMID:27011997

  9. AMS 14C and OSL/IRSL dating of the Dunaszekcső loess sequence (Hungary): chronology for 20 to 150 ka and implications for establishing reliable age-depth models for the last 40 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Molnár, Mihály; Novothny, Ágnes; Páll-Gergely, Barna; Kovács, János; Várhegyi, András

    2014-12-01

    As revealed by 18 AMS radiocarbon and 24 OSL/IRSL ages the Dunaszekcső loess-paleosol sequence is an excellent terrestrial record of paleoenvironmental change in the Carpathian Basin for the last 130 ka, with significant soil forming episodes during the Eemian interglacial (130-115 ka, MIS 5e) and in some subsequent MIS 5 stages, and distinct periods of loess accumulations during the MIS 4 and MIS 2. Charcoals from the sequence made it possible to test the accuracy of 14C ages from mollusc shells. This approach revealed that 14C ages from some gastropods having small shells (<10 mm) (Succinella oblonga, Vitrea crystallina) are statistically indistinguishable from the ages of charcoals, while others (Clausiliidae sp., Chondrula tridens) show age anomalies up to 600-800 years. OSL and pIRIR@290 ages are found to be consistently older, while post-IR OSL ages are younger than the 14C ages from charcoals and molluscs by some thousands of years, except for pIRIR@225 ages that match the radiocarbon ages quite well. OSL and IRSL ages have scatters up to 7-10 thousand years within 40 ka, while charcoals and small molluscs yield consistent ages with relatively low variability. Beyond the observation that some small molluscs seem to yield reliable 14C ages, calibrated 2σ age ranges of the radiocarbon data (ca 500-800 years for 20 to 30 ka) are an order of magnitude narrower than those of the OSL/IRSL methods (1800-4000 years for 25 to 35 ka). Thus, for establishing chronologies within 40 ka, which are both accurate and precise enough to address issues like synchroneity of millennial-scale paleoenvironmental events across regions (e.g. North Atlantic and Europe), AMS radiocarbon dating of shells of specific loess molluscs and charcoals may probably be a powerful chronological tool. However, additional work is definitely required involving 14C and OSL/IRSL dates from other loess sequences to further test the performance of these two supposedly robust chronometers.

  10. Characterization of depositional age and structure of sedimentary successions by U-Pb TIMS and LA-ICP-MS dating of volcanic horizons and detrital zircons: an example from the western Trondheim Nappe Complex, Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, Deta; Grenne, Tor; Corfu, Fernando; Eivind Augland, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Revealing the absolute depositional age of non-fossiliferous sedimentary successions represents a long-lasting challenge in Earth Sciences. Lacking age control hampers the correct interpretation of the temporal evolution of depositional systems, and, if deformed, of the architecture of fold-and-thrust belts. Dating of detrital zircons within clastic sedimentary successions has over the past decades become a popular method to approximate the absolute depositional age and to characterize the source areas of such rocks. If combined with other geochronological information, such as dating of contemporaneous volcanic horizons, a much better resolution of the stratigraphy and structure of non-fossiliferous sedimentary successions can be achieved. The western Trondheim nappe complex in the central Scandinavian Caledonides is a classical area in this respect. On top of Late Cambrian to Early Ordovician ophiolitic fragments, various volcanic, volcano-clastic and clastic successions tell a complex story of island-arc formation, ocean closure and continent collision. Several famous fossil horizons indicate deposition during the Middle to Upper Ordovician (ca. 470-445 Ma), but large areas lack an absolute age control and several contrasting stratigraphic schemes and structural interpretations have been presented in the past. In this contribution we present the results of LA-ICP-MS detrital U-Pb zircon dating of clastic horizons as well as U-Pb TIMS zircon dating of volcanic horizons and magmatic clasts in conglomerates in order to characterize the depositional age and structure of the western Trondheim nappe complex in more detail. Together with field observations, including way up criteria, the zircon data enable significant revisions of existing stratigraphic and structural models. At least four (volcano-)sedimentary successions can be distinguished above the ca. 480-485 Ma greenstones: (1) ca. 470-463 Ma shales, limestones and andesitic porphyrites (Hølonda and Fanabekken

  11. Crystallization ages of the A-type magmatism of the Graciosa Province (Southern Brazil): Constraints from zircon U-Pb (ID-TIMS) dating of coeval K-rich gabbro-dioritic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlach, Silvio R. F.; Siga, Oswaldo; Harara, Ossama M. M.; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Vilalva, Frederico C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Zircon U-Pb (ID-TIMS) ages for gabbro-dioritic rocks and for a monzogranite from the Graciosa Province of A-type granites and syenites, southern Brazil, are presented. Two gabbro-dioritic samples gave concordant ages (580 ± 2, 583 ± 3 Ma), while less precise upper intercept ages were obtained for another one (584 ± 8 Ma) and the monzogranite (585 ± 12 Ma). The best results indicate crystallization ages of the basic-intermediate magmas around 580-583 Ma. Micro-structural evidences and structural relationships between the mafic-intermediate rocks and the much more abundant granites and syenites demonstrate that magmas mingled and partially mixed with one another during emplacement and crystallization. Therefore, the results are representative of the overall magmatism. The extensional A-type magmatism occurred ca. 10-30 Ma after (1) emplacement and crystallization of the high-K calc-alkaline syn- to late-collisional batholiths, (2) peak regional metamorphism, and (3) final amalgamation of the Luis Alves, Curitiba, and Paranaguá terrains. It is suggested that the whole magmatism occurred in a short time interval and there is no evidence of spatial or temporal migration of the magmatic foci. ID-TIMS zircon dating of coeval basic-intermediate rocks may yield better emplacement and crystallization ages than direct dating of granitic and syenitic rocks, which are more susceptible to inheritance and/or late- to post-magmatic disturbances.

  12. Age dating and flow path evaluation of groundwater by SF6 and microbe in the foot of Mt. Fuji, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Chisato; Tsujimura, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Nagaosa, Kazuyo; Sakakibara, Koichi; Umei, Yohei; Ohara, Kazuma

    2016-04-01

    A variety of industries are developed at the foot of volcanic mountains in Japan and the groundwater is major source for industrial activity in those regions. The age of groundwater has been estimated to be from 10 to 30 years in Mt. Fuji regions by using 36Cl and 3H. However, the age has not been evaluated using SF6 with higher time resolution in these regions. Also, the total number of prokaryotes shows a specific value in each spring water, suggesting different path and age of the groundwater. Therefore, we aim to estimate residence time and the groundwater flow in three dimensions using the multi-tracers approach; CFCs, SF6, the total number of prokaryotes, the stable isotopes of oxygen-18, deuterium. We collected totally 25 spring water samples in Mt. Fuji and analyzed concentration of inorganic ions, the stable isotopes of oxygen-18, deuterium, CFCs, SF6. The apparent age of the spring water was estimated to be ranging from 4 to 19 years at the foot of Mt. Fuji. These results are reasonable as considering the existed age data by36Cl (Tosaki, 2008) in this region. The spring water with younger age tends to show higher total number of prokaryotes, suggesting that the groundwater flows dominantly through the shallow and young lava with the higher total number of prokaryotes, leads to younger age. Focusing on a specific spring water, the seasonal change of SF6 and total number of prokaryotes were monitored. The spring water showed a younger age and higher total number of prokaryotes during the high water flow season, whereas it showed an older age and lower total number of prokaryotes. Therefore, the total number of prokaryotes shows a good negative correlation with the residence time of the spring/ groundwater in space and time. This shows a possibility that the total number of prokaryotes could be a useful tracer of groundwater for time and space in the three dimensions information.

  13. Optical and thermoluminescence dating of Middle Stone Age and Kintampo bearing sediments at Birimi, a multi-component archaeological site in Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quickert, Nicole A.; Godfrey-Smith, Dorothy I.; Casey, Joanna L.

    2003-05-01

    We report the first luminescence ages for the archeological and geological sediments forming the substrate of the Birimi archaeological site in the Northern Region of Ghana. The site's significance rests on the fact that it contains a rich collection of artifact assemblages representative of three distinct cultures, and that, on the basis of artifact typology, the earliest assemblage is diagnostic of the Middle Stone Age (MSA) . In situ occurrences of MSA artifacts are found at over 1 m below today's surface. They are overlain by a ceramic-rich complex of a sedentary or semi-sendentary Later Stone Age culture known as the Kintampo. The western half of the site is dominated by the industrial remains of Iron Age smelting activity. Elemental, mineralogical, and sedimentological analysis of the cultural and sub-cultural sedimentary horizons at the site revealed at least three distinct lithostratigraphic units. The quartz sediments are derived from the sandstone of the Gambaga escarpment, mass wasted and accreted fluvially at a rate of 3.2 cm/ka, forming a wide terrace at Birimi. Silts and finer fractions derive from windblown dust, likely from White Volta River and granitic sources to the north. Soil forming processes and wide fluctuations in moisture have progressively reduced the sediments at depth to the resistant quartz and kaolinite, with rich iron oxide coatings, and created two ironstone horizons composed of goethite-cemented quartz nodules. Multiple aliquot green-light stimulated optical ages for 125-150 μm quartz grains yielded ages of 23.6±2.9 and 40.8±11.8 ka for the MSA-bearing sediments, and 58.4±15.3 ka for the base of the terrace. Radiocarbon ages on charcoal from Kintampo-bearing units are 3.36-3.83 ka cal BP, and are supported by thermoluminescence (TL) ages on pottery sherds and burnt house daub fragments of this cultural complex. A 0.4 ka age on sediment from the site's surface confirms that the quartz zeroes well when exposed to natural light

  14. A 13 ± 3 ka age determination of a tholeiite, Pinacate volcanic field, Mexico, and improved methods for 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of young basaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, Brent D.; Gutmann, James T.; Swisher, Carl C., III

    2008-11-01

    Among the youngest lava flows of the Pinacate volcanic field, Sonora, Mexico, is a large outpouring of tholeiite, the Ives flow. This tube-fed pahoehoe flow contrasts sharply with other Pinacate lavas in its great volume, alkali-poor composition and morphologic features, which include novel small structures named "spatter tubes." Despite its K-poor character, young age, and the presence of excess 40Ar, we determined a 40Ar/ 39Ar age on samples of this flow at 13 ± 3 ka. Such an age determination is made possible via careful monitoring of the mass discrimination of the mass spectrometer and by stacking results from multiple incremental-heating experiments into a single, composite isochron. This age is among the youngest ever to be determined with such precision by the 40Ar/ 39Ar method on a K-poor tholeiite.

  15. The age of the Keystone thrust: laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar dating of foreland basin deposits, southern Spring Mountains, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Carr, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    Nonmarine sedimentary and volcaniclastic foreland-basin deposits in the Spring Mountains are cut by the Contact and Keystone thrusts. These synorogenic deposits, informally designated the Lavinia Wash sequence by Carr (1980), previously were assigned a Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous(?) age. New 40Ar.39Ar laser-fusion and incremental-heating studies of a tuff bed in the Lavinia Wash sequence support a best estimate age of 99.0 ?? 0.4 Ma, indicating that the Lavinia Wash sequence is actually late Early Cretaceous in age and establishing a maximum age for final emplacement of the Contact and Keystone thrust plates consistent with the remainder of the Mesozoic foreland thrust belt. -from Authors

  16. Preliminary Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum and laser probe dating of the M1 core of the Manson Impact Structure, Iowa: A K-T boundary crater candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunk, M. J.; Snee, L. W.; French, B. M.; Harlan, S. S.; McGee, J. J.

    1993-03-01

    Preliminary Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum and laser probe dating results from new drill core from the 35-km-diameter Manson Impact Structure (MIS), Iowa indicates a reasonable possibility that the MIS is a Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary impact event. Several different types of samples from a melt-matrix breccia, a unit of apparent crater fill intersected by the M1 core, were analyzed. Ar-40/Ar-39 results from these samples indicate a maximum age for the MIS of about 65.4 plus or minus 0.4(2 sigma) Ma. Petrographic analyses of the samples indicate a high probability that all the dated samples from the melt-matrix breccia contain relict grains that were not entirely melted or degassed at the time of impact, suggesting that the actual age of the MIS could be somewhat younger than our preliminary results indicate. The results are consistent with a previously published age estimate of shocked microcline from the MIS central uplift of 65.7 plus or minus 1.0 Ma.

  17. Preliminary Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum and laser probe dating of the M1 core of the Manson Impact Structure, Iowa: A K-T boundary crater candidate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunk, M. J.; Snee, L. W.; French, B. M.; Harlan, S. S.; Mcgee, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum and laser probe dating results from new drill core from the 35-km-diameter Manson Impact Structure (MIS), Iowa indicates a reasonable possibility that the MIS is a Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary impact event. Several different types of samples from a melt-matrix breccia, a unit of apparent crater fill intersected by the M1 core, were analyzed. Ar-40/Ar-39 results from these samples indicate a maximum age for the MIS of about 65.4 plus or minus 0.4(2 sigma) Ma. Petrographic analyses of the samples indicate a high probability that all the dated samples from the melt-matrix breccia contain relict grains that were not entirely melted or degassed at the time of impact, suggesting that the actual age of the MIS could be somewhat younger than our preliminary results indicate. The results are consistent with a previously published age estimate of shocked microcline from the MIS central uplift of 65.7 plus or minus 1.0 Ma.

  18. in vivo quantification of white matter microstructure for use in aging: A focus on two emerging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lamar, Melissa; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Charlton, Rebecca A.; Dean, Douglas; Little, Deborah; Deoni, Sean C

    2013-01-01

    Human brain imaging has seen many advances in the quantification of white matter in vivo. For example, these advances have revealed the association between white matter damage and vascular disease as well as their impact on risk for and development of dementia and depression in an aging population. Current neuroimaging methods to quantify white matter damage provide a foundation for understanding such age-related neuropathology; however, these methods are not as adept at determining the underlying microstructural abnormalities signaling at risk tissue or driving white matter damage in the aging brain. This review will begin with a brief overview of the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in understanding white matter alterations in aging before focusing in more detail on select advances in both diffusion-based methods and multi-component relaxometry techniques for imaging white matter microstructural integrity within myelin sheaths and the axons they encase. While DTI greatly extended the field of white matter interrogation, these more recent technological advances will add clarity to the underlying microstructural mechanisms that contribute to white matter damage. More specifically, the methods highlighted in this review may prove more sensitive (and specific) for determining the contribution of myelin versus axonal integrity to the aging of white matter in brain. PMID:24080382

  19. In vivo quantification of white matter microstructure for use in aging: a focus on two emerging techniques.

    PubMed

    Lamar, Melissa; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Charlton, Rebecca A; Dean, Douglas; Little, Deborah; Deoni, Sean C

    2014-02-01

    Human brain imaging has seen many advances in the quantification of white matter in vivo. For example, these advances have revealed the association between white matter damage and vascular disease as well as their impact on risk for and development of dementia and depression in an aging population. Current neuroimaging methods to quantify white matter damage provide a foundation for understanding such age-related neuropathology; however, these methods are not as adept at determining the underlying microstructural abnormalities signaling at risk tissue or driving white matter damage in the aging brain. This review will begin with a brief overview of the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in understanding white matter alterations in aging before focusing in more detail on select advances in both diffusion-based methods and multi-component relaxometry techniques for imaging white matter microstructural integrity within myelin sheaths and the axons they encase. Although DTI greatly extended the field of white matter interrogation, these more recent technological advances will add clarity to the underlying microstructural mechanisms that contribute to white matter damage. More specifically, the methods highlighted in this review may prove more sensitive (and specific) for determining the contribution of myelin versus axonal integrity to the aging of white matter in brain. PMID:24080382

  20. Direct Dating of Hominids Remains In Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Falguères, C.

    When archaeological sites are associated with human remains, it is relevant to be able to date those valuable remains for different reasons. The main one is that it avoids the stratigraphical problems which can be due to intrusive burials in the sequence. The other reason consists in the fact that human bones may be encountered out of established stratigraphical context. On the other hand, the majority of dating methods currently used are destructive and can not be applied on these precious samples particularly when they are older than 40,000 years and can not be dated by radiocarbon. Since several years, we have developped a completely non-destructive method which consists in the measurement of human remains using the gamma -ray spectrometry. This technique has been used recently by other laboratories. We present here two important cases for the knowledge of human evolution in Eurasia. The first example is Qafzeh site in Israel where many human skeletons have been unearthed from burials associated with fauna and lithic artefacts. This site has been dated by several independent radiometric methods. So, it was possible to compare our gamma results with the other results yielded by the different methods. The second case concerns the most evolved Homo erectus found in Java, Indonesia, at Ngandong site, close to the Solo river. A recent debate has been focused on the age of these fossils and their direct dating is of outmost importance for the knowledge of settlement of Modern Humans in South-East Asia.

  1. Age-related macular degeneration: clinical findings, histopathology and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Zarbin, Marco A; Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness among people over age 55 years in industrialized countries. Known major risk factors for AMD include: age >55 years, history of smoking, white race, and mutations in various components of the complement system. Early AMD is characterized by the presence of drusen and pigmentary abnormalities. Late AMD is associated with central visual loss and is characterized by the presence of choroidal neovascularization and/or geographic atrophy. Early AMD is associated with a number of biochemical abnormalities including oxidative damage to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, complement deposition in the RPE-Bruch's membrane-choriocapillaris complex, lipidization of Bruch's membrane, and extracellular matrix abnormalities (e.g. collagen crosslinking, advanced glycation end product formation). Antiangiogenic drugs block the vascular leakage associated with choroidal new vessels, thus reducing retinal edema and stabilizing or restoring vision. At this time, there are no proven effective treatments for the nonexudative complications of AMD. Modern ocular imaging technologies (including spectral domain and phase variance optical coherence tomography, short- and long-wavelength fundus autofluorescence, adaptive optics-scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and near-infrared reflectance) enable one to follow changes in the RPE, photoreceptors, and choriocapillaris quantitatively as the disease progresses. In addition, one can quantitatively assess the volume of drusen and areas of atrophy. These data, when correlated with the known histopathology of AMD, may provide useful measures of treatment efficacy that are likely to be more sensitive and reproducible than conventional end points such as visual acuity and rate of enlargement of geographic atrophy. As a result, these imaging technologies may be valuable in assessing the effects of cell-based therapy for patients with AMD. PMID:24732758

  2. Constraining the age and origin of the seamount province in the Northeast Indian Ocean using geophysical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taneja, Rajat; O'Neill, Craig

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of western margin of Australia from Greater India started around 155 Ma and progressed southwards. After the separation, the interceding intraplate region experienced large volumes of submarine volcanism, extending over 100 Myrs. The Christmas Island Seamount Province (CHRISP, as it has been dubbed) lies south of the Java-Sunda Trench, and contains numerous submerged volcanic seamounts, and two sub-aerially exposed island groups—Cocos (Keeling) Islands, and Christmas Island. While recent geochronological investigations have shed light on the diverse eruption ages of the volcanics of this region, some islands/seamounts have demonstrated protracted volcanic histories, and it is not clear how the volcanic loading, tectonic subsidence, and subsequent emergence history of the islands relates to these discrete volcanic episodes. This study utilises a number of geophysical techniques to determine the crustal structure, loading and subsidence history, and last sub-aerial exposure age for the CHRISP. The study shows that flexural and subsidence modelling are reliable techniques in constraining the age of the seamounts when geochronological techniques are not possible. Utilising regional gravity signatures, we model the crustal structure underneath the Cocos (Keeling) Island, and constrain the thickness of the limestone cover between 900 and 2,100 m. Using age-depth subsidence curves for oceanic lithosphere the time since these seamounts were exposed above sea-level was determined, and a trend in exposure ages that youngs towards the west is observed. Two episodes of volcanism have been recorded at Christmas Island and they are of different origin. The younger phase in the Pliocene is a manifestation of flexure induced cracks produced in the lithosphere as it rides the subduction fore-bulge, whereas a low velocity seismic zone rising from the lower mantle, and tectonic reorganization, may be associated with the older Eocene volcanic phase, as well as much of

  3. New Sakmarian ages for the Rio Bonito formation (Paraná Basin, southern Brazil) based on LA-ICP-MS U-Pb radiometric dating of zircons crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagliari, Joice; Lavina, Ernesto Luiz Correa; Philipp, Ruy Paulo; Tognoli, Francisco Manoel Wohnrath; Basei, Miguel Angelo Stipp; Faccini, Ubiratan Ferrucio

    2014-12-01

    Two ash fall beds (tonstein) sampled from the post-glacial Permian deposits of the Paraná Basin have provided new U-Pb radiometric age constraints for this stratigraphic interval. The zircon grains were recovered from tonstein layers interbedded with fine-grained and carbonaceous lithologies in the middle portion of the Rio Bonito Formation. In both samples, the dominant population is interpreted as generated by explosive volcanism, as having formed immediately before the eruption. Based on 238U/206Pb, the selected zircon grains from the dominant population have weighted mean ages of 290.6 ± 2.8 Ma and 281.7 ± 3.2 Ma, corresponding to the Sakmarian and Kungurian ages in the Cisuralian epoch, respectively. These ages constrain the time of the deposition of the tonstein horizons and have important stratigraphic implications for the Late Paleozoic evolution of both the Paraná Basin and the southwestern region of Gondwana. The results presented here and the radiometric data already published suggest that deposition of the post-glacial coal-bearing deposits of the Rio Bonito Formation was probably initiated before the Early Permian. Thus, we infer that the climate had already ameliorated by this period in order to allow for the formation and accumulation of peat in this region of Gondwana.

  4. Integrated J- and H-band spectra of globular clusters in the LMC: implications for stellar population models and galaxy age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubenova, M.; Kuntschner, H.; Rejkuba, M.; Silva, D. R.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The rest-frame near-IR spectra of intermediate age (1-2 Gyr) stellar populations are dominated by carbon based absorption features offering a wealth of information. Yet, spectral libraries that include the near-IR wavelength range do not sample a sufficiently broad range of ages and metallicities to allow for accurate calibration of stellar population models and thus the interpretation of the observations. Aims: In this paper we investigate the integrated J- and H-band spectra of six intermediate age and old globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Methods: The observations for six clusters were obtained with the SINFONI integral field spectrograph at the ESO VLT Yepun telescope, covering the J (1.09-1.41 μm) and H-band (1.43-1.86 μm) spectral range. The spectral resolution is 6.7 Å in J and 6.6 Å in H-band (FWHM). The observations were made in natural seeing, covering the central 24″ × 24″ of each cluster and in addition sampling the brightest eight red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star candidates within the clusters' tidal radii. Targeted clusters cover the ages of ~1.3 Gyr (NGC 1806, NGC 2162), 2 Gyr (NGC 2173) and ~13 Gyr (NGC 1754, NGC 2005, NGC 2019). Results.H-band C2 and K-band 12CO (2-0) feature strengths for the LMC globular clusters are compared to the models of Maraston (2005). C2 is reasonably well reproduced by the models at all ages, while 12CO (2-0) shows good agreement for older (age ≥ 2 Gyr) populations, but the younger (1.3 Gyr) globular clusters do not follow the models. We argue that this is due to the fact that the empirical calibration of the models relies on only a few Milky Way carbon star spectra, which show different 12CO (2-0) index strengths than the LMC stars. The C2 absorption feature strength correlates strongly with age. It is present essentially only in populations that have 1-2 Gyr old stars, while its value is consistent with zero for older populations. The distinct spectral

  5. Acoustic emissions generated in aged dental composites using a laser thermoacoustic technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Lin, C T; Dong, D R; Huang, H M; Shih, Y H

    2000-09-01

    The heating up of dental composites by laser will produce acoustic emissions (AEs) that may be related to fracture mechanisms in the composites. It has been proved that the mechanical properties of dental composites are affected by storage in food simulating liquids, i.e. 75% ethanol, which has a solubility parameter approximating to that of bisphenol glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) resin. A new method was innovated to evaluate the laser-induced AEs in dental composites aged by 75% ethanol solution. Model systems (50/50 BisGMA/TEGDMA resin filled with 0% and 75 wt.% 5-10 microm silanized BaSiO6) as well as three commercial composites (Marathon One, Z100 and Herculite XRV) were used in this study. Nine samples acting as the control group were tested to establish the correlation of AEs to laser power. The effect of ageing by immersion in 75% ethanol on AEs and diametral tensile strength (DTS) was then evaluated. A quasi-continuous wave CO2 laser was used to heat up the composites. AEs of frequency 100-200 kHz were collected, filtered, recorded and processed using a 4610 Smart Acoustic Monitor. Burst patterns, which formally were assumed to be correlated to fracture mechanisms, were also identified from the data obtained at laser power > or = 5 W for commercial composites and > or = 4 W for model systems. Higher laser powers cause the AE to increase for all composites except unfilled model resin. AEs as a function of power for all aged systems were flat (< 100 events) below 4 W. Emissions then rose sharply to > 1000 events at 7.1 W. Statistically significant differences were found between the AEs obtained at 5 W (commercial composites) and those at 4.3 W (model systems) for material systems and storage times. Marathon One was less affected by the laser and an abrupt change in AE was found between days 0 and 7 of storage for all commercial composites. The AE value from the unfilled model resin was found to be significantly different from that of the model composites

  6. Radiocarbon Dating, Memories, and Hopes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Libby, W. F.

    1972-10-01

    The history of radiocarbon dating from 1939 to the present is reviewed. The basic principles of radiocarbon dating are that cosmic rays make living things radioactive with {sup 14}C to a certain level fixed by the environment and that at death the intake of food stops so no replenishment of the {sup 14}C steadily lost by the immutable decay occurs. Therefore measurement of the degree of decay gives the time lapse since death, i.e., the radiocarbon age. The equipment developed and experiments performed to measure the specific activity of specimens to be dated are described. The results obtained by world-wide experimenters are discussed. These showed that on simultaneity radiocarbon dating is apparently reliable but that absolute dates may be incorrect by as much as 600 to 700 y. The value of radiocarbon dating to archaeologists, geologists, climatologists, and historians is stressed. (LCL)

  7. 29 CFR 4022.10 - Earliest PBGC Retirement Date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... after the date the participant reaches age 55, the Earliest PBGC Retirement Date for the participant is... reaches age 55, the Earliest PBGC Retirement Date for the participant is the date the participant reaches... participant reaches age 55, the PBGC will make a determination, under the facts and circumstances, as...

  8. Detection of coffee flavour ageing by solid-phase microextraction/surface acoustic wave sensor array technique (SPME/SAW).

    PubMed

    Barié, Nicole; Bücking, Mark; Stahl, Ullrich; Rapp, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The use of polymer coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor arrays is a very promising technique for highly sensitive and selective detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We present new developments to achieve a low cost sensor setup with a sampling method enabling the highly reproducible detection of volatiles even in the ppb range. Since the VOCs of coffee are well known by gas chromatography (GC) research studies, the new sensor array was tested for an easy assessable objective: coffee ageing during storage. As reference method these changes were traced with a standard GC/FID set-up, accompanied by sensory panellists. The evaluation of GC data showed a non-linear characteristic for single compound concentrations as well as for total peak area values, disabling prediction of the coffee age. In contrast, the new SAW sensor array demonstrates a linear dependency, i.e. being capable to show a dependency between volatile concentration and storage time. PMID:25624226

  9. Race and Ancestry in the Age of Inclusion: Technique and Meaning in Post-Genomic Science

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Janet K.; Ackerman, Sara L.; Darling, Katherine Weatherford; Hiatt, Robert A.; Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how race and ancestry are taken up in gene-environment interaction (GEI) research on complex diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Using 54 in-depth interviews of 33 scientists and over 200 hours of observation at scientific conferences, we explore how GEI researchers use and interpret race, ethnicity, and ancestry in their work. We find that the use of self-identified race and ethnicity (SIRE) exists alongside ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to ascertain genetic ancestry. Our participants assess the utility of these two techniques in relative terms, downplaying the accuracy and value of SIRE compared to the precision and necessity of AIMs. In doing so, we argue that post-genomic scientists seeking to understand the interactions of genetic and environmental disease determinants actually undermine their ability to do so, by valorizing precise characterizations of individuals’ genetic ancestry over measurement of the social processes and relations that differentiate social groups. PMID:25378251

  10. Race and ancestry in the age of inclusion: technique and meaning in post-genomic science.

    PubMed

    Shim, Janet K; Ackerman, Sara L; Darling, Katherine Weatherford; Hiatt, Robert A; Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin

    2014-12-01

    This article examines how race and ancestry are taken up in gene-environment interaction (GEI) research on complex diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Using 54 in-depth interviews of 33 scientists and over 200 hours of observation at scientific conferences, we explore how GEI researchers use and interpret race, ethnicity, and ancestry in their work. We find that the use of self-identified race and ethnicity (SIRE) exists alongside ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to ascertain genetic ancestry. Our participants assess the utility of these two techniques in relative terms, downplaying the accuracy and value of SIRE compared to the precision and necessity of AIMs. In doing so, we argue that post-genomic scientists seeking to understand the interactions of genetic and environmental disease determinants actually undermine their ability to do so by valorizing precise characterizations of individuals' genetic ancestry over measurement of the social processes and relations that differentiate social groups. PMID:25378251

  11. The impact of minimum legal drinking age laws on alcohol consumption, smoking, and marijuana use: evidence from a regression discontinuity design using exact date of birth.

    PubMed

    Yörük, Barış K; Yörük, Ceren Ertan

    2011-07-01

    This paper uses a regression discontinuity design to estimate the impact of the minimum legal drinking age laws on alcohol consumption, smoking, and marijuana use among young adults. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997 Cohort), we find that granting legal access to alcohol at age 21 leads to an increase in several measures of alcohol consumption, including an up to a 13 percentage point increase in the probability of drinking. Furthermore, this effect is robust under several different parametric and non-parametric models. We also find some evidence that the discrete jump in alcohol consumption at age 21 has negative spillover effects on marijuana use but does not affect the smoking habits of young adults. Our results indicate that although the change in alcohol consumption habits of young adults following their 21st birthday is less severe than previously known, policies that are designed to reduce drinking among young adults may have desirable impacts and can create public health benefits. PMID:21719131

  12. QuEChERS, a sample preparation technique that is “catching on”: an up-to-date interview with its inventors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The technique of QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) is only 7 years old, yet it is revolutionizing the manner in which multiresidue, multiclass pesticide analysis (and perhaps beyond) is performed. Columnist Ron Majors sits down with inventors Steve Lehotay and Michelangelo An...

  13. Growth marks observation: preferential techniques and teeth for ageing of Spanish red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus).

    PubMed

    Azorit, C; Analla, M; Hervas, J; Carrasco, R; Muñoz-Cobo, J

    2002-10-01

    A total of 207 teeth belonging to 53 deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) from Sierra Morena (South of Spain) were analysed using histological thin sections and/or polished thick sections. Growth marks were observed in dentine and cementum of incisors, molars and canines. Tooth, region of the tooth, and type of preparation giving the best performance in terms of sharpness and interpretation ease of the growth marks, when used for Spanish deer ageing, were identified. The tissue chosen for the study was the cellular cementum of the inter-radicular pad from molars and the acellular cementum of the root from incisors, both observed through longitudinal cuts. Histological sections obtained with a conventional microtome were optimal for a reliable identification of the first growth marks. In sections thicker than 15 microm the first rest line, when observed in cementum can be confused with the cementum-dentine junction; whereas in the polished sections from molars it will not appear at all. Dentine interpretation was more difficult. Its observation should only be accomplished using cross-sections of the molar root. Secondary or accessory marks were visible in every tooth, being those from the molar pad the easiest to distinguish. Canines were the less suitable teeth for this study. PMID:12484425

  14. Successful performance of luminescence dating on glacial sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medialdea, Alicia; Bateman, Mark; Evans, David; Roberts, David; Chiverrell, Richard; Clark, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The use of luminescence dating to establish accurate chronology of sedimentary environments has been exponentially increasing in the last decades. The age range covered and the versatility of the technique have made it become a key in studies of the Quaternary. Nevertheless luminescence dating of glacial sediments has shown to be challenging because of being affected by incomplete bleaching but also due to the complex luminescence behaviour of quartz grain within these sediments. This complexity often causes standard protocols in luminescence dating to be inadequate for this type of material. More than 150 samples from glacial environments are being dated using OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) to provide a base for the BRITICE-CHRONO project which aim is to establish the retreat patterns of the last British and Irish Ice Sheet. This work presents the successful performance of luminescence dating on a selection of these samples for which ages coherent with the LGM have been estimated when applying improved measuring and analysing methods. Comparison with the results obtained using standard protocols showed that implausible ages would have been derived otherwise. In addition, within the B-C project duplicate samples of some sedimentary units have been measured. The coherent results obtained show the reproducibility of these improved methods giving robustness to the age estimates and providing a solid base for the establishing of the ice retreat patterns.

  15. Development of a precise and accurate age-depth model based on 40Ar/39Ar dating of volcanic material in the ANDRILL (1B) drill core, Southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, J. I.; McIntosh, W. C.; Dunbar, N. W.

    2012-10-01

    High precision 40Ar/39Ar dates on a variety of volcanic materials from the AND-1B drill core provide pinning points for defining the chronostratigraphy for the core. The volcanic materials dated include 1) felsic and basaltic tephra, 2) interior of a ~ 3 m thick intermediate submarine lava flow, and 3) felsic and basaltic volcanic clasts. In the upper 600 m of the core, two felsic tephra, two basaltic tephra and the intermediate laval flow yield precise and depositional ages, with further maximum age constraints from volcanic clasts. Below 600 m in the core, tephric intervals are significantly altered and maximum age constraints only are available from volcanic clasts. The ages for eight stratigraphic intervals are 1) 17.17-17.18 mbsf, basaltic clast (maximum depositional age 0.310 ± 0.039 Ma, all errors quoted at 2σ), 2) 52.80-52.82 mbsf, three basaltic clasts (maximum depositional age 0.726 ± 0.052 Ma), 3) 85.27-85.87 mbsf felsic tephra (1.014 ± 0.008 Ma), 4) ~ 112-145 mbsf sequence of basaltic tephra (1.633 ± 0.057 to 1.683 ± 0.055 Ma), 5) 480.97-481.96 mbsf pumice-rich mudstone (4.800 ± 0.076 Ma), 6) 646.30-649.34 mbsf intermediate lava flow (6.48 ± 0.13 Ma), 7) 822.78 mbsf kaersutite phenocrysts from volcanic clasts (maximum depositional age 8.53 ± 0.53 Ma) and 8) ~ 1280 mbsf, three volcanic clasts (maximum depositional age 13.57 ± 0.13 Ma). Minimum average sediment accumulation rates or 102 and 87 m/Ma for the upper and lower 650 m of core, respectively were calculated using the 40Ar/39Ar analyses. The volcanic material recovered from AND-1B also reveals a general northward progression of volcanism in Southern McMurdo Sound.

  16. Effect of different aging techniques on the polysaccharide and phenolic composition and sensory characteristics of Syrah red wines fermented using different yeast strains.

    PubMed

    del Barrio-Galán, Rubén; Medel-Marabolí, Marcela; Peña-Neira, Álvaro

    2015-07-15

    The effect of high levels of the polysaccharide Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain (HPS) and another conventional yeast strain (FERM) on the polysaccharide and phenolic composition of Syrah red wines during alcoholic fermentation and subsequent aging on lees, with or without oak wood chips, and on inactive dry yeast was investigated. The HPS yeast released higher amounts of polysaccharides during alcoholic fermentation than FERM yeast (485 g L(-1) and 403 g L(-1), respectively) and after the aging period (516 g L(-1) and 500 g L(-1), respectively). The different aging techniques increased the polysaccharide concentration; the concentration was dependent on the aging technique applied. The interaction of the polysaccharides with the phenolic compounds depended on the yeast strain, aging technique, aging period and compound analysed. The HPS wines exhibited better sensory characteristics than the FERM wines after alcoholic fermentation; however, during the aging period, it was difficult to determine which technique produced the best wine due to the interactions of aging technique, aging period and sensory attribute evaluated. PMID:25722146

  17. The use of single-date MODIS imagery for estimating large-scale urban impervious surface fraction with spectral mixture analysis and machine learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chengbin; Wu, Changshan

    2013-12-01

    Urban impervious surface information is essential for urban and environmental applications at the regional/national scales. As a popular image processing technique, spectral mixture analysis (SMA) has rarely been applied to coarse-resolution imagery due to the difficulty of deriving endmember spectra using traditional endmember selection methods, particularly within heterogeneous urban environments. To address this problem, we derived endmember signatures through a least squares solution (LSS) technique with known abundances of sample pixels, and integrated these endmember signatures into SMA for mapping large-scale impervious surface fraction. In addition, with the same sample set, we carried out objective comparative analyses among SMA (i.e. fully constrained and unconstrained SMA) and machine learning (i.e. Cubist regression tree and Random Forests) techniques. Analysis of results suggests three major conclusions. First, with the extrapolated endmember spectra from stratified random training samples, the SMA approaches performed relatively well, as indicated by small MAE values. Second, Random Forests yields more reliable results than Cubist regression tree, and its accuracy is improved with increased sample sizes. Finally, comparative analyses suggest a tentative guide for selecting an optimal approach for large-scale fractional imperviousness estimation: unconstrained SMA might be a favorable option with a small number of samples, while Random Forests might be preferred if a large number of samples are available.

  18. A replica technique for extracting precipitates from neutron-irradiated or thermal-aged vanadium alloys for TEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, K.; Iwasaki, M.

    2014-06-01

    A carbon replica technique has been developed to extract precipitates from vanadium alloys. Using this technique, precipitation phases can be extracted from neutron-irradiated or thermal-aged V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. Precipitate identification using EDS X-ray analysis and electron diffraction was facilitated. Only NaCl type of Ti(OCN) precipitate was formed in the thermal-aged V-4Cr-4Ti alloys at 600 °C for 20 h and cation sub-lattice was only occupied by Ti atoms. However, the thin plate of precipitates with NaCl type of crystallographic structure could be seen in the V-4Cr-4Ti alloys irradiated at 593 °C in the JOYO fast reactor. The precipitate contained chromium and vanadium atoms on the cation sub-lattice as well as titanium atoms. It is considered that the phase of MX type (M = Ti, V, Cr and X = O, N, C) is a metastable phase under neutron irradiation.

  19. Experimental Techniques for Evaluating the Effects of Aging on Impact and High Strain Rate Properties of Triaxial Braided Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts, Gary D.; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Gilat, Amos; Matrka, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program is underway to measure the impact and high strain rate properties of triaxial braided composite materials and to quantify any degradation in properties as a result of thermal and hygroscopic aging typically encountered during service. Impact tests are being conducted on flat panels using a projectile designed to induce high rate deformation similar to that experienced in a jet engine fan case during a fan blade-out event. The tests are being conducted on as-fabricated panels and panels subjected to various numbers of aging cycles. High strain rate properties are being measured using a unique Hopkinson bar apparatus that has a larger diameter than conventional Hopkinson bars. This larger diameter is needed to measure representative material properties because of the large unit cell size of the materials examined in this work. In this paper the experimental techniques used for impact and high strain rate testing are described and some preliminary results are presented for both as-fabricated and aged composites.

  20. Fast charging technique for high power LiFePO4 batteries: A mechanistic analysis of aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anseán, D.; Dubarry, M.; Devie, A.; Liaw, B. Y.; García, V. M.; Viera, J. C.; González, M.

    2016-07-01

    One of the major issues hampering the acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs) is the anxiety associated with long charging time. Hence, the ability to fast charging lithium-ion battery (LIB) systems is gaining notable interest. However, fast charging is not tolerated by all LIB chemistries because it affects battery functionality and accelerates its aging processes. Here, we investigate the long-term effects of multistage fast charging on a commercial high power LiFePO4-based cell and compare it to another cell tested under standard charging. Coupling incremental capacity (IC) and IC peak area analysis together with mechanistic model simulations ('Alawa' toolbox with harvested half-cell data), we quantify the degradation modes that cause aging of the tested cells. The results show that the proposed fast charging technique caused similar aging effects as standard charging. The degradation is caused by a linear loss of lithium inventory, coupled with a less degree of linear loss of active material on the negative electrode. This study validates fast charging as a feasible mean of operation for this particular LIB chemistry and cell architecture. It also illustrates the benefits of a mechanistic approach to understand cell degradation on commercial cells.

  1. Copper-bearing encrustations: a tool for age dating and constraining the physical-chemical regime during the late Quaternary in the Wadi Araba, southern Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, H. G.; Techmer, A.; Botz, R.

    2013-07-01

    The alluvial-fluvial drainage system in the Wadi Araba, southern Jordan, incised into Cambrian clastic sedimentary and felsic igneous rocks giving rise to a disseminated Cu-(Mn) mineralization of diagenetic and epigenetic origin along the southern branch of the Dead Sea Transform Fault (=DSTF). During the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, the primary Cu sulfides were replaced by secondary minerals giving rise to hypogene to supergene encrustations, bearing Cu silicates, Cu carbonates, Cu oxychlorides and cupriferous vanadates. They occur in fissures, coat walls and developed even-rim/meniscus and blocky cements in the arenites near the surface. The first generation cement has been interpreted in terms of freshwater vadose hydraulic conditions, while the second-generation blocky cement of chrysocolla and malachite evolved as late cement. The Cu-Si-C fluid system within the Wadi Araba drainage system is the on-shore or subaerial facies of a regressive lacustrine regime called the "Lake Lisan Stage", a precursor of the present-day Dead Sea. Radiocarbon dating (younger than 27,740 ± 1,570 years), oxygen-isotope-based temperature determination (hot brine-related mineralization at 60-80 °C, climate-driven mineralization at 25-30 °C) and thermodynamical calculations let to the subdivision of this secondary Cu mineralization into four stages, whose chemical and mineralogical composition was controlled by the variation of the anion complexes of silica and carbonate and the chlorine contents. The acidity of the pore water positively correlates with the degree of oxidation. The highest aridity and most intensive evaporation deduced from the thermodynamical calculations were achieved during stage 3, which is coeval with late Lake Lisan. Geogene processes causing Cu-enriched encrustations overlap with man-made manganiferous slags. The smelter feed has been derived mainly from Cu ore which developed during Late Pleistocene in the region.

  2. Radioactive dating of the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John J.; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Truran, James W.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which an accurate determination of the age of the Galaxy, and thus a lower bound on the age of the universe, can be obtained from radioactive dating is discussed. Emphasis is given to the use of the long-lived radioactive nuclei Re-187, Th-232, U-238, and U-235. The nature of the production sites of these and other potential Galactic chronometers is examined along with their production ratios. Age determinations from models of nucleocosmochronology are reviewed and compared with age determination from stellar sources and age constraints form cosmological considerations.

  3. Validation of the FFM PD count technique for screening personality pathology in later middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Joke; Rossi, Gina; De Clercq, Barbara; Dierckx, Eva; Bastiaansen, Leen

    2013-01-01

    Research on the applicability of the five factor model (FFM) to capture personality pathology coincided with the development of a FFM personality disorder (PD) count technique, which has been validated in adolescent, young, and middle-aged samples. This study extends the literature by validating this technique in an older sample. Five alternative FFM PD counts based upon the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R) are computed and evaluated in terms of both convergent and divergent validity with the Assessment of DSM-IV Personality Disorders Questionnaire (shortly ADP-IV; DSM-IV, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - Fourth edition). For the best working count for each PD normative data are presented, from which cut-off scores are derived. The validity of these cut-offs and their usefulness as a screening tool is tested against both a categorical (i.e., the DSM-IV - Text Revision), and a dimensional (i.e., the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology; DAPP) measure of personality pathology. All but the Antisocial and Obsessive-Compulsive counts exhibited adequate convergent and divergent validity, supporting the use of this method in older adults. Using the ADP-IV and the DAPP - Short Form as validation criteria, results corroborate the use of the FFM PD count technique to screen for PDs in older adults, in particular for the Paranoid, Borderline, Histrionic, Avoidant, and Dependent PDs. Given the age-neutrality of the NEO PI-R and the considerable lack of valid personality assessment tools, current findings appear to be promising for the assessment of pathology in older adults. PMID:22913535

  4. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating of basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsukamoto, S.; Duller, G.A.T.; Wintle, A.G.; Muhs, D.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of dating basalt using luminescence was tested on four samples with independent age control from Cima volcanic field, California, with the ultimate aim of assessing whether the technique could be used to date sediments on the surface of Mars. Previous analysis of these samples had demonstrated that the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal is most suitable for dating as it showed the lowest fading rate among various luminescence signals. In this study, changes in equivalent dose as a function of preheat are described. The ages for the two youngest Cima samples agree with the independent ages based on cosmogenic nuclide measurements (12.0 ?? 0.8 ka). In the two older samples (dated to 320 and 580 ka by K-Ar), the luminescence behaviour is more complex and the form of the IRSL decay curve is seen to vary with dose. Mathematical fitting is used to isolate two components and their intensities are used to produce dose response curves. The slower component yields a larger equivalent dose. However, even using this component and after correction for fading, the ages obtained for the older samples are younger than the K-Ar ages. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Identifying sources of dissolved organic carbon in agriculturally dominated rivers using radiocarbon age dating: Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sickman, James O.; DiGiorgio, Carol L.; Davisson, M. Lee; Lucero, Delores M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    We used radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to resolve sources of riverine carbon within agriculturally dominated landscapes in California. During 2003 and 2004, average Δ14C for DOC was -254‰ in agricultural drains in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, -218‰ in the San Joaquin River, -175‰ in the California State Water Project and -152‰ in the Sacramento River. The age of bulk DOC transiting the rivers of California's Central Valley is the oldest reported for large rivers and suggests wide-spread loss of soil organic matter caused by agriculture and urbanization. Using DAX 8 adsorbent, we isolated and measured 14C concentrations in hydrophobic acid fractions (HPOA); river samples showed evidence of bomb-pulse carbon with average Δ14C of 91 and 76‰ for the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers, respectively, with older HPOA, -204‰, observed in agricultural drains. An operationally defined non-HPOA fraction of DOC was observed in the San Joaquin River with seasonally computed Δ14C values of between -275 and -687‰; the source of this aged material was hypothesized to be physically protected organic-matter in high clay-content soils and agrochemicals (i.e., radiocarbon-dead material) applied to farmlands. Mixing models suggest that the Sacramento River contributes about 50% of the DOC load in the California State Water Project, and agricultural drains contribute approximately one-third of the load. In contrast to studies showing stabilization of soil carbon pools within one or two decades following land conversion, sustained loss of soil organic matter, occurring many decades after the initial agricultural-land conversion, was observed in California's Central Valley.

  6. Radiocarbon dating of terrestrial carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbonates encompass a wide range of materials that potentially could be used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Biogenic carbonates, including shells and tests of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, and foraminifera, are preserved in a variety of late Quaternary deposits and may be suitable for 14C dating. Primary calcareous deposits (marls, tufa, speleothems) and secondary carbonates (rhizoliths, fracture fill, soil carbonate) may also be targeted for dating when conditions are favorable. This chapter discusses issues that are commonly encountered in 14C dating of terrestrial carbonates, including isotopic disequilibrium and open-system behavior, as well as methods used to determine the reliability of ages derived from these materials. Recent methodological advancements that may improve the accuracy and precision of 14C ages of terrestrial carbonates are also highlighted.

  7. Some geophysical considerations in radioisotope dating applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Radioisotope dating only assumes radioactive decay laws are taking place allowing closed form solutions to be obtained in generating a sample date estimate. To be discussed in this work is the isotopic distribution expected in geological samples due to mass diffusion superimposed on that from simple radioactive decay. By taking into consideration the isotope effect (differential mass diffusion rates) when measuring isotopic ratios from very old samples, the distribution dependency will cause a bias if isotopic diffusion rates are not identical throughout a material (or at least across the boundaries of all samples measured). The isotope effect being that isotopes having a smaller atomic mass will diffuse faster in a medium than will their heavier counterparts causing concentration gradients of their ratios even when there are no contributions from radioactive decay which will tend to bias all sample ages (slopes of the isochron) to have a more linear distribution. The application to Sr/Rb dating is evaluated and shown to result in expected age overestimates. Suggested methods to test for this effect along with sample preparation techniques to minimize it are discussed. Special thanks the NCSU Nuclear Engineering Department.

  8. ESR dating of pseudotachylite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, A.; Toyoda, S.; Takagi, H.; Arita, K.

    2002-12-01

    ESR (electron spin resonance) dating method has been used to determine the ages of quaternary events. When a mineral receives natural radiation, a part of paired electrons in quartz are ionized, and are trapped by lattice defects and impurties as unpaired electrons. The amount of unpaired electrons increases with time. The ESR age is obtained by dividing the total dose of natural radiation by the natural dose rate. Gamma ray doses are given to the sample to obtain the total dose by extrapolating the dose response of the signal intensity to the zero ordinate. The natural dose rate is calculated from U, Th, and K concentrations, and so on. Quartz is one of the promising minerals useful for ESR dating. In the present paper, we attempted to obtain ages of a land slide event. We collected pseudotachylite from Lantan, Himalaya. A land of about 4 km in diameter has found to have slid several kilometers resulting in pseudotachylite at the base. The samples were gently crushed sieved and soaked in 6N HCl for 1 night and then in 20% HF for two hours, but quartz grains were too small to be extracted. However, ESR signals of characteristic quartz were observed. As long as the sample is uniform, it is not crucial to extract pure quartz grains. With the usual procedure of ESR dating, gamma ray irradiation and ESR measurements, we obtained accumulated natural doses of 290 to 450 Gy. The concentrations of radioactive elements, K, U, Th, which give most of the natural dose to quartz grains, were measured by the low background gamma ray spectrometry. We obtained 7.62 ppm of uranium, 21.1 ppm of thorium, and 3.72% of K2O. Assuming the cosmic dose rate of 0.1mGy/y, we obtained 6.08 mGy/y as the natural dose rate. The ESR ages are obtained by dividing the accumulated doses by the natural dose rate to be 49ka from Al center signal (an electronic hole trapped at Al impurity in quartz) and 74ka from Ti center signal (an electron trapped at Ti impurity in quartz) for a sample, and 56ka and

  9. Transport process of the March 2011 Tohoku-oki Tsunami deposits estimated using OSL dating related techniques in the Soma coast, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashizaki, R.; Shirai, M.

    2013-12-01

    Modern tsunami deposits offer us the opportunity to understand characteristics and sedimentary processes of tsunami deposits. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) intensity of mineral grains are useful to estimate the length of burial age, which represents the amount of ionizing radiation absorbed by the minerals and is reset by sufficient exposure to sunlight (bleaching). Although unbleached or partially bleached samples are not available for estimation of true OSL age, residual OSL intensity may be useful to estimate origin of sediments and/or transport processes. Although lots studies correlate depositional environment and equivalent dose (De), which is obtained from OSL intensity and essential parameter for obtaining OSL age, none discusses relation between transport processes and De. Whereas, Shirai and Hayashizaki (2013) attempted to estimate sand grain transport process using percentage of bleached grain (bleaching percentage; BLP) estimated directly from OSL intensity. This study therefore attempts to estimate depositional processes of tsunami deposits caused by the March 2011 Tohoku-oki Tsunami using De and BLP in the Soma coast, Fukushima, northeastern Japan. In this study, tsunami deposits and pre-tsunami foreshore sediments (5 cm depth; sampled on Oct. 2010) were investigated. The 300-500 μm K-rich feldspar grains were extracted from sediment samples under subdued orange light. An individual feldspar grain was handpicked and fixed on a stainless steel disk with a binocular microscope. The measurements were made on an automated luminescence reader (Risø TL/OSL DA-20) equipped with a 90Sr/90Y beta source (ca. 0.13Gy/s). De for single grain K-feldspar was determined using a single-aliquot regenerative dose (SAR) protocol. Although pre-tsunami foreshore sediments are expected to be bleached by exposing enough sunlight, some of them are not reset completely in the Soma coast. Coastal erosion induces exposure of old buried sediments having higher De and

  10. Lifetime of an ocean island volcano feeder zone: constraints from U-Pb dating on coexisting zircon and baddeleyite, and 40/39Ar age determinations, Fuerteventura, Canary Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allibon, James; Ovtcharova, Maria; Bussy, Francois; Cosca, Michael; Schaltegger, Urs; Bussien, Denise; Lewin, Eric

    2011-01-01

    High-precision isotope dilution - thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) U-Pb zircon and baddeleyite ages from the PX1 vertically layered mafic intrusion Fuerteventura, Canary Islands, indicate initiation of magma crystallization at 22.10 ± 0.07 Ma. The magmatic activity lasted a minimum of 0.52 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar amphibole dating yielded ages from 21.9 ± 0.6 to 21.8 ± 0.3, identical within errors to the U-Pb ages, despite the expected 1% theoretical bias between 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dates. This overlap could result from (i) rapid cooling of the intrusion (i.e., less than the 0.3 to 0.6 Ma 40Ar/39Ar age uncertainties) from closure temperatures (Tc) of zircon (699-988 °C) to amphibole (500-600 °C); (ii) lead loss affecting the youngest zircons; or (iii) excess argon shifting the plateau ages towards older values. The combination of the 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb datasets implies that the maximum amount of time PX1 intrusion took to cool below amphibole Tc is 0.8 Ma, suggesting PX1 lifetime of 520,000 to 800,000 Ma. Age disparities among coexisting baddeleyite and zircon (22.10 ± 0.07/0.08/0.15 Ma and 21.58 ± 0.15/0.16/0.31 Ma) in a gabbro sample from the pluton margin suggest complex genetic relationships between phases. Baddeleyite is found preserved in plagioclase cores and crystallized early from low silica activity magma. Zircon crystallized later in a higher silica activity environment and is found in secondary scapolite and is found close to calcite veins, in secondary scapolite that recrystallised from plagioclase. close to calcite veins. Oxygen isotope δ18O values of altered plagioclase are high (+7.7), indicating interaction with fluids derived from host-rock carbonatites. The coexistence of baddeleyite and zircon is ascribed to interaction of the PX1 gabbro with CO2-rich carbonatite-derived fluids released during contact metamorphism.

  11. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggerty, S.E.; Raber, E.; Naeser, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206Pb and 238U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.3 ?? 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 ?? 5.7 and 92.4 ?? 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 ?? 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.0 ?? 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 ?? 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 ?? 59.6 and 705.5 ?? 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption. ?? 1983.

  12. Report on the feasibility of using isotopes to source and age-date groundwater in Orange County water district`s Forebay region

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Niemeyer, S.; Beiriger, J.; Herndon, R.

    1996-05-01

    From March to September 1995, the Isotope Sciences Division of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory performed isotopic measurements on water in the Orange County Forebay region. The goal was to test the applicability of isotope techniques for determining the current groundwater flow paths and flow rates in the OCWD spreading facilities. Successful results could then be used to predict the fate of proposed reclaimed waste water recharge. Stable isotope measurements in surface waters and groundwaters in the Forebay region of the Orange County groundwater basin provided a general source indicator. The data defined three general groups: (1) groundwater derived from recharged Santa Ana River water (SAR),(2) groundwater resulting from a mixture of recharged Colorado River water and the SAR, and (3) groundwater recharged from the Santiago basin area. In the first group of data, recharge directly from the SAR flow was not readily distinguishable from groundwater recharged via the spreading ponds. Some groundwater samples from Forebay wells showed significant temporal variability in stable isotope values, while others remained constant throughout the study period. The temporal changes in the groundwater stable isotope signatures are believed to be controlled by similar variations in the stable isotope signatures of the surface water recharge. With further sampling, these seasonal isotopic variations may provide a viable tracer for young (<2 years) groundwater.

  13. Application of uranium-series dating of pedogenic carbonate and beryllium-10 cosmogenic exposure dating to neotectonic and geochronologic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Kathryn Elise

    Determining reliable ages for alluvial fan surfaces in arid to semi arid environments is important for many earth science applications. Herein, 230Th/U (U-series) dating of pedogenic carbonate is applied to several abandoned alluvial fans in southern California with the goal of improving our understanding of both the age of deposits, and the history of their surfaces. U-series dating of carefully selected milligram size samples of visibly pure dense pedogenic carbonate by thermal ionization mass spectrometry is found to yield reliable ages for surfaces ranging from ˜6 ka to over 100 ka. Combining U-series minimum ages with 10Be surface exposure and depth profile models can provide more accurate and precise ages than either technique could yield alone. Results suggest that surface cobbles dated by 10Be cosmogenic exposure are commonly anomalously young most likely due to partial shielding as cobbles are exhumed from depth, and that boulders are a more favorable target for surface exposure dating. Combining U-series ages from pedogenic carbonate with modeling of 10Be depth profiles is a powerful technique that can constrain both the age and erosion rate of a surface, however it is most useful when soil and geomorphic interpretations can be used to constrain model results. The surfaces studied are alluvial fans that are offset across major strands of the San Andreas fault system in southern California, and slip rates are determined for two fault strands. The Coachella Valley segment of the San Andreas fault has a slip rate of between 12--22 mm/yr (averaged over 50 +/- 5 ka) with a preferred interpretation of 15.6 mm/yr. The southern end of the Elsinore fault has a slip rate of 1.5 +/- 0 4 mm/yr (averaged over ˜42 ka).

  14. Planets Around Low-mass Stars (PALMS). V. Age-dating Low-mass Companions to Members and Interlopers of Young Moving Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Liu, Michael C.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Mann, Andrew W.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Hinkley, Sasha; Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Flagg, Laura; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Allers, Katelyn N.; Best, William M. J.; Kotson, Michael C.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Wahhaj, Zahed; Biller, Beth A.; Hayward, Thomas L.

    2015-06-01

    We present optical and near-infrared adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of 13 ultracool (>M6) companions to late-type stars (K7-M4.5), most of which have recently been identified as candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs; 8-120 Myr) in the literature. Three of these are new companions identified in our AO imaging survey, and two others are confirmed to be comoving with their host stars for the first time. The inferred masses of the companions (˜10-100 MJup) are highly sensitive to the ages of the primary stars; therefore we critically examine the kinematic and spectroscopic properties of each system to distinguish bona fide YMG members from old field interlopers. The new M7 substellar companion 2MASS J02155892-0929121 C (40-60 MJup) shows clear spectroscopic signs of low gravity and, hence, youth. The primary, possibly a member of the ˜40 Myr Tuc-Hor moving group, is visually resolved into three components, making it a young low-mass quadruple system in a compact (≲100 AU) configuration. In addition, Li i λ6708 absorption in the intermediate-gravity M7.5 companion 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B provides unambiguous evidence that it is young (≲200 Myr) and resides below the hydrogen-burning limit. Three new close-separation (<1″) companions (2MASS J06475229-2523304 B, PYC J11519+0731 B, and GJ 4378 Ab) orbit stars previously reported as candidate YMG members, but instead are likely old (≳1 Gyr) tidally locked spectroscopic binaries without convincing kinematic associations with any known moving group. The high rate of false positives in the form of old active stars with YMG-like kinematics underscores the importance of radial velocity and parallax measurements to validate candidate young stars identified via proper motion and activity selection alone. Finally, we spectroscopically confirm the cool temperature and substellar nature of HD 23514 B, a recently discovered M8 benchmark brown dwarf orbiting the dustiest-known member of the

  15. Dating volcanic ash by use of thermoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, G.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The fine-silt-sized (4-11 {mu}m) grains of glass separated from four samples of independently dated, 8 to 400 ka, tephra beds provide accurate thermoluminescence (TL) ages. This demonstration of reliable TL dating of volcanic glass provides a new tephrochronometer for deposits spanning the Holocene to middle Pleistocene age range.

  16. Formation ages and thermal histories of fracture-filling hematite and Mn-oxide in Precambrian basement from (U-Th)/He dating and 4He/3He diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, P. W.; Shuster, D. L.; Evenson, N.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary Fe- and Mn-oxides in bedrock form from fluid flow associated with events that may not be preserved in stratigraphic records. (U-Th)/He chronometry is well suited for dating these phases but potential diffusive loss of 4He can complicate interpretations. Here we show that measuring He diffusion kinetics of dated samples can resolve whether ages record formation or cooling. Proterozoic (1.6 Ga) volcanics in Aravaipa Canyon, southern Arizona, contain 1.4-1.6-Ga quartz-vein-hosted hematite, as well as 1.0-1.1-Ga hematite precipitated on fractures and overlain by 20-30-Ma Mn-oxide. Hematite 4He/3He age spectra and multi-domain (MD) diffusion models are consistent with a small proportion (4-10%) of domains between 1-500 nm, larger proportions (5-15%) of 1-10 μm domains, and a majority (60-75%) of domains of 80-150 μm. Although the smallest domains would have extremely low He retentivity, models predict bulk "closure temperatures" of 180-200 °C. The 1.4-1.6-Ga quartz-vein hematite likely formed soon after eruption of its host rock, and has not been hotter than ~250 °C for Ma durations. The 1.0-1.1 Ga age of the fracture-fill hematite likely also records the timing of precipitation, but from fluids associated with nearby diabase of the same age. In contrast, the 4He/3He MD model of the 20-30-Ma Mn-oxide requires ~80% of 1-100 nm domains and 20% between 1-10 μm. Although the Mn-oxide likely formed at the same time as the hematite it coats, its age records transient heating from overlying 28-Ma volcanics. In all cases, approximate crystal sizes observed in SEM images are consistent with the predictions of MD modeling, and support the assumed kinetics of He diffusion (~147-157 kJ/mol and ~2.2×10-4 cm2/s for hematite, and ~134 kJ/mol and ~4×10-3 cm2/s for Mn-oxide).These results suggest that specular hematite can have bulk He closure temperatures at least as high as 200 °C and in some cases record precipitation; this is supported by our results on specularite

  17. Ability to learn inhaler technique in relation to cognitive scores and tests of praxis in old age

    PubMed Central

    Allen, S; Ragab, S

    2002-01-01

    Clinical observations have shown that some older patients are unable to learn to use a metered dose inhaler (MDI) despite having a normal abbreviated mental test (AMT) score, possibly because of dyspraxia or unrecognised cognitive impairment. Thirty inhaler-naive inpatients (age 76–94) with an AMT score of 8–10 (normal) were studied. Standard MDI training was given and the level of competence reached was scored (inhalation score). A separate observer performed the minimental test (MMT), Barthel index, geriatric depression score (GDS), ideational dyspraxia test (IDT), and ideomotor dyspraxia test (IMD). No correlative or threshold relationship was found between inhalation score and Barthel index, GDS, or IDT. However, a significant correlation was found between inhalation score and IMD (r = 0.45, p = 0.039) and MMT (r = 0.48, p = 0.032) and threshold effects emerged in that no subject with a MMT score of less than 23/30 had an inhalation score of 5/10 or more (adequate technique requires 6/10 or more), and all 17/18 with an inhalation score of 6/10 or more had an IMD of 14/20 or more. The three patients with a MMT >22 and inhalation score <6 had abnormal IMD scores. Inability to learn an adequate inhaler technique in subjects with a normal AMT score appears to be due to unrecognised cognitive impairment or dyspraxia. The MMT is probably a more useful screening test than the AMT score in this context. PMID:11796871

  18. What Is the Relationship between the Age of the Audience and the Effectiveness of Marketing Techniques in Attracting Students to a Community College?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberg, Carol A.

    A study was conducted at Prince George's Community College (PGCC) to investigate the relationship between the age of the audience and the effectiveness of marketing techniques in attracting students to the college. The study focused on how and why community colleges market themselves, and why some techniques were more effective than others for…

  19. Bushveld-aged fluid flow, peak metamorphism, and gold mobilization in the Witwatersrand basin, South Africa: Constraints from in situ SHRIMP U-Pb dating of monazite and xenotime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Birger; Fletcher, Ian R.; Muhling, Janet R.; Mueller, Andreas G.; Hall, Greg C.

    2007-10-01

    In situ U-Pb dating of monazite and xenotime in gold reefs and unmineralized greenschist facies sedimentary rocks from the Witwatersrand basin, South Africa, reveals two episodes of tectonothermal activity. A major event between 2.06 and 2.03 Ga is recorded in the Wit-watersrand and Transvaal Supergroups in the northwestern and central basin, and broadly coincides with the ca. 2.06 Ga Bushveld event. In the central and southern basin, a previously unrecognized event has been dated between 2.14 and 2.12 Ga. The widespread geographic and stratigraphic occurrence of Bushveld-aged monazite and xenotime, including both auriferous reefs and unmineralized strata, indicates that metamorphism and fluid flow associated with magmatism was pervasive, affecting most of the succession (>10 km thick) in the central and northern parts of the basin. The metamorphic phosphate dates, which are younger away from the complex, indicate a lag of 20-30 m.y. between emplacement and phosphate growth in the central basin (˜100 km south), suggesting that heat related to magmatism was transferred southward at an average rate of 3-5 mm yr-1. The absence of 2.06-2.03 Ga phosphates in the Welkom goldfield at the southern end of the basin implies that Bushveld-related heating and fluid flow did not affect this part of the basin. The intergrowth of ca. 2.045 Ga monazite with gold in quartz-pebble conglomerate from the West Rand goldfield indicates that fluid flow related to the Bushveld event caused mobilization of gold in the Witwatersrand basin.

  20. A comparison of U/Th and rapid-screen 14C dates from Line Island fossil corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, Pamela R.; Cobb, Kim M.; Bush, Shari L.; Cheng, Hai; Santos, Guaciara M.; Southon, John R.; Lawrence Edwards, R.; Deocampo, Daniel M.; Sayani, Hussein R.

    2016-03-01

    Time-consuming and expensive radiometric dating techniques limit the number of dates available to construct absolute chronologies for high-resolution paleoclimate reconstructions. A recently developed rapid-screen 14C dating technique reduces sample preparation time and per sample costs by 90%, but its accuracy has not yet been tested on shallow-water corals. In this study, we test the rapid-screen 14C dating technique on shallow-water corals by comparing 44 rapid-screen 14C dates to both high-precision 14C dates and U/Th dates from mid- to late-Holocene fossil corals collected from the central tropical Pacific (2-4°N, 157-160°W). Our results show that 42 rapid-screen 14C and U/Th dates agree within uncertainties, confirming closed-system behavior and ensuring chronological accuracy. However, two samples that grew ˜6500 years ago have calibrated 14C ages ˜1000 years younger than the corresponding U/Th ages, consistent with diagenetic alteration as indicated by the presence of 15-23% calcite. Mass balance calculations confirm that the observed dating discrepancies are consistent with 14C addition and U removal, both of which occur during diagenetic calcite recrystallization. Under the assumption that aragonite-to-calcite replacement is linear through time, we estimate the samples' true ages using the measured 14C and U/Th dates and percent calcite values. Results illustrate that the rapid-screen 14C dates of Holocene-aged fossil corals are accurate for samples with less than 2% calcite. Application of this rapid-screen 14C method to the fossil coral rubble fields from Kiritimati Island reveal significant chronological clustering of fossil coral across the landscape, with older ages farther from the water's edge.

  1. Geochemical, zircon U-Pb dating and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic constraints on the age and petrogenesis of an Early Cretaceous volcanic-intrusive complex at Xiangshan, Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shui-Yuan; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Jiang, Yao-Hui; Zhao, Kui-Dong; Fan, Hong-Hai

    2011-01-01

    The Late Mesozoic geology of Southeast China is characterized by extensive Jurassic to Cretaceous magmatism consisting predominantly of granites and rhyolites and subordinate mafic rocks, forming a belt of volcanic-intrusive complexes. The Xiangshan volcanic-intrusive complex is located in the NW region of the belt and mainly contains the following lithologies: rhyodacite and rhyodacitic porphyry, porphyritic lava, granite porphyry with mafic microgranular enclaves, quartz monzonitic porphyry, and lamprophyre dyke. Major and trace-element compositions, zircon U-Pb dating, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions have been investigated for these rocks. The precise SHRIMP and LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating shows that the emplacement of various magmatic units at Xiangshan took place within a short time period of less than 2 Myrs. The stratigraphically oldest rhyodacite yielded a zircon U-Pb age of 135 ± 1 Ma and the overlying rhyodacitic porphyry has an age of 135 ± 1 Ma. Three porphyritic lava samples yielded zircon U-Pb ages of 136 ± 1 Ma, 132 ± 1 Ma, and 135 ± 1 Ma, respectively. Two subvolcanic rocks (granite porphyry) yielded zircon U-Pb ages of 137 ± 1 Ma and 137 ± 1 Ma. A quartz monzonitic porphyry dyke, which represented the final stage of magmatism at Xiangshan, also yielded a zircon U-Pb age of 136 ± 1 Ma. All these newly obtained precise U-Pb ages demonstrate that the entire magmatic activity at Xiangshan was rapid and possibly took place at the peak of extensional tectonics in SE China. The geochemical data indicate that all these samples from the volcanic-intrusive complex have an A-type affinity. Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data suggest that the Xiangshan volcanic-intrusive complex derived mainly from remelting of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic crust without significant additions of mantle-derived magma. However, the quartz monzonitic porphyry, which has zircon Hf model ages older than the whole-rock Nd model ages, and which has ɛNd(T) value higher than the other rocks

  2. U-Th Burial Dates on Ostrich Eggshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, W. D.; Fylstra, N. D.; Tryon, C. A.; Faith, J. T.; Peppe, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Obtaining precise and accurate dates at archaeological sites beyond the range of radiocarbon dating is challenging but essential for understanding human origins. Eggshells of ratites (large flightless birds including ostrich, emu and others) are common in many archaeological sequences in Africa, Australia and elsewhere. Ancient eggshells are geochemically suitable for the U-Th technique (1), which has about ten times the range of radiocarbon dating (>500 rather than 50 ka), making eggshells attractive dating targets. Moreover, C and N isotopic studies of eggshell provide insights into paleovegetation and paleoprecipitation central to assessing past human-environment interactions (2,3). But until now, U-Th dates on ratite eggshell have not accounted for the secondary origin of essentially all of their U. We report a novel approach to U-Th dating of eggshell that explicitly accounts for secondary U uptake that begins with burial. Using ostrich eggshell (OES) from Pleistocene-Holocene east African sites, we have measured U and 232Th concentration profiles across OES by laser ablation ICP-MS. U commonly peaks at 10s to 100s of ppb and varies 10-fold or more across the ~2 mm thickness of OES, with gradients modulated by the layered structure of the eggshell. Common Th is high near the shell surfaces, but low in the middle "pallisade" layer of OES, making it optimal for U-Th dating. We determine U-Th ages along the U concentration gradient by solution ICP-MS analyses of two or more fractions of the pallisade layer. We then estimate OES burial dates using a simple model for diffusive uptake of uranium. Comparing such "U-Th burial dates" with radiocarbon dates for OES calcite from the same shells, we find good agreement in 7 out of 9 cases, consistent with rapid burial and confirming the accuracy of the approach. The remaining 2 eggshells have anomalous patterns of apparent ages that reveal they are unsuitable for U-Th dating, thereby providing reliability criteria innate

  3. Radioactive Dating: A Method for Geochronology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Gives historical background on the discovery of natural radiation and discusses various techniques for using knowledge of radiochemistry in geochronological studies. Indicates that of these radioactive techniques, Potassium-40/Argon-40 dating is used most often. (JN)

  4. Teen Dating Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... dating violence prevention initiative seeks to reduce dating violence and increase healthy relationships in high-risk urban communities through comprehensive, multisector prevention. Division of Adolescent ...

  5. Direct dating of human fossils.

    PubMed

    Grün, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    The methods that can be used for the direct dating of human remains comprise of radiocarbon, U-series, electron spin resonance (ESR), and amino acid racemization (AAR). This review gives an introduction to these methods in the context of dating human bones and teeth. Recent advances in ultrafiltration techniques have expanded the dating range of radiocarbon. It now seems feasible to reliably date bones up to 55,000 years. New developments in laser ablation mass spectrometry permit the in situ analysis of U-series isotopes, thus providing a rapid and virtually non-destructive dating method back to about 300,000 years. This is of particular importance when used in conjunction with non-destructive ESR analysis. New approaches in AAR analysis may lead to a renaissance of this method. The potential and present limitations of these direct dating techniques are discussed for sites relevant to the reconstruction of modern human evolution, including Florisbad, Border Cave, Tabun, Skhul, Qafzeh, Vindija, Banyoles, and Lake Mungo. PMID:17103430

  6. A Bronze Age Pre-Historic Dolmen: Laser Cleaning Techniques of Paintings and Graffiti (The Bisceglie Dolmen Case Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurelio, G.

    The whole building was included and covered by an elliptical plan tumulus as reported for other similar monuments situated in the same territory of BISCEGLIE and GIOVINAZZO (in South of Italy). The monument was built by a community established in that area to mark their territory. It has a typical funerary character (funeral urn) and it was destined to the collective sepulture in the Middle Bronze Age, as indicated by the ceramic finds, accompanying the rich dead men, copper objects and ornaments, bones and amber recovered inside together with human rests. Degradation Mapping and Laser Cleaning with Photographs, during and after the process in-situ were carried out. Black incrustations and writings (by some different felt pens, marking pens, permanent black and colored ink pigments — fluorescent and no, as well as permanent text liner markings and spayed black paint) were cleaned by using a portable Nd:YAG Laser (λ 1.06 μm — 0.53 μm, in N-Mode and Q-Switch Mode, Laser pulse duration 150 μs or 6ns — f 1 to 10Hz — E max. 500 mJ per pulse in 1st harmonic and 200 mJ per pulse in 2nd harmonic). So, according to the different ink types three different laser cleaning techniques were used.

  7. Dating and Marriage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family : Dating & Marriage Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Dating and Marriage Dating and Marriage If you are living with HIV, ... Living! Having HIV does not prevent you from dating or marrying—it just may require a little ...

  8. Electron-microprobe Th-U-Pb monazite dating in Early-Palaeozoic high-grade gneisses as a completion of U-Pb isotopic ages (Wilson Terrane, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, B.; Schüssler, U.

    2013-08-01

    The electron microprobe (EMP) Th-U-Pb monazite bulk chemical dating method was applied to granulite-facies rocks of the Wilson Terrane in Antarctica. A combination of this method to isotopic U-Pb-SHRIMP ages for the evaluation of metamorphic processes required the analysis of reference monazites. These can be subdivided into three groups: a) Monazite with variable total Pb at constant Th (e.g. VK-1) is unsuitable for EMP data evaluation; b) Monazite with highly variable total Pb and Th, but with at least some Th/Pb approximating an apparent isochrone (e.g. MPN) is partly useful; and c) Monazite with constant Th/Pb at high Th (e.g. Madmon monazite) is best suitable for the combined approach and can be additionally used to improve the Th calibration for EMP. Study of monazite in grain mounts and in thin sections led to partly different but complementary results: Older monazites with EMP ages up to 680 Ma occur mainly in a grain mount from diatexite and metatexite and are interpreted as detrital relics. Some of these monazites show structures and mineral-chemical zonation trends resembling metasomatism by alkali-bearing fluids. A marked mobility of Th, P, Ce, Si and U is observed. The age of the metasomatic event can be bracketed between 510 and 450 Ma. Furthermore, in the grain mount and in numerous petrographic thin sections of migmatites and gneisses, the EMP Th-U-Pb and SHRIMP U-Pb monazite data uniformly signal a major metamorphic event with a medium-pressure granulite facies peak between 512 and 496 Ma. Subsequent isothermal uplift and then amphibolite-facies conditions between 488 and 466 Ma led to crystallisation of pristine monazite. The high-grade metamorphic event, related to the Ross Orogeny, can be uniformly traced more than 600 km along strike in the Wilson Terrane.

  9. Radiokrypton dating with Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Zappala, Jake; Bailey, Kevin; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr is the ideal tracer for old water and ice in the age range of 105-106 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr-dating, a concept pursued over the past four decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is now available for the first time to the earth science community at large. This is made possible by our development of the Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) method, in which individual atoms of the desired isotope are captured and detected with superior selectivity in a laser-based atom trap. Thus far, ATTA has been used to analyze 81Kr, 85Kr, and 39Ar, which have extremely low isotopic abundances (10-16 to 10-11) , and cover a wide range of ages and applications. In collaboration with earth scientists, we are dating groundwater in major aquifers around the world as well as polar ice from Antarctica. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  10. Comparison on three classification techniques for sex estimation from the bone length of Asian children below 19 years old: an analysis using different group of ages.

    PubMed

    Darmawan, M F; Yusuf, Suhaila M; Kadir, M R Abdul; Haron, H

    2015-02-01

    Sex estimation is used in forensic anthropology to assist the identification of individual remains. However, the estimation techniques tend to be unique and applicable only to a certain population. This paper analyzed sex estimation on living individual child below 19 years old using the length of 19 bones of left hand applied for three classification techniques, which were Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA), Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) multilayer perceptron. These techniques were carried out on X-ray images of the left hand taken from an Asian population data set. All the 19 bones of the left hand were measured using Free Image software, and all the techniques were performed using MATLAB. The group of age "16-19" years old and "7-9" years old were the groups that could be used for sex estimation with as their average of accuracy percentage was above 80%. ANN model was the best classification technique with the highest average of accuracy percentage in the two groups of age compared to other classification techniques. The results show that each classification technique has the best accuracy percentage on each different group of age. PMID:25540897

  11. Accelerator radiocarbon dating of evidence for prehistoric horticulture in Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conard, N.; Asch, D.L.; Asch, N.B.; Elmore, D.; Gove, H.; Rubin, M.; Brown, J.A.; Wiant, M.D.; Farnsworth, K.B.; Cook, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    With the development of direct detection radiocarbon dating, which uses an accelerator as part of a highly selective mass spectrometer, it is now possible to determine the age of milligram samples of organic materials1-5. One application of accelerator dating is in evaluating scanty, sometimes controversial evidence for early horticulture throughout the world. We have now used the technique to date small samples of carbonized, cultivated plant remains from archaeological sites in Illinois. The results, reported here, establish (1) that squash was introduced by 7,000 yr ago, 2,500 yr before eastern North American records previously reported; (2) that horticulture involving indigenous plants had begun by 4,000 BP in eastern North America with domestication of Iva annua, a small-seeded annual; (3) that anomalous discoveries of Archaic period maize represent contaminants; and (4) that introduction of maize by initial Middle Woodland times (???2,000 BP) is questionable. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. Peer involvement in adolescent dating violence.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Pam S; Martsolf, Donna; Draucker, Claire Burke

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the ways in which peers are involved in adolescent dating violence. Eighty-eight young adults aged 18-21 were interviewed and asked to reflect on aggressive dating relationships they experienced as teens. The researchers used grounded theory to analyze the data. Findings showed that male and female peers were involved in adolescent dating violence in unique ways. Male peers were involved in dating violence by participating in the aggression, agitating the aggression, being the competition, trivializing the aggression, and keeping tabs on the recipient. Female peers were involved in dating violence by deserting the recipient, cheating with the boyfriend, being the audience, needling the male dating partner, and helping the recipient. Male and female peers were involved similarly in adolescent dating violence by confronting the partner. School nurses working with adolescents are uniquely positioned to approach adolescents about dating violence. Interventions aimed at promoting discussions with adolescents are discussed. PMID:23239788

  13. Thai female adolescents' perceptions of dating violence.

    PubMed

    Thongpriwan, Vipavee; McElmurry, Beverly J

    2009-10-01

    We explored how Thai female adolescents describe the meaning and context of dating violence. Twenty-four students, aged 15-17, were purposively recruited from a secondary school in Bangkok for individually audio-taped interviews. The interviews lasted 45- 70 minutes. ATLAS ti 5.2 was selected for content analysis. Five themes emerged, including characteristics of adolescent romantic relationships, influences on adolescent romantic relationships, perceptions of dating violence, cycle of dating-violence experiences, and influences on adolescents' perceptions of dating violence. The findings indicate a foundation for developing culturally sensitive programs for dating-violence prevention among Thai adolescents. PMID:19742362

  14. Optical Dating of Martian Eolian Sediments by Robotic Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek W. G.; Lepper, Kenneth; McKeever, W. S.

    2000-07-01

    The Martian polar ice caps record a wealth of information about the past history and climate of Mars, but as pointed out by Clifford et al. in the summary of the First International Conference on Mars Polar Science and Exploration, 'The single greatest obstacle to unlocking and interpreting the geologic and climatic record preserved at the [martian] poles is the need for absolute dating.' Stratification in the polar caps arises, at least in part, from the incorporation of eolian material into the ice, and dune fields near the poles indicate eolian transport is an important surfical process in this region of Mars. Eolian materials are ideally suited for sediment dating using luminescence methods. Luminescence dating techniques have been used successfully to make absolute age determinations for numerous terrestrial Quaternary eolian deposits. Clifford et al. also concluded that cost, simplicity, and potential for minaturization make luminescence dating more feasible than isotopic methods for in situ dating by robotic landers. In fact, the water detection equipment of the Deep Space 2 microprobes and the MECA on the Mars Polar Lander contain components similar to those required for luminescence dating.

  15. Age-dependent variation in mating success of sterile male Mediterranean fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae): implications for sterile insect technique.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Todd E; Edu, James; Pahio, Elaine

    2007-08-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is widely used in integrated programs against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Unfortunately, the mass-rearing procedures inherent to the SIT often lead to a reduction in the mating ability of the released males. To counter this deficiency, SIT programs rely upon the production and release of large numbers of sterile males to achieve high overflooding (sterile:wild male) ratios. To ensure a high release volume, emergence facilities release adult males at a young age (2 d old in some cases). The primary objective of this study was to describe age-dependent variation in the mating propensity and competitiveness of sterile males of C. capitata. Males that were 2 or 3 d old had lower mating propensity than males that were > or =4 d old, and 3-d-old males had lower mating competitiveness than males that were > or =4 d old. Given these results, we measured the effect of a longer holding period on male mortality in storage boxes. With delayed food placement, males held in storage boxes for 4 d after emergence showed no higher mortality than males held for only 2 d (the standard interval). Using large field enclosures, we compared the levels of egg sterility attained via releases of 2- versus 4-d-old sterile males at two overflooding ratios (5:1 and 100:1). At the lower ratio, the proportion of unhatched eggs observed for trials involving 2-d-old sterile males was not, on average, significantly higher than that observed for matings between wild flies (33 versus 25%, respectively), whereas the level of egg sterility observed for releases of 4 d old sterile males was 62%. At the 100:1 overflooding ratio, the proportion of unhatched eggs associated with the 2-d-old sterile males was 58%, a level not significantly different from that induced by 4-d-old sterile males at the 5:1 ratio and significantly lower than the level (79%) observed for 4-d-old sterile males at 100:1 overflooding ratio

  16. Chlorine-36 dating of saline sediments: Preliminary results from Searles Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, F.M.; Smith, G.I.; Bentley, H.W.; Elmore, D.; Gove, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the ratios of chlorine-36 to chlorine in five halite samples from Searles Lake sediments, previously dated by carbon-14, thorium-230, and magnetostratigraphic techniques. The ages calculated from the chlorine ratios are generally concordant with those from the other methods, implying the constancy of the chlorine input ratio over the last million years.

  17. A Bayesian Approach to the Evaluation of Equivalent Doses in Sediment Mixtures for Luminescence Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivia, D. S.; Burbidge, C.; Roberts, R. G.; Bailey, R. M.

    2004-11-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence from minerals is proving to be a very useful dating technique in archaeology and physical geography. In this work we study the analysis of the relevant data from a Bayesian viewpoint, comparing some simple age and noise models.

  18. New Hydroxyproline Radiocarbon Dates from Sungir, Russia, Confirm Early Mid Upper Palaeolithic Burials in Eurasia

    PubMed Central

    Nalawade-Chavan, Shweta; McCullagh, James; Hedges, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sungir (Russia) is a key Mid-Upper Palaeolithic site in Eurasia, containing several spectacular burials that disclose early evidence for complex burial rites in the form of a range of grave goods deposited along with the dead. Dating has been particularly challenging, with multiple radiocarbon dates ranging from 19,160±270 to 28,800±240 BP for burials that are believed to be closely similar in age. There are disparities in the radiocarbon dates of human bones, faunal remains and charcoal found on the floor of burials [1], [2], [3]. Our approach has been to develop compound-specific methods using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to separate single amino acids, such as hydroxyproline, and thereby avoid the known human contamination on the bones themselves. Previously, we applied this technique to obtain radiocarbon dates of ∼30,000 BP for Sungir 2, Sungir 3 and a mammoth bone from the occupation levels of the site [4]. The single amino acid radiocarbon dates were in good agreement with each other compared to all the dates previously reported, supporting their reliability. Here we report new hydroxyproline dates for two more human burials from the same site, Sungir 1 and Sungir 4. All five hydroxyproline dates reported are statistically indistinguishable and support an identical age for the group. The results suggest that compound-specific radiocarbon analysis should be considered seriously as the method of choice when precious archaeological remains are to be dated because they give a demonstrably contaminant-free radiocarbon age. The new ages are, together with the previously dated ‘Red Lady of Paviland’ human in the British Isles, the earliest for Mid Upper Palaeolithic burial behaviour in Eurasia, and point to the precocious appearance of this form of rite in Europe Russia. PMID:24416120

  19. Post-glacial landforms dating by lichenometry in Iceland - the accuracy of relative results and conversely

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaulne, Armelle

    2014-05-01

    Lichenometry studies are carried out in Iceland since 1970 all over the country, using various techniques to solve a range of geomorphologic issues, from moraine dating and glacial advances, outwash timing, proglacial river incision, soil erosion, rock-glacier development, climate variations, to debris-flow occurrence and extreme snow-avalanche frequency. Most users have sought to date proglacial landforms in two main areas, around the southern ice-caps of Vatnajökull and Myrdalsjökull; and in Tröllaskagi in northern Iceland. Based on the results of over thirty five published studies, lichenometry is deemed to be successful dating tool in Iceland, and seems to approach an absolute dating technique at least over the last hundred years, under well constrained environmental conditions at local scale. With an increasing awareness of the methodological limitations of the technique, together with more sophisticated data treatments, predicted lichenometric 'ages' are supposedly gaining in robustness and in precision. However, comparisons between regions, and even between studies in the same area, are hindered by the use of different measurement techniques and data processing. These issues are exacerbated in Iceland by rapid environmental changes across short distances and, more generally, by the common problems surrounding lichen species mis-identification in the field; not mentioning the age discrepancy offered by other dating tools, such as tephrochronology. Some authors claim lichenometry can help to a precise reconstruction of landforms and geomorphic processes in Iceland, proposing yearly dating, others includes margin errors in their reconstructions, while some limit its use to generation identifications, refusing to overpass the nature of the gathered data and further interpretation. Finally, can lichenometry be a relatively accurate dating technique or rather an accurate relative dating tool in Iceland?

  20. Views of the Self and Others at Different Ages: Utility of Repertory Grid Technique in Detecting the Positivity Effect in Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ben D.; Harter, Stephanie Lewis

    2010-01-01

    Socioemotional selectivity theory (Carstensen, 1995) posits a "positivity effect" in older adults, describing an increasing tendency to attend to, process, interpret, and remember events and others in life in a positive fashion as one ages. Drawing on personal construct theory, Viney (1993) observes increasing integration of constructions of self…

  1. The Hamburg/ESO R-process enhanced star survey (HERES). IV. Detailed abundance analysis and age dating of the strongly r-process enhanced stars CS 29491-069 and HE 1219-0312

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, W.; Wiesendahl, U.; Christlieb, N.; Eriksson, K.; Korn, A. J.; Barklem, P. S.; Hill, V.; Beers, T. C.; Farouqi, K.; Pfeiffer, B.; Kratz, K.-L.

    2009-09-01

    We report on a detailed abundance analysis of two strongly r-process enhanced, very metal-poor stars newly discovered in the HERES project, CS 29491-069 ([Fe/H]=-2.51, [r/Fe]=+1.1) and HE 1219-0312 ([Fe/H]=-2.96, [r/Fe]=+1.5). The analysis is based on high-quality VLT/UVES spectra and MARCS model atmospheres. We detect lines of 15 heavy elements in the spectrum of CS 29491-069, and 18 in HE 1219-0312; in both cases including the Th II 4019 Å line. The heavy-element abundance patterns of these two stars are mostly well-matched to scaled solar residual abundances not formed by the s-process. We also compare the observed pattern with recent high-entropy wind (HEW) calculations, which assume core-collapse supernovae of massive stars as the astrophysical environment for the r-process, and find good agreement for most lanthanides. The abundance ratios of the lighter elements strontium, yttrium, and zirconium, which are presumably not formed by the main r-process, are reproduced well by the model. Radioactive dating for CS 29491-069 with the observed thorium and rare-earth element abundance pairs results in an average age of 9.5 Gyr, when based on solar r-process residuals, and 17.6 Gyr, when using HEW model predictions. Chronometry seems to fail in the case of HE 1219-0312, resulting in a negative age due to its high thorium abundance. HE 1219-0312 could therefore exhibit an overabundance of the heaviest elements, which is sometimes called an “actinide boost”. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (Proposal Number 170.D-0010). Table 8 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. The Antarctica component of postglacial rebound model ICE-6G_C (VM5a) based on GPS positioning, exposure age dating of ice thicknesses, and relative sea level histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Peltier, W. R.; Drummond, R.; Moore, Angelyn W.

    2014-07-01

    A new model of the deglaciation history of Antarctica over the past 25 kyr has been developed, which we refer to herein as ICE-6G_C (VM5a). This revision of its predecessor ICE-5G (VM2) has been constrained to fit all available geological and geodetic observations, consisting of: (1) the present day uplift rates at 42 sites estimated from GPS measurements, (2) ice thickness change at 62 locations estimated from exposure-age dating, (3) Holocene relative sea level histories from 12 locations estimated on the basis of radiocarbon dating and (4) age of the onset of marine sedimentation at nine locations along the Antarctic shelf also estimated on the basis of 14C dating. Our new model fits the totality of these data well. An additional nine GPS-determined site velocities are also estimated for locations known to be influenced by modern ice loss from the Pine Island Bay and Northern Antarctic Peninsula regions. At the 42 locations not influenced by modern ice loss, the quality of the fit of postglacial rebound model ICE-6G_C (VM5A) is characterized by a weighted root mean square residual of 0.9 mm yr-1. The Southern Antarctic Peninsula is inferred to be rising at 2 mm yr-1, requiring there to be less Holocene ice loss there than in the prior model ICE-5G (VM2). The East Antarctica coast is rising at approximately 1 mm yr-1, requiring ice loss from this region to have been small since Last Glacial Maximum. The Ellsworth Mountains, at the base of the Antarctic Peninsula, are inferred to be rising at 5-8 mm yr-1, indicating large ice loss from this area during deglaciation that is poorly sampled by geological data. Horizontal deformation of the Antarctic Plate is minor with two exceptions. First, O'Higgins, at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, is moving southeast at a significant 2 mm yr-1 relative to the Antarctic Plate. Secondly, the margins of the Ronne and Ross Ice Shelves are moving horizontally away from the shelf centres at an approximate rate of 0.8 mm yr-1, in

  3. An alternate technique of care using silver fluoride followed by stannous fluoride in the management of root caries in aged care.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Alan

    2016-03-01

    An alternate technique of care to prevent, arrest and manage root caries using aqueous silver fluoride followed by stannous fluoride (AgF+SnF2 ) in aged care is demonstrated by three case studies. With increasing age, the inability to maintain ones own oral care from dementia, illness or frailty and polypharmacy induced salivary gland hypofunction will result in dental caries becoming a progessively greater burden for the elderly. Future generations of elders will live longer and need to maintain many more teeth longer than earlier generations. Both silver diamine fluoride (SDF)and AgF+SnF2 arrest and prevent caries and are easy to use in residential aged care facilities. Clinical differences between SDF and AgF+SnF2 are discussed. However, in aged care, AgF+SnF2 may offer advantages over SDF. AgF+SnF2 used to arrest and prevent caries in children can be modified to provide effective but minimally invasive care for an ageing and frail population. These techniques are rapid, inexpensive and nonthreatening suited to treat frail elders, dementia patients exhibiting challenging behaviours and patients with multiple rapidly progressing decay. Silver fluoride, applied before placing glass-ionomer cement (GIC) restorations is an important adjunct to the atraumatic restorative technique and may retard caries reactivation more than GIC used alone. PMID:26687774

  4. Food Product Dating

    MedlinePlus

    ... Formula What do can codes mean? Dates on Egg Cartons UPC or Bar Codes Storage Times Refrigerator ... primarily on perishable foods such as meat, poultry, eggs and dairy products. "Closed" or "coded" dating might ...

  5. Dating megafaunal extinction on the Pleistocene Darling Downs, eastern Australia: the promise and pitfalls of dating as a test of extinction hypotheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gilbert J.; Webb, Gregory E.; Zhao, Jian-xin; Feng, Yue-xing; Murray, Andrew S.; Cooke, Bernard N.; Hocknull, Scott A.; Sobbe, Ian H.

    2011-04-01

    A key to understanding Late Pleistocene megafaunal extinction dynamics is knowledge of megafaunal ecological response(s) to long-term environmental perturbations. Strategically, that requires targeting fossil deposits that accumulated during glacial and interglacial intervals both before and after human arrival, with subsequent palaeoecological models underpinned by robust and reliable chronologies. Late Pleistocene vertebrate fossil localities from the Darling Downs, eastern Australia, provide stratigraphically-intact, abundant megafaunal sequences, which allows for testing of anthropogenic versus climate change megafauna extinction hypotheses. Each stratigraphic unit at site QML796, Kings Creek Catchment, was previously shown to have had similar sampling potential, and the basal units contain both small-sized taxa (e.g., land snails, frogs, bandicoots, rodents) and megafauna. Importantly, sequential faunal horizons show stepwise decrease in taxonomic diversity with the loss of some, but not all, megafauna in the geographically-small palaeocatchment. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of our intensive, multidisciplinary dating study of the deposits (>40 dates). Dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C (targeting bone, freshwater molluscs, and charcoal) and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry U/Th (targeting teeth and freshwater molluscs) do not agree with each other and, in the case of AMS 14C dating, lack internal consistency. Scanning electron microscopy and rare earth element analyses demonstrate that the dated molluscs are diagenetically altered and contain aragonite cements that incorporated secondary young C, suggesting that such dates should be regarded as minimum ages. AMS 14C dated charcoals provide ages that occur out of stratigraphic order, and cluster in the upper chronological limits of the technique (˜40-48 ka). Again, we suggest that such results should be regarded as suspicious and only minimum ages. Subsequent

  6. Dating fault-associated Quaternary material from the Nevada Test Site using uranium-series methods

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.G.

    1981-09-01

    Accumulations of secondary carbonate in the arid southern Great Basin are frequently associated with or disturbed by Basin and Range faults. In appropriate situations, these materials may be dated by uranium-series disequilibrium techniques using a combined chemical-leach and graphical correction procedure to account for included detrital material. The dates provide a minimum, a maximum, or a bracket of ages for tectonic activity on the faults investigated. Carbonates (e.g., travertine, calcrete, and caliche) were dated from the Carpetbag, Yucca, Boundary, and Cane Spring Faults at the Nevada Test Site. Multiple ages obtained from the same fault were always in correct relative order where stratigraphic relationships were known. Many of the ages obtained agree with age estimates based on geomorphology. A bracket of ages obtained for three samples from the Carpetbag Fault suggest that the last natural movement occurred more than 37,000 but less than 93,000 yr ago. A maximum age of 35,000 yr is obtained for natural movement on the Yucca Fault. A total of six repeatedly disturbed carbonate samples could provide only an obviously high maximum age of 217,000 yr for movement on the Boundary Fault. Tufaceous travertines from the Cane Spring Fault and a related normal fault suggest a probable low-minimum age of 41,000 yr for the last movement. Initial attempts were made to determine the potential for age dating fault zone secondary silica using uranium-series disequilibrium techniques. The old ages obtained (greater than or equal to 700,000 yr) support the contention that most Quaternary tectonism has been restricted to areas of recent subsidence, the deep alluvial basins. These results also validate recent attempts to determine U-Pb ages for uraniferous opals.

  7. Isotope age of the rare metal pegmatite formation in the Kolmozero-Voron'ya greenstone belt (Kola region of the Fennoscandian shield): U-Pb (TIMS) microlite and tourmaline dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, Nikolay; Lyalina, Ludmila; Mokrushin, Artem; Zozulya, Dmitry; Groshev, Nikolay; Steshenko, Ekaterina; Kunakkuzin, Evgeniy

    2016-04-01

    surface contamination being placed the ultrasonic bath with the 7N HNO3 solution. The discordia constructed for seven measured microlite weights is characterized by upper intercepts with concordia at 2454±8 Ma, which probably reflects the time of rare metal pegmatite crystallization, coeval with the age of tourmaline granites. Taking into consideration the obtained U--Pb age of microlite, it may be assumed that the tourmaline granites dated back to 2520±70 Ma served as the most probable parental rocks for rare metal pegmatites of the Vasin-Myl'k deposit. The work is supported by RFBR No 16-05-00367, No 16-05-00427 and project No 0231-2015-0005

  8. Peer Involvement in Adolescent Dating Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Pam S.; Martsolf, Donna; Draucker, Claire Burke

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the ways in which peers are involved in adolescent dating violence. Eighty-eight young adults aged 18-21 were interviewed and asked to reflect on aggressive dating relationships they experienced as teens. The researchers used grounded theory to analyze the data. Findings showed that male and female peers were involved in…

  9. Radiocarbon dating of the Shroud of Turin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damon, P. E.; Donahue, D. J.; Gore, B. H.; Hatheway, A. L.; Jull, A. J. T.; Linick, T. W.; Sercel, P. J.; Toolin, L. J.; Bronk, C. R.; Hall, E. T.; Hedges, R. E. M.; Housley, R.; Law, I. A.; Perry, C.; Bonani, G.; Trumbore, S.; Woelfli, W.; Ambers, J. C.; Bowman, S. G. E.; Leese, M. N.; Tite, M. S.

    1989-02-01

    Very small samples from the Shroud of Turin have been dated by accelerator mass spectrometry in laboratories at Arizona, Oxford and Zurich. As controls, three samples whose ages had been determined independently were also dated. The results provide conclusive evidence that the linen of the Shroud of Turin is mediaeval.

  10. Optimization of the in-situ U-Pb age dating method via LA-Quadrupole-ICP-MS with applications to the timing of U-Zr-Mo mineralization in the Poços de Caldas Alkaline Complex, SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Lynthener Bianca; Lana, Cristiano; Scholz, Ricardo; Nalini, Herminio Arias, Jr.; de Abreu, Adriana Tropia

    2015-10-01

    The high spatial resolution of the LA-ICP-MS systems allows rapid extraction of vital isotopic information from individual growth zones of minerals. This paper describes in detail the optimization of a relatively inexpensive LA-ICP-MS system consisting of a UV 213 Laser Ablation and a Quadrupole ICP-MS. The results of optimization take into account laser energy, beam diameter, frequency and ICP-MS gas conditions. The optimized conditions were tested for precision and accuracy on a number of well-characterized zircons, commonly used as primary and secondary quality control standards. The acquisition of the U-Pb data is carried out in automated mode (pre-set points) for up to 12 h/day with only minimal operator presence. Individual U-Pb zircon analysis lasts 80 s. The 2σ uncertainties of the standards ranged between 1.4 and 8.2%, and overall their relative deviations ranged from 0.02 to 0.87%. The results are comparable to techniques that use more complex and time-consuming approaches such as LA-MC-ICP-MS and ion-microprobe. We have applied this method to obtain ages of numerous granitoid rocks from the Southern São Francisco Craton and a well-known Archean granitoid of the Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa. We furthermore provide the first results of U-Pb age dating of U-Zr-Mo mineralization in the Poços de Caldas Alkaline Complex, SE Brazil, with a U-Pb age of 85 ± 3 Ma for zircon-bearing hydrothermal veins.

  11. A Date with Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Robert; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Teen dating violence is common but preventable. A survey of Texas high schoolers showed that half of respondents had been victims of dating violence. A majority of both sexes believed that certain behaviors justified being hit by their dating partners. It is important to raise the awareness of school personnel, parents, and students. Peer…

  12. Thermoluminescence of Antarctic meteorites: A rapid screening technique for terrestrial age estimation, pairing studies and identification of specimens with unusual prefall histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) is a promising technique for rapid screening of the large numbers of Antarctic meteorites, permitting identification of interesting specimens that can then be studied in detail by other, more definite techniques. Specifically, TL permits determination of rough terrestrial age, identification of potential paired groups and location of specimens with unusual pre-fall histories. Meteorites with long terrestrial ages are particularly valuable for studying transport and weathering mechanisms. Pairing studies are possible because TL variations among meteorites are large compared to variations within individual objects, especially for natural TL. Available TL data for several L3 fragments, three of which were paired by other techniques, are presented as an example of the use of TL parameters in pairing studies. Additional TL measurements, specifically a blind test, are recommended to satisfactorily establish the reliability of this pairing property. The TL measurements also identify fragments with unusual pre-fall histories, such an near-Sun orbits.

  13. Desert Varnish: Relative and Absolute Dating Using Portable X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Lytle, F. W.

    2003-12-01

    Levels of manganese and iron measured in situ with a portable x-ray fluorescence instrument permit relative and absolute dating of desert varnish. This novel technique may have wide potential application to dating Pleistocene and Holocene events and geomorphic surfaces in dry climate settings. Desert varnish is a thin biogenic coating, enriched in Mn and Fe, found on rock surfaces in arid and semi-arid regions. The accumulation of varnish marks the passage of time since a fresh rock surface was created or exposed. Thus the varnish thickness reflects the age of the event that created the fresh surface, whatever the agent was, e.g., a rock fall, a fault movement, or an aboriginal artist. Past attempts to date rock varnish have been marked more by ambiguity or outright failure than by success. Our recent research suggests a practical and rapid method for dating varnish using a portable x-ray fluorescence instrument (PXRF). Varnish thickness encodes two distinct signals, metal and clay. The biogenic Mn and Fe record the passage of time, whereas the accumulation of clay particles is a more time-random process. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) can measure just the "metal thickness" of Mn and Fe in varnish. Earlier tedious microscope techniques focused on physical thickness that includes the noise associated with the clay component. XRF integrates the metal thickness of a broad area of varnish, which is seen to vary significantly in a thin-section traverse. Thus XRF provides a meaningful average thickness over a surface. A portable x-ray fluorescence unit provides rapid, non-destructive, in situ measurements. On outcrop a single analysis takes about 2 minutes and the varnish is not consumed or even disturbed. The hand-held PXRF instrument is simple to operate and relatively inexpensive (\\$ 30,000). PXRF analysis of varnish on independently dated materials yielded a substantive correlation between age and metal (Mn + Fe) thickness. This provided an initial validation of the

  14. The dating and interpretation of a Mode 1 site in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barham, L.; Phillips, W.M.; Maher, B.A.; Karloukovski, V.; Duller, G.A.T.; Jain, M.; Wintle, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Flake based assemblages (Mode 1) comprise the earliest stone technologies known, with well-dated Oldowan sites occurring in eastern Africa between ??? 2.6-1.7 Ma, and in less securely dated contexts in central, southern and northern Africa. Our understanding of the spread and local development of this technology outside East Africa remains hampered by the lack of reliable numerical dating techniques applicable to non-volcanic deposits. This study applied the still relatively new technique of cosmogenic nuclide burial dating (10Be/26Al) to calculate burial ages for fluvial gravels containing Mode 1 artefacts in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia. The Manzi River, a tributary of the Luangwa River, has exposed a 4.7 m deep section of fluvial sands with discontinuous but stratified gravel layers bearing Mode 1, possibly Oldowan, artefacts in the basal layers. An unconformity divides the Manzi section, separating Mode 1 deposits from overlying gravels containing Mode 3 (Middle Stone Age) artefacts. No diagnostic Mode 2 (Acheulean) artefacts were found. Cosmogenic nuclide burial dating was attempted for the basal gravels as well as exposure ages for the upper Mode 3 gravels, but was unsuccessful. The complex depositional history of the site prevented the calculation of reliable age models. A relative chronology for the full Manzi sequence was constructed, however, from the magnetostratigraphy of the deposit (N>R>N sequence). Isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) dating of the upper Mode 3 layers also provided consistent results (???78 ka). A coarse but chronologically coherent sequence now exists for the Manzi section with the unconformity separating probable mid- or early Pleistocene deposits below from late Pleistocene deposits above. The results suggest Mode 1 technology in the Luangwa Valley may post-date the Oldowan in eastern and southern Africa. The dating programme has contributed to a clearer understanding of the geomorphological processes that have shaped the valley and

  15. The dating and interpretation of a Mode 1 site in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Barham, Lawrence; Phillips, William M; Maher, Barbara A; Karloukovski, Vassil; Duller, Geoff A T; Jain, Mayank; Wintle, Ann G

    2011-05-01

    Flake based assemblages (Mode 1) comprise the earliest stone technologies known, with well-dated Oldowan sites occurring in eastern Africa between ~2.6-1.7 Ma, and in less securely dated contexts in central, southern and northern Africa. Our understanding of the spread and local development of this technology outside East Africa remains hampered by the lack of reliable numerical dating techniques applicable to non-volcanic deposits. This study applied the still relatively new technique of cosmogenic nuclide burial dating ((10)Be/(26)Al) to calculate burial ages for fluvial gravels containing Mode 1 artefacts in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia. The Manzi River, a tributary of the Luangwa River, has exposed a 4.7 m deep section of fluvial sands with discontinuous but stratified gravel layers bearing Mode 1, possibly Oldowan, artefacts in the basal layers. An unconformity divides the Manzi section, separating Mode 1 deposits from overlying gravels containing Mode 3 (Middle Stone Age) artefacts. No diagnostic Mode 2 (Acheulean) artefacts were found. Cosmogenic nuclide burial dating was attempted for the basal gravels as well as exposure ages for the upper Mode 3 gravels, but was unsuccessful. The complex depositional history of the site prevented the calculation of reliable age models. A relative chronology for the full Manzi sequence was constructed, however, from the magnetostratigraphy of the deposit (N>R>N sequence). Isothermal thermoluminescence (ITL) dating of the upper Mode 3 layers also provided consistent results (~78 ka). A coarse but chronologically coherent sequence now exists for the Manzi section with the unconformity separating probable mid- or early Pleistocene deposits below from late Pleistocene deposits above. The results suggest Mode 1 technology in the Luangwa Valley may post-date the Oldowan in eastern and southern Africa. The dating programme has contributed to a clearer understanding of the geomorphological processes that have shaped the valley and

  16. Reconstructing level changes and assessing evidence for tectonic and glacial-rebound induced tilting of the Lake Wakatipu basin, New Zealand using novel techniques for correlating and dating paleoshorelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, S. T.; Stahl, T. A.; Cook, S.

    2013-12-01

    Glacial-rebound signals have not previously been identified or isolated from tectonic processes in the New Zealand landscape. This contrasts with other parts of the world where glacial-unloading has caused tens to hundreds of meters of uplift and increased fault activity. The aim of this research was to quantify the magnitude and timing of post-glacial lake-level changes and deformation of the Lake Wakatipu basin, New Zealand. Abandoned shorelines up to 43 m above the modern water-level had previously been suggested to be tilted. Accurate measurement of the magnitude and timing of tilting would provide a unique attempt to extract a glacial-rebound signal from the tectonically-overprinted New Zealand landscape. Paleo-shoreline profiles were surveyed along the lake using GPS and existing air-borne LiDAR datasets. The shoreline profiles were correlated based on elevation and numerically cross-correlated to assess potential progressive offset. The results reveal negligible elevation differences, in conflict with previous suggestions of shoreline tilting. The timing of lake lowering was assessed with Schmidt hammer exposure-age and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of a flight of alluvial terraces directly correlated with the shorelines. The ages suggest formation of the lake by ~17.1 +/- 2.6 ka, which is assumed to be the approximate age for initial formation of the highest and most prominent preserved shoreline. Abandonment of this high-stand shoreline is thought to have commenced at ~12 ka when lake drainage switched to a new outlet, and was followed by gradual lowering (of about 20 m in 8-10 kyr). Lowering accelerated at about 2 ka, rapidly achieving 26-29 m of lowering before then reversing by 3-6 m to attain the present-day level. Glacial-rebound induced uplift or fault activity in the last 18 kyr has not been recorded by paleo-shorelines of Lake Wakatipu. We suggest that a glacial-isostatic signal is not present in the data because either glacial

  17. Dating of ballpoint pen ink.

    PubMed

    Hofer, R

    2004-11-01

    In this paper we describe a case in which a cash book, dated of the year 2000, was sent to the Forensic Science Division, Document Laboratory, Zurich Canton Police in March 2003. The questioned document was a list of 29 pages containing a consecutive handwritten numbering and dated entries (payments) made of blue ballpoint pen ink. By definition, a cash book has to be written by hand and the entries have to be made daily. The questioned document was suspected to have been written within a short period (e.g., a few hours) and backdated. The document lab was asked to determine the date of the entries of the questioned list. On one hand, we were asked, if the cash book had been kept on account consecutively during the period of one year, and on the other hand, the judges were interested in knowing, if the document could have been written in 2003 and back dated to 2000. To answer these questions, the document was examined for latent elements by electrostatic detection device (ESDA). The relative dating of the entries was performed by the quantification of the ballpoint pen ink dyes and their degradation products using HPLC. Results show that it is possible to determine the relative age of entries written by ballpoint pen within a relatively short time scale, if storage and supporting material of the different samples are the same or at least similar. PMID:15568713

  18. Datation U_Pb : âge de mise en place du magmatisme bimodal des Jebilet centrales (chaîne Varisque, Maroc). Implications géodynamiquesU_Pb dating: emplacement age of the bimodal magmatism of central Jebilet (Variscan Belt, Morocco). Geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaifi, Abderrahim; Potrel, Alain; Capdevila, Ramon; Lagarde, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    The bimodal magmatism of central Jebilet is dated to 330.5 +0.68-0.83 Ma by UPb dating on zircons. This age, similar to that of the syntectonic Jebilet cordierite-bearing granitoids, corresponds to the age of the local major tectonometamorphic event. The syntectonic plutonism of the Jebilet massif, composed of tholeiitic, alkaline, and peraluminous calc-alkaline series, is variegated. Magmas emplacement was favoured by the local extension induced by the motion along the western boundary of the Carboniferous basins of the Moroccan Meseta. The Jebilet massif exemplifies the activation of various magmas sources during an episode of continental convergence and crustal wrenching.

  19. U-Pb SHRIMP dating of uraniferous opals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemchin, A.A.; Neymark, L.A.; Simons, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    U-Pb and U-series analyses of four U-rich opal samples using sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) demonstrate the potential of this technique for the dating of opals with ages ranging from several tens of thousand years to millions of years. The major advantages of the technique, compared to the conventional thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS), are the high spatial resolution (???20 ??m), the ability to analyse in situ all isotopes required to determine both U-Pb and U-series ages, and a relatively short analysis time which allows obtaining a growth rate of opal as a result of a single SHRIMP session. There are two major limitations to this method, determined by both current level of development of ion probes and understanding of ion sputtering processes. First, sufficient secondary ion beam intensities can only be obtained for opal samples with U concentrations in excess of ???20 ??g/g. However, this restriction still permits dating of a large variety of opals. Second, U-Pb ratios in all analyses drifted with time and were only weakly correlated with changes in other ratios (such as U/UO). This drift, which is difficult to correct for, remains the main factor currently limiting the precision and accuracy of the U-Pb SHRIMP opal ages. Nevertheless, an assumption of similar behaviour of standard and unknown opals under similar analytical conditions allowed successful determination of ages with precisions of ???10% for the samples investigated in this study. SHRIMP-based U-series and U-Pb ages are consistent with TIMS dating results of the same materials and known geological timeframes. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Bullying Predicts Reported Dating Violence and Observed Qualities in Adolescent Dating Relationships.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wendy E; Wolfe, David A

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between reported bullying, reported dating violence, and dating relationship quality measured through couple observations was examined. Given past research demonstrating similarity between peer and dating contexts, we expected that bullying would predict negative dating experiences. Participants with dating experience (n = 585; 238 males, M(age) = 15.06) completed self-report assessments of bullying and dating violence perpetration and victimization. One month later, 44 opposite-sex dyads (M(age) = 15.19) participated in behavioral observations. In 10-min sessions, couples were asked to rank and discuss areas of relationship conflict while being video-recorded. Qualities of the relationship were later coded by trained observers. Regression analysis revealed that bullying positively predicted dating violence perpetration and victimization. Self-reported bullying also predicted observations of lower relationship support and higher withdrawal. Age and gender interactions further qualified these findings. The bullying of boys, but not girls, was significantly related to dating violence perpetration. Age interactions showed that bullying was positively predictive of dating violence perpetration and victimization for older, but not younger adolescents. Positive affect was also negatively predicted by bullying, but only for girls. These findings add to the growing body of evidence that adolescents carry forward strategies learned in the peer context to their dating relationships. PMID:25355858

  1. Forced oscillation technique. Reference values for resistance and reactance over a frequency spectrum of 2-26 Hz in healthy children aged 2.3-12.5 years.

    PubMed

    Duiverman, E J; Clément, J; van de Woestijne, K P; Neijens, H J; van den Bergh, A C; Kerrebijn, K F

    1985-01-01

    The forced pseudo-random noise oscillation technique is a method by which total respiratory resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs) can be measured simultaneously at various frequencies by means of complex oscillations, superimposed at the mouth during spontaneous quiet breathing. Reference values were obtained in 255 healthy Caucasian children of Dutch descent aged 2.3-12.5 years. Rrs and Xrs vs frequency (f) curves are mainly determined by the child's sex, age, height and weight. Taking complete Rrs and Xrs-f curves into account, we found that Rrs values were significantly higher in young boys than in young girls. They were equal at about 8 years, but at about 12 years of age Rrs values were again significantly higher in boys than in girls. Frequency dependence of Rrs was found in healthy boys up to about 5 years of age, but not in girls of the same age or in older children. These data suggest differences in airway diameter between boys and girls. At all ages Xrs was significantly lower in boys than in girls. This suggests differences in bronchial patency of peripheral airways, boys being at a disadvantage. It is concluded that multiple frequency oscillometry is a method which is ideal for children from the age of about 3 years. The possibility of measuring Rrs as well as frequency dependence of Rrs and Xrs simultaneously is the major advantage over other oscillation devices. PMID:3995199

  2. Thermoluminescence dating of Australian palaeo-earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutton, J.T.; Prescott, J.R.; Bowman, J.R.; Dunham, M.N.E.; Crone, A.J.; Machette, M.N.; Twidale, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating is a useful tool for determining the age of prehistoric earthquakes by dating deposits that are stratigraphically related to fault scarps that formed during the earthquakes. TL dating of aeolian sand in the area of the 1988 Tennant Creek, Northern Territory, earthquakes provides evidence that similar earthquakes have not ruptured the causative faults for at least 50 ka. Pilot TL measurements of deposits associated with the Roopena and Ash Ridge fault scarps near Whyalla on Eyre Peninsula, South Australia, suggest an age of 140 ka for the Quaternary deposits associated with the formation of the scarps. ?? 1994.

  3. Derivatization technique to increase the spectral selectivity of two-dimensional Fourier transform infrared focal plane array imaging: analysis of binder composition in aged oil and tempera paint.

    PubMed

    Zumbühl, Stefan; Scherrer, Nadim C; Eggenberger, Urs

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of standard Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) on oil-based paint samples often suffers from interfering bands of the different compounds, namely, binder, oxidative aging products, carboxylates formed during aging, and several pigments and fillers. The distinction of the aging products such as ketone and carboxylic acid functional groups pose the next problem, as these interfere with the triglyceride esters of the oil. A sample preparation and derivatization technique using gaseous sulfur tetrafluoride (SF4), was thus developed with the aim to discriminate overlapping signals and achieve a signal enhancement on superposed compounds. Of particular interest in this context is the signal elimination of the broad carboxylate bands of the typical reaction products developing during the aging processes in oil-based paints, as well as signal interference originating from several typical pigments in this spectral range. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish the different carbonyl-containing functional groups upon selective alteration. The derivatization treatment can be applied to both microsamples and polished cross sections. It increases the selectivity of the infrared spectroscopy technique in a fundamental manner and permits the identification and two-dimensional (2D) localization of binder components in aged paint samples at the micrometer scale. The combination of SF4 derivatization with high-resolution 2D FT-IR focal plane array (FPA) imaging delivers considerable advances to the study of micro-morphological processes involving organic compounds. PMID:24694702

  4. Integrating age information from different localities for stratigraphic marker beds: discussion of the Eltville Tephra age (Western Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeden, Christian; Zens, Joerg; Lehmkuhl, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Stratigraphic marker beds are often used in geosciences for regional and global correlation. For various reasons dating those layers directly proves to be difficult sometimes. In such cases ages from above and below such a horizon represent minimum- and maximum-ages. If these ages are determined from more than one location, it is possible to combine these ages, test their consistency and finally derive an age in agreement with the findings from most localities. Several approaches to integrate the age information from different localities are discussed, resulting in combined ages consistent with both stratigraphy and most of the dating results. All approach rely on assumptions, most importantly the correctness of ages and their reported uncertainty. The Eltville Tephra originates from an unknown eruption in the Eifel volcanic field is an important maker bed in Rhine-Meuse Area nearby the boundary between the deposition of reworked and primary loess during the LGM (ca. 20 ka). The Eltville Tephra is usually imbedded in loess; dates from directly above and below come almost exclusively from luminescence dating. As different luminescence dating techniques were applied to samples over- and underlying the Eltville Tephra a systematic bias of the sum of these techniques seems unlikely, but may be present due to the fact that most ages are feldspar ages uncorrected for fading. The results of several statistical approaches to deal with ages from various localities are compared, and their chances and shortcomings using well understood artificial data are discussed. These are also used to obtain an integrated datum for the Eltville Tephra including a reproducible uncertainty. This has the potential to improve on existing dates for various other stratigraphic marker beds especially in the terrestrial realm, where often dates for (or around) correlative sediments are obtained from various localities.

  5. 40Ar-39Ar dating of volcanogenic products from the AND-2A core (ANDRILL Southern McMurdo Sound Project, Antarctica): correlations with the Erebus Volcanic Province and implications for the age model of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vincenzo, Gianfranco; Bracciali, Laura; Del Carlo, Paola; Panter, Kurt; Rocchi, Sergio

    2010-05-01

    The AND-2A drillcore (Antarctic Drilling Program—ANDRILL) was successfully completed in late 2007 on the Antarctic continental margin (Southern McMurdo Sound, Ross Sea) with the aim of tracking ice proximal to shallow marine environmental fluctuations and to document the 20-Ma evolution of the Erebus Volcanic Province. Lava clasts and tephra layers from the AND-2A drillcore were investigated from a petrographic and stratigraphic point of view and analyzed by the 40Ar-39Ar laser technique in order to constrain the age model of the core and to gain information on the style and nature of sediment deposition in the Victoria Land Basin since Early Miocene. Ten out of 17 samples yielded statistically robust 40Ar-39Ar ages, indicating that the AND-2A drillcore recovered ≤230 m of Middle Miocene (˜128-358 m below sea floor, ˜11.5-16.0 Ma) and >780 m of Early Miocene (˜358-1093 m below sea floor, ˜16.0-20.1 Ma). Results also highlight a nearly continuous stratigraphic record from at least 358 m below sea floor down hole, characterized by a mean sedimentation rate of ˜19 cm/ka, possible oscillations of no more than a few hundreds of ka and a break within ˜17.5-18.1 Ma. Comparison with available data from volcanic deposits on land, suggests that volcanic rocks within the AND-2A core were supplied from the south, possibly with source areas closer to the drill site for the upper core levels, and from 358 m below sea floor down hole, with the “proto-Mount Morning” as the main source.

  6. Radium decay series dating of barite deposition in the Gulf of Mexico: Initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gent, D.L.; Scott, L.M.; Fu, B.

    1995-12-31

    Barite deposits consisting of chimneys and crusts were recently documented and recovered by submersible from hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico offshore Louisiana at water depths of 510-670 m in the Garden Banks and Mississippi Canyon areas. This is the first discovery of barite deposits associated with cold hydrocarbon seeps. The outer part of the chimneys are dominated by barite whereas the inner part of the chimneys are dominated by barite with pyrite as accessory mineral. The crusts are about 5-8 cm thick and their surficial layers are composed of barite coexisting with carbonate whereas the lower part of the crusts consists of barite, carbonate, and pyrite. A program of radiometric dating by Ra decay series isotopes was initiated in order to derive a chronology of barite deposition in association with the hydrocarbon seeps. Chimneys and crusts were analyzed for NORM using a high purity intrinsic germanium gamma spectroscopy system. The deposits were found to contain {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra at concentrations comparable to those found in scale associated with oil production in the Gulf States Region (approximately 500 pCi/gm and 250 pCi/gm, respectively). The deposits were subjected to two separate age dating techniques. The primary technique utilized gamma spectroscopy for determination of {sup 210}Pb/{sup 226}Ra ratios. The second technique utilized gamma spectroscopy for determination of {sup 226}Th/{sup 228}Ra ratios. Ages as determined by {sup 210}Pb/{sup 226}Ra ranged from 2 years to 40 years. The {sup 228}Th/{sup 228}Ra methodology tended to validate the primary dating technique, although the useful range of dating for this method does not exceed 15 years. Sulfide-rich layers in the barite deposits tended to give anomalous and biased results when dated by the primary method. Both methodologies also appear valid for age dating scale deposits {le} 100 years old that are generated in oil production operations.

  7. Date Palm Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews date palm genetic resources and their conservation. Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is an important food crop in the Middle East and North Africa. Its center of origin and diversity most probably is the area near Iraq/Iran. From there, it spread throughout its present range...

  8. Radiometric Dating in Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are several aspects and methods of quantitatively measuring geologic time using a constant-rate natural process of radioactive decay. Topics include half lives and decay constants, radiogenic growth, potassium-argon dating, rubidium-strontium dating, and the role of geochronology in support of geological exploration. (DS)

  9. Dating Violence in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysova, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenon of violence in interpersonal relationships has been little studied in Russia, and the phenomenon of violence between dating partners has not been the object of scientific interest at all. The study on which the present article is based was designed to obtain information about the violence in dating among students enrolled in…

  10. Choosing a Calving Date

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calving date affects cost and timing of production events. Due to the polyestrous nature of beef females, producers can choose a calving date that fits their production system and geographic region. Any time an entire production system is considered, decision making becomes complex. Any calving syst...

  11. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P; Brook, Edward J

    2014-05-13

    We present successful (81)Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ∼350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The (81)Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 ± 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) (85)Kr and (39)Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the (81)Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130-115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA (81)Kr analysis requires a 40-80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, (81)Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility. PMID:24753606

  12. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Brook, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    We present successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ∼350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 ± 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) 85Kr and 39Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the 81Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130–115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA 81Kr analysis requires a 40–80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, 81Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility. PMID:24753606

  13. Promising Behavior Change Techniques in a Multicomponent Intervention to Reduce Concerns about Falls in Old Age: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vestjens, Lotte; Kempen, Gertrudis I. J. M.; Crutzen, Rik; Kok, Gerjo; Zijlstra, G. A. Rixt

    2015-01-01

    Complex behavior change interventions need evidence regarding the effectiveness of individual components to understand how these interventions work. The objective of this study was to identify the least and most promising behavior change techniques (BCTs) within the Dutch intervention "A Matter of Balance" (AMB-NL) aimed at concerns…

  14. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Two Nakhlites, MIL03346 and Y000593: A Detailed Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Radiometric dating of martian nakhlites by several techniques have given similar ages of approx.1.2-1.4 Ga [e.g. 1, 2]. Unlike the case with shergottites, where the presence of martian atmosphere and inherited radiogenic Ar-40 produce apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 ages older than other radiometric ages, Ar-Ar ages of nakhlites are similar to ages derived by other techniques. However, even in some nakhlites the presence of trapped martian Ar produces some uncertainty in the Ar-Ar age. We present here an analysis of such Ar-Ar ages from the MIL03346 and Y000593 nakhlites.

  15. A quick technique to improve the geometry characterisation of aged HPGe detectors for MC code efficiency calculation.

    PubMed

    Moser, H; Maringer, F J

    2016-03-01

    During the EMRP JRP MetroMETAL project a detector image of an aged HPGe gamma-ray detector was created for MC efficiency calculation. Using the nominal construction parameters of the detector, the simulation showed unacceptably high deviations from the assured activity values. This paper describes an optimisation of a virtual detector to obtain better results using limited resources and offers comparisons of efficiency values of point and voluminous sources calculated by LABSOCS® and PENELOPE 2011. PMID:26688355

  16. OSL and Cosmogenic 10Be Dating of Fluvial Terraces on the Northeast Pamir Margin, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. A.; Chen, J.; Yang, H.; Li, T.; Bookhagen, B.; Burbank, D. W.; Bufe, A.

    2015-12-01

    Along the northeast Pamir margin in northwest China, flights of late Pleistocene fluvial terraces span actively deforming structures. We present detailed results on three terraces that we dated using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and cosmogenic 10Be techniques. Quartz OSL dating of two different grain sizes (4-11 and 90-180 μm) revealed the fine-grain quartz fraction overestimates the terrace ages by up to an order of magnitude. Two-mm, small-aliquot, coarse-grain quartz OSL ages, calculated using the finite mixture model, yielded stratigraphically consistent ages within error and dated times of terrace deposition to ~15 ka, ~18.5 ka, and ~75 ka. We speculate the observed grain-size dependence of OSL ages is likely related to the mode of transport of the grains in the fluvial system, with coarser grains sizes spending more time on sand bars where they are more thoroughly bleached than grains in the turbid, commonly episodic flows that carry the silt fraction. Our study suggests that, in flashy, turbid fluvial systems, coarse-grain OSL samples are likely to yield more reliable depositional ages than will fine-grain samples. Cosmogenic 10Be depth profiles date the times of terrace abandonment to ~8 ka, ~15 ka, and ~75 ka, yielding ages in overall agreement with the coarse-grain OSL ages. These ages are generally consistent with other dated terraces in the region that place their deposition and subsequent abandonment during the last deglaciation (13-18 ka) and suggest the formation of these terraces on the margins of the Tarim Basin and along the flanks of the Tian Shan is climatically controlled.

  17. Using accelerator mass spectrometry for radiocarbon dating of textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Jull, A.J.T.

    1997-12-01

    Since 1981 we have operated an NSF Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility at the University of Arizona. The AMS method allows us to use very small samples of carbon, <1 mg for radiocarbon dating in contrast to earlier counting techniques. This has opened a vast array of applications of radiocarbon dating that was difficult to do before AMS because of sample size limitations of decay counting. Some of the many applications of AMS include paleoclimatic studies, archaeological research and the age of first settlement of North America by man, dating of art works and artifacts, fall times and terrestrial residence ages of meteorites, production of {sup 14}C in lunar samples by galactic and solar cosmic rays, studies of in situ {sup 14}C produced by cosmic ray spallation in rocks and ice, and studies of {sup 14}C in groundwater dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved organic carbon. At our laboratory, we have also successfully applied AMS {sup 14}C to dating of many types of textiles, including silks and linens, art works, documents and artifacts fabricated from wood, parchment, ivory, and bone. The results for many of these samples are often important in questions of the authenticity of these works of art and artifacts. Our studies have encompassed a wide range of art works ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Shroud of Turin, and the Chinese silk trade to the works of Raphael, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Recently, we also dated the Vinland Map, a controversial document that shows the eastern coast of North America apparently using information from Viking voyages.

  18. Using a Novel Absolute Ontogenetic Age Determination Technique to Calculate the Timing of Tooth Eruption in the Saber-Toothed Cat, Smilodon fatalis

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, M. Aleksander; Feranec, Robert S.; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Bjornsson, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the superb fossil record of the saber-toothed cat, Smilodon fatalis, ontogenetic age determination for this and other ancient species remains a challenge. The present study utilizes a new technique, a combination of data from stable oxygen isotope analyses and micro-computed tomography, to establish the eruption rate for the permanent upper canines in Smilodon fatalis. The results imply an eruption rate of 6.0 millimeters per month, which is similar to a previously published average enamel growth rate of the S. fatalis upper canines (5.8 millimeters per month). Utilizing the upper canine growth rate, the upper canine eruption rate, and a previously published tooth replacement sequence, this study calculates absolute ontogenetic age ranges of tooth development and eruption in S. fatalis. The timing of tooth eruption is compared between S. fatalis and several extant conical-toothed felids, such as the African lion (Panthera leo). Results suggest that the permanent dentition of S. fatalis, except for the upper canines, was fully erupted by 14 to 22 months, and that the upper canines finished erupting at about 34 to 41 months. Based on these developmental age calculations, S. fatalis individuals less than 4 to 7 months of age were not typically preserved at Rancho La Brea. On the whole, S. fatalis appears to have had delayed dental development compared to dental development in similar-sized extant felids. This technique for absolute ontogenetic age determination can be replicated in other ancient species, including non-saber-toothed taxa, as long as the timing of growth initiation and growth rate can be determined for a specific feature, such as a tooth, and that growth period overlaps with the development of the other features under investigation. PMID:26132165

  19. Application of chlorine-36 technique in determining the age of modern groundwater in the Al-Zulfi province, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Challan, Mohsen B

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to estimate the residence time of groundwater based on bomb-produced (36)Cl. (36)Cl/Cl ratios in the water samples are determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting. (36)Cl/Cl ratios in the groundwater were estimated to be 1.0-2.0 × 10(-12). Estimates of residence time were obtained by comparing the measured bomb-derived (36)Cl concentrations in groundwater with the background reference. Dating based on a (36)Cl bomb pulse may be more reliable and sensitive for groundwater recharged before 1975, back as far as the mid-1950s. The above (36)Cl background concentration was deduced by determining the background-corrected Dye-3 ice core data from the frozen Arctic data, according to the estimated total (36)Cl resources. The residence time of 7.81 × 10(4) y is obtained from extrapolated groundwater flow velocity. (36)Cl concentration in groundwater does not reflect the input of bomb pulse (36)Cl, and it belongs to the era before 1950. PMID:26269327

  20. Helium-uranium dating of corals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Fanale and Schaeffer (1965) determined He/U ages of corals and other aragonitic fossils, and found that the results generally agreed with independent age estimates. As a more extensive and rigorous test of the reliability of He/U ages of fossil corals, I have determined He/U ages of forty-five independently dated Cenozoic corals. Uranium and thorium isotope compositions and Rn-222 retentivities were also determined as consistency checks. The results indicate that reliable ages are obtained when certain consistency tests are met and specified corrections are made.

  1. Ice Core Dating Software for Interactive Dating of Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, A. V.; Mayewski, P. A.; Abdul Jawad, B. S.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists involved in ice core dating are well familiar with the problem of identification and recording the depth of annual signals using stable isotopes, glaciochemistry, ECM (electrical conductivity), DEP (dielectric properties) and particle counter data. Traditionally all parameters used for ice core dating were plotted as a function of depth, printed and after years were marked on the paper, converted to depth vs. age time scale. To expedite this tedious and manual process we developed interactive computer software, Ice core Dating (ICD) program. ICD is written in Java programming language, and uses GPL and GPL site licensed graphic libraries. The same 3.5 Mb in size pre-compiled single jar file, that includes all libraries and application code, was successfully tested on WinOS, Mac OSX, Linux, and Solaris operating systems running Java VM version 1.4. We have followed the modular design philosophy in our source code so potential integration with other software modules, data bases and server side distributed computer environments can be easily implemented. We expect to continue development of new suites of tools for easy integration of ice core data with other available time proxies. ICD is thoroughly documented and comes with a technical reference and cookbook that explains the purpose of the software and its many features, and provides examples to help new users quickly become familiar with the operation and philosophy of the software. ICD is available as a free download from the Climate Change Institute web site ( under the terms of GNU GPL public license.

  2. Listening to the voices of important others: how adolescents make sense of troubled dating relationships.

    PubMed

    Martsolf, Donna S; Draucker, Claire B; Bednarz, Lucy C; Lea, Joshua A

    2011-12-01

    Nearly one third of adolescents experience dating relationship maltreatment. Grounded theory methods were used to explicate a typology of ways by which adolescents incorporate views of others in making sense of their troubled dating relationships. Interviews with 90 young adults (ages 18-21 years) who had troubled adolescent dating relationships were analyzed using constant comparative techniques. A typology of ways in which adolescents "listen to the voices of important others" emerged. The six ways were "preventing challenging voices of important others," "deflecting irksome voices of important others," "succumbing to demanding voices of important others," "soliciting confirming voices of important others," "considering cautionary voices of important others," and "heeding knowing voices of important others." Professionals can use this model when deciding how to offer input about troubled adolescent dating relationships. PMID:22114797

  3. Evidence from U-Th dating against Northern Hemisphere forcing of the penultimate deglaciation

    PubMed

    Henderson; Slowey

    2000-03-01

    Milankovitch proposed that summer insolation at mid-latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere directly causes the ice-age climate cycles. This would imply that times of ice-sheet collapse should correspond to peaks in Northern Hemisphere June insolation. But the penultimate deglaciation has proved controversial because June insolation peaks 127 kyr ago whereas several records of past climate suggest that change may have occurred up to 15 kyr earlier. There is a clear signature of the penultimate deglaciation in marine oxygen-isotope records. But dating this event, which is significantly before the 14C age range, has not been possible. Here we date the penultimate deglaciation in a record from the Bahamas using a new U-Th isochron technique. After the necessary corrections for alpha-recoil mobility of 234U and 230Th and a small age correction for sediment mixing, the midpoint age for the penultimate deglaciation is determined to be 135 +/- 2.5 kyr ago. This age is consistent with some coral-based sea-level estimates, but it is difficult to reconcile with June Northern Hemisphere insolation as the trigger for the ice-age cycles. Potential alternative driving mechanisms for the ice-age cycles that are consistent with such an early date for the penultimate deglaciation are either the variability of the tropical ocean-atmosphere system or changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration controlled by a process in the Southern Hemisphere. PMID:10716440

  4. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    James, H.F.; Stafford, T.W. Jr.; Steadman, D.W.; Olson, S.L.; Martin, P.S.; Jull, A.J.; McCoy, P.C.

    1987-04-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The /sup 14/C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame for testing the hypothesis that Holocene extinction on islands began after human colonization. Despite growing evidence that a worldwide wave of extinctions coincided with human colonization of oceanic islands, little radiometric data have been available to date the extinction of most small fossil vertebrates on islands. The TAMS technique of dating purified collagen from the bones of small vertebrates could lead to vastly improved chronologies of extinction for oceanic islands where catastrophic mid- to late-Holocene extinction is expected or known to have occurred. Chronologies derived from nonarcheological sites that show continuous sedimentation, such as the Puu Naio Cave deposit, may also yield key evidence on the timing of earliest human settlement of Oceania.

  5. Teen Dating Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keeffe, Nona K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Surveyed high school students (N=256) in Sacramento, California. Found that 35.1 percent had experienced some form of abuse in their dating relationships. Explored the severity of the violence and its intergenerational component. (Author/ABB)

  6. Primate molecular divergence dates.

    PubMed

    Steiper, Michael E; Young, Nathan M

    2006-11-01

    With genomic data, alignments can be assembled that greatly increase the number of informative sites for analysis of molecular divergence dates. Here, we present an estimate of the molecular divergence dates for all of the major primate groups. These date estimates are based on a Bayesian analysis of approximately 59.8 kbp of genomic data from 13 primates and 6 mammalian outgroups, using a range of paleontologically supported calibration estimates. Results support a Cretaceous last common ancestor of extant primates (approximately 77 mya), an Eocene divergence between platyrrhine and catarrhine primates (approximately 43 mya), an Oligocene origin of apes and Old World monkeys (approximately 31 mya), and an early Miocene (approximately 18 mya) divergence of Asian and African great apes. These dates are examined in the context of other molecular clock studies. PMID:16815047

  7. Petroleum fingerprinting: Dating a gasoline release

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.D.; Morrison, R.D.

    1996-09-01

    Dating a gasoline releases is particularly important in situations involving a contaminated gasoline service station. Often the station begins under the control of a major oil company, and as it ages and deteriorates it may be operated by a series of smaller operators. When facing a claim for contamination, often operators blame former operators. Fingerprinting is one of several successful methods used to date petroleum releases on contaminated sites. The topics covered in this article are inventory reconciliation; reverse groundwater modeling; hydrocarbon fingerprinting.

  8. Enhancement of aged and denatured fingerprints using the cyanoacrylate fuming technique following dusting with amino acid-containing powders.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Carly; Almond, Matthew J; Baum, John V; Bond, John W

    2013-03-01

    We have carried out experiments to investigate the aging of latent fingerprints deposited on black PVC over a period of 4-15 weeks. A thumbprint was used in each case and before deposition of the print the donor rubbed their thumb around their nose to add sebaceous deposits. We have studied the effect of heat, light, and moisture and we find that moisture is the most significant factor in the degradation of the latent print. We have attempted to enhance these latent prints by dusting with valine powder or powders composed of valine mixed with gold or red fluorescent commercial fingerprint powders. To make a direct comparison between "treated" and "untreated" prints, the prints were cut in half with one-half being "treated" and one-half not. Our studies show the best results being obtained when powders of valine and red fluorescent powders are applied prior to cyanoacrylate fuming. PMID:23316682

  9. First krypton-81 dating of glacial ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severinghaus, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    A long-held dream of glaciologists has been the direct radiometric dating of ancient glacial ice. Carbon-14 is unfortunately complicated by in-situ cosmogenic production of this isotope from cosmic ray spallation on oxygen nuclei in the ice. Krypton-81 is an ideal tracer in several ways: it has no anthropogenic sources, is made in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation on stable krypton nuclei, and it has a half-life of 229 kyr, which is a useful age range for ancient glacial ice samples. However, the abundance of krypton-81 is dauntingly low. Recent analytical advances by a team of physicists at Argonne National Labs has now made it possible to measure practical quantities of ice (50 kg) by Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA), a technique using lasers to cool krypton-81 atoms to absolute zero and trap them, enabling accurate counting of single atoms. The precision attained by this technique approaches 0.5%, implying an age accuracy of about 1000 yr for samples from the last interglacial period. Here we show that krypton-81 dating has been successfully applied for the first time, to an outcrop of ancient ice dating from the last interglacial period (125 kyr BP) at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica, which is independently dated using methane and d18O of atmospheric oxygen for stratigraphic matching to well-dated Chinese speleothem records.

  10. Rock varnish microlamination dating of late Quaternary geomorphic features in the drylands of western USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tanzhuo; Broecker, Wallace S.

    2008-01-01

    Varnish microlamination (VML) dating is a correlative age determination technique that can be used to date and correlate various geomorphic features in deserts. In this study, we establish a generalized late Quaternary (i.e., 0-300 ka) varnish layering sequence for the drylands of western USA and tentatively correlate it with the SPECMAP oxygen isotope record. We then use this climatically correlated varnish layering sequence as a correlative dating tool to determine surface exposure ages for late Quaternary geomorphic features in the study region. VML dating of alluvial fan deposits in Death Valley of eastern California indicates that, during the mid to late Pleistocene, 5-15 ky long aggradation events occurred during either wet or dry climatic periods and that major climate shifts between glacial and interglacial conditions may be the pacemaker for alteration of major episodes of fan aggradation. During the Holocene interglacial time, however, 0.5-1 ky long brief episodes of fan deposition may be linked to short periods of relatively wet climate. VML dating of alluvial desert pavements in Death Valley and the Mojave Desert reveals that pavements can be developed rapidly (< 10 ky) during the Holocene (and probably late Pleistocene) in the arid lowlands (< 800 m msl) of these regions; but once formed, they may survive for 74-85 ky or even longer without being significantly disturbed by geomorphic processes operative at the pavement surface. Data from this study also support the currently accepted, "being born at the surface" model of desert pavement formation. VML dating of colluvial boulder deposits on the west slope of Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada, yields a minimum age of 46 ka for the emplacement of these deposits on the slope, suggesting that they were probably formed during the early phase of the last glaciation or before. These results, combined with those from our previous studies, demonstrate that VML dating has great potential to yield numerical age

  11. Age-dependent fracture risk in hip revisions with radial impaction grafting technique: a 5-10 year medium-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Chomrikh, Laila; Gebuhr, Peter; Bierling, Roelf; Lind, Ulla; Zwart, Hendrik J J

    2014-02-01

    Radial impaction grafting (RIG) potentially improves the durability and reliability of cementing the femoral components in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this multicenter, prospective study, 88 revision THAs (87 patients) with RIG technique were performed. The average follow-up time was 7.0 years (range, 5.0-10.2). There were 14 femur fractures: 2 intraoperative, 5 within 3 months after surgery, and 7 later in the postoperative stage (range, 5-84 months). Sixteen patients were lost to follow-up and 20 died without stem re-revision. None of the patients have been re-revised for any reason during follow-up. Age was observed to be a significant factor for determining fracture risk. In conclusion, RIG can be considered a reliable surgical technique, especially for younger patients. PMID:23891061

  12. Radiocarbon dating of a pine tree (Pinus densiflora) from Yeongwol, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. H.; Lee, J. H.; Kang, J.; Song, S.; Yun, M. H.; Kim, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of the dating of a pine tree (Pinus densiflora) from Yeongwol, Korea. The age of the tree was estimated to be in the range of hundreds of years, however, the tree had been broken by a strong wind in March 2010 and now only the stump of the tree is left. At the time of sampling in 2014, there were several decayed parts in the stump, so using the usual dendrochronological method (i.e. ring counting) for dating was difficult. However, we found a small wood sample with tree rings near the center of the stump that could be used for radiocarbon wiggle-match dating. Radiocarbon dates were determined using Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The IntCal13 curve was used to calibrate the radiocarbon dates, and the wiggle matching technique was used to reduce the error of the calibrated ages. Based on the dating results, we suggest that the pine tree is approximately 300 years or older.

  13. Green and early age compressive strength of extruded cement mortar monitored with compression tests and ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, Thomas . E-mail: mail@tvoigt.com; Malonn, Tim; Shah, Surendra P.

    2006-05-15

    Knowledge about the early age compressive strength development of cementitious materials is an important factor for the progress and safety of many construction projects. This paper uses cylindrical mortar specimens produced with a ram extruder to investigate the transition of the mortar from plastic and deformable to hardened state. In addition, wave transmission and reflection measurements with P- and S-waves were conducted to obtain further information about the microstructural changes during the setting and hardening process. The experiments have shown that uniaxial compression tests conducted on extruded mortar cylinders are a useful tool to evaluate the green strength as well as the initiation and further development of the compressive strength of the tested material. The propagation of P-waves was found to be indicative of the internal structure of the tested mortars as influenced, for example, by the addition of fine clay particles. S-waves used in transmission and reflection mode proved to be sensitive to the inter-particle bonding caused by the cement hydration and expressed by an increase in compressive strength.

  14. Radiocarbon dating: Jewish inspiration of Christian catacombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutgers, Leonard V.; van der Borg, Klaas; de Jong, Arie F. M.; Poole, Imogen

    2005-07-01

    The famous catacombs of ancient Rome are huge underground cemeteries, of which two Jewish catacomb complexes of uncertain age and 60 early-Christian catacombs have survived. Here we use radiocarbon dating to determine the age of wood originating from one of the Jewish catacombs and find that it pre-dates its Christian counterparts by at least 100 years. These results indicate that burial in Roman catacombs may not have begun as a strictly Christian practice, as is commonly believed, but rather that its origin may lie in Jewish funerary customs.

  15. Luminescence dating of river terrace formation - methodological challenges and complexity of result interpretation: a case study from the headwaters of the River Main, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Thomas; Fuchs, Markus; Zöller, Ludwig

    2015-04-01

    River terraces are widespread geomorphic features of Quaternary landscapes. Besides tectonics, their formation is predominantly controlled by climatic conditions. Changes in either conditions cause changes in fluvial discharge and sediment load. Therefore, fluvial terraces are widely used as important non-continuous sedimentary archives for paleotectonic and paleoenvironmental reconstruction. The informative value of fluvial archives and their significance for paleoenvironmental research, however, strongly depend on a precise dating of the terrace formation. Over the last decades, various luminescence dating techniques have successfully been applied on fluvial deposits and were able to provide reliable age information. In contrast to radiocarbon dating, modern luminescence dating techniques provide an extended dating range, which enables the determination of age information for fluvial and other terrestrial archives far beyond the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Due to the general abundance of quartz and feldspar minerals, there is almost no limitation of dateable material, so that luminescence dating methods can be applied on a wide variety of deposits. When using luminescence dating techniques, however, some methodological difficulties have to be considered. Due to the mechanism of fluvial transport, this is especially true for fluvial sediments, for which two major problems have been identified to be the main reasons of incorrect age estimations: (1) incomplete resetting of the luminescence signal during transport and (2) dosimetric inaccuracies as a result of the heterogeneity of terrace gravels. Thus, luminescence dating techniques are still far from being standard methods for dating fluvial archives and the calculated sedimentation ages always demand a careful interpretation. This contribution reveals some of the difficulties that may occur when luminescence dating techniques are applied on river terraces and illustrates several strategies used for

  16. Uranium Series Accessory Crystal Dating of Magmatic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Axel K.

    2011-05-01

    Complex and protracted crystallization histories over geologic timescales are recorded in accessory minerals (e.g., zircon, allanite). Although magmatic crystallization was traditionally assumed to occur essentially instantaneously for the purposes of interpreting mineral geochronometers with low absolute time resolution for ancient samples, it emerged relatively recently that magmatic crystallization can occur over extended durations. This discovery arose from applying high-spatial-resolution accessory mineral dating techniques for uranium series isotopes to young volcanic and cognate plutonic rocks. The emerging pattern from these studies is that individual crystals and crystal populations record crystallization episodes lasting from <1,000 to many hundreds of thousands of years. Accessory mineral dating of volcanic rocks and cognate plutonic xenoliths opens new research avenues for crystal age fingerprinting that correlates pyroclastic deposits, lavas, and plutonic rocks by using characteristic age distributions. It also provides direct observations on magmatic accumulation and residence times, and the preeruptive configuration of subterraneous magma bodies and intrusive complexes with implications for the forecasting of volcanic eruptions. Awareness of potentially protracted crystallization in igneous rocks should guide the interpretation of accessory mineral ages.

  17. Dating Modern Deltas: Progress, Problems, and Prognostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Jean-Daniel

    Radiocarbon dating is the method most frequently used to date Holocene deltaic sequences, but less than one quarter of 14C dates are within +/-500 years of predicted age. Such dates tend to be unreliable, in other words, often too old and commonly inverted upsection, and core sample dates obtained near deltaic plain surfaces may be as old as mid- to late Holocene. Stratigraphic irregularities result primarily from downslope reworking of upland alluvial sediment, with displacement of "old carbon" in the sediment that accumulates in lower valleys and deltaic plains. Use of dates that are too old results in inaccurately calculated rates (most often too low) of relative sea-level rise and/or land subsidence. More reliable timing of deltaic sediment requires a multiple-method dating approach, including, where possible, identification of associated archaeological material. Developing an accurate dating strategy is a critical step for implementing reliable coastal protection measures needed for the rapidly increasing human populations in these low-lying, vulnerable nearshore settings.

  18. The Uranium-trend dating method: Principles and application for southern California marine terrace deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Rosholt, J.N.; Bush, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    Uranium-trend dating is an open-system method for age estimation of Quaternary sediments, using disequilibrium in the 238U234U230Th decay series. The technique has been applied to alluvium, colluvium, loess, till, and marine sediments. In this study we tested the U-trend dating method on calcareous marine terrace deposits from the Palos Verdes Hills and San Nicolas Island, California. Independent age estimates indicate that terraces in these areas range from ???80 ka to greater than 1.0 Ma. Two low terraces on San Nicolas Island yielded U-trend plots that have a clustered array of points and the ages of these deposits are indeterminate or highly suspect. Middle Pleistocene terraces and one early Pleistocene terrace on San Nicolas Island and all terraces on the Palos Verdes Hills gave reasonably linear U-trend plots and estimated ages that are stratigraphically consistent and in agreement with independent age estimates. We conclude that many marine terrace deposits are suitable for U-trend dating, but U-trend plots must be carefully evaluated and U-trend ages should be consistent with independent geologic control. ?? 1989.

  19. Radiocarbon Dating the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, M. A.; Gajewski, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Anthropocene has no agreed start date since current suggestions for its beginning range from Pre-Industrial times to the Industrial Revolution, and from the mid-twentieth century to the future. To set the boundary of the Anthropocene in geological time, we must first understand when, how and to what extent humans began altering the Earth system. One aspect of this involves reconstructing the effects of prehistoric human activity on the physical landscape. However, for global reconstructions of land use and land cover change to be more accurately interpreted in the context of human interaction with the landscape, large-scale spatio-temporal demographic changes in prehistoric populations must be known. Estimates of the relative number of prehistoric humans in different regions of the world and at different moments in time are needed. To this end, we analyze a dataset of radiocarbon dates from the Canadian Archaeological Radiocarbon Database (CARD), the Palaeolithic Database of Europe and the AustArch Database of Australia, as well as published dates from South America. This is the first time such a large quantity of dates (approximately 60,000) has been mapped and studied at a global scale. Initial results from the analysis of temporal frequency distributions of calibrated radiocarbon dates, assumed to be proportional to population density, will be discussed. The utility of radiocarbon dates in studies of the Anthropocene will be evaluated and potential links between population density and changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, climate, migration patterning and fire frequency coincidence will be considered.

  20. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of the Brunhes-Matuyama Geomagnetic Field Reversal.

    PubMed

    Baksi, A K; Hsu, V; McWilliams, M O; Farrar, E

    1992-04-17

    Magnetostratigraphic studies are widely used in conjunction with the geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS) to date events in the range 0 to 5 million years ago. A critical tie point on the GPTS is the potassium-argon age of the most recent (Brunhes-Matuyama) geomagnetic field reversal. Astronomical values for the forcing frequencies observed in the oxygen isotope record in Ocean Drilling Project site 677 suggest that the age of this last reversal is 780 ka (thousand years ago), whereas the potassium-argon-based estimate is 730 ka. Results from 4039; Ar incremental heating studies on a series of lavas from Maui that straddle the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal give an age of 783 + 11 ka, in agreement with the astronomically derived value. The astronomically based technique appears to be a viable tool for dating young sedimentary sequences. PMID:17743111

  1. I-Xe dating of silicate and troilite from IAB iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.

    1979-01-01

    Silicate and troilite inclusions from IAB iron meteorites were dated by the I-Xe technique. Silicate samples from inclusions in the Copiapo, Landes, Woodbine, Pitts and Mundrabilla meteorites and troilite samples from Pitts and Mundrabilla were subjected to neutron irradiation and the xenon isotope ratios produced were determined. Well-defined I-Xe ages were obtained for Woodbine, Copiapo, Landes and Mundrabilla and are found to be within 3.7 million years of the Bjurbole meteorite, suggesting a close relationship to the stone chondrites. The analysis of troilite from Pitts suggests an age of 17 million years older than Bjurbole, while Mundrabilla troilite is observed to predate Mundrabilla silicate. The abundances of Ga, Ge and Ni are found to be correlated with I-Xe ages, supporting the validity of the I-Xe dating method. The results are considered to favor a nebular model of meteorite formation.

  2. Dating shallow groundwater using {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He and {sup 85}Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, D.K.

    1988-08-26

    Determining the age of groundwater from monitoring wells can greatly aid in understanding a hydrologic system. Groundwater dating techniques have been used to estimate residence times ranging from about 1000 to 50,000 years. While such measurements have been very useful in hydrothermal and geochemical studies and in the development of groundwater supplies, they have been of limited use in contaminant studies associated with shallow groundwater systems since residence times are often much less than 1000 years.

  3. Première datation des lydiennes paléozoïques dans les Hellénides internes (mont Parnis, Grèce); implications géologiquesFirst age dating of the Lydian stones in the Inner Hellenides (Mount Parnis, Greece); geological significances.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caridroit, Martial; Ferrière, Jacky; Dégardin, Jean-Marie; Vachard, Daniel; Clément, Bernard

    2000-09-01

    Using radiolarian and conodont remains, a Tournaisian age has been obtained from the Lydian rocks (or lydites) of the Parnis Mount (Greece); this result is the first direct age dating of the Lydian rocks of continental Greece. In the same area, some limestone strata, interbedded in sandstones, yield Carboniferous and Permian foraminifers; the established stratigraphy is not consistent and so, the Lydian rocks have to be considered as blocks in an olistostrome unconformably overlain or thrusted by Triassic limestones. Otherwise, the Lydian rocks are interpreted as biogenic siliceous deposits due to the absence of carbonate sedimentation (not as a high siliceous production).

  4. Thermoluminescence dating of Hawaiian basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Rodd James

    1979-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of plagioclase separates from 11 independently dated alkalic basalts 4,500 years to 3.3 million years old and 17 tholeiitic basalts 16 years to 450,000 years old from the Hawaiian Islands were investigated for the purpose of developing a TL dating method for young volcanic rocks. Ratios of natural to artificial TL intensity, when normalized for natural radiation dose rates, were used to quantify the thermoluminescence response of individual samples for age-determination purposes. The TL ratios for the alkalic basalt plagioclase were found to increase with age at a predictable exponential rate that permits the use of the equation for the best-fit line through a plot of the TL ratios relative to known age as a TL age equation. The equation is applicable to rocks ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte over the age range from about 2,000 to at least 250,000 years before present (B.P.). The TL ages for samples older than 50,000 years have a calculated precision of less than :t 10 percent and a potential estimated accuracy relative to potassium-argon ages of approximately :t 10 percent. An attempt to develop a similar dating curve for the tholeiitic basalts was not as successful, primarily because the dose rates are on the average lower than those for the alkalic basalts by a factor of 6, resulting in lower TL intensities in the tholeiitic basalts for samples of equivalent age, and also because the age distribution of dated material is inadequate. The basic TL properties of the plagioclase from the two rock types are similar, however, and TL dating of tholeiitic basalts should eventually be feasible over the age range 10,000 to at least 200,000 years B.P. The average composition of the plagioclase separates from the alkalic basalts ranges from oligoclase to andesine; compositional variations within this range have no apparent effect on the TL ratios. The average composition of the plagioclase from the tholeiitic

  5. Optical Dating of Marine Sediment From ODP Core 658B - An Intercomparison With an Independent AMS 14C Chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, S. J.; Stokes, S.; Henderson, G.

    2004-12-01

    We demonstrate the potential of optical dating of detrital quartz silt from marine sediments via a chronological intercomparison for samples from ODP Site 658, which range in age from 0 to 140ka. ODP Site 658 is located off Cap Blanc, Mauritania. It has a high sedimentation rate (18 cm/ka), due to high regional surface productivity and large inputs of windblown Africa dust. This windblown dust provides both the substrate for optical dating and a proxy for North African aridity. The AMS 14C chronology is based on monospecific foraminiferal (Globigerinoides bulloides) samples. This is the first large-scale, systematic application of optical dating to marine sediment, and demonstrates that the technique has considerable potential for the age estimation of otherwise undateable deep-sea material. Optical dating techniques measure the total ionising radiation dose that a mineral grain has received since its last exposure to sunlight (i.e. during burial). The resulting optical age is essentially calibrated via a knowledge of the environmental dose rate, yielding the burial period. The environmental dose rate is derived from the decay of radioisotopes in the sediment (K, U and Th). In terrestrial sediments, the uranium and thorium decay chains can be assumed to be in equilibrium. In the marine realm this assumption is not valid, and unsupported uranium decay series exist on deposition. Consequently, the environmental dose rate changes with sample age. This problem was circumvented by quantifying U and Th decay series disequilibrium, using an MC-ICP-MS. The evolution of the environmental dose rate during burial was modelled, and ages for each sample calculated. The 14C and optical ages are generally in good agreement, indicating that the latter technique can provide equally robust chronologies for marine sediments. Although the maximum age attainable using optical dating is sample specific, the dose rate and luminescence characteristics of the samples analysed in this study

  6. Correcting for nucleogenic ^{36}Cl in cosmogenic ^{36}Cl dating of volcanic rocks from the Erciyes volcano, Central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikaya, M. A.; Zreda, M.; Desilets, D.; Ciner, A.; Sen, E.

    2006-12-01

    Many radiometric methods are suitable for dating lava flows, but none is reliable for routine dating of lava flows younger than 10 ky. The cosmogenic ^{36}Cl method seems promising because it can be applied to any type of rock and laboratory and analytical work is easy and fast. But low cosmogenic ^{36}Cl inventory (after short exposure duration), combined with possible large non-cosmogenic component, makes this technique difficult to apply in a routine fashion. We applied the ^{36}Cl method to date a lava flow and the 14C technique to date the associated ash flow from the Erciyes (Argaeus) volcano, central Turkey. The average of three cosmogenic ^{36}Cl ages is 7.3 \\mp 0.5 ky and the average of two radiocarbon ages is 9.5 \\mp 0.3 ky (calibrated using Calib 5.0). The difference could be due to the overestimation of the calculated nucleogenic ^{36}Cl, which makes up almost one-third of the measured ^{36}Cl. If the nucleogenic component were set to zero, the average ^{36}Cl age would be 10.3 \\mp 0.2 ky. Thus, the ^{36}Cl age should be in the range between 7.3 ky and 10.2 ky, which includes the 14C age near the upper end of the interval. Under the assumption that the 14C age is correct and that the nucleogenic ^{36}Cl has reached a secular equilibrium with the magma, the nucleogenic ^{36}Cl needed to reconcile the ^{36}Cl and 14C ages is only about one-fifth of that previously calculated. In order to investigate this disparity of ages and possible calculating errors of nucleogenic ^{36}Cl, we are analyzing rock samples from where we can directly measure nucleogenic component of ^{36}Cl. This work is important for developing better ways to estimate the nucleogenic ^{36}Cl, which will improve the accuracy of ^{36}Cl dating of young volcanic rocks.

  7. Radiocarbon dating late Quaternary loess deposits using small terrestrial gastropod shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.; McGeehin, John P.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Bettis, E. Arthur

    2013-09-01

    Constraining the ages and mass accumulation rates of late Quaternary loess deposits is often difficult because of the paucity of organic material typically available for 14C dating and the inherent limitations of luminescence techniques. Radiocarbon dating of small terrestrial gastropod shells may provide an alternative to these methods as fossil shells are common in loess and contain ˜12% carbon by weight. Terrestrial gastropod assemblages in loess have been used extensively to reconstruct past environmental conditions but have been largely ignored for dating purposes. Here, we present the results of a multi-faceted approach to understanding the potential for using small terrestrial gastropod shells to date loess deposits in North America. First, we compare highly resolved 14C ages of well-preserved wood and gastropod shells (Succineidae) recovered from a Holocene loess section in Alaska. Radiocarbon ages derived from the shells are nearly identical to wood and plant macrofossil ages throughout the section, which suggests that the shells behaved as closed systems with respect to carbon for at least the last 10 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present). Second, we apply 14C dating of gastropod shells to late Pleistocene loess deposits in the Great Plains using stratigraphy and independent chronologies for comparison. The new shell ages require less interpretation than humic acid radiocarbon ages that are commonly used in loess studies, provide additional stratigraphic coverage to previous dating efforts, and are in correct stratigraphic order more often than their luminescence counterparts. Third, we show that Succineidae shells recovered from historic loess in the Matanuska River Valley, Alaska captured the 20th century 14C bomb spike, which suggests that the shells can be used to date late Holocene and historic-aged loess. Finally, results from Nebraska and western Iowa suggest that, similar to other materials, shell ages approaching ˜40 ka should

  8. Radiocarbon dating late Quaternary loess deposits using small terrestrial gastropod shells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeff S.; McGeehin, John P.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Bettis, E. Arthur, III

    2013-01-01

    Constraining the ages and mass accumulation rates of late Quaternary loess deposits is often difficult because of the paucity of organic material typically available for 14C dating and the inherent limitations of luminescence techniques. Radiocarbon dating of small terrestrial gastropod shells may provide an alternative to these methods as fossil shells are common in loess and contain ∼12% carbon by weight. Terrestrial gastropod assemblages in loess have been used extensively to reconstruct past environmental conditions but have been largely ignored for dating purposes. Here, we present the results of a multi-faceted approach to understanding the potential for using small terrestrial gastropod shells to date loess deposits in North America. First, we compare highly resolved 14C ages of well-preserved wood and gastropod shells (Succineidae) recovered from a Holocene loess section in Alaska. Radiocarbon ages derived from the shells are nearly identical to wood and plant macrofossil ages throughout the section, which suggests that the shells behaved as closed systems with respect to carbon for at least the last 10 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present). Second, we apply 14C dating of gastropod shells to late Pleistocene loess deposits in the Great Plains using stratigraphy and independent chronologies for comparison. The new shell ages require less interpretation than humic acid radiocarbon ages that are commonly used in loess studies, provide additional stratigraphic coverage to previous dating efforts, and are in correct stratigraphic order more often than their luminescence counterparts. Third, we show that Succineidae shells recovered from historic loess in the Matanuska River Valley, Alaska captured the 20th century 14C bomb spike, which suggests that the shells can be used to date late Holocene and historic-aged loess. Finally, results from Nebraska and western Iowa suggest that, similar to other materials, shell ages approaching ∼40 ka should

  9. The Realities of Date Rape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presley, Cara; Watson, Jennifer; Williams, Audrey R.

    This poster presentation addresses the issue of date rape, specifically in the college environment. Highlighted are date rape statistics, demographics, and date rape drugs. Also discussed are date rape warnings and prevention strategies. It is concluded that college and university administrators must place the issue of date rape and acquaintance…

  10. From Romance to Rocket Science: Speed Dating in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muurlink, Olav; Poyatos Matas, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    This article is the first comprehensive review of speed dating in the tertiary sector. While speed dating has its origins as a networking technique to connect singles, it has only more recently made its way into the academy. Since 2005 universities world-wide have begun to adopt speed dating protocols as a tool for building research culture. An…

  11. Amino acid racemization dating of Upper Pleistocene - Holocene terrestrial gastropods from a Mediterranean region (Murcia, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Mayordomo, Julian; Ortiz, Jose E.; Torres, Trinidad; Insua-Arevalo, Juan M.; Martinez-Diaz, Jose J.; Altolaguirre, Yul; Canales-Fernandez, Maria L.; Martin-Banda, Raquel

    2014-05-01

    by the radiocarbon method applied to pieces of charcoal found in the same sedimentary unit as the gastropod. The other subsets consider dates, or bracketed dates, obtained from other dating techniques (TL, OSL, Uranium series) or even stratigraphic criteria. Preliminary results show that Torres et al. (1997) calibration algorithm estimates ages as much as ten times older than the most likely one. We think that this result is due to a strong bias on the way the algorithm was obtained, based mostly in Lower Pleistocene/Pliocene samples. Hence, the new data presented here could be used to constraint better the Torres et al. (1997) function towards Upper Pleistocene and Holocene dates. This type of calibration model would be very valuable in determining ages of recent deposits in the Murcia Region, a matter that is critical in paleoseismological research.

  12. Effect of aging on arsenic and lead fractionation and availability in soils: coupling sequential extractions with diffusive gradients in thin-films technique.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Guan, Dong-Xing; Ren, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Min; Luo, Jun; Ma, Lena Q

    2014-05-30

    We coupled the diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) technique with two sequential extraction methods to investigate the influence of aging on As and Pb fractionation and availability in three soils spiked with As (40 or 400mgkg(-1)), Pb (150 or 1500mgkg(-1)) or As+Pb (40mgkg(-1) As and 150mgkg(-1) Pb). During aging, As moved from the more available (non-specifically and specifically sorbed) to less available (amorphous and crystallized Fe/Al) fractions while Pb moved from the first three fractions (exchangeable, carbonate and Fe/Mn hydroxide) to organic fraction. However, even after 33-week aging, much more As and Pb were in the least available residual fraction in spiked soils than native soils (11-59% vs. 1.2-12%). Relatively, As in spiked soils was much more available than Pb with 11-14% As and 46-59% Pb in the residual fraction. Correlation analysis indicated that As in the non-specifically and specifically sorbed fractions and Pb in the exchangeable fraction were likely sources of DGT-measured labile As and Pb. The fact that As and Pb distribution and availability in spiked soils were significantly different from native soils suggests caution needs to be exercised when using spiked soils for research. PMID:24751493

  13. The Dating Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerger, Monte J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities to cultivate the tendency to see special qualities in numbers that can be played on certain calendar days. Includes games on the constant of the day, Fibonacci and golden ratio dates, primes, powers, December 25, and the day of the year. (ASK)

  14. Biodiversity of date palm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is the dominant component upon which the sustainable biophysical and socio-economic structures of the oasis ecosystem are based; a fruit tree with unique nutritional, biochemical and biophysical characteristics, a rich source of aesthetic and cultural values, and ...

  15. Neighborhood Factors and Dating Violence Among Youth

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Renee M.; Parker, Elizabeth M.; Rinehart, Jenny; Nail, Jennifer; Rothman, Emily F.

    2015-01-01

    Context The purpose of this review is to summarize the empirical research on neighborhood-level factors and dating violence among adolescents and emerging adults to guide future research and practice. Evidence acquisition In 2015, 20 articles were identified through a search of the literature using PubMed. Eligible articles included those that: (1) had been published in a peer-reviewed journal since 2005; (2) reported a measure of association between at least one neighborhood-level factor and dating violence; and (3) had a study population of youth aged <26 years. We abstracted information about the studies, including measurement of dating violence and neighborhood factors, and measures of effect. Evidence synthesis Results were summarized into three categories based on the aspect of neighborhood which was the focus of the work: demographic and structural characteristics (n=11), neighborhood disorder (n=12), and social disorganization (n=8). There was some evidence to suggest that neighborhood disadvantage is associated with dating violence, but very little evidence to suggest that residence characteristics (e.g., racial heterogeneity) are associated with dating violence. Results do suggest that perceived neighborhood disorder is associated with physical dating violence perpetration, but do not suggest that it is associated with physical dating violence victimization. Social control and community connectedness are both associated with dating violence, but findings on collective efficacy are mixed. Conclusions Existing research suggests that neighborhood factors may be associated with dating violence. However, there is a limited body of research on the neighborhood context of dating violence and more rigorous research is needed. PMID:26296444

  16. Absolute Dating of Desert Varnish Using Portable X-Ray Fluorescence: Calibration and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Lytle, F. W.; Rowley, P. D.; Ferris, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Desert varnish, also called rock varnish, is a thin biogenic layer of Mn-oxides, Fe-oxides, and clays that coats rock surfaces in arid and semi-arid regions. The mass of these metals in the varnish registers cumulative biologic activity over time and presents a possible dating mechanism, subject to appropriate assumptions and restrictions. We have used a portable x-ray fluorescence (PXRF) unit to measure Mn and Fe in numerous desert varnishes, both in the field and laboratory; the anticipated relationship between age and mass emerges from these data. Our attempts to refine the PXRF technique for absolute dating of desert varnish are confounded by the limited number of "dated" varnishes available to calibrate and test the method. Although there is no current method to directly ascertain the age of desert varnish, our search for "dated" varnishes has yielded three suitable types of test materials: (1) The ages of young basalt flows dated by various K/Ar radiometric techniques represent the maximum age of varnish developed on those surfaces. Such rocks are useful in the time range of perhaps 250,000 to 10,000 years; surface spalling with loss of varnish presents an upper time limit and difficulty in dating Holocene basalts presents a lower limit. Basalt flows typically provide horizontal surfaces that are ideal for PXRF measurements because, as a biogenic process, varnish development even at a single site varies with solar orientation. (2) Petroglyphs are the rock art that native peoples produced by pecking away varnish to expose fresh rock. This process restarts varnish development and the pecked surface gradually repatinates over time. At some locales, certain figures, symbols, and stylistic elements can be associated with an archaeological culture of known antiquity and duration, thus providing an age range for such glyphs. In the desert Southwest and Great Basin of the United States, appropriate glyphs are known from the present to at least 7000 years BP. Many of

  17. 10Be dating of Neogene halite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmaker, Reuven; Lazar, Boaz; Beer, Jürg; Christl, Marcus; Tepelyakov, Natalya; Stein, Mordechai

    2013-12-01

    Direct radioactive dating of ancient halite formations is difficult because this mineral typically lacks conventionally datable material. We describe an attempt to date Neogene halite using the cosmogenic isotope 10Be (T1/2 = 1.39 Ma). We dated marine-derived salt deposits from the Sedom and Amora (The Hebrew forms of Sodom and Gomorrah) Formations, Dead Sea basin, Israel. To verify whether Be is incorporated into marine halite we measured the stable isotope 9Be, 7Be (the short lived “cosmogenic brother” of 10Be having T1/2 = 53.3 d), and 10Be in evaporation pans of sea-salt production plants. The data suggest that seawater beryllium is incorporated into the halite with a halite-brine distribution coefficient, (KD) of about unity. A 10Be/9Be decay curve constructed for Sedom Formation halite yielded an age that lies in the range of ∼2-6 Ma. The 10Be decay curve constructed for Sedom Formation halite yielded an age that lies in the range of 3-5 Ma. This age is consistent with previous estimates of the Sedom Formation age. Furthermore, this age lies in the same range of 10Be in situ ages obtained on the lacustrine Erq El Ahmer Formation located in the northern Jordan Valley. This may imply that during the Mid Pliocene the Sedom Lagoon, the water-body that deposited the Sedom Formation, might have been already disconnected from the open sea.

  18. Exploring the Use of Motivational Interviewing with a Disengaged Primary-Aged Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cryer, Sarah; Atkinson, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests motivational interviewing (MI) techniques are both widely-used by educational psychologists (EPs) and effective in supporting young people of secondary age. To date, there has been no published research investigating the use of MI with primary-aged children. This study details the use of a short MI-based intervention with a…

  19. Investigating Early/Middle Bronze Age copper and bronze axes by micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and neutron imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Elin; Pereira, Marco A. Stanojev; Lopes, Filipa; Marques, José G.; Santos, Joana P.; Araújo, M. Fátima; Silva, Rui J. C.; Senna-Martinez, João C.

    2016-08-01

    Micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) analysis and neutron imaging techniques, namely 2D radiography and 3D tomography, have been applied for the study of four metal axes from the Early/Middle Bronze Age in Western Iberia, a period characterized by a metallurgical change in the use of copper to bronze. Micro-XRF analysis has shown that one of the axes was produced in copper with some arsenic while the other three were produced in a copper-tin alloy (bronze) with variable tin contents and some arsenic and lead. Neutron radiography and tomography were applied to study internal heterogeneities of the axes in a non-invasive way since the specificities of neutron interaction with matter allow a suitable penetration of these relatively thick copper-based objects when compared to the use of a conventional X-ray radiography. Neutron imaging allowed the visualization of internal fissures and pores and the evaluation of their distribution, size and shape. Relevant information for the reconstruction of ancient manufacturing techniques was gathered, revealing that one ax was produced with the mold in an angle of ≈ 25°, probably to facilitate gas escape during metal pouring. Also, information regarding physical weaknesses of the axes was collected, providing relevant data for their conservation. The combination of these non-destructive techniques allowed the evaluation of the metal composition and the internal structure of the axes. Micro-XRF allowed the distinction among copper and bronze axes, and provided data about the composition of early bronzes for which data is scarce. The neutron imaging study allowed for the first time the visualization of internal heterogeneities in early bronze axes, namely pores and large voids, providing relevant information for the reconstruction of ancient manufacturing techniques and raising pertinent information regarding physical weaknesses of these types of objects.

  20. 40Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Kapthurin Formation, Baringo, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; McBrearty, Sally

    2002-01-01

    The(40)Ar/(39)Ar radiometric dating technique has been applied to tuffs and lavas of the Kapthurin Formation in the Tugen Hills, Kenya Rift Valley. Two variants of the(40)Ar/(39)Ar technique, single-crystal total fusion (SCTF) and laser incremental heating (LIH) have been employed to date five marker horizons within the formation: near the base, the Kasurein Basalt at 0.61+/-0.04 Ma; the Pumice Tuff at 0.543+/-0.004 Ma; the Upper Kasurein Basalt at 0.552+/-0.015 Ma; the Grey Tuff at 0.509+/-0.009 Ma; and within the upper part of the formation, the Bedded Tuff at 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. The new, precise radiometric age determination for the Pumice Tuff also provides an age for the widespread Lake Baringo Trachyte, since the Pumice Tuff is the early pyroclastic phase of this voluminous trachyte eruption. These results establish the age of fossil hominids KNM-BK 63-67 and KNM-BK 8518 at approximately 0.510-0.512 Ma, a significant finding given that few Middle Pleistocene hominids are radiometrically dated. The Kapthurin hominids are thus the near contemporaries of those from Bodo, Ethiopia and Tanzania. A flake and core industry from lacustrine sediments in the lower part of the formation is constrained by new dates of 0.55-0.52 Ma, a period during which the Acheulian industry, characterized by handaxes, is known throughout East Africa. Points, typical of the Middle Stone Age (MSA), are found in Kapthurin Formation sediments now shown to date to between 0.509+/-0.009 Ma and 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. This date exceeds previous estimates for the age of the MSA elsewhere in East Africa by 49 ka, and establishes the age of Acheulian to MSA transition for the region. Evidence of the use of the Levallois technique for the manufacture of both small flakes and biface preforms, the systematic production of blades, and the use and processing of red ochre also occurs in this interval. The presence of blades and red ochre at this depth is important as blades signify a high degree of technical

  1. Consideration of geomorphological uncertainties with terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND): combining Schmidt-hammer and 10Be dating, Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    "by vision". Especially in regions like the Southern Alps affected of considerable neo-tectonic activity and paraglacial erosion, post-depositional movement of any boulders on moraine ridges cannot be excluded a priori. On base on these considerations, an attempt to combine TCND with Schmidt-hammer measurements for the dating of Holocene moraines and the reconstruction of a regional glacier chronology has been developed (Winkler 2009). Cosmogenic 10Be dating delivers ‘absolute' ages for the exposure of boulder surfaces, i.e. the same surface tested with the Schmidt-hammer relative-age dating technique. Therefore, Schmidt-hammer measurements can successfully endorse the selection of representative boulders for TCND and effectively avoid sampling boulders that have been exposed to post-depositional movement (e.g. rotation). Additionally, the number of boulders sampled for TCND can be reduced, positive in the light of economic and conservational considerations. Results from the application of this combined ‘multi-proxy-approach' at a number of individual glaciers in Westland/Tai Poutini and Mt Cook/Aoraki National Parks of the Southern Alps proof its potential. At least three ‘Little Ice Age'-type events culminating around 2,300, 1,600, and 1,000 years ago and predating the "Little Ice Age" have been confirmed. The construction of a dating curve based on both Schmidt-hammer and cosmogenic (10Be) dating results shows high significance and demonstrates the high potential of this attempt. References: Schaefer, J.M., Denton, G.H., Kaplan, M., Putnam, A., Finkel, R.C., Barrell, D.J.A., Andersen, B.G., Schwartz, R., McIntosh, A., Chinn, T. & Schlüchter, C. (2009): High-frequency Holocene glacier fluctuations in New Zealand differ from the northern signature. Science 324, 622 - 625. Winkler, S. (2009): First attempt to combine terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (10Be) and Schmidt hammer relative-age dating: Strauchon Glacier, Southern Alps, New Zealand. Central European

  2. Nuclear constraints on the age of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    A review is made of how one can use nuclear physics to put rather stringent limits on the age of the universe and thus the cosmic distance scale. The age can be estimated to a fair degree of accuracy. No single measurement of the time since the Big Bang gives a specific, unambiguous age. There are several methods that together fix the age with surprising precision. In particular, there are three totally independent techniques for estimating an age and a fourth technique which involves finding consistency of the other three in the framework of the standard Big Bang cosmological model. The three independent methods are: cosmological dynamics, the age of the oldest stars, and radioactive dating. This paper concentrates on the third of the three methods, and the consistency technique. Previously announced in STAR as N83-34868

  3. Nuclear constraints on the age of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1982-01-01

    A review is made of how one can use nuclear physics to put rather stringent limits on the age of the universe and thus the cosmic distance scale. The age can be estimated to a fair degree of accuracy. No single measurement of the time since the Big Bang gives a specific, unambiguous age. There are several methods that together fix the age with surprising precision. In particular, there are three totally independent techniques for estimating an age and a fourth technique which involves finding consistency of the other three in the framework of the standard Big Bang cosmological model. The three independent methods are: cosmological dynamics, the age of the oldest stars, and radioactive dating. This paper concentrates on the third of the three methods, and the consistency technique.

  4. Retrospective Birth Dating of Cells

    SciTech Connect

    L.Spalding, K; Bhardwaj, R D; Buchholz, B A; Druid, H; Frisen, J

    2005-04-19

    The generation of cells in the human body has been difficult to study and our understanding of cell turnover is limited. Extensive testing of nuclear weapons resulted in a dramatic global increase in the levels of the isotope {sup 14}C in the atmosphere, followed by an exponential decrease after the test ban treaty in 1963. We show that the level of {sup 14}C in genomic DNA closely parallels atmospheric levels, and can be used to establish the time point when the DNA was synthesized and cells were born. We use this strategy to determine the age of cells in the cortex of the adult human brain, and show that whereas non-neuronal cells are exchanged, occipital neurons are as old as the individual, supporting the view that postnatal neurogenesis does not take place in this region. Retrospective birth dating is a generally applicable strategy that can be used to measure cell turnover in man under physiological and pathological conditions.

  5. U-Pb Dating of Zircons and Phosphates in Lunar Meteorites, Acapulcoites and Angrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Q.; Zeigler, R. A.; Yin, Q. Z.; Korotev, R. L.; Joliff, B. L.; Amelin, Y.; Marti, K.; Wu, F. Y.; Li, X. H.; Li, Q. L.; Lin, Y. T.; Liu, Y.; Tang, G. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Zircon U-Pb geochronology has made a great contribution to the timing of magmatism in the early Solar System [1-3]. Ca phosphates are another group of common accessory minerals in meteorites with great potential for U-Pb geochronology. Compared to zircons, the lower closure temperatures of the U-Pb system for apatite and merrillite (the most common phosphates in achondrites) makes them susceptible to resetting during thermal metamorphism. The different closure temperatures of the U-Pb system for zircon and apatite provide us an opportunity to discover the evolutionary history of meteoritic parent bodies, such as the crystallization ages of magmatism, as well as later impact events and thermal metamorphism. We have developed techniques using the Cameca IMS-1280 ion microprobe to date both zircon and phosphate grains in meteorites. Here we report U-Pb dating results for zircons and phosphates from lunar meteorites Dhofar 1442 and SaU 169. To test and verify the reliability of the newly developed phosphate dating technique, two additional meteorites, Acapulco, obtained from Acapulco consortium, and angrite NWA 4590 were also selected for this study as both have precisely known phosphate U-Pb ages by TIMS [4,5]. Both meteorites are from very fast cooled parent bodies with no sign of resetting [4,5], satisfying a necessity for precise dating.

  6. Dating Violence among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iconis, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Dating violence is a significant problem on college campuses. More than one-fifth of the undergraduate dating population are physically abused by their dating partners and an even greater percentage are psychologically abused. Researchers have identified risk factors for college student dating violence. Preventive interventions are strongly…

  7. Luminescence dating of ancient Darhad basin, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheul Kim, Jin; Yi, Sangheon; Lim, Jaesoo; Kim, Ju-Yong

    2016-04-01

    Darhad basin is located in the northern Mongolia, in the western end of the Baikal Rift Zone. In contrast to the neighboring Lake Hovsgol, Mongolia's largest and deepest lake, the Darhad is a drained lake basin. It is ~100 km long (north-south), 20-40 km wide and covered by sediments which locally exceed 500 m thickness (Zorin et al., 1989). Darhad basin is characterized by alternating episodes of expansion and desiccation that are closely related with the Pleistocene damming events. Previous studies of the Darhad Basin suggest that the last paleolake was dammed by a large glacier or the sediments (Selivanov, 1967, 1968; Krivonogov et al., 2005; Gillespie et al., 2008). Especially, recent expansion of the paleolake might be caused by the two glacial maxima during MIS 4 and 2. However, glacier-dammed lakes might be short-lived, dried up and permafrost occurred in the drained basin during the Holocene period. The uppermost paleolake sediments (13.2 m depth) are exposed following the curvature of the meandering river (called "Hodon outcrop"). It is considered the most likely site for the youngest paleolake sediments because it is distributed in the northern middle part of the paleolake. Krivonogov et al. 2012 described the Hodon outcrop with the sedimentological and chronological data. Age dating of 16 samples (11 mollusk shells, 5 wood fragments) indicated that Hodon outcrop sediments were deposited between 10.1±7 and 4.9±5 ka. However, the ages obtained on shells much older dates than the matched wood samples because of ingestion of old carbon by mollusks. The age difference between shells and wood fragments is a minimum of 1.73 ka and a maximum of 3.41 ka (average 2.5 ka). In this case, 14C ages from shells should be corrected with appropriate correction factor. However, the old carbon effects could vary temperally and spatially in the Darhad paleolake. The limited number of the 14C ages from wood fragments result in a simple linear trend in the depth-age curve

  8. The Blake geomagnetic excursion recorded in a radiometrically dated speleothem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osete, María-Luisa; Martín-Chivelet, Javier; Rossi, Carlos; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Egli, Ramon; Muñoz-García, M. Belén; Wang, Xianfeng; Pavón-Carrasco, F. Javier; Heller, Friedrich

    2012-11-01

    One of the most important developments in geomagnetism has been the recognition of polarity excursions of the Earth's magnetic field. Accurate timing of the excursions is a key point for understanding the geodynamo process and for magnetostratigraphic correlation. One of the best-known excursions is the Blake geomagnetic episode, which occurred during marine isotope stage MIS 5, but its morphology and age remain controversial. Here we show, for the first time, the Blake excursion recorded in a stalagmite which was dated using the uranium-series disequilibrium techniques. The characteristic remanent magnetisation is carried by fine-grained magnetite.