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Sample records for age dependency ratio

  1. The Old-Age Healthy Dependency Ratio in Europe.

    PubMed

    Muszyńska, Magdalena M; Rau, Roland

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to answer the question of whether improvements in the health of the elderly in European countries could compensate for population ageing on the supply side of the labour market. We propose a state-of-health-specific (additive) decomposition of the old-age dependency ratio into an old-age healthy dependency ratio and an old-age unhealthy dependency ratio in order to participate in a discussion of the significance of changes in population health to compensate for the ageing of the labour force. Applying the proposed indicators to the Eurostat's population projection for the years 2010-2050, and assuming there will be equal improvements in life expectancy and healthy life expectancy at birth, we discuss various scenarios concerning future of the European labour force. While improvements in population health are anticipated during the years 2010-2050, the growth in the number of elderly people in Europe may be expected to lead to a rise in both healthy and unhealthy dependency ratios. The healthy dependency ratio is, however, projected to make up the greater part of the old-age dependency ratio. In the European countries in 2006, the value of the old-age dependency ratio was 25. But in the year 2050, with a positive migration balance over the years 2010-2050, there would be 18 elderly people in poor health plus 34 in good health per 100 people in the current working age range of 15-64. In the scenarios developed in this study, we demonstrate that improvements in health and progress in preventing disability will not, by themselves, compensate for the ageing of the workforce. However, coupled with a positive migration balance, at the level and with the age structure assumed in the Eurostat's population projections, these developments could ease the effect of population ageing on the supply side of the European labour market.

  2. Large-scale age-dependent skewed sex ratio in a sexually dimorphic avian scavenger.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, Sergio A; Carrete, Martina; Donázar, José Antonio; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Age-dependent skewed sex ratios have been observed in bird populations, with adult males generally outnumbering females. This trend is mainly driven by higher female mortality, sometimes associated with anthropogenic factors. Despite the large amount of work on bird sex ratios, research examining the spatial stability of adult sex ratios is extremely scarce. The Andean condor (Vultur gryphus) is the only bird of prey with strong sexual dimorphism favouring males (males are 30% heavier than females). By examining data from most of its South-American range, we show that while the juvenile sex ratio is balanced, or even female-skewed, the sex ratio becomes increasing male-skewed with age, with adult males outnumbering females by >20%, and, in some cases by four times more. This result is consistent across regions and independent of the nature of field data. Reasons for this are unknown but it can be hypothesized that the progressive disappearance of females may be associated with mortality caused by anthropogenic factors. This idea is supported by the asymmetric habitat use by the two sexes, with females scavenging in more humanized areas. Whatever the cause, male-skewed adult sex ratios imply that populations of this endangered scavenger face higher risks of extinction than previously believed.

  3. Large-Scale Age-Dependent Skewed Sex Ratio in a Sexually Dimorphic Avian Scavenger

    PubMed Central

    Lambertucci, Sergio A.; Carrete, Martina; Donázar, José Antonio; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Age-dependent skewed sex ratios have been observed in bird populations, with adult males generally outnumbering females. This trend is mainly driven by higher female mortality, sometimes associated with anthropogenic factors. Despite the large amount of work on bird sex ratios, research examining the spatial stability of adult sex ratios is extremely scarce. The Andean condor (Vultur gryphus) is the only bird of prey with strong sexual dimorphism favouring males (males are 30% heavier than females). By examining data from most of its South-American range, we show that while the juvenile sex ratio is balanced, or even female-skewed, the sex ratio becomes increasing male-skewed with age, with adult males outnumbering females by >20%, and, in some cases by four times more. This result is consistent across regions and independent of the nature of field data. Reasons for this are unknown but it can be hypothesized that the progressive disappearance of females may be associated with mortality caused by anthropogenic factors. This idea is supported by the asymmetric habitat use by the two sexes, with females scavenging in more humanized areas. Whatever the cause, male-skewed adult sex ratios imply that populations of this endangered scavenger face higher risks of extinction than previously believed. PMID:23029488

  4. Large-scale age-dependent skewed sex ratio in a sexually dimorphic avian scavenger.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, Sergio A; Carrete, Martina; Donázar, José Antonio; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Age-dependent skewed sex ratios have been observed in bird populations, with adult males generally outnumbering females. This trend is mainly driven by higher female mortality, sometimes associated with anthropogenic factors. Despite the large amount of work on bird sex ratios, research examining the spatial stability of adult sex ratios is extremely scarce. The Andean condor (Vultur gryphus) is the only bird of prey with strong sexual dimorphism favouring males (males are 30% heavier than females). By examining data from most of its South-American range, we show that while the juvenile sex ratio is balanced, or even female-skewed, the sex ratio becomes increasing male-skewed with age, with adult males outnumbering females by >20%, and, in some cases by four times more. This result is consistent across regions and independent of the nature of field data. Reasons for this are unknown but it can be hypothesized that the progressive disappearance of females may be associated with mortality caused by anthropogenic factors. This idea is supported by the asymmetric habitat use by the two sexes, with females scavenging in more humanized areas. Whatever the cause, male-skewed adult sex ratios imply that populations of this endangered scavenger face higher risks of extinction than previously believed. PMID:23029488

  5. Aged and Dependency Ratios among Autism, Intellectual Disability and Other Disabilities: 10-Year Trend Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Lan-Ping; Sung, Chang-Lin; Wu, Jia-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Dependency ratios are useful as general indicators of future economic and social health. The present paper focuses on the description of dependency ratios and over time change in different kind of disability which include autism, intellectual disability, vision, hearing, and limb impairments. We analyzed data mainly from the public web-access…

  6. Offspring sex ratio in red-winged blackbirds is dependent on maternal age.

    PubMed

    Blank, J L; Nolan, V

    1983-10-01

    In a marsh-breeding population of red-winged blackbirds, the sex ratio of offspring that survived to leave the nest varied with maternal age. Old mothers produced an excess of male fledglings, middle-aged mothers produced almost equal proportions of males and females, and young mothers produced nearly twice as many females as males. More males than females hatched from the eggs of old mothers, whereas among newly hatched progeny of middle-aged and young mothers the sex ratio did not differ from unity. The hatching rate of eggs of old mothers was unusually low, suggesting that the biased sex ratio of their hatchlings may have been caused by more frequent death of female embryos, although other possibilities can be imagined. Starvation of nestlings after hatching also affected the sex ratio among young that left the nest. When starvation occurred, it fell principally on young produced by the last and next-to-last eggs laid in the clutch. Because old mothers allocated relatively more energy to those eggs than to earlier-laid eggs, whereas young mothers apportioned energy equally to their eggs, few nestlings of old mothers but many nestlings of young mothers starved. Most nestlings that died were male. It followed that the male bias in sex ratio of progeny of old mothers did not change between hatching and nestleaving, but the ratio among progeny of young mothers shifted after hatching to a strong bias favoring females at nest-leaving.

  7. Is extinction age dependent?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doran, N.A.; Arnold, A.J.; Parker, W.C.; Huffer, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    Age-dependent extinction is an observation with important biological implications. Van Valen's Red Queen hypothesis triggered three decades of research testing its primary implication: that age is independent of extinction. In contrast to this, later studies with species-level data have indicated the possible presence of age dependence. Since the formulation of the Red Queen hypothesis, more powerful tests of survivorship models have been developed. This is the first report of the application of the Cox Proportional Hazards model to paleontological data. Planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies allow the taxonomic and precise stratigraphic resolution necessary for the Cox model. As a whole, planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies clearly show age-dependent extinction. In particular, the effect is attributable to the presence of shorter-ranged species (range < 4 myr) following extinction events. These shorter-ranged species also possess tests with unique morphological architecture. The morphological differences are probably epiphenomena of underlying developmental and heterochronic processes of shorter-ranged species that survived various extinction events. Extinction survivors carry developmental and morphological characteristics into postextinction recovery times, and this sets them apart from species populations established independently of extinction events. Copyright ?? 2006, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  8. Age-dependent changes in the ratio of (R)- and (S)-2-butanol released by virgin females of Dasylepida ishigakiensis (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Fujiwara-Tsujii, N; Yasui, H; Wakamura, S; Mochizuki, F; Arakaki, N

    2012-12-01

    The females of the white grub beetle, Dasylepida ishigakiensis, release two enantiomers of 2-butanol, (R)-2-butanol and (S)-2-butanol. The ratio describing the relative proportions of these two enantiomers (R/S ratio) has not yet been investigated. (R)-2-Butanol has been shown to attract males in laboratory and field experiments, whereas (S)-2-butanol tends to inhibit them. To determine the R/S ratio of the 2-butanol emitted by virgin females, we collected 2-butanol from young (53 days old), mature (63 days old) and old females (73 days old) using water, extracted with an SPME fibre and subsequently injected into GC-MS. The major component of the 2-butanol emitted by the young females was (R)-2-butanol, but as the females aged, the component ratio favoured (S)-2-butanol. Young females released an 80:20 mixture of (R)- and (S)-2-butanol, whereas old females released a 45:55 mixture. The EAG response of male antennae to a 50:50 ratio (racemic mixture) showed a similar dose-response curve to that of (R)-2-butanol. The male orientation responses to (R)-2-butanol decreased when the relative proportion of (S)-2-butanol increased. An inhibitory and/or masking effect of (S)-2-butanol on male orientation behaviour was also observed in the flight tunnel assay. These results suggest that males are more strongly attracted to young females than to old females. We also discuss the possibility of using 2-butanol isomers as a control or monitoring agent for this insect.

  9. Long-lived crowded-litter mice have an age-dependent increase in protein synthesis to DNA synthesis ratio and mTORC1 substrate phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Drake, Joshua C; Bruns, Danielle R; Peelor, Frederick F; Biela, Laurie M; Miller, Richard A; Hamilton, Karyn L; Miller, Benjamin F

    2014-11-01

    Increasing mouse litter size [crowded litter (CL)] presumably imposes a transient nutrient stress during suckling and extends lifespan through unknown mechanisms. Chronic calorically restricted and rapamycin-treated mice have decreased DNA synthesis and mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling but maintained protein synthesis, suggesting maintenance of existing cellular structures. We hypothesized that CL would exhibit similar synthetic and signaling responses to other long-lived models and, by comparing synthesis of new protein to new DNA, that insight may be gained into the potential preservation of existing cellular structures in the CL model. Protein and DNA synthesis was assessed in gastroc complex, heart, and liver of 4- and 7-mo CL mice. We also examined mTORC1 signaling in 3- and 7-mo aged animals. Compared with controls, 4-mo CL had greater DNA synthesis in gastroc complex with no differences in protein synthesis or mTORC1 substrate phosphorylation across tissues. Seven-month CL had less DNA synthesis than controls in heart and greater protein synthesis and mTORC1 substrate phosphorylation across tissues. The increased new protein-to-new DNA synthesis ratio suggests that new proteins are synthesized more so in existing cells at 7 mo, differing from 4 mo, in CL vs. controls. We propose that, in CL, protein synthesis shifts from being directed toward new cells (4 mo) to maintenance of existing cellular structures (7 mo), independently of decreased mTORC1.

  10. DPOAE generation dependence on primary frequencies ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botti, Teresa; Sisto, Renata; Moleti, Arturo; D'Amato, Luisa; Sanjust, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Two different mechanisms are responsible for the DPOAE generation. The nonlinear distortion wave-fixed mechanism generates the DPOAE Zero-Latency (ZL) component, as a backward traveling wave from the "overlap" region. Linear reflection of the forward DP wave (IDP) generates the DPOAE Long-Latency (LL) component through a place-fixed mechanism. ZL and LL components add up vectorially to generate the DPOAE recorded in the ear canal. The 2f1 - f2 and 2f2 - f1 DPOAE intensity depends on the stimulus level and on the primary frequency ratio r = f2/f1, where f1 and f2 are the primary stimuli frequencies. Here we study the behavior of the ZL and LL DPOAE components as a function of r by both numerical and laboratory experiments, measuring DPAOEs with an equal primary levels (L1 = L2) paradigm in the range [35, 75] dB SPL, with r ranging in [1.1, 1.45]. Numerical simulations of a nonlocal nonlinear model have been performed without cochlear roughness, to suppress the linear reflection mechanism. In this way the model solution at the base represents the DPOAE ZL component, and the solution at the corresponding DPOAE tonotopic place corresponds to the IDP. This technique has been not effectual to study the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE, as a consequence of its generation mechanism. While the 2f1 - f2 generation place is known to be the tonotopic place x(f2), the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE one has to be assumed basal to its corresponding reflection place. That is because ZL components generated in x(f2) cannot significantly pass through their resonant place. Moreover increasing the ratio r, 2f2 - f1 ZL and LL generation place approach each other, because the overlap region of primary tones decreases. Consequently, the distinction between the two places becomes complicated. DPOAEs have been measured in six young normal-hearing subjects. DPOAE ZL and LL components have been separated by a time-frequency filtering method based on the wavelet transform 1. due to their different phase gradient delay

  11. Inferences about ungulate population dynamics derived from age ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, N.C.; Kauffman, M.J.; Mills, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Age ratios (e.g., calf:cow for elk and fawn:doe for deer) are used regularly to monitor ungulate populations. However, it remains unclear what inferences are appropriate from this index because multiple vital rate changes can influence the observed ratio. We used modeling based on elk (Cervus elaphus) life-history to evaluate both how age ratios are influenced by stage-specific fecundity and survival and how well age ratios track population dynamics. Although all vital rates have the potential to influence calf:adult female ratios (i.e., calf:xow ratios), calf survival explained the vast majority of variation in calf:adult female ratios due to its temporal variation compared to other vital rates. Calf:adult female ratios were positively correlated with population growth rate (??) and often successfully indicated population trajectories. However, calf:adult female ratios performed poorly at detecting imposed declines in calf survival, suggesting that only the most severe declines would be rapidly detected. Our analyses clarify that managers can use accurate, unbiased age ratios to monitor arguably the most important components contributing to sustainable ungulate populations, survival rate of young and ??. However, age ratios are not useful for detecting gradual declines in survival of young or making inferences about fecundity or adult survival in ungulate populations. Therefore, age ratios coupled with independent estimates of population growth or population size are necessary to monitor ungulate population demography and dynamics closely through time.

  12. Calibrating recruitment estimates for mourning doves from harvest age ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Otis, David L.

    2010-01-01

    We examined results from the first national-scale effort to estimate mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) age ratios and developed a simple, efficient, and generalizable methodology for calibrating estimates. Our method predicted age classes of unknown-age wings based on backward projection of molt distributions from fall harvest collections to preseason banding. We estimated 1) the proportion of late-molt individuals in each age class, and 2) the molt rates of juvenile and adult birds. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated our estimator was minimally biased. We estimated model parameters using 96,811 wings collected from hunters and 42,189 birds banded during preseason from 68 collection blocks in 22 states during the 2005–2007 hunting seasons. We also used estimates to derive a correction factor, based on latitude and longitude of samples, which can be applied to future surveys. We estimated differential vulnerability of age classes to harvest using data from banded birds and applied that to harvest age ratios to estimate population age ratios. Average, uncorrected age ratio of known-age wings for states that allow hunting was 2.25 (SD 0.85) juveniles:adult, and average, corrected ratio was 1.91 (SD 0.68), as determined from harvest age ratios from an independent sample of 41,084 wings collected from random hunters in 2007 and 2008. We used an independent estimate of differential vulnerability to adjust corrected harvest age ratios and estimated the average population age ratio as 1.45 (SD 0.52), a direct measure of recruitment rates. Average annual recruitment rates were highest east of the Mississippi River and in the northwestern United States, with lower rates between. Our results demonstrate a robust methodology for calibrating recruitment estimates for mourning doves and represent the first large-scale estimates of recruitment for the species. Our methods can be used by managers to correct future harvest survey data to generate recruitment estimates for use in

  13. Temperature Dependence of Isotope Ratios in Tree Rings

    PubMed Central

    Libby, L. M.; Pandolfi, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The stable isotope ratios of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen have been measured for a German oak in wood samples of roughly three years each, for the years 1712-1954 A.D., and correlated with the existing weather records from England, Basel, and Geneva to evaluate the empirical temperature coefficients. Isotope ratios in a second official oak, measured for the years 1530-1800 A.D., show the cold temperatures of the Little Ice Age interspersed with warm intervals. PMID:16592163

  14. Age estimation by pulp/tooth ratio in lower premolars by orthopantomography.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; De Luca, Stefano; Alemán, Inmaculada; Ferrante, Luigi; Cingolani, Mariano

    2012-01-10

    Accurate age estimation has always been a problem for forensic scientists, and apposition of secondary dentine is often used as an indicator of age. Since 2004, in order to examine patterns of secondary dentine apposition, Cameriere et al. have been extensively studying the pulp/tooth area ratio of the canines by panoramic and peri-apical X-ray images. The main aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between age and age-related changes in the pulp/tooth area ratio in monoradicular teeth, with the exception of canines, by orthopantomography. A total of 606 orthopantomograms of Spanish white Caucasian patients (289 women and 317 men), aged between 18 and 75 years and coming from Bilbao and Granada (Spain), was analysed. Regression analysis of age of monoradicular teeth indicated that the lower premolars were the most closely correlated with age. An ANCOVA did not show significant differences between men and women. Multiple regression analysis, with age as dependent variable and pulp/tooth area ratio as predictor, yielded several formulae. R(2) ranged from 0.69 to 0.75 for a single lower premolar tooth and from 0.79 to 0.86 for multiple lower premolar teeth. Depending on the available number of premolar teeth, the mean of the absolute values of residual standard error, at 95% confidence interval, ranged between 4.34 and 6.02 years, showing that the pulp/tooth area ratio is a useful variable for assessing age with reasonable accuracy.

  15. Age and Sex Ratios in a High-Density Wild Red-Legged Partridge Population

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Jesús; Ponz, Carolina; Margalida, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a wild red-legged partridge population were examined over a 14-year period in Spain to identify patterns in age and sex ratios in relation to weather parameters, and to assess the importance of these parameters in population dynamics and management. The results gave age ratios of 1.07 (but 2.13 in July counts), juvenile sex ratios of 1.01 and adult sex ratios of 1.47. Overall, 12% more females were hatched and female juvenile mortality was 7.3% higher than in males. Sex differential mortality explains the 19.2% deficit in adult females, which are more heavily predated than males during the breeding period. Accordingly, age ratios are dependent on sex ratios and both are density dependent. Over time, ratios and density changes appear to be influenced by weather and management. When the habitat is well conserved, partridge population dynamics can be explained by a causal chain: weather operates on net primary production, thereby affecting partridge reproduction and predation and, as a result, age and sex ratios in the October population. A reduction in the impact of predation (i.e. the effects of ground predators on eggs, chicks and breeding females) is the key factor to improve the conservation of partridge populations and associated biological processes. PMID:27508503

  16. Age and Sex Ratios in a High-Density Wild Red-Legged Partridge Population.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Jesús; Ponz, Carolina; Margalida, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a wild red-legged partridge population were examined over a 14-year period in Spain to identify patterns in age and sex ratios in relation to weather parameters, and to assess the importance of these parameters in population dynamics and management. The results gave age ratios of 1.07 (but 2.13 in July counts), juvenile sex ratios of 1.01 and adult sex ratios of 1.47. Overall, 12% more females were hatched and female juvenile mortality was 7.3% higher than in males. Sex differential mortality explains the 19.2% deficit in adult females, which are more heavily predated than males during the breeding period. Accordingly, age ratios are dependent on sex ratios and both are density dependent. Over time, ratios and density changes appear to be influenced by weather and management. When the habitat is well conserved, partridge population dynamics can be explained by a causal chain: weather operates on net primary production, thereby affecting partridge reproduction and predation and, as a result, age and sex ratios in the October population. A reduction in the impact of predation (i.e. the effects of ground predators on eggs, chicks and breeding females) is the key factor to improve the conservation of partridge populations and associated biological processes. PMID:27508503

  17. {alpha}/{beta} ratio: A dose range dependence study

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Lourdes M. . E-mail: logarcia@ottawahospital.on.ca; Wilkins, David E.; Raaphorst, Gijsbert P.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dependence of the {alpha}/{beta} ratio determined from in vitro survival curves on the dose ranges. Methods: Detailed clonogenic cell survival experiments were used to determine the least squares estimators for the linear quadratic model for different dose ranges. The cell lines used were CHO AA8, a Chinese hamster fibroblast cell line; U-373 MG, a human glioblastoma cell line; and CP3 and DU-145, two human prostate carcinoma cell lines. The {alpha}, {beta}, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio behaviors, combined with a goodness-of-fit analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of the experiments, were assessed within different dose regions. Results: Including data from the low-dose region has a significant influence on the determination of the {alpha}, {beta}, and {alpha}/{beta} ratio from in vitro survival curve data. In this region, the values are poorly determined and have significant variability. The mid-dose region is characterized by more precise and stable values and is in agreement with the linear quadratic model. The high-dose region shows relatively small statistical error in the fitted parameters but the goodness-of-fit and Monte Carlo analyses showed poor quality fits. Conclusion: The dependence of the fitted {alpha} and {beta} on the dose range has an impact on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio determined from the survival data. The low-dose region had a significant influence that could be a result of a strong linear, rather than quadratic, component, hypersensitivity, and adaptive responses. This dose dependence should be interpreted as a caution against using inadequate in vitro cell survival data for {alpha}/{beta} ratio determination.

  18. New Horizons: Dietary protein, ageing and the Okinawan ratio.

    PubMed

    Le Couteur, David G; Solon-Biet, Samantha; Wahl, Devin; Cogger, Victoria C; Willcox, Bradley J; Willcox, D Craig; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J

    2016-07-01

    Nutrition has profound effects on ageing and lifespan. Caloric restriction is the major nutritional intervention that historically has been shown to influence lifespan and/or healthspan in many animal models. Studies have suggested that a reduction in protein intake can also increase lifespan, albeit not as dramatically as caloric restriction. More recent research based on nutritional geometry has attempted to define the effects of nutrition on ageing over a broad landscape of dietary macronutrients and energy content. Such studies in insects and mice indicate that animals with ad libitum access to low-protein, high-carbohydrate diets have longest lifespans. Remarkably, the optimum content and ratio of dietary protein to carbohydrates for ageing in experimental animals are almost identical to those in the traditional diets of the long-lived people on the island of Okinawa. PMID:27130207

  19. Benzodiazepines consumption: does dependence vary with age?

    PubMed

    Gérardin, Marie; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Guerlais, Marylène; Guillou-Landreat, Morgane; Grall-Bronnec, Marie; Jolliet, Pascale

    2014-09-01

    We have compared two groups of chronic benzodiazepines (or zolpidem/zopiclone) users: "Seniors," aged 65 years or more, and "Adults," aged less than 65 years. The study took place in the Pays de Loire region. The questionnaire assesses dependence based on items from the DSM-IV. The analysis was based on 176 Senior questionnaires and 212 Adult questionnaires. Whereas Senior patients take benzodiazepines routinely with little negative consequences, Adults suffer from underlying psychological trouble, mention a higher consumption than planned, which causes negative consequences. 35.2% of Seniors are dependent on benzodiazepines versus 49.8% of Adults. PMID:24810390

  20. Benzodiazepines consumption: does dependence vary with age?

    PubMed

    Gérardin, Marie; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Guerlais, Marylène; Guillou-Landreat, Morgane; Grall-Bronnec, Marie; Jolliet, Pascale

    2014-09-01

    We have compared two groups of chronic benzodiazepines (or zolpidem/zopiclone) users: "Seniors," aged 65 years or more, and "Adults," aged less than 65 years. The study took place in the Pays de Loire region. The questionnaire assesses dependence based on items from the DSM-IV. The analysis was based on 176 Senior questionnaires and 212 Adult questionnaires. Whereas Senior patients take benzodiazepines routinely with little negative consequences, Adults suffer from underlying psychological trouble, mention a higher consumption than planned, which causes negative consequences. 35.2% of Seniors are dependent on benzodiazepines versus 49.8% of Adults.

  1. Optimal Taylor-Couette flow: radius ratio dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Huisman, Sander G.; Jannink, Tim J. G.; Van Gils, Dennis P. M.; Verzicco, Roberto; Grossmann, Siegfried; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    Taylor-Couette flow with independently rotating inner (i) and outer (o) cylinders is explored numerically and experimentally to determine the effects of the radius ratio {\\eta} on the system response. Numerical simulations reach Reynolds numbers of up to Re_i=9.5 x 10^3 and Re_o=5x10^3, corresponding to Taylor numbers of up to Ta=10^8 for four different radius ratios {\\eta}=r_i/r_o between 0.5 and 0.909. The experiments, performed in the Twente Turbulent Taylor-Couette (T^3C) setup, reach Reynolds numbers of up to Re_i=2x10^6$ and Re_o=1.5x10^6, corresponding to Ta=5x10^{12} for {\\eta}=0.714-0.909. Effective scaling laws for the torque J^{\\omega}(Ta) are found, which for sufficiently large driving Ta are independent of the radius ratio {\\eta}. As previously reported for {\\eta}=0.714, optimum transport at a non-zero Rossby number Ro=r_i|{\\omega}_i-{\\omega}_o|/[2(r_o-r_i){\\omega}_o] is found in both experiments and numerics. Ro_opt is found to depend on the radius ratio and the driving of the system. At a driving in the range between {Ta\\sim3\\cdot10^8} and {Ta\\sim10^{10}}, Ro_opt saturates to an asymptotic {\\eta}-dependent value. Theoretical predictions for the asymptotic value of Ro_{opt} are compared to the experimental results, and found to differ notably. Furthermore, the local angular velocity profiles from experiments and numerics are compared, and a link between a flat bulk profile and optimum transport for all radius ratios is reported.

  2. Age at marriage, sex-ratios, and ethnic heterogamy.

    PubMed

    Stier, H; Shavit, Y

    1994-05-01

    "This paper focuses on the effects of age at marriage and the sex-ratio on patterns of ethnic homogamy among Israeli women. We hypothesize that later marriages are more likely than early marriages to be heterogamous as the 'marriage market' shifts from school to the work-place. By the same token, when facing severe marriage squeezes women will be forced to out-marry. Employing data from the 1983 census, we model mate selection of women from Afro-Asian and Euro-American origin in various birth-cohorts. The results do not fully support our hypotheses: we find that in and of itself, age at marriage does not enhance ethnic heterogamy."

  3. Aspect ratio dependent cytotoxicity and antimicrobial properties of nanoclay.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Kamla; Agarwal, Shweta; Tyagi, Aakriti; Verma, Anita K; Bohidar, H B

    2014-10-01

    Nanoclays may enter human body through various routes such as through the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, skin, blood, etc. There is dearth of such studies evaluating the interaction of clay nanoparticles with human cells. In particular, the interaction of proteins and nucleic acids with nanoparticles of different aspect ratio remains a domain that is very poorly probed and understood. In the present study, we address the issue of cytotoxicity and antimicrobial attributes of two distinct nanoclay platelets namely, laponite (diameter = 25 nm and thickness = 1 nm) and montmorillonite (MMT, diameter = 300 nm and thickness = 1 nm), having different aspect ratio (25:1 vs 300:1). Cytotoxicity was assessed in both prokatyotes: Escherichia coli, eukaryotes-human embryonic kidney (HEK), and cervical cancer SiHa cell lines, and a comparative size-based analysis of the toxicity were made at different exposure time points by MTT assay. The antimicrobial activity of the nanoclays was evaluated by disc diffusion method (Kirbey-Bauer protocol). Laponite exhibited maximum efficacy as an antimicrobial agent against E. coli. Comparatively smaller size laponite could preferentially enter the cells, leading to relatively wider or larger zone of inhibition. On contradictory; laponite showed 74.67 % survival while MMT showed 89.02 % survival in eukaryotic cells at 0.00001 % (w/v) concentration. In summary, both MMT and laponite indicated cytotoxicity at 0.05 % concentration within 24 h of exposure on HEK and cervical cancer (SiHa) cell lines. The toxicity was possibly dependent on size, aspect ratio, and concentration. PMID:24894661

  4. Demographic drivers of age-dependent sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Martin, A M; Festa-Bianchet, M; Coltman, D W; Pelletier, F

    2016-07-01

    Sexual selection has a critical role in evolution, and it is fundamental to identify what ecological factors drive its variation. Disentangling the ecological correlates of sexual selection over the long term, however, is challenging and has rarely been done in nature. We sought to assess how demographic changes influenced the intensity, direction and form of sexual selection and whether selective pressures varied with age. We tested whether breeder sex ratio, number of competitors and age structure influenced selection differentials on horn length of wild bighorn rams (Ovis canadensis) of different age classes on Ram Mountain, Alberta. We used 21 years of data including a detailed pedigree, demographic parameters and repeated morphological measurements. Sexual selection on horn length of males of all ages was directional and positive. Selection intensity increased with the number of competitors, reflecting male-male encounter rate during the rut, but was independent of breeder sex ratio or age structure. This result can also be linked to changes in population size because the number of competitors was highly correlated to total number of sheep. This demographic effect likely arises from age-dependent mating tactics. Males aged 2-4 years are weakly competitive and experienced stronger sexual selection as they accounted for a greater proportion of all males. Selection experienced by mature males appeared independent of demography. Our study provides a rare description of the demographic determinants of sexual selection in nature.

  5. Demographic drivers of age-dependent sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Martin, A M; Festa-Bianchet, M; Coltman, D W; Pelletier, F

    2016-07-01

    Sexual selection has a critical role in evolution, and it is fundamental to identify what ecological factors drive its variation. Disentangling the ecological correlates of sexual selection over the long term, however, is challenging and has rarely been done in nature. We sought to assess how demographic changes influenced the intensity, direction and form of sexual selection and whether selective pressures varied with age. We tested whether breeder sex ratio, number of competitors and age structure influenced selection differentials on horn length of wild bighorn rams (Ovis canadensis) of different age classes on Ram Mountain, Alberta. We used 21 years of data including a detailed pedigree, demographic parameters and repeated morphological measurements. Sexual selection on horn length of males of all ages was directional and positive. Selection intensity increased with the number of competitors, reflecting male-male encounter rate during the rut, but was independent of breeder sex ratio or age structure. This result can also be linked to changes in population size because the number of competitors was highly correlated to total number of sheep. This demographic effect likely arises from age-dependent mating tactics. Males aged 2-4 years are weakly competitive and experienced stronger sexual selection as they accounted for a greater proportion of all males. Selection experienced by mature males appeared independent of demography. Our study provides a rare description of the demographic determinants of sexual selection in nature. PMID:27090379

  6. Age-dependent decay in the landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Winitzki, Sergei

    2008-03-15

    The picture of the 'multiverse' arising in diverse cosmological scenarios involves transitions between metastable vacuum states. It was pointed out by Krauss and Dent that the transition rates decrease at very late times, leading to a dependence of the transition probability between vacua on the age of each vacuum region. I investigate the implications of this non-Markovian, age-dependent decay on the global structure of the spacetime in landscape scenarios. I show that the fractal dimension of the eternally inflating domain is precisely equal to 3, instead of being slightly below 3, which is the case in scenarios with purely Markovian, age-independent decay. I develop a complete description of a non-Markovian landscape in terms of a nonlocal master equation. Using this description I demonstrate by an explicit calculation that, under some technical assumptions about the landscape, the probabilistic predictions of our position in the landscape are essentially unchanged, regardless of the measure used to extract these predictions. I briefly discuss the physical plausibility of realizing non-Markovian vacuum decay in cosmology in view of the possible decoherence of the metastable quantum state.

  7. Aspect-ratio-dependent etching of polymers as interlayer dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gusung

    2000-08-01

    The reactive ion etching of the polymer has been studied in CF4-O2, SF6, and N2 plasmas to understand the contributions of aspect-ratio dependent etching (ARDE), an anisotropic etch profiles, and the etch rate for one of low-k polymers, Divinyl bis-benzocyclobutene (BCB, silicon containing spin-on polymer). A new experimental process (Type B) was implemented to determine the ARDE in which the AR remains constant during the entire experiment. These samples showed the uniform etch rate for all trenches. However, in conventional structure (Type A), using a SiO2 hardmask for patterning, ARDE phenomena can be observed. In the range of 30--35% CF4 in O2, BCB shows the maximum etch rate, and this coincides with the maximum in the oxygen concentration. Complete anisotropic profiles can be obtained at low pressure where the fluorine atom concentration is low. The highest etch rates are achieved at the higher pressures where fluorine and oxygen atom concentrations are high, but with an increase in the amount of profile tapering in Type A. In Type B samples, etching gives increased undercutting and bowing with an increase in pressure. At low pressure, the sidewall profile is vertical regardless of the aspect ratio of the pattern. No oxide is exposed to the CF4-O2 plasma and undercutting occurs with an increase of fluorine concentration. In large trenches, polymer residue and micromasking phenomena were observed in both cases. Specifically, the surface roughness of etched BCB in CF 4-O2 was much higher than in SF6 and N2. Lateral etching of the BCB, mask erosion and faceting of the hardmask were more prominently observed with SF6. SF6 produces a very clean surface and no residue at the bottom of a trench. In N2 plasma, the etch rate of BCB is very low due to physical ion bombardment and trenches are formed by mask erosion and micro-trenching.

  8. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Temperature Dependence Aerosol Scattering Ratio and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman water vapor signal and the lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here we use those results to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, extinction to backscatter ratio and water vapor mixing ratio. Pertinent analysis examples are presented to illustrate each calculation.

  9. Dispersion of the ratios of cosmogenic isotopes of noble gases in chondrites of different cosmic-ray exposure ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexeev, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    The dispersion of ratios of (He-3/Ne-21)c and (Ne-22/Ne-21)c depending on the cosmic-ray exposure ages of meteorites is analyzed. The dispersion is increased as age decreases. This effect may be stipulated by presence of a more significant portion of meteorites of small preatmospheric sizes among meteorites of small radiation ages in comparison to meteorites of higher exposure age.

  10. Aspect ratio dependence in magnetorotational instability shearing box simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodo, G.; Mignone, A.; Cattaneo, F.; Rossi, P.; Ferrari, A.

    2008-08-01

    Aims: We study the changes in the properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability in a shearing box, as the computational domain size in the radial direction is varied relative to the height. Methods: We perform 3D simulations in the shearing box approximation, with a net magnetic flux, and we consider computational domains with different aspect ratios. Results: We find that in boxes of aspect ratio unity the transport of angular momentum is strongly intermittent and dominated by channel solutions in agreement with previous work. In contrast, in boxes with larger aspect ratios, the channel solutions and the associated intermittent behavior disappear. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that, as the aspect ratio becomes larger, the characteristics of the solution become aspect ratio independent. We conclude that shearing box calculations with an aspect ratio of unity or near unity may introduce spurious effects.

  11. Age dependent changes of arterial wall viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Antonov, P; Antonova, M; Nikolova, N; Antonova, N; Vlaskovska, M; Kasakov, L

    2008-01-01

    Viscoelastic characteristics (VEC) of old rat aorta (Wistar, 10 months) were obtained by sinusoidal excitation of intraluminal pressure (p) in cylindrical arterial preparations. The pressure excitation frequency (f(exc)) was swept in the range 3-30 Hz up and down at several mean-pressure levels while response volume oscillations were recorded and resonance curves were plotted. Natural frequency (f(0)), dynamic modulus of elasticity (E') and coefficient of viscosity (beta) were estimated from resonance curves and the dependences of VEC on p were drawn. The results showed that f(0) decreased linearly with p whereas our previous data for young rat aorta (Wistar, 4 months) showed independence of f(0) on p. E' increased nonlinearly with p with the values being higher in comparison to young rat aorta. This means stiffening of rat aorta with age in accordance with the known literature data. beta-values increased linearly with p being higher in comparison to young rat aorta, demonstrative of raised intrinsic friction in the wall. VEC values were higher at decreasing f(exc) suggesting that the direction of excitation sweeping also determines the arterial wall biomechanical behaviour. It could be concluded that blood vessels VEC worsen with age, which endangers the arterial wall integrity, especially at higher intraluminal pressure.

  12. SEECAL: Program to calculate age-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes the computer program SEECAL, which calculates specific effective energies (SEE) to specified target regions for ages newborn, 1 y, 5 y, 10 y, 15 y, a 70-kg adult male, and a 58-kg adult female. The dosimetric methodology is that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and is generally consistent with the schema of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee of the US Society of Nuclear Medicine. Computation of SEEs is necessary in the computation of equivalent dose rate in a target region, for occupational or public exposure to radionuclides taken into the body. Program SEECAL replaces the program SEE that was previously used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program SEE was used in the dosimetric calculations for occupational exposures for ICRP Publication 30 and is limited to adults. SEECAL was used to generate age-dependent SEEs for ICRP Publication 56, Part 1. SEECAL is also incorporated into DCAL, a radiation dose and risk calculational system being developed for the Environmental Protection Agency. Electronic copies of the program and data files and this report are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  13. Age dependency of neointima formation on vascular prostheses in dogs.

    PubMed

    Noishiki, Y; Yamane, Y; Ichikawa, Y; Yamazaki, I; Yamamoto, K; Kosuge, T; Manabe, T; Mo, M

    2000-09-01

    Neointima formed quickly on vascular prostheses implanted in young dogs but not in aged dogs. Previously, we found that impeding neointima formation on vascular prostheses occurred more frequently in aged animals. From these observations, we hypothesized that neointima formation was age-dependent in dogs. To test the hypothesis, 26 fabric Dacron vascular prostheses were analyzed. Half of them were retrieved from aged dogs (more than 13 years old) while the other half were from young ones (less than 1 year old). The grafts were harvested at 8 weeks and 3 months after implantation. The graft surfaces were photographed and analyzed by computer for the ratio of the areas with and without thrombus. Light and scanning electron microscopic observation revealed that most of the thrombus-free areas were lined with endothelial cells. Then the endothelialized areas were calculated. Using data obtained from macroscopic, light microscopic, and scanning electron microscopic observations, the arithmetic means were calculated as the degree of neointima formation. In young animals, the degrees at 8 weeks and at 3 months were 89.1 +/- 8.5% (mean +/- SD) and 95.7 +/- 3.3%, respectively. In old animals, they were 27.9 +/- 5.9% and 31.5 +/- 6. 8%, respectively. From these results, we concluded that neointima formation was age-dependent in dogs.

  14. Site-dependant redox ratio in healthy oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, Sivabalan; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic coenzymes NADH and FAD are autofluorescent and can be monitored non-destructively and without exogenous labels, using optical techniques. These endogenous fluorophores which are present in the cells and tissues gives rise to different fluorescence emission/excitation spectra between the normal and different diseased conditions. In the resent years, finding the optical redox ratio i.e., the ratio of the fluorescence intensity of FAD and NADH, gives the relative change in the oxidation-reduction state of the cells. Unlike other organs oral cavity has lined with variety of mucosal types. We investigated in vivo Optical redox ratio for four different anatomical locations viz., cheek mucosa, vermilion border of the lip, Hard palate, dorsal side of the tongue of healthy oral cavity. We measured this ratio for 20 healthy subjects and the redox ratio was significantly different between the different anatomical locations. The statistical significance was also investigated.

  15. Age estimation by pulp/tooth ratio in canines by peri-apical X-rays.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Ferrante, Luigi; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Bonfiglioli, Benedetta; Rastelli, Elisa; Cingolani, Mariano

    2007-01-01

    Estimation of age in individuals has received considerable attention in forensic science, in which it is a widely used method for individual identification, together with paleo-demographic analyses to establish mortality patterns in past populations. The present investigation, which is a continuation of a previously published pilot study, was conducted to examine the possible application of the pulp/tooth area ratio by peri-apical images as an indicator of age at death. A total of 200 peri-apical X-rays of upper and lower canines were assembled from 57 male and 43 female skeletons of Caucasian origin, aged between 20 and 79 years. They belong to the Frassetto osteological collection of Sassari (Sardinia) and are housed in the Museum of Anthropology, Department of Experimental and Evolutionistic Biology, University of Bologna. For each skeleton, dental maturity was evaluated by measuring the pulp/tooth area ratio on upper (x(1)) and lower (x(2)) canines. Very good agreement was found between intraobserver measurements. Statistical analysis was performed in order to obtain multiple regression formulae for dental age calculation, with chronological age as dependent variable, and gender, and upper and lower canines as independent variables. Stepwise regression analysis showed that gender did not contribute significantly to the fit (p=0.881) whereas variables x(1) and x(2) and the first-order interaction between them did. These two variables explained 92.5% of variations in estimated chronological age and the residual standard error was 4.06 years. Lastly, two simple linear regression equations were obtained for age estimation using canines from the maxilla and mandible separately. Both models explained 86% of variations in estimated chronological age and allowed an age-at-death estimate with a residual standard error of about 5.4 years.

  16. Aspect Ratio Dependence in Magnetorotational Instability Shearing Box Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, Andrea; Ferrari, Attilio; Bodo, Gianluigi; Rossi, Paola; Cattaneo, Fausto

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the magnetorotational instability in the shearing box approximation with a nonzero net flux are presented. By changing the size of the computational domain in the radial direction relative to the vertical box height, we find, in agreement with previous studies, that transport of angular momentum (associated with the so-called "channel solution") is strongly intermittent and maximized for boxes of unit aspect ratio. On the other hand, in boxes with larger aspect ratio the intermittent behavior disappears and angular momentum transport is inhibited.

  17. Binary accretion rates: dependence on temperature and mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    We perform a series of 2D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas accretion on to binaries via a circumbinary disc, for a range of gas temperatures and binary mass ratios (q). We show that increasing the gas temperature increases the accretion rate on to the primary for all values of the binary mass ratio: for example, for q = 0.1 and a fixed binary separation, an increase of normalized sound speed by a factor of 5 (from our `cold' to `hot' simulations) changes the fraction of the accreted gas that flows on to the primary from 10 to ˜40 per cent. We present a simple parametrization for the average accretion rate of each binary component accurate to within a few per cent and argue that this parametrization (rather than those in the literature based on warmer simulations) is relevant to supermassive black hole accretion and all but the widest stellar binaries. We present trajectories for the growth of q during circumbinary disc accretion and argue that the period distribution of stellar `twin' binaries is strong evidence for the importance of circumbinary accretion. We also show that our parametrization of binary accretion increases the minimum mass ratio needed for spin alignment of supermassive black holes to q ˜ 0.4, with potentially important implications for the magnitude of velocity kicks acquired during black hole mergers.

  18. Reduction of Aspect Ratio Dependency in Silicon Trench Etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Robert

    2013-09-01

    The etch rate of deep features in silicon, such as trenches and vias, can vary significantly with the changing aspect ratio (AR) of the feature. This work focused on using a continuous plasma process utilizing a gas mixture of SF6-C4F8-Ar to produce trenches of varying widths and depths. Optical and electrical diagnostics of percent flow, total flow and RF bias on trench profiles were investigated. Experiments were also performed to show that the etch rate of low AR features can be reduced through the deposition of a passivation layer and thereby allow larger AR features to ``catch up''. It is also possible to invert the ARDE in certain circumstances. Financial Support: TI/SRC Award # 2261.001.

  19. Aspect-ratio dependence of thermodynamic Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucht, Alfred; Grueneberg, Daniel; Schmidt, Felix M.

    2012-02-01

    We consider the three-dimensional Ising model in a LxLxL cuboid geometry with finite aspect ratio ρ=L/L and periodic boundary conditions along all directions. For this model the finite-size scaling functions of the excess free energy and thermodynamic Casimir force are evaluated numerically by means of Monte Carlo simulations [1]. The Monte Carlo results compare well with recent field theoretical results for the Ising universality class at temperatures above and slightly below the bulk critical temperature Tc. Furthermore, the excess free energy and Casimir force scaling functions of the two-dimensional Ising model are calculated exactly for arbitrary ρ and compared to the three-dimensional case. We give a general argument that the Casimir force vanishes at the critical point for ρ=1 and becomes repulsive in periodic systems for ρ>1. [4pt] [1] Alfred Hucht, Daniel Gr"uneberg, and Felix M. Schmidt, Phys. Rev. E 83, 051101 (2011)

  20. Induced Alpha-Band Oscillations Reflect Ratio-Dependent Number Discrimination in the Infant Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libertus, Melissa E.; Pruitt, Laura B.; Woldorff, Marty G.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral studies show that infants are capable of discriminating the number of objects or events in their environment, while also suggesting that number discrimination in infancy may be ratio-dependent. However, due to limitations of the dependent measures used with infant behavioral studies, the evidence for ratio dependence falls short of the…

  1. Auger electron spectroscopy for the determination of sex and age related Ca/P ratio at different bone sites

    SciTech Connect

    Balatsoukas, Ioannis; Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Tzaphlidou, Margaret

    2010-10-15

    The Ca/P ratio of normal cortical and trabecular rat bone was measured by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Semiquantitative analysis was carried out using ratio techniques to draw conclusions on how age, sex and bone site affect the relative composition of calcium and phosphorus. Results show that Ca/P ratio is not sex dependent; quite the opposite, bone sites exhibit variations in elemental stoichiometry where femoral sections demonstrate higher Ca/P ratio than rear and front tibias. Age-related changes are more distinct for cortical bone in comparison with the trabecular bone. The latter's Ca/P ratio remains unaffected from all the parameters under study. This study confirms that AES is able to successfully quantify bone mineral main elements when certain critical points, related to the experimental conditions, are addressed effectively.

  2. Towards an Analytical Age-Dependent Model of Contrast Sensitivity Functions for an Ageing Society.

    PubMed

    Joulan, Karine; Brémond, Roland; Hautière, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF) describes how the visibility of a grating depends on the stimulus spatial frequency. Many published CSF data have demonstrated that contrast sensitivity declines with age. However, an age-dependent analytical model of the CSF is not available to date. In this paper, we propose such an analytical CSF model based on visual mechanisms, taking into account the age factor. To this end, we have extended an existing model from Barten (1999), taking into account the dependencies of this model's optical and physiological parameters on age. Age-dependent models of the cones and ganglion cells densities, the optical and neural MTF, and optical and neural noise are proposed, based on published data. The proposed age-dependent CSF is finally tested against available experimental data, with fair results. Such an age-dependent model may be beneficial when designing real-time age-dependent image coding and display applications. PMID:26078994

  3. Towards an Analytical Age-Dependent Model of Contrast Sensitivity Functions for an Ageing Society

    PubMed Central

    Joulan, Karine; Brémond, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF) describes how the visibility of a grating depends on the stimulus spatial frequency. Many published CSF data have demonstrated that contrast sensitivity declines with age. However, an age-dependent analytical model of the CSF is not available to date. In this paper, we propose such an analytical CSF model based on visual mechanisms, taking into account the age factor. To this end, we have extended an existing model from Barten (1999), taking into account the dependencies of this model's optical and physiological parameters on age. Age-dependent models of the cones and ganglion cells densities, the optical and neural MTF, and optical and neural noise are proposed, based on published data. The proposed age-dependent CSF is finally tested against available experimental data, with fair results. Such an age-dependent model may be beneficial when designing real-time age-dependent image coding and display applications. PMID:26078994

  4. The Influence of the Brain on Overpopulation, Ageing and Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cape, Ronald D. T.

    1989-01-01

    With time, an increasing number in the world population is becoming old, and changes in the aging brain mean that a significant proportion of the aged are likely to be dependent on others. The devotion of resources to research into the aging brain could bring benefits far outweighing the investment. (Author/CW)

  5. 38 CFR 3.204 - Evidence of dependents and age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and age. 3.204 Section 3.204 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Evidence of dependents and age. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, VA will... furnished for the purpose of establishing marriage, dissolution of marriage, age, relationship, or death,...

  6. 38 CFR 3.204 - Evidence of dependents and age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and age. 3.204 Section 3.204 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Evidence of dependents and age. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, VA will... furnished for the purpose of establishing marriage, dissolution of marriage, age, relationship, or death,...

  7. 38 CFR 3.204 - Evidence of dependents and age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and age. 3.204 Section 3.204 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Evidence of dependents and age. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, VA will... furnished for the purpose of establishing marriage, dissolution of marriage, age, relationship, or death,...

  8. 38 CFR 3.204 - Evidence of dependents and age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and age. 3.204 Section 3.204 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Evidence of dependents and age. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, VA will... furnished for the purpose of establishing marriage, dissolution of marriage, age, relationship, or death,...

  9. 38 CFR 3.204 - Evidence of dependents and age.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and age. 3.204 Section 3.204 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Evidence of dependents and age. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, VA will... furnished for the purpose of establishing marriage, dissolution of marriage, age, relationship, or death,...

  10. Age Estimation of African Lions Panthera leo by Ratio of Tooth Areas.

    PubMed

    White, Paula A; Ikanda, Dennis; Ferrante, Luigi; Chardonnet, Philippe; Mesochina, Pascal; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Improved age estimation of African lions Panthera leo is needed to address a number of pressing conservation issues. Here we present a formula for estimating lion age to within six months of known age based on measuring the extent of pulp closure from X-rays, or Ratio Of tooth AReas (ROAR). Derived from measurements taken from lions aged 3-13 years for which exact ages were known, the formula explains 92% of the total variance. The method of calculating the pulp/tooth area ratio, which has been used extensively in forensic science, is novel in the study of lion aging. As a quantifiable measure, ROAR offers improved lion age estimates for population modeling and investigations of age-related mortality, and may assist national and international wildlife authorities in judging compliance with regulatory measures involving age.

  11. Age Estimation of African Lions Panthera leo by Ratio of Tooth Areas.

    PubMed

    White, Paula A; Ikanda, Dennis; Ferrante, Luigi; Chardonnet, Philippe; Mesochina, Pascal; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Improved age estimation of African lions Panthera leo is needed to address a number of pressing conservation issues. Here we present a formula for estimating lion age to within six months of known age based on measuring the extent of pulp closure from X-rays, or Ratio Of tooth AReas (ROAR). Derived from measurements taken from lions aged 3-13 years for which exact ages were known, the formula explains 92% of the total variance. The method of calculating the pulp/tooth area ratio, which has been used extensively in forensic science, is novel in the study of lion aging. As a quantifiable measure, ROAR offers improved lion age estimates for population modeling and investigations of age-related mortality, and may assist national and international wildlife authorities in judging compliance with regulatory measures involving age. PMID:27089506

  12. Age Estimation of African Lions Panthera leo by Ratio of Tooth Areas

    PubMed Central

    Ikanda, Dennis; Ferrante, Luigi; Chardonnet, Philippe; Mesochina, Pascal; Cameriere, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Improved age estimation of African lions Panthera leo is needed to address a number of pressing conservation issues. Here we present a formula for estimating lion age to within six months of known age based on measuring the extent of pulp closure from X-rays, or Ratio Of tooth AReas (ROAR). Derived from measurements taken from lions aged 3–13 years for which exact ages were known, the formula explains 92% of the total variance. The method of calculating the pulp/tooth area ratio, which has been used extensively in forensic science, is novel in the study of lion aging. As a quantifiable measure, ROAR offers improved lion age estimates for population modeling and investigations of age-related mortality, and may assist national and international wildlife authorities in judging compliance with regulatory measures involving age. PMID:27089506

  13. Estimating age ratios and size of pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging.

    PubMed

    Monson, Daniel H; Udevitz, Mark S; Jay, Chadwick V

    2013-01-01

    During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance) to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010-2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m(2) (std. err. = 0.02), herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03-0.06) and we documented ∼30,000 animals along ∼1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0-2 yr-olds) tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying) will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species. PMID:23936106

  14. Estimating age ratios and size of Pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monson, Daniel H.; Udevitz, Mark S.; Jay, Chadwick V.

    2013-01-01

    During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance) to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010–2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m2 (std. err. = 0.02), herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03–0.06) and we documented ~30,000 animals along ~1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0–2 yr-olds) tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying) will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species.

  15. Estimating age ratios and size of pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging.

    PubMed

    Monson, Daniel H; Udevitz, Mark S; Jay, Chadwick V

    2013-01-01

    During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance) to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010-2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m(2) (std. err. = 0.02), herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03-0.06) and we documented ∼30,000 animals along ∼1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0-2 yr-olds) tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying) will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species.

  16. Estimating Age Ratios and Size of Pacific Walrus Herds on Coastal Haulouts using Video Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Daniel H.; Udevitz, Mark S.; Jay, Chadwick V.

    2013-01-01

    During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance) to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010–2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m2 (std. err. = 0.02), herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03–0.06) and we documented ∼30,000 animals along ∼1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0–2 yr-olds) tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying) will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species. PMID:23936106

  17. Determining the age of cats by pulp cavity/tooth width ratio using dental radiography

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungsun; Ahn, Jaesang; Kang, Sunmee; Lee, Euiri; Kim, Soohyun; Park, Sangwan; Park, Sungwon; Noh, Hyunwoo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of age on the ratio of pulp cavity/tooth width (P/T ratio) in healthy cats. The dental radiographs of 32 cats (16 males and 16 females) were generated with a digital dental X-ray unit with the animals under general anesthesia. Standardized measurement of the canine teeth was performed by drawing a line on the radiograph perpendicular to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) of the tooth. There was an inversely proportional correlation between chronological age and the P/T ratio. Moreover, a strong Pearson squared correlation (γ2 = 0.92) was identified by the curved regression model. No significant differences in the P/T ratio based on gender or breed were found. These results suggest that determination of age by P/T ratio could be clinically useful for estimating the chronological age of cats. PMID:25234207

  18. Determining the age of cats by pulp cavity/tooth width ratio using dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoungsun; Ahn, Jaesang; Kang, Sunmee; Lee, Euiri; Kim, Soohyun; Park, Sangwan; Park, Sungwon; Noh, Hyunwoo; Seo, Kangmoon

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of age on the ratio of pulp cavity/tooth width (P/T ratio) in healthy cats. The dental radiographs of 32 cats (16 males and 16 females) were generated with a digital dental X-ray unit with the animals under general anesthesia. Standardized measurement of the canine teeth was performed by drawing a line on the radiograph perpendicular to the cemento- enamel junction (CEJ) of the tooth. There was an inversely proportional correlation between chronological age and the P/T ratio. Moreover, a strong Pearson squared correlation (γ(2) = 0.92) was identified by the curved regression model. No significant differences in the P/T ratio based on gender or breed were found. These results suggest that determination of age by P/T ratio could be clinically useful for estimating the chronological age of cats. PMID:25234207

  19. Linear age-dependent population growth with seasonal harvesting.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, D A

    1980-06-01

    A population growth is modelled by the Von Foerster PDE with accompanying Lotka-Volterra integral equation describing the birth rate; the age specific death and fertility rates are assumed to depend only on age and not time. A harvesting policy where a fraction of the population of age greater than a given age is harvested for a fraction of a given season. This introduces a time dependence, but this difficulty is circumvented by devising approximate time-independent models whose birthrates bracket the true birthrate--the standard renewal equation theory applies to the approximate models so quantitative results can be obtained.

  20. The ligand activity of AGE-proteins to scavenger receptors is dependent on their rate of modification by AGEs.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Ryoji; Mera, Katsumi; Nakajou, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Yukio; Iwao, Yasunori; Imai, Hiroki; Murata, Toshinori; Otagiri, Masaki

    2007-12-01

    The cellular interaction of proteins modified with advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) is believed to induce several different biological responses, which are involved in the development of diabetic vascular complications. We report here that the ratio of protein glycation is implicated in its ligand activity to scavenger receptors. Although highly-modified AGE-bovine serum albumin (high-AGE-BSA) was significantly recognized by human monocyte-derived macrophages and Chinese hamster ovary cells which overexpress such scavenger receptors as CD36, SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B type-I), and LOX-1 (Lectin-like Ox-LDL receptor-1), the mildly-modified-AGE-BSA (mild-AGE-BSA) did not show any ligand activity to these cells. Furthermore, when (111)In-labeled high- or mild-AGE-BSA were injected into the tail vein of mice, the high-AGE-BSA was rapidly cleared from the circulation whereas the clearance rate of the mild-AGE-BSA was very slow, similar to the native BSA. These results demonstrate the first evidence that the ligand activity of the AGE-proteins to the scavenger receptors and its pharmacokinetic properties depend on their rate of modification by AGEs, and we should carefully prepare the AGE-proteins in vitro to clarify the physiological significance of the interaction between the AGE-receptors and AGE-proteins.

  1. Sex ratio of equine offspring is affected by the ages of the mare and stallion.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marianna Machado; Maia, Leonardo Lara; Nobre, Daniel Magalhães; Oliveira Neto, José Ferraz; Garcia, Tiago Rezende; Lage, Maria Coeli Gomes Reis; de Melo, Maria Isabel Vaz; Viana, Walmir Santos; Palhares, Maristela Silveira; da Silva Filho, José Monteiro; Santos, Renato Lima; Valle, Guilherme Ribeiro

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of parental age on the sex ratio of offspring in horses. Two trials were performed. In the first trial, the data from a randomly obtained population with a 1:1 sex ratio of 59,950 Mangalarga Marchador horses born in Brazil from 1990 to 2011 were analyzed. The sex ratios of the offspring were compared among groups according to the mare and the stallion ages (from 3 to 25 years). In the first step of the analysis, the mares and stallions were grouped according to age in 5-year intervals. In the second step, the groups were based on the parental age gap at conception. In the third step, the group of the mares and stallions with similar ages from the second step was subdivided, and the different parental age subgroups that were divided into 5-year intervals were compared. In the fourth step, the sex ratio of the offspring was determined according to the ages of the mares and the stallions at conception. The second trial was based on the data from 253 horses of several breeds that were born after natural gestation into a herd from 1989 to 2010, and the offspring of groups that were younger or older than 15 years were compared. The data from both trials were analyzed using a chi-square test (P ≤ 0.01 for the first trial; and P ≤ 0.05 for the second trial) for the comparisons of the sex ratios. In the first trial, the Spearman test (P ≤ 0.01) was used to verify the correlations between the parental age and the offspring sex ratio. In the first trial, the offspring sex ratio decreased as the mare or stallion age increased, and the decrease was more marked for the mares than for the stallions. In the second trial, the mares older than 15 years had more fillies than the younger mares, but the stallion age had no effect on the sex of the offspring. The first trial, with a large number of horses, revealed the pattern of the distribution of the sex ratios of offspring according to the parental age in horses, whereas the

  2. The Processing of Symbolic and Nonsymbolic Ratios in School-Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Meert, Gaëlle; Grégoire, Jacques; Seron, Xavier; Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the processing of ratios of natural numbers in school-age children. Nine- and eleven-year-olds were presented collections made up of orange and grey dots (i.e., nonsymbolic format) and fractions (i.e., symbolic format). They were asked to estimate ratios between the number of orange dots and the total number of dots and fractions by producing an equivalent ratio of surface areas (filling up a virtual glass). First, we tested whether symbolic notation of ratios affects their processing by directly comparing performance on fractions with that on dot sets. Second, we investigated whether children’s estimates of nonsymbolic ratios of natural numbers relied at least in part on ratios of surface areas by contrasting a condition in which the ratio of surface areas occupied by dots covaried with the ratio of natural numbers and a condition in which this ratio of surface areas was kept constant across ratios of natural numbers. The results showed that symbolic notation did not really have a negative impact on performance among 9-year-olds, while it led to more accurate estimates in 11-year-olds. Furthermore, in dot conditions, children’s estimates increased consistently with ratios between the number of orange dots and the total number of dots even when the ratio of surface areas was kept constant but were less accurate in that condition than when the ratio of surface areas covaried with the ratio of natural numbers. In summary, these results indicate that mental magnitude representation is more accurate when it is activated from symbolic ratios in children as young as 11 years old and that school-age children rely at least in part on ratios of surface areas to process nonsymbolic ratios of natural numbers when given the opportunity to do so. PMID:24312393

  3. Quantifying Age-dependent Extinction from Species Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Helen K; Lambert, Amaury; Stadler, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Several ecological factors that could play into species extinction are expected to correlate with species age, i.e., time elapsed since the species arose by speciation. To date, however, statistical tools to incorporate species age into likelihood-based phylogenetic inference have been lacking. We present here a computational framework to quantify age-dependent extinction through maximum likelihood parameter estimation based on phylogenetic trees, assuming species lifetimes are gamma distributed. Testing on simulated trees shows that neglecting age dependence can lead to biased estimates of key macroevolutionary parameters. We then apply this method to two real data sets, namely a complete phylogeny of birds (class Aves) and a clade of self-compatible and -incompatible nightshades (Solanaceae), gaining initial insights into the extent to which age-dependent extinction may help explain macroevolutionary patterns. Our methods have been added to the R package TreePar. PMID:26405218

  4. Emergence of ratio-dependent and predator-dependent functional responses for pollination mutualism and seed parasitism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Holland, J. Nathaniel

    2006-01-01

    Prey (N) dependence [g(N)], predator (P) dependence [g(P) or g(N,P)], and ratio dependence [f(P/N)] are often seen as contrasting forms of the predator's functional response describing predator consumption rates on prey resources in predator–prey and parasitoid–host interactions. Analogously, prey-, predator-, and ratio-dependent functional responses are apparently alternative functional responses for other types of consumer–resource interactions. These include, for example, the fraction of flowers pollinated or seeds parasitized in pollination (pre-dispersal) seed-parasitism mutualisms, such as those between fig wasps and fig trees or yucca moths and yucca plants. Here we examine the appropriate functional responses for how the fraction of flowers pollinated and seeds parasitized vary with the density of pollinators (predator dependence) or the ratio of pollinator and flower densities (ratio dependence). We show that both types of functional responses can emerge from minor, but biologically important variations on a single model. An individual-based model was first used to describe plant–pollinator interactions. Conditional upon on whether the number of flowers visited by the pollinator was limited by factors other than search time (e.g., by the number of eggs it had to lay, if it was also a seed parasite), and on whether the pollinator could directly find flowers on a plant, or had to search, the simulation results lead to either a predator-dependent or a ratio-dependent functional response. An analytic model was then used to show mathematically how these two cases can arise.

  5. Age-Dependent and Age-Independent Measures of Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Lawrence W.; Hofmann, Richard

    Using a longitudinal data set obtained from 169 pre-adolescent children between the ages of 8 and 13 years, this study statistically divided locus of control into two independent components. The first component was noted as "age-dependent" (AD) and was determined by predicted values generated by regressing children's ages onto their locus of…

  6. Using Tensor Momentum Dependent Deuteron Potential to Extract the Asymptotic D/S Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Emad El-Deen, A. Sultan; Mustafa, Mustafa M.; Zahran, Elbadry S.

    2010-09-30

    A new value for the deuteron asymptotic D/S ratio {eta} = 0.02640{+-}0.00024 is extracted from an empirical linear {eta}-Q relation found for a class of deuteron momentum dependent potentials with tensor momentum dependent part. These potentials fit a recently published phase shift analysis and the binding energy of the deuteron.

  7. Age- and sex-dependent change in stratum corneum sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Denda, M; Koyama, J; Hori, J; Horii, I; Takahashi, M; Hara, M; Tagami, H

    1993-01-01

    We measured six stratum corneum sphingolipid species (ceramides 1-6) in 26 males and 27 females, and found a significant change in their percentage composition only among female subjects of different age groups. There was a significant increase in ceramide 1 and 2 with a corresponding decrease in ceramide 3 and 6 from prepubertal age to adulthood. Thereafter the ratio of ceramide 2 to total sphingolipids decreased with age in contrast to ceramide 3 which showed an increase. Such a pattern of change in the aging population is different from that observed in scaly skin experimentally induced by tape stripping. The present results suggest a significant influence of female hormones on the composition of stratum corneum sphingolipids. Moreover, the different patterns of change in sphingolipid composition of stratum corneum lipids between scales from inflammatory skin and those from aged skin also suggest that epidermal biosynthesis of sphingolipids is influenced by epidermal proliferative activity. PMID:8304781

  8. Variations in pulp/tooth area ratio as an indicator of age: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Ferrante, Luigi; Cingolani, Mariano

    2004-03-01

    This paper details a method for age determination of adults from single rooted teeth. The sample consisted of 100 Italian white Caucasian patients (46 men, 54 women) aged between 18 and 72 years. The single rooted maxillary right canine was utilized in this preliminary study. Pulp/root ration, tooth length, pulp/tooth length ratio, pulp/tooth area and pulp/root width ratios at three different levels were computed. Pearson's correlation coefficients between age and these variables showed that the ratio between pulp and tooth area correlated best with age (r2 = 0.85). Stepwise multiple regression models yielded a linear relationship between pulp/root width at mid-root level and chronological age and a linear relationship when pulp/tooth area was compared to age. Statistical analysis indicated that these two variables explain 84.9% of variations in estimated chronological age. The median of the absolute value of residual errors between actual and estimated ages was less than four years.

  9. Age-Dependent Male Mating Investment in Drosophila pseudoobscura

    PubMed Central

    Dhole, Sumit; Pfennig, Karin S.

    2014-01-01

    Male mating investment can strongly influence fitness gained from a mating. Yet, male mating investment often changes with age. Life history theory predicts that mating investment should increase with age, and males should become less discriminatory about their mate as they age. Understanding age-dependent changes in male behavior and their effects on fitness is important for understanding how selection acts in age-structured populations. Although the independent effects of male or female age have been studied in many species, how these interact to influence male mating investment and fitness is less well understood. We mated Drosophila pseudoobscura males of five different age classes (4-, 8-, 11-, 15-, 19-day old) to either young (4-day) or old (11-day) females, and measured copulation duration and early post-mating fecundity. Along with their independent effects, we found a strong interaction between the effects of male and female ages on male mating investment and fitness from individual matings. Male mating investment increased with male age, but this increase was more prominent in matings with young females. Male D. pseudoobscura made smaller investments when mating with old females. The level of such discrimination based on female age, however, also changed with male age. Intermediate aged males were most discriminatory, while the youngest and the oldest males did not discriminate between females of different ages. We also found that larger male mating investments resulted in higher fitness payoffs. Our results show that male and female ages interact to form a complex pattern of age-specific male mating investment and fitness. PMID:24586373

  10. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  11. Age-dependent protection quantities for external photon irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chou, D P; Wang, J N; Chen, I J

    2001-01-01

    The age-dependent conversion coefficients of the protection quantities, the equivalent dose and the effective dose defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), are obtained. A Monte Carlo computer code and the age-dependent hermaphrodite mathematical phantoms of six age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old and adult are used for the evaluation. Twenty-three photon source energies from 10 keV to 10 MeV and six kinds of irradiation geometries: AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT, and ISO are chosen in the calculation. The evaluated conversion coefficients for the adult are compared with those in ICRP Publication 74 with good agreement. The conversion coefficients of the equivalent dose and the effective dose increase while the age of the phantom decreases, but with some exceptions for the AP irradiation geometry under certain conditions. PMID:11605795

  12. Bayesian Reconstruction of Two-Sex Populations by Age: Estimating Sex Ratios at Birth and Sex Ratios of Mortality1

    PubMed Central

    Wheldon, Mark C.; Raftery, Adrian E.; Clark, Samuel J.; Gerland, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Summary The original version of Bayesian reconstruction, a method for estimating age-specific fertility, mortality, migration and population counts of the recent past with uncertainty, produced estimates for female-only populations. Here we show how two-sex populations can be similarly reconstructed and probabilistic estimates of various sex ratio quantities obtained. We demonstrate the method by reconstructing the populations of India from 1971 to 2001, Thailand from 1960 to 2000, and Laos from 1985 to 2005. We found evidence that in India, sex ratio at birth exceeded its conventional upper limit of 1.06, and, further, increased over the period of study, with posterior probability above 0.9. In addition, almost uniquely, we found evidence that life expectancy at birth (e0) was lower for females than for males in India (posterior probability for 1971–1976 equal to 0.79), although there was strong evidence for a narrowing of the gap through to 2001. In both Thailand and Laos, we found strong evidence for the more usual result that e0 was greater for females and, in Thailand, that the difference increased over the period of study. PMID:26612972

  13. Age-dependent forest carbon sink: Estimation via inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao; Shi, Peijun; Jia, Gensuo; Dai, Yongjiu; Zhao, Xiang; Shangguan, Wei; Du, Ling; Wu, Hao; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-12-01

    Forests have been recognized to sequester a substantial amount of carbon (C) from the atmosphere. However, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the magnitude and time course of the C sink. Revealing the intrinsic relationship between forest age and C sink is crucial for reducing uncertainties in prediction of forest C sink potential. In this study, we developed a stepwise data assimilation approach to combine a process-based Terrestrial ECOsystem Regional model, observations from multiple sources, and stochastic sampling to inversely estimate carbon cycle parameters including carbon sink at different forest ages for evergreen needle-leaved forests in China. The new approach is effective to estimate age-dependent parameter of maximal light-use efficiency (R2 = 0.99) and, accordingly, can quantify a relationship between forest age and the vegetation and soil C sinks. The estimated ecosystem C sink increases rapidly with age, peaks at 0.451 kg C m-2 yr-1 at age 22 years (ranging from 0.421 to 0.465 kg C m-2 yr-1), and gradually decreases thereafter. The dynamic patterns of C sinks in vegetation and soil are significantly different. C sink in vegetation first increases rapidly with age and then decreases. C sink in soil, however, increases continuously with age; it acts as a C source when the age is less than 20 years, after which it acts as a sink. For the evergreen needle-leaved forest, the highest C sink efficiency (i.e., C sink per unit net primary productivity) is approximately 60%, with age between 11 and 43 years. Overall, the inverse estimation of carbon cycle parameters can make reasonable estimates of age-dependent C sequestration in forests.

  14. On the dynamics of the age structure, dependency, and consumption

    PubMed Central

    Hock, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effects of population aging due to declining fertility and rising elderly life expectancy on consumption possibilities in the presence of intergenerational transfers. Our analysis is based on a highly tractable continuous-time overlapping generations model in which the population is divided into three groups (youth dependents, workers, and elderly dependents) and lifecourse transitions take place in a probabilistic fashion. We show that the consumption-maximizing response to greater longevity in highly developed countries is an increase in fertility. However, with larger transfer payments, the actual fertility response will likely be the opposite, leading to further population aging. PMID:24353374

  15. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    PubMed

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point.

  16. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    PubMed

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point. PMID:25768548

  17. Role of Mitochondrial Complex IV in Age-Dependent Obesity.

    PubMed

    Soro-Arnaiz, Ines; Li, Qilong Oscar Yang; Torres-Capelli, Mar; Meléndez-Rodríguez, Florinda; Veiga, Sónia; Veys, Koen; Sebastian, David; Elorza, Ainara; Tello, Daniel; Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Cogliati, Sara; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose Maria; Balsa, Eduardo; Fuertes, Esther; Romanos, Eduardo; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Enriquez, Jose Antonio; Fernandez-Real, Jose Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; De Bock, Katrien; Aragonés, Julián

    2016-09-13

    Aging is associated with progressive white adipose tissue (WAT) enlargement initiated early in life, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown. Here we show that mitochondrial complex IV (CIV) activity and assembly are already repressed in white adipocytes of middle-aged mice and involve a HIF1A-dependent decline of essential CIV components such as COX5B. At the molecular level, HIF1A binds to the Cox5b proximal promoter and represses its expression. Silencing of Cox5b decreased fatty acid oxidation and promoted intracellular lipid accumulation. Moreover, local in vivo Cox5b silencing in WAT of young mice increased the size of adipocytes, whereas restoration of COX5B expression in aging mice counteracted adipocyte enlargement. An age-dependent reduction in COX5B gene expression was also found in human visceral adipose tissue. Collectively, our findings establish a pivotal role for CIV dysfunction in progressive white adipocyte enlargement during aging, which can be restored to alleviate age-dependent WAT expansion. PMID:27626667

  18. TESTING PULSAR RADIATION MODELS USING AN alpha-WEAK-DEPENDENT ALTITUDE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. J.; Cui, X. H.; Qiao, G. J.; Xu, R. X.; Wang, H. G.

    2009-09-20

    It is found that pulsar radiation altitude ratios between different radio frequencies are weak-dependent on the inclination angle alpha. This is proved via series expansion techniques and illustrated by using pulsar examples of PSR B0329+54, B1508+55, B2016+28, B1133+16, and B2319+60. It is emphasized that this alpha-weak-dependent radiation altitude ratio offers a good tool to test pulsar radiation models. We use the measured altitude ratios to constrain the parameter space for the Ruderman-Sutherland model and the inverse Compton scattering model. It is found that the Ruderman-Sutherland model is not compatible with the measured altitude ratios, while the results are compatible with the inverse Compton scattering model. The potential possible applications of this method in studying pulsar timing and in studying pulsar high energy radiation are also discussed.

  19. The own-age face recognition bias is task dependent.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Valentina; Macchi Cassia, Viola; Mondloch, Catherine J

    2015-08-01

    The own-age bias (OAB) in face recognition (more accurate recognition of own-age than other-age faces) is robust among young adults but not older adults. We investigated the OAB under two different task conditions. In Experiment 1 young and older adults (who reported more recent experience with own than other-age faces) completed a match-to-sample task with young and older adult faces; only young adults showed an OAB. In Experiment 2 young and older adults completed an identity detection task in which we manipulated the identity strength of target and distracter identities by morphing each face with an average face in 20% steps. Accuracy increased with identity strength and facial age influenced older adults' (but not younger adults') strategy, but there was no evidence of an OAB. Collectively, these results suggest that the OAB depends on task demands and may be absent when searching for one identity.

  20. Age-dependent protection quantities for external neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chou, D P; Wang, J N; Chen, I J; Chang, B J

    2003-01-01

    Based on the recommendations issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), equivalent doses and effective doses for different ages are obtained for external neutron sources. The calculations at 28 neutron energies from 1 x 10(-9) MeV to 20 MeV are carried out for six irradiation geometries: AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO. An age-dependent anthropomorphic mathematical phantom series of six age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old and adult is used with the Monte Carlo computer code MCNP for the dose evaluations. The results for adults are compared with those in ICRP Publication 74 and are in good agreement. At low energies the effective doses increase as the phantom age increases, but at high energics they decrease with increasing age for the AP, PA, ROT and ISO irradiation geometries. In the whole energy region the effective doses decrease as the phantom age increases for the RLAT and LLAT irradiation geometries. The age-dependent equivalent doses behave similarly to the effective doses, with some exceptions caused by the influence of the organ position. PMID:12862238

  1. A comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    In the absence of age-specific biokinetic models, current retention models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) frequently are used as a point of departure for evaluation of exposures to the general population. These models were designed and intended for estimation of long-term integrated doses to the adult worker. Their format and empirical basis preclude incorporation of much valuable physiological information and physiologically reasonable assumptions that could be used in characterizing the age-specific behavior of radioelements in humans. In this paper we discuss a comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling in which consideration is given not only to changes with age in masses and relative geometries of body organs and tissues but also to best available physiological and radiobiological information relating to the age-specific biobehavior of radionuclides. This approach is useful in obtaining more accurate estimates of long-term dose commitments as a function of age at intake, but it may be particularly valuable in establishing more accurate estimates of dose rate as a function of age. Age-specific dose rates are needed for a proper analysis of the potential effects on estimates or risk of elevated dose rates per unit intake in certain stages of life, elevated response per unit dose received during some stages of life, and age-specific non-radiogenic competing risks.

  2. Age-dependent morphological and compositional variations on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Extended smooth plains cover the interior of a number of craters on Ceres. Smooth plains appear on different topographic levels associated with pits and flow-like features that overrun crater rims. The material forming these plains also ponds in depressions and smaller craters and cover the pre-existing surface creating distinct geological boundaries. Ikapati crater shows smooth plains on different topographic levels associated with pits and flow-like features that overrun crater rims. The material forming these plains, ponds in depressions and smaller craters and cover the pre-existing surface creating a distinct geological boundary. The interior of Occator also exhibits extended plains of ponded material, multiple flows originating from the center overwhelming the mass wasting deposits from the rim, dome-like features, vents cracks and fissures. Furthermore, crater densities on Occator's floor are lower than those on the ejecta blanket indicating a post-impact formation age of the flows. The flows to the northeast appear to originate from the central region and move slightly uphill. This indicates either a feeding zone that pushes the flows forward by supplying low-viscosity material or a depression of the crater center, possibly after discharging a subsurface reservoir. The plains and flows as well as some areas surrounding the craters appear spectrally blue. Both plains and flow material are characterized in camera and spectrometer visible spectra by a slightly negative slope with a gradual drop off up to 10% in reflectance from 0.5μm to 1μm. Although the spectral variations in the visible are subtle, they are clearly expressed in the color ratio composite. The crater densities of 20 locations across the surface of Ceres with different spectral behavior were analyzed in order to investigate the age dependence of spectral surface features. The results indicate that bluish material is mainly associated with the youngest impact craters on Ceres (< 0.5 Ga) while

  3. Human dental age estimation by calculation of pulp-tooth volume ratios yielded on clinically acquired cone beam computed tomography images of monoradicular teeth.

    PubMed

    Star, Hazha; Thevissen, Patrick; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Fieuws, Steffen; Solheim, Tore; Willems, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Secondary dentine is responsible for a decrease in the volume of the dental pulp cavity with aging. The aim of this study is to evaluate a human dental age estimation method based on the ratio between the volume of the pulp and the volume of its corresponding tooth, calculated on clinically taken cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from monoradicular teeth. On the 3D images of 111 clinically obtained CBCT images (Scanora(®) 3D dental cone beam unit) of 57 female and 54 male patients ranging in age between 10 and 65 years, the pulp-tooth volume ratio of 64 incisors, 32 canines, and 15 premolars was calculated with Simplant(®) Pro software. A linear regression model was fit with age as dependent variable and ratio as predictor, allowing for interactions of specific gender or tooth type. The obtained pulp-tooth volume ratios were the strongest related to age on incisors.

  4. Auditory brainstem response in neonates: influence of gender and weight/gestational age ratio

    PubMed Central

    Angrisani, Rosanna M. Giaffredo; Bautzer, Ana Paula D.; Matas, Carla Gentile; de Azevedo, Marisa Frasson

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of gender and weight/gestational age ratio on the Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) in preterm (PT) and term (T) newborns. METHODS: 176 newborns were evaluated by ABR; 88 were preterm infants - 44 females (22 small and 22 appropriate for gestational age) and 44 males (22 small and 22 appropriate for gestational age). The preterm infants were compared to 88 term infants - 44 females (22 small and 22 appropriate for gestational age) and 44 males (22 small and 22 appropriate for gestational age). All newborns had bilateral presence of transient otoacoustic emissions and type A tympanometry. RESULTS: No interaural differences were found. ABR response did not differentiate newborns regarding weight/gestational age in males and females. Term newborn females showed statistically shorter absolute latencies (except on wave I) than males. This finding did not occur in preterm infants, who had longer latencies than term newborns, regardless of gender. CONCLUSIONS: Gender and gestational age influence term infants' ABR, with lower responses in females. The weight/gestational age ratio did not influence ABR response in either groups. PMID:24473955

  5. Measurements of the cosmic-ray Be/B ratio and the age of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. W.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The ratio Be/B depends on whether the confinement time of cosmic rays in the Galaxy is long or short compared to the radioactive half-life of Be-10. We report observations of this ratio which were obtained with a dE/dx-Cerenkov detector launched into a polar orbit on OGO-6 as part of the Caltech Solar and Galactic Cosmic Ray Experiment. Be/B ratios were determined for various rigidity thresholds up to 15 GV. We find no statistically significant rigidity dependence of the ratio, which is 0.41 plus or minus 0.02 when averaged over all observed cutoffs. Additional calculations suggest that if the present fragmentation parameters are correct, then the lifetime of cosmic rays in the Galaxy is less then 10 m.y.

  6. Nox2-dependent ROS signaling protects against skeletal ageing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone remodeling is age-dependently regulated and changes dramatically during the course of development. Progressive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals, has been suspected to be the leading cause of many inflammatory and degen...

  7. Investigation of temperature dependence of development and aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacher, G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Temperature dependence of maturation and metabolic rates in insects, and the failure of vital processes during development were investigated. The paper presented advances the general hypothesis that aging in biological systems is a consequence of the production of entropy concomitant with metabolic activity.

  8. Origin of the bell-like dependence of the DPOAE amplitude on primary frequency ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukashkin, Andrei N.; Russell, Ian J.

    2001-12-01

    For low and medium sound pressure levels (SPLs), the amplitude of the distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) recorded from guinea pigs at the 2f1-f2 frequency is maximal when f2/f1~1.23 and decreases for lower and higher f2/f1 ratios. The high-ratio slope of the DPOAE dependence on the ratio of the primary frequencies might be anticipated since the f1 amplitude at the f2 place is expected to decrease for higher f2/f1 ratios. The low-ratio slope of the dependence at low and medium SPLs of the primaries is actually one slope of a notch. The DPOAE amplitude recovers from the notch when the f2/f1 ratio is further reduced. In two-dimensional space formed by the f2/f1 ratio, and the levels of the primaries, the notch is continuous and has a level-dependent phase transition. The notch is identical to that seen in DPOAE growth functions. Similar notches and phase transitions were observed for high-order and high-frequency DPOAEs. Theoretical analysis reveals that a single saturating nonlinearity is capable of generating similar amplitude notch and phase transition when the f2/f1 ratio is decreased because of the increase in f1 amplitude at the DPOAE generation place (f2 place). The difference between the DPOAE recorded from guinea pigs and humans is discussed in terms of different position of the operating point of the DPOAE generating nonlinearity.

  9. Ratio dependence in small number discrimination is affected by the experimental procedure

    PubMed Central

    Agrillo, Christian; Piffer, Laura; Bisazza, Angelo; Butterworth, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Adults, infants and some non-human animals share an approximate number system (ANS) to estimate numerical quantities, and are supposed to share a second, ‘object-tracking,’ system (OTS) that supports the precise representation of a small number of items (up to 3 or 4). In relative numerosity judgments, accuracy depends on the ratio of the two numerosities (Weber’s Law) for numerosities >4 (the typical ANS range), while for numerosities ≤4 (OTS range) there is usually no ratio effect. However, recent studies have found evidence for ratio effects for small numerosities, challenging the idea that the OTS might be involved for small number discrimination. Here we tested the hypothesis that the lack of ratio effect in the numbers 1–4 is largely dependent on the type of stimulus presentation. We investigated relative numerosity judgments in college students using three different procedures: a simultaneous presentation of intermingled and separate groups of dots in separate experiments, and a further experiment with sequential presentation. As predicted, in the large number range, ratio dependence was observed in all tasks. By contrast, in the small number range, ratio insensitivity was found in one task (sequential presentation). In a fourth experiment, we showed that the presence of intermingled distractors elicited a ratio effect, while easily distinguishable distractors did not. As the different ratio sensitivity for small and large numbers has been often interpreted in terms of the activation of the OTS and ANS, our results suggest that numbers 1–4 may be represented by both numerical systems and that the experimental context, such as the presence/absence of task-irrelevant items in the visual field, would determine which system is activated. PMID:26579032

  10. Age of Alcohol-Dependence Onset: Associations with Severity of Dependence and Seeking Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hingson, Ralph W.; Heeren, Timothy; Winter, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We explored whether people who become alcohol dependent at younger ages are more likely to seek alcohol-related help or treatment or experience chronic relapsing dependence. Methods: In 2001-2002 the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism completed a face-to-face interview survey with a multistage probability sample of 43…

  11. 32 CFR 48.302 - Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents. 48.302 Section 48.302 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION...

  12. 32 CFR 48.302 - Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents. 48.302 Section 48.302 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION...

  13. Path dependence of lithium ion cells aging under storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Laisuo; Zhang, Jianbo; Huang, Jun; Ge, Hao; Li, Zhe; Xie, Fengchao; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates path dependence of lithium ion cells that are stored under static and non-static conditions. In the static storage tests, the levels of temperature and state of charge (SOC) are kept constant. The results of 12 tests from a combination of three temperatures and four SOCs show that, as expected, the cell ages faster at higher temperature and higher SOC. However, the cell aging mode, while consistent for all the evaluated temperatures, is different at 95% SOC from that at lower SOCs. In the non-static storage tests, the levels of temperature and SOC vary with time during the test process. The effect of the sequence of stress levels on cell aging is studied statistically using the statistical method of analysis of variation (ANOVA). It is found that cell capacity fade is path independent of both SOC and temperature, while cell resistance increase is path dependent on SOC and path independent of temperature. Finally, rate-based empirical aging models are adopted to fit the cell aging in the static storage tests. The aging model for capacity fade is demonstrated to be applicable to the non-static tests with errors between -3% and +3% for all the tested conditions over 180 days.

  14. Cation-ratio dating: A new rock varnish age-determination technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Ronald I.

    1983-07-01

    Rock varnish coats many surfaces of geomorphic and archaeologic interest in arid lands. All varnish dating techniques are limited by the time lag between the exposure of a surface to subaerial processes and the onset of varnishing. They are valid only where manganese is not remobilized after deposition, for example, in most arid environments. The premise of a new age-determination method, cation-ratio dating, is that the ratio of the more mobile cations (e.g., K and Ca) to titanium in varnish decreases with time. Although there are many inherent assumptions and potential limitations, cation-ratio dating has been verified on relative age-sequences from a Death Valley debris cone, Negev Desert talus flatirons, and prehistoric lake levels at Searles Lake in California. Varnish cation ratios have been calibrated to independently dated surfaces in the Coso volcanic field and vicinity in California. Tentative absolute dates have been assigned to geomorphic surfaces in the Coso area. Cation ratios have been used to distinguish relative ages of archaeologic artifacts in southwestern North America and to demonstrate that varnish at the South Stoddard locality, Mojave Desert, did not form in 25 yr.

  15. Age-dependent changes in cuticular hydrocarbons of larvae in Aldrichina grahami (Aldrich) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Ye, Gong-Yin; Xu, Ying; Hu, Cui; Zhu, Guang-Hui

    2014-09-01

    Necrophagous flies, comprising the first wave of insects present in a cadaver, provide a great potential for more accurate determination of the late postmortem interval (PMI) based on their age. Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHs) are a promising age indicator in some insect species, especially for the larvae of necrophagous flies. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to characterize the age-dependent, quantitative changes in CHs of larval Aldrichina grahami (Aldrich) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) at 24°C. The majority of low-molecular-weight alkanes (≤C25) and almost all of the alkenes decreased in abundance with larval development. By contrast, the abundance of high-molecular-weight alkanes of chain length greater than C25 gradually increased with age. For several peaks, including peak 28 (pentacosene a), peak 31 (n-C25), peak 43 (n-C27) and peak 68 (n-C31), a highly significant correlation was found between peak ratio (n-C29 divided by each chromatographic peak) and chronological age of the larvae. A mathematical model, derived from multivariate linear regression analysis, was developed for determining age of the larvae based on age-dependent changes in CHs. The estimated larval age based on the CHs had a good linear correlation with the chronological age (R(2)>0.9). These results indicate that CHs has a great potential for determining the age of fly larvae, and concomitantly for the PMI in forensic investigation.

  16. Reliability in age determination by pulp/tooth ratio in upper canines in skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Brogi, Giuseppe; Ferrante, Luigi; Mirtella, Dora; Vultaggio, Claudia; Cingolani, Mariano; Fornaciari, Gino

    2006-07-01

    Estimation of age of skeletal remains is one of the most complex questions for anthropologists. The most common macroscopic methods are based on dental wear and histological evaluation of bone remodeling. These methods are often qualitative, require great technical expertise, and have proved inexact in the estimation of ages over 50 years. Certain dental methods investigate the apposition of secondary dentine, in the study of tooth cross-sections, and X-rays to study width, height, and pulp area. The primary author previously proposed a method of estimating the age of a living person based on the pulp/tooth ratio (PTR) method in the upper canines. The aim of the present study is to verify whether the PTR method can also be used to estimate the age at death of skeletal remains. This paper investigates the study of historical samples of known age as a means to validate the proposed method.

  17. Sex ratio at reproductive age: changes over the last century in the Italian population.

    PubMed

    Ulizzi, L; Astolfi, P; Zonta, L A

    2001-02-01

    The radical improvement in living conditions experienced in Italy during the last century caused a reduction in male extra-mortality during the prereproductive years. As a consequence, a progressive increase in the sex ratio at the beginning of the reproductive age (15-19 years) occurred, so that in recent times the sex ratio in the young adult population has approached the almost constant value of 1.06 observed at birth. We calculated that the sex composition would be the same in newborns and in young adults in about one generation: obviously, we have to assume that the sex differentials in mortality and migration are constant over time. The 1:1 equilibrium between sexes, which maximizes reproductive success, occurred in the 15-19 age group at the beginning of the century and shifted to the 30-35 age group in the 1990s. We compared the 1993-1995 sex ratios in different age groups in European Union countries and observed that in Italy as well as in other Mediterranean countries the numerical equality between sexes is reached at 30-35 years of age, while in north-central Europe it is reached later, approximately at the end of reproductive life.

  18. Bionomic Exploitation of a Ratio-Dependent Predator-Prey System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiti, Alakes; Patra, Bibek; Samanta, G. P.

    2008-01-01

    The present article deals with the problem of combined harvesting of a Michaelis-Menten-type ratio-dependent predator-prey system. The problem of determining the optimal harvest policy is solved by invoking Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. Dynamic optimization of the harvest policy is studied by taking the combined harvest effort as a dynamic…

  19. Age dependency of cerebral oxygenation assessed with near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colier, Willy N.; van Haaren, Nicole J.; van de Ven, Marjo J.; Folgering, Hans T.; Oeseburg, Berend

    1997-04-01

    Near-IR spectroscopy (NIRS) is an optical technique that provides information on cerebral tissue oxygenation and hemodynamics on a continuous, direct, and noninvasive basis. It is used to determine cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity during normoxic hyper- and hypocapnia in a group of 28 healthy volunteers aged 20 to 83 years. The main focus is on to the age dependency of the measured variables. The influence of changes in minute ventilation during normocapnia on the cerebral oxygenation was also studied. The mean CBV in age was, for 20 to 30 years, 2.14 +/- 0.51 ml/100 g of brain tissue; for 45 to 50 years, 1.92 +/- 0.40 ml/100 g; and for 70 to 83 years, 1.47 +/- 0.55 ml/100 g. The CBV showed a significant decease with advancing age. No influence was found for a change in minute ventilation on cerebral oxygenation. During hypercapnia cerebral blood flow (CBF) significantly increased in al age groups, with a factor of 1.31 +/- 0.17 kPa-1, 1.64 +/- 1.39 kPa-1, and 2.4 +/- 1.7 kPa-1, respectively, for the three age groups. The difference in change among the age groups was not statistically significant. The trend seen was an increased change in CBF with advancing age. During hypocapnia, the CBF significantly decreased in all age groups, with a factor of 0.89 +/- 0.08 kPa-1, 0.89 +/- 0.04 kPa-1, and 0.85 +/- 0.11 kPa-1, respectively. There was no significant difference among the age groups.

  20. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David A.; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom L.

    2015-03-27

    The lattice thermal conductivities (k) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure P using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in k with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of k. This anomalous P dependence of k arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with smallmore » mass ratios. We find this work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.« less

  1. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David A.; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom L.

    2015-03-27

    The lattice thermal conductivities (k) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure P using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in k with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of k. This anomalous P dependence of k arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small mass ratios. We find this work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.

  2. Aspect ratio dependent fluorescence quenching of eosin Y by gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Weng, Guojun; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Junwu

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanorods of different aspect ratios had been synthesized using seed mediated growth method. The formed gold nanorods had been characterized by the absorption and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. The obtained gold nanorods were used to study the quenched effect on fluorescence of Eosin Y. Experimental results revealed that Eosin Y molecules adsorbed on the metallic surfaces, suffering strong quenching of their fluorescence and the quenching efficiency was different for different aspect ratio. Using dielectric coated gold nanorods model, the probable mechanism of aspect ratio dependent quenching efficiency was obtained by numerical calculation based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer and quasi-static theory. The calculation results showed that the non-monotonic changing of fluorescence quenching was attributed to competing effects of aspect ratio and the dielectric constant of coated shell on surface plasmon resonance.

  3. Aspect ratio dependent fluorescence quenching of eosin Y by gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Weng, Guojun; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Junwu

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanorods of different aspect ratios had been synthesized using seed mediated growth method. The formed gold nanorods had been characterized by the absorption and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. The obtained gold nanorods were used to study the quenched effect on fluorescence of Eosin Y. Experimental results revealed that Eosin Y molecules adsorbed on the metallic surfaces, suffering strong quenching of their fluorescence and the quenching efficiency was different for different aspect ratio. Using dielectric coated gold nanorods model, the probable mechanism of aspect ratio dependent quenching efficiency was obtained by numerical calculation based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer and quasi-static theory. The calculation results showed that the non-monotonic changing of fluorescence quenching was attributed to competing effects of aspect ratio and the dielectric constant of coated shell on surface plasmon resonance. PMID:24738353

  4. Genistein modulates proliferation and mitochondrial functionality in breast cancer cells depending on ERalpha/ERbeta ratio.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Blanquer-Rossello, M Mar; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women of developed countries. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, and 17β-estradiol (E2) could have effects on the cell cycle and mitochondrial function and dynamics. Three human breast cancer cell lines with different estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) ratio were used: MCF-7 (high ERα/ERβ ratio), T47D (low ERα/ERβ ratio) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative). Cell proliferation, cell cycle, mitochondrial functionality, and mitochondrial dynamics parameters were analyzed. E2 and genistein treatment induced cell proliferation and apoptosis inhibition in MCF-7, but not in T47D and MDA-MB-231. Moreover, genistein treatment produced an up-regulation of ERβ and a rise in cytochrome c oxidase activity in T47D cells, decreasing the ATP synthase/cytochrome c oxidase ratio. Finally, genistein treatment produced a drop in mitochondrial dynamics only in MCF-7 cells. In summary, the beneficial effects of genistein consumption depend on the ERα/ERβ ratio in breast cells. Therefore, genistein treatment produces cell cycle arrest and an improvement of mitochondrial functionality in T47D cells with a low ERα/ERβ ratio, but not in MCF-7 (high ERα/ERβ ratio) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative) ones.

  5. A comparison of methods used to obtain age ratios of snow and Canada geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, K.F.; Linder, R.L.; Springer, P.F.

    1969-01-01

    The validity of group counts, cannon-net catches, and hunter-bag checks for estimating productivity of lesser snow geese (Anser caerulescens caerulescens) and small Canada geese (Branta canadensis hutchinsii-parvipes complex) was studied at Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge during the falls of 1965 and 1966. Age ratios of snow geese obtained from net-trapped samples were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than from group counts at the same site. Immature snow geese were shot in a significantly greater (P < 0.01) proportion than they existed in the population as determined by group counts. Cannon-net catches and hunter-bag checks of snow and Canada geese yielded age ratios which were biased because of behavioral characteristics of the geese. Immatures of both species were less wary of trap equipment and immature snow geese were more vulnerable to the gun than adults. It was believed that age ratios from group counts of snow geese were more representative of the population than those from net catches and hunter-bag checks. Sex ratios of net-trapped geese showed a preponderance of males for adult Canada and adult and immature snow geese, whereas females were predominant in the immature segment of Canada geese. Hunter selectivity of blue- or white-phase snow geese was not observed at Sand Lake Refuge. Differential vulnerability to hunting between snow and Canada geese resulted from differences m feeding-flight behavior.

  6. Rippled-spectrum resolution dependence on masker-to-probe ratio.

    PubMed

    Supin, Alexander Ya; Popov, Vladimir V; Milekhina, Olga N; Tarakanov, Mikhail B

    2005-06-01

    Resolution of rippled sound spectrum (probe) in the presence of additional noise band (masker) was studied as a function of masker-to-probe ratio and sound level in normal listeners. The probe bands were 0.5-oct wide (ERB) centered at 2 kHz; the masker band either coincided with the probe (on-frequency masker), or was 3/4 octaves below (low-frequency masker), or 3/4 octaves above the probe (high-frequency masker). Ripple-density resolution in the probe band was measured by finding the highest ripple density at which an interchange of ripple peaks and valleys was detectable (the phase-reversal test). (i) The effect of the low-frequency masker increased (resolution decreased) when masker-to-probe ratio changed from -25 dB to +20 dB; the effect increased (resolution decreased) with sound level increase. (ii) The effect of the on-frequency masker steeply increased (resolution abruptly decreased) when masker-to-probe ratio exceeded 0 dB; the effect was little dependent on sound level. (iii) The high-frequency masker was little effective unless the masker-to-probe ratio reached 30-40 dB; the effect increased (resolution decreased) with sound level decrease. Thus, different position of the masker band relative to the probe resulted in qualitatively different kinds of spectrum-pattern resolution dependence on both the masker-to-probe ratio and sound level.

  7. Energy dependence of p¯/p ratio in p+p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Subhash; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Kumar, Lokesh; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2010-10-01

    We compiled the experimentally measured p¯/p ratio at midrapidity in p+p collisions from s=23 to 7000 GeV and compared it to various mechanisms of baryon production as implemented in the pythia, phojet, and Heavy Ion Jet Interaction Generator (HIJING)/B-B¯ models. For the models studied with default settings, phojet has the best agreement with the measurements, pythia gives a higher value for s<200 GeV, and the ratios from HIJING/B-B¯ are consistently lower for all the s studied. A comparison of the data to different mechanisms of baryon production as implemented in pythia shows that through a suitable tuning of the suppression of diquark-antidiquark pair production in the color field relative to quark-antiquark production and allowing the diquarks to split according to the popcorn scheme, a fairly reasonable description of the measured p¯/p ratio for s<200 GeV is given. A comparison of the beam energy dependence of the p¯/p ratio in p+p and nucleus-nucleus (A + A) collisions at midrapidity shows that the baryon production is significantly more for A + A collisions relative to p+p collisions for s<200 GeV. We also carry out a phenomenological fit to the ybeam dependence of the p¯/p ratio.

  8. Energy dependence of p-bar/p ratio in p+p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, Subhash; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Kumar, Lokesh

    2010-10-15

    We compiled the experimentally measured p-bar/p ratio at midrapidity in p+p collisions from {radical}(s)=23 to 7000 GeV and compared it to various mechanisms of baryon production as implemented in the pythia, phojet, and Heavy Ion Jet Interaction Generator (HIJING)/B-B models. For the models studied with default settings, phojet has the best agreement with the measurements, pythia gives a higher value for {radical}(s)<200 GeV, and the ratios from HIJING/B-B are consistently lower for all the {radical}(s) studied. A comparison of the data to different mechanisms of baryon production as implemented in pythia shows that through a suitable tuning of the suppression of diquark-antidiquark pair production in the color field relative to quark-antiquark production and allowing the diquarks to split according to the popcorn scheme, a fairly reasonable description of the measured p-bar/p ratio for {radical}(s)<200 GeV is given. A comparison of the beam energy dependence of the p-bar/p ratio in p+p and nucleus-nucleus (A + A) collisions at midrapidity shows that the baryon production is significantly more for A + A collisions relative to p+p collisions for {radical}(s)<200 GeV. We also carry out a phenomenological fit to the y{sub beam} dependence of the p-bar/p ratio.

  9. Age-dependent fatigue behaviour of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Diab, T; Sit, S; Kim, D; Rho, J; Vashishth, D

    2005-01-01

    Despite a general understanding that bone quality contributes to skeletal fragility, very little information exits on the age-dependent fatigue behavior of human bone. In this study four-point bending fatigue tests were conducted on aging bone in conjunction with the analysis of stiffness loss and preliminary investigation of nanoindentation based measurements of local tissue stiffness and histological evaluation of resultant tensile and compressive damage to identify the damage mechanism responsible for the increase in age-related bone fragility. The results obtained show that there is an exponential decrease in fatigue life with age, and old bone exhibits different modulus degradation profiles than young bone. In addition, this study provides preliminary evidence indicating that during fatigue loading, younger bone formed diffuse damage, lost local tissue stiffness on the tensile side. Older bone, in contrast, formed linear microcracks lost local tissue stiffness on the compressive side. Thus, the propensity of aging human bone to form more linear microcracks than diffuse damage may be a significant contributor to bone quality, and age related fragility in bone.

  10. Age estimation by pulp/tooth area ratio in canines: study of a Portuguese sample to test Cameriere's method.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, R; Cunha, E; Sassaroli, E; Nuzzolese, E; Ferrante, L

    2009-12-15

    Age estimation in adults is an important problem in both anthropological and forensic fields, and apposition of secondary dentine is often used as an indicator of age. In recent papers, Cameriere et al. studied the pulp/tooth area ratio of canines for this purpose. The present study examines the application of the pulp/tooth area ratio by peri-apical X-ray images as an age indicator in a Portuguese identified sample. The statistical model was then compared with results from an Italian identified sample, to establish whether a common regression model for both samples could be developed. The Portuguese sample consisted of 126 canines of male and 132 of female from subjects 20 to 84 years old, from the osteological collection of the Museum of Anthropology at Coimbra University. The Italian sample consisted of 114 canines of male and 86 of female from subjects 20 to 79 years old, analyzed in Cameriere et al. (2007), and came from the Frassetto osteological collection of Sassari (Sardinia), now housed in the Museum of Anthropology, Department of Experimental and Evolutionistic Biology, University of Bologna. Statistical analysis was performed in order to obtain multiple regression formulas for dental age calculation, with chronological age as dependent variable, and gender and pulp/tooth area ratio on upper (RA(u)) and lower canines (RA(l)) as independent variables. ANCOVA analysis showed that gender was not significant but that variables RA(u) and RA(l) were. The regression model for the Portuguese sample yielded the following equations: Age=101.3-556.68 RA(u) (upper canines) and Age=92.37-492.05 RA(l) (lower canines). Both models explained about 97% of total variance, and mean prediction errors were ME=2.37 years and 2.55 years, respectively. Comparisons between the equation referring to the Portuguese sample and the equivalent linear equations proposed by Cameriere et al. for the Italian sample did not reveal significant differences between the linear models

  11. Key Plant Structural and Allocation Traits Depend on Relative Age in the Perennial Herb Pimpinella saxifraga

    PubMed Central

    NIINEMETS, ÜLO

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Perennial plant formations always include a mixture of various-aged individuals of community-creating species, but the physiological and competitive potentials of plants of differing age and the importance on whole community functioning are still not entirely known. The current study tested the hypothesis that ontogenetically old plants have limited biomass investments in leaves and enhanced foliage support costs. • Methods Leaf structure, size and biomass allocation were studied in the perennial herb Pimpinella saxifraga during plant ontogeny from seedling to senile phases to determine age-dependent controls on key plant structural traits. The average duration of the full ontogenetic cycle is approx. 5–10 years in this species. Plants were sampled from shaded and open habitats. • Key Results Leaflet dry mass per unit area (MA) increased, and the fraction of plant biomass in leaflets (FL) decreased with increasing age, leading to a 5- to 11-fold decrease in leaf area ratio (LAR = FL/MA) between seedlings and senescent plants. In contrast, the fraction of below-ground biomass increased with increasing age. Leaflet size and number per leaf increased with increasing age. This was not associated with enhanced support cost in older plants as age-dependent changes in leaf shape and increased foliage packing along the rachis compensated for an overall increase in leaf size. Age-dependent trends were the same in habitats with various irradiance, but the LAR of plants of varying age was approx. 1·5-fold larger in the shade due to lower MA and larger FL. • Conclusions As plant light interception per unit total plant mass scales with LAR, these data demonstrate major age-dependent differences in plant light-harvesting efficiency that are further modified by site light availability. These ontogenetic changes reduce the differences among co-existing species in perennial communities, and therefore need consideration in our understanding of how

  12. Age-dependent diet choice in an avian top predator.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Christian; Whittingham, Mark J; Newton, Ian

    2006-03-01

    Age-dependent breeding performance is arguably one of the best-documented phenomena in ornithology. The existence of age-related trends has major implications for life-history theory, but the proximate reasons for these patterns remain poorly understood. It has been proposed that poor breeding performance of young individuals might reflect lack of foraging skills. We investigated this possibility in a medium-sized, powerful raptor-the northern goshawk Accipiter gentilis. Male goshawks are responsible for providing their females and their offspring with food. We hypothesized that young males may generally show poor breeding performance or even delay breeding, because they lack the experience to hunt efficiently-especially, their principal avian prey, the feral pigeon Columba livia. Our study exploited a rare 'natural experiment', the expansion phase of an urban population, where intraspecific interference was negligible and many young males bred successfully. This enabled us to examine the improvement of foraging skills in a larger sample of young individuals, and in more controlled conditions than usually possible. Using data from individually identified male breeders, we show that, consistent with our hypothesis, the proportion of pigeons in the diet increased significantly with male age, for at least the first three years of life. Other studies have shown a parallel increase in productivity, and a positive effect of a pigeon-rich diet on brood size and nestling condition, stressing the potential fitness relevance of this prey species for goshawks. Our results suggest a causal link between patterns of age-dependence in foraging ecology and reproductive performance. Furthermore, our study is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that prey choice of breeders, which might reflect individual hunting skills, is age-dependent in a raptor. PMID:16537129

  13. Age-related Shifts in Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Peak-ratios and Amplitude Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is an important temporal cue for precise speech and complex sound recognition. However, functional decline of the auditory periphery as well as degradation of central auditory processing due to aging can reduce the salience and resolution of temporal cues. Age-related deficits in central temporal processing have previously been observed at more rapid AM frequencies and various AM depths. These centrally observed changes result from cochlear changes compounded with changes along the ascending auditory pathway. In fact, a decrease in ability to detect temporally modulated sounds accurately could originate from changes in cochlear filtering properties and in cochlear mechanics due to aging. Nonetheless, few studies have examined cochlear mechanisms in AM detection. To assess integrity of the mechanical properties of the auditory periphery, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are a tool commonly used in clinics and in research. In this study, we measured DPOAEs to reveal age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and degradation in AM detection by basilar membrane vibration. Two tones (f1 and f2, f2>f1) at various f2/f1 ratios and simultaneous presentation of one AM and one pure tone were used as stimuli to evoke DPOAEs. In addition of observing reduced DPOAE amplitudes and steeper slopes in the input-output DPOAE functions, higher peak f2/f1 ratios and broader f2/f1 tuning were also observed in aged animals. Aged animals generally had lower distortion product (DP) and first sideband (SB 1) responses evoked by an f1 pure tone and an f2 AM tone, regardless of whether the AM frequency was 45 Hz or 128 Hz. SB 1 thresholds, which corresponds to the smallest stimulus AM depth that can induce cochlear vibrations at the DP generator locus, were higher in aged animals as well. The results suggest that age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and AM detection by basilar membrane vibration are consistent with a reduction in endocochlear

  14. Dependence of Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanopeapods on Filling Ratios of Fullerene Molecules.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liu; Feng, Yanhui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2015-11-12

    Focusing on carbon nanopeapods (CNPs), i.e., carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with fullerene C60 molecules, the thermal conductivity and its dependence on the filling ratio of C60 molecules have been investigated by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It turns out that the CNP thermal conductivity increases first, reaches its maximum value at filling ratio of 50%, and then decreases with increasing filling ratio. The heat transfer mechanisms were analyzed by the motion of C60 molecules, the mass transfer contribution, the phonon vibrational density of states, and the relative contributions of tube and C60 molecules to the total heat flux. The mass transfer in CNPs is mainly attributed to the rotational and translational motion of C60 molecules in tubes. As the filling ratio is larger than 50%, the axially translational motion of C60 molecules gets more and more restricted with increasing filling ratio. For either the mass transfer contribution to heat transfer or the phonon coupling between the tube wall and C60, the peaking behavior occurs at a filling ratio of 50%, which confirms the corresponding maximum thermal conductivity of CNP. With the filling ratio increasing, the dominating contribution to heat transfer changes from tube-wall atoms to fullerene atoms. Their relative contributions almost keep stable when the filling ratio is larger than 50% until it reaches 100%, where the contribution from fullerene atoms suddenly drops because of strong confinement of translational motion of C60 molecules. This work may offer valuable routes for probing heat transport in CNT hybrid structures, and possible device applications.

  15. The Ratio of 2nd to 4th Digit Length in Korean Alcohol-dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Changwoo; Bae, Hwallip; Lee, Yu-Sang; Won, Sung-Doo; Kim, Dai Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The ratio of 2nd to 4th digit length (2D:4D) is a sexually dimorphic trait. Men have a relatively shorter second digit than fourth digit. This ratio is thought to be influenced by higher prenatal testosterone level or greater sensitivity to androgen. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between alcohol dependence and 2D:4D in a Korean sample and whether 2D:4D can be a biologic marker in alcohol dependence. Methods In this study, we recruited 87 male patients with alcohol dependence from the alcohol center of one psychiatric hospital and 52 healthy male volunteers who were all employees in the same hospital as controls. We captured images of the right and left hands of patients and controls using a scanner and extracted data with a graphics program. We measured the 2D:4D of each hand and compared the alcohol dependence group with the control group. We analyzed these ratios using an independent-samples t-test. Results The mean 2D:4D of patients was 0.934 (right hand) and 0.942 (left hand), while the mean 2D:4D of controls was 0.956 (right hand) and 0.958 (left hand). Values for both hands were significantly lower for patients than controls (p<0.001, right hand; p=0.004, left hand). Conclusion Patients who are alcohol dependent have a significantly lower 2D:4D than controls, similar to the results of previous studies, which suggest that a higher prenatal testosterone level in the gonadal period is related to alcoholism. Furthermore, 2D:4D is a possible predictive marker of alcohol dependence. PMID:27121425

  16. Age Dependent Absolute Plate and Plume Motion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, D. E.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    construct rapidly and represent a time period close to the inception age of the seamount, thus by proxy also the hotspot location. Here we present a new age dependent plate motion model that tests the 'fixed' and 'moving' hotspot hypotheses.

  17. A Stochastic Version of the Brass PF Ratio Adjustment of Age-Specific Fertility Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jack; Alcantara, Adélamar; Ruan, Xiaomin

    2011-01-01

    Estimates of age-specific fertility rates based on survey data are known to suffer down-bias associated with incomplete reporting. Previously, William Brass (1964, 1965, 1968) proposed a series of adjustments of such data to reflect more appropriate levels of fertility through comparison with data on children-ever-born by age, a measure of cohort-specific cumulative fertility. His now widely-used Parity/Fertility or PF ratio method makes a number of strong assumptions, which have been the focus of an extended discussion in the literature on indirect estimation. However, while it is clear that the measures used in making adjusted age-specific fertility estimates with this method are captured with statistical uncertainty, little discussion of the nature of this uncertainty around PF-ratio based estimates of fertility has been entertained in the literature. Since both age-specific risk of childbearing and cumulative parity (children ever born) are measured with statistical uncertainty, an unknown credibility interval must surround every PF ratio-based estimate. Using the standard approach, this is unknown, limiting the ability to make statistical comparisons of fertility between groups or to understand stochasticity in population dynamics. This paper makes use of approaches applied to similar problems in engineering, the natural sciences, and decision analysis—often discussed under the title of uncertainty analysis or stochastic modeling—to characterize this uncertainty and to present a new method for making PF ratio-based fertility estimates with 95 percent uncertainty intervals. The implications for demographic analysis, between-group comparisons of fertility, and the field of statistical demography are explored. PMID:21829718

  18. Temperature dependent ferromagnetic relaxation and gyromagnetic ratio in Ni80Fe20 / Gd thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadadi, Behrouz; Mohammadi, Jamileh; Mewes, Claudia; Mewes, Tim; Eggers, Tatiana; Miller, Casey; MINT Center Team; Rochester Institute of Technology Team

    2015-03-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the magnetization dynamics of NiFe thin films (5nm & 10nm) capped with a 3nm Gd layer using broadband ferromagnetic resonance. We observe that the effective Gilbert damping parameter determined from the broadband measurements increases as the temperature approaches the Curie-temperature of the Gd layer. Part of the enhancement can be explained by an increase of the spin-pumping contribution to the relaxation as the temperature approaches the Curie temperature of Gd. We also measure a strong increase of the gyromagnetic ratio with decreasing temperature which resembles the increase of the gyromagnetic ratio in rare earth containing transition metals near the compensation point. This increase in the gyromagnetic ratio is expected to lead to an increased Gilbert type damping due to spin-orbit interaction, that likely also contributes to the increase in damping. NSF-CAREER Award No. 0952929 and NSF-ECCS-1231929.

  19. Influence of chemical oxygen demand/total Kjeldahl nitrogen ratio and sludge age on nitrification of nitrogenous wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Gupta, S K

    2004-01-01

    Four laboratory-scale biological nitrification units (influent total Kjeldahl nitrogen [TKN] = 1002 to 1062 mg/L) were operated at chemical oxygen demand (COD)/TKN ratios of approximately 0.5, 1.0,15, and 2.0 and at three different sludge ages of 30, 20, and 10 days to study the influence of COD/TKN, sludge age, COD loading, and TKN loading on nitrification and nitrifiers. Percent nitrification was found to increase with decreases in COD/TKN and increases in sludge age. The average nitrifier concentration increased from 460 mg/L at a COD/TKN of 2.22 and a sludge age of 10 days to 706 mg/L at a COD/TKN of 0.676 and a sludge age of 30 days. The nitrifier fraction was found to be higher at a lower COD/TKN and lower at a higher COD/TKN. The nitrifier fraction increased with the decrease in sludge age and COD loadings and the increase in TKN loadings. The effect of sludge age on the nitrifier fraction was amplified at a COD/ TKN of approximately 0.5 rather than at approximately 2.0. The nitrification rate (kilograms TKN oxidized per kilograms nitrifiers per day) was shown to be dependent on COD/TKN and sludge age. The activity performed by Nitrobacter was affected at all COD/TKN ratios studied as well as at a sludge age of 10 days. This was manifested by the accumulation of high levels of nitrite-nitrogen in the nitrified effluent. The presence of heterotrophs did not affect nitrification rates and the growth of nitrifiers, which were found to be beneficial. High sludge age and COD loadings resulted in a higher sludge volume index of more than 200 mL/g mixed liquor suspended solids. Microscopic examination showed filamentous structure of sludge under these conditions. It is concluded from the investigations that a sludge age of 30 days and a COD/TKN of approximately 1.0 are optimal to yield maximum nitrification and nitrifier growth rates for treating high-strength nitrogenous wastewater.

  20. Peripheral Surgical Wounding and Age-Dependent Neuroinflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation), CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients. PMID:24796537

  1. Calorie Restriction Suppresses Age-Dependent Hippocampal Transcriptional Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Marissa J.; Dolgalev, Igor; Alldred, Melissa J.; Heguy, Adriana; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) enhances longevity and mitigates aging phenotypes in numerous species. Physiological responses to CR are cell-type specific and variable throughout the lifespan. However, the mosaic of molecular changes responsible for CR benefits remains unclear, particularly in brain regions susceptible to deterioration during aging. We examined the influence of long-term CR on the CA1 hippocampal region, a key learning and memory brain area that is vulnerable to age-related pathologies, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Through mRNA sequencing and NanoString nCounter analysis, we demonstrate that one year of CR feeding suppresses age-dependent signatures of 882 genes functionally associated with synaptic transmission-related pathways, including calcium signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and Creb signaling in wild-type mice. By comparing the influence of CR on hippocampal CA1 region transcriptional profiles at younger-adult (5 months, 2.5 months of feeding) and older-adult (15 months, 12.5 months of feeding) timepoints, we identify conserved upregulation of proteome quality control and calcium buffering genes, including heat shock 70 kDa protein 1b (Hspa1b) and heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 (Hspa5), protein disulfide isomerase family A member 4 (Pdia4) and protein disulfide isomerase family A member 6 (Pdia6), and calreticulin (Calr). Expression levels of putative neuroprotective factors, klotho (Kl) and transthyretin (Ttr), are also elevated by CR in adulthood, although the global CR-specific expression profiles at younger and older timepoints are highly divergent. At a previously unachieved resolution, our results demonstrate conserved activation of neuroprotective gene signatures and broad CR-suppression of age-dependent hippocampal CA1 region expression changes, indicating that CR functionally maintains a more youthful transcriptional state within the hippocampal CA1 sector. PMID:26221964

  2. Calorie Restriction Suppresses Age-Dependent Hippocampal Transcriptional Signatures.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Marissa J; Dolgalev, Igor; Alldred, Melissa J; Heguy, Adriana; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) enhances longevity and mitigates aging phenotypes in numerous species. Physiological responses to CR are cell-type specific and variable throughout the lifespan. However, the mosaic of molecular changes responsible for CR benefits remains unclear, particularly in brain regions susceptible to deterioration during aging. We examined the influence of long-term CR on the CA1 hippocampal region, a key learning and memory brain area that is vulnerable to age-related pathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Through mRNA sequencing and NanoString nCounter analysis, we demonstrate that one year of CR feeding suppresses age-dependent signatures of 882 genes functionally associated with synaptic transmission-related pathways, including calcium signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and Creb signaling in wild-type mice. By comparing the influence of CR on hippocampal CA1 region transcriptional profiles at younger-adult (5 months, 2.5 months of feeding) and older-adult (15 months, 12.5 months of feeding) timepoints, we identify conserved upregulation of proteome quality control and calcium buffering genes, including heat shock 70 kDa protein 1b (Hspa1b) and heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 (Hspa5), protein disulfide isomerase family A member 4 (Pdia4) and protein disulfide isomerase family A member 6 (Pdia6), and calreticulin (Calr). Expression levels of putative neuroprotective factors, klotho (Kl) and transthyretin (Ttr), are also elevated by CR in adulthood, although the global CR-specific expression profiles at younger and older timepoints are highly divergent. At a previously unachieved resolution, our results demonstrate conserved activation of neuroprotective gene signatures and broad CR-suppression of age-dependent hippocampal CA1 region expression changes, indicating that CR functionally maintains a more youthful transcriptional state within the hippocampal CA1 sector. PMID:26221964

  3. 32 CFR 48.302 - Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... youngest child birth date as applicable to the option elected. At or before the time of his retirement, he... age of the dependents must be substantiated by a birth certificate or other competent evidence. The birth date of a member must be verified by his service record. All required substantiating evidence...

  4. 32 CFR 48.302 - Substantiating evidence regarding dependency and age of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... youngest child birth date as applicable to the option elected. At or before the time of his retirement, he... age of the dependents must be substantiated by a birth certificate or other competent evidence. The birth date of a member must be verified by his service record. All required substantiating evidence...

  5. Age-dependent social learning in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Noble, Daniel W A; Byrne, Richard W; Whiting, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Evidence of social learning, whereby the actions of an animal facilitate the acquisition of new information by another, is taxonomically biased towards mammals, especially primates, and birds. However, social learning need not be limited to group-living animals because species with less interaction can still benefit from learning about potential predators, food sources, rivals and mates. We trained male skinks (Eulamprus quoyii), a mostly solitary lizard from eastern Australia, in a two-step foraging task. Lizards belonging to 'young' and 'old' age classes were presented with a novel instrumental task (displacing a lid) and an association task (reward under blue lid). We did not find evidence for age-dependent learning of the instrumental task; however, young males in the presence of a demonstrator learnt the association task faster than young males without a demonstrator, whereas old males in both treatments had similar success rates. We present the first evidence of age-dependent social learning in a lizard and suggest that the use of social information for learning may be more widespread than previously believed.

  6. Age-dependent lens changes in galactose-fed dogs.

    PubMed

    Lackner, P A; Rodriguez, L; Sato, S; Lizak, M J; Wyman, M; Kador, P F

    1997-03-01

    Aldose reductase initiated sugar cataract formation in 9-month old galactose-fed dogs has been documented to progress from an accentuation of lens sutures (1 month after initial feeding) to the appearance of cortical vacuoles (3 months), cortical opacities (4-6 months) and eventually the progressive formation of a clear zone at the cortical equatorial regions of the cataractous lenses (> 12 months). Here, the effect of age on the onset and degree of sugar cataract formation has been investigated in beagles fed a 30% galactose diet starting at 2, 6, and 24 months of age. Cataract formation was monitored by slit lamp and retroillumination microscopy. Compared to 9-month old dogs, cataract formation in the younger dogs was more rapid and the lens changes were more severe. In the 2-month old group of dogs, galactose-feeding resulted in a rapid formation of dense cataracts which began to resorb after 106 days of galactose feeding with only opaque nuclear remnants remaining after eight months. These changes were mirrored by age-dependent reductions of lenticular NADPH-dependent reductase activity.

  7. High-precision abundances of Sc, Mn, Cu, and Ba in solar twins. Trends of element ratios with stellar age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, P. E.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: A previous study of correlations between element abundances and ages of solar twin stars in the solar neighborhood is extended to include Sc, Mn, Cu, and Ba to obtain new information on the nucleosynthetic history of these elements. Methods: HARPS spectra with S/N ≳ 600 are used to derive very precise (σ ~ 0.01 dex) differential abundances of Sc, Mn, Cu, and Ba for 21 solar twins and the Sun. The analysis is based on MARCS model atmospheres with parameters determined from the excitation and ionization balance of Fe lines. Stellar ages with internal errors less than 1 Gyr are obtained by interpolation in the log g - Teff diagram between isochrones based on the Aarhus Stellar Evolution Code. Results: For stars younger than 6 Gyr, [Sc/Fe], [Mn/Fe], [Cu/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] are tightly correlated with stellar age, which is also the case for the other elements previously studied; linear relations between [X/Fe] and age have χ^2red ˜ 1, and for most stars the residuals do not depend on elemental condensation temperature. For ages between 6 and 9 Gyr, the [X/Fe] - age correlations break down and the stars split up into two groups having respectively high and low [X/Fe] for the odd-Z elements Na, Al, Sc, and Cu. Conclusions: While stars in the solar neighborhood younger than ~ 6 Gyr were formed from interstellar gas with a smooth chemical evolution, older stars seem to have originated from regions enriched by supernovae with different neutron excesses. Correlations between abundance ratios and stellar age suggest that: (i) Sc is made in Type II supernovae along with the α-capture elements; (ii) the Type II to Ia yield ratio is about the same for Mn and Fe; (iii) Cu is mainly made by the weak s-process in massive stars; (iv) the Ba/Y yield ratio for asymptotic giant branch stars increases with decreasing stellar mass; (v) [Y/Mg] and [Y/Al] can be used as chemical clocks when determining ages of solar metallicity stars. Based on data products from observations made

  8. Nociceptor Sensitization Depends on Age and Pain Chronicity123

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, Amanda K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral inflammation causes mechanical pain behavior and increased action potential firing. However, most studies examine inflammatory pain at acute, rather than chronic time points, despite the greater burden of chronic pain on patient populations, especially aged individuals. Furthermore, there is disagreement in the field about whether primary afferents contribute to chronic pain. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the contribution of nociceptor activity to the generation of pain behaviors during the acute and chronic phases of inflammation in both young and aged mice. We found that both young (2 months old) and aged (>18 months old) mice exhibited prominent pain behaviors during both acute (2 day) and chronic (8 week) inflammation. However, young mice exhibited greater behavioral sensitization to mechanical stimuli than their aged counterparts. Teased fiber recordings in young animals revealed a twofold mechanical sensitization in C fibers during acute inflammation, but an unexpected twofold reduction in firing during chronic inflammation. Responsiveness to capsaicin and mechanical responsiveness of A-mechanonociceptor (AM) fibers were also reduced chronically. Importantly, this lack of sensitization in afferent firing during chronic inflammation occurred even as these inflamed mice exhibited continued behavioral sensitization. Interestingly, C fibers from inflamed aged animals showed no change in mechanical firing compared with controls during either the acute or chronic inflammatory phases, despite strong behavioral sensitization to mechanical stimuli at these time points. These results reveal the following two important findings: (1) nociceptor sensitization to mechanical stimulation depends on age and the chronicity of injury; and (2) maintenance of chronic inflammatory pain does not rely on enhanced peripheral drive. PMID:26866058

  9. Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Predicting Its Dependence on Capillary Number and Viscosity Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.; Anna, Shelley L.; Tortora, Paul; Kadambi, J. R.; Oliver, M.; Bromhal, Grant S.; Smith, Duane H.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the need to determine the dependencies of two-phase flow in a wide range of applications from carbon dioxide sequestration to enhanced oil recovery, we have developed a standard two-dimensional, pore-level model of immiscible drainage, incorporating viscous and capillary effects. This model has been validated through comparison with several experiments. For a range of stable viscosity ratios (M=μinjected,nwfdefending,wf ≥ 1), we had increased the capillary number, Nc and studied the way in which the flows deviate from fractal capillary fingering at a characteristic time and become compact for realistic capillary numbers. This crossover has enabled predictions for the dependence of the flow behavior upon capillary number and viscosity ratio. Our results for the crossover agreed with earlier theoretical predictions, including the universality of the leading power-law indicating its independence of details of the porous medium structure. In this article, we have observed a similar crossover from initial fractal viscous fingering (FVF) to compact flow, for large capillary numbers and unstable viscosity ratios M < 1. In this case, we increased the viscosity ratio from infinitesimal values, and studied the way in which the flows deviate from FVF at a characteristic time and become compact for non-zero viscosity ratios. This crossover has been studied using both our pore-level model and micro-fluidic flow-cell experiments. The same characteristic time, τ = 1/M0.7, satisfactorily describes both the pore-level results.

  10. Age-dependent ascending aorta mechanics assessed through multiphase CT.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Primiano, Charles; McKay, Raymond; Elefteriades, John

    2013-12-01

    Quantification of the age- and gender-specific in vivo mechanical characteristics of the ascending aorta (AA) will allow for identification of abnormalities aside from changes brought on by aging alone. Multiphase clinical CT scans of 45 male patients between the ages of 30 and 79 years were analyzed to assess age-dependent in vivo AA characteristics. The three-dimensional AA geometry for each patient was reconstructed from the CT scans for 9-10 phases throughout the cardiac cycle. The AA circumference was measured during each phase and was used to determine the corresponding diameter, circumferential strain, and wall tension at each phase. The pressure-strain modulus was also determined for each patient. The mean diastolic AA diameter was significantly smaller among young (42.6 ± 5.2 years) at 29.9 ± 2.8 mm than old patients (69.0 ± 5.2 years) at 33.2 ± 3.2 mm. The circumferential AA strain from end-diastole to peak-systole decreased from 0.092 ± 0.03 in young to 0.056 ± 0.03 in old patients. The pressure-strain modulus increased two-fold from 68.4 ± 30.5 kPa in young to 162.0 ± 93.5 kPa in old patients, and the systolic AA wall tension increased from 268.5 ± 31.3 kPa in young to 304.9 ± 49.2 kPa in old patients. The AA dilates and stiffens with aging which increases the vessel wall tension, likely predisposing aneurysm and dissection.

  11. ASPECT RATIO DEPENDENCE OF THE FREE-FALL TIME FOR NON-SPHERICAL SYMMETRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, Andy; Johnstone, Doug; Toala, Jesus A.; Heitsch, Fabian E-mail: Douglas.Johnstone@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca E-mail: e.vazquez@crya.unam.mx E-mail: fheitsch@unc.edu

    2012-09-10

    We investigate the collapse of non-spherical substructures, such as sheets and filaments, which are ubiquitous in molecular clouds. Such non-spherical substructures collapse homologously in their interiors but are influenced by an edge effect that causes their edges to be preferentially accelerated. We analytically compute the homologous collapse timescales of the interiors of uniform-density, self-gravitating filaments and find that the homologous collapse timescale scales linearly with the aspect ratio. The characteristic timescale for an edge-driven collapse mode in a filament, however, is shown to have a square-root dependence on the aspect ratio. For both filaments and circular sheets, we find that selective edge acceleration becomes more important with increasing aspect ratio. In general, we find that lower dimensional objects and objects with larger aspect ratios have longer collapse timescales. We show that estimates for star formation rates, based upon gas densities, can be overestimated by an order of magnitude if the geometry of a cloud is not taken into account.

  12. Aspect Ratio Dependence of the Free-fall Time for Non-spherical Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pon, Andy; Toalá, Jesús A.; Johnstone, Doug; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Heitsch, Fabian; Gómez, Gilberto C.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the collapse of non-spherical substructures, such as sheets and filaments, which are ubiquitous in molecular clouds. Such non-spherical substructures collapse homologously in their interiors but are influenced by an edge effect that causes their edges to be preferentially accelerated. We analytically compute the homologous collapse timescales of the interiors of uniform-density, self-gravitating filaments and find that the homologous collapse timescale scales linearly with the aspect ratio. The characteristic timescale for an edge-driven collapse mode in a filament, however, is shown to have a square-root dependence on the aspect ratio. For both filaments and circular sheets, we find that selective edge acceleration becomes more important with increasing aspect ratio. In general, we find that lower dimensional objects and objects with larger aspect ratios have longer collapse timescales. We show that estimates for star formation rates, based upon gas densities, can be overestimated by an order of magnitude if the geometry of a cloud is not taken into account.

  13. Age-Dependent Cost-Utility of Pediatric Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Yevgeniy R.; Yeh, Susan T.; Seshamani, Meena; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Tobey, Emily A.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Frick, Kevin D.; Niparko, John K.

    2013-01-01

    integration rate was significantly higher in the youngest group at 81% as compared to 57% and 63% for the middle and oldest groups, respectively (p<0.05) after six years of follow-up. After incorporating lifetime educational cost savings, cochlear implantation led to net societal savings of $31,252, $10,217, and $6,680 for the youngest, middle, and oldest groups at CI, respectively, over the child’s projected lifetime. Conclusions Even without considering improvements in lifetime earnings, the overall cost-utility results indicate highly favorable ratios. Early (<18 months) intervention with cochlear implantation was associated with greater and longer quality of life improvements, similar direct costs of implantation, and economically-valuable improved classroom placement, without a greater incidence of medical and surgical complications when compared to cochlear implantation at older ages. PMID:23558665

  14. Sex ratio of congenital abnormalities in the function of maternal age: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Csermely, Gyula; Urbán, Robert; Czeizel, Andrew E; Veszprémi, Béla

    2015-05-01

    Maternal age effect is well-known in the origin of numerical chromosomal aberrations and some isolated congenital abnormalities (CAs). The sex ratio (SR), i.e. number of males divided by the number of males and females together, of most CAs deviates from the SR of newborn population (0.51). The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the possible association of maternal age with the SR of isolated CAs in a population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996. First, SR of 24 CA entities/groups was estimated in 21,494 patients with isolated CA. In the next step SR of different maternal age groups was compared to the mean SR of the given CA-groups. The SR of four CA-groups showed some deviation in certain maternal age groups. Cases with anencephaly had female excess in young mothers (<25 years). Cases with skull's CAs particularly craniosynostosis had a male excess in cases born to women over 30 years. Two other CA groups (cleft lip ± palate and valvar pulmonic stenosis within the group of right-sided obstructive defect of heart) had significant deviation in SR of certain maternal age groups from the mean SR, but these deviations were not harmonized with joining age groups and thus were considered as a chance effect due to multiple testing. In conclusion, our study did not suggest that in general SR of isolated CAs might be modified by certain maternal age groups with some exception such as anencephaly and craniosynostosis.

  15. Sex ratio of congenital abnormalities in the function of maternal age: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Csermely, Gyula; Urbán, Robert; Czeizel, Andrew E; Veszprémi, Béla

    2015-05-01

    Maternal age effect is well-known in the origin of numerical chromosomal aberrations and some isolated congenital abnormalities (CAs). The sex ratio (SR), i.e. number of males divided by the number of males and females together, of most CAs deviates from the SR of newborn population (0.51). The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the possible association of maternal age with the SR of isolated CAs in a population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996. First, SR of 24 CA entities/groups was estimated in 21,494 patients with isolated CA. In the next step SR of different maternal age groups was compared to the mean SR of the given CA-groups. The SR of four CA-groups showed some deviation in certain maternal age groups. Cases with anencephaly had female excess in young mothers (<25 years). Cases with skull's CAs particularly craniosynostosis had a male excess in cases born to women over 30 years. Two other CA groups (cleft lip ± palate and valvar pulmonic stenosis within the group of right-sided obstructive defect of heart) had significant deviation in SR of certain maternal age groups from the mean SR, but these deviations were not harmonized with joining age groups and thus were considered as a chance effect due to multiple testing. In conclusion, our study did not suggest that in general SR of isolated CAs might be modified by certain maternal age groups with some exception such as anencephaly and craniosynostosis. PMID:25354028

  16. Age-dependent changes in matrix composition and organization at the ligament-to-bone insertion.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Ning E; Mitroo, Siddarth; Chen, Faye H; Lu, Helen H; Doty, Stephen B

    2006-08-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) often occur at the ligament-to-bone insertion site; thus, an in-depth understanding of the native insertion is critical in identifying the etiology of failure and devising optimal treatment protocols for ACL injuries. The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic characterization of the ACL-to-bone interface, focusing on structural and compositional changes as a function of age. Using a bovine model, three age groups were studied: Neonatal (1-7 days old), Immature (2-6 months old), and Mature (2-5 years old). The distribution of types I, II, X collagen, decorin, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), glycosaminoglycan (GAG), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and minerals at the ACL-to-bone insertion were examined. Additionally, cell aspect ratio, size, and distribution across the insertion were quantified. The ACL-to-bone insertion is divided into four regions: ligament, nonmineralized interface, mineralized interface, and bone. Both region-dependent and age-dependent structural and compositional changes at the insertion site were observed in this study. The interface in the skeletally immature group resembled articular cartilage, while the adult interface was similar to fibrocartilaginous tissue. Age-dependent changes in extracellular matrix composition (type X collagen, sulfated glycosaminoglycan), cellularity, ALP activity, and mineral distribution were also found. Marked differences in collagen fiber orientation between the femoral and tibial insertions were observed, and these differences became more pronounced with age.

  17. Magnetic Prandtl number dependence of the kinetic-to-magnetic dissipation ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-08-10

    Using direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional hydromagnetic turbulence, either with helical or non-helical forcing, we show that the kinetic-to-magnetic energy dissipation ratio always increases with the magnetic Prandtl number, i.e., the ratio of kinematic viscosity to magnetic diffusivity. This dependence can always be approximated by a power law, but the exponent is not the same in all cases. For non-helical turbulence, the exponent is around 1/3, while for helical turbulence it is between 0.6 and 2/3. In the statistically steady state, the rate of energy conversion from kinetic into magnetic by the dynamo must be equal to the Joule dissipation rate. We emphasize that for both small-scale and large-scale dynamos, the efficiency of the energy conversion depends sensitively on the magnetic Prandtl number, and thus on the microphysical dissipation process. To understand this behavior, we also study shell models of turbulence and one-dimensional passive and active scalar models. We conclude that the magnetic Prandtl number dependence is qualitatively best reproduced in the one-dimensional model as a result of dissipation via localized Alfvén kinks.

  18. Parkinson disease male-to-female ratios increase with age: French nationwide study and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, Frédéric; Kab, Sofiane; Mohamed, Fatima; Canonico, Marianne; Le Guern, Morgane; Quintin, Cécile; Carcaillon, Laure; Nicolau, Javier; Duport, Nicolas; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Boussac-Zarebska, Marjorie; Elbaz, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is 1.5 times more frequent in men than women. Whether age modifies this ratio is unclear. We examined whether male-to-female (M–F) ratios change with age through a French nationwide prevalence/incidence study (2010) and a meta-analysis of incidence studies. Methods We used French national drug claims databases to identify PD cases using a validated algorithm. We computed M–F prevalence/incidence ratios overall and by age using Poisson regression. Ratios were regressed on age to estimate their annual change. We identified all PD incidence studies with age/sex-specific data, and performed a meta-analysis of M–F ratios. Results On the basis of 149 672 prevalent (50% women) and 25 438 incident (49% women) cases, age-standardised rates were higher in men (prevalence=2.865/1000; incidence=0.490/1000 person-years) than women (prevalence=1.934/1000; incidence=0.328/1000 person-years). The overall M–F ratio was 1.48 for prevalence and 1.49 for incidence. Prevalence and incidence M–F ratios increased by 0.05 and 0.14, respectively, per 10 years of age. Incidence was similar in men and women under 50 years (M–F ratio <1.2, p>0.20), and over 1.6 (p<0.001) times higher in men than women above 80 years (p trend <0.001). A meta-analysis of 22 incidence studies (14 126 cases, 46% women) confirmed that M– F ratios increased with age (0.26 per 10 years, p trend=0.005). Conclusions Age-increasing M–F ratios suggest that PD aetiology changes with age. Sex-related risk/protective factors may play a different role across the continuum of age at onset. This finding may inform aetiological PD research. PMID:26701996

  19. Pressure-Dependent Yields and Product Branching Ratios in the Broadband Photolysis of Chlorine Nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Sander, Stanley P.; Friedl, Randall R.

    1996-01-01

    The photolysis of chlorine nitrate was studied using broadband flash photolysis coupled with long-path ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Branching ratios for the Cl + NO3 and ClO + NO2 product channels were determined from time-dependent measurements of ClO and NO3 concentrations. Yields of the ClO and NO3 products displayed a dependence on the bath gas density and the spectral distribution of the photolysis pulse. Product yields decreased with increasing bath gas density regardless of the spectral distribution of the photolysis pulse; however, the decrease in product yield was much more pronounced when photolysis was limited to longer wavelengths. For photolysis in a quartz cell (lambda > 200 nm) the yield decreased by a factor of 2 over the pressure 10-100 Torr. In a Pyrex cell (lambda > 300 nm), the yield decreased by a factor of 50 over the same pressure range. When photolysis was limited to lambda > 350 nm, the yield decreased by a factor of 250. Branching ratios for the photolysis channels [ClONO2 + h.nu yields ClO + NO2 (1a) and ClONO2 + h.nu yields Cl + NO3 (lb)] were determined from the relative ClO and NO3 product yields at various pressures. Although the absolute product yield displayed a pressure dependence, the branching between the two channels was independent of pressure. The relative branching ratios (assuming negligible contributions from other channels) are 0.61 +/- 0.20 for channel 1a and 0.39 +/- 0.20 for channel lb for photolysis with lambda > 200 nm and 0.44 +/- 0.08 for channel 1a and 0.56 +/- 0.08 for channel 1b for photolysis with lambda > 300 nm. The implications of these results for the chemistry of the lower stratosphere are discussed.

  20. Quantum-state Dependence of Product Branching Ratios in Vacuum Ultraviolet Photodissociation of N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu; Gao, Hong; Chung Chang, Yih; Hammouténe, D.; Ndome, H.; Hochlaf, M.; Jackson, William M.; Ng, C. Y.

    2016-03-01

    The branching ratios for the N(4S) + N(2D), N(4S) + N(2P), and N(2D) + N(2D) channels are measured for the photodissociation of {{{N}}}2({X}1{{{{Σ }}}g}+;v\\prime\\prime =0,J\\prime\\prime ) in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of 100,808-122,159 cm-1 using the VUV-VUV pump-probe approach combined with velocity-map-imaging-photoion detection. No evidence of forming the ground-state N(4S) + N(4S) products is found. No potential barrier is observed for the N(2D) + N(2D) channel, but the N(4S) + N(2P) channel has a small potential barrier of ≈740 cm-1. The branching ratios are found to depend on the symmetry of predissociative N2 states instead of the total VUV excitation energy, indicating that N2 photodissociation is nonstatistical. When the branching ratios for N(4S) + N(2D) and N(4S) + N(2P) products are plotted as a function of the VUV excitation energy for the valence N2 1Πu and {}1{{{{Σ }}}{{u}}}+ states, oscillations in these ratios are observed demonstrating how these channels are competing with each other. These data can be used to select both the velocity and internal states of the atomic products by picking the quantum state that is excited. High-level ab initio potential energy curves of the excited N2 states are calculated to provide insight into the mechanisms for the observed branching ratios. The calculations predict that the formation of both N(4S) + N(2D) and N(4S) + N(2P) channels involves potential energy barriers, in agreement with experimental observations. A discussion of the application of the present results to astronomy, planetary sciences, and comets is given.

  1. Life form dependent impacts of macrophyte vegetation on the ratio of resuspended nutrients.

    PubMed

    Nurminen, Leena; Horppila, Jukka

    2009-07-01

    The effects of floating-leaved and submerged macrophytes on sediment resuspension and on the ratio of resuspended nitrogen and phosphorus were studied by sediment traps in the Kirkkojärvi basin in southern Finland. The effect of submerged macrophytes on preventing sediment resuspension was stronger than the effect of floating-leaved plants. On average, among submerged plants the resuspension rate of suspended solids was 43%, and among floating-leaved plants 87% of that in the open water. The floating-leaved Nuphar lutea had a reductive effect on P resuspension but no significant effect on N resuspension. The impact on P resuspension was strong, because root uptake by Nuphar lutea reduced the P content of the sediment. N:P ratio in resuspended nutrients was 6.7 among the plants and 4.1 in the open water. Among suzbmerged plants, sediment N content was strongly increased but P content was not affected due to the pleustophytic life form of the dominant plants (Ceratophyllum demersum, Ranunculus circinatus). The effect of pleustophytes on sediment nutrients was weak, because their nutrient uptake is mostly foliar. The N:P ratio of resuspended nutrients was 7.9 among the submerged plants and 7.0 in the open water. The results suggested that depending on the life form, macrophytes can modify the flux of N and/or P to the water column through their effects on nutrient resuspension and possibly modify phytoplankton communities via their effects on the N:P ratio. If the overall nutrient level is the most important factor for the dominance of cyanobacteria, submerged macrophytes can have stronger effects on phytoplankton community structure than floating-leaved species. If N:P ratio is of importance, the effects of floating-leaved species may be more pronounced. PMID:19505709

  2. [Changes in employment, retirement age and fertility: their effects on economic dependency and per capita income].

    PubMed

    Bravo, J H

    1991-04-01

    This article provides a very simplified analysis of the impact of changes in unemployment, retirement age, and fertility on economic dependency and per capita income in Latin America. The macroeconomic consequences of variations in age structure have received a little recent attention among Latin American researchers and policymakers, partly because of the lack of simple but rigorous analytical models to orient research. This analysis is simplified in that it focuses on changes in age distribution but does not explicitly consider effects of changes in population size, even though in reality the 2 types of changes are interrelated. The analysis has also been simplified by not taking into account any type of causal interaction between the demographic and economic variables analyzed; only the most elementary accounting relations between them are utilized. The 1st section defines the concept of economic dependency, specifies the effects of changes in its demographic and economic components, and establishes a simple link between the dependency ratio and per capita income. These and other derivations in the following sections permit evaluation of the impact of changes in employment, retirement age, and fertility on the dependency ratio and per capita income. The work concludes with a synthesis and general discussion, including a theoretical consideration of the effects of interactions among components. Only the most important equations are presented in the main text, but all variables, equations, and relations are defined and derived in the appendix. 6 countries were studied to illustrate the relationships in the context of the demographic diversity of Latin America. Argentina and Cuba represented countries in an advanced stage of the demographic transition, Chile and Mexico represented an intermediate phase, and Bolivia and Peru represented countries at the beginning of the transition. Results of decomposition of changes in dependency and income due to each of the

  3. Age- and speed-related differences in harmonic ratios during walking.

    PubMed

    Lowry, K A; Lokenvitz, N; Smiley-Oyen, A L

    2012-02-01

    Harmonic ratios (HRs), derived from trunk accelerations, measure smoothness of trunk motion during gait; higher ratios indicate greater smoothness. Previous research indicates that young adults optimize HRs at preferred pace, exhibiting reduced HRs at speeds faster and slower than preferred. Recent studies examining HRs and other trunk acceleration measures challenge this finding. The purpose of this study was to examine age-related differences in HRs across a range of self-selected overground walking speeds. Anteroposterior (AP), vertical (VT), and mediolateral (ML) HRs were examined in 13 young adults (ages 20-23), 13 healthy older adults (ages 60-69), and 13 healthy old-old adults (ages 80-86) while walking overground at very slow, slow, preferred, fast, and very fast speeds. Young and older adults exhibited similar HRs in all directions of motion across speeds, while old-old adults exhibited lower AP- and VT-HRs. All groups exhibited reduced HRs at speeds slower than preferred. However, there were no differences in HRs between preferred and faster speeds, with the exception of reduced VT-HRs in the very fast condition for the older groups. The ML-HR was not different between groups, and varied less across speeds. Stride time variability exhibited inverse relations with, and independently contributed to, HRs across speeds; lower stride time variability was associated with greater smoothness of trunk motion. Older groups were not disproportionately affected by walking more slowly and smoothness of trunk motion did not show a clear pattern of optimization at preferred pace for any group.

  4. On the prior dependence of constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Cortês, Marina; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David E-mail: a.liddle@sussex.ac.uk

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the prior dependence of constraints on cosmic tensor perturbations. Commonly imposed is the strong prior of the single-field inflationary consistency equation, relating the tensor spectral index n{sub T} to the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. Dropping it leads to significantly different constraints on n{sub T}, with both positive and negative values allowed with comparable likelihood, and substantially increases the upper limit on r on scales k = 0.01 Mpc{sup -1} to 0.05 Mpc{sup -1}, by a factor of ten or more. Even if the consistency equation is adopted, a uniform prior on r on one scale does not correspond to a uniform one on another; constraints therefore depend on the pivot scale chosen. We assess the size of this effect and determine the optimal scale for constraining the tensor amplitude, both with and without the consistency relation.

  5. Age estimation using pulp/tooth area ratio in maxillary canines-A digital image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Manjushree; Devi, Yashoda B. K.; Rakesh, N.; Juneja, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Determination of age of a subject is one of the most important aspects of medico-legal cases and anthropological research. Radiographs can be used to indirectly measure the rate of secondary dentine deposition which is depicted by reduction in the pulp area. Materials and Methods: In this study, 200 patients of Karnataka aged between 18-72 years were selected for the study. Panoramic radiographs were made and indirectly digitized. Radiographic images of maxillary canines (RIC) were processed using a computer-aided drafting program (ImageJ). The variables pulp/root length (p), pulp/tooth length (r), pulp/root width at enamel-cementum junction (ECJ) level (a), pulp/root width at mid-root level (c), pulp/root width at midpoint level between ECJ level and mid-root level (b) and pulp/tooth area ratio (AR) were recorded. All the morphological variables including gender were statistically analyzed to derive regression equation for estimation of age. Results: It was observed that 2 variables ‘AR’ and ‘b’ contributed significantly to the fit and were included in the regression model, yielding the formula: Age = 87.305−480.455(AR)+48.108(b). Statistical analysis indicated that the regression equation with selected variables explained 96% of total variance with the median of the residuals of 0.1614 years and standard error of estimate of 3.0186 years. Conclusion: There is significant correlation between age and morphological variables ‘AR’ and ‘b’ and the derived population specific regression equation can be potentially used for estimation of chronological age of individuals of Karnataka origin. PMID:25177137

  6. Relation between the alignment dependence of coercive force decrease ratio and the angular dependence of coercive force of ferrite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yutaka; Kitai, Nobuyuki; Hosokawa, Seiichi; Hoshijima, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The relation of the coercive force decrease ratio (CFDR) and the angular dependence of the coercive force (ADCF) of ferrite magnets and their temperature properties were investigated. When we compared that against the angle of the magnetization reverse area obtained from these calculation results, which was obtained from the Gaussian distribution of the grain alignment and the postulation that every grain follows the Kondorskii law or the 1/cos θ law, and against the angle of the reverse magnetization area calculated from the experiment CFDR data of these magnets, it was found that this latter expanded at room temperature, to 36° from the calculated angle, for magnet with α=0.96. It was also found that, as temperature increased from room temperature to 413 K, the angle of the reverse magnetization area of ferrite magnets obtained from the experiment data expanded from 36° to 41°. When we apply these results to the temperature properties of ADCF, it seems that the calculated ADCF could qualitatively and reasonably explain these temperature properties, even though the difference between the calculated angular dependence and the experimental data still exists in the high angle range. These results strongly suggest that the coercive force of these magnets is determined by the magnetic domain wall motion. The magnetic domain walls are strongly pinned at tilted grains, and when the domain walls are de-pinned from their pinning sites, the coercive force is determined.

  7. Aspect ratio dependent etching lag reduction in deep silicon etch processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.L.; Johnson, D.; Westerman, R.

    2006-07-15

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device fabrication often involves three dimensional structures with high aspect ratios. Moreover, MEMS designs require structures with different dimensions and aspect ratios to coexist on a single microchip. There is a well-documented aspect ratio dependent etching (ARDE) effect in deep silicon etching processes. For features with different dimensions etched simultaneously, the ARDE effect causes bigger features to be etched at faster rates. In practice, ARDE effect has many undesired complications to MEMS device fabrication. This article presents a physical model to describe the time division multiplex (TDM) plasma etch processes and thereafter the experimental results on ARDE lag reduction. The model breaks individual plasma etch cycles in the TDM plasma etch processes into polymer deposition, polymer removal, and spontaneous silicon etching stages. With the insights gained from the model and control over the passivation and etch steps, it has been demonstrated that ARDE lag can be controlled effectively. Experiments have shown that a normal ARDE lag can be changed to an inverse ARDE lag. Under optimized conditions, the ARDE lag is reduced to below 2%-3% for trenches with widths ranging from 2.5 to 100 {mu}m, while maintaining good etch profile in trenches with different dimensions. Such results are achieved at etch rates exceeding 2 {mu}m/min.

  8. Production activities and economic dependency by age and gender in Europe: A cross-country comparison

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Bernhard; Prskawetz, Alexia; Freund, Inga

    2015-01-01

    We compare selected European countries using an economic dependency ratio which emphasizes the role of age-specific levels of production and consumption. Our analysis reveals large differences in the age- and gender-specific level and type of production activities across selected European countries and identifies possible strategies to adjust age-specific economic behaviour to an ageing population. The cross-country differences in economic dependency of children and elderly persons are largely determined by the age at which people enter, respectively exit, the labour market. The ability of the working age population to support children and elderly persons in turn is strongly influenced by the participation of women in paid work. We also provide a measure for the age-specific production and consumption in form of unpaid household work. The inclusion of unpaid household work leads to a decrease of the gender differences in production activities and indicates that the working age population supports children and elderly persons not only through monetary transfers but also through services produced by unpaid work (e.g. childcare, cooking, cleaning…). Given the available data, we cannot distinguish the age profile of consumption by gender and have to assume – in case of unpaid work - that each member of the household consumes the same. Hence, our results have to be regarded as a first approximation only. Our paper aims to argue that a reform of the welfare system needs to take into account not only public transfers but also private transfers, in particular the transfers in form of goods and services produced through unpaid household work. PMID:26110107

  9. Dependence of the ac loss on the aspect ratio in a cable in conduit conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cau, F.; Bruzzone, P.

    2010-04-01

    The coupling current loss in rectangular superconducting cables is strictly dependent on their aspect ratio, which has an impact on the area linked by the field variation and consequently on the currents induced between strands. The relation between the ac loss and aspect ratio is studied with reference to the testing of three short cable in conduit conductor (CICC) samples at the SULTAN test facility. The first conductor is a 25 kA NbTi cable for the JT60-SA tokamak; the second is a 20 kA Nb3Sn cable for the HZB hybrid magnet. The last CICC is a 68 kA Nb3Sn cable with layout similar to that of the ITER toroidal field (TF) conductor (called the 'European toroidal field (EUTF) alternate'). All the samples are assembled with two conductor sections differing only in their orientation with respect to the external variable field. In the first and third samples, the cable of one leg is rotated by 90°, while in the HZB sample it is rotated by 45° with respect to the other leg. The ac loss is measured at the SULTAN test facility using a gas flow calorimetric method. A sample length of 39 cm is exposed to a sinusoidal field with an amplitude of ± 0.3 or ± 0.2 T (depending on the superconductor) and frequency variable in the range 0.1-0.8 Hz. A background field of 2 T perpendicular both to the sinusoidal field and to the sample axis is also applied. The ac loss is assessed by measuring the variation of the He enthalpy, assuming the metal enthalpy to be negligible. The loss curve for both legs is discussed in terms of the respective aspect ratios and the results, including data from former test campaigns, are compared with the aim of finding an analytical relation between the loss and the conductor dimensions.

  10. Feto-maternal heart rate ratio in pregnant bitches: effect of gestational age and maternal size.

    PubMed

    Alonge, S; Mauri, M; Faustini, M; Luvoni, G C

    2016-10-01

    Few information is available on parameters that can be used to objectively assess the foetal health during canine pregnancy. To identify a reliable parameter for the evaluation of foetal well-being, the effect of pre-gestational maternal bodyweight and gestational age on foetal heart rate (FHR) and on feto-maternal heart rate ratio (FHR/MHR) was investigated. Seventeen client-owned pregnant bitches of different pre-gestational maternal bodyweight were examined by serial echo colour Doppler. Only data from 11 uncomplicated pregnancies were included in the statistical analysis. The relationship between FHR, and FHR/MHR, and independent variables was analysed by polynomial regression (p ≤ .05). The FHR and the FHR/MHR significantly fitted a multiple quadratic regression for all independent variables. They both increased from 35 to 20 days before parturition and then a decreasing pattern followed. Higher values of both parameters were observed in bitches of lowest and highest bodyweight. Patterns of FHR and FHR/MHR were similar, but the ratio better describes the effect of the independent variables on the data. Thus, the highest significance of FHR/MHR compared to FHR alone encourages the application of this ratio to evaluate foetal well-being. The equation derived by the regression analysis of FHR/MHR could be applied in clinical practice to obtain its expected values in healthy pregnancies. PMID:27440379

  11. Age-Dependent Metastatic Spread and Survival: Cancer of Unknown Primary as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Pavlidis, Nicholas; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Sundquist, Kristina; Ji, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    In order to describe a novel approach for the clinical study of metastases, we provide here age-specific incidence and survival data for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Metastases in various organs are found at CUP diagnosis, which have implications for prognosis, and we hypothesize similar prognostic implications for metastases found at diagnosis of primary cancers. We identified 33,224 CUP patients from the Swedish Cancer Registry and calculated incidence rates (IRs) for CUP development. Cox proportional hazards regression models were performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for relative survival in CUP patients compared to the general population. In age-group specific analyses, a maximal IR was reached at age 85–89 years, followed by a marked decline to age 90+ (7-fold in men and 3-fold in women). The overall HR for relative survival declined systematically by age. CUP may be applied as an epidemiological age-incidence model for cancer metastases providing evidence in line with autopsy data that the metastatic potential, as shown by the incidence of CUP, appears to weaken markedly at age 85 years, depending on metastatic locations. The relative death rates were highest among young patients, which was probably entirely due to the low death rates in young background population. PMID:27009354

  12. Age-dependence of intracranial viscoelastic properties in living rats.

    PubMed

    Shulyakov, Alexander V; Cenkowski, Stefan S; Buist, Richard J; Del Bigio, Marc R

    2011-04-01

    To explore the effect of maturation on intracranial mechanical properties, viscoelastic parameters were determined in 44 live rats at ages 1-2, 10-12, 21, 56-70, and 180 days using instrumented indentation. With the dura mater intact, the apparent modulus of elasticity, the indentation modulus, and viscous behavior were measured in vivo, as well as 1 h after death. In a separate group of 25 rats, brain water, and protein content were determined. A significant increase of the elastic and indentation moduli beginning at 10-12 days after birth and continuing to 180 days was observed. The creep behavior decreased in the postnatal period and stabilized at 21 days. Changes in intracranial biomechanical properties corresponded to a gradual decrease of brain water, and an increase in total protein content, including glial fibrillary acidic protein, myelin basic protein, and neurofilament light chain. Elastic properties were not significantly different comparing the live and dead states. However, there were significant postmortem changes in viscous behavior. Viscoelastic properties of living rat intracranial contents are shown to be age dependent, reflecting the physical and biochemical changes during postnatal development. This may be important for understanding why young and mature brains respond differently in situations of brain trauma and hydrocephalus.

  13. Size and Age Dependence of Koronis Family Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L. A.

    2011-10-01

    The ancient and massive Koronis family now has four identified subfamilies (asteroid families made by the breakup of fragments of the ancient collision), with ages running from 5.7 to 290 My. This presents unique opportunities to explore space weathering processes, along with dynamical processes such as collisions and binary formation and destruction. Analysis of family members with accurate SDSS measurements shows a correlation of average subfamily color with age that for the first time is highly statistically significant. Yet Thomas et al. (2011) report a size dependence of the colors of the ancient family that demands caution when comparing subfamilies with differing size distributions. Reanalyis of the Thomas et al. data show the reported break near asteroid diameter 5 km is not significant. However, analysis of the much more extensive SDSS data set show a significant break past diameter 2.5 km, with smaller objects systematically bluer. The break is not present in the Karin subfamily (the youngest at 5.7 My), but is already fully developed in the Eriphyla subfamily (only 220 My). The reddening trend with age remains even when comparing only asteroids of similar size, confirming the presence of space weathering phenomena. The meaning of the trend with size is not immediately clear. We consider briefly the strengths and weaknesses of several interpretations of the bluer colors for small objects: 1) those objects receive more jolts from random collisions capable of shaking the regolith and exposing fresh material beneath; 2) those objects receive more jolts from the cycle of fission and recombination driven by YORP; and 3) the lower gravity on those objects retains regolith less well.

  14. Different Phenotypic and Genotypic Presentations in Alcohol Dependence: Age at Onset Matters*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chu; Prescott, Carol A.; Walsh, Dermot; Patterson, Diana G.; Riley, Brien P.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kuo, Po-Hsiu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Several theoretical typology models have been proposed to classify alcoholism into more homogeneous subtypes using various criteria, for which age at onset of alcohol dependence is shared across many models. We investigated the evidence for the distinction between early- versus late-onset alcoholism by examining relevant phenotypic and genotypic variables. Method: Data are from 1,248 individuals with alcohol dependence, who were interviewed to collect detailed clinical information. Early versus late onset of alcohol dependence was defined by the age at onset of 22 years. Odds ratio (OR) and Cohen's d were calculated as effect size for comparisons of clinical features between the two groups. We adjusted interviewed age and gender in logistic regression models. Case-control genetic analyses were conducted for the association between HTR1B, SLC6A4, DRD2, and OPRμ1 genes and subgroups of alcohol dependence using a sample of 530 controls screened for alcohol problems. Results: Early-onset alcoholism exhibited significantly (p < .01) different clinical characteristics from late-onset alcoholism, including higher severity in alcohol dependence symptoms (d = 0.22) and maximum drinking quantity within 24 hours (d = 0.40), more rapid progression from regular drinking to meet alcohol dependence diagnosis (d = 1.73), higher expectancies for alcohol (d = 0.22−0.47), more comorbidity with externalizing disorders (ORs = 2.8−2.9), and greater prevalence of family alcohol use problems (d = 0.26−0.43). In addition, markers in the HTR1B and OPRμ1 genes showed genetic associations with subgroups of alcohol dependence (ORs = 1.5−2.4). Conclusions: Our findings support that subgroups of alcohol dependence defined by onset age have phenotypic and genetic differences. The early-onset subgroup had more severe features for almost every aspect we examined. Coupled with genetic association findings, age at onset of alcohol dependence may serve as a simple but important

  15. Patterns formations in a diffusive ratio-dependent predator-prey model of interacting populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camara, B. I.; Haque, M.; Mokrani, H.

    2016-11-01

    The present investigation deals with the analysis of the spatial pattern formation of a diffusive predator-prey system with ratio-dependent functional response involving the influence of intra-species competition among predators within two-dimensional space. The appropriate condition of Turing instability around the interior equilibrium point of the present model has been determined. The emergence of complex patterns in the diffusive predator-prey model is illustrated through numerical simulations. These results are based on the existence of bifurcations of higher codimension such as Turing-Hopf, Turing-Saddle-node, Turing-Transcritical bifurcation, and the codimension- 3 ​Turing-Takens-Bogdanov bifurcation. The paper concludes with discussions of our results in ecology.

  16. The explicit dependence of quadrat variance on the ratio of clump size to quadrat size.

    PubMed

    Ferrandino, Francis J

    2005-05-01

    ABSTRACT In the past decade, it has become common practice to pool mapped binary epidemic data into quadrats. The resultant "quadrat counts" can then be analyzed by fitting them to a probability distribution (i.e., betabinomial). Often a binary form of Taylor's power law is used to relate the quadrat variance to the quadrat mean. The fact that there is an intrinsic dependence of such analyses on quadrat size and shape is well known. However, a clear-cut exposition of the direct connection between the spatial properties of the two-dimensional pattern of infected plants in terms of the geometry of the quadrat and the results of quadrat-based analyses is lacking. This problem was examined both empirically and analytically. The empirical approach is based on a set of stochastically generated "mock epidemics" using a Neyman-Scott cluster process. The resultant spatial point-patterns of infected plants have a fixed number of disease foci characterized by a known length scale (monodisperse) and saturated to a known disease level. When quadrat samples of these epidemics are fit to a beta-binomial distribution, the resulting measures of aggregation are totally independent of disease incidence and most strongly dependent on the ratio of the length scale of the quadrat to the length scale of spatial aggregation and to a lesser degree on disease saturation within individual foci. For the analytical approach, the mathematical form for the variation in the sum of random variates is coupled to the geometry of a quadrat through an assumed exponential autocorrelation function. The net result is an explicit equation expressing the intraquadrat correlation, quadrat variance, and the index of dispersion in terms of the ratio of the quadrat length scale to the correlative length scale.

  17. Distortion product otoacoustic emission generation mechanisms and their dependence on stimulus level and primary frequency ratio.

    PubMed

    Botti, Teresa; Sisto, Renata; Sanjust, Filippo; Moleti, Arturo; D'Amato, Luisa

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a systematic analysis of the dependence on stimulus level and primary frequency ratio r of the different components of human distortion product otoacoustic emissions has been performed, to check the validity of theoretical models of their generation, as regards the localization of the sources and the relative weight of distortion and reflection generation mechanisms. 2f1 - f2 and 2f2 - f1 distortion product otoacoustic emissions of 12 normal hearing ears from six human subjects have been measured at four different levels, in the range [35, 65] dB sound pressure level, at eight different ratios, in the range [1.1, 1.45]. Time-frequency filtering was used to separate distortion and reflection components. Numerical simulations have also been performed using an active nonlinear cochlear model. Both in the experiment and in the simulations, the behavior of the 2f1 - f2 distortion and reflection components was in agreement with previous measurements and with the predictions of the two-source model. The 2f2 - f1 response showed a rotating-phase component only, whose behavior was in general agreement with that predicted for a component generated and reflected within a region basal to the characteristic place of frequency 2f2 - f1, although alternative interpretations, which are also discussed, cannot be ruled out.

  18. The Relationship between Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte Ratio and Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Pinar Altiaylik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the possible associations of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). Methods Patients were divided to three groups of 40 patients with non-neovascular ARMD (group 1), 40 patients with neovascular ARMD (group 2), and 40 healthy control subjects (group 3). The neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were evaluated using an ABX Pentra DF120/USA biochemical analyzer, and hs-CRP levels were measured using a Beckman Coulter Immage 800. The NLR was measured by dividing neutrophil count by lymphocyte count. Results The patients in group 2 were older and more often diabetic than the patients in groups 1 and 3 (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). The NLR level was 1.65 ± 0.71 in group 1, 1.98 ± 0.84 in group 2, and 1.46 ± 0.44 in group 3. The hs-CRP value was 1.98 ± 0.251 mg/L in group 1, 3.242 ± 0.211 mg/L in group 2, and 1.145 ± 0.193 mg/L in group 3. Both NLR and hs-CRP values were significantly higher in group 2 compared to group 3 (p = 0.002 and p = 0.002, respectively). In multivariate analysis, NLR remained an independent predictor of neovascular ARMD (odds ratio, 3.882; 95% confidence interval, 1.574 to 9.576; p = 0.003) together with age (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.041), and hs-CRP (p = 0.018). Conclusions Our study suggests that increased NLR value is independently associated with neovascular ARMD. PMID:27729758

  19. Age-Ratios and Condition of En Route Migrant Blackpoll Warblers in the British Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boal, Clint W.

    2014-01-01

    The en route migration ecology of Blackpoll Warblers (Setophaga striata) is poorly understood, yet intriguing. Blackpoll Warblers undertake the longest open water migration of any wood warbler species, traveling from northeastern North America to South America, with the first potential landfall being the West Indies. This migration requires substantial energy reserves and subjects Blackpoll Warblers to unpredictable weather events, which may influence survival. Few studies have examined age ratios or condition of Blackpoll Warblers while the warblers are en route through the Caribbean region. I captured and banded Blackpoll Warblers in the British Virgin Islands over 10 consecutive autumn migrations. Ratios of hatch-year to adult Blackpoll Warblers were variable but averaged lower than the ratios reported at continental departure locations. Average mass of Blackpoll Warblers was less than that reported at continental departure locations, with 26% of adults and 40% of hatch-year birds below the estimated fat free mass; hatch-year birds were consistently in poorer condition than adults. Blackpoll Warblers captured in the British Virgin Islands were also in poorer condition than those reported from the Dominican Republic and Barbados; this may be because of the British Virgin Islands being the first landfall after the transatlantic crossing, whereas Blackpoll Warblers arriving at the other Caribbean study locations may have had opportunities for stopover prior to arrival or have departed from farther south on the continent. However, this suggests that the British Virgin Islands likely provide important stopover habitat as a first landfall location for Blackpoll Warblers arriving from the transatlantic migration route.

  20. Galaxy Mergers and Dark Matter Halo Mergers in LCDM: Mass, Redshift, and Mass-Ratio Dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    We employ a high-resolution LCDM N-body simulation to present merger rate predictions for dark matter halos and investigate how common merger-related observables for galaxies - such as close pair counts, starburst counts, and the morphologically disturbed fraction - likely scale with luminosity, stellar mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift from z = 0 to z = 4. We provide a simple 'universal' fitting formula that describes our derived merger rates for dark matter halos a function of dark halo mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift, and go on to predict galaxy merger rates using number density-matching to associate halos with galaxies. For example, we find that the instantaneous merger rate of m/M > 0.3 mass ratio events into typical L {approx}> fL{sub *} galaxies follows the simple relation dN/dt {approx_equal} 0.03(1+f)Gyr{sup -1} (1+z){sup 2.1}. Despite the rapid increase in merger rate with redshift, only a small fraction of > 0.4L{sub *} high-redshift galaxies ({approx} 3% at z = 2) should have experienced a major merger (m/M > 0.3) in the very recent past (t < 100 Myr). This suggests that short-lived, merger-induced bursts of star formation should not contribute significantly to the global star formation rate at early times, in agreement with observational indications. In contrast, a fairly high fraction ({approx} 20%) of those z = 2 galaxies should have experienced a morphologically transformative merger within a virial dynamical time. We compare our results to observational merger rate estimates from both morphological indicators and pair-fraction based determinations between z = 0-2 and show that they are consistent with our predictions. However, we emphasize that great care must be made in these comparisons because the predicted observables depend very sensitively on galaxy luminosity, redshift, overall mass ratio, and uncertain relaxation timescales for merger remnants. We show that the majority of bright galaxies at z = 3 should have undergone a major

  1. Accurate age scale of the Dome Fuji ice core, Antarctica from O2/N2 ratio of trapped air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.; Suzuki, K.; Parrenin, F.

    2012-04-01

    Chronology of the first Dome Fuji deep ice core (core length: 2,500 m, ice thickness: 3,035 m) for the age range from 80 kyr to 340 kyr ago was established by orbital tuning of measured O2/N2 ratios in trapped air to local summer insolation, with precision better than about 2,000 years (Kawamura et al., 2007). The O2/N2 ratios found in polar ice cores are slightly lower than the atmospheric ratio because of size-dependent molecular fractionation during bubble close-off. The magnitude of this gas fractionation is believed to be governed by the magnitude of snow metamorphism when the layer was originally at the surface, which in turn is controlled by local summer insolation (Fujita et al., 2009). A strong advantage of the O2/N2 chronology is that there is no need to assume a lag between climatic records in the ice core and orbital forcings, becacuse O2/N2 ratios record local insolation through physical processes. Accuracy of the chronology was validated by comparing the O2/N2 chronology with U-Th radiometric chronology of speleothem records (Cheng et al., 2009) for the ends of Terminations II, III and IV, as well as several large climatic events, for which both ice-core CH4 and speleothem δ18O (a proxy for precipitation) show abrupt shifts as seen in the last glacial period. All ages from O2/N2 and U-Th chronology agreed with each other within ~2,000 yr. The O2/N2 chronology permits comparisons between Antarctic climate, greenhouse gases, astronomically calculated orbital parameters, and radiometrically-dated sea level and monsoon records. Here, we completed the measurements of O2/N2 ratios of the second Dome Fuji ice core, which reached bedrock, for the range from 2,400 to 3,028 m (320 - 700 kyr ago) at approximately 2,000-year time resolution. We made significant improvements in ice core storage practices and mass spectrometry. In particular, the ice core samples were stored at about -50 ° C until the air extraction, except during short periods of transportation

  2. Does sex-ratio selection influence nest-site choice in a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination?

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Timothy S.; Maciel, Jessica A.; Janzen, Fredric J.

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that dioecious species should produce a balanced primary sex ratio maintained by frequency-dependent selection. Organisms with environmental sex determination, however, are vulnerable to maladaptive sex ratios, because environmental conditions vary spatio-temporally. For reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination, nest-site choice is a behavioural maternal effect that could respond to sex-ratio selection, as mothers could adjust offspring sex ratios by choosing nest sites that will have particular thermal properties. This theoretical prediction has generated decades of empirical research, yet convincing evidence that sex-ratio selection is influencing nesting behaviours remains absent. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence from nature that sex-ratio selection, rather than only viability selection, is probably an important component of nest-site choice in a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination. We compare painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) neonates from maternally selected nest sites with those from randomly selected nest sites, observing no substantive difference in hatching success or survival, but finding a profound difference in offspring sex ratio in the direction expected based on historical records. Additionally, we leverage long-term data to reconstruct our sex ratio results had the experiment been repeated in multiple years. As predicted by theory, our results suggest that sex-ratio selection has shaped nesting behaviour in ways likely to enhance maternal fitness. PMID:24266033

  3. Age-dependent sensitization of cutaneous nociceptors during developmental inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well-documented that neonates can experience pain after injury. However, the contribution of individual populations of sensory neurons to neonatal pain is not clearly understood. Here we characterized the functional response properties and neurochemical phenotypes of single primary afferents after injection of carrageenan into the hairy hindpaw skin using a neonatal ex vivo recording preparation. Results During normal development, we found that individual afferent response properties are generally unaltered. However, at the time period in which some sensory neurons switch their neurotrophic factor responsiveness, we observe a functional switch in slowly conducting, broad spiking fibers (“C”-fiber nociceptors) from mechanically sensitive and thermally insensitive (CM) to polymodal (CPM). Cutaneous inflammation induced prior to this switch (postnatal day 7) specifically altered mechanical and heat responsiveness, and heat thresholds in fast conducting, broad spiking (“A”-fiber) afferents. Furthermore, hairy skin inflammation at P7 transiently delayed the functional shift from CM to CPM. Conversely, induction of cutaneous inflammation after the functional switch (at P14) caused an increase in mechanical and thermal responsiveness exclusively in the CM and CPM neurons. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that inflammation at either time point induced TRPV1 expression in normally non-TRPV1 expressing CPMs. Realtime PCR and western blotting analyses revealed that specific receptors/channels involved in sensory transduction were differentially altered in the DRGs depending on whether inflammation was induced prior to or after the functional changes in afferent prevalence. Conclusion These data suggest that the mechanisms of neonatal pain development may be generated by different afferent subtypes and receptors/channels in an age-related manner. PMID:24906209

  4. Efficacy of the FEV1/FEV6 ratio compared to the FEV1/FVC ratio for the diagnosis of airway obstruction in subjects aged 40 years or over.

    PubMed

    Rosa, F W; Perez-Padilla, R; Camelier, A; Nascimento, O A; Menezes, A M B; Jardim, J R

    2007-12-01

    The present cross-sectional, population-based study was designed to evaluate the performance of the FEV1/FEV6 ratio for the detection of airway-obstructed subjects compared to the FEV1/FVC <0.70 fixed ratio test, as well as the lower limit of normality (LLN) for 1000 subjects (3)40 years of age in the metropolitan area of São Paulo, SP, Brazil. After the exclusion of 37 (3.7%) spirometries, a total of 963 pre-bronchodilator (BD) and 918 post-BD curves were constructed. The majority of the post-BD curves (93.1%) were of very good quality and achieved grade A (762 curves) or B (93 curves). The FEV1/FEV6 and FEV1/FVC ratios were highly correlated (r(2) = 0.92, P < 0.000). Two receiver operator characteristic curves were constructed in order to express the imbalance between the sensitivity and specificity of the FEV1/FEV6 ratio compared to two FEV1/FVC cut-off points for airway obstruction: equal to 70 (area under the curve = 0.98, P < 0.0001) and the LLN (area under the curve = 0.97, P < 0.0001), in the post-BD curves. According to an FEV1/FVC <0.70, the cut-off point for the FEV1/FEV6 ratio with the highest sum for sensitivity and specificity was 0.75. The FEV1/FEV6 ratio can be considered to be a good alternative to the FEV1/FVC ratio for the diagnosis of airway obstruction, both using a fixed cut-off point or below the LLN as reference. The FEV1/FEV6 ratio has the additional advantage of being an easier maneuver for the subjects and for the lung function technicians, providing a higher reproducibility than traditional spirometry maneuvers.

  5. Lead-uranium ratio of siliceous pitchblende from Great Bear Lake, N. W. T., Canada, and its possible age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marble, J.P.

    1936-01-01

    1. A sample of pitchblende from LaBine Point, Echo Bay, Great Bear Lake, N. W. T., Canada, yields a "corrected" lead-ratio of 0.193, corresponding to an age of 1323 million years. 2. As the atomic weight and isotopic composition of the lead, and the Pa/UI ratio of this same sample have been determined, ages, etc., calculated by different methods should agree. This agreement has not been obtained in all instances, and possible reasons have been outlined. 3. The age found indicates that a possible Keewatin granite may be the source of the pitch-blende.

  6. Hummingbird wing efficacy depends on aspect ratio and compares with helicopter rotors

    PubMed Central

    Kruyt, Jan W.; Quicazán-Rubio, Elsa M.; van Heijst, GertJan F.; Altshuler, Douglas L.; Lentink, David

    2014-01-01

    Hummingbirds are the only birds that can sustain hovering. This unique flight behaviour comes, however, at high energetic cost. Based on helicopter and aeroplane design theory, we expect that hummingbird wing aspect ratio (AR), which ranges from about 3.0 to 4.5, determines aerodynamic efficacy. Previous quasi-steady experiments with a wing spinner set-up provide no support for this prediction. To test this more carefully, we compare the quasi-steady hover performance of 26 wings, from 12 hummingbird taxa. We spun the wings at angular velocities and angles of attack that are representative for every species and measured lift and torque more precisely. The power (aerodynamic torque × angular velocity) required to lift weight depends on aerodynamic efficacy, which is measured by the power factor. Our comparative analysis shows that AR has a modest influence on lift and drag forces, as reported earlier, but interspecific differences in power factor are large. During the downstroke, the power required to hover decreases for larger AR wings at the angles of attack at which hummingbirds flap their wings (p < 0.05). Quantitative flow visualization demonstrates that variation in hover power among hummingbird wings is driven by similar stable leading edge vortices that delay stall during the down- and upstroke. A side-by-side aerodynamic performance comparison of hummingbird wings and an advanced micro helicopter rotor shows that they are remarkably similar. PMID:25079868

  7. Hummingbird wing efficacy depends on aspect ratio and compares with helicopter rotors.

    PubMed

    Kruyt, Jan W; Quicazán-Rubio, Elsa M; van Heijst, GertJan F; Altshuler, Douglas L; Lentink, David

    2014-10-01

    Hummingbirds are the only birds that can sustain hovering. This unique flight behaviour comes, however, at high energetic cost. Based on helicopter and aeroplane design theory, we expect that hummingbird wing aspect ratio (AR), which ranges from about 3.0 to 4.5, determines aerodynamic efficacy. Previous quasi-steady experiments with a wing spinner set-up provide no support for this prediction. To test this more carefully, we compare the quasi-steady hover performance of 26 wings, from 12 hummingbird taxa. We spun the wings at angular velocities and angles of attack that are representative for every species and measured lift and torque more precisely. The power (aerodynamic torque × angular velocity) required to lift weight depends on aerodynamic efficacy, which is measured by the power factor. Our comparative analysis shows that AR has a modest influence on lift and drag forces, as reported earlier, but interspecific differences in power factor are large. During the downstroke, the power required to hover decreases for larger AR wings at the angles of attack at which hummingbirds flap their wings (p < 0.05). Quantitative flow visualization demonstrates that variation in hover power among hummingbird wings is driven by similar stable leading edge vortices that delay stall during the down- and upstroke. A side-by-side aerodynamic performance comparison of hummingbird wings and an advanced micro helicopter rotor shows that they are remarkably similar.

  8. Aspect-ratio dependence of magnetization reversal in cylindrical ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Musaab S.; Atkinson, Del

    2016-05-01

    The magnetization reversal behavior in isolated cylindrical and square cross-section Ni81Fe19 nanowires was systematically studied as a function of nanowire cross-section dimensions from 10 up to 200 nm using micromagnetic simulations. This approach provides access to the switching field, remanence ratio and most significantly the magnetization structures during reversal, which allows the evolution of magnetization processes to be studied with scaling of the cross-sectional dimensions. The dimensional trends in reversal behavior for both square and circular cross-section were comparable throughout the range of dimensions studied. The thinnest nanowires showed simple square switching and 100% remanence. With increasing diameter the switching field reduces and above 40 nm the reversal behavior shows an increasing rotational component prior to sharp switching of the magnetization. The magnitude of the reversible component increases with increasing dimensions up to 150 nm, above which the magnetization reversal process is more complicated and the hysteresis loops are no longer bistable. The micromagnetic structures evolve from simple uniform parallel single domain states in the thinnest wires through the formation of vortex-like end states in thicker wires to complex multidomain structures during the reversal of the thickest wires. In the later cases the reversal is not simple curling-like behavior, although the angular switching field dependence was comparable with curling.

  9. Seeking Methods to Reduce the Aspect Ratio Dependence in Deep Silicon Etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Robert L.; Goeckner, M. J.; Overzet, L. J.

    2012-10-01

    We are examining how to reduce the Aspect Ratio Dependence (ARD) of deep silicon etch processes while maintaining both smooth sidewalls and an acceptable etch rate. In particular, SF6/O2/Ar and SF6/C4F8/Ar plasmas have both been shown to etch silicon with good anisotropy in a continuous etch process producing good sidewall profiles and at acceptable etch rates. Unfortunately, these processes also suffer from significant ARD. We are proposing to use an ARD deposition process to balance the ARD of the etch process and thereby find a reasonably AR independent process having an acceptable overall etch rate. To do this, we propose to examine both the ARD deposition rate into various AR trenches and the ARD etch rate of the passivation layer in those trenches. We are pursuing this in part because other researchers have shown that the etch rate of low AR features can be reduced (by depositing a passivation layer) and allow larger AR features to ``catch up.'' As a result, the same depth trench can be obtained [1]. The work is being carried out in a Plasma-Therm Versaline reactor in the UTD clean room. [4pt] [1] See for example: S. Lai, D. Johnson & R. Westerman, J.Vac. Sci. Tech. A, 24, 1283, (2006).

  10. Hummingbird wing efficacy depends on aspect ratio and compares with helicopter rotors.

    PubMed

    Kruyt, Jan W; Quicazán-Rubio, Elsa M; van Heijst, GertJan F; Altshuler, Douglas L; Lentink, David

    2014-10-01

    Hummingbirds are the only birds that can sustain hovering. This unique flight behaviour comes, however, at high energetic cost. Based on helicopter and aeroplane design theory, we expect that hummingbird wing aspect ratio (AR), which ranges from about 3.0 to 4.5, determines aerodynamic efficacy. Previous quasi-steady experiments with a wing spinner set-up provide no support for this prediction. To test this more carefully, we compare the quasi-steady hover performance of 26 wings, from 12 hummingbird taxa. We spun the wings at angular velocities and angles of attack that are representative for every species and measured lift and torque more precisely. The power (aerodynamic torque × angular velocity) required to lift weight depends on aerodynamic efficacy, which is measured by the power factor. Our comparative analysis shows that AR has a modest influence on lift and drag forces, as reported earlier, but interspecific differences in power factor are large. During the downstroke, the power required to hover decreases for larger AR wings at the angles of attack at which hummingbirds flap their wings (p < 0.05). Quantitative flow visualization demonstrates that variation in hover power among hummingbird wings is driven by similar stable leading edge vortices that delay stall during the down- and upstroke. A side-by-side aerodynamic performance comparison of hummingbird wings and an advanced micro helicopter rotor shows that they are remarkably similar. PMID:25079868

  11. Early-type galaxy archeology: Ages, abundance ratios, and effective temperatures from full-spectrum fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Graves, Genevieve J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2014-01-01

    The stellar populations of galaxies hold vital clues to their formation histories. In this paper we present results based on modeling stacked spectra of early-type galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a function of velocity dispersion, σ, from 90 km s{sup –1} to 300 km s{sup –1}. The spectra are of extremely high quality, with typical signal-to-noise ratio of 1000 Å{sup –1}, and a wavelength coverage of 4000 Å –8800 Å. Our population synthesis model includes variation in 16 elements from C to Ba, a two-component star formation history, the shift in effective temperature, Δ T {sub eff}, of the stars with respect to a solar metallicity isochrone, and the stellar initial mass function, among other parameters. In our approach we fit the full optical spectra rather than a select number of spectral indices and are able to, for the first time, measure the abundances of the elements V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni from the integrated light of distant galaxies. Our main results are as follows: (1) light-weighted stellar ages range from 6-12 Gyr from low to high σ; (2) [Fe/H] varies by less than 0.1 dex across the entire sample; (3) Mg closely tracks O, and both increase from ≈0.0 at low σ to ∼0.25 at high σ; Si and Ti show a shallower rise with σ, and Ca tracks Fe rather than O; (4) the iron peak elements V, Cr, Mn, and Ni track Fe, while Co tracks O, suggesting that Co forms primarily in massive stars; (5) C and N track O over the full sample and [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] exceed 0.2 at high σ; and (6) the variation in Δ T {sub eff} with total metallicity closely follows theoretical predictions based on stellar evolution theory. This last result is significant because it implies that we are robustly solving not only for the detailed abundance patterns but also the detailed temperature distributions (i.e., isochrones) of the stars in these galaxies. A variety of tests reveal that the systematic uncertainties in our measurements are probably 0.05 dex or

  12. Age-Dependent Face Detection and Face Categorization Performance

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Grüter, Martina; Grüter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Empirical studies on the development of face processing skills with age show inconsistent patterns concerning qualitative vs. quantitative changes over time or the age range for peak cognitive performance. In the present study, we tested the proficiency in face detection and face categorization with a large sample of participants (N = 312; age range: 2-88 yrs). As test objects, we used so-called Mooney faces, two-tone (black and white) images of faces lacking critical information of a local, featural and relational nature, reflecting difficult real world face processing conditions. We found that performance in the assessment of gender and age from Mooney faces increases up to about age 15, and decreases from 65 years on. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of classic and recent findings from face development literature. PMID:24116236

  13. Aging signaling pathways and circadian clock-dependent metabolic derangements

    PubMed Central

    Tevy, Maria Florencia; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga; Pincus, Zachary; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock machinery orchestrates organism metabolism in order to ensure that development, survival and reproduction are attuned to diurnal environmental variations. For unknown reasons, there is a decline in circadian rhythms with age, concomitant with declines in the overall metabolic tissues homeostasis and changes in the feeding behavior of aged organisms. This disruption of the relationship between the clock and the nutrient sensing networks might underlie age-related diseases; overall, greater knowledge of the molecular mediators of and variations in clock networks during lifespan may shed light on the aging process and how it may be delayed. In this review we address the complex links between the circadian clock, metabolic (dys)functions and aging in different model organisms. PMID:23299029

  14. Age-dependent changes in central somatosensory conduction time.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Hedderich, J

    1982-01-01

    Cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials(SEPs) were recorded in 45 normal subjects. Absolute peak latencies and latency differences between the components P7, N9, N11, N13, P17 and N20 were measured. Subjects aged 40-60 years had significantly longer latencies of N13 and N20 than subjects aged 15-39 years. Moreover, statistical analysis revealed a significant prolongation of N9-N13, N11-N13 and N13-N20 transit times in older subjects. Possible connections with known morphological age-related findings are discussed. PMID:6288387

  15. Attention enhancing effects of methylphenidate are age-dependent.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shevon E; Shumsky, Jed S; Waterhouse, Barry D

    2015-01-01

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin®) is used to treat a variety of cognitive disorders. MPH is also popular among healthy individuals, including the elderly, for its ability to focus attention and improve concentration, but these effects have not been shown to be comparable between aged and adult subjects. Thus, we tested whether MPH would improve performance in sustained attention in both adult and aged rats. In addition, we tested the impact of visual distraction on performance in this task and the ability of MPH to mitigate the effects of distraction. Adult (6-12 months) and aged (18-22 months) male Sprague-Dawley rats were given oral MPH, and their cognitive and motor abilities were tested. Results suggest that while MPH improves task performance in adults; there is no improvement in the aged animals. These outcomes suggest that the use of MPH for cognitive enhancement in elderly individuals may be ineffective.

  16. Neuronal mechanisms of motor learning are age dependent.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, Kelly M M; De Rond, Veerle; Zijdewind, Inge; Koch, Giacomo; Veldman, Menno P; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-10-01

    There is controversy whether age-related neuroanatomical and neurophysiological changes in the central nervous system affect healthy old adults' abilities to acquire and retain motor skills. We examined the effects of age on motor skill acquisition and retention and potential underlying mechanisms by measuring corticospinal and intracortical excitability, using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Healthy young (n = 24, 22 years) and old (n = 22, 71 years) adults practiced a wrist flexion-extention visuomotor task or only watched the templates as an attentional control for 20 minutes. Old compared with young adults performed less well at baseline. Although the absolute magnitude of skill acquisition and retention was similar in the 2 age groups (age × intervention × time, p = 0.425), a comparison of baseline-similar age sub-groups revealed impaired skill acquisition but not retention in old versus young. Furthermore, the neuronal mechanisms differed as revealed by an opposite direction of associations in the age-groups between relative skill acquisition and intracortical facilitation during the task, and opposite changes during skill retention in corticospinal excitability at rest and during the task and intracortical inhibition during the task. PMID:27494184

  17. Neuronal mechanisms of motor learning are age dependent.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, Kelly M M; De Rond, Veerle; Zijdewind, Inge; Koch, Giacomo; Veldman, Menno P; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-10-01

    There is controversy whether age-related neuroanatomical and neurophysiological changes in the central nervous system affect healthy old adults' abilities to acquire and retain motor skills. We examined the effects of age on motor skill acquisition and retention and potential underlying mechanisms by measuring corticospinal and intracortical excitability, using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Healthy young (n = 24, 22 years) and old (n = 22, 71 years) adults practiced a wrist flexion-extention visuomotor task or only watched the templates as an attentional control for 20 minutes. Old compared with young adults performed less well at baseline. Although the absolute magnitude of skill acquisition and retention was similar in the 2 age groups (age × intervention × time, p = 0.425), a comparison of baseline-similar age sub-groups revealed impaired skill acquisition but not retention in old versus young. Furthermore, the neuronal mechanisms differed as revealed by an opposite direction of associations in the age-groups between relative skill acquisition and intracortical facilitation during the task, and opposite changes during skill retention in corticospinal excitability at rest and during the task and intracortical inhibition during the task.

  18. Age dependency of base modification in rabbit liver DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, O.; Fuji, I.; Yoshida, T.; Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Age-related modifications of DNA bases have been observed in the liver of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a lagomorph with a median life span in captivity of 5-7 yr. The ages of the animals studied ranged from 6 wk to 9 yr. After the DNA had been extracted from the liver cell nuclei and hydrolyzed with acid, the bases were analyzed by column chromatography with Cellulofine gels (GC-15-m). Two peaks in the chromatogram, which eluted before the four DNA bases, contained modified bases. Those materials, which were obtained in relatively large amounts from old animals, were highly fluorescent, and were shown to be crosslinked base products by mass spectrometry. The yield of crosslinked products versus rabbit age (greater than 0.5 yr) can be fitted by an exponential function (correlation coefficient: 0.76 +/- 0.09).

  19. Characterizing the aging of biomass burning organic aerosol by use of mixing ratios: a meta-analysis of four regions.

    PubMed

    Jolleys, Matthew D; Coe, Hugh; McFiggans, Gordon; Capes, Gerard; Allan, James D; Crosier, Jonathan; Williams, Paul I; Allen, Grant; Bower, Keith N; Jimenez, Jose L; Russell, Lynn M; Grutter, Michel; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2012-12-18

    Characteristic organic aerosol (OA) emission ratios (ERs) and normalized excess mixing ratios (NEMRs) for biomass burning (BB) events have been calculated from ambient measurements recorded during four field campaigns. Normalized OA mass concentrations measured using Aerodyne Research Inc. quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS) reveal a systematic variation in average values between different geographical regions. For each region, a consistent, characteristic ratio is seemingly established when measurements are collated from plumes of all ages and origins. However, there is evidence of strong regional and local-scale variability between separate measurement periods throughout the tropical, subtropical, and boreal environments studied. ERs close to source typically exceed NEMRs in the far-field, despite apparent compositional change and increasing oxidation with age. The absence of any significant downwind mass enhancement suggests no regional net source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from atmospheric aging of BB sources, in contrast with the substantial levels of net SOA formation associated with urban sources. A consistent trend of moderately reduced ΔOA/ΔCO ratios with aging indicates a small net loss of OA, likely as a result of the evaporation of organic material from initial fire emissions. Variability in ERs close to source is shown to substantially exceed the magnitude of any changes between fresh and aged OA, emphasizing the importance of fuel and combustion conditions in determining OA loadings from biomass burning. PMID:23163290

  20. Lucid dreaming: an age-dependent brain dissociation.

    PubMed

    Voss, Ursula; Frenzel, Clemens; Koppehele-Gossel, Judith; Hobson, Allan

    2012-12-01

    The current study focused on the distribution of lucid dreams in school children and young adults. The survey was conducted on a large sample of students aged 6-19 years. Questions distinguished between past and current experience with lucid dreams. Results suggest that lucid dreaming is quite pronounced in young children, its incidence rate drops at about age 16 years. Increased lucidity was found in those attending higher level compared with lower level schools. Taking methodological issues into account, we feel confident to propose a link between the natural occurrence of lucid dreaming and brain maturation. PMID:22639960

  1. Lucid dreaming: an age-dependent brain dissociation.

    PubMed

    Voss, Ursula; Frenzel, Clemens; Koppehele-Gossel, Judith; Hobson, Allan

    2012-12-01

    The current study focused on the distribution of lucid dreams in school children and young adults. The survey was conducted on a large sample of students aged 6-19 years. Questions distinguished between past and current experience with lucid dreams. Results suggest that lucid dreaming is quite pronounced in young children, its incidence rate drops at about age 16 years. Increased lucidity was found in those attending higher level compared with lower level schools. Taking methodological issues into account, we feel confident to propose a link between the natural occurrence of lucid dreaming and brain maturation.

  2. Age dependent course of EAE in Aire-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Rina; Aricha, Revital; Eilam, Raya; From, Ido; Mizrahi, Keren; Arnon, Ruth; Souroujon, Miriam C; Fuchs, Sara

    2013-09-15

    This study explores the consequences of deficiency in the autoimmune regulator (Aire) on the susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Increased susceptibility to EAE was found in Aire knockout (KO) compared to wild type (WT) in 6month old mice. In contrast, 2month old Aire KO mice were less susceptible to EAE than WT mice, and this age-related resistance correlated with elevated proportions of T regulatory (Treg) cells in their spleen and brain. Combined with our previous findings in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis, we suggest an age-related association between Aire and Treg cells in the susceptibility to autoimmunity.

  3. The energy dependence of the ratios of secondary to primary elements in the cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Margolis, S. H.; Simpson, J. A.; Wefel, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    The secondary to primary ratios B/C, N/O and (Sc-Mn)/Fe in the galactic cosmic rays have been measured in the overall energy interval 30-180 MeV/n with the University of Chicago cosmic ray telescope on board the satellite IMP-8 during the period 1974-1978. These results, together with the values of the same ratios measured at higher energies, have been compared to the results of cosmic ray propagation calculations using different pathlength distributions (PLD) and different levels of solar modulation, in order to select a single set of parameters consistent with all the measured ratios.

  4. Accommodating volume-constant age-dependent optical (AVOCADO) model of the crystalline GRIN lens

    PubMed Central

    Sheil, Conor J.; Goncharov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce a new age-dependent model of the human lens with two GRIN power distributions (axial and radial) that allow decoupling of its refractive power and axial optical path length. The aspect ratio of the lens core can be held constant under accommodation, as well as the lens volume by varying the asphericity of the lens external surfaces. The spherical aberration calculated by exact raytracing is shown to be in line with experimental data. The proposed model is compared to previous GRIN models from the literature, and it is concluded that the features of the new model will be useful for GRIN reconstruction in future experimental studies; in particular, studies of the accommodation-dependent properties of the ageing human eye. A proposed logarithmic model of the lens core enables decoupling of three fundamental optical characteristics of the lens, namely axial optical path length, optical power and third-order spherical aberration, without changing the external shape of the lens. Conversely, the near-surface GRIN structure conforms to the external shape of the lens, which is necessary for accommodation modelling. PMID:27231637

  5. Accommodating volume-constant age-dependent optical (AVOCADO) model of the crystalline GRIN lens.

    PubMed

    Sheil, Conor J; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce a new age-dependent model of the human lens with two GRIN power distributions (axial and radial) that allow decoupling of its refractive power and axial optical path length. The aspect ratio of the lens core can be held constant under accommodation, as well as the lens volume by varying the asphericity of the lens external surfaces. The spherical aberration calculated by exact raytracing is shown to be in line with experimental data. The proposed model is compared to previous GRIN models from the literature, and it is concluded that the features of the new model will be useful for GRIN reconstruction in future experimental studies; in particular, studies of the accommodation-dependent properties of the ageing human eye. A proposed logarithmic model of the lens core enables decoupling of three fundamental optical characteristics of the lens, namely axial optical path length, optical power and third-order spherical aberration, without changing the external shape of the lens. Conversely, the near-surface GRIN structure conforms to the external shape of the lens, which is necessary for accommodation modelling. PMID:27231637

  6. Canine pulp ratios in estimating pensionable age in subjects with questionable documents of identification.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Ferrante, Luigi

    2011-03-20

    One of the most interesting reasons for needing to estimate age in adult subjects is to ascertain the age of a person of questionable pensionable age. This problem is becoming increasingly important in Europe, owing to the high number of immigrants without valid birth certificates. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the application of the apposition of secondary dentine of canines by the method of Cameriere et al. [10], in order to estimate the pensionable age of subjects without proper birth certificates. Periapical X-rays of 180 canines from 90 subjects aged between 50 and 79, 46 men and 44 women, were analysed. Estimated ages were used to test the medico-legal question as to whether an individual was older or younger than 65 years of age. In subjects under 65, age was correctly evaluated in 91% and 89% of individuals using maxillary and mandibular canines, respectively. In subjects over 65, of pensionable age, estimates were correct in 85% and 88% of cases, respectively. The proportion of individuals with correct classifications was 89% for both maxillary and mandibular canines taken together. In only four subjects, the results of maxillary and mandibular canines were discordant; in the other 86 subjects, the test of maxillary and mandibular canines yielded concordant results. Among the latter, the proportion of individuals who were really aged 65 years or older, and who were correctly estimated as such, was 94%, and the proportion of individuals younger than 65 years of age who were correctly estimated as such was 96%.

  7. Age-dependent motor unit remodelling in human limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Piasecki, Mathew; Ireland, Alex; Jones, David A; McPhee, Jamie S

    2016-06-01

    Voluntary control of skeletal muscle enables humans to interact with and manipulate the environment. Lower muscle mass, weakness and poor coordination are common complaints in older age and reduce physical capabilities. Attention has focused on ways of maintaining muscle size and strength by exercise, diet or hormone replacement. Without appropriate neural innervation, however, muscle cannot function. Emerging evidence points to a neural basis of muscle loss. Motor unit number estimates indicate that by age around 71 years, healthy older people have around 40 % fewer motor units. The surviving low- and moderate-threshold motor units recruited for moderate intensity contractions are enlarged by around 50 % and show increased fibre density, presumably due to collateral reinnervation of denervated fibres. Motor unit potentials show increased complexity and the stability of neuromuscular junction transmissions is decreased. The available evidence is limited by a lack of longitudinal studies, relatively small sample sizes, a tendency to examine the small peripheral muscles and relatively few investigations into the consequences of motor unit remodelling for muscle size and control of movements in older age. Loss of motor neurons and remodelling of surviving motor units constitutes the major change in ageing muscles and probably contributes to muscle loss and functional impairments. The deterioration and remodelling of motor units likely imposes constraints on the way in which the central nervous system controls movements. PMID:26667009

  8. Functional aging in the nervous system contributes to age-dependent motor activity decline in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Bi; Lei, Haoyun; Feng, Zhaoyang; Liu, Jianfeng; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2013-09-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in multiple physiological functions (i.e., functional aging). As animals age, they exhibit a gradual loss in motor activity, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we approach this question in C. elegans by functionally characterizing its aging nervous system and muscles. We find that motor neurons exhibit a progressive functional decline, beginning in early life. Surprisingly, body-wall muscles, which were previously thought to undergo functional aging, do not manifest such a decline until mid-late life. Notably, motor neurons first develop a deficit in synaptic vesicle fusion followed by that in quantal size and vesicle docking/priming, revealing specific functional deteriorations in synaptic transmission. Pharmacological stimulation of synaptic transmission can improve motor activity in aged animals. These results uncover a critical role for the nervous system in age-dependent motor activity decline in C. elegans and provide insights into how functional aging occurs in this organism.

  9. Emission behavior of sudan red 7B on dogbone-shaped gold nanorods: Aspect ratio dependence of the metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Dewan S.; Sharma, Debdulal; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-stabilized 'dogbone-shaped' gold nanorods of aspect ratio varying from 1 to 6 have been synthesized by seed-mediated growth method in aqueous medium. Then, sudan red 7B, an alien molecular probe has been used as local probe to elucidate aspect ratio dependence of the nanorods on the photophysical properties of the dye molecules. It is seen that the relative intensity decreases exponentially with increasing aspect ratio and has been attributed to decrease in overall surface area for a particular concentration of the nanorods. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching has been ascribed to the electron and energy transfer processes in the gold-fluorophore hybrid nanostructures.

  10. Sensitivity to cocaine conditioned reward depends on sex and age

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Elena; Wade, Dean; Izenwasser, Sari

    2009-01-01

    Human and animal laboratory studies show that females and males respond differently to drugs and that drug administration during adolescence leads to different behavioral effects than during adulthood. Adult female rats are more sensitive to the behavioral effects of cocaine than adult males, but it is not known if the same effect of sex exists during adolescence. In the present study, sensitivity to the conditioned reward of cocaine was evaluated using a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm where adolescent (PND 34) and adult (PND 66) male and female rats were trained and tested for the development of CPP to multiple doses of cocaine. Female rats developed CPP at lower doses than males, regardless of age. In addition, adolescent male and female rats established a CPP at lower doses of cocaine than adult male and female rats, respectively. Thus, both age and sex altered cocaine conditioned reward with the order of sensitivity being adolescent females > adult females > adolescent males > adult males. These data show that adolescents are more sensitive to the conditioned rewarding properties of cocaine than adults and that females respond to lower doses of cocaine compared to males regardless of age. PMID:19032962

  11. Geographic segregation and evidence of density-dependent changes in sex ratios in an abundant colonial waterbird.

    PubMed

    Dorr, Brian S; Hanson-Dorr, Katie C; DeVault, Travis L; Guillaumet, Alban; Barras, Scott C

    2014-11-01

    Demographic information, such as geographic segregation of sexes and sex ratio data, is needed to develop, model and evaluate conservation and management strategies for wildlife. A variety of physiological, behavioral and environmental factors can influence segregation of sexes and sex ratios, many of which originate with density-dependent processes. Departure from 50:50 sex ratios of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) collected during control efforts in breeding and wintering areas across their eastern range of the USA were evaluated using using a Z-test as well as Stouffer's weighted Z-tests. In addition, a specifically-designed randomization test was used to evaluate density-dependent effects on primary sex ratios in cormorants from egg collections and colony nest count data over a 21-year period. Cormorants collected from breeding colonies were strongly male-biased, whereas cormorants collected from feeding flocks were slightly biased toward females. Cormorants were partly segregated by sex on the wintering grounds, with significantly more males found in areas with intensive channel catfish aquaculture. The null hypothesis that females produced a balanced sex ratio independent of number of nesting cormorants was rejected: more male embryos were produced during rapid population growth, whereas at maximum nesting number more female embryos were produced. Once populations stabilized, the sex ratio was more equal. This examination of sex ratios indicates that different management methods and locations result in sex-biased culling of cormorants. Sex-biased culling in cormorants could make population reduction efforts more efficient and reduce overall take. We suggest further research to examine density-dependent effects on primary sex ratios documented here.

  12. Effects of Aging and Blood Contamination on the Urinary Protein–Creatinine Ratio in Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Lammey, Michael L; Ely, John J; Zavaskis, Tony; Videan, Elaine; Sleeper, Meg M

    2011-01-01

    The initial goal of this study was to evaluate proteinuria by using the protein to creatinine (UPC) ratio of urine obtained by cystocentesis of healthy adult captive chimpanzees. Urine samples were collected by using ultrasound-guided cystocentesis from 125 (80 male, 45 female) captive chimpanzees. All samples were collected over a 17-mo time period (August 2008 to January 2010) during the animal's annual physical examination. Samples were assayed at a veterinary diagnostic laboratory. Results indicated that both age and blood contamination affect the UPC ratio and therefore alter the diagnostic utility of the UPC ratio in chimpanzees. In addition, this research establishes reference ranges by age for the UPC ratio in healthy adult chimpanzees. Chimps younger than the median age of 24.6 y have a median UPC ratio of 0.098 (range, 0 to 1.76), whereas older animals have a median UPC of 0.288 (range, 0 to 2.44). Our results likely will enable veterinarians working with chimpanzees to better evaluate their renal function. PMID:21640034

  13. Effects of aging and blood contamination on the urinary protein-creatinine ratio in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Lammey, Michael L; Ely, John J; Zavaskis, Tony; Videan, Elaine; Sleeper, Meg M

    2011-05-01

    The initial goal of this study was to evaluate proteinuria by using the protein to creatinine (UPC) ratio of urine obtained by cystocentesis of healthy adult captive chimpanzees. Urine samples were collected by using ultrasound-guided cystocentesis from 125 (80 male, 45 female) captive chimpanzees. All samples were collected over a 17-mo time period (August 2008 to January 2010) during the animal's annual physical examination. Samples were assayed at a veterinary diagnostic laboratory. Results indicated that both age and blood contamination affect the UPC ratio and therefore alter the diagnostic utility of the UPC ratio in chimpanzees. In addition, this research establishes reference ranges by age for the UPC ratio in healthy adult chimpanzees. Chimps younger than the median age of 24.6 y have a median UPC ratio of 0.098 (range, 0 to 1.76), whereas older animals have a median UPC of 0.288 (range, 0 to 2.44). Our results likely will enable veterinarians working with chimpanzees to better evaluate their renal function. PMID:21640034

  14. Size Dependent Cellular Uptake of Rod-like Bionanoparticles with Different Aspect Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangxiang; Wu, Fengchi; Tian, Ye; Wu, Man; Zhou, Quan; Jiang, Shidong; Niu, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the cellular internalization mechanism of nanoparticles is essential to study their biological fate. Especially, due to the anisotropic properties, rod-like nanoparticles have attracted growing interest for the enhanced internalization efficiency with respect to spherical nanoparticles. Here, to elucidate the effect of aspect ratio of rod-like nanoparticles on cellular uptake, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a typical rod-like bionanoparticle, is developed as a model. Nanorods with different aspect ratios can be obtained by ultrasound treatment and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. By incubating with epithelial and endothelial cells, we found that the rod-like bionanoparticles with various aspect ratios had different internalization pathways in different cell lines: microtubules transport in HeLa and clathrin-mediated uptake in HUVEC for TMV4 and TMV8; caveolae-mediated pathway and microtubules transport in HeLa and HUVEC for TMV17. Differently from most nanoparticles, for all the three TMV nano-rods with different aspect ratios, macropinocytosis takes no effect on the internalization in both cell types. This work provides a fundamental understanding of the influence of aspect ratio on cellular uptake decoupled from charge and material composition. PMID:27080246

  15. Orientation of X Lines in Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection-Mass Ratio Dependency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the X line orientation of magnetic reconnection in an asymmetric configuration. A spatially localized perturbation is employed to induce a single X line, which has sufficient freedom to choose its orientation in three-dimensional systems. The effect of ion to electron mass ratio is investigated, and the X line appears to bisect the magnetic shear angle across the current sheet in the large mass ratio limit. The orientation can generally be deduced by scanning through the corresponding 2-D simulations to find the reconnection plane that maximizes the peak reconnection electric field. The deviation from the bisection angle in the lower mass ratio limit is consistent with the orientation shift of the most unstable linear tearing mode in an electron-scale current sheet.

  16. The Phytoestrogen Genistein Affects Breast Cancer Cells Treatment Depending on the ERα/ERβ Ratio.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Torrens-Mas, Margalida; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soybeans. GEN exerts its functions through its interaction with the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and we previously reported that the ERα/ERβ ratio is an important factor to consider in GEN-treated breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GEN in breast cancer cells with different ERα/ERβ ratio: MCF-7 (high ratio), T47D (low ratio), and MCF-7 overexpressing ERβ (MCF7 + ERβ) treated with cisplatin (CDDP), paclitaxel (PTX) or tamoxifen (TAM). Cell viability, ROS production, autophagy, apoptosis, antioxidant enzymes protein levels, and cell cycle were analyzed. GEN treatment provoked an increase in cell viability in MCF-7 cells and in the antioxidant enzymes protein levels in combination with the cytotoxic agents, decreasing ROS production (CDDP + GEN and TAM+GEN) and autophagy (TAM + GEN) or apoptosis (CDDP + GEN and TAM + GEN). Moreover GEN treatment enhanced the cell cycle S phase entry in CDDP+GEN- and TAM + GEN-treated MCF-7 cells and, in the case of CDDP + GEN, increased the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase and decreased it in the subG0 /G1 phase. Otherwise, in the T47D and MCF7 + ERβ cells the combination of GEN with cytotoxic treatments did not cause significant changes in these parameters, even TAM + GEN-treated T47D cells showed less cell viability due to an increment in the autophagy. In conclusion, GEN consumption may be counterproductive in those patients receiving anticancer treatment with a high ERα/ERβ ratio diagnosed breast cancer and it could be harmless or even beneficial in those patients with a lower ERα/ERβ ratio breast cancer cells.

  17. Age estimation from pulp/tooth area ratio in maxillary incisors among Egyptians using dental radiographic images.

    PubMed

    Zaher, Jaklin Fekri; Fawzy, Irene Atef; Habib, Sahar Refaat; Ali, Magdy Mohamed

    2011-02-01

    Age estimation from dental radiographs is a non-destructive, simple method to obtain information. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of age estimation from Egyptians' incisors radiographs. 144 periapical radiographs of maxillary (central & lateral) incisors (both sexes) aged 12-60 were used. Digital camera was used to image the radiographs. Images were computed and pulp/tooth area ratios were determined by AutoCAD Program. Data were subjected to correlation and regression analysis which showed statistically significant correlation (r = 0.23 &P = 0.006 for maxillary central incisors and r = -0.2 &P = 0.05 for maxillary lateral incisors) between age and pulp tooth area ratio. Linear regression equations were determined separately for both central and lateral incisors along with the corresponding Standard Error of Estimate, which ranged from 1.2 to 5.08 years. Consequently, it was concluded that pulp/tooth area ratios of incisors are reliable for estimation of age among Egyptians in forensic work. PMID:21315299

  18. Young Nearby Suns and Stellar Jitter Dependence on Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Nicole; White, Russel; Delfosse, Xavier; Noah Quinn, Samuel; Latham, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Finding the nearest young planets offers the most direct way to improve our understanding of how planets form, how they migrate, and how they evolve. However, most radial velocity (RV) surveys have avoided young stars because of their problematic characteristics, including high levels of stellar activity. Recent advancements in infrared (IR) detectors as well as wavelength calibration methods have provided new ways of pursuing high-precision RV measurements of young stars. While this work has been successfully applied to many young late-K and M dwarfs, much less RV work has been done on young Sun-like stars, with the very recent exception of adolescent stars (~600 Myr) in open clusters. In order to better understand the dynamical and structural forces that shaped our own Solar system, we must begin to explore the more massive realm of Sun-like stars.We present precision optical radial velocity data of 5 young, nearby, Sun-like stars in AB Dor and assess our ability to detect young planets with current spectroscopic methods. The data were obtained with the TRES spectrograph on the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Fred L. Whipple Observatory and with SOPHIE on the 1.95 m Telescope at the Observatoire de Haute Provence. We obtained a RV precision of ~8 m/s with TRES and ~7 m/s precision with SOPHIE; average observed dispersions are 38 m/s and 33 m/s, respectively. We combine our results with spectroscopic data of Sun-like stars spanning a broad range of youthful ages (< 1 Gyr) from the literature to investigate the relationship between stellar jitter and stellar age. The results suggest that the jitter of Sun-like stars decreases below 100 m/s for stars older than ~30 Myr, which would enable the discovery of hot Jupiters orbiting these adolescent age stars.

  19. Age-dependent biomechanical properties of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Lelonkiewicz, Monika; Wieczorowski, Michał

    2013-01-01

    The skin fulfills one of its most important functions, that is protection from mechanical injuries, due to the mechanism of reversible deformation of the structure. Human skin is a complex living material but in biomechanical tests it reveals its homogeneous nature. Biomechanical skin parameters change with time. Results of thickness measurements, where the skin was subjected to pressure, revealed that the Young's modulus increased linearly with age. The process of ageing is the reason why the skin becomes thinner, stiffer, less tense and less flexible. Skin tension measured during in vivo uniaxial load and the elasticity modulus are higher in children than in elderly adults. Furthermore, mean ultimate skin deformation before bursting is 75% for newborns and 60% for the elderly. Several types of the main lines were distinguished on the skin. The static lines, described by Langer, correspond to the lines of maximum tension, the Kraissl's lines correspond to the movements of the skin during muscle work, whereas the Borges lines are the relaxed skin tension lines. Biomechanical tests of the human skin help to quantify the effectiveness of dermatological products, detect skin diseases, schedule and plan surgical and dermatological interventions and treatments. PMID:24353490

  20. Scale dependence of sex ratio in wild plant populations: implications for social selection.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Brian J; Augat, Malcolm E; Taylor, Douglas R; Brodie, Edmund D

    2016-03-01

    Social context refers to the composition of an individual's social interactants, including potential mates. In spatially structured populations, social context can vary among individuals within populations, generating the opportunity for social selection to drive differences in fitness functions among individuals at a fine spatial scale. In sexually polymorphic plants, the local sex ratio varies at a fine scale and thus has the potential to generate this opportunity. We measured the spatial distribution of two wild populations of the gynodioecious plant Silene vulgaris and show that there is fine-scale heterogeneity in the local distribution of the sexes within these populations. We demonstrate that the largest variance in sex ratio is among nearest neighbors. This variance is greatly reduced as the spatial scale of social interactions increases. These patterns suggest the sex of neighbors has the potential to generate fine-scale differences in selection differentials among individuals. One of the most important determinants of social interactions in plants is the behavior of pollinators. These results suggest that the potential for selection arising from sex ratio will be greatest when pollen is shared among nearest neighbors. Future studies incorporating the movement of pollinators may reveal whether and how this fine-scale variance in sex ratio affects the fitness of individuals in these populations. PMID:26865952

  1. Wide-area ratios of evapotranspiration to precipitation in monsoon dependent semiarid vegetation communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims. E vapotranspiration (ET) and ratios of ET to precipitation (PPT) are important factors in the water budget of semiarid rangelands and are in part determined by the dominant plant communities. We determined ET and ET/PPT for shrublands, grasslands and mesquite savannas in southern Arizona and d...

  2. The Ageing Brain: Age-dependent changes in the electroencephalogram during propofol and sevoflurane general anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Purdon, P. L.; Pavone, K. J.; Akeju, O.; Smith, A. C.; Sampson, A. L.; Lee, J.; Zhou, D. W.; Solt, K.; Brown, E. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaesthetic drugs act at sites within the brain that undergo profound changes during typical ageing. We postulated that anaesthesia-induced brain dynamics observed in the EEG change with age. Methods We analysed the EEG in 155 patients aged 18–90 yr who received propofol (n=60) or sevoflurane (n=95) as the primary anaesthetic. The EEG spectrum and coherence were estimated throughout a 2 min period of stable anaesthetic maintenance. Age-related effects were characterized by analysing power and coherence as a function of age using linear regression and by comparing the power spectrum and coherence in young (18- to 38-yr-old) and elderly (70- to 90-yr-old) patients. Results Power across all frequency bands decreased significantly with age for both propofol and sevoflurane; elderly patients showed EEG oscillations ∼2- to 3-fold smaller in amplitude than younger adults. The qualitative form of the EEG appeared similar regardless of age, showing prominent alpha (8–12 Hz) and slow (0.1–1 Hz) oscillations. However, alpha band dynamics showed specific age-related changes. In elderly compared with young patients, alpha power decreased more than slow power, and alpha coherence and peak frequency were significantly lower. Older patients were more likely to experience burst suppression. Conclusions These profound age-related changes in the EEG are consistent with known neurobiological and neuroanatomical changes that occur during typical ageing. Commercial EEG-based depth-of-anaesthesia indices do not account for age and are therefore likely to be inaccurate in elderly patients. In contrast, monitoring the unprocessed EEG and its spectrogram can account for age and individual patient characteristics. PMID:26174300

  3. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Rose, H; Lehtinen, O; Biskupek, J; Kaiser, U

    2014-10-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions.

  4. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Rose, H; Lehtinen, O; Biskupek, J; Kaiser, U

    2014-10-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. PMID:24566042

  5. Does breeding population trajectory and age of nesting females influence disparate nestling sex ratios in two populations of Cooper's hawks?

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, Robert N; Stout, William E; Giovanni, Matthew D; Levine, Noah H; Cava, Jenna A; Hardin, Madeline G; Haynes, Taylor G

    2015-09-01

    Offspring sex ratios at the termination of parental care should theoretically be skewed toward the less expensive sex, which in most avian species would be females, the smaller gender. Among birds, however, raptors offer an unusual dynamic because they exhibit reversed size dimorphism with females being larger than males. And thus theory would predict a preponderance of male offspring. Results for raptors and birds in general have been varied although population-level estimates of sex ratios in avian offspring are generally at unity. Adaptive adjustment of sex ratios in avian offspring is difficult to predict perhaps in part due to a lack of life-history details and short-term investigations that cannot account for precision or repeatability of sex ratios across time. We conducted a novel comparative study of sex ratios in nestling Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperii) in two study populations across breeding generations during 11 years in Wisconsin, 2001-2011. One breeding population recently colonized metropolitan Milwaukee and exhibited rapidly increasing population growth, while the ex-Milwaukee breeding population was stable. Following life-history trade-off theory and our prediction regarding this socially monogamous species in which reversed sexual size dimorphism is extreme, first-time breeding one-year-old, second-year females in both study populations produced a preponderance of the smaller and cheaper sex, males, whereas ASY (after-second-year), ≥2-year-old females in Milwaukee produced a nestling sex ratio near unity and predictably therefore a greater proportion of females compared to ASY females in ex-Milwaukee who produced a preponderance of males. Adjustment of sex ratios in both study populations occurred at conception. Life histories and selective pressures related to breeding population trajectory in two age cohorts of nesting female Cooper's hawk likely vary, and it is possible that these differences influenced the sex ratios we documented for

  6. Does breeding population trajectory and age of nesting females influence disparate nestling sex ratios in two populations of Cooper's hawks?

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, Robert N; Stout, William E; Giovanni, Matthew D; Levine, Noah H; Cava, Jenna A; Hardin, Madeline G; Haynes, Taylor G

    2015-09-01

    Offspring sex ratios at the termination of parental care should theoretically be skewed toward the less expensive sex, which in most avian species would be females, the smaller gender. Among birds, however, raptors offer an unusual dynamic because they exhibit reversed size dimorphism with females being larger than males. And thus theory would predict a preponderance of male offspring. Results for raptors and birds in general have been varied although population-level estimates of sex ratios in avian offspring are generally at unity. Adaptive adjustment of sex ratios in avian offspring is difficult to predict perhaps in part due to a lack of life-history details and short-term investigations that cannot account for precision or repeatability of sex ratios across time. We conducted a novel comparative study of sex ratios in nestling Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperii) in two study populations across breeding generations during 11 years in Wisconsin, 2001-2011. One breeding population recently colonized metropolitan Milwaukee and exhibited rapidly increasing population growth, while the ex-Milwaukee breeding population was stable. Following life-history trade-off theory and our prediction regarding this socially monogamous species in which reversed sexual size dimorphism is extreme, first-time breeding one-year-old, second-year females in both study populations produced a preponderance of the smaller and cheaper sex, males, whereas ASY (after-second-year), ≥2-year-old females in Milwaukee produced a nestling sex ratio near unity and predictably therefore a greater proportion of females compared to ASY females in ex-Milwaukee who produced a preponderance of males. Adjustment of sex ratios in both study populations occurred at conception. Life histories and selective pressures related to breeding population trajectory in two age cohorts of nesting female Cooper's hawk likely vary, and it is possible that these differences influenced the sex ratios we documented for

  7. Precision and reliability of pulp/tooth area ratio (RA) of second molar as indicator of adult age.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Ferrante, Luigi; Cingolani, Mariano

    2004-11-01

    This paper discusses a method for assessing adult age based on the relationship between age and measurement of the pulp/tooth area ratio (RA) of the second molar teeth. The sample consisted of 312 Italian white Caucasian patients (135 men, 177 women) aged between 14 and 24 years. Orthopantomograph samples (OPGs) were analyzed by the same observer and calibrated by kappa statistics. Probabilities of an individual being older than 18 years of age (adult age) were derived using measurements of the ratio pulp/tooth area (RA) of the second molar teeth and the dichotomized stages of third molar development (Tm) as explanatory variables. These results were exploited to establish a threshold value to assign an individual to juvenile or adult age. A cut-off value of RA* = 0.088 was applied if Tm = 0 and RA* = 0.097 if Tm = 1. The sensitivity of this test was 91% and its specificity 94.5%. The proportion of individuals with correct classifications was 92%.

  8. The second to fourth digit ratio and age at first marriage in semi-nomadic people from Namibia.

    PubMed

    Sorokowski, Piotr; Sorokowska, Agnieszka; Danel, Dariusz; Mberira, Mara L; Pokrywka, Leszek

    2012-06-01

    The second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) is used as a potential marker for prenatal androgen exposure. It is associated with many behavioral and biological variables, including fertility and sexual behavior. However, direct association between 2D:4D and reproductive success--in populations where no contraceptives are used--has not been investigated. Here, we present a study conducted among the semi-nomad Himba population living in northern Namibia. 2D:4D ratios were calculated for a sample of this population (N=99; 60 women, 39 men), and the results were correlated with age, marital status, age at first marriage, number of children, and number of marriages. As found in the majority of previous studies, males had lower 2D:4D ratios than females. The 2D:4D ratio did not correlate with number of children. Females and males with a more masculine 2D:4D were married earlier and were more likely to have a husband or wife. We suggest that mating preferences for females with masculine 2D:4D are related to masculinity of phenotypic and personality traits of such women, which are beneficial in harsh environmental conditions and/or higher facial masculinity, which influences the perceived age of an individual. At the same time, masculine (physically strong, dominant, and hardworking) males might gather resources necessary to marry their first wife earlier.

  9. Charge-to-mass-ratio-dependent ion heating during magnetic reconnection in the MST RFP

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Almagri, A. F.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Terry, P. W.; Craig, D.

    2013-05-15

    Temperature evolution during magnetic reconnection has been spectroscopically measured for various ion species in a toroidal magnetized plasma. Measurements are made predominantly in the direction parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field. It is found that the increase in parallel ion temperature during magnetic reconnection events increases with the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion species. This trend can be understood if the heating mechanism is anisotropic, favoring heating in the perpendicular degree of freedom, with collisional relaxation of multiple ion species. The charge-to-mass ratio trend for the parallel temperature derives from collisional isotropization. This result emphasizes that collisional isotropization and energy transfer must be carefully modeled when analyzing ion heating measurements and comparing to theoretical predictions.

  10. Energy dependence of the P(bar)/P ratio in cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, R. L.; Mauger, B. G.; Nunn, S.; Horan, S.

    1984-01-01

    The antiproton/proton /P(bar)/P/ratio is presented for seven kinetic energy intervals from 4.4 - 13.4 GeV. The P(bar) were observed in 1979 by the New Mexico State University balloon-borne magnet spectrometer. The observations are compared to various models including secondary production in a leaky box. A decline in the P(bar)/P ratio at low energies is expected if the P(bar) are produced as secondaries. The data are consistent with such a decline but the P(bar)/P ratio is much higher than expected. The confidence level is less than 0.0001 for a model based on a leaky box with a mean-matter-traversed lambda of 7 gm/sq cm. The best leaky-box-model fit obtained by varying lambda gives a confidence level of 0.12 for lambda l= 21 + or - 3 gm/sq c. Results are also presented for fits based on the closed-galaxy and other models.

  11. The face-time continuum: lifespan changes in facial width-to-height ratio impact aging-associated perceptions.

    PubMed

    Hehman, Eric; Leitner, Jordan B; Freeman, Jonathan B

    2014-12-01

    Aging influences how a person is perceived on multiple dimensions (e.g., physical power). Here we examined how facial structure informs these evolving social perceptions. Recent work examining young adults' faces has revealed the impact of the facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) on perceived traits, such that individuals with taller, thinner faces are perceived to be less aggressive, less physically powerful, and friendlier. These perceptions are similar to those stereotypically associated with older adults. Examining whether fWHR might contribute to these changing perceptions over the life span, we found that age provides a shifting context through which fWHR differentially impacts aging-related social perceptions (Study 1). In addition, archival analyses (Study 2) established that fWHR decreases across age, and a subsequent study found that fWHR mediated the relationship between target age and multiple aging-related perceptions (Study 3). The findings provide evidence that fWHR decreases across age and influences stereotypical perceptions that change with age. PMID:25278108

  12. Investigation of K X-ray intensity ratios of some 4d transition metals depending on the temperature.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Yüksel; Kavaz, Esra; Ahmadi, Nader; Ertuğrul, Mehmet; Ekinci, Neslihan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we have studied the intensity ratios Kβ/Kα depending on the temperature for transition elements Mo, Nb, Zr and Y by 59.5keV γ-rays from a 100 mCi (241)Am radioisotope point source. The Kα and Kβ emission spectra of Mo, Nb, Zr and Y were measured by using a Si (Li) solid-state detector at temperature between 40 and 400°C. σKα and σKβ production cross-sections, Kβ/Kα intensity ratios, asymmetry factor, energy shifts and full width half maximum (FWHM) values of the elements have been calculated. Temperature-dependent changes of the parameters are tabulated and given in the graphical forms. Based on the results obtained, Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of the elements are dependent on the temperature. It is shown that σKβ fluorescence cross sections of Mo, Nb and Zr have more increase rate than σKα fluorescence cross sections with increasing temperature. For Y, σKα and σKβ production cross-sections firstly decrease, then increase. In general, Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios tend to increase with increasing temperature. Some significant shifts are observed in Kα and Kβ emission spectra of Mo and Y. These results may contribute to the XRF studies of transition metals. PMID:27380197

  13. Associations of age with serum insulin, proinsulin and the proinsulin-to-insulin ratio: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin responses and insulin levels seem to decline with age. However, the question of beta cell impairment attributable to ageing has been sparsely addressed in population-based studies. Non-fasting insulin levels are determined by the ambient degree of insulin resistance together with the capacity of beta cells to compensate by insulin secretion to prevent hyperglycaemia. A raised proinsulin-to-insulin ratio (proinsulin/insulin) due to impaired processing of proinsulin is an early marker of beta cell dysfunction. We hypothesised that in a general population, signs of beta cell failure with advancing age manifest not only by decreases in random insulin, but also with a corresponding increase in its precursor proinsulin. Methods In the Tromsø Study 1994-95 we measured insulin and proinsulin concentrations in random blood samples from 6212 persons without self-reported diabetes mellitus and plotted the levels as percentiles according to age. In regression analyses we assessed the relationships between age and insulin, proinsulin, and proinsulin/insulin, while adjusting for the concomitant measurements of glucose and other metabolic variables, and the time since the last meal. Results Median insulin concentrations declined significantly with advancing age group in men, but not in women. Proinsulin levels and proinsulin/insulin increased across age groups in both genders. After adjustment, greater age was associated with lower log10(insulin) and higher log10(proinsulin) and log10(proinsulin/insulin) (p = 0.0001 for all). Conclusions Negative associations of age with random insulin levels, together with positive associations of age with proinsulin and proinsulin/insulin, point towards a loss of beta cell function inherent in the ageing process. PMID:21162746

  14. Increased age of transformed mouse neural progenitor/stem cells recapitulates age-dependent clinical features of human glioma malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Mikheev, Andrei M.; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Stoll, Elizabeth A.; Mikheeva, Svetlana A.; Beyer, Richard P.; Plotnik, David A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Silber, John R.; Born, Donald E.; Kosai, Yoshito; Horner, Philip J.; Rostomily, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing age is the most robust predictor of greater malignancy and treatment resistance in human gliomas. However, the adverse association of clinical course with aging is rarely considered in animal glioma models, impeding delineation of the relative importance of organismal versus progenitor cell aging in the genesis of glioma malignancy. To address this limitation, we implanted transformed neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), the presumed cells of glioma origin, from 3 and 18month old mice into 3 and 20-month host animals. Transplantation with progenitors from older animals resulted in significantly shorter (p ≤ 0.0001) median survival in both 3month (37.5 vs 83 days) and 20-month (38 vs 67 days) hosts, indicating that age-dependent changes intrinsic to NSPCs rather than host animal age accounted for greater malignancy. Subsequent analyses revealed that increased invasiveness, genomic instability, resistance to therapeutic agents and tolerance to hypoxic stress accompanied aging in transformed NSPCs. Greater tolerance to hypoxia in older progenitor cells, as evidenced by elevated HIF-1 promoter reporter activity and hypoxia response gene (HRG) expression, mirror the upregulation of HRGs in cohorts of older vs younger glioma patients revealed by analysis of gene expression databases, suggesting that differential response to hypoxic stress may underlie age-dependent differences in invasion, genomic instability and treatment resistance. Our study provides strong evidence that progenitor cell aging is responsible for promoting the hallmarks of age-dependent glioma malignancy and that consideration of progenitor aging will facilitate development of physiologically and clinically relevant animal models of human gliomas. PMID:22958206

  15. The relationship between paternal age, sex ratios, and aneuploidy frequencies in human sperm, as assessed by multicolor FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.; Spriggs, E. |; Ko, E.

    1995-12-01

    We studied the frequencies of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm, diploidy and disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, X, and Y in sperm from 10 normal men aged 21 - 52 years, to determine whether there was any relationship between donor age and any of these variables. Multicolor FISH was used to control for lack of probe hybridization and to distinguish diploid sperm from disomic sperm. A minimum of 10,000 sperm per donor was evaluated for each chromosome, for a total of 225,846 sperm studied. Sperm were considered disomic if two fluorescent signals were separated by a minimal distance of one signal domain. The mean frequencies of X- and Y-bearing sperm were 50.1% and 49.0%, respectively; not significantly different from 50%. There was no correlation between paternal age and {open_quotes}sex ratio {close_quotes} in sperm. Similarly, there was no association between the frequency of diploid sperm (mean, .16%; range, .06%-.42%) and donor age. For disomy frequencies, there was no relationship between donor age and disomy 12 (mean, .16%; range, .10%-.25%), XX (mean, .07%; range, .03%-.17%), and XY sperm (mean, .16%; range, .08%-.24%). There was a significant increase in the frequency of YY sperm (P = .04; mean, .18%; range, .10%-.43%) and disomy 1 sperm (P = .01; mean, .11%; range, .05%-.18%) with donor age. In summary, our results do not support a correlation between paternal age and sex ratio or diploidy. A relationship between paternal age and disomy was observed for disomy 1 and YY sperm but not for disomy 12, XX or XY sperm. 37 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Energy dependence of pion in-medium effects on the π-/π+ ratio in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Ma, Yu-Gang

    2013-06-01

    Within the framework of a thermal model with its parameters fitted to the results from an isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model, we have studied the pion in-medium effect on the charged-pion ratio in heavy-ion collisions at various energies. We find that due to the cancellation between the effects from pion-nucleon s-wave and p-wave interactions in nuclear medium, the π-/π+ ratio generally decreases after including the pion in-medium effect. The effect is larger at lower collision energies as a result of narrower pion spectral functions at lower temperatures.

  17. The age of illite cement growth, Village Fields area, Southern North Sea: Evidence from K-Ar ages and [sup 18]O/[sup 16]O ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A.G.; Coleman, M.L.; Gluyas, J.G. )

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we describe K-Ar radiometric ages and oxygen isotope ratio measurements of illite cements from eolian sandstone samples of the Permian lower Leman Sandstone Formation (Rotliegen-des Group). The samples come from a large (about 100 [times] 100 km) part of the Southern North Sea basin (Village Fields area) and from a range of burial depths (2.8-3.4 km subsea bed). Mean illite ages in the gas fields of Ravenspuran North (164 Ma [+-] 20.1 [2[sigma

  18. Effects of noise suppression on intelligibility: dependency on signal-to-noise ratios.

    PubMed

    Hilkhuysen, Gaston; Gaubitch, Nikolay; Brookes, Mike; Huckvale, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The effects on speech intelligibility of three different noise reduction algorithms (spectral subtraction, minimal mean squared error spectral estimation, and subspace analysis) were evaluated in two types of noise (car and babble) over a 12 dB range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Results from these listening experiments showed that most algorithms deteriorated intelligibility scores. Modeling of the results with a logit-shaped psychometric function showed that the degradation in intelligibility scores was largely congruent with a constant shift in SNR, although some additional degradation was observed at two SNRs, suggesting a limited interaction between the effects of noise suppression and SNR.

  19. Finding Uncertainties that Cause the Age Dependence of Dose Limits to Be Immature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation permissible exposure limits (PEL) are intended to set acceptable levels of cancer risks, and avoid any clinical significant non-cancer effects. The 1989 recommendation of the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) recommended a strong age dependence of dose limits that departed drastically from the then mature 1970 dose limits recommendations from the National Academy of Science, which were independent of age. In 2000, the NCRP recommended revised limits that showed a similar trend of risk with age to the 1989 report. In this model, the cancer risk per Sv varies by more than 2-fold for ages between 30- and 50-yr. Therefore for galactic cosmic rays exposure, astronaut age has a larger influence on risk then radiation shielding mass or material composition, vehicle propulsion method, or position in the solar cycle. For considering the control of mission costs and resources, the possibility of using astronaut age as a trade variable in mission design could be considered. However, the uncertainties in describing the age dependence on risk have not been fully explored. We discuss biological factors that influence the age dependence of radiation risks, including susceptibility, expression and latency, and radiation quality. These factors depend not only on the individual s age, but also their genetic sensitivity and interaction with other environmental factors. Epidemiological data is limited in describing the age dependence on risk. The 2005, BEIR VII report recommends an age dependence for cancer risk attributable solely to the life-table disagreeing strongly with the NCRP model. However, BEIR VII also noted the limited power of human data for concomitantly describing both age and age after exposure dependences of cancer risks. Many experimental studies have shown that high LET radiation (e.g., high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei and neutrons) display reduced latency compared to low LET radiation, suggesting distinct biological

  20. Age estimation by pulp/tooth ratio in lateral and central incisors by peri-apical X-ray.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, R; Cunha, E; Wasterlain, S N; De Luca, S; Sassaroli, E; Pagliara, F; Nuzzolese, E; Cingolani, M; Ferrante, L

    2013-07-01

    Since 2004, several papers on the analysis of the apposition of secondary dentine have been published. The aim of this paper was to study a sample of peri-apical X-ray images of upper and lower incisors, both lateral and medial, to examine the application of pulp/tooth area ratio as an indicator of age. A sample of 116 individuals, 62 men and 54 women, aged between 18 and 74 years, was studied. Data were fitted with age as a linear function of the pulp/tooth ratio of incisors. The total variance explained by the regression equation ranged from 51.3% of age, when lower lateral incisors were used as explanatory variable, to 81.6% when upper lateral incisors were used. The accuracy of the corresponding regression model yielded ME = 8.44 and 5.34 years, respectively. These results show that, although incisors are less reliable than canines or lower premolars, they can be used to estimate age-at-death when the latter are absent.

  1. Age dependence of the concentrations of harmful substances in Baltic herring (Clupea harengus)

    SciTech Connect

    Perttila, M.; Tervo, V.; Parmanne, R.

    1982-01-01

    The age dependence of Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, Hg, CH/sub 3/-Hg, DDT, DDD, DDE, HCH, HCB and the PCBs have been studied in Baltic herring of 1 to 6 years of age. Lead, cadmium, mercury and the organochlorine concentrations increase significantly with age. In the case of the DDTs and the PCBs, the variations can be attributed almost totally to the combined effect of age and variations in the lipid percentage.

  2. Role of acid sphingomyelinase in the age-dependent dysregulation of sphingolipids turnover in the tissues of rats.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Nataliya A; Garkavenko, Vladimir V; Storozhenko, Galina V; Timofiychuk, Olga A

    2016-04-01

    Old age-associated pathologies usually coincide with altered sphingolipid metabolism. In the present article, the role of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) in the age-dependent changes of sphingomyelin (SM) and ceramide contents in the tissues has been investigated by means of ASMase inhibitors, imipramine and zoledronic acid. It has been determined that ceramide content and ceramide/SM ratio increased, while SM level decreased in the heart, liver, blood serum and skeletal muscles of 24-month old rats in contrast to 3-month old animals. Injections of imipramine or zoledronic acid to 24-month old rats resulted in significant downregulation of ASMase in the liver and skeletal and heart muscles. The both inhibitors decreased the ceramide content and ceramide/SM ratio and increased the SM content in all tissues studied, except the heart, of old rats to the levels close to those observed in the young animals. Long-term treatment of rats by inhibitors, which have different mechanisms of action on ASMase, exerts the similar, but not equal effects on enzyme activity and SM turnover. In summary, the data above strongly suggest that the age-dependent up-regulation of ASMase plays an important role in the modulation of ceramide and SM contents in rat tissues and that imipramine and zoledronic acid are useful tools for SM turnover manipulation at old age. PMID:26830134

  3. Vortices behavior depending on the aspect ratio of an insect-like flapping wing in hover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jong-Seob; Chang, Jo Won; Cho, Hwan-Kee

    2015-09-01

    Force measurements and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) were carried out to reveal the effects of the aspect ratio (AR) of an insect-like flapping wing. A total of seven aspect ratios around that of an insect wing including 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 were taken into account for the same hovering configurations. Time-course forces showed that both lift and drag in the translational phase were maximized in the case of AR = 3, which is the closest ratio to that of a living insect. The chordwise cross-sectional DPIV conclusively showed that the leading-edge vortex (LEV) on the wing of AR = 1.5 remained nearly unchanged in all cross sections. In other AR cases, however, the trailing-edge vortices (TEV) were clearly found with LEVs that lifted off the wing surfaces at the outboard cross sections. In each of these cases, the TEV interrupted the downwash, and the overall flows behind the wing became wakes similar to those found over a blunt body. The near-wake flow structures revealed that the tip vortex gradually entered the inner area from the wing tip as the AR increased. Circulations and downwash distributions showed a stretched LEV and asymmetrically developed tip and root vortices as the AR moved away from AR = 3. These results do not only indicate that the AR effects of a flapping wing are characteristics that are definitely distinctive from those of a typical aircraft, but also briefly imply that maintaining an LEV attachment by employing strong rotational accelerations is not the highest priority when attempting to achieve lift enhancements. Among the tested cases, the wing of AR = 3 had a balanced downwash flux as well as the best aerodynamic performance characteristics, including the maximum lift, reasonable efficiency, and a moderate pitching moment. This indirectly explains why the wings of living flyers adept at hovering have this AR, and it also suggests the appropriate AR for a flapping-type micro-air vehicle.

  4. Age at sexual maturity, sex ratio, fecundity, and longevity of isolated headwater populations of Westslope cutthroat trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downs, Christopher C.; White, R.G.; Shepard, B.B.

    1997-01-01

    We sampled 19 isolated headwater populations of westslope cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi in Montana to provide estimates of fecundity, longevity, sex ratio, and age at sexual maturity. Fecundity was estimated for 31 fish collected from two streams in the upper Missouri River drainage. Females smaller than 149 mm fork length (FL) were generally immature and their fecundities could not be estimated. Mean fecundities (SD) were 227 eggs (41.1) for 150-174-mm fish, 346 eggs (85.6) for 175-199-mm fish, and 459 eggs (150.8) for 200-mm and larger fish. A linear regression model (two stream samples combined) to predict fecundity (E) from fork length was developed (E = -494.9 + 4.4.FL: r2 = 0.51, P < 0.001) for westslope cutthroat trout in the upper Missouri River drainage. Regression slopes of fecundity against fish length differed significantly (P < 0.01) between these and some of the previously studied populations. Steeper slopes were associated with lacustrine-adfluvial populations. The average sex ratio was 1.3 males per female across all sampled streams. Males began to mature sexually at age 2 and all were mature by age 4. Some females (27%) were sexually mature at age 3 and most of them (93%) were mature by age 5. Length was a better predictor of sexual maturity than age. Males matured at 110-160 mm and females at 150-180 mm FL. The maximum estimated age was 8 years based on otoliths from 475 fish collected from our 19 study streams and 14 additional streams.

  5. Age estimation by pulp/tooth ratio in canines by mesial and vestibular peri-apical X-rays.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Ferrante, Luigi; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Bonfiglioli, Benedetta; Rastelli, Elisa; Cingolani, Mariano

    2007-09-01

    Changes in the size of the pulp canal, caused by apposition of secondary dentine, are the best morphometric parameters for estimating age by X-rays. The apposition of secondary dentine is the most frequently used method for age estimation in adult subjects. In two previous papers, we studied the application of the pulp/tooth area ratio by peri-apical X-rays as an indicator of age at death. The aim of the present study was to test the accuracy of age evaluation by combined analysis of labio-lingual and mesial peri-apical X-rays of lower and upper canines. A total of 200 such X-rays were assembled from 57 male and 43 female skeletons of Caucasian origin, aged between 20 and 79 years. For each skeleton, dental maturity was evaluated by measuring the pulp/tooth area ratio according to labio-lingual and mesial X-rays on upper (x(1), x(2)) and lower (x(3), x(4)) canines. Very good agreement was found between intra-observer measurements. Statistical analysis showed that all variables x(1), x(2), x(3), and x(4) and the first-order interaction between x(1) and x(3) contributed significantly to the fit, so that they were included in the regression model, yielding the following regression formula: Age = 120.737 - 337.112x(1) - 79.709x(2) - 364.534x(3) - 65.655x(4) + 1531.918x(1)x(3) . The residual standard error of estimated ages was 3.62 years, with 94 degrees of freedom, and the median of the residuals was -0.155 years, with an interquartile range of 4.96 years. The accuracy of the method was ME = 2.8 years, where ME is the mean prediction error. The model also explained 94% of total variance (R(2) = 0.94).

  6. Nonparametric inference for time-dependent incremental cost-effectiveness ratios.

    PubMed

    Yee, Laura M; Gary Chan, Kwun Chuen

    2015-12-30

    As the costs of medical care increase, more studies are evaluating cost in addition to effectiveness of treatments. Cost-effectiveness analyses in randomized clinical trials have typically been conducted only at the end of follow-up. However, cost-effectiveness may change over time. We therefore propose a nonparametric estimator to assess the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio over time. We also derive the asymptotic variance of our estimator and present formulation of Fieller-based simultaneous confidence bands. Simulation studies demonstrate the performance of our point estimators, variance estimators, and confidence bands. We also illustrate our methods using data from a randomized clinical trial, the second Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial. This trial studied the effects of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators on patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmia. Results show that our estimator performs well in large samples, indicating promising future directions in the field of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Dependence of Strehl ratio on f-number of optical system.

    PubMed

    Miks, Antonin; Novak, Jiri; Novak, Pavel

    2012-06-10

    Formulas for a minimum of wave aberration variance and a maximum of the Strehl ratio in the optimal image point are derived using the third- and fifth-order aberration theory. Moreover, relations for the calculation of the optimal value of f-number of the optical system were derived, which enabled us to theoretically analyze real optical systems and their image quality. The optimal f-number corresponds to such a value of f-number when the image quality of a real optical system is comparable to an aberration-free optical system. This value may also serve as an auxiliary criterion of the image quality of the optical system, for example, in photography.

  8. Distributions of Competing Container Mosquitoes Depend on Detritus Types, Nutrient Ratios, and Food Availability

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Ebony G.; Damal, Kavitha; Lounibos, L. P.; Juliano, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Coexistence of competitors may result if resources are sufficiently abundant to render competition unimportant, or if species differ in resource requirements. Detritus type has been shown to affect interspecific competitive outcomes between Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Aedes aegypti (L.) larvae under controlled conditions. We assessed the relationships among spatial distributions of detritus types, nutrients, and aquatic larvae of these species in nature. We collected mosquitoes, water, and detritus from artificial containers across 24 Florida cemeteries that varied in relative abundances of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus.We measured nutrient content of fine particulate organic matter in water samples as total N, P, and C and ratios of these nutrients. We quantified food availability via a bioassay, raising individual Aedes larvae in the laboratory in standard volumes of field-collected, particulate-containing water from each cemetery. Quantities of detritus types collected in standard containers were significant predictors of nutrients and nutrient ratios. Nutrient abundances were significant predictors of relative abundance of Ae. aegypti, and of larval survival and development by both species in the bioassay. Survival and development of larvae reared in particulate-containing water from sites decreased with decreasing relative abundance of Ae. aegypti. These data suggest that N, P, and C availabilities are determined by detritus inputs to containers and that these nutrients in turn determine the feeding environment encountered by larvae, the intensity of interspecific competition among larvae, and subsequent relative abundances of species at sites. Detritus inputs, nutrients, and food availability thus seem to contribute to distributions of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus in cemetery containers throughout Florida. PMID:22707761

  9. Transverse velocity dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio as a signature of the QCD critical point.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, M; Bass, S A; Müller, B; Nonaka, C

    2008-09-19

    The presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram can deform the trajectories describing the evolution of the expanding fireball in the mu_B-T phase diagram. If the average emission time of hadrons is a function of transverse velocity, as microscopic simulations of the hadronic freeze-out dynamics suggest, the deformation of the hydrodynamic trajectories will change the transverse velocity (beta_T) dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio when the fireball passes in the vicinity of the critical point. An unusual beta_T dependence of the [over]p/p ratio in a narrow beam energy window would thus signal the presence of the critical point.

  10. Transverse Velocity Dependence of the Proton-Antiproton Ratio as a Signature of the QCD Critical Point

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, M.; Bass, S. A.; Mueller, B.; Nonaka, C.

    2008-09-19

    The presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram can deform the trajectories describing the evolution of the expanding fireball in the {mu}{sub B}-T phase diagram. If the average emission time of hadrons is a function of transverse velocity, as microscopic simulations of the hadronic freeze-out dynamics suggest, the deformation of the hydrodynamic trajectories will change the transverse velocity ({beta}{sub T}) dependence of the proton-antiproton ratio when the fireball passes in the vicinity of the critical point. An unusual {beta}{sub T} dependence of the p/p ratio in a narrow beam energy window would thus signal the presence of the critical point.

  11. Increased Waist-to-height Ratio May Contribute to Age-related Increase in Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Masoumeh; Kamali, Majid; Dastsouz, Farideh; Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Amanat, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) increases with age. The objective was to determine whether lifestyle and dietary behaviors and anthropometric measures, which are affected by these behaviors, contribute to the increase of CVD risk factors across age categories of 20–50-year-old. Methods: In a cross-sectional design, 437 adults aged 20–50-year-old were selected from households living in Shiraz. Risk factors of CVD, including body mass index (BMI), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), blood pressure, fasting blood glucose (FBG), serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C, respectively) as well as lifestyle behaviors (physical activity and smoking), dietary habits, and food intakes were assessed across the age categories of 20–29, 30–39, and 40–50 years. Linear regression was used to examine the contribution of different variables to the age-related increase of CVD risk factors. Results: All CVD risk factors, except for HDL-C, significantly increased across age categories. Older subjects had healthier dietary habits and food intakes, but they possessed nonsignificantly lower physical activity and higher smoking rate compared to younger adults. Adjusting for physical activity, smoking, and BMI did not change the significant positive association between age and CVD risk factors but adjusting for WHtR disappeared associations for blood pressure, triglycerides, and metabolic syndrome although significant associations remained for FBG and total and LDL-C. Conclusions: Age-related increase of CVD risk factors occurred independent of lifestyle habits. WHtR, but not BMI, may partially contribute to the age-related increase in CVD risk factors. PMID:27195100

  12. Age dependence of glucose tolerance in adult KK-Ay mice, a model of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Goutam; Thumpayil, Sherin; Lafontant, David-Erick; Woubneh, Wolde; Toney, Jeffrey H

    2009-11-01

    Yellow KK mice carrying the 'yellow obese' gene Ay are a well established polygenic model for human non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. These animals develop marked adiposity and decreased glucose tolerance relative to their control littermates, KK mice. The authors monitored glucose tolerance in KK-Ay mice over time and observed a significant (Page-dependent improvement (13.3% by 175 d of age and 36.4% by 212 d of age, relative to 85 d of age). During the same time period, body weight and food and water consumption were relatively constant. The authors also measured plasma levels of endocrine hormones that are important in diabetes. Levels of insulin were approximately 8 times higher and levels of amylin 3 times higher in 220-d-old KK-Ay mice than in 180-d-old mice, whereas levels of glucagon-like peptide 1, glucagon and leptin remained relatively constant. These findings suggest that KK-Ay mice undergo an age-dependent improvement of glucose tolerance when maintained on a normal diet for 25 weeks or longer, due in part to increases in plasma levels of insulin and amylin.

  13. The dissimilar costs of love and war: age-specific mortality as a function of the operational sex ratio.

    PubMed

    Adler, M I; Bonduriansky, R

    2011-06-01

    Lifespan and ageing are strongly affected by many environmental factors, but the effects of social environment on these life-history traits are not well understood. We examined effects of social interaction on age-specific mortality rate in the sexually dimorphic neriid fly Telostylinus angusticollis. We found that although interaction with other individuals reduced longevity of both sexes, the costs associated with variation in operational sex ratio were sex specific: males' early-life mortality rate increased, and lifespan decreased, with increasing male bias in the sex ratio, whereas surprisingly, the presence of males had no effect on early-life mortality or lifespan of females. Intriguingly, early-life (immediate) mortality costs did not covary with late-life (latent) costs. Rather, both sexes aged most rapidly in a social environment dominated by the opposite sex. Our findings suggest that distinct reproductive activities, such as mating and fighting, impose different age-specific patterns of mortality, and that such costs are strongly sex specific.

  14. Bacteria-to-Archaea ratio depending on soil depth and agrogenic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Manucharova, Natalia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Archaeal communities and their potential roles in the soil ecosystem are affected by a number of soil proprerties and environmental factors. Competitive interactions between Archaea and Bacteria play a particular role in spread and abundance of these two domains. Therefore, the goal of the study was to evaluate the Bacteria-to-Archaea ratio in different soils. The research was carried out at field and natural ecosystems of European part of Russia. Samples were collected within the soil profiles (3-6 horizons) of chernozem and kastanozem with distinctly different agrogenic impact. In situ hybridization with fluorescently labeled rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes (FISH) was used to determine the abundance of metabolically active cells of Archaea and Bacteria. The Cmic, Corg, C/N, DNA content and growth characteristics have been analyzed as well. Determination of number of metabolically active cells in chernozem under arable land and forest revealed that abundance of Archaea in topsoil under forest was higher more than 2 times comparing with arable land, but leveled off in the deeper horizons. Plowing of Chernozem decreased amount of archaeal and bacterial active cells simultaneously, however, Bacteria were more resistant to agrogenic impact than Archaea. Determination of the taxonomic composition within Bacteria domain showed a significant decrease in the abundance of phylogenetic groups Firmicutes and Actinobacteria in the topsoil under arable land comparing to the forest, which is the main reason for the declining of the total amount of prokaryotic cells. In kastanozem significant change in the number of metabolically active cells due to plowing was detected only within 40 cm soil layer, and this effect disappeared in lower horizons. The number of Archaea was higher in the upper horizons of arable as compared to virgin soil. Conversely, the number of Bacteria in the upper layers of the soil after plowing kastanozem decreased. Relationship between soil organic

  15. Ion Bernstein instability dependence on the proton-to-electron mass ratio: Linear dispersion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyungguk; Liu, Kaijun

    2016-07-01

    Fast magnetosonic waves, which have as their source ion Bernstein instabilities driven by tenuous ring-like proton velocity distributions, are frequently observed in the inner magnetosphere. One major difficulty in the simulation of these waves is that they are excited in a wide frequency range with discrete harmonic nature and require time-consuming computations. To overcome this difficulty, recent simulation studies assumed a reduced proton-to-electron mass ratio, mp/me, and a reduced light-to-Alfvén speed ratio, c/vA, to reduce the number of unstable modes and, therefore, computational costs. Although these studies argued that the physics of wave-particle interactions would essentially remain the same, detailed investigation of the effect of this reduced system on the excited waves has not been done. In this study, we investigate how the complex frequency, ω = ωr+iγ, of the ion Bernstein modes varies with mp/me for a sufficiently large c/vA (such that ωpe2/Ωe2≡(me/mp)(c/vA)2≫1) using linear dispersion theory assuming two different types of energetic proton velocity distributions, namely, ring and shell. The results show that low- and high-frequency harmonic modes respond differently to the change of mp/me. For the low harmonic modes (i.e., ωr˜Ωp), both ωr/Ωp and γ/Ωp are roughly independent of mp/me, where Ωp is the proton cyclotron frequency. For the high harmonic modes (i.e., Ωp≪ωr≲ωlh, where ωlh is the lower hybrid frequency), γ/ωlh (at fixed ωr/ωlh) stays independent of mp/me when the parallel wave number, k∥, is sufficiently large and becomes inversely proportional to (mp/me)1/4 when k∥ goes to zero. On the other hand, the frequency range of the unstable modes normalized to ωlh remains independent of mp/me, regardless of k∥.

  16. Precision Medicine for Tobacco Dependence: Development and Validation of the Nicotine Metabolite Ratio.

    PubMed

    Allenby, Cheyenne E; Boylan, Kelly A; Lerman, Caryn; Falcone, Mary

    2016-09-01

    Quitting smoking significantly reduces the risk of tobacco-related morbidity and mortality, yet there is a high rate of relapse amongst smokers who try to quit. Phenotypic biomarkers have the potential to improve smoking cessation outcomes by identifying the best available treatment for an individual smoker. In this review, we introduce the nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) as a reliable and stable phenotypic measure of nicotine metabolism that can guide smoking cessation treatment among smokers who wish to quit. We address how the NMR accounts for sources of variation in nicotine metabolism including genotype and other biological and environmental factors such as estrogen levels, alcohol use, body mass index, or menthol exposure. Then, we highlight clinical trials that validate the NMR as a biomarker to predict therapeutic response to different pharmacotherapies for smoking cessation. Current evidence supports the use of nicotine replacement therapy for slow metabolizers, and non-nicotine treatments such as varenicline for normal metabolizers. Finally, we discuss future research directions to elucidate mechanisms underlying NMR associations with treatment response, and facilitate the implementation of the NMR as biomarker in clinical practice to guide smoking cessation. PMID:26872457

  17. Wide-area ratios of evapotranspiration to precipitation in monsoon-dependent semiarid vegetation communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glenn, Edward P.; Scott, Russell L.; Nguyen, Uyen; Nagler, Pamela L.

    2015-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) and the ratio of ET to precipitation (PPT) are important factors in the water budget of semiarid rangelands and are in part determined by the dominant plant communities. Our goal was to see if landscape changes such as tree or shrub encroachment and replacement of native grasses by invasive grasses impacted ET and ET/PPT and therefore watershed hydrology in this biome. We determined ET and ET/PPT for shrublands, grasslands and mesquite savannas in southern Arizona at five moisture flux towers and determined the environmental factors controlling ET in each plant community. We then scaled ET over areas of 4–36 km2, representing homogeneous patches of each plant community, using the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from MODIS sensors on the Terra satellite. Over wide areas, estimated ET/PPT projected from MODIS EVI ranged from 0.71 for a sparsely-vegetated shrub site to 1.00 for grasslands and mesquite savannas. The results did not support hypotheses that encroachment of mesquites into grasslands or that replacement of native grasses with introduced Eragrostis lehmanniana (lehmann lovegrass) have increased rangeland ET.

  18. TEMPO-mediated oxidation on galactomannan: Gal/Man ratio and chain flexibility dependence.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Caroline Novak; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Lucyszyn, Neoli; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2016-11-20

    Guar (GG) and locust bean (LBG) galactomannans (GMs) oxidation at C-6 was performed with catalyst TEMPO, in which the reaction progress was monitored by consume of NaOH solution. The products were characterized by spectroscopic analysis, infrared, and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance, confirming the presence of aldehydes groups as intermediate of reaction to carboxylic acid. From high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection Man/Gal molar ratio was determined and demonstrated a preference to oxidize Man during the reaction on both GMs, following a first order kinetics of oxidation. The comparative macromolecular behavior of native and oxidized GMs was obtained through the analysis by high performance size exclusion chromatography, and the persistence length (Lp) was 6nm and 4nm to native LBG and GG, respectively. A more accessible OH-6 at mannose residue in LBG could be related with a two times faster reaction than GG. The selective oxidation with catalyst TEMPO proved to be efficient to increase the flexibility of the GMs during oxidation. Short reaction time and β-elimination process were mainly observed to LBG, probably due to a more favorable oxidation access to the polysaccharide main chain. PMID:27561508

  19. The density ratio dependence of self-similar Rayleigh-Taylor mixing.

    PubMed

    Youngs, David L

    2013-11-28

    Previous research on self-similar mixing caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is summarized and a recent series of high resolution large eddy simulations is described. Mesh sizes of approximately 2000 ×1000 × 1000 are used to investigate the properties of high Reynolds number self-similar RT mixing at a range of density ratios from 1.5 : 1 to 20 : 1. In some cases, mixing evolves from 'small random perturbations'. In other cases, random long wavelength perturbations (k(-3) spectrum) are added to give self-similar mixing at an enhanced rate, more typical of that observed in experiments. The properties of the turbulent mixing zone (volume fraction distributions, turbulence kinetic energy, molecular mixing parameter, etc.) are related to the RT growth rate parameter, α. Comparisons are made with experimental data on the internal structure and the asymmetry of the mixing zone (spike distance/bubble distance). The main purpose of this series of simulations is to provide data for calibration of engineering models (e.g. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models). It is argued that the influence of initial conditions is likely to be significant in most applications and the implications of this for engineering modelling are discussed.

  20. TEMPO-mediated oxidation on galactomannan: Gal/Man ratio and chain flexibility dependence.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Caroline Novak; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Lucyszyn, Neoli; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2016-11-20

    Guar (GG) and locust bean (LBG) galactomannans (GMs) oxidation at C-6 was performed with catalyst TEMPO, in which the reaction progress was monitored by consume of NaOH solution. The products were characterized by spectroscopic analysis, infrared, and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance, confirming the presence of aldehydes groups as intermediate of reaction to carboxylic acid. From high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection Man/Gal molar ratio was determined and demonstrated a preference to oxidize Man during the reaction on both GMs, following a first order kinetics of oxidation. The comparative macromolecular behavior of native and oxidized GMs was obtained through the analysis by high performance size exclusion chromatography, and the persistence length (Lp) was 6nm and 4nm to native LBG and GG, respectively. A more accessible OH-6 at mannose residue in LBG could be related with a two times faster reaction than GG. The selective oxidation with catalyst TEMPO proved to be efficient to increase the flexibility of the GMs during oxidation. Short reaction time and β-elimination process were mainly observed to LBG, probably due to a more favorable oxidation access to the polysaccharide main chain.

  1. The significance of placental ratios in pregnancies complicated by small for gestational age, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Sun; Cho, Soo Hyun; Kwon, Han Sung; Sohn, In Sook

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the placental weight, volume, and density, and investigate the significance of placental ratios in pregnancies complicated by small for gestational age (SGA), preeclampsia (PE), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods Two hundred and fifty-four pregnant women were enrolled from August 2005 through July 2013. Participants were divided into four groups: control (n=82), SGA (n=37), PE (n=102), and GDM (n=33). The PE group was classified as PE without intrauterine growth restriction (n=65) and PE with intrauterine growth restriction (n=37). Birth weight, placental weight, placental volume, placental density, and placental ratios including birth weight/placental weight ratio (BPW) and birth weight/placental volume ratio (BPV) were compared between groups. Results Birth weight, placental weight, and placental volume were lower in the SGA group than in the control group. However, the BPW and BPV did not differ between the two groups. Birth weight, placental weight, placental volume, BPW, and BPV were all significantly lower in the PE group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, birth weight, BPW, and BPV were higher in the GDM group, whereas placental weight and volume did not differ in the two groups. Placental density was not significantly different among the four groups. Conclusion Placental ratios based on placental weight, placental volume, placental density, and birth weight are helpful in understanding the pathophysiology of complicated pregnancies. Moreover, they can be used as predictors of pregnancy complications. PMID:25264525

  2. The dependence of irradiation creep in austenitic alloys on displacement rate and helium to dpa ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1998-03-01

    Before the parametric dependencies of irradiation creep can be confidently determined, analysis of creep data requires that the various creep and non-creep strains be separated, as well as separating the transient, steady-state, and swelling-driven components of creep. When such separation is attained, it appears that the steady-state creep compliance, B{sub o}, is not a function of displacement rate, as has been previously assumed. It also appears that the formation and growth of helium bubbles under high helium generation conditions can lead to a significant enhancement of the irradiation creep coefficient. This is a transient influence that disappears as void swelling begins to dominate the total strain, but this transient can increase the apparent creep compliance by 100--200% at relatively low ({le}20) dpa levels.

  3. Polyphenols decreased liver NADPH oxidase activity, increased muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and decreased gastrocnemius age-dependent autophagy in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Caroline; Chabi, Beatrice; Fouret, Gilles; Py, Guillaume; Sairafi, Badie; Elong, Cecile; Gaillet, Sylvie; Cristol, Jean Paul; Coudray, Charles; Feillet-Coudray, Christine

    2012-09-01

    This study explored major systems of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and their consequences on oxidative stress, mitochondriogenesis and muscle metabolism in aged rats, and evaluated the efficiency of 30-day oral supplementation with a moderate dose of a red grape polyphenol extract (RGPE) on these parameters. In the liver of aged rats, NADPH oxidase activity was increased and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities were altered, while xanthine oxidase activity remained unchanged. In muscles, only mitochondrial activity was modified with aging. The oral intake of RGPE decreased liver NADPH oxidase activity in the aged rats without affecting global oxidative stress, suggesting that NADPH oxidase was probably not the dominant detrimental source of production of O(2)·(-) in the liver. Interestingly, RGPE supplementation increased mitochondrial biogenesis and improved antioxidant status in the gastrocnemius of aged rats, while it had no significant effect in soleus. RGPE supplementation also decreased age-dependent autophagy in gastrocnemius of aged rats. These results extended existing findings on the beneficial effects of RGPE on mitochondriogenesis and muscle metabolism in aged rats.

  4. Evidence for reduced experience-dependent dendritic spine plasticity in the aging prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bloss, Erik B.; Janssen, William G.; Ohm, Daniel T.; Yuk, Frank J.; Wadsworth, Shannon; Saardi, Karl M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Morrison, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive functions that require the prefrontal cortex are highly sensitive to aging in humans, non-human primates, and rodents, although the neurobiological correlates of this vulnerability remain largely unknown. It has been proposed that dendritic spines represent the primary site of structural plasticity in the adult brain, and recent data have supported the hypothesis that aging is associated with alterations of dendritic spine morphology and plasticity in prefrontal cortex. However, no study to date has directly examined whether aging alters the capacity for experience-dependent spine plasticity in aging prefrontal neurons. To address this possibility we used young, middle-aged, and aged rats in a behavioral stress paradigm known to produce spine remodeling in prefrontal cortical neurons. In young rats, stress resulted in dendritic spine loss and altered patterns of spine morphology; in contrast, spines from middle-aged and aged animals were remarkably stable and did not show evidence of remodeling. The loss of stress-induced spine plasticity observed in aging rats occurred alongside robust age-related reductions in spine density and shifts in remaining spine morphology. Taken together, the data presented here provide the first evidence that experience-dependent spine plasticity is altered by aging in prefrontal cortex, and support a model in which dendritic spines become progressively less plastic in the aging brain. PMID:21613496

  5. Predicting plasticity: acute context-dependent changes to vocal performance predict long-term age-dependent changes.

    PubMed

    James, Logan S; Sakata, Jon T

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the factors that predict and guide variation in behavioral change can lend insight into mechanisms of motor plasticity and individual differences in behavior. The performance of adult birdsong changes with age in a manner that is similar to rapid context-dependent changes to song. To reveal mechanisms of vocal plasticity, we analyzed the degree to which variation in the direction and magnitude of age-dependent changes to Bengalese finch song could be predicted by variation in context-dependent changes. Using a repeated-measures design, we found that variation in age-dependent changes to the timing, sequencing, and structure of vocal elements ("syllables") was significantly predicted by variation in context-dependent changes. In particular, the degree to which the duration of intersyllable gaps, syllable sequencing at branch points, and fundamental frequency of syllables within spontaneous [undirected (UD)] songs changed over time was correlated with the degree to which these features changed from UD song to female-directed (FD) song in young-adult finches (FDyoung). As such, the structure of some temporal features of UD songs converged over time onto the structure of FDyoung songs. This convergence suggested that the FDyoung song could serve as a stable target for vocal motor plasticity. Consequently, we analyzed the stability of FD song and found that the temporal structure of FD song changed significantly over time in a manner similar to UD song. Because FD song is considered a state of heightened performance, these data suggest that age-dependent changes could reflect practice-related improvements in vocal motor performance. PMID:26311186

  6. Predicting plasticity: acute context-dependent changes to vocal performance predict long-term age-dependent changes

    PubMed Central

    James, Logan S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors that predict and guide variation in behavioral change can lend insight into mechanisms of motor plasticity and individual differences in behavior. The performance of adult birdsong changes with age in a manner that is similar to rapid context-dependent changes to song. To reveal mechanisms of vocal plasticity, we analyzed the degree to which variation in the direction and magnitude of age-dependent changes to Bengalese finch song could be predicted by variation in context-dependent changes. Using a repeated-measures design, we found that variation in age-dependent changes to the timing, sequencing, and structure of vocal elements (“syllables”) was significantly predicted by variation in context-dependent changes. In particular, the degree to which the duration of intersyllable gaps, syllable sequencing at branch points, and fundamental frequency of syllables within spontaneous [undirected (UD)] songs changed over time was correlated with the degree to which these features changed from UD song to female-directed (FD) song in young-adult finches (FDyoung). As such, the structure of some temporal features of UD songs converged over time onto the structure of FDyoung songs. This convergence suggested that the FDyoung song could serve as a stable target for vocal motor plasticity. Consequently, we analyzed the stability of FD song and found that the temporal structure of FD song changed significantly over time in a manner similar to UD song. Because FD song is considered a state of heightened performance, these data suggest that age-dependent changes could reflect practice-related improvements in vocal motor performance. PMID:26311186

  7. Growth and haematological response of indigenous Venda chickens aged 8 to 13 weeks to varying dietary lysine to energy ratios.

    PubMed

    Alabi, O J; Ng'ambi, J W; Mbajiorgu, E F; Norris, D; Mabelebele, M

    2015-06-01

    The effect of feeding varying dietary lysine to energy levels on growth and haematological values of indigenous Venda chickens aged 8 - 13 weeks was evaluated. Four hundred and twenty Venda chickens (BW 362 ± 10 g) were allocated to four dietary treatments in a completely randomized design. Each treatment was replicated seven times, and each replicate had fifteen chickens. Four maize-soya beans-based diets were formulated. Each diet had similar CP (150 g/kg DM) and lysine (8 g lysine/kg DM) but varying energy levels (11, 12, 13 and 14 MJ ME/kg DM). The birds were reared in a deep litter house; feed and water were provided ad libitum. Data on growth and haematological values were collected and analysed using one-way analysis of variance. Duncan's test for multiple comparisons was used to test the significant difference between treatment means (p < 0.05). A quadratic equation was used to determine dietary lysine to energy ratios for optimum parameters which were significant difference. Results showed that dietary energy level influenced (p < 0.05) feed intake, feed conversion ratio, live weight, haemoglobin and pack cell volume values of chickens. Dry matter digestibility, metabolizable energy and nitrogen retention not influenced by dietary lysine to energy ratio. Also, white blood cell, red blood cell, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration in female Venda chickens aged 91 days were not influenced by dietary lysine to energy ratio. It is concluded that dietary lysine to energy ratios of 0.672, 0.646, 0.639 and 0.649 optimized feed intake, growth rate, FCR and live weight in indigenous female Venda chickens fed diets containing 8 g of lysine/kg DM, 150 g of CP/kg DM and 11 MJ of ME/kg DM. This has implications in diet formulation for indigenous female Venda chickens.

  8. Observations of the spectral dependence of linear particle depolarization ratio of aerosols using NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Kahnert, M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Berkoff, T. A.; Seaman, S. T.; Collins, J. E.; Fenn, M. A.; Rogers, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Linear particle depolarization ratio is presented for three case studies from the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar-2 HSRL-2). Particle depolarization ratio from lidar is an indicator of non-spherical particles and is sensitive to the fraction of non-spherical particles and their size. The HSRL-2 instrument measures depolarization at three wavelengths: 355, 532, and 1064 nm. The three measurement cases presented here include two cases of dust-dominated aerosol and one case of smoke aerosol. These cases have partial analogs in earlier HSRL-1 depolarization measurements at 532 and 1064 nm and in literature, but the availability of three wavelengths gives additional insight into different scenarios for non-spherical particles in the atmosphere. A case of transported Saharan dust has a spectral dependence with a peak of 0.30 at 532 nm with smaller particle depolarization ratios of 0.27 and 0.25 at 1064 and 355 nm, respectively. A case of aerosol containing locally generated wind-blown North American dust has a maximum of 0.38 at 1064 nm, decreasing to 0.37 and 0.24 at 532 and 355 nm, respectively. The cause of the maximum at 1064 nm is inferred to be very large particles that have not settled out of the dust layer. The smoke layer has the opposite spectral dependence, with the peak of 0.24 at 355 nm, decreasing to 0.09 and 0.02 at 532 and 1064 nm, respectively. The depolarization in the smoke case may be explained by the presence of coated soot aggregates. We note that in these specific case studies, the linear particle depolarization ratio for smoke and dust-dominated aerosol are more similar at 355 nm than at 532 nm, having possible implications for using the particle depolarization ratio at a single wavelength for aerosol typing.

  9. Observations of the spectral dependence of particle depolarization ratio of aerosols using NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Kahnert, M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Berkoff, T. A.; Seaman, S. T.; Collins, J. E.; Fenn, M. A.; Rogers, R. R.

    2015-09-01

    Particle depolarization ratio is presented for three case studies from the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar-2 (HSRL-2). Particle depolarization ratio from lidar is an indicator of non-spherical particles and is sensitive to the fraction of non-spherical particles and their size. The HSRL-2 instrument measures depolarization at three wavelengths: 355, 532, and 1064 nm. The three measurement cases presented here include two cases of dust aerosol and one case of smoke aerosol. These cases have partial analogs in earlier HSRL-1 depolarization measurements at 532 and 1064 nm and in literature, but the availability of three wavelengths gives additional insight into different scenarios for non-spherical particles in the atmosphere. A case of transported Saharan dust has a spectral dependence with a peak of 0.30 at 532 nm with smaller particle depolarization ratios of 0.27 and 0.25 at 1064 and 355 nm, respectively. A case of locally generated wind-blown North American dust has a maximum of 0.38 at 1064 nm, decreasing to 0.37 and 0.24 at 532 and 355 nm, respectively. The cause of the maximum at 1064 nm is inferred to be very large particles that have not settled out of the dust layer. The smoke layer has the opposite spectral dependence, with the peak of 0.24 at 355 nm, decreasing to 0.09 and 0.02 at 532 and 1064 nm. The depolarization in the smoke case is inferred to be due to the presence of coated soot aggregates. We also point out implications for the upcoming EarthCARE satellite, which will measure particle depolarization ratio only at 355 nm. At 355 nm, the particle depolarization ratios for all three of our case studies are very similar, indicating that smoke and dust may be more difficult to separate with EarthCARE measurements than heretofore supposed.

  10. Intrinsic Age-Dependent Changes and Cell-Cell Contacts Regulate Nephron Progenitor Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Salomonis, Nathan; Aronow, Bruce J; Hong, Christian I; Zhang, Tongli; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-10-12

    During fetal development, nephrons of the metanephric kidney form from a mesenchymal progenitor population that differentiates en masse before or shortly after birth. We explored intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling progenitor lifespan in a transplantation assay that allowed us to compare engraftment of old and young progenitors into the same young niche. The progenitors displayed an age-dependent decrease in proliferation and concomitant increase in niche exit rates. Single-cell transcriptome profiling revealed progressive age-dependent changes, with heterogeneity increasing in older populations. Age-dependent elevation in mTor and reduction in Fgf20 could contribute to increased exit rates. Importantly, 30% of old progenitors remained in the niche for up to 1 week post engraftment, a net gain of 50% to their lifespan, but only if surrounded by young neighbors. We provide evidence in support of a model in which intrinsic age-dependent changes affect inter-progenitor interactions that drive cessation of nephrogenesis. PMID:26460946

  11. Intrinsic Age-Dependent Changes and Cell-Cell Contacts Regulate Nephron Progenitor Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Salomonis, Nathan; Aronow, Bruce J; Hong, Christian I; Zhang, Tongli; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-10-12

    During fetal development, nephrons of the metanephric kidney form from a mesenchymal progenitor population that differentiates en masse before or shortly after birth. We explored intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling progenitor lifespan in a transplantation assay that allowed us to compare engraftment of old and young progenitors into the same young niche. The progenitors displayed an age-dependent decrease in proliferation and concomitant increase in niche exit rates. Single-cell transcriptome profiling revealed progressive age-dependent changes, with heterogeneity increasing in older populations. Age-dependent elevation in mTor and reduction in Fgf20 could contribute to increased exit rates. Importantly, 30% of old progenitors remained in the niche for up to 1 week post engraftment, a net gain of 50% to their lifespan, but only if surrounded by young neighbors. We provide evidence in support of a model in which intrinsic age-dependent changes affect inter-progenitor interactions that drive cessation of nephrogenesis.

  12. Age and sex-dependent decreases in ChAT in basal forebrain nuclei.

    PubMed

    Luine, V N; Renner, K J; Heady, S; Jones, K J

    1986-01-01

    Microdissection techniques were utilized to measure the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) (enzyme responsible for synthesis of acetylcholine) in individual basal forebrain nuclei of aged (24 month) and young (4 month) male and female rats. Small but consistent decreases in the activity of ChAT in aged rats were found, and the location of the changes was dependent on the sex of the rat. Aged female rats showed approximately 30% lower ChAT and 40% lower acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the ventral globus pallidus (vGP). Aged males did not show decreased ChAT in the vGP but activity in the medial aspect of the horizontal diagonal band nucleus was 50% lower than in the young males. ChAT activity in four other closely aligned basal forebrain nuclei was not different between the young and aged rats. Analysis of cell number, density and area in the vGP by AChE histochemistry showed no significant differences between aged and young females. In addition, age and sex-dependent changes were measured in pituitary glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. The relationship of the changes to age-dependent decrements in memory, the possible influence of gonadal hormones on aging, and the mechanisms responsible for age-related declines in ChAT activity are discussed.

  13. Grain size dependency in clumped isotope ratios in high temperature calcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Y.; Ghosh, P.; Misra, S.

    2013-12-01

    Here we have extended the application of clumped isotope thermometry for understanding the geospeedometers using calcite produced at high temperature and pressure. Static recrystallization experiments were conducted on cylindrical discs of AR grade carbonate with three different grain sizes (40μm, 200μm and 400μm) at constant pressure (170×5 MPa) and two different temperatures (6000×10°C and 8000×10°C) for 24 hours. The rate of temperature ramps for heating and cooling were set at 20°C/min and 60°C/min, respectively, mimicking a laboratory scale metamorphic condition of sudden burial and exhumation. The carbonate rocks, with prominent calcite mineral composition were prepared in a cylindrical capsule and were investigated for grain size distribution using Mastersizer, a laser technology to measure grain size. We identified three categories of crystals with grain size varying between 40μm, 200μm and 400μm. 15mg carbonate powder drilled from the periphery of the cylindrical discs were analysed for Clumped isotope ratio (Ghosh et al., 2006). Calcite formation experiment allowed re-crystallization of original powder produced at ambient temperature by subjecting the experimental setup to the temperatures of 800 and 600°C (Pressure was maintained constant at 170×5 MPa). We found broadly three different grain size fractions measured using in-situ laser probe. The present experiments were performed in dry environment unlike the wet high pressure experiment presented in the Passey and Henkes (2012). The present experimental value for Δ 47 was translated into absolute temperature using thermometry equation proposed by Ghosh et al., (2006). We observed a strong relationship of clumped isotopic composition with grain sizes of carbonates, which was rather inconsistent with the earlier presumption (Passey and Henkes 2012). The clumped temperature value was found matching with the true temperature in cases where grain size attained 400 micron, while finer fraction

  14. Simultaneous age-dependent and age-independent sexual selection in the lekking black grouse (Lyrurus tetrix).

    PubMed

    Kervinen, Matti; Lebigre, Christophe; Soulsbury, Carl D

    2016-05-01

    Individuals' reproductive success is often strongly associated with their age, with typical patterns of early-life reproductive improvement and late-life senescence. These age-related patterns are due to the inherent trade-offs between life-history traits competing for a limited amount of resources available to the organisms. In males, such trade-offs are exacerbated by the resource requirements associated with the expression of costly sexual traits, leading to dynamic changes in trait expression throughout their life span. Due to the age dependency of male phenotypes, the relationship between the expression of male traits and mating success can also vary with male age. Hence, using longitudinal data in a lekking species with strong sexual selection - the black grouse Lyrurus tetrix - we quantified the effects of age, life span and age of first lek attendance (AFL) on male annual mating success (AMS) to separate the effects of within-individual improvement and senescence on AMS from selective (dis)appearance of certain phenotypes. Then, we used male AMS to quantify univariate and multivariate sexual selection gradients on male morphological and behavioural traits with and without accounting for age and age-related effects of other traits. Male AMS increased with age, and there was no significant reproductive senescence. Most males never copulated, and of the ones that did, the majority had only one successful year. Life span was unrelated to AMS, but early AFL tended to lead to higher AMS at ages 1-3. AMS was related to most morphological and behavioural traits when male age was ignored. Accounting for age and age-specific trait effects (i.e. the interaction between a trait and age) reduced the magnitude of the selection gradients and revealed that behavioural traits are under consistent sexual selection, while sexual selection on morphological traits is stronger in old males. Therefore, sexual selection in black grouse operates primarily on male behaviour and

  15. Simultaneous age-dependent and age-independent sexual selection in the lekking black grouse (Lyrurus tetrix).

    PubMed

    Kervinen, Matti; Lebigre, Christophe; Soulsbury, Carl D

    2016-05-01

    Individuals' reproductive success is often strongly associated with their age, with typical patterns of early-life reproductive improvement and late-life senescence. These age-related patterns are due to the inherent trade-offs between life-history traits competing for a limited amount of resources available to the organisms. In males, such trade-offs are exacerbated by the resource requirements associated with the expression of costly sexual traits, leading to dynamic changes in trait expression throughout their life span. Due to the age dependency of male phenotypes, the relationship between the expression of male traits and mating success can also vary with male age. Hence, using longitudinal data in a lekking species with strong sexual selection - the black grouse Lyrurus tetrix - we quantified the effects of age, life span and age of first lek attendance (AFL) on male annual mating success (AMS) to separate the effects of within-individual improvement and senescence on AMS from selective (dis)appearance of certain phenotypes. Then, we used male AMS to quantify univariate and multivariate sexual selection gradients on male morphological and behavioural traits with and without accounting for age and age-related effects of other traits. Male AMS increased with age, and there was no significant reproductive senescence. Most males never copulated, and of the ones that did, the majority had only one successful year. Life span was unrelated to AMS, but early AFL tended to lead to higher AMS at ages 1-3. AMS was related to most morphological and behavioural traits when male age was ignored. Accounting for age and age-specific trait effects (i.e. the interaction between a trait and age) reduced the magnitude of the selection gradients and revealed that behavioural traits are under consistent sexual selection, while sexual selection on morphological traits is stronger in old males. Therefore, sexual selection in black grouse operates primarily on male behaviour and

  16. A Unifying Concept for the Dependence of Whole-crop N : P Ratio on Biomass: Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Duncan J.; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Zhang, Kefeng; Bosh-Serra, Angela; Boldrini, Arianna; Karawulova, Lyudmila

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Numerous estimates have been made of the concentrations of N and P required for good growth of crop species but they have not been defined by any unifying model. The aim of the present study was to develop such a model for the dependence of the N : P ratio on crop mass, to test its validity and to use it to identify elements of similarity between different crop species and wild plants. Methods A model was derived between plant N : P ratio (Rw) and its dry biomass per unit area (W) during growth with near optimum nutrition by considering that plants consist of growth-related tissue and storage-related tissue with N : P ratios Rg and Rs, respectively. Testing and calibration against experimental data on different crop species led to a simple equation between Rw and W which was tested against independent experimental data. Key Results The validity of the model and equation was supported by 365 measurements of Rw in 38 field experiments on crops. Rg and Rs remained approximately constant throughout growth, with average values of 11·8 and 5·8 by mass. The model also approximately predicted the relationships between leaf N and P concentrations in 124 advisory estimates on immature tissues and in 385 wild species from published global surveys. Conclusions The N : P ratio of the biomass of very different crops, during growth with near optimum levels of nutrients, is defined entirely in terms of crop biomass, an average N : P ratio of the storage/structure-related tissue of the crop and an average N : P ratio of the growth-related tissue. The latter is similar to that found in leaves of many wild plant species, and even micro-organisms and terrestrial and freshwater autotrophs. PMID:18840873

  17. Testosterone Administration Moderates Effect of Social Environment on Trust in Women Depending on Second-to-Fourth Digit Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Buskens, Vincent; Raub, Werner; van Miltenburg, Nynke; Montoya, Estrella R.; van Honk, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Animal research has established that effects of hormones on social behaviour depend on characteristics of both individual and environment. Insight from research on humans into this interdependence is limited, though. Specifically, hardly any prior testosterone experiments in humans scrutinized the interdependency of testosterone with the social environment. Nonetheless, recent testosterone administration studies in humans repeatedly show that a proxy for individuals’ prenatal testosterone-to-estradiol ratio, second-to-fourth digit-ratio (2D:4D ratio), influences effects of testosterone administration on human social behaviour. Here, we systematically vary the characteristics of the social environment and show that, depending on prenatal sex hormone priming, testosterone administration in women moderates the effect of the social environment on trust. We use the economic trust game and compare one-shot games modelling trust problems in relations between strangers with repeated games modelling trust problems in ongoing relations between partners. As expected, subjects are more trustful in repeated than in one-shot games. In subjects prenatally relatively highly primed by testosterone, however, this effect disappears after testosterone administration. We argue that impairments in cognitive empathy may reduce the repeated game effect on trust after testosterone administration in subjects with relatively high prenatal testosterone exposure and propose a neurobiological explanation for this effect. PMID:27282952

  18. Paradise Lost: Age-Dependent Mortality of American Communes, 1609-1965

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitts, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Theorists agree that the risk of folding changes as organizations age, but there is little consensus as to the general form or generative processes of age-dependent mortality. This article investigates four such processes (maturation, senescence, legitimation and obsolescence), which have been taken as competing accounts. Using two analytical…

  19. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  20. Rapamycin activates autophagy in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: implications for normal aging and age-dependent neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Graziotto, John J; Cao, Kan; Collins, Francis S; Krainc, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    While rapamycin has been in use for years in transplant patients as an antirejection drug, more recently it has shown promise in treating diseases of aging, such as neurodegenerative disorders and atherosclerosis. We recently reported that rapamycin reverses the cellular phenotype of fibroblasts from children with the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). We found that the causative aberrant protein, progerin, was cleared through autophagic mechanisms when the cells were treated with rapamycin, suggesting a new potential treatment for HGPS. Recent evidence shows that progerin is also present in aged tissues of healthy individuals, suggesting that progerin may contribute to physiological aging. While it is intriguing to speculate that rapamycin may affect normal aging in humans, as it does in lower organisms, it will be important to identify safer analogues of rapamycin for chronic treatments in humans in order to minimize toxicity. In addition to its role in HGPS and normal aging, we discuss the potential of rapamycin for the treatment of age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. The U/Th production ratio and the age of the Milky Way from meteorites and Galactic halo stars.

    PubMed

    Dauphas, Nicolas

    2005-06-30

    Some heavy elements (with atomic number A > 69) are produced by the 'rapid' (r)-process of nucleosynthesis, where lighter elements are bombarded with a massive flux of neutrons. Although this is characteristic of supernovae and neutron star mergers, uncertainties in where the r-process occurs persist because stellar models are too crude to allow precise quantification of this phenomenon. As a result, there are many uncertainties and assumptions in the models used to calculate the production ratios of actinides (like uranium-238 and thorium-232). Current estimates of the U/Th production ratio range from approximately 0.4 to 0.7. Here I show that the U/Th abundance ratio in meteorites can be used, in conjunction with observations of low-metallicity stars in the halo of the Milky Way, to determine the U/Th production ratio very precisely (0.57(+0.037)(-0.031). This value can be used in future studies to constrain the possible nuclear mass formulae used in r-process calculations, to help determine the source of Galactic cosmic rays, and to date circumstellar grains. I also estimate the age of the Milky Way (14.5(+2.8)(-2.2)Gyr in a way that is independent of the uncertainties associated with fluctuations in the microwave background or models of stellar evolution.

  2. Age-Dependent Terminal Declines in Reproductive Output in a Wild Bird

    PubMed Central

    Hammers, Martijn; Richardson, David S.; Burke, Terry; Komdeur, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In many iteroparous species individual fitness components, such as reproductive output, first increase with age and then decline during late-life. However, individuals differ greatly in reproductive lifespan, but reproductive declines may only occur in the period just before their death as a result of an age-independent decline in physiological condition. To fully understand reproductive senescence it is important to investigate to what extent declines in late-life reproduction can be explained by age, time until death, or both. However, the study of late-life fitness performance in natural populations is challenging as the exact birth and death dates of individuals are often not known, and most individuals succumb to extrinsic mortality before reaching old age. Here, we used an exceptional long-term longitudinal dataset of individuals from a natural, closed, and predator-free population of the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis) to investigate reproductive output, both in relation to age and to the time until the death of an individual (reverse-age approach). We observed an initial age-dependent increase in reproductive output that was followed by a decline in old age. However, we found no significant decline in reproductive output in the years directly preceding death. Although post-peak reproductive output declined with age, this pattern differed between terminal and non-terminal reproductive attempts, and the age-dependence of the terminal breeding attempt explained much of the variation in age-specific reproductive output. In fact, terminal declines in reproductive output were steeper in very old individuals. These results indicate that not only age-dependent, but also age-independent factors, such as physiological condition, need to be considered to understand reproductive senescence in wild-living animals. PMID:22792307

  3. Beryllium geochemistry in soils: Evaluation of 10Be/9Be ratios in authigenic minerals as a basis for age models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barg, E.; Lal, D.; Pavich, M.J.; Caffee, M.W.; Southon, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Soils contain a diverse and complex set of chemicals and minerals. Being an 'open system', both in the chemical and nuclear sense, soils have defied quantitative nuclear dating. However, based on the published studies of the cosmogenic atmospheric 10Be in soils, its relatively long half-life (1.5 Ma), and the fact that 10Be gets quickly incorporated in most soil minerals, this radionuclide appears to be potentially the most useful for soil dating. We therefore studied the natural variations in the specific activities of 10Be with respect to the isotope 9Be in mineral phases in eight profiles of diverse soils from temperate to tropical climatic regimes and evaluated the implications of the data for determining the time of formation of soil minerals, following an earlier suggestion [Lal et al., 1991. Development of cosmogenic nuclear methods for the study of soil erosion and formation rates. Current Sci. 61, 636-639.]. We find that the 10Be/9Be ratios in both bulk soils and in the authigenic mineral phases are confined within a narrower range than in 10Be concentrations. Also, the highest 10Be/9Be ratios in authigenic minerals are observed at the soil-rock interface as predicted by the model. We present model 10Be/9Be ages of the B-horizon and the corresponding soil formation rates for several soil profiles. The present study demonstrates that the 10Be/9Be ratios in the authigenic phases, e.g. clay and Fe-hydroxides, can indeed be used for obtaining useful model ages for soils younger than 10-15 Ma. However, the present work has to be pushed considerably further, to take into account more realistic age models in which, for instance, downward transport of 10Be and clays, and in-situ dissolution of clay minerals at depths, altering the 10Be/9Be ratios of the acidic solutions, are included. We show that in the case of younger soils (< 1 Ma) studied here, their 10Be inventories and 10Be/9Be ratios have been significantly disturbed possibly by mixing with transported

  4. Thickness-dependent cooperative aging in polycrystalline films of antiferromagnet CoO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tianyu; Cheng, Xiang; Boettcher, Stefan; Urazhdin, Sergei; Novozhilova, Lydia

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that thin polycrystalline films of antiferromagnet CoO, in bilayers with ferromagnetic Permalloy, exhibit slow power-law aging of their magnetization state. The aging characteristics are remarkably similar to those previously observed in thin epitaxial Fe50Mn50 films, indicating that these behaviors are likely generic to ferromagnet/antiferromagnet bilayers. In very thin films, aging is observed over a wide temperature range. In thicker CoO, aging effects become reduced at low temperatures. Aging entirely disappears for large CoO thicknesses. We also investigate the dependence of aging characteristics on temperature and magnetic history. Analysis shows that the observed behaviors are inconsistent with the Neel-Arrhenius model of thermal activation, and are instead indicative of cooperative aging of the antiferromagnet. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms controlling the stationary states and dynamics of ferromagnet/antiferromagnet bilayers, and potentially other frustrated magnetic systems.

  5. Growth, age at metamorphosis, and sex ratio of northern brook lamprey in a tributary of southern Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purvis, Harold A.

    1970-01-01

    Growth was studied of five year classes of the northern brook lamprey, Ichthyomyzon fossor, collected from the Sturgeon River during intervals between treatment of the stream with a lampricide. Growth varied considerably among year classes. Larvae of the 1963 year class were slightly longer at age II and 30% longer at age III than the III-group larvae of the 1960 year class. About 6% of 558 III-group lampreys of the 1963 year class had metamorphosed by 17 August 1966. Although the sex ratio of larvae was about 1:1, 97% of the metamorphosed lampreys were males. The distribution of pigmentation on the caudal fin and upper lip in ammocoetes less than 40 mm long permitted accurate and rapid separation of northern brook lampreys from the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

  6. Time Dependent Solution for the He I Line Ratio Electron Temperature and Density Diagnostic in TEXTOR and DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Burgos, J. M.; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, E. A.; Loch, S. D.; Balance, C. P.

    2010-11-01

    We developed a time dependent solution for the He I line ratio diagnostic. Stationary solution is applied for L-mode at TEXTOR. The radial range is typically limited to a region near the separatrix due to metastable effects, and the atomic data used. We overcome this problem by applying a time dependent solution and thus avoid unphysical results. We use a new R-Matrix with Pseudostates and Convergence Cross-Coupling electron impact excitation and ionization atomic data set into the Collisional Radiative Model (CRM). We include contributions from higher Rydberg states into the CRM by means of the projection matrix. By applying this solution (to the region near the wall) and the stationary solution (near the separatrix), we triple the radial range of the current diagnostic. We explore the possibility of extending this approach to H-mode plasmas in DIII-D by estimating line emission profiles from electron temperature and density Thomson scattering data.

  7. Aperture dependence of the mixing efficiency, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the speckle number in coherent lidar receivers.

    PubMed

    Leeb, W R; Winzer, P J; Kudielka, K H

    1998-05-20

    With the aid of the van Cittert-Zernike theorem we develop an analytical expression for the ensemble-averaged heterodyne mixing efficiency in coherent lidar receivers that are looking at a diffuse target that is in the receiver's far field. Our extremely simple and straightforward analysis shows that the dependence of the mixing efficiency on the receive aperture size dR first follows a parabolic decrease and later approaches a (dR)(-2) function. As a consequence, the signal-to-noise ratio does not increase proportionally to the aperture area but saturates. For the system model chosen, the heterodyne mixing efficiency exhibits the same functional dependence on the lidar geometry as the reciprocal of the number of speckle cells within the receive aperture.

  8. Temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of silica fume cement pastes with a very low water–binder ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, I.; Teramoto, A.

    2013-08-15

    Ultra-high-strength concrete with a large unit cement content undergoes considerable temperature increase inside members due to hydration heat, leading to a higher risk of internal cracking. Hence, the temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes made with silica fume premixed cement with a water–binder ratio of 0.15 was studied extensively. Development of autogenous shrinkage showed different behaviors before and after the inflection point, and dependence on the temperature after mixing and subsequent temperature histories. The difference in autogenous shrinkage behavior poses problems for winter construction because autogenous shrinkage may increase with decrease in temperature after mixing before the inflection point and with increase in temperature inside concrete members with large cross sections.

  9. Genetic correlations between body weight change and reproduction traits in Merino ewes depend on age.

    PubMed

    Rose, G; Mulder, H A; van der Werf, J H J; Thompson, A N; van Arendonk, J A M

    2014-08-01

    Merino sheep in Australia experience periods of variable feed supply. Merino sheep can be bred to be more resilient to this variation by losing less BW when grazing poor quality pasture and gaining more BW when grazing good quality pasture. Therefore, selection on BW change might be economically attractive but correlations with other traits in the breeding objective need to be known. The genetic correlations (rg) between BW, BW change, and reproduction were estimated using records from approximately 7,350 fully pedigreed Merino ewes managed at Katanning in Western Australia. Number of lambs and total weight of lambs born and weaned were measured on approximately 5,300 2-yr-old ewes, approximately 4,900 3-yr-old ewes, and approximately 3,600 4-yr-old ewes. On a proportion of these ewes BW change was measured: approximately 1,950 2-yr-old ewes, approximately 1,500 3-yr-old ewes, and approximately 1,100 4-yr-old ewes. The BW measurements were for 3 periods. The first period was during mating period over 42 d on poor pasture. The second period was during pregnancy over 90 d for ewes that got pregnant on poor and medium quality pasture. The third period was during lactation over 130 d for ewes that weaned a lamb on good quality pasture. Genetic correlations between weight change and reproduction were estimated within age classes. Genetic correlations were tested to be significantly greater magnitude than 0 using likelihood ratio tests. Nearly all BW had significant positive genetic correlations with all reproduction traits. In 2-yr-old ewes, BW change during the mating period had a positive genetic correlation with number of lambs weaned (rg = 0.58); BW change during pregnancy had a positive genetic correlation with total weight of lambs born (rg = 0.33) and a negative genetic correlation with number of lambs weaned (rg = -0.49). All other genetic correlations were not significantly greater magnitude than 0 but estimates of genetic correlations for 3-yr-old ewes were

  10. Sex Ratio and Body Mass of Adult Herbivorous Beetles Depend on Time of Occurrence and Light Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Łukowski, Adrian; Mąderek, Ewa; Giertych, Marian J.; Karolewski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Body mass and sex ratio (F/M) of folivorous insects are easily measured parameters that are commonly used to assess the effect of food quality, living conditions, and preferences on the selection of favourable sites for offspring. A study was conducted on the polyphagous beetle, Gonioctena quinquepunctata (a pest of the native Prunus padus and alien P. serotina) and on the monophagous beetle, Altica brevicollis coryletorum (a pest of Corylus avellana). Both species have a similar life cycle with emergence of current-year adults in summer, and reproduction of 1-year-old insects in spring. A. brevicollis coryletorum feeds primarily on sunlit shrubs, while G. quinquepunctata prefers shaded leaves. The present study assessed the effect of time of occurrence (insect age) on body mass in both sexes and on the sex ratio F/M, taking into account the influence of light conditions associated with their favoured food source (sunlit vs. shaded leaves). We hypothesized that a change in body mass in current-year insects would be determined by the amount of consumed food, while the sex ratio would be stable, when in 1-year-old insects females would die shortly after oviposition, while males would be active for a prolonged time. Results confirmed the hypothesis that changes in mass of current-year beetles was determined by the amount of food intake. We also found that in spring, unfertilized females coexist with fertilized ones and that the latter females live for some time after oviposition; resulting in fluctuations of the mean mass for females. In both species, 1-year-old beetles were heavier than current-year. The preference of A. brevicollis coryletorum for sunlit leaves results in a higher body weight than in G. quinquepunctata in both seasons. The data are consistent and indicate seasonal fluctuations in body mass and changes in the sex ratio in 1-year-old beetles, due to the entrance into their reproductive period. PMID:26657564

  11. Sex Ratio and Body Mass of Adult Herbivorous Beetles Depend on Time of Occurrence and Light Conditions.

    PubMed

    Łukowski, Adrian; Mąderek, Ewa; Giertych, Marian J; Karolewski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Body mass and sex ratio (F/M) of folivorous insects are easily measured parameters that are commonly used to assess the effect of food quality, living conditions, and preferences on the selection of favourable sites for offspring. A study was conducted on the polyphagous beetle, Gonioctenaquinquepunctata (a pest of the native Prunus padus and alien P. serotina) and on the monophagous beetle, Alticabrevicollis coryletorum (a pest of Corylus avellana). Both species have a similar life cycle with emergence of current-year adults in summer, and reproduction of 1-year-old insects in spring. A. brevicollis coryletorum feeds primarily on sunlit shrubs, while G. quinquepunctata prefers shaded leaves. The present study assessed the effect of time of occurrence(insect age) on body mass in both sexes and on the sex ratio F/M, taking into account the influence of light conditions associated with their favoured food source (sunlit vs. shaded leaves). We hypothesized that a change in body mass in current-year insects would be determined by the amount of consumed food, while the sex ratio would be stable, when in 1-year-old insects females would die shortly after oviposition, while males would be active for a prolonged time. Results confirmed the hypothesis that changes in mass of current-year beetles was determined by the amount of food intake. We also found that in spring, unfertilized females coexist with fertilized ones and that the latter females live for some time after oviposition; resulting in fluctuations of the mean mass for females. In both species, 1-year-old beetles were heavier than current-year. The preference of A. brevicollis coryletorum for sunlit leaves results in a higher body weight than in G. quinquepunctata in both seasons. The data are consistent and indicate seasonal fluctuations in body mass and changes in the sex ratio in 1-year-old beetles, due to the entrance into their reproductive period. PMID:26657564

  12. Age-dependent alterations of Fc gamma receptor-mediated effector functions of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fülöp, T; Fóris, G; Wórum, I; Leövey, A

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the effector functions in polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL), harvested from blood of young and aged healthy subjects of both sexes, were studied. FC gamma-receptor (Fc gamma R)-mediated incorporation of IgG coated 51Cr-HRBC significantly increased in the aged male group, while the phagocytosis of pre-opsonized fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans) was independent of both the age and sex. However, the intracellular killing capacity of neutrophils obtained from aged male subjects significantly decreased toward 51Cr-labelled c. albicans. The antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was also impaired with ageing in both sexes. The age-dependent decrease in the effector functions of PMNL may be explained, among others, by the fact that during yeast cell incorporation the increased cAMP level does not return to the basic level in the old group. On the other hand, the cGMP level which increased in PMNL of aged subjects does not show any progressive increase as in the young subjects, but remains unchanged. The oxidative metabolism producing free radicals being necessary for the effective intracellular killing and ADCC diminished in PMNL of aged subjects of both sexes. The above findings indicate that the adaptation of cyclic nucleotide system and the oxidative burst to the cell activation becomes impaired with ageing. PMID:2994926

  13. Spatial arrangement of prey affects the shape of ratio-dependent functional response in strongly antagonistic predators.

    PubMed

    Hossie, Thomas J; Murray, Dennis L

    2016-04-01

    Predators play a key role in shaping natural ecosystems, and understanding the factors that influence a predator's kill rate is central to predicting predator-prey dynamics. While prey density has a well-established effect on predation, it is increasingly apparent that predator density also can critically influence predator kill rates. The effects of both prey and predator density on the functional response will, however, be determined in part by their distribution on the landscape. To examine this complex relationship we experimentally manipulated prey density, predator density, and prey distribution using a tadpole (prey)-dragonfly nymph (predator) system. Predation was strongly ratio-dependent irrespective of prey distribution, but the shape of the functional response changed from hyperbolic to sigmoidal when prey were clumped in space. This sigmoidal functional response reflected a relatively strong negative effect of predator interference on kill rates at low prey: predator ratios when prey were clumped. Prey aggregation also appeared to promote stabilizing density-dependent intraguild predation in our system. We conclude that systems with highly antagonistic predators and patchily distributed prey are more likely to experience stable dynamics, and that our understanding of the functional response will be improved by research that examines directly the mechanisms generating interference. PMID:27220200

  14. Morphometric skin characteristics dependent on chronological and biological age: the Leiden Longevity Study.

    PubMed

    Waaijer, Mariette E C; Gunn, David A; Catt, Sharon D; van Ginkel, Michael; de Craen, Anton J M; Hudson, Nicole M; van Heemst, Diana; Slagboom, P Eline; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Maier, Andrea B

    2012-12-01

    The effect of chronological age on skin characteristics is readily visible, and its underlying histological changes have been a field of study for several years. However, the effect of biological age (i.e. a person's rate of ageing compared to their chronological age) on the skin has so far only been studied in facial photographs. Skin biopsies obtained from middle-aged offspring of nonagenarian siblings that are genetically enriched for longevity were compared to their partners who represent the general Dutch population. Though of the same chronological age, the offspring were previously observed to be of a younger biological age than their partners. The biopsies were analysed on several aspects epidermal and elastic fibre morphology. We investigated whether these skin characteristics were dependent on chronological age, familial longevity (the difference between the offspring and partners) and Framingham heart risk scores, adjusted for external stressors. A decreased thickness and flattening of the epidermis as well as an increased amount of elastic fibres in the reticular dermis were observed with chronological age (P < 0.001, P < 0.001 and P = 0.03, respectively), but no effect of familial longevity was found. The Framingham heart risk score was associated with some skin characteristics. A slower rate of skin ageing does not mark offspring from nonagenarian siblings. Epidermal and elastic fibre morphometric characteristics are not a potential marker for familial longevity in middle-aged subjects enriched for familial longevity.

  15. Age-dependent changes in the neural substrates of empathy in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Greimel, Ellen; Piefke, Martina; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Remschmidt, Helmut; Fink, Gereon R.; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    In typical development, empathic abilities continue to refine during adolescence and early adulthood. Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) show deficits in empathy, whereas adults with ASD may have developed compensatory strategies. We aimed at comparing developmental trajectories in the neural mechanisms underlying empathy in individuals with ASD and typically developing control (TDC) subjects. Using an explicit empathizing paradigm and functional magnetic resonance imaging, 27 participants with ASD and 27 TDC aged 12–31 years were investigated. Participants were asked to empathize with emotional faces and to either infer the face’s emotional state (other-task) or to judge their own emotional response (self-task). Differential age-dependent changes were evident during the self-task in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right medial prefrontal cortex, right inferior parietal cortex, right anterior insula and occipital cortex. Age-dependent decreases in neural activation in TDC were paralleled by either increasing or unchanged age-dependent activation in ASD. These data suggest ASD-associated deviations in the developmental trajectories of self-related processing during empathizing. In TDC, age-dependent modulations of brain areas may reflect the ‘fine-tuning’ of cortical networks by reduction of task-unspecific brain activity. Increased age-related activation in individuals with ASD may indicate the development of compensatory mechanisms. PMID:23784073

  16. Age-dependent changes in the neural substrates of empathy in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Greimel, Ellen; Piefke, Martina; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Remschmidt, Helmut; Fink, Gereon R; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2014-08-01

    In typical development, empathic abilities continue to refine during adolescence and early adulthood. Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) show deficits in empathy, whereas adults with ASD may have developed compensatory strategies. We aimed at comparing developmental trajectories in the neural mechanisms underlying empathy in individuals with ASD and typically developing control (TDC) subjects. Using an explicit empathizing paradigm and functional magnetic resonance imaging, 27 participants with ASD and 27 TDC aged 12-31 years were investigated. Participants were asked to empathize with emotional faces and to either infer the face's emotional state (other-task) or to judge their own emotional response (self-task). Differential age-dependent changes were evident during the self-task in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right medial prefrontal cortex, right inferior parietal cortex, right anterior insula and occipital cortex. Age-dependent decreases in neural activation in TDC were paralleled by either increasing or unchanged age-dependent activation in ASD. These data suggest ASD-associated deviations in the developmental trajectories of self-related processing during empathizing. In TDC, age-dependent modulations of brain areas may reflect the 'fine-tuning' of cortical networks by reduction of task-unspecific brain activity. Increased age-related activation in individuals with ASD may indicate the development of compensatory mechanisms.

  17. Preventive effects of Chlorella on cognitive decline in age-dependent dementia model mice.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yuya; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Konishi, Fumiko; Hasegawa, Takashi; Kumamoto, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Ohta, Shigeo

    2009-10-30

    Oxidative stress is one of the major causes of age-dependent memory loss and cognitive decline. Cytotoxic aldehydes are derived from lipid peroxides and their accumulation may be responsible for age-dependent neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer's disease. Since aldehyde dehydrogenases detoxify such aldehydes, we constructed transgenic mice with mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) activity deficiency (DAL101 mice) as an age-dependent dementia model. This model animal is age-dependently progressed by persistent oxidative stress, and thus enables us to investigate foods that prevent dementia. Since Chlorella, a kind of alga, exhibits various anti-oxidative effects, we investigated whether Chlorella has the potential to prevent age-dependent cognitive impairment. We fed Chlorella to DAL101 mice and investigated its effects on oxidative stress and the progression of cognitive decline using the Morris water-maze and object recognition tests. The diet with Chlorella tended to reduce oxidative stress and significantly prevented the decline of cognitive ability, as shown by both methods. Moreover, consumption of Chlorella decreased the number of activated astrocytes in the DAL101 brain. These findings suggest that the prolonged consumption of Chlorella has the potential to prevent the progression of cognitive impairment.

  18. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival.

    PubMed

    Christiansen-Jucht, Céline; Erguler, Kamil; Shek, Chee Yan; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Parham, Paul E

    2015-05-28

    Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a "standard" model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors.

  19. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival.

    PubMed

    Christiansen-Jucht, Céline; Erguler, Kamil; Shek, Chee Yan; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Parham, Paul E

    2015-06-01

    Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a "standard" model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors. PMID:26030468

  20. Effect of Maternal Age on the Ratio of Cleavage and Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Early Developmental Stage Bovine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    TAKEO, Shun; GOTO, Hiroya; KUWAYAMA, Takehito; MONJI, Yasunori; IWATA, Hisataka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Age-associated deterioration in both the quality and quantity of mitochondria occurs in older women. The main aim of this study was to examine the effect of age on mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA number) in early developmental stage bovine embryos as well as the dynamics of mtDNA number during early embryo development. Real-time PCR was used to determine mtDNA number. In vitro-produced embryos 48 h after insemination derived from Japanese black cows, ranging in age from 25 to 209 months were categorized based on their cleavage status. There was an overall negative relationship between the age of the cow and cleavage status, to the extent that the ratio of embryos cleaved over the 4-cell stage was greater in younger cows. The mtDNA number did not differ among the cleaved status of embryos. In the next experiment, oocytes collected from each donor cow were divided into 2 groups containing 10 oocytes each, in order to compare the mtDNA number of mature oocytes and early developmental stage embryos within individuals. Upon comparing the mtDNA number between oocytes at the M2 stage and early developmental stage 48 h post insemination, mtDNA number was found to decrease in most cows, but was found to increase in some cows. In conclusion, age affects the cleaving ability of oocytes, and very old cows (> 180 months) tend to have lower mtDNA numbers in their oocytes. The change in mtDNA number during early development varied among individual cows, although overall, it showed a tendency to decrease. PMID:23269452

  1. Maternal care, mother-offspring aggregation and age-dependent coadaptation in the European earwig.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Y; Kölliker, M

    2013-09-01

    Benefits and costs of parental care are expected to change with offspring development and lead to age-dependent coadaptation expressed as phenotypic (behavioural) matches between offspring age and parental reproductive stage. Parents and offspring interact repeatedly over time for the provision of parental care. Their behaviours should be accordingly adjusted to each other dynamically and adaptively, and the phenotypic match between offspring age and parental stage should stabilize the repeated behavioural interactions. In the European earwig (Forficula auricularia), maternal care is beneficial for offspring survival, but not vital, allowing us to investigate the extent to which the stability of mother-offspring aggregation is shaped by age-dependent coadaptation. In this study, we experimentally cross-fostered nymphs of different age classes (younger or older) between females in early or late reproductive stage to disrupt age-dependent coadaptation, thereby generating female-nymph dyads that were phenotypically matched or mismatched. The results revealed a higher stability in aggregation during the first larval instar when care is most intense, a steeper decline in aggregation tendency over developmental time and a reduced developmental rate in matched compared with mismatched families. Furthermore, nymph survival was positively correlated with female-nymph aggregation stability during the early stages when maternal care is most prevalent. These results support the hypothesis that age-related phenotypically plastic coadaptation affects family dynamics and offspring developmental rate.

  2. Dependencies of pore pressure on elastic wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, K.; Uehara, S. I.; Mizoguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Marine seismic refraction have found that there are high Vp/Vs ratio regions in oceanic crusts at subducting oceanic plates (e.g, Cascadia subduction zone (2.0-2.8) (Audet et al., 2009)). Previous studies based on laboratory measurements indicated that Vp/Vs ratio is high when porosity and/or pore pressure is high (Christensen, 1984; Peacock et al., 2011). Although several studies have investigated the relationships between fracture distributions and Vp, Vs (e.g., Wang et al., 2012; Blake et al., 2013), the relationships for rocks (e.g., gabbro and basalt) composing oceanic crust are still unclear. This study reports the results of laboratory measurements of Vp, Vs (transmission method) at controlled confining and pore pressure and estimation of Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro which mimic highly fractured rocks in the high Vp/Vs ratio zone, in order to declare the dependence of fracture distributions on Vp/Vs. For the measurements, we prepared three type specimens; a non-heated intact specimen, specimens heated up to 500 °C and 700 °C for 24 hours. Porosities of intact, 500 °C and 700 °C specimens measured under the atmospheric pressure are 0.5, 3.4 and 3.5%, respectively. Measurements were conducted at a constant confining pressure of 50 MPa, with decreasing pore pressure from 49 to 0.1 MPa and then increasing to 49 MPa. While Vp/Vs for the intact specimen is almost constant at elevated pore pressure, the Vp/Vs values for the thermally cracked ones were 2.0~2.2 when pore pressure was larger than 30 MPa. In future, we will reveal the relationship between the measured elastic wave velocities and the characteristics of the microfracture distribution. This work was supported by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Number 26400492).

  3. Effect of ageing in fibre bundle models on the evolution of acoustic and silent damage in time-dependent failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartz, S.; Main, I. G.; Zaiser, M.; Kun, F.

    2012-04-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of damage in brittle materials is often modelled by fibre bundle models. In real fibre bundles (such as suspension bridge ropes), and in other composite materials such as rocks and ceramics, the evolution of damage as a function of stress and time can be recorded using acoustic emissions (AE), and used to asses the integrity of the sample and its lifetime. Such monitoring however tells only part of the story, since time-dependent, effectively 'silent' damage also occurs without AE, and small AE events may not be recorded below some recording threshold set by the background noise. The proportion of seismic to aseismic deformation is important for a number of applications, for example providing a strong constraint on plate boundary dynamics and estimates of earthquake hazard. Accordingly we have modified the usual fibre bundle model by introducing some additional ageing, which results in silent damage below a nominal threshold for more dynamic deformation. This enables us to model the effect of the model parameters on the ratio of acoustic to total damage, and how it evolves in time under a given stress history. We found that the silent damage dominates the process and that for a constant applied stress the ratio between acoustic and silent emissions is approximately constant over a wide range of time. The proportionality factor depends strongly on the applied stress and only weakly on the ageing parameter, while it is the other way around for the failure time which depends more on the ageing parameter than on the applied stress.

  4. Intrinsic TGF-β signaling promotes age-dependent CD8+ T cell polyfunctionality attrition

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Rajarshi; Moretto, Magali M.; Castillo, Julio C.; Petrovas, Constantinos; Ferrando-Martinez, Sara; Shokal, Upasana; Leal, Manuel; Koup, Richard A.; Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Khan, Imtiaz A.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced age is associated with immune system deficits that result in an increased susceptibility to infectious diseases; however, specific mediators of age-dependent immune dysfunction have not been fully elucidated. Here we demonstrated that aged mice exhibit poor effector CD8+ T cell polyfunctionality, primarily due to CD8+ T cell–extrinsic deficits, and that reduced CD8+ T cell polyfunctionality correlates with increased susceptibility to pathogenic diseases. In aged animals challenged with the parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi, effector CD8+ T cell survival and polyfunctionality were suppressed by highly elevated TGF-β1. Furthermore, TGF-β depletion reduced effector CD8+ T cell apoptosis in both young and aged mice and enhanced effector CD8+ T cell polyfunctionality in aged mice. Surprisingly, intrinsic blockade of TGF-β signaling in CD8+ T cells was sufficient to rescue polyfunctionality in aged animals. Together, these data demonstrate that low levels of TGF-β1 promote apoptosis of CD8+ effector T cells and high TGF-β1 levels associated with age result in both CD8+ T cell apoptosis and an altered transcriptional profile, which correlates with loss of polyfunctionality. Furthermore, elevated TGF-β levels are observed in the elderly human population and in aged Drosophila, suggesting that TGF-β represents an evolutionarily conserved negative regulator of the immune response in aging organisms. PMID:24762437

  5. Age-dependent decline in dental pulp regeneration after pulpectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Misako

    2014-04-01

    The age-associated decline in the regenerative abilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be due to age-related changes in reduction in number, intrinsic properties of MSCs and extrinsic factors of the extracellular environment (the stem cell niche). The effect of age on the efficacy of MSC transplantation on regeneration, however, has not been clearly demonstrated due to variable methods of isolation of MSCs and variations in stem cell populations. In this study, dental pulp stem cell (DPSC) subsets were isolated from young and aged dog teeth based on their migratory response to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (MDPSCs). In order to study the age-associated changes, their biological properties and stability were compared and the regenerative potential was examined in a pulpectomized tooth model in aged dogs. MDPSCs from aged dogs were efficiently enriched in stem cells, expressing trophic factors with high proliferation, migration and anti-apoptotic effects as in MDPSCs from young dogs. However, pulp regeneration was retarded 120 days after autologous transplantation of aged MDPSCs. We further demonstrated that isolated periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) from aged dogs, representative of migrating stem cells from outside of the tooth compartment to regenerate pulp tissue, had lower proliferation, migration and anti-apoptotic abilities. These results therefore provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the age-dependent decline in pulp regeneration, which are attributed to a decrease in the regenerative potential of resident stem cells.

  6. Dependency conflict, marital threat, and alcohol consumption in a middle-aged sample.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, J C; Wheeler, D S

    1992-09-01

    The hypothesis that dependency conflict is associated with higher levels of alcohol consumption when dependency needs are threatened or thwarted was tested with a sample of 672 middle-aged, married adults with college-age children. The subjects' current level of alcohol consumption was predicted based on the present level of threat to the marital relationship (assessed by reports from several family members) and on indices of dependency need and inhibition of dependent behavior estimated from sibship size, sibship density, and sibling position. A multiple regression analysis yielded a significant two-way interaction (p less than .05) between marital threat and subject sex, and a significant three-way interaction of dependency need, inhibition of dependent behavior, and marital threat. High marital threat was associated with higher levels of alcohol consumption in men and slightly lower levels of alcohol consumption in women. Additionally, when dependency need was high, alcohol consumption was generally low, except when both inhibition of dependent behavior and marital threat were high. However, when dependency need was low, the highest alcohol consumption score occurred when marital threat was low and inhibition was high.

  7. Optimal Control of Markov Processes with Age-Dependent Transition Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Mrinal K. Saha, Subhamay

    2012-10-15

    We study optimal control of Markov processes with age-dependent transition rates. The control policy is chosen continuously over time based on the state of the process and its age. We study infinite horizon discounted cost and infinite horizon average cost problems. Our approach is via the construction of an equivalent semi-Markov decision process. We characterise the value function and optimal controls for both discounted and average cost cases.

  8. Age-dependent factors in the biokinetics and dosimetry of radionuclides: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.M.; Gerber, G.B.; Stather, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    The need to develop generally accepted models for assessing doses to members of the public has been identified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection which set up in 1987 a Task Group of Committee II on Age-dependent Dosimetry, with the aim of reviewing the current state of knowledge in this area, calculating dose coefficients for different age-groups in the population and identifying the needs for future research. The Radiation Protection Programme of the Commission of the European Communities, the Office of Health and Environmental Research of the United States Department of Energy and the European Late Effects Project Cirpup (EULEP) organised a Workshop on ``Age-dependent Factors in the Biokinetics and Dosimetry of Radionuclides``. This Workshop, which was held at Schloss Elmau in southem Bavaria, Germany, November 4--8 1991, was attended by more than fifty scientists from some fifteen countries. The invited or contributed papers presented at the Workshop, which are published in this volume, covered many areas including gastrointestinal uptake and inhalation of radionuclides by various age-groups in the population, the effect of age on the biokinetics of radionuclides in bone, thyroid and other tissues, the development of age-dependent biokinetic models and the transfer of radionuclides from the mother to the developing embryo and fetus. Reviews of the activities of the ICRP Task Group on Age-dependent Dosimetry and of other collaborative international investigations are also included. The presentations provided a comprehensive overview of the current state of our knowledge on the age-related factors which are of importance for assessing radiation exposure of the population, indicating the progress which has been made since the previous Workshop on this topic held in Angers, France in late 1986.

  9. Age-dependent and age-independent human memory persistence is enhanced by delayed posttraining methylphenidate administration.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Iván; Bevilaqua, Lia R; Rossato, Janine I; Lima, Ramón H; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín

    2008-12-01

    Healthy human volunteers 16-82 years of age with at least 10 years of schooling were exposed to two different memory tasks. The first task involved incidental memory. The subjects were asked, as casually as possible: "Did you watch any movie on TV 2 days ago? And 7 days ago? If so, do you remember the title of the movie(s) and the name of the first two actors (actresses)?" Retention scores (maximum = 3: title, actor 1, and actor 2) were equally high (overall mean = 2.6, n = 61) in all age groups (16-20, 21-30, 31-40, 41-60, and 61-82 years) for the day 2 scores. Scores for the movie seen 7 days before decreased significantly and progressively in the three older groups in relation to age, which indicates reduced persistence of this type of memory beginning at the age of 41-50 years and becoming more extensive over the years. The other task was a formal memory procedure. Subjects were asked to study a brief text with factual information on the 1954 World Soccer Cup for 10 min. They were then exposed to 10 questions on the text 2 days and, again, 7 days later. Retention scores declined between the two tests, but in this task, the decline of persistence occurred to a similar extent in all age groups, and thus was not dependent on age. Methylphenidate (10 mg p.o.) given 12 hours after acquisition markedly enhanced persistence of the two memory types. This suggests an involvement of dopaminergic processes in persistence in the late posttraining period.

  10. Cell cycle age dependence for radiation-induced G/sub 2/ arrest: evidence for time-dependent repair

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.

    1985-09-01

    Exponentially growing eucaryotic cells, irradiated in interphase, are delayed in progression to mitosis chiefly by arrest in G/sub 2/. The sensitivity of Chinese hamster ovary cells to G/sub 2/ arrest induction by X rays increases through the cell cycle, up to the X-ray transition point (TP) in G/sub 2/. This age response can be explained by cell cycle age-dependent changes in susceptibility of the target(s) for G/sub 2/ arrest and/or by changes in capability for postirradiation recovery from G/sub 2/ arrest damage. Discrimination between sensitivity changes and repair phenomena is possible only if the level of G/sub 2/ arrest-causing damage sustained by a cell at the time of irradiation and the level ultimately expressed as arrest can be determined. The ability of caffeine to ameliorate radiation-induced G/sub 2/ arrest, while inhibiting repair of G/sub 2/ arrest-causing damage makes such an analysis possible. In the presence of caffeine, progression of irradiated cells was relatively unperturbed, but on caffeine removal, G/sub 2/ arrest was expressed. The duration of G/sub 2/ arrest was independent of the length of the prior caffeine exposure. This finding indicates that the target for G/sub 2/ arrest induction is present throughout the cell cycle and that the level of G/sub 2/ arrest damage incurred is initially constant for all cell cycle phases. The data are consistent with the existence of a time-dependent recovery mechanism to explain the age dependence for radiation induction of G/sub 2/ arrest.

  11. Sexual selection, multiple male ornaments, and age- and condition-dependent signaling in the common yellowthroat.

    PubMed

    Freeman-Gallant, Corey R; Taff, Conor C; Morin, Douglas F; Dunn, Peter O; Whittingham, Linda A; Tsang, Susan M

    2010-04-01

    In many animals, sexual selection has resulted in complex signaling systems in which males advertise aspects of their phenotypic or genetic quality through elaborate ornamentation and display behaviors. Different ornaments might convey different information or be directed at different receivers, but they might also be redundant signals of quality that function reliably at different times (ages) or in different contexts. We explored sexual selection and age- and condition-dependent signaling in the common yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas), a sexually dichromatic warbler with two prominent plumage ornaments--a melanin-based, black facial "mask" and carotenoid-based, UV-yellow "bib." In a three-year study, variance among males in the number of social (M(w)) and extra-pair (M(e)) mates generated strong sexual selection on mask and bib attributes. Some traits (mask size, bib yellow brightness) were correlated with male age and did not experience selection beyond age-related increases in M(w) and M(e). Other traits showed age-specific (bib size) or age-reversed (ultraviolet brightness) patterns of selection that paralleled changes in the information-content of each ornament. The components of male fitness generating selection in young versus old males were distinct, reflecting different sources of variation in male fertilization success. Age- and context-dependent changes in the strength, direction, and target of selection may help explain the maintenance of multiple ornaments in this and other species.

  12. Correction of aspect ratio dependency in deep silicon etch using SF6/C4F8/Ar gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Robert Lee

    The etch rate of deep features in silicon, such as trenches and vias, can vary significantly with the changing Aspect Ratio (AR) of the feature. Developing a better understanding of the complex volumetric and surface chemistry as well as the etching mechanisms controlling the Aspect Ratio Dependent Etch-rate (ARDE) continues to present research opportunities. Recall that ARDE is generally characterized by small AR features etching at faster rates than large AR features. The main causes of ARDE include Knudsen transport of neutrals into and out of the features as well as ion and neutral loss to the walls due to angular spread in the velocity distribution function and differential charging of insulating microstructures. This work focuses on using a continuous plasma process utilizing a gas mixture of SF6/C4F8/Ar to produce trenches of varying widths and depths. The experimental results were obtained using a Plasma-Therm Versaline processing system. Experiments were performed to show that the etch rate of low AR features can be reduced through the deposition of a passivation layer and thereby allow larger AR features to catch up. It is also possible to invert the ARDE in certain circumstances. We will present the insights we have gained into the ARDE process and the solutions we have tested.

  13. Ontogenetic changes in genetic variances of age-dependent plasticity along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Nilsson-Örtman, V; Rogell, B; Stoks, R; Johansson, F

    2015-10-01

    The expression of phenotypic plasticity may differ among life stages of the same organism. Age-dependent plasticity can be important for adaptation to heterogeneous environments, but this has only recently been recognized. Whether age-dependent plasticity is a common outcome of local adaptation and whether populations harbor genetic variation in this respect remains largely unknown. To answer these questions, we estimated levels of additive genetic variation in age-dependent plasticity in six species of damselflies sampled from 18 populations along a latitudinal gradient spanning 3600 km. We reared full sib larvae at three temperatures and estimated genetic variances in the height and slope of thermal reaction norms of body size at three points in time during ontogeny using random regression. Our data show that most populations harbor genetic variation in growth rate (reaction norm height) in all ontogenetic stages, but only some populations and ontogenetic stages were found to harbor genetic variation in thermal plasticity (reaction norm slope). Genetic variances in reaction norm height differed among species, while genetic variances in reaction norm slope differed among populations. The slope of the ontogenetic trend in genetic variances of both reaction norm height and slope increased with latitude. We propose that differences in genetic variances reflect temporal and spatial variation in the strength and direction of natural selection on growth trajectories and age-dependent plasticity. Selection on age-dependent plasticity may depend on the interaction between temperature seasonality and time constraints associated with variation in life history traits such as generation length. PMID:25649500

  14. An age-dependent feedback control model of calcium dynamics in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fusheng; Liu, Weijiu

    2010-06-01

    The functional decline of selected proteins or organelles leads to aging at the intracellular level. Identification of these proteins or organelles is usually challenging to traditional single-factor approaches since these factors are inter-connected via feedback or feedforward controls. Establishing a feedback control model to simulate the interactions of multiple factors is an insightful approach to guide the search for proteins involved in aging. However, there are only a few mathematical models describing the age-dependent accumulation of DNA mutations, which are directly or indirectly induced by deterioration of the intracellular environment including alteration of calcium homeostasis, a contributor of aging. Thus, based on Cui and Kaandorp's model, we develop an age-dependent mathematical model for the calcium homeostasis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our model contains cell cycle-dependent aging factors and can qualitatively reproduce calcium shocks and calcium accumulations in cells observed in experiments. Using this model, we predict calcium oscillations in wild type, pmc1 Delta, and pmr1 Delta cells. This prediction suggests that Pmr1p plays a major role in regulating cytosolic calcium. Combining the model with our experimental lifespan data, we predict an upper-limit of cytosolic calcium tolerance for cell survival. This prediction indicates that, for aged cells (>35 generations), no pmr1 Delta can tolerate the cytosolic calcium concentration of 0.1 microM while a very small fraction (1%) of aged wild type cells (>50 generations) can tolerate a high cytosolic calcium concentration of 0.5 microM.

  15. Mutant alpha-synuclein causes age-dependent neuropathology in monkey brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Wang, Guohao; Wang, Chuan-En; Guo, Xiangyu; Yin, Peng; Gao, Jinquan; Tu, Zhuchi; Wang, Zhengbo; Wu, Jing; Hu, Xintian; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-05-27

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease that often occurs in those over age 60. Although rodents and small animals have been used widely to model PD and investigate its pathology, their short life span makes it difficult to assess the aging-related pathology that is likely to occur in PD patient brains. Here, we used brain tissues from rhesus monkeys at 2-3, 7-8, and >15 years of age to examine the expression of Parkin, PINK1, and α-synuclein, which are known to cause PD via loss- or gain-of-function mechanisms. We found that α-synuclein is increased in the older monkey brains, whereas Parkin and PINK1 are decreased or remain unchanged. Because of the gain of toxicity of α-synuclein, we performed stereotaxic injection of lentiviral vectors expressing mutant α-synuclein (A53T) into the substantia nigra of monkeys and found that aging also increases the accumulation of A53T in neurites and its associated neuropathology. A53T also causes more extensive reactive astrocytes and axonal degeneration in monkey brain than in mouse brain. Using monkey brain tissues, we found that A53T interacts with neurofascin, an adhesion molecule involved in axon subcellular targeting and neurite outgrowth. Aged monkey brain tissues show an increased interaction of neurofascin with A53T. Overexpression of A53T causes neuritic toxicity in cultured neuronal cells, which can be attenuated by transfected neurofascin. These findings from nonhuman primate brains reveal age-dependent pathological and molecular changes that could contribute to the age-dependent neuropathology in PD.

  16. Spatiotemporal Dependency of Age-Related Changes in Brain Signal Variability

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, A. R.; Vakorin, V.; Kovacevic, N.; Wang, H.; Diaconescu, A.; Protzner, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical and empirical work has focused on the variability of network dynamics in maturation. Such variability seems to reflect the spontaneous formation and dissolution of different functional networks. We sought to extend these observations into healthy aging. Two different data sets, one EEG (total n = 48, ages 18–72) and one magnetoencephalography (n = 31, ages 20–75) were analyzed for such spatiotemporal dependency using multiscale entropy (MSE) from regional brain sources. In both data sets, the changes in MSE were timescale dependent, with higher entropy at fine scales and lower at more coarse scales with greater age. The signals were parsed further into local entropy, related to information processed within a regional source, and distributed entropy (information shared between two sources, i.e., functional connectivity). Local entropy increased for most regions, whereas the dominant change in distributed entropy was age-related reductions across hemispheres. These data further the understanding of changes in brain signal variability across the lifespan, suggesting an inverted U-shaped curve, but with an important qualifier. Unlike earlier in maturation, where the changes are more widespread, changes in adulthood show strong spatiotemporal dependence. PMID:23395850

  17. Molecular Correlates of Age-Dependent Seizures in an Inherited Neonatal-Infantile Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Yunxiang; Deprez, Liesbet; Maljevic, Snezana; Pitsch, Julika; Claes, Lieve; Hristova, Dimitrina; Jordanova, Albena; Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Bellan-Koch, Astrid; Blazevic, Dragica; Schubert, Simone; Thomas, Evan A.; Petrou, Steven; Becker, Albert J.; De Jonghe, Peter; Lerche, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Many idiopathic epilepsy syndromes have a characteristic age dependence, the underlying molecular mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Here we propose a mechanism that can explain that epileptic spells in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures occur almost exclusively during the first days to months of life. Benign familial…

  18. Age, Dose, and Time-Dependency of Plasma and Tissue Distribution of Deltamethrine in Immature Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objective of this project was to characterize the systemic disposition of the pyrethroid, deltamethrin (DLT), in immature rats, with emphasis on the age-dependence of target organ (brain) dosimetry. Postnatal day (PND) 10, 21, and 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0...

  19. In vitro age dependent response of macrophages to micro and nano titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Marcos E; Sittner, Maximiliano; Cabrini, Rómulo L; Guglielmotti, María B; Olmedo, Daniel G; Tasat, Deborah R

    2015-02-01

    As a result of corrosion, microparticles (MP) and/or nanoparticles (NP) can be released from the metallic implants surface into the bioenvironment. The biological response to these particles depends not only on the physico-chemical properties of the particles but also on host factors, such as age. Macrophages have attracted wide concern in biomedicine. The aim of this investigation was to study the age related biological response of macrophages to TiO2 -MP and NP in vitro. Alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained from young and senescent rats were cultured and exposed to TiO2 -MP and NP. Cell metabolism, superoxide anion (O2 (-) ) and nitric oxide (NO) generation, and cytokine release (IL-6, TNFα, IL-10) were measured. Cell metabolism was not affected by particle exposure. O2 (-) and NO generation increased in a dose dependent manner. A marked increase on IL-6 release was found in the young-AM subpopulation exposed to TiO2 -MP. Conversely, both particle sizes induced a dose dependent release of TNFα in senescent-AM. Only the highest concentration of TiO2 -particles caused a significant increase in IL-10 release in AM-cultures. These observations lend strong support to the suggestion that cellular response of macrophages to TiO2 -particles is age dependent. The biological effect of the particles would seem to be more deleterious in the senescent age-group.

  20. Limits on a gravitational field dependence of the proton-electron mass ratio from H2 in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Bagdonaite, J; Salumbides, E J; Preval, S P; Barstow, M A; Barrow, J D; Murphy, M T; Ubachs, W

    2014-09-19

    Spectra of molecular hydrogen (H2) are employed to search for a possible proton-to-electron mass ratio (μ) dependence on gravity. The Lyman transitions of H2, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope towards white dwarf stars that underwent a gravitational collapse, are compared to accurate laboratory spectra taking into account the high temperature conditions (T∼13 000  K) of their photospheres. We derive sensitivity coefficients Ki which define how the individual H2 transitions shift due to μ dependence. The spectrum of white dwarf star GD133 yields a Δμ/μ constraint of (-2.7±4.7stat±0.2syst)×10(-5) for a local environment of a gravitational potential ϕ∼10(4) ϕEarth, while that of G29-38 yields Δμ/μ=(-5.8±3.8stat±0.3syst)×10(-5) for a potential of 2×10(4) ϕEarth. PMID:25279624

  1. Limits on a gravitational field dependence of the proton-electron mass ratio from H2 in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Bagdonaite, J; Salumbides, E J; Preval, S P; Barstow, M A; Barrow, J D; Murphy, M T; Ubachs, W

    2014-09-19

    Spectra of molecular hydrogen (H2) are employed to search for a possible proton-to-electron mass ratio (μ) dependence on gravity. The Lyman transitions of H2, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope towards white dwarf stars that underwent a gravitational collapse, are compared to accurate laboratory spectra taking into account the high temperature conditions (T∼13 000  K) of their photospheres. We derive sensitivity coefficients Ki which define how the individual H2 transitions shift due to μ dependence. The spectrum of white dwarf star GD133 yields a Δμ/μ constraint of (-2.7±4.7stat±0.2syst)×10(-5) for a local environment of a gravitational potential ϕ∼10(4) ϕEarth, while that of G29-38 yields Δμ/μ=(-5.8±3.8stat±0.3syst)×10(-5) for a potential of 2×10(4) ϕEarth.

  2. Underestimation of urinary biomarker-to-creatinine ratio resulting from age-related gain in muscle mass in rats.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Yutaka; Morikawa, Yuji; Takagi, Shingo; Torii, Mikinori; Matsubara, Mitsunobu

    2013-01-01

    Recent efforts have been made to identify useful urinary biomarkers of nephrotoxicity. Furthermore, the application of urine to the other toxicities as new biomarker source has been recently expanded. Meanwhile, correction of urinary biomarker concentrations according to fluctuations in urine flow rate is required for adequate interpretation of the alteration. The urinary biomarker-to-creatinine ratio (UBCR) is widely used because of the convenience, while the urinary biomarker-excretion rate is regarded as the gold standard corrective method. Because creatinine is a catabolite in energy production in muscles, we hypothesized that altered muscle mass could affect creatinine kinetics, ultimately affecting UBCR. However, no study has examined this hypothesis. In this study, we examined the influence of muscle mass gain on UBCR, using male Sprague-Dawley rats during the growth phase, 6-12-week old. Both plasma creatinine and excretion of urinary creatinine (Ucr excretion) showed increases with muscle mass gain in rats, in which the alterations of UBCR were lowered. The renal mRNA level of the organic cation transporter-2 (Oct2), a creatinine transporter, showed an age-related increase, whereas the mRNA level of multidrug and toxin extrusions-1 (Mate1) remained constant. Multiple regression analysis showed that the increase in creatinine clearance highly contributed to the age-related increase in Ucr excretion compared to the mRNA levels of Oct2 and Mate1. This suggested that the age-related increase in Ucr excretion may be attributable to the increased transglomerular passage of creatinine. In conclusion, the results suggest that muscle mass gain can affect creatinine kinetics, leading to underestimation of UBCR. Therefore, it is important to understand the characteristics of the corrective method when using urinary biomarker, the failure of which can result in an incorrect diagnosis.

  3. Determination of Age-Dependent Reference Ranges for Coagulation Tests Performed Using Destiny Plus

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Fatma Demet; Serdar, Muhittin; Merve Ari, Elif; Onur Oztan, Mustafa; Hikmet Kozcu, Sureyya; Tarhan, Huseyin; Cakmak, Ozgur; Zeytinli, Merve; Yasar Ellidag, Hamit

    2016-01-01

    Background In order to apply the right treatment for hemostatic disorders in pediatric patients, laboratory data should be interpreted with age-appropriate reference ranges. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determining age-dependent reference range values for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen tests, and D-dimer tests. Materials and Methods A total of 320 volunteers were included in the study with the following ages: 1 month - 1 year (n = 52), 2 - 5 years (n = 50), 6 - 10 years (n = 48), 11 - 17 years (n = 38), and 18 - 65 years (n = 132). Each volunteer completed a survey to exclude hemostatic system disorder. Using a nonparametric method, the lower and upper limits, including 95% distribution and 90% confidence intervals, were calculated. Results No statistically significant differences were found between PT and aPTT values in the groups consisting of children. Thus, the reference ranges were separated into child and adult age groups. PT and aPTT values were significantly higher in the children than in the adults. Fibrinogen values in the 6 - 10 age group and the adult age group were significantly higher than in the other groups. D-dimer levels were significantly lower in those aged 2 - 17; thus, a separate reference range was established. Conclusions These results support other findings related to developmental hemostasis, confirming that adult and pediatric age groups should be evaluated using different reference ranges. PMID:27617078

  4. Age estimation in an Indian population using pulp/tooth volume ratio of mandibular canines obtained from cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, N; Neelakantan, P; Thiruvengadam, C; Ramani, P; Premkumar, P; Natesan, A; Herald, J S; Luder, H U

    2011-07-01

    The present study assessed the suitability of pulp/tooth volume ratio of mandibular canines for age prediction in an Indian population. Volumetric reconstruction of scanned images of mandibular canines from 140 individuals (aged ten - 70 years), using computed tomography was used to measure pulp and tooth volumes. Age calculated using a formula reported earlier for a Belgian sample, resulted in errors > ten years in almost 86% of the study population. The regression equation obtained for the Indian population: Age = 57.18 + (- 413.41 x pulp/tooth volume ratio), was applied to an independent control group (n = 48), and this resulted in mean absolute errors of 8.54 years which was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than those derived with the Belgian formula. The pulp/tooth volume ratio is a useful indicator of age, although correlations may vary in different populations and hence, specific formulae should be applied for the estimates. PMID:21841263

  5. [Dynamics of elements distribution in blood, depending on age, by example of Moscow Region residents].

    PubMed

    Yuvs, G G; Ignatova, T N; Anuchin, A M; Lebedeva, V L; Shilov, V V; Khapalyuk, A V

    2015-01-01

    Elemental status of a person determines the qualitative and quantitative content of chemical elements in the human body. This marker allows us to estimate the level of imbalance of chemical elements and therefore health risks. The method for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of 67 elements in biomaterials has been proposed. The detailed elemental analysis of whole blood samples of 1711 healthy people (age range 0-100 years) of Moscow Region has been performed. A number of patterns of age-related changes of the element status conditionally healthy people has been estimated. Na content in the samples increased with the age of the person. Presumably, this result reflects the studied populations nutrition disorders associated with immoderate consumption of table salt. The maximum content of Ca was observed in blood samples of people age range 0-20 years (66-69 mg/kg), the Ca content in the blood samples of people age range 26-85 years was significantly lower (59-62 mg/kg). The maximum decrease of Ca was detected in blood samples of people age range of 85-100 years (57-59 mg/kg). Thisreductionin the concentration of Ca, apparently due to age-related changes of Ca balance, correlates with decrease of bone mineral density and bone mass. Iron content decreased in the blood samples of people age range 10-100 years from 480 to 390 mg/kg. Selenium content in blood of people age range 0-25 years linearly increased, remained stable high in the blood of people age range 25-55 years (0,13-0,136 mg/kg) and then gradually decreased. A graph of As content dependence from a person's age is a mirror image of the graph of Se content dependence from a person's age, which is evidence of the antagonistic effects of these elements. Graphic changes in the content of rare earth elements Eu and Ho reflect the unidirectional trend of these elements accumulation. The maximum content of these elements was observed in blood samples of people age range of 25-65 years. Perhaps a

  6. [Dynamics of elements distribution in blood, depending on age, by example of Moscow Region residents].

    PubMed

    Yuvs, G G; Ignatova, T N; Anuchin, A M; Lebedeva, V L; Shilov, V V; Khapalyuk, A V

    2015-01-01

    Elemental status of a person determines the qualitative and quantitative content of chemical elements in the human body. This marker allows us to estimate the level of imbalance of chemical elements and therefore health risks. The method for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of 67 elements in biomaterials has been proposed. The detailed elemental analysis of whole blood samples of 1711 healthy people (age range 0-100 years) of Moscow Region has been performed. A number of patterns of age-related changes of the element status conditionally healthy people has been estimated. Na content in the samples increased with the age of the person. Presumably, this result reflects the studied populations nutrition disorders associated with immoderate consumption of table salt. The maximum content of Ca was observed in blood samples of people age range 0-20 years (66-69 mg/kg), the Ca content in the blood samples of people age range 26-85 years was significantly lower (59-62 mg/kg). The maximum decrease of Ca was detected in blood samples of people age range of 85-100 years (57-59 mg/kg). Thisreductionin the concentration of Ca, apparently due to age-related changes of Ca balance, correlates with decrease of bone mineral density and bone mass. Iron content decreased in the blood samples of people age range 10-100 years from 480 to 390 mg/kg. Selenium content in blood of people age range 0-25 years linearly increased, remained stable high in the blood of people age range 25-55 years (0,13-0,136 mg/kg) and then gradually decreased. A graph of As content dependence from a person's age is a mirror image of the graph of Se content dependence from a person's age, which is evidence of the antagonistic effects of these elements. Graphic changes in the content of rare earth elements Eu and Ho reflect the unidirectional trend of these elements accumulation. The maximum content of these elements was observed in blood samples of people age range of 25-65 years. Perhaps a

  7. BMAL1-dependent regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway delays aging.

    PubMed

    Khapre, Rohini V; Kondratova, Anna A; Patel, Sonal; Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Wrobel, Michelle; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping system, has been linked with control of aging, but molecular mechanisms of regulation are not known. BMAL1 is a transcriptional factor and core component of the circadian clock; BMAL1 deficiency is associated with premature aging and reduced lifespan. Here we report that activity of mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is increased upon BMAL1 deficiency both in vivo and in cell culture. Increased mTOR signaling is associated with accelerated aging; in accordance with that, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin increased lifespan of Bmal1-/- mice by 50%. Our data suggest that BMAL1 is a negative regulator of mTORC1 signaling. We propose that the circadian clock controls the activity of the mTOR pathway through BMAL1-dependent mechanisms and this regulation is important for control of aging and metabolism.

  8. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series Xt . The branching ratio bx is defined as bx=E[ξx/x] . The random variable ξx is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x , so ξx={Xt+1∣Xt=x} . If bx>1 , the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x , while if bx<1 , it is subcritical. For stock prices we find bx=1 within statistical uncertainty, for all x , consistent with an “efficient market hypothesis.” For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, bx is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where bx≃1 , which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for Xt and for ξx . For the BTW model the distribution of ξx is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x . Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where bx is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model—supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  9. Glucocorticoid-Dependent Hippocampal Transcriptome in Male Rats: Pathway-Specific Alterations With Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuey-Chu; Blalock, Eric M.; Curran-Rauhut, Meredith A.; Kadish, Inga; Blalock, Susan J.; Brewer, Lawrence; Porter, Nada M.

    2013-01-01

    Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are known to exert numerous effects in the hippocampus, their chronic regulatory functions remain poorly understood. Moreover, evidence is inconsistent regarding the long-standing hypothesis that chronic GC exposure promotes brain aging/Alzheimer disease. Here, we adrenalectomized male F344 rats at 15 months of age, maintained them for 3 months with implanted corticosterone (CORT) pellets producing low or intermediate (glucocorticoid receptor–activating) blood levels of CORT, and performed microarray/pathway analyses in hippocampal CA1. We defined the chronic GC-dependent transcriptome as 393 genes that exhibited differential expression between intermediate and low CORT groups. Short-term CORT (4 days) did not recapitulate this transcriptome. Functional processes/pathways overrepresented by chronic CORT–up-regulated genes included learning/plasticity, differentiation, glucose metabolism, and cholesterol biosynthesis, whereas processes overrepresented by CORT–down-regulated genes included inflammatory/immune/glial responses and extracellular structure. These profiles indicate that GCs chronically activate neuronal/metabolic processes while coordinately repressing a glial axis of reactivity/inflammation. We then compared the GC transcriptome with a previously defined hippocampal aging transcriptome, revealing a high proportion of common genes. Although CORT and aging moved expression of some common genes in the same direction, the majority were shifted in opposite directions by CORT and aging (eg, glial inflammatory genes down-regulated by CORT are up-regulated with aging). These results contradict the hypothesis that GCs simply promote brain aging and also suggest that the opposite direction shifts during aging reflect resistance to CORT regulation. Therefore, we propose a new model in which aging-related GC resistance develops in some target pathways, whereas GC overstimulation develops in others, together generating much of the

  10. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, Andreas; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Christopoulou, Maria; Kühn, Sven; Kuster, Niels

    2010-04-01

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  11. Long-range transport of black carbon to the Pacific Ocean and its dependence on aging timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Liu, J.; Tao, S.; Ban-Weiss, G. A.

    2015-10-01

    Improving the ability of global models to predict concentrations of black carbon (BC) over the Pacific Ocean is essential to evaluate the impact of BC on marine climate. In this study, we tag BC tracers from 13 source regions around the globe in a global chemical transport model, Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4). Numerous sensitivity simulations are carried out varying the aging timescale of BC emitted from each source region. The aging timescale for each source region is optimized by minimizing errors in vertical profiles of BC mass mixing ratios between simulations and HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO). For most HIPPO deployments, in the Northern Hemisphere, optimized aging timescales are less than half a day for BC emitted from tropical and midlatitude source regions and about 1 week for BC emitted from high-latitude regions in all seasons except summer. We find that East Asian emissions contribute most to the BC loading over the North Pacific, while South American, African and Australian emissions dominate BC loadings over the South Pacific. Dominant source regions contributing to BC loadings in other parts of the globe are also assessed. The lifetime of BC originating from East Asia (i.e., the world's largest BC emitter) is found to be only 2.2 days, much shorter than the global average lifetime of 4.9 days, making the contribution from East Asia to the global BC burden only 36 % of that from the second largest emitter, Africa. Thus, evaluating only relative emission rates without accounting for differences in aging timescales and deposition rates is not predictive of the contribution of a given source region to climate impacts. Our simulations indicate that the lifetime of BC increases nearly linearly with aging timescale for all source regions. When the aging rate is fast, the lifetime of BC is largely determined by factors that control local deposition rates (e.g., precipitation). The sensitivity of lifetime to aging

  12. Long-range transport of black carbon to the Pacific Ocean and its dependence on aging timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Liu, J.; Tao, S.; Ban-Weiss, G. A.

    2015-06-01

    Improving the ability of global models to predict concentrations of black carbon (BC) over the Pacific Ocean is essential to evaluate the impact of BC on marine climate. In this study, we tag BC tracers from 13 source regions around the globe in a global chemical transport model MOZART-4. Numerous sensitivity simulations are carried out varying the aging timescale of BC emitted from each source region. The aging timescale for each source region is optimized by minimizing errors in vertical profiles of BC mass mixing ratios between simulations and HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO). For most HIPPO deployments, in the Northern Hemisphere, optimized aging timescales are less than half a day for BC emitted from tropical and mid-latitude source regions, and about 1 week for BC emitted from high latitude regions in all seasons except summer. We find that East Asian emissions contribute most to the BC loading over the North Pacific, while South American, African and Australian emissions dominate BC loadings over the South Pacific. Dominant source regions contributing to BC loadings in other parts of the globe are also assessed. The lifetime of BC originating from East Asia (i.e., the world's largest BC emitter) is found to be only 2.2 days, much shorter than the global average lifetime of 4.9 days, making East Asia's contribution to global burden only 36 % of BC from the second largest emitter, Africa. Thus, evaluating only relative emission rates without accounting for differences in aging timescales and deposition rates is not predictive of the contribution of a given source region to climate impacts. Our simulations indicate that lifetime of BC increases nearly linearly with aging timescale for all source regions. When aging rate is fast, the lifetime of BC is largely determined by factors that control local deposition rates (e.g. precipitation). The sensitivity of lifetime to aging timescale depends strongly on the initial hygroscopicity of freshly emitted BC

  13. Centrality and rapidity dependence of particle ratios in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsene, I. C.; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2009-06-01

    We report on preliminary identified particle ratios from Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 GeV in different centrality classes, measured with the BRAHMS spectrometer. Results from Cu+Cu and p+p collisions at mid-rapidity at the same energy are also included. The average transverse momenta of particle spectra, anti-particle to particle ratios and K/π ratios dependence on centrality and rapidity are shown and discussed.

  14. The Relationship between the Second-to-Fourth Digit Ratio and Behavioral Sexual Dimorphism in School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Takahiko; Araki, Atsuko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Ito, Sachiko; Ikeno, Tamiko; Sasaki, Seiko; Kitta, Takeya; Moriya, Kimihiko; Cho, Kazutoshi; Morioka, Keita; Kishi, Reiko; Shinohara, Nobuo; Takeda, Masayuki; Nonomura, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic brain development and behavior are known to be influenced by sex hormones exposure in prenatal periods. On the other hand, second-to forth digit ratio (2D/4D) has been used as an indirect method to investigate the putative effects of prenatal exposure to androgen. In the present study, we herein investigated the relationship between gender-role play behavior and the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D/4D), which has been used as an indirect method to investigate the putative effects of prenatal exposure to androgens, in school-aged children. Among 4981 children who became 8 years old by November 2014 and were contactable for this survey by The Hokkaido Study of Environment and Children's Health, 1631 (32.7%), who had data for 2D/4D and Pre-school Activities Inventory (PSAI) as well as data for the survey at baseline, were available for analysis. Parents sent reports of PSAI on the sex-typical characteristics, preferred toys, and play activities of children, and black and white photocopies of the left and right hand palms via mail. PSAI consisted of 12 masculine items and 12 feminine items, and a composite score was created by subtracting the feminine score from the masculine score, with higher scores representing masculine-typical behavior. While composite scores in PSAI were significantly higher in boys than in girls, 2D/4D was significantly lower in boys than in girls. Although the presence or absence of brothers or sisters affected the composite, masculine, and feminine scored of PSAI, a multivariate regression model revealed that 2D/4D negatively correlated with the composite scores of PSAI in boys, whereas no correlation was found in girls. Although 2D/4D negatively correlated with the masculine score in boys and girls, no correlation was observed between 2D/4D and the feminine score. In conclusion, although social factors, such as the existence of brother or sisters, affect dimorphic brain development and behavior in childhood, the present

  15. The Relationship between the Second-to-Fourth Digit Ratio and Behavioral Sexual Dimorphism in School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takahiko; Araki, Atsuko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Ito, Sachiko; Ikeno, Tamiko; Sasaki, Seiko; Kitta, Takeya; Moriya, Kimihiko; Cho, Kazutoshi; Morioka, Keita; Kishi, Reiko; Shinohara, Nobuo; Takeda, Masayuki; Nonomura, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic brain development and behavior are known to be influenced by sex hormones exposure in prenatal periods. On the other hand, second-to forth digit ratio (2D/4D) has been used as an indirect method to investigate the putative effects of prenatal exposure to androgen. In the present study, we herein investigated the relationship between gender-role play behavior and the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D/4D), which has been used as an indirect method to investigate the putative effects of prenatal exposure to androgens, in school-aged children. Among 4981 children who became 8 years old by November 2014 and were contactable for this survey by The Hokkaido Study of Environment and Children's Health, 1631 (32.7%), who had data for 2D/4D and Pre-school Activities Inventory (PSAI) as well as data for the survey at baseline, were available for analysis. Parents sent reports of PSAI on the sex-typical characteristics, preferred toys, and play activities of children, and black and white photocopies of the left and right hand palms via mail. PSAI consisted of 12 masculine items and 12 feminine items, and a composite score was created by subtracting the feminine score from the masculine score, with higher scores representing masculine-typical behavior. While composite scores in PSAI were significantly higher in boys than in girls, 2D/4D was significantly lower in boys than in girls. Although the presence or absence of brothers or sisters affected the composite, masculine, and feminine scored of PSAI, a multivariate regression model revealed that 2D/4D negatively correlated with the composite scores of PSAI in boys, whereas no correlation was found in girls. Although 2D/4D negatively correlated with the masculine score in boys and girls, no correlation was observed between 2D/4D and the feminine score. In conclusion, although social factors, such as the existence of brother or sisters, affect dimorphic brain development and behavior in childhood, the present

  16. The Relationship between the Second-to-Fourth Digit Ratio and Behavioral Sexual Dimorphism in School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takahiko; Araki, Atsuko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Ito, Sachiko; Ikeno, Tamiko; Sasaki, Seiko; Kitta, Takeya; Moriya, Kimihiko; Cho, Kazutoshi; Morioka, Keita; Kishi, Reiko; Shinohara, Nobuo; Takeda, Masayuki; Nonomura, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic brain development and behavior are known to be influenced by sex hormones exposure in prenatal periods. On the other hand, second-to forth digit ratio (2D/4D) has been used as an indirect method to investigate the putative effects of prenatal exposure to androgen. In the present study, we herein investigated the relationship between gender-role play behavior and the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D/4D), which has been used as an indirect method to investigate the putative effects of prenatal exposure to androgens, in school-aged children. Among 4981 children who became 8 years old by November 2014 and were contactable for this survey by The Hokkaido Study of Environment and Children's Health, 1631 (32.7%), who had data for 2D/4D and Pre-school Activities Inventory (PSAI) as well as data for the survey at baseline, were available for analysis. Parents sent reports of PSAI on the sex-typical characteristics, preferred toys, and play activities of children, and black and white photocopies of the left and right hand palms via mail. PSAI consisted of 12 masculine items and 12 feminine items, and a composite score was created by subtracting the feminine score from the masculine score, with higher scores representing masculine-typical behavior. While composite scores in PSAI were significantly higher in boys than in girls, 2D/4D was significantly lower in boys than in girls. Although the presence or absence of brothers or sisters affected the composite, masculine, and feminine scored of PSAI, a multivariate regression model revealed that 2D/4D negatively correlated with the composite scores of PSAI in boys, whereas no correlation was found in girls. Although 2D/4D negatively correlated with the masculine score in boys and girls, no correlation was observed between 2D/4D and the feminine score. In conclusion, although social factors, such as the existence of brother or sisters, affect dimorphic brain development and behavior in childhood, the present

  17. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  18. Chronic BDNF deficiency leads to an age-dependent impairment in spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Anne; Psotta, Laura; Brigadski, Tanja; Endres, Thomas; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a crucial mediator of neural plasticity and, consequently, of memory formation. In hippocampus-dependent learning tasks BDNF also seems to play an essential role. However, there are conflicting results concerning the spatial learning ability of aging BDNF(+/-) mice in the Morris water maze paradigm. To evaluate the effect of chronic BDNF deficiency in the hippocampus on spatial learning throughout life, we conducted a comprehensive study to test differently aged BDNF(+/-) mice and their wild type littermates in the Morris water maze and to subsequently quantify their hippocampal BDNF protein levels as well as expression levels of TrkB receptors. We observed an age-dependent learning deficit in BDNF(+/-) animals, starting at seven months of age, despite stable hippocampal BDNF protein expression and continual decline of TrkB receptor expression throughout aging. Furthermore, we detected a positive correlation between hippocampal BDNF protein levels and learning performance during the probe trial in animals that showed a good learning performance during the long-term memory test.

  19. Age-Dependent Impairment of Eyeblink Conditioning in Prion Protein-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Hirono, Moritoshi; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Sakaguchi, Suehiro; Yoshioka, Tohru; Katamine, Shigeru; Kirino, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Mice lacking the prion protein (PrPC) gene (Prnp), Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice, show late-onset cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration because of ectopic overexpression of PrPC-like protein (PrPLP/Dpl). Because PrPC is highly expressed in cerebellar neurons (including PCs and granule cells), it may be involved in cerebellar synaptic function and cerebellar cognitive function. However, no studies have been conducted to investigate the possible involvement of PrPC and/or PrPLP/Dpl in cerebellum-dependent discrete motor learning. Therefore, the present cross-sectional study was designed to examine cerebellum-dependent delay eyeblink conditioning in Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice in adulthood (16, 40, and 60 weeks of age). The aims of the present study were two-fold: (1) to examine the role of PrPC and/or PrPLP/Dpl in cerebellum-dependent motor learning and (2) to confirm the age-related deterioration of eyeblink conditioning in Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice as an animal model of progressive cerebellar degeneration. Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice aged 16 weeks exhibited intact acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses (CRs), although the CR timing was altered. The same result was observed in another line of PrPc-deficient mice, ZrchI PrnP0/0 mice. However, at 40 weeks of age, CR incidence impairment was observed in Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice. Furthermore, Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice aged 60 weeks showed more significantly impaired CR acquisition than Ngsk Prnp0/0 mice aged 40 weeks, indicating the temporal correlation between cerebellar PC degeneration and motor learning deficits. Our findings indicate the importance of the cerebellar cortex in delay eyeblink conditioning and suggest an important physiological role of prion protein in cerebellar motor learning. PMID:23593266

  20. Unusual Ratio between Free Thyroxine and Free Triiodothyronine in a Long-Lived Mole-Rat Species with Bimodal Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Vole, Christiane; Begall, Sabine; Bens, Martin; Broecker-Preuss, Martina; Sahm, Arne; Szafranski, Karol; Burda, Hynek; Dammann, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Ansell's mole-rats (Fukomys anselli) are subterranean, long-lived rodents, which live in eusocial families, where the maximum lifespan of breeders is twice as long as that of non-breeders. Their metabolic rate is significantly lower than expected based on allometry, and their retinae show a high density of S-cone opsins. Both features may indicate naturally low thyroid hormone levels. In the present study, we sequenced several major components of the thyroid hormone pathways and analyzed free and total thyroxine and triiodothyronine in serum samples of breeding and non-breeding F. anselli to examine whether a) their thyroid hormone system shows any peculiarities on the genetic level, b) these animals have lower hormone levels compared to euthyroid rodents (rats and guinea pigs), and c) reproductive status, lifespan and free hormone levels are correlated. Genetic analyses confirmed that Ansell's mole-rats have a conserved thyroid hormone system as known from other mammalian species. Interspecific comparisons revealed that free thyroxine levels of F. anselli were about ten times lower than of guinea pigs and rats, whereas the free triiodothyronine levels, the main biologically active form, did not differ significantly amongst species. The resulting fT4:fT3 ratio is unusual for a mammal and potentially represents a case of natural hypothyroxinemia. Comparisons with total thyroxine levels suggest that mole-rats seem to possess two distinct mechanisms that work hand in hand to downregulate fT4 levels reliably. We could not find any correlation between free hormone levels and reproductive status, gender or weight. Free thyroxine may slightly increase with age, based on sub-significant evidence. Hence, thyroid hormones do not seem to explain the different ageing rates of breeders and non-breeders. Further research is required to investigate the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the unusual proportion of free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine. PMID:25409169

  1. Unusual ratio between free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine in a long-lived mole-rat species with bimodal ageing.

    PubMed

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Vole, Christiane; Begall, Sabine; Bens, Martin; Broecker-Preuss, Martina; Sahm, Arne; Szafranski, Karol; Burda, Hynek; Dammann, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Ansell's mole-rats (Fukomys anselli) are subterranean, long-lived rodents, which live in eusocial families, where the maximum lifespan of breeders is twice as long as that of non-breeders. Their metabolic rate is significantly lower than expected based on allometry, and their retinae show a high density of S-cone opsins. Both features may indicate naturally low thyroid hormone levels. In the present study, we sequenced several major components of the thyroid hormone pathways and analyzed free and total thyroxine and triiodothyronine in serum samples of breeding and non-breeding F. anselli to examine whether a) their thyroid hormone system shows any peculiarities on the genetic level, b) these animals have lower hormone levels compared to euthyroid rodents (rats and guinea pigs), and c) reproductive status, lifespan and free hormone levels are correlated. Genetic analyses confirmed that Ansell's mole-rats have a conserved thyroid hormone system as known from other mammalian species. Interspecific comparisons revealed that free thyroxine levels of F. anselli were about ten times lower than of guinea pigs and rats, whereas the free triiodothyronine levels, the main biologically active form, did not differ significantly amongst species. The resulting fT4:fT3 ratio is unusual for a mammal and potentially represents a case of natural hypothyroxinemia. Comparisons with total thyroxine levels suggest that mole-rats seem to possess two distinct mechanisms that work hand in hand to downregulate fT4 levels reliably. We could not find any correlation between free hormone levels and reproductive status, gender or weight. Free thyroxine may slightly increase with age, based on sub-significant evidence. Hence, thyroid hormones do not seem to explain the different ageing rates of breeders and non-breeders. Further research is required to investigate the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the unusual proportion of free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine.

  2. Elevated Systolic Blood Pressure in Male GH Transgenic Mice Is Age Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Adam; Benner, Chance M.; Sim, Don; Liu, Xingbo; List, Edward O.; Householder, Lara A.; Berryman, Darlene E.

    2014-01-01

    Acromegaly is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Transgenic mice expressing bovine GH (bGH) gene have previously been used to examine the effects of chronic GH stimulation on cardiovascular function. Results concerning systolic blood pressure (SBP) in bGH mice are conflicting. We hypothesized that these discrepancies may be the result of the various ages of the mice used in previous studies. In the current study, SBP was assessed monthly in male bGH mice from 3–12 months of age. Factors known to alter blood pressure were assessed during this time and included: levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and glucose homeostasis markers, and renal levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Beginning at 6 months of age bGH had increased SBP compared with wild-type controls, which remained elevated through 12 months of age. Despite having increased blood pressure and cardiac BNP mRNA, bGH mice had decreased circulating levels of BNP. Additionally, bGH mice had an age-dependent decline in insulin levels. For example, they were hyperinsulinemic at 3 months, but by 11 months of age were hypoinsulinemic relative to wild-type controls. This decrease in insulin was accompanied by improved glucose tolerance at 11 months. Finally, both angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression were severely depressed in kidneys of 11-month-old bGH mice. These results indicate that elevated SBP in bGH mice is dependent on age, independent of insulin resistance, and related to alterations in both the natriuretic peptide and renin-angiotensin systems. PMID:24424040

  3. Elevated systolic blood pressure in male GH transgenic mice is age dependent.

    PubMed

    Jara, Adam; Benner, Chance M; Sim, Don; Liu, Xingbo; List, Edward O; Householder, Lara A; Berryman, Darlene E; Kopchick, John J

    2014-03-01

    Acromegaly is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Transgenic mice expressing bovine GH (bGH) gene have previously been used to examine the effects of chronic GH stimulation on cardiovascular function. Results concerning systolic blood pressure (SBP) in bGH mice are conflicting. We hypothesized that these discrepancies may be the result of the various ages of the mice used in previous studies. In the current study, SBP was assessed monthly in male bGH mice from 3-12 months of age. Factors known to alter blood pressure were assessed during this time and included: levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and glucose homeostasis markers, and renal levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Beginning at 6 months of age bGH had increased SBP compared with wild-type controls, which remained elevated through 12 months of age. Despite having increased blood pressure and cardiac BNP mRNA, bGH mice had decreased circulating levels of BNP. Additionally, bGH mice had an age-dependent decline in insulin levels. For example, they were hyperinsulinemic at 3 months, but by 11 months of age were hypoinsulinemic relative to wild-type controls. This decrease in insulin was accompanied by improved glucose tolerance at 11 months. Finally, both angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression were severely depressed in kidneys of 11-month-old bGH mice. These results indicate that elevated SBP in bGH mice is dependent on age, independent of insulin resistance, and related to alterations in both the natriuretic peptide and renin-angiotensin systems. PMID:24424040

  4. Distinctive patterns of age-dependent hypomethylation in interspersed repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    Jintaridth, Pornrutsami; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2010-04-01

    Interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) are a major contributor to genome size and may contribute to cellular functions. IRSs are subdivided according to size and functionally related structures into short interspersed elements, long interspersed elements (LINEs), DNA transposons, and LTR-retrotransposons. Many IRSs may produce RNA and regulate genes by a variety of mechanisms. The majority of DNA methylation occurs in IRSs and is believed to suppress IRS activities. Global hypomethylation, or the loss of genome-wide methylation, is a common epigenetic event not only in senescent cells but also in cancer cells. Loss of LINE-1 methylation has been characterized in many cancers. Here, we evaluated the methylation levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of LINE-1, Alu, and human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) in 177 samples obtained from volunteers between 20 and 88 yr of age. Age was negatively associated with methylation levels of Alu (r = -0.452, P < 10(-3)) and HERV-K (r = -0.326, P < 10(-3)) but not LINE-1 (r = 0.145, P = 0.055). Loss of methylation of Alu occurred during ages 34-68 yr, and loss of methylation of HERV-K occurred during ages 40-63 yr and again during ages 64-83 yr. Interestingly, methylation of Alu and LINE-1 are directly associated, particularly at ages 49 yr and older (r = 0.49, P < 10(-3)). Therefore, only some types of IRSs lose methylation at certain ages. Moreover, Alu and HERV-K become hypomethylated differently. Finally, there may be several mechanisms of global methylation. However, not all of these mechanisms are age-dependent. This finding may lead to a better understanding of not only the biological causes and consequences of genome-wide hypomethylation but also the role of IRSs in the aging process.

  5. Dependence of the spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio on aerosol spectral distribution and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Dumka, U. C.; Psiloglou, B. E.

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the modification of the clear-sky spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio (DDR) as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA), spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The solar spectrum under various atmospheric conditions is derived with Simple Model of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer of Sunshine (SMARTS) radiative transfer code, using the urban and continental aerosol models as inputs. The spectral DDR can be simulated with great accuracy by an exponentially decreasing curve, while the aerosol optical properties strongly affect the scattering processes in the atmosphere, thus modifying the DDR especially in the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Furthermore, the correlation between spectral DDR and spectral AOD can be represented precisely by an exponential function and can give valuable information about the dominance of specific aerosol types. The influence of aerosols on spectral DDR increases with increasing SZA, while the simulations using the urban aerosol model as input in SMARTS are closer to the measurements taken in the Athens urban environment. The SMARTS simulations are interrelated with spectral measurements and can be used for indirect estimations of SSA. Overall, the current work provides some theoretical approximations and functions that help in understanding the dependence of DDR on astronomical and atmospheric parameters.

  6. Gender ratio in a clinical population sample, age of diagnosis and duration of assessment in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Marion; McKenzie, Karen; Johnson, Tess; Catchpole, Ciara; O'Hare, Anne; McClure, Iain; Forsyth, Kirsty; McCartney, Deborah; Murray, Aja

    2016-07-01

    This article reports on gender ratio, age of diagnosis and the duration of assessment procedures in autism spectrum disorder diagnosis in a national study which included all types of clinical services for children and adults. Findings are reported from a retrospective case note analysis undertaken with a representative sample of 150 Scottish children and adults recently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The study reports key findings that the gender ratio in this consecutively referred cohort is lower than anticipated in some age groups and reduces with increasing age. The gender ratio in children, together with the significant difference in the mean age of referral and diagnosis for girls compared to boys, adds evidence of delayed recognition of autism spectrum disorder in younger girls. There was no significant difference in duration of assessment for males and females suggesting that delays in diagnosis of females occur prior to referral for assessment. Implications for practice and research are considered.

  7. MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS FOR M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: AGE DATING AND A SURPRISING METALLICITY TREND

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, Jay; Huchra, John P.; Smith, Graeme H.; Brodie, Jean P.

    2009-08-15

    We have obtained velocity dispersions from Keck high-resolution integrated spectroscopy of 10 M31 globular clusters (GCs), including three candidate intermediate-age GCs. We show that these candidates have the same V-band mass-to-light (M/L{sub V} ) ratios as the other GCs, implying that they are likely to be old. We also find a trend of derived velocity dispersion with wavelength, but cannot distinguish between a systematic error and a physical effect. Our new measurements are combined with photometric and spectroscopic data from the literature in a re-analysis of all M31 GC M/L{sub V} values. In a combined sample of 27 GCs, we show that the metal-rich GCs have lower M/L{sub V} than the metal-poor GCs, in conflict with predictions from stellar population models. Fragmentary data for other galaxies support this observation. The M31 GC fundamental plane is extremely tight, and we follow up an earlier suggestion by Djorgovski to show that the fundamental plane can be used to estimate accurate distances (potentially 10% or better)

  8. Adult age differences in the realism of confidence judgments: overconfidence, format dependence, and cognitive predictors.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Patrik; Rönnlund, Michael; Juslin, Peter; Nilsson, Lars-Göran

    2008-09-01

    Realistic confidence judgments are essential to everyday functioning, but few studies have addressed the issue of age differences in overconfidence. Therefore, the authors examined this issue with probability judgment and intuitive confidence intervals in a sample of 122 healthy adults (ages: 35-40, 55-60, 70-75 years). In line with predictions based on the naïve sampling model (P. Juslin, A. Winman, & P. Hansson, 2007), substantial format dependence was observed, with extreme overconfidence when confidence was expressed as an intuitive confidence interval but not when confidence was expressed as a probability judgment. Moreover, an age-related increase in overconfidence was selectively observed when confidence was expressed as intuitive confidence intervals. Structural equation modeling indicated that the age-related increases in overconfidence were mediated by a general cognitive ability factor that may reflect executive processes. Finally, the results indicated that part of the negative influence of increased age on general ability may be compensated for by an age-related increase in domain-relevant knowledge. PMID:18808243

  9. Age-associated changes in hippocampal-dependent cognition in Diversity Outbred mice.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ming Teng; Spiegel, Amy M; Gallagher, Michela

    2014-11-01

    Episodic memory impairment due to aging has been linked to hippocampal dysfunction. Evidence exists for alterations in specific circuits within the hippocampal system that are closely coupled to individual differences in the presence and severity of such memory loss. Here, we used the newly developed Diversity Outbred (DO) mouse that was designed to model the genetic diversity in human populations. Young and aged DO mice were tested in a hippocampal-dependent water maze task. Young mice showed higher proficiency and more robust memory compared to the overall performance of aged mice. A substantial number of the older mice, however, performed on par with the normative performance of the younger mice. Stereological quantification of somatostatin-immunoreactive neurons in the dentate hilus showed that high-performing young and unimpaired aged mice had similar numbers of somatostatin-positive interneurons, while aged mice that were impaired in the spatial task had significantly fewer such neurons. These data in the DO model tie loss of hilar inhibitory network integrity to age-related memory impairment, paralleling data in other rodent models.

  10. Age Impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation is improved by resveratrol in rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gocmez, Semil S; Scarpace, Philip J; Whidden, Melissa A; Erdos, Benedek; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Sakarya, Yasemin; Utkan, Tijen; Tumer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether resveratrol improves the adverse effects age on vascular function in mesenteric arteries (MAs), and diminishes the hyperactivity in adrenal gland with age. [Methods] Male F344 x Brown Norway rats were assigned to 6-month control (YC), 6-month resveratrol (YR), 24-month control (OC) and 24-month resveratrol (OR). Resveratrol (15 mg/kg) was provided to resveratrol groups in drinking water for 14 days. [Results] Concentration response curves to phenylephrine (PE, 10-9-10-5M), acetylcholine (Ach, 10-9-10-5M) and resveratrol (10-8-10-4M) were evaluated in pressurized isolated MAs. The Ach concentration-response curve was right shifted with maximal response diminished in OC compared with YC rats. These effects were reversed by resveratrol treatment. The resveratrol-mediated relaxant responses were unchanged with age or resveratrol suggesting an endothelium-independent mechanism. Resveratrol tended to increase endothelial nitric oxide synthase; caused no effect on copper-zinc superoxide dismutase; and normalized the age-related elevatation in DβH and NPY levels in adrenal medulla, two indicators of sympathetic activity [Conclusion] These data indicate that resveratrol reverses age-related dysfunction in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in MAs and partially reverses hyperactivity of adrenomedullary function with age. This treatment may have a therapeuticpotential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or hypertension in the elderly. PMID:27298812

  11. Cadmium in moose kidney and liver--age and gender dependency, and standardisation for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Rolf; Frank, Adrian

    2009-10-01

    In the northern hemisphere moose has been found to be suitable as a monitoring animal for the presence of cadmium in the environment. The metal accumulates mainly in the kidney and the liver, with the rate of accumulation dependent on age and possibly also on gender. Collection of tissue material often results in sample selections with disparate age and gender composition, which makes comparison between different regions and different studies difficult. A previous large scale investigation of metals in kidney and liver from moose in Sweden provided Cd data (n = 3,817 and 3,802, respectively) to further explore the relation between Cd accumulation and age/gender. Based on local averages, the individual deviations were analysed with respect to the factors age and gender resulting in an 'ageing function' for each gender and organ. In addition, estimates of the pure individual variations were obtained; the standard deviations correspond to a factor 1.7-1.9 for the Cd concentration, which indicates that 25-30 samples are needed to give a representative mean value (with RSD approximately 10%). In order to be able to compare results from different studies, all individual results can be transformed to represent a 'standard moose' with respect to age and gender. A comparison along these lines was undertaken between Cd levels in Alaska and Sweden. Finally, a relationship between the Cd levels in kidney and liver was derived, providing at least rough estimates for kidney from liver values (or vice versa).

  12. Pleiotropic age-dependent effects of mitochondrial dysfunction on epidermal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Michael C; Demaria, Marco; Melov, Simon; Campisi, Judith

    2015-08-18

    Tissue homeostasis declines with age partly because stem/progenitor cells fail to self-renew or differentiate. Because mitochondrial damage can accelerate aging, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction impairs stem cell renewal or function. We developed a mouse model, Tg(KRT14-cre/Esr1) (20Efu/J) × Sod2 (tm1Smel) , that generates mitochondrial oxidative stress in keratin 14-expressing epidermal stem/progenitor cells in a temporally controlled manner owing to deletion of Sod2, a nuclear gene that encodes the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2). Epidermal Sod2 loss induced cellular senescence, which irreversibly arrested proliferation in a fraction of keratinocytes. Surprisingly, in young mice, Sod2 deficiency accelerated wound closure, increasing epidermal differentiation and reepithelialization, despite the reduced proliferation. In contrast, at older ages, Sod2 deficiency delayed wound closure and reduced epidermal thickness, accompanied by epidermal stem cell exhaustion. In young mice, Sod2 deficiency accelerated epidermal thinning in response to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, phenocopying the reduced regeneration of older Sod2-deficient skin. Our results show a surprising beneficial effect of mitochondrial dysfunction at young ages, provide a potential mechanism for the decline in epidermal regeneration at older ages, and identify a previously unidentified age-dependent role for mitochondria in skin quality and wound closure.

  13. Patterns of alcohol dependence in Thai drinkers: a differential item functioning analysis of gender and age bias.

    PubMed

    Srisurapanont, Manit; Kittiratanapaiboon, Phunnapa; Likhitsathian, Surinporn; Kongsuk, Thoranin; Suttajit, Sirijit; Junsirimongkol, Boonsiri

    2012-02-01

    In Caucasians, the patterns of alcohol use disorders in women and adolescents are likely to be different from those in men and adults, respectively. The authors examined these differences in a Southeast Asian sample of Thai people living in communities. A two-parameter logistic model of the IRT log-likelihood-ratio (IRTLR) test for differential item functioning (DIF) procedure was used. Participants were a subsample of 3718 current drinkers participating in the 2008 Thai National Mental Health Survey (n=17,140). The 1-year prevalence rates of alcohol dependence were 1.4% in women and 13.7% in men. Based on the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), alcohol dependence and abuse module, all current drinkers were interviewed for a yes/no response to each of seven alcohol dependence criteria. Confirmatory factor analysis suggested a single-factor model of alcohol dependence criteria (χ2=211.51, RMSEA=0.06, SRMR=0.03 and CFI=0.96). Compared with 3174 men, 544 women had a significantly higher threshold estimate for quit/control problems and a lower threshold value for drinking despite physical/mental problems (b parameter difference of 0.25 and -0.30, respectively). Thai adolescents (n=272) and Thai adults (n=3446) had no statistically significant DIF on any criterion. The criterion of time spent drinking had significantly high discrimination estimates in women, men, adolescent and adults (a parameters of 2.50, 2.08, 2.33 and 2.16, respectively). Gender bias on alcohol dependence criteria can be found in Thai drinkers. Time spent drinking may be the most useful criterion for discriminating the severity of alcohol dependence across age and gender groups of Thai drinkers.

  14. Quality Saving Mechanisms of Mitochondria during Aging in a Fully Time-Dependent Computational Biophysical Model.

    PubMed

    Mellem, Daniel; Fischer, Frank; Jaspers, Sören; Wenck, Horst; Rübhausen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for the energy production of eukaryotic cells. During aging mitochondria run through various processes which change their quality in terms of activity, health and metabolic supply. In recent years, many of these processes such as fission and fusion of mitochondria, mitophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy consumption have been subject of research. Based on numerous experimental insights, it was possible to qualify mitochondrial behaviour in computational simulations. Here, we present a new biophysical model based on the approach of Figge et al. in 2012. We introduce exponential decay and growth laws for each mitochondrial process to derive its time-dependent probability during the aging of cells. All mitochondrial processes of the original model are mathematically and biophysically redefined and additional processes are implemented: Mitochondrial fission and fusion is separated into a metabolic outer-membrane part and a protein-related inner-membrane part, a quality-dependent threshold for mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis is introduced and processes for activity-dependent internal oxidative stress as well as mitochondrial repair mechanisms are newly included. Our findings reveal a decrease of mitochondrial quality and a fragmentation of the mitochondrial network during aging. Additionally, the model discloses a quality increasing mechanism due to the interplay of the mitophagy and biogenesis cycle and the fission and fusion cycle of mitochondria. It is revealed that decreased mitochondrial repair can be a quality saving process in aged cells. Furthermore, the model finds strategies to sustain the quality of the mitochondrial network in cells with high production rates of reactive oxygen species due to large energy demands. Hence, the model adds new insights to biophysical mechanisms of mitochondrial aging and provides novel understandings of the interdependency of mitochondrial processes. PMID:26771181

  15. Ageing diminishes endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and tetrahydrobiopterin content in rat skeletal muscle arterioles.

    PubMed

    Delp, Michael D; Behnke, Bradley J; Spier, Scott A; Wu, Guoyao; Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2008-02-15

    Ageing reduces endothelium-dependent vasodilatation through an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) signalling pathway. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arginase activity diminishes endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in skeletal muscle arterioles from old rats, and whether NOS substrate (L-arginine) and cofactor (tetrahydrobiopterin; BH(4)) concentrations are reduced. First-order arterioles were isolated from the soleus muscle of young (6 months old) and old (24 months old) male Fischer 344 rats. In vitro changes in luminal diameter in response to stepwise increases in flow were determined in the presence of the NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10(-5) mol l(-1)), the arginase inhibitor N(omega)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (NOHA, 5 x 10(-4) mol l(-1)), exogenous L-arginine (3 x 10(-3) mol l(-1)) or the precursor for BH(4) synthesis sepiapterin (1 micromol l(-1)). Arteriolar L-arginine and BH(4) content were determined via HPLC. Ageing decreased flow-mediated vasodilatation by 52%, and this difference was abolished with NOS inhibition. Neither inhibition of arginase activity nor addition of exogenous L-arginine had any effect on flow-mediated vasodilatation; arteriolar l-arginine content was also not different between age groups. BH(4) content was lower in arterioles from old rats (94 +/- 8 fmol (mg tissue)(-1)) relative to controls (234 +/- 21 fmol (mg tissue)(-1)), and sepiapterin elevated flow-mediated vasodilatation in arterioles from old rats. These results demonstrate that the impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation induced by old age is due to an altered nitric oxide signalling mechanism in skeletal muscle arterioles, but is not the result of increased arginase activity and limited L-arginine substrate. Rather, the age-related deficit in flow-mediated vasodilatation appears to be the result, in part, of limited BH(4) bioavailability.

  16. Quality Saving Mechanisms of Mitochondria during Aging in a Fully Time-Dependent Computational Biophysical Model

    PubMed Central

    Mellem, Daniel; Fischer, Frank; Jaspers, Sören; Wenck, Horst; Rübhausen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for the energy production of eukaryotic cells. During aging mitochondria run through various processes which change their quality in terms of activity, health and metabolic supply. In recent years, many of these processes such as fission and fusion of mitochondria, mitophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy consumption have been subject of research. Based on numerous experimental insights, it was possible to qualify mitochondrial behaviour in computational simulations. Here, we present a new biophysical model based on the approach of Figge et al. in 2012. We introduce exponential decay and growth laws for each mitochondrial process to derive its time-dependent probability during the aging of cells. All mitochondrial processes of the original model are mathematically and biophysically redefined and additional processes are implemented: Mitochondrial fission and fusion is separated into a metabolic outer-membrane part and a protein-related inner-membrane part, a quality-dependent threshold for mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis is introduced and processes for activity-dependent internal oxidative stress as well as mitochondrial repair mechanisms are newly included. Our findings reveal a decrease of mitochondrial quality and a fragmentation of the mitochondrial network during aging. Additionally, the model discloses a quality increasing mechanism due to the interplay of the mitophagy and biogenesis cycle and the fission and fusion cycle of mitochondria. It is revealed that decreased mitochondrial repair can be a quality saving process in aged cells. Furthermore, the model finds strategies to sustain the quality of the mitochondrial network in cells with high production rates of reactive oxygen species due to large energy demands. Hence, the model adds new insights to biophysical mechanisms of mitochondrial aging and provides novel understandings of the interdependency of mitochondrial processes. PMID:26771181

  17. Quality Saving Mechanisms of Mitochondria during Aging in a Fully Time-Dependent Computational Biophysical Model.

    PubMed

    Mellem, Daniel; Fischer, Frank; Jaspers, Sören; Wenck, Horst; Rübhausen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for the energy production of eukaryotic cells. During aging mitochondria run through various processes which change their quality in terms of activity, health and metabolic supply. In recent years, many of these processes such as fission and fusion of mitochondria, mitophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy consumption have been subject of research. Based on numerous experimental insights, it was possible to qualify mitochondrial behaviour in computational simulations. Here, we present a new biophysical model based on the approach of Figge et al. in 2012. We introduce exponential decay and growth laws for each mitochondrial process to derive its time-dependent probability during the aging of cells. All mitochondrial processes of the original model are mathematically and biophysically redefined and additional processes are implemented: Mitochondrial fission and fusion is separated into a metabolic outer-membrane part and a protein-related inner-membrane part, a quality-dependent threshold for mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis is introduced and processes for activity-dependent internal oxidative stress as well as mitochondrial repair mechanisms are newly included. Our findings reveal a decrease of mitochondrial quality and a fragmentation of the mitochondrial network during aging. Additionally, the model discloses a quality increasing mechanism due to the interplay of the mitophagy and biogenesis cycle and the fission and fusion cycle of mitochondria. It is revealed that decreased mitochondrial repair can be a quality saving process in aged cells. Furthermore, the model finds strategies to sustain the quality of the mitochondrial network in cells with high production rates of reactive oxygen species due to large energy demands. Hence, the model adds new insights to biophysical mechanisms of mitochondrial aging and provides novel understandings of the interdependency of mitochondrial processes.

  18. Age-Dependent Biochemical Dysfunction in Skeletal Muscle of Triple-Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer`s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro-Cardoso, Vera F.; Castro, Marisa; Oliveira, M.M.; Moreira, Paula I.; Peixoto, Francisco; A.Videira, Romeu

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of Alzheimer`s disease as a systemic pathology shifted the research paradigm toward a better understanding of the molecular basis of the disease considering the pathophysiological changes in both brain and peripheral tissues. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of disease progression on physiological relevant features of skeletal muscle obtained from 3, 6 and 12 month-old 3xTg-AD mice, a model of Alzheimer`s disease, and respective agematched nonTg mice. Our results showed that skeletal muscle functionality is already affected in 3-month-old 3xTg-AD mice as evidenced by deficient acetylcholinesterase and catalase activities as well as by alterations in fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes. Additionally, an age-dependent accumulation of amyloid-β1-40 peptide occurred in skeletal muscle of 3xTg-AD mice, an effect that preceded bioenergetics mitochondrial dysfunction, which was only detected at 12 months of age, characterized by decreased respiratory control ratio and ADP/O index and by an impairment of complex I activity. HPLC-MS/MS analyses revealed significant changes in phospholipid composition of skeletal muscle tissues from 3xTg-AD mice with 12 months of age when compared with age-matched nonTg mice. Increased levels of lyso-phosphatidylcholine associated with a decrease of phosphatidylcholine molecular species containing arachidonic acid were detected in 3xTg-AD mice, indicating an enhancement of phospholipase A2 activity and skeletal muscle inflammation. Additionally, a decrease of phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogens content and an increase in phosphatidylinositol levels was observed in 3xTg-AD mice when compared with age-matched nonTg mice. Altogether, these observations suggest that the skeletal muscle of 3xTg-AD mice are more prone to oxidative and inflammatory events. PMID:25654504

  19. Age-dependent accumulation of (137)Cs by pike Esox lucius in the Yenisei River.

    PubMed

    Zotina, T A; Trofimova, E A; Dementyev, D V; Bolsunovsky, A Ya

    2016-05-01

    Age-dependent accumulation of (137)Cs in the muscles and bodies of the pike Esox lucius (aged two to seven years) inhabiting a section of the Yenisei River polluted with artificial radionuclides has been studied. The content of (137)Cs in muscles varied from 0.5 to 7.0 Bq/kg of fresh weight. The maximum content of the radionuclide has been found in juveniles. The content of (137)Cs in pike muscles and body decreased considerably with age. The high content of (137)Cs in the muscles of juveniles is probably a consequence of their higher intensity of feeding as compared to older individuals, which is due to the intense growth of juveniles. PMID:27411826

  20. Is cell aging caused by respiration-dependent injury to the mitochondrial genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. E.; Yengoyan, L. S.; Miquel, J.; Cottrell, S. F.; Economos, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    Though intrinsic mitochondrial aging has been considered before as a possible cause of cellular senescence, the mechanisms of such mitochondrial aging have remained obscure. In this article, the hypothesis of free-radical-induced inhibition of mitochondrial replenishment in fixed postmitotic cells is expanded. It is maintained that the respiration-dependent production of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals may not be fully counteracted, leading to a continuous production of lipoperoxides and malonaldehyde in actively respiring mitochondria. These compounds, in turn, can easily react with the mitochondrial DNA which is in close spatial relationship with the inner mitochondrial membrane, producing an injury that the mitochondria may be unable to counteract because of their apparent lack of adequate repair mechanisms. Mitochondrial division may thus be inhibited leading to age-related reduction of mitochondrial numbers, a deficit in energy production with a concomitant decrease in protein synthesis, deterioration of physiological performance, and, therefore, of organismic performance.

  1. Age-dependent changes in cat masseter nerve: an electrophysiological and morphological study.

    PubMed

    Chase, M H; Engelhardt, J K; Adinolfi, A M; Chirwa, S S

    1992-07-24

    The present study was undertaken to determine the manner in which aging affects the function and structure of the masseter nerve in old cats. Electrophysiological data demonstrated a significant decrease in the conduction velocity of the action potential in old cats compared with that observed in adult cats. Light microscopic analyses revealed an age-dependent decrease in axon diameter. Electron microscopic observations of the masseter nerve in the aged cats revealed a disruption of the myelin sheaths and a pronounced increase in collagen fibers in the endoneurium and perineurium. These morphological changes are discussed and then related to the decrease in conduction velocity which was observed in the electrophysiological portion of this study. PMID:1521161

  2. Age-dependent decline of nogo-a protein in the mouse cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anita; Thakur, M K

    2014-11-01

    Nogo-A, a myelin-associated neurite growth inhibitory protein, is implicated in synaptic plasticity. It binds to its receptor namely the Nogo-66 receptor1 (NgR1) and regulates filamentous (F) actin dynamics via small GTPases of the Rho family, RhoA kinase (ROCK), LimK and cofilin. These proteins are associated with the structural plasticity, one of the components of synaptic plasticity, which is known to decline with normal aging. So, the level of Nogo-A and its receptor NgR1 are likely to vary during normal brain aging. However, it is not clearly understood how the levels of Nogo-A and its receptor NgR1 change in the cerebrum during aging. Several studies show an age- and gender-dependent decline in synaptic plasticity. Therefore, the present study was planned to analyze the relative changes in the mRNA and protein levels of Nogo-A and NgR1 in both male and female mice cerebrum during normal aging. Western blot analysis has shown decrease in Nogo-A protein level during aging in both male and female mice cerebrum. This was further confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis. RT-PCR analysis of Nogo-A mRNA showed no significant difference in the above-mentioned groups. This was also supported by in situ hybridization. NgR1 protein and its mRNA expression levels showed no significant alteration with aging in the cerebrum of both male and female mice. Taken together, we speculate that the downregulation of Nogo-A protein might have a role in the altered synaptic plasticity during aging.

  3. Hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor activation enhances voltage-dependent Ca2+ conductances: relevance to brain aging.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, D S; Campbell, L W; Thibault, O; Landfield, P W

    1992-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) activate several biochemical/molecular processes in the hippocampus through two receptor types. In addition, GCs influence cognitive behaviors and hippocampal neural activity and can also increase the rate of aging-dependent cell loss in the hippocampus. However, the ionic mechanisms through which GCs modulate hippocampal neuronal function are not well understood. We report here direct evidence that activation of cytosolic steroid receptors, specifically of the type II GC receptor, can enhance voltage-dependent Ca2+ conductances in brain neurons. Ca2+ current was assessed by current-clamp measures of Ca2+ action potentials and by sharp electrode voltage-clamp analyses of voltage-sensitive currents in cesium-, tetrodotoxin-, and tetraethylammonium-treated CA1 neurons in hippocampal slices. Both Ca2+ action potentials and voltage-activated Ca2+ currents (N- and L-like) were increased by 2-hr exposure to the synthetic GC receptor agonist, RU 28362. This effect of RU 28362 was blocked by coincubation with cycloheximide, indicating that the GC receptor-Ca2+ channel interaction depends on de novo protein synthesis. Dysregulated calcium homeostasis is also viewed as a candidate mechanism in brain aging. Thus, present results are consistent with the hypothesis that excessive GC-receptor activation and resultant increased Ca2+ influx may be two sequential phases of a brain-aging process that results initially in impairment of function and eventually in neuronal loss. PMID:1528857

  4. Evidence for different patterns of chemosensory alterations in the elderly population: impact of age versus dependency.

    PubMed

    Sulmont-Rossé, Claire; Maître, Isabelle; Amand, Marion; Symoneaux, Ronan; Van Wymelbeke, Virginie; Caumon, Elodie; Tavarès, Jérémy; Issanchou, Sylvie

    2015-03-01

    The present experiment aimed to explore the interindividual variability in chemosensory abilities among the elderly population. The chemosensory abilities of 559 subjects, aged from 65 to 99 years, were evaluated. Various categories of the elderly, including people who were living at home either without or with assistance, and people who were living in a nursing home, were interviewed. The results revealed that 43% of the sample presented well-preserved chemosensory abilities, whereas 21% of the participants presented a moderate impairment. Of the sample, 33% presented well-preserved olfactory abilities but strong impairment in gustatory abilities and 3% were nearly anosmic but remained able to perceive the salty taste, demonstrating that gustation and olfaction were not systematically damaged simultaneously. The results showed a link between the level of dependence (free living vs. living at home with help vs. nursing home) and chemosensory abilities, independently of the age effect. These results strengthen the hypothesis that the impairment of chemosensory abilities is not only an effect of age per se; rather, it is related to events that are associated with aging. Factors that lead to increased dependence (such as poor health) also lead to an impairment in chemosensory performance.

  5. Role of Temperament, Personality Traits and Onset Age of Smoking in Predicting Opiate Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Amirabadi, Bahareh; Nikbakht, Mohammad; Nokani, Mostafa; Alibeygi, Neda; Safari, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: According to drug gateway theory, smoking cigarettes, especially, low onset age of smoking, is one of the risk factors for future use. Objectives: The present study aimed to compare nicotine and opiate addicts to identify the differences in personality traits and onset age of smoking in the two groups that cause some individuals to appeal to other substances after starting to use cigarettes. Patients and Methods: Two groups of opiate and nicotine addicts were randomly selected. Revised version of the Cloninger temperament inventory questionnaire, the Fagrastrom nicotine dependence and the Maudsley addiction profile were used. ANOVA and logistic regression were applied for data analysis. Results: Opiate addicts had higher scores in novelty seeking dimension and lower scores in cooperativeness compared to nicotine addicts. The onset age of smoking cigarette in opiate addicts was lower than nicotine addicts. Conclusions: Low onset age of smoking cigarettes, high novelty seeking and low cooperativeness in opiate dependents are among the important personality traits in future use of drugs that can predict the subsequent onset of using opiate drugs. PMID:26870712

  6. Biological factors and age-dependence of primary motor cortex experimental plasticity.

    PubMed

    Polimanti, Renato; Simonelli, Ilaria; Zappasodi, Filippo; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Pellicciari, Maria Concetta; Benussi, Luisa; Squitti, Rosanna; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Tecchio, Franca

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate whether the age-dependence of brain plasticity correlates with the levels of proteins involved in hormone and brain functions we executed a paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocol and blood tests. We measured the PAS-induced plasticity in the primary motor cortex. Blood levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), estradiol, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3, progesterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone, and the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) were determined in 15 healthy men and 20 healthy women. We observed an age-related reduction of PAS-induced plasticity in females that it is not present in males. In females, PAS-induced plasticity displayed a correlation with testosterone (p = 0.006) that became a trend after the adjustment for the age effect (p = 0.078). In males, IGF-1 showed a nominally significant correlation with the PAS-induced plasticity (p = 0.043). In conclusion, we observed that hormone blood levels (testosterone in females and IGF-1 in males) may be involved in the age-dependence of brain plasticity.

  7. Age-dependent changes in microscale stiffness and mechanoresponses of cells.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Jasmin T; Louban, Ilia; Jungbauer, Simon; Bissinger, Martin; Kaufmann, Dieter; Kemkemer, Ralf; Spatz, Joachim P

    2011-05-23

    Cellular ageing can lead to altered cell mechanical properties and is known to affect many fundamental physiological cell functions. To reveal age-dependent changes in cell mechanical properties and in active mechanoresponses, the stiffness of human fibroblasts from differently aged donors was determined, as well as the cell's reaction to periodic mechanical deformation of the culture substrate, and the two parameters were correlated. A comparison of the average Young's moduli revealed that cells from young donors (<25 years) are considerably stiffer than cells from older donors (>30 years). The reduced stiffness of cells from the older donor group corresponds to the measured decrease of actin in these cells. Remarkably, cells from the older donor group show a significantly faster reorganization response to periodic uniaxial tensile strain than cells from the young donor group. The impact of a reduced amount of actin on cell stiffness and cell reorganization kinetics is further confirmed by experiments where the amount of cellular actin in cells from the young donor group was decreased by transient siRNA knockdown of the actin gene. These cells show a reduced stiffness and enhanced reorganization speed, and in this way mimic the properties and behavior of cells from the older donor group. These results demonstrate that mechanical properties of human fibroblasts depend on the donor's age, which in turn may affect the cells' active responses to mechanical stimulations.

  8. Anopheles mortality is both age- and Plasmodium-density dependent: implications for malaria transmission

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Daily mortality is an important determinant of a vector's ability to transmit pathogens. Original simplifying assumptions in malaria transmission models presume vector mortality is independent of age, infection status and parasite load. Previous studies illustrate conflicting evidence as to the importance of Plasmodium-induced vector mortality, but very few studies to date have considered the effect of infection density on mosquito survival. Methods A series of three experiments were conducted, each consisting of four cages of 400-1,000 Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes fed on blood infected with different Plasmodium berghei ookinete densities per microlitre of blood. Twice daily the numbers of dead mosquitoes in each group were recorded, and on alternate days a sample of live mosquitoes from each group were dissected to determine parasite density in both midgut and salivary glands. Results Survival analyses indicate that mosquito mortality is both age- and infection intensity-dependent. Mosquitoes experienced an initially high, partly feeding-associated, mortality rate, which declined to a minimum before increasing with mosquito age and parasite intake. As a result, the life expectancy of a mosquito is shown to be dependent on both insect age and the density of Plasmodium infection. Conclusion These results contribute to understanding in greater detail the processes that influence sporogony in the mosquito, indicate the impact that parasite density could have on malaria transmission dynamics, and have implications for the design, development, and evaluation of transmission-blocking strategies. PMID:19822012

  9. Age-dependent uncoupling of mitochondria from Ca2+ release units in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ainbinder, Alina; Michelucci, Antonio; Kern, Helmut; Dirksen, Robert T.; Boncompagni, Simona; Protasi, Feliciano

    2015-01-01

    Calcium release units (CRUs) and mitochondria control myoplasmic [Ca2+] levels and ATP production in muscle, respectively. We recently reported that these two organelles are structurally connected by tethers, which promote proximity and proper Ca2+ signaling. Here we show that disposition, ultrastructure, and density of CRUs and mitochondria and their reciprocal association are compromised in muscle from aged mice. Specifically, the density of CRUs and mitochondria is decreased in muscle fibers from aged (>24 months) vs. adult (3-12 months), with an increased percentage of mitochondria being damaged and misplaced from their normal triadic position. A significant reduction in tether (13.8±0.4 vs. 5.5±0.3 tethers/100μm2) and CRU-mitochondrial pair density (37.4±0.8 vs. 27.0±0.7 pairs/100μm2) was also observed in aged mice. In addition, myoplasmic Ca2+ transient (1.68±0.08 vs 1.37±0.03) and mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (9.6±0.050 vs 6.58±0.54) during repetitive high frequency tetanic stimulation were significantly decreased. Finally oxidative stress, assessed from levels of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), Cu/Zn superoxide-dismutase (SOD1) and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD2) expression, were significantly increased in aged mice. The reduced association between CRUs and mitochondria with aging may contribute to impaired cross-talk between the two organelles, possibly resulting in reduced efficiency in activity-dependent ATP production and, thus, to age-dependent decline of skeletal muscle performance. PMID:26485763

  10. A rapid method for determining arachidonic:eicosapentaenoic acid ratios in whole blood lipids: correlation with erythrocyte membrane ratios and validation in a large Italian population of various ages and pathologies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Omega-3 and -6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA), are important for good health conditions. They are present in membrane phospholipids. The ratio of total n-6:n-3 LCPUFA and arachidonic acid:eicosapentaenoic acid (AA and EPA), should not exceed 5:1. Increased intake of n-6 and decreased consumption of n-3 has resulted in much higher, ca 10/15:1 ratio in RBC fatty acids with the possible appearance of a pathological "scenario". The determination of RBC phospholipid LCPUFA contents and ratios is the method of choice for assessing fatty acid status but it is labour intensive and time consuming. Aims of the study [i] To describe and validate a rapid method, suitable for large scale population studies, for total blood fatty acid assay; [ii] to verify a possible correlation between total n-6:n-3 ratio and AA:EPA ratios in RBC phospholipids and in whole-blood total lipids, [iii] to assess usefulness of these ratio as biomarkers of LCPUFA status. Methods [1] Healthy volunteers and patients with various pathologies were recruited. [2] Fatty acid analyses by GC of methyl esters from directly derivatized whole blood total lipids and from RBC phospholipids were performed on fasting blood samples from 1432 subjects categorised according to their age, sex and any existing pathologies. AA:EPA ratio and the total n-6:n-3 ratio were determined. Results AA:EPA ratio is a more sensitive and reliable index for determining changes in total blood fatty acid and it is correlated with the ratio derived from extracted RBC phospholipids. Conclusions The described AA:EPA ratio is a simple, rapid and reliable method for determining n-3 fatty acid status. PMID:20105293

  11. Evidence for age-dependent changes in Sertoli cell androgen receptor concentration.

    PubMed

    Buzek, S W; Caston, L A; Sanborn, B M

    1987-01-01

    Cytosol and nuclear receptor concentrations in Sertoli cells isolated from the testes of 15-, 25-, and 35-day-old rats were measured using hydroxylapatite separation procedures. In these cells the mean Kd of the cytosol receptor for methyltrienolone (3H-R1881) ranged between 2.3 and 2.9 nM, and the concentration of cytosol androgen receptor per mg Sertoli cell DNA increased over the 15-to 35-day age interval. However, when the data were expressed per mg cytosol protein, no increase was observed. The increase in receptor concentration per mg DNA paralleled the increase in cytosol protein/DNA ratio. The concentration of androgen receptor per mg DNA in nuclear extracts also increased with age. Consequently, total Sertoli cell androgen receptor increases over the time interval in which meiosis is first completed in the testis.

  12. Care dependence in old age: preferences, practices and implications in two Indonesian communities

    PubMed Central

    SCHRÖDER-BUTTERFILL, ELISABETH; FITHRY, TENGKU SYAWILA

    2013-01-01

    The provision of physical care is a sensitive matter in all cultures and is circumscribed by moral injunctions and personal preferences. Research on Western cultures has shown care networks to be narrow subsets of people’s wider networks and revealed dependence to be deeply undermining of full personhood. In non-Western societies these issues have received little attention, although it is sometimes assumed that care provision and dependence are much less problematic. This paper uses longitudinal ethnographic data from two ethnic groups in rural Indonesia to compare care preferences and practices in old age and to examine the implications of care dependence. The groups manifest varying degrees of daughter preference in care and differ in the extent to which notions of shame and avoidance prohibit cross-gender intimate care and care by ‘non-blood’ relatives. Demographic and social constraints often necessitate compromises in actual care arrangements (e.g. dependence on in-laws, neighbours or paid carers), not all of which are compatible with quality care and a valued identity. We argue that by probing the norms and practices surrounding care provision in different socio-cultural settings, it becomes possible to arrive at a deeper understanding of kinship, personhood and sociality. These insights are not only of sociological interest but have implications for people’s vulnerability to poor quality care in old age. PMID:24518962

  13. Identification of an age-dependent biomarker signature in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are neurodevelopmental conditions with symptoms manifesting before the age of 3, generally persisting throughout life and affecting social development and communication. Here, we have investigated changes in protein biomarkers in blood during childhood and adolescent development. Methods We carried out a multiplex immunoassay profiling analysis of serum samples from 37 individuals with a diagnosis of ASD and their matched, non-affected siblings, aged between 4 and 18 years, to identify molecular pathways affected over the course of ASDs. Results This analysis revealed age-dependent differences in the levels of 12 proteins involved in inflammation, growth and hormonal signaling. Conclusions These deviations in age-related molecular trajectories provide further insight into the progression and pathophysiology of the disorder and, if replicated, may contribute to better classification of ASD individuals, as well as to improved treatment and prognosis. The results also underline the importance of stratifying and analyzing samples by age, especially in ASD and potentially other developmental disorders. PMID:23915542

  14. Age-dependent decrease in the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of ouabain in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohta, M; Kanai, S; Sato, Y; Kitani, K

    1988-03-01

    The biliary excretion of i.v. injected ouabain was examined in male and female Wistar-derived rats in relation to age. The hepatic uptake velocity for ouabain was also determined in isolated hepatocyte preparations obtained from male rats of various ages. Biliary recovery values of ouabain (percent of the dose) were fairly comparable for young male and female rats (3-4 month old). Recovery progressively decreased with age, the first 10-min recoveries at 24 months being about one-third those of respective young values in both sexes. A significant linear relation was demonstrated between the first 10-min recovery (Y, percent of the dose) and rat age (X, month), yielding the relations of Y = 17.75-0.43X for males and Y = 18.99-0.43X for females respectively. Similarly, the initial uptake velocity (Y, nmol/mg/min) for ouabain decreased in a linear fashion with age (X, month), yielding a significant negative correlation (Y = 0.704-0.0021X, r = -0.839, P less than 0.005, N = 21) at an ouabain concentration of 8 microM. Kinetic studies using non-linear regression analysis revealed a significantly lower Vmax value (0.533 +/- 0.041 nmol/mg/min) in old (24-29 months) rats compared to the young (4-4.5 months) value (1.193 +/- 0.105 nmol per mg/min, P less than 0.05), while the affinity constant (Km, microM) did not differ significantly between young and old animals (203.12 +/- 25.42 microM in young rats vs 283.68 +/- 28.90 microM in old rats, mean +/- SE, 0.05 less than P less than 0.1). The results of the present study suggest that the age-dependent decrease in the biliary recovery of i.v. injected ouabain in rats can be largely explained by the decrease with age in the hepatic uptake of ouabain. Furthermore, the results provide further support for our previous thesis that the decrease in the lateral mobility of hepatocyte plasma membrane proteins, as revealed by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique, may play a significant role in the age-dependent

  15. Age-related maintenance of eccentric strength: a study of temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Power, Geoffrey A; Flaaten, Nordan; Dalton, Brian H; Herzog, Walter

    2016-04-01

    With adult aging, eccentric strength is maintained better than isometric strength leading to a higher ratio of eccentric/isometric force production (ECC/ISO) in older than younger adults. The purpose was to investigate the ECC/ISO during electrical activation of the adductor pollicis during lengthening (20-320° s(-1)) contractions in 24 young (n = 12, ∼24 years) and old (n = 12, ∼72 years) males across muscle temperatures (cold ∼19 °C; normal ∼30 °C; warm ∼35 °C). For isometric force, the old were 20-30 % weaker in the normal and cold conditions (P < 0.05) with no difference for the warm condition compared to young (P > 0.05). Half-relaxation time (HRT) did not differ across age for the normal and warm temperatures (P > 0.05), but it slowed significantly for old in the cold condition compared with young (∼15 %; P < 0.05), as well, there was a 20 and 40 % increase in muscle stiffness for the young and old, respectively. ECC/ISO was 50-60 % greater for the cold condition than the normal and warm conditions. There was no age difference in ECC/ISO across ages for the normal and warm conditions (P > 0.05), but for the cold, the old exhibited a 20-35 % higher ECC/ISO than did the young for velocities above 60° s(-1) (P < 0.05). A contributing factor to the elevated ECC/ISO is an increased proportion of weakly compared to strongly bound crossbridges. These findings highlight the relationship (r = 0.70) between intrinsic muscle contractile speed (HRT) and eccentric strength in old age. PMID:27028894

  16. Altered connexin 43 expression underlies age dependent decrease of Treg cell suppressor function in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuczma, Michal; Wang, Cong-Yi; Ignatowicz, Leszek; Gourdie, Robert; Kraj, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Type I diabetes (T1D) is one of the most extensively studied autoimmune diseases but the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β-cells are still not well understood. Here we show that Treg cells in NOD mice undergo age-dependent loss of suppressor functions exacerbated by the decreased ability of activated effector T cells to upregulate Foxp3 and generate Treg cells in the peripheral organs. This age-dependent loss is associated with reduced intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions, which is caused by impaired upregulation and decreased expression of connexin 43. Regulatory functions can be corrected, even in T cells isolated from aged, diabetic mice, by a synergistic activity of retinoic acid, TGF-β, and IL-2, which enhance connexin 43 and Foxp3 expression in Treg cells and restore the ability of conventional CD4+ T cells to upregulate Foxp3 and generate peripherally derived Treg cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that suppression mediated by Treg cells from diabetic mice is enhanced by a novel reagent, which facilitates gap junction aggregation. In summary, our report identifies gap junction-mediated intercellular communication as an important component of the Treg cell suppression mechanism compromised in NOD mice and suggests how Treg mediated immune regulation can be improved. PMID:25911751

  17. Notch Fracture Toughness of Glasses: Dependence on Rate, Age, and Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasoya, Manish; Rycroft, Chris H.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the fracture toughness (resistance) of glasses is a fundamental problem of prime theoretical and practical importance. Here we theoretically study its dependence on the loading rate, the age (history) of the glass, and the notch radius ρ . Reduced-dimensionality analysis suggests that the notch fracture toughness results from a competition between the initial, age- and history-dependent, plastic relaxation time scale τ0pl and an effective loading time scale τext(K˙ I,ρ ) , where K˙ I is the tensile stress-intensity-factor rate. The toughness is predicted to scale with √{ρ } independently of ξ ≡τext/τ0pl for ξ ≪1 , to scale as T √{ρ }log (ξ ) for ξ ≫1 (related to thermal activation, where T is the temperature), and to feature a nonmonotonic behavior in the crossover region ξ ˜O (1 ) (related to plastic yielding dynamics). These predictions are verified using 2D computations, providing a unified picture of the notch fracture toughness of glasses. The theory highlights the importance of time-scale competition and far-from-steady-state elasto-viscoplastic dynamics for understanding the toughness and shows that the latter varies quite significantly with the glass age (history) and applied loading rate. Experimental support for bulk metallic glasses is presented, and possible implications for applications are discussed.

  18. Age-related changes in color appearance depend on unique-hue components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okajima, Katsunori; Tsuchiya, Nao; Yamashita, Kazuyuki

    2002-06-01

    In order to compare color appearance as seen by elderly and young people, we conducted an experiment where the subjects responded to the color appearance of 75 color chips using a categorical color naming method and an elemental color scaling method. The results show that categorical color naming between elderly and young subjects is almost identical for most color chips, but there were significant differences in the elemental color scaling between the two age groups depending on unique-hue components. The differences in yellow and blue components between elderly and young subjects suggest that the neural mechanism of color vision in elderly people may over perform on constancy of color appearance so as to compensate for the age-related change of the human crystalline lens. In addition, the chromatic components in elderly subjects indicate higher values than those in young subjects for low saturation color chips, whereas the chromatic components in elderly subjects indicate lower values than those in young subjects when viewing high saturation color chips. These results show that the age-related changes of unique hue components strongly depend on saturation of colors, and suggest that the practical range of color appearance in elderly people is small in comparison with young people.

  19. Influence of growth during infancy on endothelium-dependent vasodilatation at the age of 6 months.

    PubMed

    Touwslager, Robbert N H; Gerver, Willem-Jan M; Tan, Frans E S; Gielen, Marij; Zeegers, Maurice P; Zimmermann, Luc J; Houben, Alfons J H M; Blanco, Carlos E; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Mulder, Antonius L M

    2012-11-01

    Low birth weight and accelerated infant growth are associated with cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as a precursor of atherosclerosis and is also related to infant growth. We aimed to examine whether an association between infant growth and endothelial function is already present during discrete periods of growth during the first 6 months of life in healthy term infants. A cohort of 104 newborns was studied in the first week after birth and reexamined at the age of 6 months. Maximum vasodilatation in response to acetylcholine (endothelium dependent) and nitroprusside (endothelium independent) was measured in the vasculature of the forearm skin, using laser Doppler flowmetry and iontophoresis. Growth was calculated as difference in Z scores for weight, length, weight-for-length, and head circumference. Multivariable multilevel linear regression was used for the analysis. Growth from 0 to 1 month (calculated as difference in weight) was the only window in the first 6 months of life that was significantly and inversely associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilatation at 6 months (b=-11.72 perfusion units per Z score, P=0.01 in multivariable analysis). Birth size was not important when considered simultaneously with infant growth. Maximum endothelium-independent vasodilatation was not associated with birth size or growth parameters. We conclude that growth in the first month of life is inversely associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilatation at the age of 6 months in healthy term infants, regardless of birth size.

  20. Time-dependent degradation of titanium osteoconductivity: an implication of biological aging of implant materials.

    PubMed

    Att, Wael; Hori, Norio; Takeuchi, Masato; Ouyang, Jianyong; Yang, Yang; Anpo, Masakazu; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2009-10-01

    The shelf life of implantable materials has rarely been addressed. We determined whether osteoconductivity of titanium is stable over time. Rat bone marrow-derived osteoblasts were cultured on new titanium disks (immediately after acid-etching), 3-day-old (stored after acid-etching for 3 days in dark ambient conditions), 2-week-old, and 4-week-old disks. Protein adsorption capacity, and osteoblast migration, attachment, spread, proliferation and mineralization decreased substantially on old titanium surfaces in an age-dependent manner. When the 4-week-old implants were placed into rat femurs, the biomechanical strength of bone-titanium integration was less than half that for newly processed implants at the early healing stage. More than 90% of the new implant surface was covered by newly generated bone compared to 58% for 4-week-old implants. This time-dependent biological degradation was also found for machined and sandblasted titanium surfaces and was associated with progressive accumulation of hydrocarbon on titanium surfaces. The new surface could attract osteoblasts even under a protein-free condition, but its high bioactivity was abrogated by masking the surface with anions. These results uncover an aging-like time-dependent biological degradation of titanium surfaces from bioactive to bioinert. We also suggest possible underlying mechanisms for this biological degradation that provide new insights into how we could inadvertently lose, and conversely, maximize the osteoconductivity of titanium-based implant materials.

  1. Aging modulates calcium-dependent phosphatidylinositol degradation by cerebral cortex synaptic plasma membrane phospholipases.

    PubMed

    Strosznajder, J; Samochocki, M; Wikieł, H; Małecki, A

    1994-01-01

    The synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) and cytosol fractions from cerebral cortex of adult (4-mo-old) and aged (27-mo-old) rats were used as a source of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and phospholipase C (PLC). The activity of PLC acting on [3H-inositol]phosphatidylinositol ([3H]PtdIns) was investigated in the presence of endogenous and 2 mM Ca2+. Arachidonic acid (AA) release was studied in the same conditions, using 1-stearoyl-[2-14C]arachidonyl-sn-glycerophosphoinositol ([14C]PtdIns) as a substrate. In the presence of endogenous Ca2+ (i.e., no added Ca2+) SPM-bound PLC and PLA2 or diacylglycerol (DAG) lipase of aged brain exert significantly higher activity in degradation of PtdIns as compared to their activities in adult brain. Moreover, these enzymes of aged brain are less or not further activated by 2 mM Ca2+, contrary to the enzymes isolated from adult brain. The activity of cytosolic enzymes involved in degradation [3H]PtdIns and [14C]PtdIns and their regulation by Ca2+ ions are not significantly changed in senescent cerebral cortex as compared to the adult. The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), measured with fura-2, is lower in aged brain compared to adult brain, which may suggest the modification in Ca2+ ion redistribution in aged brain and probably its higher concentration in membranes. These results indicate that aging modifies significantly the activity of membrane-bound, Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase(s) degrading PtdIns, which may be connected with alteration of Ca2+ ion redistribution and may influence the formation and accumulation of very potent lipid messengers as diacylglycerol, lysophospholipid, and arachidonic acid, known to be involved in neurotransmission processes. PMID:8179775

  2. Mercury and Selenium Balance in Endangered Saimaa Ringed Seal Depend on Age and Sex.

    PubMed

    Lyytikäinen, Merja; Pätynen, Juuso; Hyvärinen, Heikki; Sipilä, Tero; Kunnasranta, Mervi

    2015-10-01

    The endangered Saimaa ringed seal (Pusa hispida saimensis) is exposed to relatively high concentrations of mercury (Hg) in freshwaters poor in selenium (Se), a known antagonist of Hg. The impact of age and sex on the bioaccumulation of Hg and Se was studied by analyzing liver, muscle, and hair samples from seals of different age groups. Adult females were found to accumulate significantly more Hg in the liver (with ca. 60% as HgSe), and less Hg in the muscles compared to adult males, which may be explained by accelerated metabolism during gestation and lactation. In adult seals, molar Se:Hg ratios in the muscles fall below one, which is considered a threshold for the emergence of adverse effects. As a result, Saimaa ringed seals may be at risk of developing health and reproductive problems. According to mass balance calculations, the pups are exposed to considerable amounts (μg/d) of mercury during gestation, although lactation is their main exposure route. In lanugo pups, Hg concentrates in the hair, and molting serves as a main detoxification route. For other age groups, demethylation followed by the formation of HgSe is the main detoxification route, and the demethylation capability develops in pups by the time of weaning.

  3. Microglial brain region-dependent diversity and selective regional sensitivities to ageing

    PubMed Central

    Grabert, Kathleen; Michoel, Tom; Karavolos, Michail H; Clohisey, Sara; Baillie, J Kenneth; Stevens, Mark P; Freeman, Tom C; Summers, Kim M; McColl, Barry W

    2015-01-01

    Microglia play critical roles in neural development, homeostasis and neuroinflammation and are increasingly implicated in age-related neurological dysfunction. Neurodegeneration often occurs in disease-specific spatially-restricted patterns, the origins of which are unknown. We performed the first genome-wide analysis of microglia from discrete brain regions across the adult lifespan of the mouse and reveal that microglia have distinct region-dependent transcriptional identities and age in a regionally variable manner. In the young adult brain, differences in bioenergetic and immunoregulatory pathways were the major sources of heterogeneity and suggested that cerebellar and hippocampal microglia exist in a more immune vigilant state. Immune function correlated with regional transcriptional patterns. Augmentation of the distinct cerebellar immunophenotype and a contrasting loss in distinction of the hippocampal phenotype among forebrain regions were key features during ageing. Microglial diversity may enable regionally localised homeostatic functions but could also underlie region-specific sensitivities to microglial dysregulation and involvement in age-related neurodegeneration. PMID:26780511

  4. Treadmill exercise induces age and protocol-dependent epigenetic changes in prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cechinel, Laura Reck; Basso, Carla Giovana; Bertoldi, Karine; Schallenberger, Bruna; de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2016-10-15

    Some studies have linked age-related beneficial effects of exercise and epigenetic mechanisms. Although, the impact of treadmill exercise on histone acetylation, histone and DNA methylation marks in aged cortices yet remains poorly understood. Considering the role of frontal cortex on brain functions, we investigated the potential of different exercise protocols, single session and daily exercise, to modulate epigenetic marks, namely global H4 acetylation, histone methyltransferase activity (HMT H3K27) and levels of DNA methytransferase (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) in prefrontal cortices from 3 and 21-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two treadmill exercise protocols, single session (20min) or daily moderate (20min/day during 14days). The daily exercise protocol induced an increased in histone H4 acetylation levels in prefrontal cortices of 21-months-old rats, without any effects in young adult group. DNMT3b levels were increased in aged cortices of animals submitted to single session of exercise. These results indicate that prefrontal cortex is susceptible to epigenetic changes in a protocol dependent-manner and that H4 acetylation levels and DNMT3b content changes might be linked at least in part to exercise-induced effects on brain functions. PMID:27418438

  5. Microglial brain region-dependent diversity and selective regional sensitivities to aging.

    PubMed

    Grabert, Kathleen; Michoel, Tom; Karavolos, Michail H; Clohisey, Sara; Baillie, J Kenneth; Stevens, Mark P; Freeman, Tom C; Summers, Kim M; McColl, Barry W

    2016-03-01

    Microglia have critical roles in neural development, homeostasis and neuroinflammation and are increasingly implicated in age-related neurological dysfunction. Neurodegeneration often occurs in disease-specific, spatially restricted patterns, the origins of which are unknown. We performed to our knowledge the first genome-wide analysis of microglia from discrete brain regions across the adult lifespan of the mouse, and found that microglia have distinct region-dependent transcriptional identities and age in a regionally variable manner. In the young adult brain, differences in bioenergetic and immunoregulatory pathways were the major sources of heterogeneity and suggested that cerebellar and hippocampal microglia exist in a more immune-vigilant state. Immune function correlated with regional transcriptional patterns. Augmentation of the distinct cerebellar immunophenotype and a contrasting loss in distinction of the hippocampal phenotype among forebrain regions were key features during aging. Microglial diversity may enable regionally localized homeostatic functions but could also underlie region-specific sensitivities to microglial dysregulation and involvement in age-related neurodegeneration.

  6. Prefrontal atrophy, disrupted NREM slow waves and impaired hippocampal-dependent memory in aging.

    PubMed

    Mander, Bryce A; Rao, Vikram; Lu, Brandon; Saletin, Jared M; Lindquist, John R; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Jagust, William; Walker, Matthew P

    2013-03-01

    Aging has independently been associated with regional brain atrophy, reduced slow wave activity (SWA) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and impaired long-term retention of episodic memories. However, whether the interaction of these factors represents a neuropatholgical pathway associated with cognitive decline in later life remains unknown. We found that age-related medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) gray-matter atrophy was associated with reduced NREM SWA in older adults, the extent to which statistically mediated the impairment of overnight sleep-dependent memory retention. Moreover, this memory impairment was further associated with persistent hippocampal activation and reduced task-related hippocampal-prefrontal cortex functional connectivity, potentially representing impoverished hippocampal-neocortical memory transformation. Together, these data support a model in which age-related mPFC atrophy diminishes SWA, the functional consequence of which is impaired long-term memory. Such findings suggest that sleep disruption in the elderly, mediated by structural brain changes, represents a contributing factor to age-related cognitive decline in later life.

  7. Adenomatous polyposis coli heterozygous knockout mice display hypoactivity and age-dependent working memory deficits

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Fukui, Yasuyuki; Takao, Keizo; Ohira, Koji; Tanda, Koichi; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Toyama, Keiko; Oshima, Masanobu; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    A tumor suppressor gene, Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc), is expressed in the nervous system from embryonic to adulthood stages, and transmits the Wnt signaling pathway in which schizophrenia susceptibility genes, including T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) and calcineurin (CN), are involved. However, the functions of Apc in the nervous system are largely unknown. In this study, as the first evaluation of Apc function in the nervous system, we have investigated the behavioral significance of the Apc gene, applying a battery of behavioral tests to Apc heterozygous knockout (Apc+/−) mice. Apc+/− mice showed no significant impairment in neurological reflexes or sensory and motor abilities. In various tests, including light/dark transition, open-field, social interaction, eight-arm radial maze, and fear conditioning tests, Apc+/− mice exhibited hypoactivity. In the eight-arm radial maze, Apc+/− mice 6–7 weeks of age displayed almost normal performance, whereas those 11–12 weeks of age showed a severe performance deficit in working memory, suggesting that Apc is involved in working memory performance in an age-dependent manner. The possibility that anemia, which Apc+/− mice develop by 17 weeks of age, impairs working memory performance, however, cannot be excluded. Our results suggest that Apc plays a role in the regulation of locomotor activity and presumably working memory performance. PMID:22347851

  8. When does maternal age-dependent trisomy 21 arise relative to meiosis?

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Jiang Zheng; Byers, B.

    1996-07-01

    Polymorphic DNA markers have recently been used to estimate the fraction of trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) cases that may be attributable to postzygotic nondisjunction - indicative of a loss in the fidelity of the first few cell divisions after fertilization. In these studies, a postzygotic nondisjunction is defined as a case in which two chromosomes of the trisomic set are homozygous for all informative markers (i.e., for those markers that were heterozygous in their parent of origin). These studies estimate that the postzygotic mutation mechanism accounts for 4.5% (11/238) and 3.5% (9/255) of their cases, respectively, but their estimates may actually be conservative, since all noninformative haplotypes (frequency not reported) are arbitrarily attributed to meiosis II-type nondisjunction. Nevertheless, even the conservative estimates would, if confirmed, constitute a new and nonnegligible source of chromosomal segregation errors leading to trisomy. These studies` conclusions are supported by the observation that the 20 reported {open_quotes}postzygotic{close_quotes} cases (5 paternal and 15 maternal) appear to be less dependent on maternal age (mean maternal age 28.4 years) than maternal meiosis I-type failures (mean maternal age 31.2 years). However, given the limited sample size involved, one should be cautious in positing the absence of a maternal age effect. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Prevalence and age-dependent occurrence of intestinal protozoan infections in suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Damriyasa, I Made; Bauer, Christian

    2006-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was performed on 20 pig breeding farms in southern Hesse, central Germany, to evaluate the prevalence and age-dependent occurrence of intestinal protozoan parasites in unweaned piglets. Faecal samples of 514 clinically unaffected piglets of different age (< 1 to 5-7 weeks) were examined using the sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF) concentration technique. Infections with the following protozoan species were detected: Balantidium coli (16 of 20 farms), Entamoeba sp. (15), Jodamoeba sp. (14), Isospora (I.) suis (9), Chilomastix sp. (6) and Eimeria spp. (6). The protozoan species differed in the start and course of (oo)cyst excretion. I. suis oocysts and Jodamoeba cysts were detected already in the first week of life whereas shedding of the other parasites started later on. The prevalence of Isospora oocyst excretion increased to a maximum (18%) in 2-3 weeks old animals followed by a sharp decline. The proportion of Balantidium, Entamoeba or Jodamoeba positive suckling piglets continously increased until the age of 5-7 weeks to 60%, 52% and 22%, respectively, whereas that of Chilomastix positive animals remained on a low level of 8-12% independent of the age. Eimeria oocysts were found transiently in the faeces of 1-4 weeks old piglets. PMID:17009710

  10. Treadmill exercise induces age and protocol-dependent epigenetic changes in prefrontal cortex of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cechinel, Laura Reck; Basso, Carla Giovana; Bertoldi, Karine; Schallenberger, Bruna; de Meireles, Louisiana Carolina Ferreira; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2016-10-15

    Some studies have linked age-related beneficial effects of exercise and epigenetic mechanisms. Although, the impact of treadmill exercise on histone acetylation, histone and DNA methylation marks in aged cortices yet remains poorly understood. Considering the role of frontal cortex on brain functions, we investigated the potential of different exercise protocols, single session and daily exercise, to modulate epigenetic marks, namely global H4 acetylation, histone methyltransferase activity (HMT H3K27) and levels of DNA methytransferase (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) in prefrontal cortices from 3 and 21-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two treadmill exercise protocols, single session (20min) or daily moderate (20min/day during 14days). The daily exercise protocol induced an increased in histone H4 acetylation levels in prefrontal cortices of 21-months-old rats, without any effects in young adult group. DNMT3b levels were increased in aged cortices of animals submitted to single session of exercise. These results indicate that prefrontal cortex is susceptible to epigenetic changes in a protocol dependent-manner and that H4 acetylation levels and DNMT3b content changes might be linked at least in part to exercise-induced effects on brain functions.

  11. Nurse staff allocation by nurse patient ratio vs. a computerized nurse dependency management system: a comparative cost analysis of Australian and New Zealand hospitals.

    PubMed

    Heslop, Liza; Plummer, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Coding, costing, and accounting for nursing care requirements in Australian public and private hospitals lacks systematic research. Nurse costing for two nurse staffing allocation methods--nurse patient ratios and a computerized nurse dependency management system--were compared. Retrospective nursing workload management data were obtained from hospital information systems in 21 acute care public and private hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Descriptive statistics, cost analysis, and cost modeling were conducted for 103,269 shifts of nursing care. The comparison of costs for nursing staff by nurse-patient ratios and by a computerized nurse dependency management system demonstrated differences. The provision of nursing care using the computerized nurse dependency management system was, overall, lower in cost than for nurse-patient ratios. PMID:23346733

  12. Nurse staff allocation by nurse patient ratio vs. a computerized nurse dependency management system: a comparative cost analysis of Australian and New Zealand hospitals.

    PubMed

    Heslop, Liza; Plummer, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Coding, costing, and accounting for nursing care requirements in Australian public and private hospitals lacks systematic research. Nurse costing for two nurse staffing allocation methods--nurse patient ratios and a computerized nurse dependency management system--were compared. Retrospective nursing workload management data were obtained from hospital information systems in 21 acute care public and private hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Descriptive statistics, cost analysis, and cost modeling were conducted for 103,269 shifts of nursing care. The comparison of costs for nursing staff by nurse-patient ratios and by a computerized nurse dependency management system demonstrated differences. The provision of nursing care using the computerized nurse dependency management system was, overall, lower in cost than for nurse-patient ratios.

  13. Age-Dependent Susceptibility of Chromosome Cohesion to Premature Separase Activation in Mouse Oocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Teresa; Schultz, Richard M.; Lampson, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hypothesis to explain the maternal age-dependent increase in formation of aneuploid eggs is deterioration of chromosome cohesion. Although several lines of evidence are consistent with this hypothesis, whether cohesion is actually reduced in naturally aged oocytes has not been directly tested by any experimental perturbation. To directly target cohesion, we increased the activity of separase, the protease that cleaves the meiotic cohesin REC8, in oocytes. We show that cohesion is more susceptible to premature separase activation in old oocytes than in young oocytes, demonstrating that cohesion is significantly reduced. Furthermore, cohesion is protected by two independent mechanisms that inhibit separase, securin and an inhibitory phosphorylation of separase by CDK1; both mechanisms must be disrupted to prematurely activate separase. With the continual loss of cohesins from chromosomes that occurs throughout the natural reproductive lifespan, tight regulation of separase in oocytes may be particularly important to maintain cohesion and prevent aneuploidy. PMID:21865557

  14. Exercise benefits for the aging brain depend on the accompanying cognitive load: insights from sleep electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Horne, Jim

    2013-11-01

    Although exercise clearly offsets aging effects on the body, its benefits for the aging brain are likely to depend on the extent that physical activity (especially locomotion) facilitates multisensory encounters, curiosity, and interactions with novel environments; this is especially true for exploratory activity, which occupies much of wakefulness for most mammals in the wild. Cognition is inseparable from physical activity, with both interlinked to promote neuroplasticity and more successful brain aging. In these respects and for humans, exercising in a static, featureless, artificially lit indoor setting contrasts with exploratory outdoor walking within a novel environment during daylight. However, little is known about the comparative benefits for the aging brain of longer-term daily regimens of this latter nature including the role of sleep, to the extent that sleep enhances neuroplasticity as shown in short-term laboratory studies. More discerning analyses of sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) slow-wave activity especially 0.5-2-Hz activity would provide greater insights into use-dependent recovery processes during longer-term tracking of these regimens and complement slower changing waking neuropsychologic and resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures, including those of the brain's default mode network. Although the limited research only points to ephemeral small sleep EEG effects of pure exercise, more enduring effects seem apparent when physical activity incorporates cognitive challenges. In terms of "use it or lose it," curiosity-driven "getting out and about," encountering, interacting with, and enjoying novel situations may well provide the brain with its real exercise, further reflected in changes to the dynamics of sleep. PMID:24051117

  15. Age-dependent variation of the Gradient Index profile in human crystalline lenses.

    PubMed

    de Castro, A; Siedlecki, D; Borja, David; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice; Marcos, S

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To reconstruct the gradient index (GRIN) profile of human crystalline lenses ex-vivo using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging with an optimization technique and to study the dependence of the GRIN profile with age. METHODS: Cross-sectional images of nine isolated human crystalline lenses with ages ranging from 6 to 72 (post mortem time 1 to 4 days) were obtained using a custom-made OCT system. Lenses were extracted from whole cadaver globes and placed in a measurement chamber filled with preservation medium (DMEM). Lenses were imaged with the anterior surface up and then flipped over and imaged again, to obtain posterior lens surface profiles both undistorted and distorted by the refraction through the anterior crystalline lens and GRIN. The GRIN distribution of the lens was described with three variables by means of power function, with variables being the nucleus and surface index, and a power coefficient that describes the decay of the refractive index from the nucleus to the surface. An optimization method was used to search for the parameters that produced the best match of the distorted posterior surface. RESULTS: The distorted surface was simulated with accuracy around the resolution of the OCT system (under 15 µm). The reconstructed refractive index values ranged from 1.356 to 1.388 for the surface, and from 1.396 to 1.434 for the nucleus. The power coefficient ranged between 3 and 18. The power coefficient increased significantly with age, at a rate of 0.24 per year. CONCLUSION: Optical Coherence Tomography allowed optical, non-invasive measurement of the 2-D gradient index profile of the isolated human crystalline lens ex vivo. The age-dependent variation of the changes is consistent with previous data using magnetic resonance imaging, and the progressive formation of a refractive index plateau. PMID:22865954

  16. Age-Dependent Effects of Haptoglobin Deletion in Neurobehavioral and Anatomical Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Glushakov, Alexander V.; Arias, Rodrigo A.; Tolosano, Emanuela; Doré, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhages are common features of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their presence is associated with chronic disabilities. Recent clinical and experimental evidence suggests that haptoglobin (Hp), an endogenous hemoglobin-binding protein most abundant in blood plasma, is involved in the intrinsic molecular defensive mechanism, though its role in TBI is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Hp deletion on the anatomical and behavioral outcomes in the controlled cortical impact model using wildtype (WT) C57BL/6 mice and genetically modified mice lacking the Hp gene (Hp−∕−) in two age cohorts [2–4 mo-old (young adult) and 7–8 mo-old (older adult)]. The data obtained suggest age-dependent significant effects on behavioral and anatomical TBI outcomes and recovery from injury. Moreover, in the adult cohort, neurological deficits in Hp−∕− mice at 24 h were significantly improved compared to WT, whereas there were no significant differences in brain pathology between these genotypes. In contrast, in the older adult cohort, Hp−∕− mice had significantly larger lesion volumes compared to WT, but neurological deficits were not significantly different. Immunohistochemistry for ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed significant differences in microglial and astrocytic reactivity between Hp−∕− and WT in selected brain regions of the adult but not the older adult-aged cohort. In conclusion, the data obtained in the study provide clarification on the age-dependent aspects of the intrinsic defensive mechanisms involving Hp that might be involved in complex pathways differentially affecting acute brain trauma outcomes. PMID:27486583

  17. Exercise benefits for the aging brain depend on the accompanying cognitive load: insights from sleep electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Horne, Jim

    2013-11-01

    Although exercise clearly offsets aging effects on the body, its benefits for the aging brain are likely to depend on the extent that physical activity (especially locomotion) facilitates multisensory encounters, curiosity, and interactions with novel environments; this is especially true for exploratory activity, which occupies much of wakefulness for most mammals in the wild. Cognition is inseparable from physical activity, with both interlinked to promote neuroplasticity and more successful brain aging. In these respects and for humans, exercising in a static, featureless, artificially lit indoor setting contrasts with exploratory outdoor walking within a novel environment during daylight. However, little is known about the comparative benefits for the aging brain of longer-term daily regimens of this latter nature including the role of sleep, to the extent that sleep enhances neuroplasticity as shown in short-term laboratory studies. More discerning analyses of sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) slow-wave activity especially 0.5-2-Hz activity would provide greater insights into use-dependent recovery processes during longer-term tracking of these regimens and complement slower changing waking neuropsychologic and resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures, including those of the brain's default mode network. Although the limited research only points to ephemeral small sleep EEG effects of pure exercise, more enduring effects seem apparent when physical activity incorporates cognitive challenges. In terms of "use it or lose it," curiosity-driven "getting out and about," encountering, interacting with, and enjoying novel situations may well provide the brain with its real exercise, further reflected in changes to the dynamics of sleep.

  18. Age-dependent variation of the Gradient Index profile in human crystalline lenses

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, A.; Siedlecki, D.; Borja, David; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice; Marcos, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To reconstruct the gradient index (GRIN) profile of human crystalline lenses ex-vivo using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging with an optimization technique and to study the dependence of the GRIN profile with age. Methods Cross-sectional images of nine isolated human crystalline lenses with ages ranging from 6 to 72 (post mortem time 1 to 4 days) were obtained using a custom-made OCT system. Lenses were extracted from whole cadaver globes and placed in a measurement chamber filled with preservation medium (DMEM). Lenses were imaged with the anterior surface up and then flipped over and imaged again, to obtain posterior lens surface profiles both undistorted and distorted by the refraction through the anterior crystalline lens and GRIN. The GRIN distribution of the lens was described with three variables by means of power function, with variables being the nucleus and surface index, and a power coefficient that describes the decay of the refractive index from the nucleus to the surface. An optimization method was used to search for the parameters that produced the best match of the distorted posterior surface. Results The distorted surface was simulated with accuracy around the resolution of the OCT system (under 15 µm). The reconstructed refractive index values ranged from 1.356 to 1.388 for the surface, and from 1.396 to 1.434 for the nucleus. The power coefficient ranged between 3 and 18. The power coefficient increased significantly with age, at a rate of 0.24 per year. Conclusion Optical Coherence Tomography allowed optical, non-invasive measurement of the 2-D gradient index profile of the isolated human crystalline lens ex vivo. The age-dependent variation of the changes is consistent with previous data using magnetic resonance imaging, and the progressive formation of a refractive index plateau. PMID:22865954

  19. Age-dependent variation of the gradient index profile in human crystalline lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Alberto; Siedlecki, Damian; Borja, David; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice; Marcos, Susana

    2011-11-01

    An investigation was carried out with the aim of reconstructing the gradient index (GRIN) profile of human crystalline lenses ex-vivo using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging with an optimization technique and to study the dependence of the GRIN profile with age. Cross-sectional images of nine isolated human crystalline lenses with ages ranging from 6 to 72 (post-mortem time 1 to 4 days) were obtained using a custom-made OCT system. Lenses were extracted from whole cadaver globes and placed in a measurement chamber filled with preservation medium (DMEM). Lenses were imaged with the anterior surface up and then flipped over and imaged again, to obtain posterior lens surface profiles both undistorted and distorted by the refraction through the anterior crystalline lens and GRIN. The GRIN distribution of the lens was described with three variables by means of power function, with variables being the nucleus and surface index, and a power coefficient that describes the decay of the refractive index from the nucleus to the surface. An optimization method was used to search for the parameters that produced the best match of the distorted posterior surface. The distorted surface was simulated with accuracy around the resolution of the OCT system (under 15 µm). The reconstructed refractive index values ranged from 1.356 to 1.388 for the surface, and from 1.396 to 1.434 for the nucleus. The power coefficient ranged between 3 and 18. The power coefficient increased significantly with age, at a rate of 0.24 per year. Optical coherence tomography allowed optical, non-invasive measurement of the 2D gradient index profile of the isolated human crystalline lens ex vivo. The age-dependent variation of the changes is consistent with previous data using magnetic resonance imaging, and the progressive formation of a refractive index plateau.

  20. Modeling of Age-Dependent Epileptogenesis by Differential Homeostatic Synaptic Scaling

    PubMed Central

    González, Oscar C.; Krishnan, Giri P.; Chauvette, Sylvain; Timofeev, Igor; Sejnowski, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) has been implicated in the development of hyperexcitability and epileptic seizures following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Our in vivo experimental studies in cats revealed that the severity of TBI-mediated epileptogenesis depends on the age of the animal. To characterize mechanisms of these differences, we studied the properties of the TBI-induced epileptogenesis in a biophysically realistic cortical network model with dynamic ion concentrations. After deafferentation, which was induced by dissection of the afferent inputs, there was a reduction of the network activity and upregulation of excitatory connections leading to spontaneous spike-and-wave type seizures. When axonal sprouting was implemented, the seizure threshold increased in the model of young but not the older animals, which had slower or unidirectional homeostatic processes. Our study suggests that age-related changes in the HSP mechanisms are sufficient to explain the difference in the likelihood of seizure onset in young versus older animals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of intractable epilepsy. Likelihood of developing epilepsy and seizures following severe brain trauma has been shown to increase with age. Specific mechanisms of TBI-related epileptogenesis and how these mechanisms are affected by age remain to be understood. We test a hypothesis that the failure of homeostatic synaptic regulation, a slow negative feedback mechanism that maintains neural activity within a physiological range through activity-dependent modulation of synaptic strength, in older animals may augment TBI-induced epileptogenesis. Our results provide new insight into understanding this debilitating disorder and may lead to novel avenues for the development of effective treatments of TBI-induced epilepsy. PMID:26424890

  1. Expression of A152T human tau causes age-dependent neuronal dysfunction and loss in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sumihiro; Djukic, Biljana; Taneja, Praveen; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Lo, Iris; Davis, Allyson; Craft, Ryan; Guo, Weikun; Wang, Xin; Kim, Daniel; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Gill, T Michael; Masliah, Eliezer; Mucke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    A152T-variant human tau (hTau-A152T) increases risk for tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Comparing mice with regulatable expression of hTau-A152T or wild-type hTau (hTau-WT), we find age-dependent neuronal loss, cognitive impairments, and spontaneous nonconvulsive epileptiform activity primarily in hTau-A152T mice. However, overexpression of either hTau species enhances neuronal responses to electrical stimulation of synaptic inputs and to an epileptogenic chemical. hTau-A152T mice have higher hTau protein/mRNA ratios in brain, suggesting that A152T increases production or decreases clearance of hTau protein. Despite their functional abnormalities, aging hTau-A152T mice show no evidence for accumulation of insoluble tau aggregates, suggesting that their dysfunctions are caused by soluble tau. In human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) transgenic mice, co-expression of hTau-A152T enhances risk of early death and epileptic activity, suggesting copathogenic interactions between hTau-A152T and amyloid-β peptides or other hAPP metabolites. Thus, the A152T substitution may augment risk for neurodegenerative diseases by increasing hTau protein levels, promoting network hyperexcitability, and synergizing with the adverse effects of other pathogenic factors. PMID:26931567

  2. Oral sapropterin acutely augments reflex vasodilation in aged human skin through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2013-10-01

    Functional constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) are required for full reflex cutaneous vasodilation and are attenuated in primary aging. Acute, locally administered BH4 increases reflex vasodilation through NO-dependent mechanisms in aged skin. We hypothesized that oral sapropterin (Kuvan, shelf-stable pharmaceutical formulation of BH4) would augment reflex vasodilation in aged human skin during hyperthermia. Nine healthy human subjects (76 ± 1 yr) ingested sapropterin (10 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Venous blood samples were collected prior to, and 3 h following, ingestion of sapropterin for measurement of plasma BH4. Three intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for local delivery of 1) lactated Ringer's solution, 2) 10 mM BH4, and 3) 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit NOS. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasodilation was induced using a water-perfused suit. At 1°C rise in oral temperature, mean body temperature was clamped and 20 mM l-NAME was perfused at each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = LDF/MAP) and expressed as a percentage of maximum (%CVCmax 28 mM sodium nitroprusside and local heat 43°C). Plasma concentrations of BH4 were significantly elevated 3 h after ingestion of sapropterin (0 h: 19.1 ± 2 pmol/ml vs. 3 h: 43.8 ± 3 pmol/ml; P < 0.001). Sapropterin increased NO-dependent vasodilation at control site (placebo: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. sapropterin: 25 ± 4 %CVCmax; P = 0.004). Local BH4 administration increased NO-dependent vasodilation compared with control in placebo trials only (control: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. BH4-treated: 24 ± 3 %CVCmax; P = 0.02). These data suggest oral sapropterin increases bioavailable BH4 in aged skin microvasculature sufficiently to increase NO synthesis through NOS and that sapropterin may be a viable intervention to

  3. Age-dependent loss of the C-terminal amino acid from alpha crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmons, T.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum made against the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin was used to monitor the purification of a tryptic peptide containing the C-terminus of the molecule from fetal versus adult bovine lenses. Mass spectral analysis of the peptide preparations obtained from these lenses demonstrated the presence of a peptide (T20) containing an intact C-terminus from fetal lenses and the presence of an additional peptide (T20') from older lenses that contained a cleaved C-terminal serine. These results demonstrate an age-dependent processing of alpha-A crystallin in the bovine lens, resulting in removal of the C-terminal amino acid residue.

  4. Large time behavior in a nonlinear age-dependent population dynamics problem with spatial diffusion.

    PubMed

    Langlais, M

    1988-01-01

    In this work we analyze the large time behavior in a nonlinear model of population dynamics with age-dependence and spatial diffusion. We show that when t----+ infinity either the solution of our problem goes to 0 or it stabilizes to a nontrivial stationary solution. We give two typical examples where the stationary solutions can be evaluated upon solving very simple partial differential equations. As a by-product of the extinction case we find a necessary condition for a nontrivial periodic solution to exist. Numerical computations not described below show a rapid stabilization.

  5. Positive mutations and mutation-dependent Verhulst factor in Penna ageing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss de Oliveira, S.; Stauffer, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    2004-02-01

    We modify twice the Penna model for biological ageing. First, we introduce back (good) mutations and a memory for them into the model. It allows us to observe an improvement of the species fitness over long-time scales as well as punctuated equilibrium. Second, we adopt a food/space competition factor that depends on the number of accumulated mutations in the individuals genomes, and get rid of the fixed limiting number of allowed mutations. Besides reproducing the main results of the standard model, we also observe a mortality maximum for the oldest old.

  6. Effect of pressure on the mechanical properties of polymers. Part II. Measurement of the time-dependent Poisson's ratio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tschoegl, N.W.

    1984-10-01

    An attempt was made to measure the time-dependent Poisson's ratio on a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). Below -10/sup 0/C, water condensation occurred when the bath returned to room temperature. These experiments therefore had to be deferred. A sample of a styrene-butadiene block copolymer evinced considerable relaxation at room temperature. The Poisson's ratio is quite high. The high values of ..mu..(t) recorded on the block copolymer could result from strain-induced anisotropy. Such anisotropy can produce E to G ratios well in excess of 3, the theoretical value for a homogeneous isotropic rubber. By the relation ..mu.. = E/2G - 1, an E to G ratio of 3.2 yields a Poisson's ratio of 0.6. ..mu..(t) clearly shows an inflection around 15 minutes which is just barely noticeable in E(t).

  7. Rapidity dependence of the K/π ratios in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsene, I. C.; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2008-10-01

    We report on measurements of identified particle yields from Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 GeV made with the BRAHMS spectrometer. Here we will concentrate on the charged K/π ratios as a function of rapidity and baryo-chemical potential. We find that the K/π ratios measured at different rapidities in the analysed dataset have a common dependence with the same ratios measured in mid-rapidity at SPS energies when plotted as a function of the \\bar{p}/p ratio. The theoretical models used for comparison, UrQMD and AMPT, give a reasonable description of the particle yields at mid-rapidity but fail to do so for the K/π ratios at forward rapidity.

  8. An age-dependent model to analyse the evolutionary stability of bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Mund, A; Kuttler, C; Pérez-Velázquez, J; Hense, B A

    2016-09-21

    Bacterial communication is enabled through the collective release and sensing of signalling molecules in a process called quorum sensing. Cooperative processes can easily be destabilized by the appearance of cheaters, who contribute little or nothing at all to the production of common goods. This especially applies for planktonic cultures. In this study, we analyse the dynamics of bacterial quorum sensing and its evolutionary stability under two levels of cooperation, namely signal and enzyme production. The model accounts for mutation rates and switches between planktonic and biofilm state of growth. We present a mathematical approach to model these dynamics using age-dependent colony models. We explore the conditions under which cooperation is stable and find that spatial structuring can lead to long-term scenarios such as coexistence or bistability, depending on the non-linear combination of different parameters like death rates and production costs. PMID:26796220

  9. Age-dependent degradation of the protein adsorption capacity of titanium.

    PubMed

    Hori, N; Att, W; Ueno, T; Sato, N; Yamada, M; Saruwatari, L; Suzuki, T; Ogawa, T

    2009-07-01

    Reported bone-implant contact percentages are far below the ideal 100%. We tested a hypothesis that the protein adsorption capability of titanium, which is critical to the process of osseointegration, changes over time before its use. Machined, acid-etched, and sandblasted surfaces were prepared and stored under dark ambient conditions for 3 days, 1 week, or 4 weeks. For all surfaces, protein adsorption decreased as the storage time increased, and their decreasing rates were dependent on titanium topography. After 4 weeks, the amounts of albumin and fibronectin adsorbed by the acid-etched surface were only 20% and 35%, respectively, of that adsorbed by the fresh surface after 2 hours of incubation, and remained substantially low even after 24 hours. This time-dependent degradation in protein adsorption of titanium correlated with its naturally decreasing hydrophilicity, which was not observed for the nickel and chromium surfaces, indicating a titanium-specific biological aging.

  10. An age-dependent model to analyse the evolutionary stability of bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Mund, A; Kuttler, C; Pérez-Velázquez, J; Hense, B A

    2016-09-21

    Bacterial communication is enabled through the collective release and sensing of signalling molecules in a process called quorum sensing. Cooperative processes can easily be destabilized by the appearance of cheaters, who contribute little or nothing at all to the production of common goods. This especially applies for planktonic cultures. In this study, we analyse the dynamics of bacterial quorum sensing and its evolutionary stability under two levels of cooperation, namely signal and enzyme production. The model accounts for mutation rates and switches between planktonic and biofilm state of growth. We present a mathematical approach to model these dynamics using age-dependent colony models. We explore the conditions under which cooperation is stable and find that spatial structuring can lead to long-term scenarios such as coexistence or bistability, depending on the non-linear combination of different parameters like death rates and production costs.

  11. Age-dependent enhancement of inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal neurons via GluR5 kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changqing; Cui, Changhai; Alkon, Daniel L

    2009-08-01

    Changes in hippocampal synaptic networks during aging may contribute to age-dependent compromise of cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Previous studies have demonstrated that GABAergic synaptic transmission exhibits age-dependent changes. To better understand such age-dependent changes of GABAergic synaptic inhibition, we performed whole-cell recordings from pyramidal cells in the CA1 area of acute hippocampal slices on aged (24-26 months old) and young (2-4 months old) Brown-Norway rats. We found that the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSCs) were significantly increased in aged rats, but the frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs were decreased. Furthermore, the regulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission by GluR5 containing kainate receptors was enhanced in aged rats, which was revealed by using LY382884 (a GluR5 kainate receptor antagonist) and ATPA (a GluR5 kainate receptor agonist). Moreover, we demonstrated that vesicular glutamate transporters are involved in the kainate receptor dependent regulation of sIPSCs. Taken together, these results suggest that GABAergic synaptic transmission is potentiated in aged rats, and GluR5 containing kainate receptors regulate the inhibitory synaptic transmission through endogenous glutamate. These alterations of GABAergic input with aging could contribute to age-dependent cognitive decline. PMID:19123252

  12. Assessment of organ-specific neutron equivalent doses in proton therapy using computational whole-body age-dependent voxel phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharatou Jarlskog, Christina; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E.; Xu, X. George; Paganetti, Harald

    2008-02-01

    Proton beams used for radiotherapy will produce neutrons when interacting with matter. The purpose of this study was to quantify the equivalent dose to tissue due to secondary neutrons in pediatric and adult patients treated by proton therapy for brain lesions. Assessment of the equivalent dose to organs away from the target requires whole-body geometrical information. Furthermore, because the patient geometry depends on age at exposure, age-dependent representations are also needed. We implemented age-dependent phantoms into our proton Monte Carlo dose calculation environment. We considered eight typical radiation fields, two of which had been previously used to treat pediatric patients. The other six fields were additionally considered to allow a systematic study of equivalent doses as a function of field parameters. For all phantoms and all fields, we simulated organ-specific equivalent neutron doses and analyzed for each organ (1) the equivalent dose due to neutrons as a function of distance to the target; (2) the equivalent dose due to neutrons as a function of patient age; (3) the equivalent dose due to neutrons as a function of field parameters; and (4) the ratio of contributions to secondary dose from the treatment head versus the contribution from the patient's body tissues. This work reports organ-specific equivalent neutron doses for up to 48 organs in a patient. We demonstrate quantitatively how organ equivalent doses for adult and pediatric patients vary as a function of patient's age, organ and field parameters. Neutron doses increase with increasing range and modulation width but decrease with field size (as defined by the aperture). We analyzed the ratio of neutron dose contributions from the patient and from the treatment head, and found that neutron-equivalent doses fall off rapidly as a function of distance from the target, in agreement with experimental data. It appears that for the fields used in this study, the neutron dose lateral to the

  13. Age-dependent modes of extensional necking instability in soft glassy materials.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, David M; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2015-04-17

    We study the instability to necking of an initially cylindrical filament of soft glassy material subject to extensional stretching. By numerical simulation of the soft glassy rheology model and a simplified fluidity model, and by analytical predictions within a highly generic toy description, we show that the mode of instability is set by the age of the sample relative to the inverse of the applied extensional strain rate. Young samples neck gradually via a liquidlike mode, the onset of which is determined by both the elastic loading and plastic relaxation terms in the stress constitutive equation. Older samples fail at smaller draw ratios via a more rapid mode, the onset of which is determined only by the solidlike elastic loading terms (though plastic effects arise later, once appreciable necking develops). We show this solidlike mode to be the counterpart, for elastoplastic materials, of the Considère mode of necking in strain-rate-independent solids. PMID:25933343

  14. Gender Ratio in a Clinical Population Sample, Age of Diagnosis and Duration of Assessment in Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Marion; McKenzie, Karen; Johnson, Tess; Catchpole, Ciara; O'Hare, Anne; McClure, Iain; Forsyth, Kirsty; McCartney, Deborah; Murray, Aja

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on gender ratio, age of diagnosis and the duration of assessment procedures in autism spectrum disorder diagnosis in a national study which included all types of clinical services for children and adults. Findings are reported from a retrospective case note analysis undertaken with a representative sample of 150 Scottish…

  15. [Metabolic memory enhances hormesis effect to the copper ions in age-depended manner].

    PubMed

    Bozhkov, A I; Sidorov, V I; Kurguzova, N I; Dlubovskaia, V L

    2014-01-01

    The ability of young and old rats to manifest the hormesis effect to lethal doses of copper sulphate and the ability to save the induced "adaptive" pattern of redistribution of copper ions after the transfer of animals in the standard conditions is the mechanism of metabolic memory. It was found that pretreatment of animals with low-dose (1 mg per 100 g body mass, i.e. 33% of the lethal dose) of copper sulfate induced the formation of their resistance to lethal doses (3 mg per 100 g), so the hormesis effect was manifested. Hormesis effect depended on the number of pre injections of small doses of copper sulphate in an S-shaped manner. The protective effect increased after 1 to 3 of preliminary injections of copper sulfate, and after four or more injections the hormesis effect decreased. It is shown that the cardinal role in intracellular pattern of copper ion redistribution play heat-stable copper binding proteins 12 kDa cytosolic proteins. The formed "adaptive" pattern of intracellular distribution of the copper ions may be reproduced, after at least, one month. The prolonged hormesis effect can be attributed to the forming metabolic memory. The intracellular distribution pattern of the copper ions was age-dependent. Age-related differences were found in hormesis effect induced by copper ions, which results in increased binding capacity of copper binding proteins in old animals, with a higher content of copper ions in the mitochondria and microsomes as compared to young animals. PMID:25051761

  16. [Age-dependent changes in mRNA transport (nucleus-cytoplasm)].

    PubMed

    Müller, W E; Agutter, P S; Prochnow, D J; Fasold, H; Sève, A P; Tsiapalis, C M; Schröder, H C

    1993-01-01

    Transport of mRNA from nucleus to cytoplasm is an ATP-dependent process which occurs strictly vectorially. Because the mRNA is structurally bound during transport, mRNA transport is a "solid-state" process consisting of i) mRNA release from the nuclear matrix, ii) mRNA translocation through the nuclear pore, and iii) cytoskeletal binding. We identified and purified the following components involved in the translocation step: i) the nuclear envelope (NE) nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) which is stimulated by the 3'poly(A) tail of mRNA, ii) the poly(A)-recognizing mRNA carrier, iii) the NE protein kinase, and iv) the NE phosphatase. In addition, we found that an RNA helicase activity is present in NE, which also may be involved in RNA transport. Our results show that, besides poly(A), also double-stranded RNA structures may modulate RNA export. The amount of mRNA released from nuclei markedly decreases with age. Evidence is presented that this age-dependent change is caused by an impairment of polyadenylation of mRNA, hnRNA processing, release of mRNA from nuclear matrix, and translocations of mRNA from nuclear to cytoplasmic compartment (decrease in activities of NE NTPase, protein kinase, and phosphatase; decrease in poly(A)-binding affinity of mRNA carrier).

  17. Consideration of age-dependent radium retention in people on the basis of the beagle model

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, N.J.; Keane, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    This paper examines in humans the proposition emanating from studies in beagles that long-term retention of radium varies in proportion to the calcium addition rate at the time of intake. Because data on the calcium addition rate in younger humans were fragmentary, human calcium-addition rates were scaled from those in beagles, the relative calcium accretion rates in the two species at equivalent stages of skeletal growth providing the scaling factor. The variation of radium retention with age was determined by fitting a modified power function to data on the retention of radium from about 30 to 15,000 days following a series of therapeutic injections of /sup 226/Ra in humans ranging in age from 18 to 63 yr. The fractional retention R at t days following a single injection of /sup 226/Ra was described by R = (1 + t/d)/sup -0/ /sup 44/. The age-dependent time constant d in the retention function was found to be proportional to the calcium addition rate at the time of injection in subjects receiving < 200 ..mu..g /sup 226/Ra.

  18. Age-dependent loss of MMP-3 in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harten, Ingrid A; Zahr, Rima S; Lemire, Joan M; Machan, Jason T; Moses, Marsha A; Doiron, Robert J; Curatolo, Adam S; Rothman, Frank G; Wight, Thomas N; Toole, Bryan P; Gordon, Leslie B

    2011-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, progressive segmental premature aging disease that includes scleroderma-like skin, progressive joint contracture, and atherosclerosis. Affected individuals die prematurely of heart attacks or strokes. Extracellular matrix dysregulation is implicated as a factor in disease progression. We analyzed messenger RNA and protein levels for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2,-3, and -9 in HGPS primary human dermal fibroblasts using real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gelatin zymography. MMP-3 messenger RNA and protein levels decreased significantly with increasing donor age in HGPS fibroblasts but not in controls. MMP-2 messenger RNA also showed a donor age-dependent decrease in HGPS fibroblasts, but levels of secreted protein were unchanged. MMP-9 was similar in HGPS and control cultures. The decreased MMP-3 may represent a shift in the inherent extracellular matrix-degrading proteolytic balance in favor of matrix deposition in HGPS. This metalloproteinase has the potential to serve as a biomarker of therapeutic efficacy when assessing treatments for HGPS.

  19. Age-dependent modulation of vascular niches for haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumbe, Anjali P; Ramasamy, Saravana K; Itkin, Tomer; Mäe, Maarja Andaloussi; Langen, Urs H; Betsholtz, Christer; Lapidot, Tsvee; Adams, Ralf H

    2016-04-21

    Blood vessels define local microenvironments in the skeletal system, play crucial roles in osteogenesis and provide niches for haematopoietic stem cells. The properties of niche-forming vessels and their changes in the ageing organism remain incompletely understood. Here we show that Notch signalling in endothelial cells leads to the expansion of haematopoietic stem cell niches in bone, which involves increases in CD31-positive capillaries and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ)-positive perivascular cells, arteriole formation and elevated levels of cellular stem cell factor. Although endothelial hypoxia-inducible factor signalling promotes some of these changes, it fails to enhance vascular niche function because of a lack of arterialization and expansion of PDGFRβ-positive cells. In ageing mice, niche-forming vessels in the skeletal system are strongly reduced but can be restored by activation of endothelial Notch signalling. These findings indicate that vascular niches for haematopoietic stem cells are part of complex, age-dependent microenvironments involving multiple cell populations and vessel subtypes.

  20. Age dependence of biochemical and biomechanical properties of tissue-engineered human septal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Rotter, Nicole; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Tobias, Geoffrey; Lebl, Martin; Roy, Amit K; Vacanti, Charles A

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the biomechanical and biochemical properties of tissue-engineered human septal cartilage vary with donor age and in vitro culture time. Chondrocytes were isolated from human septal cartilage of patients from 15 to 60 year old and maintained in primary monolayer culture for 14 days. Cells were seeded onto 0.5% PLA coated PGA disks and kept in stationary three-dimensional culture for either 1 day or 3 weeks. Specimens were then implanted subcutaneously into athymic nude mice and harvested after either 4 or 8 weeks. Upon harvest, the equilibrium confined compression modulus was measured as to quantify mechanical properties, and the glycosaminoglycan, hydroxyproline, and DNA contents were determined as measures of tissue proteoglycans, collagen, and cell density. This study demonstrated that native nasal cartilage showed distinct changes in these parameters with age, but cartilage engineered using the cells of these specimens showed no significant dependence on the age of the donor. There was little difference in quality of cartilage between samples cultured for 3 weeks in vitro and those implanted directly after seeding. Together, the results of this study suggest that the process of extracellular matrix assembly by chondrocytes on three-dimensional scaffolds may be independent of in vivo conditions experienced by the tissue prior to harvest.

  1. Steroidogenic Factor 1 in the Ventromedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Regulates Age-Dependent Obesity.

    PubMed

    Kinyua, Ann W; Yang, Dong Joo; Chang, Inik; Kim, Ki Woo

    2016-01-01

    The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) is important for the regulation of whole body energy homeostasis and lesions in the VMH are reported to result in massive weight gain. The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a known VMH marker as it is exclusively expressed in the VMH region of the brain. SF-1 plays a critical role not only in the development of VMH but also in its physiological functions. In this study, we generated prenatal VMH-specific SF-1 KO mice and investigated age-dependent energy homeostasis regulation by SF-1. Deletion of SF-1 in the VMH resulted in dysregulated insulin and leptin homeostasis and late onset obesity due to increased food intake under normal chow and high fat diet conditions. In addition, SF-1 ablation was accompanied by a marked reduction in energy expenditure and physical activity and this effect was significantly pronounced in the aged mice. Taken together, our data indicates that SF-1 is a key component in the VMH-mediated regulation of energy homeostasis and implies that SF-1 plays a protective role against metabolic stressors including aging and high fat diet. PMID:27598259

  2. Steroidogenic Factor 1 in the Ventromedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Regulates Age-Dependent Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kinyua, Ann W.; Yang, Dong Joo; Chang, Inik; Kim, Ki Woo

    2016-01-01

    The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) is important for the regulation of whole body energy homeostasis and lesions in the VMH are reported to result in massive weight gain. The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a known VMH marker as it is exclusively expressed in the VMH region of the brain. SF-1 plays a critical role not only in the development of VMH but also in its physiological functions. In this study, we generated prenatal VMH-specific SF-1 KO mice and investigated age-dependent energy homeostasis regulation by SF-1. Deletion of SF-1 in the VMH resulted in dysregulated insulin and leptin homeostasis and late onset obesity due to increased food intake under normal chow and high fat diet conditions. In addition, SF-1 ablation was accompanied by a marked reduction in energy expenditure and physical activity and this effect was significantly pronounced in the aged mice. Taken together, our data indicates that SF-1 is a key component in the VMH-mediated regulation of energy homeostasis and implies that SF-1 plays a protective role against metabolic stressors including aging and high fat diet. PMID:27598259

  3. Recombination and maternal age-dependent nondisjunction: Molecular studies of trisomy 16

    SciTech Connect

    Hassold, T.; Merrill, M.; Adkins, K.

    1995-10-01

    Trisomy 16 is the most common human trisomy, occurring in {ge} 1% of all clinically recognized pregnancies. It is thought to be completely dependent on maternal age and thus provides a useful model for studying the association of increasing maternal age and nondisjunction. We have been conducting a study to determine the parent and meiotic stage of origin of trisorny 16 and the possible association of nondisjunction and aberrant recombination. In the present report, we summarize our observations on 62 spontaneous abortions with trisomy 16. All trisomies were maternally derived, and in virtually all the error occurred at meiosis I. In studies of genetic recombination, we observed a highly significant reduction in recombination in the trisomy-generating meioses by comparison with normal female meioses. However, most cases of trisomy 16 had at least one detectable crossover between the nondisjoined chromosomes, indicating that it is reduced-and not absent-recombination that is the important predisposing factor. Additionally, our data indicate an altered distribution of crossing-over in trisomy 16, as we rarely observed crossovers in the proximal long and short arms. Thus, it may be that, at least for trisomy 16, the association between maternal age and trisomy is due to diminished recombination, particularly in the proximal regions of the chromosome. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Age-dependent relevance of endogenous 5-lipoxygenase derivatives in anxiety-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Leo, Luciana M; Almeida-Corrêa, Suellen; Canetti, Claudio A; Amaral, Olavo B; Bozza, Fernando A; Pamplona, Fabricio A

    2014-01-01

    When 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is inhibited, roughly half of the CNS effect of the prototypic endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is lost. Therefore, we decided to investigate whether inhibiting this enzyme would influence physiological functions classically described as being under control of the endocannabinoid system. Although 5-LO inhibition by MK-886 reduced lipoxin A4 levels in the brain, no effect was found in the elevated plus maze (EPM), even at the highest possible doses, via i.p. (10 mg/kg,) or i.c.v. (500 pmol/2 µl) routes. Accordingly, no alterations in anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test were observed in 5-LO KO mice. Interestingly, aged mice, which show reduced circulating lipoxin A4 levels, were sensitive to MK-886, displaying an anxiogenic-like state in response to treatment. Moreover, exogenous lipoxin A4 induced an anxiolytic-like profile in the EPM test. Our findings are in line with other reports showing no difference between FLAP KO or 5-LO KO and their control strains in adult mice, but increased anxiety-like behavior in aged mice. We also show for the first time that lipoxin A4 affects mouse behavior. In conclusion, we propose an age-dependent relevancy of endogenous 5-LO derivatives in the modulation of anxiety-like behavior, in addition to a potential for exogenous lipoxin A4 in producing an anxiolytic-like state.

  5. Emotional bias of sleep-dependent processing shifts from negative to positive with aging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bethany J; Schultz, Kurt S; Adams, Sydney; Baran, Bengi; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2016-09-01

    Age-related memory decline has been proposed to result partially from impairments in memory consolidation over sleep. However, such decline may reflect a shift toward selective processing of positive information with age rather than impaired sleep-related mechanisms. In the present study, young and older adults viewed negative and neutral pictures or positive and neutral pictures and underwent a recognition test after sleep or wake. Subjective emotional reactivity and affect were also measured. Compared with waking, sleep preserved valence ratings and memory for positive but not negative pictures in older adults and negative but not positive pictures in young adults. In older adults, memory for positive pictures was associated with slow wave sleep. Furthermore, slow wave sleep predicted positive affect in older adults but was inversely related to positive affect in young adults. These relationships were strongest for older adults with high memory for positive pictures and young adults with high memory for negative pictures. Collectively, these results indicate preserved but selective sleep-dependent memory processing with healthy aging that may be biased to enhance emotional well-being. PMID:27459938

  6. Proteomic identification of age-dependent protein nitration in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kanski, Jaroslaw; Alterman, Michail A; Schöneich, Christian

    2003-11-15

    Age-related protein nitration was studied in skeletal muscle of Fisher 344 and Fisher 344/Brown Norway (BN) F1 rats by a proteomic approach. Proteins from young (4 months) and old (24 months) Fisher 344 rats and young (6 months) and old (34 months) Fisher 344/BN F1 animals were separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Western blot showed an age-related increase in the nitration of a few specific proteins, which were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and ESI-MS/MS. We identified age-dependent apparent nitration of beta-enolase, alpha-fructose aldolase, and creatine kinase, which perform important functions in muscle energy metabolism, suggesting that the nitration of such key proteins can be, in part, responsible for the decline of muscle motor function of the muscle. Furthermore, we have identified the apparent nitration of succinate dehydrogenase, rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta (GdI-2), triosephosphate isomerase, troponin I, alpha-crystallin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

  7. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina.

    PubMed

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  8. Endothelin-1 vasoconstriction and the age-related decline in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in men.

    PubMed

    Westby, Christian M; Weil, Brian R; Greiner, Jared J; Stauffer, Brian L; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2011-06-01

    ET (endothelin)-1, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide released by the endothelium, plays an important role in vasomotor regulation and has been linked to diminished endothelial vasodilator capacity in several pathologies associated with human aging, including hypertension, Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, it is currently unknown whether the decline in endothelial vasodilatation with advancing age is due to elevated ET-1 vasoconstrictor activity. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that the age-related impairment in ACh (acetylcholine)-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation is due, at least in part, to increased ET-1-mediated vasoconstrictor tone. FBF (forearm blood flow) responses to ACh, SNP (sodium nitroprusside) and BQ-123 (ET(A) receptor blocker) were determined in 14 young (age, 25 ± 1 years) and 14 older (age, 61 ± 2 years) healthy non-obese men. Additionally, FBF responses to ACh were determined in the presence of ETA blockade. Vasodilatation to ACh was lower (approx. 25%; P<0.05) in the older men (from 4.9 ± 0.2 to 13.9 ± 0.9 ml·100 ml(-1) of tissue·min(-1)) compared with the young men (4.6 ± 0.3 to 17.2 ± 1.0 ml·100 ml(-1) of tissue·min(-1)). There were no differences in FBF responses to SNP between the young (4.8 ± 0.3 to 18.5 ± 0.3 ml·100 ml(-1) of tissue·min(-1)) and older (5.1 ± 0.3 to 17.3 ± 0.8 ml·100 ml(-1) of tissue·min(-1)) men. In the young men, resting FBF was not significantly altered by BQ-123, whereas, in the older men, FBF increased approx. 25% in response to BQ-123 infusion (P<0.05). Co-infusion of ACh with BQ-123 resulted in an approx. 20% increase in the ACh-induced vasodilatation in older men compared with saline. In contrast, FBF responses to ACh were not significantly altered by ET(A) blockade in the young men. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that ET-1 vasoconstrictor activity contributes, at least in part, to diminished endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in older men.

  9. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  10. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  11. Time dependent diffusive shock acceleration and its application to middle aged supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent gamma-ray observations show that middle aged supernova remnants (SNRs) interacting with molecular clouds (MCs) can be sources of both GeV and TeV emission. Based on the MC association, two scenarios have been proposed to explain the observed gamma-ray emission. In one, energetic cosmic ray (CR) particles escape from the SNR and then illuminate nearby MCs, producing gamma-ray emission, while the other involves direct interaction between the SNR and MC. In the direct interaction scenario, re-acceleration of pre-existing CRs in the ambient medium is investigated while particles injected from the thermal pool are neglected in view of the slow shock speeds in middle aged SNRs. However, standard diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) theory produces a steady state particle spectrum that is too flat compared to observations, which suggests that the high energy part of the observed spectrum has not yet reached a steady state. We derive a time dependent DSA solution in the test particle limit for re-acceleration of pre-existing CRs case and show that it is capable of reproducing the observed gamma-ray emission in SNRs like IC 443 and W44, in the context of a MC interaction model. We also provide a simple physical picture to understand the time dependent DSA spectrum. A spatially averaged diffusion coefficient around the SNR can be estimated through fitting the gamma-ray spectrum. The spatially averaged diffusion coefficient in middle aged SNRs like IC 443 and W44 is estimated to be ~10^(25) cm^2/s at ~ 1GeV, which is between the Bohm limit and interstellar value.

  12. Sarcolemmal dependence of cardiac protection and stress-resistance: roles in aged or diseased hearts.

    PubMed

    See Hoe, Louise E; May, Lauren T; Headrick, John P; Peart, Jason N

    2016-10-01

    Disruption of the sarcolemmal membrane is a defining feature of oncotic death in cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion (I-R), and its molecular makeup not only fundamentally governs this process but also affects multiple determinants of both myocardial I-R injury and responsiveness to cardioprotective stimuli. Beyond the influences of membrane lipids on the cytoprotective (and death) receptors intimately embedded within this bilayer, myocardial ionic homeostasis, substrate metabolism, intercellular communication and electrical conduction are all sensitive to sarcolemmal makeup, and critical to outcomes from I-R. As will be outlined in this review, these crucial sarcolemmal dependencies may underlie not only the negative effects of age and common co-morbidities on myocardial ischaemic tolerance but also the on-going challenge of implementing efficacious cardioprotection in patients suffering accidental or surgically induced I-R. We review evidence for the involvement of sarcolemmal makeup changes in the impairment of stress-resistance and cardioprotection observed with ageing and highly prevalent co-morbid conditions including diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia. A greater understanding of membrane changes with age/disease, and the inter-dependences of ischaemic tolerance and cardioprotection on sarcolemmal makeup, can facilitate the development of strategies to preserve membrane integrity and cell viability, and advance the challenging goal of implementing efficacious 'cardioprotection' in clinically relevant patient cohorts. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc.

  13. Age-Dependent Speciation Can Explain the Shape of Empirical Phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Oskar; Hartmann, Klaas; Steel, Mike; Stadler, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Tens of thousands of phylogenetic trees, describing the evolutionary relationships between hundreds of thousands of taxa, are readily obtainable from various databases. From such trees, inferences can be made about the underlying macroevolutionary processes, yet remarkably these processes are still poorly understood. Simple and widely used evolutionary null models are problematic: Empirical trees show very different imbalance between the sizes of the daughter clades of ancestral taxa compared to what models predict. Obtaining a simple evolutionary model that is both biologically plausible and produces the imbalance seen in empirical trees is a challenging problem, to which none of the existing models provide a satisfying answer. Here we propose a simple, biologically plausible macroevolutionary model in which the rate of speciation decreases with species age, whereas extinction rates can vary quite generally. We show that this model provides a remarkable fit to the thousands of trees stored in the online database TreeBase. The biological motivation for the identified age-dependent speciation process may be that recently evolved taxa often colonize new regions or niches and may initially experience little competition. These new taxa are thus more likely to give rise to further new taxa than a taxon that has remained largely unchanged and is, therefore, well adapted to its niche. We show that age-dependent speciation may also be the result of different within-species populations following the same laws of lineage splitting to produce new species. As the fit of our model to the tree database shows, this simple biological motivation provides an explanation for a long standing problem in macroevolution. PMID:25575504

  14. Sex-dependent dominance at a single locus maintains variation in age at maturity in salmon.

    PubMed

    Barson, Nicola J; Aykanat, Tutku; Hindar, Kjetil; Baranski, Matthew; Bolstad, Geir H; Fiske, Peder; Jacq, Céleste; Jensen, Arne J; Johnston, Susan E; Karlsson, Sten; Kent, Matthew; Moen, Thomas; Niemelä, Eero; Nome, Torfinn; Næsje, Tor F; Orell, Panu; Romakkaniemi, Atso; Sægrov, Harald; Urdal, Kurt; Erkinaro, Jaakko; Lien, Sigbjørn; Primmer, Craig R

    2015-12-17

    Males and females share many traits that have a common genetic basis; however, selection on these traits often differs between the sexes, leading to sexual conflict. Under such sexual antagonism, theory predicts the evolution of genetic architectures that resolve this sexual conflict. Yet, despite intense theoretical and empirical interest, the specific loci underlying sexually antagonistic phenotypes have rarely been identified, limiting our understanding of how sexual conflict impacts genome evolution and the maintenance of genetic diversity. Here we identify a large effect locus controlling age at maturity in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), an important fitness trait in which selection favours earlier maturation in males than females, and show it is a clear example of sex-dependent dominance that reduces intralocus sexual conflict and maintains adaptive variation in wild populations. Using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism data across 57 wild populations and whole genome re-sequencing, we find that the vestigial-like family member 3 gene (VGLL3) exhibits sex-dependent dominance in salmon, promoting earlier and later maturation in males and females, respectively. VGLL3, an adiposity regulator associated with size and age at maturity in humans, explained 39% of phenotypic variation, an unexpectedly large proportion for what is usually considered a highly polygenic trait. Such large effects are predicted under balancing selection from either sexually antagonistic or spatially varying selection. Our results provide the first empirical example of dominance reversal allowing greater optimization of phenotypes within each sex, contributing to the resolution of sexual conflict in a major and widespread evolutionary trade-off between age and size at maturity. They also provide key empirical evidence for how variation in reproductive strategies can be maintained over large geographical scales. We anticipate these findings will have a substantial impact on

  15. Age independent and position-dependent alterations in motor unit activity of the biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Harwood, B; Edwards, D L; Jakobi, J M

    2010-09-01

    In the biceps brachii, age-related differences in synaptic excitability and muscle architecture may affect motor unit (MU) activity differently depending on the position of the forearm. It was hypothesised that as a result of these age-related differences, greater changes in MU activity would accompany a change in forearm position in old when compared with young men. Six young (22 +/- 3 years) and six old (84 +/- 3 years) men maintained isometric elbow flexion at 10% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) during changes in forearm position. Forty-nine MUs in the short (SBB) and long (LBB) heads of the biceps brachii were followed. Motor unit recruitment and de-recruitment thresholds, motor unit discharge rates (MUDRs), and MU discharge variability were measured. Although an age-related decrease in MU recruitment thresholds, and increase in MU discharge variability was evident, changes in forearm position influenced MUDRs similarly in young and old men (P = 0.27). Motor unit recruitment thresholds of the SBB were highest in the pronated position (8.2 +/- 2.9 %MVC), whereas in the LBB they were highest in the supinated position (8.6 +/- 2.0 %MVC). Motor unit discharge rates of the LBB did not change with forearm position. In the SBB, MUDRs were highest when the forearm was supinated, and also greater when compared with the LBB in this position. No position-dependent changes were observed for MU discharge variability in the LBB, but the SBB exhibited greatest MU discharge variability in the pronated position. The results suggest that MU activity is modulated following a change in forearm position, but the response is similar in young and old adults.

  16. High-protein-low-carbohydrate diet: deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular effects depend on age.

    PubMed

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Baron, Stephanie; Vessieres, Emilie; Vibert, Francoise; Ayer, Audrey; Marchiol-Fournigault, Carmen; Henrion, Daniel; Paul, Jean-Louis; Noble, Florence; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    High-protein-low-carbohydrate (HP-LC) diets have become widespread. Yet their deleterious consequences, especially on glucose metabolism and arteries, have already been underlined. Our previous study (2) has already shown glucose intolerance with major arterial dysfunction in very old mice subjected to an HP-LC diet. The hypothesis of this work was that this diet had an age-dependent deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular outcome. Two groups of mice, young and adult (3 and 6 mo old), were subjected for 12 wk to a standard or to an HP-LC diet. Glucose and lipid metabolism was studied. The cardiovascular system was explored from the functional stage with Doppler-echography to the molecular stage (arterial reactivity, mRNA, immunohistochemistry). Young mice did not exhibit any significant metabolic modification, whereas adult mice presented marked glucose intolerance associated with an increase in resistin and triglyceride levels. These metabolic disturbances were responsible for cardiovascular damages only in adult mice, with decreased aortic distensibility and left ventricle dysfunction. These seemed to be the consequence of arterial dysfunctions. Mesenteric arteries were the worst affected with a major oxidative stress, whereas aorta function seemed to be maintained with an appreciable role of cyclooxygenase-2 to preserve endothelial function. This study highlights for the first time the age-dependent deleterious effects of an HP-LC diet on metabolism, with glucose intolerance and lipid disorders and vascular (especially microvessels) and cardiac functions. This work shows that HP-LC lead to equivalent cardiovascular alterations, as observed in very old age, and underlines the danger of such diet.

  17. Sex-dependent dominance at a single locus maintains variation in age at maturity in salmon.

    PubMed

    Barson, Nicola J; Aykanat, Tutku; Hindar, Kjetil; Baranski, Matthew; Bolstad, Geir H; Fiske, Peder; Jacq, Céleste; Jensen, Arne J; Johnston, Susan E; Karlsson, Sten; Kent, Matthew; Moen, Thomas; Niemelä, Eero; Nome, Torfinn; Næsje, Tor F; Orell, Panu; Romakkaniemi, Atso; Sægrov, Harald; Urdal, Kurt; Erkinaro, Jaakko; Lien, Sigbjørn; Primmer, Craig R

    2015-12-17

    Males and females share many traits that have a common genetic basis; however, selection on these traits often differs between the sexes, leading to sexual conflict. Under such sexual antagonism, theory predicts the evolution of genetic architectures that resolve this sexual conflict. Yet, despite intense theoretical and empirical interest, the specific loci underlying sexually antagonistic phenotypes have rarely been identified, limiting our understanding of how sexual conflict impacts genome evolution and the maintenance of genetic diversity. Here we identify a large effect locus controlling age at maturity in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), an important fitness trait in which selection favours earlier maturation in males than females, and show it is a clear example of sex-dependent dominance that reduces intralocus sexual conflict and maintains adaptive variation in wild populations. Using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism data across 57 wild populations and whole genome re-sequencing, we find that the vestigial-like family member 3 gene (VGLL3) exhibits sex-dependent dominance in salmon, promoting earlier and later maturation in males and females, respectively. VGLL3, an adiposity regulator associated with size and age at maturity in humans, explained 39% of phenotypic variation, an unexpectedly large proportion for what is usually considered a highly polygenic trait. Such large effects are predicted under balancing selection from either sexually antagonistic or spatially varying selection. Our results provide the first empirical example of dominance reversal allowing greater optimization of phenotypes within each sex, contributing to the resolution of sexual conflict in a major and widespread evolutionary trade-off between age and size at maturity. They also provide key empirical evidence for how variation in reproductive strategies can be maintained over large geographical scales. We anticipate these findings will have a substantial impact on

  18. Age-dependent expression of forkhead box O proteins in the duodenum of rats*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pan; Zhou, Zhen-qi; Huang, Rui-hua; Zhou, Bo; Wei, Quan-wei; Shi, Fang-xiong

    2011-01-01

    The O subfamily of forkhead box (FoxO) proteins is the downstream effector of the insulin-like growth factor-1/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (IGF-1/PI3K/PKB) signal pathway. The objective of the present study was to examine the expressions of three members of FoxO proteins, FoxO1, FoxO3a, and FoxO4 in the duodenum of Sprague-Dawley rats at different ages. The result demonstrated that the expression of FoxO4 in rat duodenum showed an age-dependent manner. At Day 21, there were no detectable localization and expression of FoxO4 in the duodenum, while, at Months 2 and 6, localization and expression of FoxO4 were distinct. In addition, FoxO4 staining was primarily concentrated in the cell nuclei of the lamina propria around the intestinal gland of the duodenum in 2-month-old rats, but was not detectable in the same area in 6-month-old rats. Our results showed also that although FoxO3a existed in the cytoplasm of the lamina propria at a low level at the 2- and 6-month marks, it was still not detectable at Day 21. Besides, FoxO1 was not detectable in all parts and stages. Taken together, our findings suggested that the cell-specific and age-dependent expressional patterns of FoxO4 and FoxO3a proteins in the duodenum play some roles in the development and growth performance of the rat duodenum. PMID:21887848

  19. Childhood ADHD and Conduct Disorder as Independent Predictors of Male Alcohol Dependence at Age 40*

    PubMed Central

    Knop, Joachim; Penick, Elizabeth C.; Nickel, Elizabeth J.; Mortensen, Erik L.; Sullivan, Margaret A.; Murtaza, Syed; Jensen, Per; Manzardo, Ann M.; Gabrielli, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The Danish Longitudinal Study on Alcoholism was designed to identify antecedent predictors of adult male alcoholism. The influence of premorbid behaviors consistent with childhood conduct disorder (CD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on the development of alcohol misuse was examined. Method: Subjects were selected from a Danish birth cohort (9,125), which included 223 sons of alcoholic fathers (high risk) and 106 matched sons of nonalcoholic fathers (low risk). These subjects have been studied systematically over the past 40 years. They were evaluated in their teens (n = 238), later as adults at age 30 (n = 241), and more recently at age 40 (n = 202). At 19-year/20-year follow-ups, an ADHD scale was derived from teacher ratings and a CD scale was derived from a social worker interview. At 30-year and 40-year follow-ups, a psychiatrist used structured interviews and criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, Revised, to quantify lifetime alcoholism severity and to diagnose alcohol-use disorder. Of the original subjects, 110 had complete data for the two childhood measures and the adult alcoholism outcomes. Results: In this smaller subsample, paternal risk did not predict adult alcohol dependence. Subjects who were above a median split on both the ADHD and the CD scales were more than six times more likely to develop alcohol dependence than subjects who scored below the median on both. Although the two childhood measures were correlated, a multiple regression showed that each independently predicted a measure of lifetime alcoholism severity. Conclusions: ADHD comorbid with CD was the strongest predictor of later alcohol dependence. PMID:19261228

  20. Apolipoprotein E4 causes age- and sex-dependent impairments of hilar GABAergic interneurons and learning and memory deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Leung, Laura; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Jain, Sachi; Ring, Karen; Dai, Jessica; Wang, Max Mu; Tong, Leslie; Walker, David; Huang, Yadong

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE4 has sex-dependent effects, whereby the risk of developing AD is higher in apoE4-expressing females than males. However, the mechanism underlying the sex difference, in relation to apoE4, is unknown. Previous findings indicate that apoE4 causes age-dependent impairments of hilar GABAergic interneurons in female mice, leading to learning and memory deficits. Here, we investigate whether the detrimental effects of apoE4 on hilar GABAergic interneurons are sex-dependent using apoE knock-in (KI) mice across different ages. We found that in female apoE-KI mice, there was an age-dependent depletion of hilar GABAergic interneurons, whereby GAD67- or somatostatin-positive--but not NPY- or parvalbumin-positive-interneuron loss was exacerbated by apoE4. Loss of these neuronal populations was correlated with the severity of spatial learning deficits at 16 months of age in female apoE4-KI mice; however, this effect was not observed in female apoE3-KI mice. In contrast, we found an increase in the numbers of hilar GABAergic interneurons with advancing age in male apoE-KI mice, regardless of apoE genotype. Moreover, male apoE-KI mice showed a consistent ratio of hilar inhibitory GABAergic interneurons to excitatory mossy cells approximating 1.5 that is independent of apoE genotype and age, whereas female apoE-KI mice exhibited an age-dependent decrease in this ratio, which was exacerbated by apoE4. Interestingly, there are no apoE genotype effects on GABAergic interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subregions of the hippocampus as well as the entorhinal and auditory cortexes. These findings suggest that the sex-dependent effects of apoE4 on developing AD is in part attributable to inherent sex-based differences in the numbers of hilar GABAergic interneurons, which is further modulated by apoE genotype.

  1. Time-Dependent Behavior of a Graphite/Thermoplastic Composite and the Effects of Stress and Physical Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1995-01-01

    Experimental studies were performed to determine the effects of stress and physical aging on the matrix dominated time dependent properties of IM7/8320 composite. Isothermal tensile creep/aging test techniques developed for polymers were adapted for testing of the composite material. Time dependent transverse and shear compliance's for an orthotropic plate were found from short term creep compliance measurements at constant, sub-T(8) temperatures. These compliance terms were shown to be affected by physical aging. Aging time shift factors and shift rates were found to be a function of temperature and applied stress.

  2. Cardioprotective effects of quercetin against ischemia-reperfusion injury are age-dependent.

    PubMed

    Bartekova, M; Radosinska, J; Pancza, D; Barancik, M; Ravingerova, T

    2016-09-19

    Quercetin, a polyphenolic compound present in various types of food, has been shown to exert beneficial effects in different cardiac as well as non-cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models in adult animals. However, there is no evidence about the effects of quercetin on I/R injury in non-mature animals, despite the fact that efficiency of some interventions against I/R is age-dependent. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of chronic quercetin treatment on I/R injury in juvenile and adult rat hearts. Juvenile (4-week-old) as well as adult (12-week-old) rats were treated with quercetin (20 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks, hearts were excised and exposed to 25-min global ischemia followed by 40-min reperfusion. Functional parameters of hearts and occurrence of reperfusion arrhythmias were registered to assess the cardiac function. Our results have shown that quercetin improved post-ischemic recovery of LVDP, as well as recovery of markers of contraction and relaxation, +(dP/dt)max and -(dP/dt)max, respectively, in juvenile hearts, but not in adult hearts. Quercetin had no impact on incidence as well as duration of reperfusion arrhythmias in animals of both ages. We conclude that the age of rats plays an important role in heart response to quercetin treatment in the particular dose and duration of the treatment. Therefore, the age of the treated subjects should be taken into consideration when choosing the dose of quercetin and duration of its application in prevention and/or treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Time-evolution of age-dependent mortality patterns in mathematical model of heterogeneous human population.

    PubMed

    Avraam, Demetris; Arnold-Gaille, Séverine; Jones, Dyfan; Vasiev, Bakhtier

    2014-12-01

    The widely-known Gompertz law of mortality states the exponential increase of mortality with age in human populations. Such an exponential increase is observed at the adulthood span, roughly after the reproductive period, while mortality data at young and extremely old ages deviate from it. The heterogeneity of human populations, i.e. the existence of subpopulations with different mortality dynamics, is a useful consideration that can explain age-dependent mortality patterns across the whole life-course. A simple mathematical model combining the heterogeneity of populations with an assumption that the mortality in each subpopulation grows exponentially with age has been proven to be capable of reproducing the entire mortality pattern in a human population including the observed peculiarities at early- and late-life intervals. In this work we fit this model to actual (Swedish) mortality data for consecutive periods and consequently describe the evolution of mortality dynamics in terms of the evolution of the model parameters over time. We have found that the evolution of the model parameters validates the applicability of the compensation law of mortality to each subpopulation separately. Furthermore, our study has indicated that the population structure changes so that the population tends to become more homogeneous over time. Finally, our analysis of the decrease of the overall mortality in a population over time has shown that this decrease is mainly due to a change in the population structure and to a lesser extent to a reduction of mortality in each of the subpopulations, the latter being represented by an alteration of the parameters that outline the exponential dynamics.

  4. Cardioprotective effects of quercetin against ischemia-reperfusion injury are age-dependent.

    PubMed

    Bartekova, M; Radosinska, J; Pancza, D; Barancik, M; Ravingerova, T

    2016-09-19

    Quercetin, a polyphenolic compound present in various types of food, has been shown to exert beneficial effects in different cardiac as well as non-cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models in adult animals. However, there is no evidence about the effects of quercetin on I/R injury in non-mature animals, despite the fact that efficiency of some interventions against I/R is age-dependent. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of chronic quercetin treatment on I/R injury in juvenile and adult rat hearts. Juvenile (4-week-old) as well as adult (12-week-old) rats were treated with quercetin (20 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks, hearts were excised and exposed to 25-min global ischemia followed by 40-min reperfusion. Functional parameters of hearts and occurrence of reperfusion arrhythmias were registered to assess the cardiac function. Our results have shown that quercetin improved post-ischemic recovery of LVDP, as well as recovery of markers of contraction and relaxation, +(dP/dt)max and -(dP/dt)max, respectively, in juvenile hearts, but not in adult hearts. Quercetin had no impact on incidence as well as duration of reperfusion arrhythmias in animals of both ages. We conclude that the age of rats plays an important role in heart response to quercetin treatment in the particular dose and duration of the treatment. Therefore, the age of the treated subjects should be taken into consideration when choosing the dose of quercetin and duration of its application in prevention and/or treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27643931

  5. Age-dependent modulation of sensory reweighting for controlling posture in a dynamic virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Eikema, Diderik Jan Anthony; Hatzitaki, Vassilia; Tzovaras, Dimitrios; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2012-12-01

    Older adults require more time to reweight sensory information for maintaining balance that could potentially lead to increased incidence of falling in rapidly changing or cognitively demanding environments. In this study, we manipulated the visual surround information during a collision avoidance task in order to investigate how young and elderly adults engage in sensory reweighting under conditions of visual anticipation. Sixteen healthy elderly (age: 71.5 ± 4.9 years; height: 159.3 ± 6.6 cm; mass: 73.3 ± 3.3 kg) and 20 young (age: 22.8 ± 3.3 years; height: 174.4 ± 10.7 cm; mass: 70.1 ± 13.9 kg) participants stood for 240 s on a force platform under two experimental conditions: quiet standing and standing while anticipating randomly approaching virtual objects to be avoided. During both tasks, the visual surround changed every 60 s from a stationary virtual scene (room) to either a moving room or darkness and then back to a stationary scene to evoke sensory reweighting processes. In quiet standing, elderly showed greater sway variability and were more severely affected by the removal or degradation of visual surround information when compared to young participants. During visual anticipation, sway variability was not different between the age groups. In addition, both young and elderly participants were similarly affected by the degradation or removal of the visual surround. These findings suggest that sensory reweighting in a dynamic virtual environment that evokes visual anticipation interacts with postural state anxiety regardless of age. Elderly show less efficient sensory reweighting in quiet standing due to greater visual field dependence possibly associated with fear of falling. PMID:21894445

  6. Age-Dependent Susceptibility to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Aline; Sommer, Felix; Zhang, Kaiyi; Repnik, Urska; Basic, Marijana; Bleich, André; Kühnel, Mark; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Litvak, Yael; Fulde, Marcus; Rosenshine, Ilan; Hornef, Mathias W.

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) represents a major causative agent of infant diarrhea associated with significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Although studied extensively in vitro, the investigation of the host-pathogen interaction in vivo has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Using RT-PCR and global transcriptome analysis, high throughput 16S rDNA sequencing as well as immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we characterize the EPEC-host interaction following oral challenge of newborn mice. Spontaneous colonization of the small intestine and colon of neonate mice that lasted until weaning was observed. Intimate attachment to the epithelial plasma membrane and microcolony formation were visualized only in the presence of a functional bundle forming pili (BFP) and type III secretion system (T3SS). Similarly, a T3SS-dependent EPEC-induced innate immune response, mediated via MyD88, TLR5 and TLR9 led to the induction of a distinct set of genes in infected intestinal epithelial cells. Infection-induced alterations of the microbiota composition remained restricted to the postnatal period. Although EPEC colonized the adult intestine in the absence of a competing microbiota, no microcolonies were observed at the small intestinal epithelium. Here, we introduce the first suitable mouse infection model and describe an age-dependent, virulence factor-dependent attachment of EPEC to enterocytes in vivo. PMID:27159323

  7. Spiroplasma infection causes either early or late male killing in Drosophila, depending on maternal host age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Daisuke; Anbutsu, Hisashi; Shimada, Masakazu; Fukatsu, Takema

    2007-04-01

    Symbiont-induced male-killing phenotypes have been found in a variety of insects. Conventionally, these phenotypes have been divided into two categories according to the timing of action: early male killing at embryonic stages and late male killing at late larval stages. In Drosophila species, endosymbiotic bacteria of the genus Spiroplasma have been known to cause early male killing. Here, we report that a spiroplasma strain normally causing early male killing also induces late male killing depending on the maternal host age: male-specific mortality of larvae and pupae was more frequently observed in the offspring of young females. As the lowest spiroplasma density and occasional male production were also associated with newly emerged females, we proposed the density-dependent hypothesis for the expression of early and late male-killing phenotypes. Our finding suggested that (1) early and late male-killing phenotypes can be caused by the same symbiont and probably by the same mechanism; (2) late male killing may occur as an attenuated expression of early male killing; (3) expression of early and late male-killing phenotypes may be dependent on the symbiont density, and thus, could potentially be affected by the host immunity and regulation; and (4) early male killing and late male killing could be alternative strategies adopted by microbial reproductive manipulators.

  8. Stable water isotopologue ratios in fog and cloud droplets of liquid clouds are not size-dependent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiegel, J.K.; Aemisegger, F.; Scholl, M.; Wienhold, F.G.; Collett, J.L.; Lee, T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Mertes, S.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.; Werner, Roland A.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present the first observations of stable water isotopologue ratios in cloud droplets of different sizes collected simultaneously. We address the question whether the isotope ratio of droplets in a liquid cloud varies as a function of droplet size. Samples were collected from a ground intercepted cloud (= fog) during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010) using a three-stage Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC). An instrument test revealed that no artificial isotopic fractionation occurs during sample collection with the CASCC. Furthermore, we could experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the δ values of cloud droplets of the relevant droplet sizes (μm-range) were not significantly different and thus can be assumed to be in isotopic equilibrium immediately with the surrounding water vapor. However, during the dissolution period of the cloud, when the supersaturation inside the cloud decreased and the cloud began to clear, differences in isotope ratios of the different droplet sizes tended to be larger. This is likely to result from the cloud's heterogeneity, implying that larger and smaller cloud droplets have been collected at different moments in time, delivering isotope ratios from different collection times.

  9. Direct monitoring of bias-dependent variations in the exciton formation ratio of working organic light emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Kanemoto, Katsuichi; Kanenobu, Mariko; Okawauchi, Yuta; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    In typical operation of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), excitons are assumed to generate with a ratio of 1:3 for singlet and triplet excitons, respectively, based on a simple spin statistics model. This assumption has been used in designing efficient OLEDs. Despite the larger generation ratio of triplet excitons, physical properties of fluorescent OLEDs are usually evaluated only through the electroluminescence (EL) intensity from singlets and the behaviors of triplets during the LED operation are virtually black-boxed, because the triplets are mostly non-emissive. Here, we employ transient spectroscopy combined with LED-operation for directly monitoring the non-emissive triplets of working OLEDs. The spectroscopic techniques are performed simultaneously with EL- and current measurements under various operation biases. The simultaneous measurements reveal that the relative formation ratio of singlet-to-triplet excitons dramatically changes with the magnitude of bias. The measurements also show that the generation efficiency of singlets scales with the bias, whereas that of triplets is nearly bias-independent. These features of the formation ratio and efficiency are compatibly explained by considering the yield of intersystem crossing and the energy separation of excitons from electron-hole pairs. The obtained findings via the spectroscopic measurements enable prediction of the formation pathways in OLEDs. PMID:26487499

  10. Age-Associated Increase in Cytokine Production During Systemic Inflammation-II: The Role of IL-1β in Age-Dependent IL-6 Upregulation in Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Starr, Marlene E; Saito, Mizuki; Evers, B Mark; Saito, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) upon acute inflammatory stress is significantly augmented by aging in adipose tissue, a major source of this cytokine. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of age-dependent IL-6 overproduction using visceral white adipose tissue from C57BL/6 mice. Upon treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro, IL-6 was produced by adipose tissue explants, and secreted levels were significantly higher in cultures from aged (24 months) mice compared to young (4 months). Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), two inducers of IL-6, were mainly produced by the lungs and spleen rather than adipose tissue in mice after LPS injection. Treatment of adipose explants with physiological levels of IL-1β induced significant age-dependent secretion of IL-6, while treatment with TNFα had little effect, demonstrating an augmented response of adipose tissues to IL-1β in the aged. In vitro experiments utilizing a neutralizing antibody against IL-1β and in vivo experiments utilizing IL-1-receptor-1 deficient mice, confirmed that IL-6 overproduction in the aged is regulated by autocrine/paracrine action of IL-1β which specifically occurs in aged adipose tissues. These findings indicate an elevated inflammatory potential of adipose tissue in the aged and a unique IL-1β-mediated mechanism for IL-6 overproduction, which may impact age-associated vulnerability to acute inflammatory diseases such as sepsis.

  11. Measurement of the Linear Depolarization Ratio of Aged Dust at Three Wavelengths (355, 532 and 1064 nm) Simultaneously over Barbados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarig, Moritz; Althausen, Dietrich; Ansmann, Albert; Klepel, André; Baars, Holger; Engelmann, Ronny; Groß, Silke; Freudenthaler, Volker

    2016-06-01

    A ground-based polarization Raman lidar is presented, that is able to measure the depolarization ratio at three wavelengths (355, 532 and 1064 nm) simultaneously. This new feature is implemented for the first time in a Raman lidar. It provides a full dataset of 3 backscatter coefficients, two extinction coefficients and 3 depolarization ratios (3+2+3 lidar system). To ensure the data quality, it has been compared to the well characterized two-wavelength polarization lidar POLIS. Measurements of long-range transported dust have been performed in the framework of the Saharan Aerosol Long-Range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) in the Caribbean.

  12. White LED compared with other light sources: age-dependent photobiological effects and parameters for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rebec, Katja Malovrh; Klanjšek-Gunde, Marta; Bizjak, Grega; Kobav, Matej B

    2015-01-01

    Ergonomic science at work and living places should appraise human factors concerning the photobiological effects of lighting. Thorough knowledge on this subject has been gained in the past; however, few attempts have been made to propose suitable evaluation parameters. The blue light hazard and its influence on melatonin secretion in age-dependent observers is considered in this paper and parameters for its evaluation are proposed. New parameters were applied to analyse the effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources and to compare them with the currently applied light sources. The photobiological effects of light sources with the same illuminance but different spectral power distribution were determined for healthy 4-76-year-old observers. The suitability of new parameters is discussed. Correlated colour temperature, the only parameter currently used to assess photobiological effects, is evaluated and compared to new parameters. PMID:26647954

  13. [Peculiarities of cardiovascular system pathology depending on psychological profile in patients of senior age groups].

    PubMed

    Prokhorenko, I O

    2013-01-01

    Interrelations between peculiarities of psychological profile of patients of senior age groups (according to Cattel), level of stress hormones in blood and background pathology of cardiovascular system were studied. Levels of catecholamine and corticosteroids in dynamics, rate of magnesium in erythrocytes and calcium in plaques of coronary arteries as well as fats, Holter ECG, daily profiles of blood pressure, vasomotor function of endothelium and microcirculation were analysed. It is established that stress hormones indirectly determine original form of stress reaction depending on patients' psychological profile. This contributes to the development of one or another form of cardiovascular system pathology. Excessive alcohol intake also promotes progression of cardiovascular system pathology. Depression, being a reflection of disbalance of stress hormones levels, can be used as a marker of unfavourable course of cardiovascular pathology.

  14. Age-dependent branching processes for surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases with incubation period.

    PubMed

    Slavtchova-Bojkova, Maroussia N; González, Miguel; Martìnez, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the recent results of the authors in the area of infectious disease modeling by means of branching stochastic processes. This is a new approach involving age-dependent branching models, which turned out to be more appropriate and flexible for describing the spread of an infection in a given population, than discrete time ones. Concretely, Bellman-Harris and Sevast'yanov's branching processes are investigated. It is justified that the proposed models are proper candidates as models of infectious diseases with incubation period like measles, mumps, avian flu, etc. It is worth to notice that in general the developed methodology is applicable to the diseases that follow the so-called SIR (susceptible-infected-removed) scheme in terms of epidemiological models. Two policies of extra-vaccination level are proposed and compared on the ground of simulation examples. PMID:21423438

  15. Temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient of thin films and aging effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rossel, C. Sousa, M.; Abel, S.; Caimi, D.; Suhm, A.; Abergel, J.; Le Rhun, G.; Defay, E.

    2014-01-21

    We present a technique to measure the temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient e{sub 31,f} of thin films of lead zirconate titanate (PZT), aluminum nitride, and BaTiO{sub 3} deposited on Si wafers. It is based on the collection of electric charges induced by the deflection of a Si cantilever coated with the piezoelectric film. The aim of this work is to assess the role of temperature in the decay of the remnant polarization of these materials, in particular, in optimized gradient-free PZT with composition PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3}. It is found that in contrast to theoretical predictions, e{sub 31,f} decreases with temperature because of the dominance of relaxation effects. The observation of steps in the logarithmic aging decay law is reminiscent of memory effects seen in frustrated spin glasses.

  16. Calculating excess risk with age-dependent adjustment factors and cumulative doses: ethylene oxide case study.

    PubMed

    Sielken, Robert L; Flores, Ciriaco Valdez

    2009-10-01

    U.S. EPA's Supplemental Guidance in 2005 documented their procedure for incorporating age-dependent adjustment factors (ADAFs) into lifetime excess risk calculations. EPA's first attempt to implement an ADAF when the dose-response model had a cumulative dose metric was for ethylene oxide and that attempt (US EPA, 2006) failed to successfully follow EPA's own guidelines. The failure suggested that the incorporation of ADAFs would increase the lifetime excess risk for ethylene oxide by approximately 66%. However, if the procedure in the guidelines were followed correctly, then the increase would have only been 0.008% or approximately 8,000 fold less. Because cumulative exposure is a common dose metric in dose-response models of epidemiological data, a correct implementation of the guidelines is of widespread importance.

  17. Age and stage dependency of estrogen receptor expression by lymphocyte precursors

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Hideya; Kouro, Taku; Yokota, Takafumi; Comp, Phillip C.; Kincade, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Sex steroids negatively regulate B lymphopoiesis in adult mice. Paradoxically, lymphocytes arise during fetal life, when estrogen levels are high and maternal lymphopoiesis is suppressed. Here we demonstrate that embryonic B lymphopoiesis was unaffected by estrogen, but sensitive to glucocorticoids. Both fetal and adult precursors contained glucocorticoid receptor transcripts, but only adult precursors expressed estrogen receptor α and β together with the androgen receptor. Fetal hematopoietic cells did not efficiently acquire functional estrogen receptors after transplantation to irradiated adult mice. Sex steroid receptors were also expressed in a stage- and developmental age-dependent fashion in human precursors. A developmental switch in responsiveness of hematopoietic cells to sex steroids may be essential for formation of the immune system. PMID:11752459

  18. Age dependent regulation of bone-mass and renal function by the MEPE ASARM-motif

    PubMed Central

    Zelenchuk, Lesya V; Hedge, Anne-Marie; Rowe, Peter S N

    2015-01-01

    renal function. Free ASARM-peptide also effects renal mineral phosphate handling by influencing FGF23 expression. These findings have implications for understanding age-dependent osteoporosis, unraveling drug-targets and developing treatments. PMID:26051469

  19. From CIE 2006 physiological model to improved age-dependent and average colorimetric observers.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Autrusseau, Florent; Viénot, Françoise; Le Callet, Patrick; Blondé, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    the source of these prediction errors at higher wavelengths. Correcting these errors in the model can lead to an improved age-dependent observer and can also help update the current CIE 10° standard colorimetric observer. Accordingly, it would reduce the discrepancies between color matches with broadband spectral primaries and color matches with narrowband spectral primaries.

  20. Age-dependent improvement in passive avoidance learning of the young chick: cholinergic mediation?

    PubMed

    Zolman, J F; Mattingly, B A

    1982-06-01

    Cholinergic mediation of the age-dependent improvement in response suppression of the young chick was studied by determining the performance of 4-day-old chicks, pretreated with scopolamine, during passive avoidance (PA) and extinction testing. In Experiment 1, chicks were trained briefly to key peck for heat reward (prepunishment training), and then tested for PA learning under immediate, 2-sec-delayed, or no shock condition. Half of the chicks in each wing-shock (5 mA, 5 sec) condition received saline injections before prepunishment training and .5 mg/kg scopolamine injections after prepunishment training. The rest of the chicks received .5 mg/kg scopolamine injections both before and after prepunishment training. For chicks in both scopolamine groups, delaying shock onset resulted in significantly less response suppression than immediate response-contingent shock. In Experiment 2, 4-day-old chicks injected with either saline or scopolamine were trained to key peck for heat reward and then tested for resistance to extinction under either response-contingent shock or nonshock conditions. Punishment decreased the number of extinction responses for both saline and scopolamine groups of chicks. Previous studies have shown that normal 1-day-old chicks do not show a significant delay of punishment effect during PA testing and that response-contingent punishment increases the number of their responses during extinction. Hence, the results of the present experiments indicate that the age-dependent improvement in response suppression of the young chick cannot be explained solely by a significant increase in central cholinergic functioning. PMID:7096681

  1. Lung injury after hemorrhage is age-dependent: role of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ

    PubMed Central

    Zingarelli, Basilia; Hake, Paul W.; O’Connor, Michael; Burroughs, Timothy J.; Wong, Hector R.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The incidence of multiple organ failure in pediatric trauma victims is lower than in the adult population. However, the molecular mechanisms are not yet defined. We investigated whether the pathophysiologic characteristics of hemorrhage-induced lung injury may be age-dependent and may be regulated by the peroxisome proliferator activator receptor γ (PPARγ). Design Prospective, laboratory investigation that used an established rodent model of hemorrhagic shock. Setting University hospital laboratory. Subjects Young (n=67; 3–5 months old) and mature (n=66; 11–13 months old) male rats. Interventions Hemorrhagic shock was induced in young and mature rats by withdrawing blood to a mean arterial blood pressure of 50 mmHg. After 3 hrs, rats were rapidly resuscitated by infusing the shed blood and sacrificed 3 hrs thereafter. Measurements and Main Results In young rats, lung injury was characterized by accumulation of red cells and neutrophils at the end of the resuscitation period; at Western blot analysis, lung expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was increased. In contrast, the severity of lung injury was more pronounced in mature rats. Lung myeloperoxidase activity and expression of constitutive and inducible ICAM-1 was significantly higher in mature rats when compared to young rats. Mature rats also had higher plasma levels of cytokines and chemokines when compared to young rats. This heightened inflammation was associated with higher degree of activation of nuclear factor-κB and down-regulation of PPARγ and heat shock factor-1 in the lung of mature rats when compared to young rats. Treatment with the PPARγ ligand, the cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, ameliorated lung injury in young, but not in mature animals. Conclusions Lung injury after severe hemorrhage is age-dependent and may be secondary to a diverse regulation of PPARγ. PMID:19384226

  2. The Left Hand Second to Fourth Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Does Not Discriminate World-Class Female Gymnasts from Age Matched Sedentary Girls

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Maarten W.; Claessens, Albrecht L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. Methods In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129), competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129), alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley) and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) using AN(C)OVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. Results Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020) did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018), either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p<0.01), weight (53.9±7.6 kg vs 46.2 6.3 kg p<0.01), BMI (20.51±2.41 kg/m2 vs 19.05±1.56 kg/m2), skeletal age (15.2±1.1 y vs 14.5±1.2 y p>0.01), somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01), mesomorphy (p<0.01) and ectomorphy (p<0.05) respectively) all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. Conclusion Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples

  3. Age-dependent homeostatic plasticity of GABAergic signaling in developing retinal networks.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Matthias H; Grady, John; van Coppenhagen, James; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2011-08-24

    Developing retinal ganglion cells fire in correlated spontaneous bursts, resulting in propagating waves with robust spatiotemporal features preserved across development and species. Here we investigate the effects of homeostatic adaptation on the circuits controlling retinal waves. Mouse retinal waves were recorded in vitro for up to 35 h with a multielectrode array in presence of the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline, allowing us to obtain a precise, time-resolved characterization of homeostatic effects in this preparation. Experiments were performed at P4-P6, when GABA(A) signaling is depolarizing in ganglion cells, and at P7-P10, when GABA(A) signaling is hyperpolarizing. At all ages, bicuculline initially increased the wave sizes and other activity metrics. At P5-P6, wave sizes decreased toward control levels within a few hours while firing remained strong, but this ability to compensate disappeared entirely from P7 onwards. This demonstrates that homeostatic control of spontaneous retinal activity maintains specific network dynamic properties in an age-dependent manner, and suggests that the underlying mechanism is linked to GABA(A) signaling. PMID:21865458

  4. Spatial and Age-Dependent Hair Cell Generation in the Postnatal Mammalian Utricle.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Kelly, Michael C; Yu, Dehong; Wu, Hao; Lin, Xi; Chi, Fang-lu; Chen, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Loss of vestibular hair cells is a common cause of balance disorders. Current treatment options for bilateral vestibular dysfunction are limited. During development, atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1) is sufficient and necessary for the formation of hair cells and provides a promising gene target to induce hair cell generation in the mammals. In this study, we used a transgenic mouse line to test the age and cell type specificity of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle in mice. We found that forced Atoh1 expression in vivo can induce hair cell formation in the utricle from postnatal days 1 to 21, while the efficacy of hair cell induction is progressively reduced as the animals become older. In the utricle, the induction of hair cells occurs both within the sensory region and in cells in the transitional epithelium next to the sensory region. Within the sensory epithelium, the central region, known as the striola, is most subjective to the induction of hair cell formation. Furthermore, forced Atoh1 expression can promote proliferation in an age-dependent manner that mirrors the progressively reduced efficacy of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle. These results suggest that targeting both cell proliferation and Atoh1 in the utricle striolar region may be explored to induce hair cell regeneration in mammals. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of the animal model that provides an in vivo Atoh1 induction model for vestibular regeneration studies.

  5. Metallothionein modulation in relation to cadmium bioaccumulation and age-dependent sensitivity of Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Toušová, Zuzana; Kuta, Jan; Hynek, David; Adam, Vojtěch; Kizek, René; Bláha, Luděk; Hilscherová, Klára

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to contribute to understanding of the mechanisms behind sensitivity differences between early and late instar larvae of Chironomus riparius and to address the influence of the differences in standard testing approaches on the toxicity evaluation. A 10-day contact sediment toxicity test was carried out to assess sensitivity to cadmium exposure in relation to different age and laboratory culture line origin of test organisms. Chironomid larvae of early (OECD 218 method) and late instar (US-EPA600/R-99/064 method) differed substantially in sensitivity of traditional endpoints (OECD: LOEC 50 and 10 μg Cd/g dry weight (dw); US-EPA: LOEC > 1000 and 100 μg Cd/g dw for survival and growth, respectively). Bioaccumulated cadmium and metallothioneins (MTs) concentrations were analyzed to investigate the role of MTs in reduced sensitivity to cadmium in late instar larvae. Metallothioneins were induced after treatment to greater Cd concentrations, but their levels in relation to cadmium body burdens did not fully explain low sensitivity of late instars to cadmium, which indicates some other effective way of detoxification in late instars. This study brings new information related to the role of MTs in age-dependent toxicant sensitivity and discusses the implications of divergence in data generated by chironomid sediment toxicity tests by standardized methods using different instars. PMID:26957427

  6. Age-dependent postoperative cognitive impairment and Alzheimer-related neuropathology in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhipeng; Dong, Yuanlin; Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with increased cost of care, morbidity, and mortality. However, its pathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Specifically, it is unknown why elderly patients are more likely to develop POCD and whether POCD is dependent on general anesthesia. We therefore set out to investigate the effects of peripheral surgery on the cognition and Alzheimer-related neuropathology in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in the mice. The surgery induced post-operative elevation in brain β-amyloid (Aβ) levels and cognitive impairment in the 18 month-old wild-type and 9 month-old Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice, but not the 9 month-old wild-type mice. The Aβ accumulation likely resulted from elevation of beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme and phosphorylated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α. γ-Secretase inhibitor compound E ameliorated the surgery-induced brain Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in the 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgery was able to induce cognitive impairment independent of general anesthesia, and that the combination of peripheral surgery with aging- or Alzheimer gene mutation-associated Aβ accumulation was needed for the POCD to occur. These findings would likely promote more research to investigate the pathogenesis of POCD. PMID:24441878

  7. Reproductive and socioeconomic determinants of child survival: confounded, interactive, and age-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Kost, K; Amin, S

    1992-01-01

    Studies of infant and child mortality have evolved to distinguish between two sets of explanatory variables-factors related to reproductive or maternal characteristics and socioeconomic factors, generally described as characteristics of the family or household. Almost all multivariate analyses include variables from each of these two sets, but there has been little consideration of the relationship between them. We examine how these two sets of variables jointly affect mortality. We test first for confounded effects by examining socioeconomic effects while excluding and then including reproductive variables in nested multivariate models. Next, we look for age-dependent effects among the explanatory variables and find that reproductive and socioeconomic factors affect mortality at differing ages of children. Finally, we examine interactive effects of the two sets of variables. We conclude that the higher mortality observed among the low status groups is not a result of greater concentration of poor reproductive patterns in those groups. Instead, higher status groups probably have more resources available for combating the negative effects of the same high-risk reproductive patterns. PMID:1514117

  8. Age-dependent postoperative cognitive impairment and Alzheimer-related neuropathology in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhipeng; Dong, Yuanlin; Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with increased cost of care, morbidity, and mortality. However, its pathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Specifically, it is unknown why elderly patients are more likely to develop POCD and whether POCD is dependent on general anesthesia. We therefore set out to investigate the effects of peripheral surgery on the cognition and Alzheimer-related neuropathology in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in the mice. The surgery induced post-operative elevation in brain β-amyloid (Aβ) levels and cognitive impairment in the 18 month-old wild-type and 9 month-old Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice, but not the 9 month-old wild-type mice. The Aβ accumulation likely resulted from elevation of beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme and phosphorylated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α. γ-Secretase inhibitor compound E ameliorated the surgery-induced brain Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in the 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgery was able to induce cognitive impairment independent of general anesthesia, and that the combination of peripheral surgery with aging- or Alzheimer gene mutation-associated Aβ accumulation was needed for the POCD to occur. These findings would likely promote more research to investigate the pathogenesis of POCD.

  9. Task- and age-dependent effects of visual stimulus properties on children's explicit numerosity judgments.

    PubMed

    Defever, Emmy; Reynvoet, Bert; Gebuis, Titia

    2013-10-01

    Researchers investigating numerosity processing manipulate the visual stimulus properties (e.g., surface). This is done to control for the confound between numerosity and its visual properties and should allow the examination of pure number processes. Nevertheless, several studies have shown that, despite different visual controls, visual cues remained to exert their influence on numerosity judgments. This study, therefore, investigated whether the impact of the visual stimulus manipulations on numerosity judgments is dependent on the task at hand (comparison task vs. same-different task) and whether this impact changes throughout development. In addition, we examined whether the influence of visual stimulus manipulations on numerosity judgments plays a role in the relation between performance on numerosity tasks and mathematics achievement. Our findings confirmed that the visual stimulus manipulations affect numerosity judgments; more important, we found that these influences changed with increasing age and differed between the comparison and the same-different tasks. Consequently, direct comparisons between numerosity studies using different tasks and age groups are difficult. No meaningful relationship between the performance on the comparison and same-different tasks and mathematics achievement was found in typically developing children, nor did we find consistent differences between children with and without mathematical learning disability (MLD). PMID:23860419

  10. Assessment of age-dependent uranium intake due to drinking water in Hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Balbudhe, A Y; Srivastava, S K; Vishwaprasad, K; Srivastava, G K; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D

    2012-03-01

    A study has been done to assess the uranium intake through drinking water. The area of study is twin cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad, India. Uranium concentration in water samples was analysed by laser-induced fluorimetry. The associated age-dependent uranium intake was estimated by taking the prescribed water intake values. The concentration of uranium varies from below detectable level (minimum detectable level = 0.20 ± 0.02 μg l(-1)) to 2.50 ± 0.18 μg l(-1), with the geometric mean (GM) of 0.67 μg l(-1) in tap water, whereas in ground water, the range is 0.60 ± 0.05 to 82 ± 7.1 µg l(-1) with GM of 10.07 µg l(-1). The daily intake of uranium by drinking water pathway through tap water for various age groups is found to vary from 0.14 to 9.50 µg d(-1) with mean of 1.55 µg d(-1).

  11. Seasonal Dependence and Aging Effect of GEM Prototype for the SiD in the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Yvonne; Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andrew; UTA Advance Detector Team

    2015-04-01

    High energy physics experiments require detectors and electronics that are capable of high precision, stable energy read out. Since 2007, the Advance Detector team in University of Texas at Arlington has been working on the Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector technology. The detector technology utilizes the avalanche effect of charged particles in high electric field to magnify hadron signals produced in collision for precise and accurate energy interpretation. KPiX is a multi-channel 13 bits electronic chip designed for the time synchronous requirements of the Silicon Detector (SiD) in the International Linear Collider (ILC). The chip is coupled with GEM in this experiment to study the aging of the prototype 30cm × 30cm detector. In this study, cosmic ray is used as a source to study the gain fluctuation of GEM over a period of 3 years. Statistics methods are implemented to investigate the seasonal dependence of the gain of the signal. Also, the self-trigger mode of KPiX v.9 enable the study of the electronics though the chip's electronics gain variation. Results over 3 years shows that GEM is capable of stable data read out with little aging effect. The study provides invaluable information of the detector on its stability as a calorimeter.

  12. Axonal Localization of Integrins in the CNS Is Neuronal Type and Age Dependent.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Melissa R; Soleman, Sara; Cheah, Menghon; Tumbarello, David A; Mason, Matthew R J; Moloney, Elizabeth; Verhaagen, Joost; Bensadoun, Jean-Charles; Schneider, Bernard; Aebischer, Patrick; Fawcett, James W

    2016-01-01

    The regenerative ability of CNS axons decreases with age, however, this ability remains largely intact in PNS axons throughout adulthood. These differences are likely to correspond with age-related silencing of proteins necessary for axon growth and elongation. In previous studies, it has been shown that reintroduction of the α9 integrin subunit (tenascin-C receptor, α9) that is downregulated in adult CNS can improve neurite outgrowth and sensory axon regeneration after a dorsal rhizotomy or a dorsal column crush spinal cord lesion. In the current study, we demonstrate that virally expressed integrins (α9, α6, or β1 integrin) in the adult rat sensorimotor cortex and adult red nucleus are excluded from axons following neuronal transduction. Attempts to stimulate transport by inclusion of a cervical spinal injury and thus an upregulation of extracellular matrix molecules at the lesion site, or cotransduction with its binding partner, β1 integrin, did not induce integrin localization within axons. In contrast, virally expressed α9 integrin in developing rat cortex (postnatal day 5 or 10) demonstrated clear localization of integrins in cortical axons revealed by the presence of integrin in the axons of the corpus callosum and internal capsule, as well as in the neuronal cell body. Furthermore, examination of dorsal root ganglia neurons and retinal ganglion cells demonstrated integrin localization both within peripheral nerve as well as dorsal root axons and within optic nerve axons, respectively. Together, our results suggest a differential ability for in vivo axonal transport of transmembrane proteins dependent on neuronal age and subtype. PMID:27570822

  13. Axonal Localization of Integrins in the CNS Is Neuronal Type and Age Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Soleman, Sara; Mason, Matthew R. J.; Verhaagen, Joost; Bensadoun, Jean-Charles; Aebischer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The regenerative ability of CNS axons decreases with age, however, this ability remains largely intact in PNS axons throughout adulthood. These differences are likely to correspond with age-related silencing of proteins necessary for axon growth and elongation. In previous studies, it has been shown that reintroduction of the α9 integrin subunit (tenascin-C receptor, α9) that is downregulated in adult CNS can improve neurite outgrowth and sensory axon regeneration after a dorsal rhizotomy or a dorsal column crush spinal cord lesion. In the current study, we demonstrate that virally expressed integrins (α9, α6, or β1 integrin) in the adult rat sensorimotor cortex and adult red nucleus are excluded from axons following neuronal transduction. Attempts to stimulate transport by inclusion of a cervical spinal injury and thus an upregulation of extracellular matrix molecules at the lesion site, or cotransduction with its binding partner, β1 integrin, did not induce integrin localization within axons. In contrast, virally expressed α9 integrin in developing rat cortex (postnatal day 5 or 10) demonstrated clear localization of integrins in cortical axons revealed by the presence of integrin in the axons of the corpus callosum and internal capsule, as well as in the neuronal cell body. Furthermore, examination of dorsal root ganglia neurons and retinal ganglion cells demonstrated integrin localization both within peripheral nerve as well as dorsal root axons and within optic nerve axons, respectively. Together, our results suggest a differential ability for in vivo axonal transport of transmembrane proteins dependent on neuronal age and subtype. PMID:27570822

  14. Acute stress affects free recall and recognition of pictures differently depending on age and sex.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Vanesa; Pulopulos, Matias M; Puig-Perez, Sara; Espin, Laura; Gomez-Amor, Jesus; Salvador, Alicia

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about age differences in the effects of stress on memory retrieval. Our aim was to perform an in-depth examination of acute psychosocial stress effects on memory retrieval, depending on age and sex. For this purpose, data from 52 older subjects (27 men and 25 women) were reanalyzed along with data from a novel group of 50 young subjects (26 men and 24 women). Participants were exposed to an acute psychosocial stress task (Trier Social Stress Test) or a control task. After the experimental manipulation, the retrieval of positive, negative and neutral pictures learned the previous day was tested. As expected, there was a significant response to the exposure to the stress task, but the older participants had a lower cortisol response to TSST than the younger ones. Stress impaired free recall of emotional (positive and negative) and neutral pictures only in the group of young men. Also in this group, correlation analyses showed a marginally significant association between cortisol and free recall. However, exploratory analyses revealed only a negative relationship between the stress-induced cortisol response and free recall of negative pictures. Moreover, stress impaired recognition memory of positive pictures in all participants, although this effect was not related to the cortisol or alpha-amylase response. These results indicate that both age and sex are critical factors in acute stress effects on specific aspects of long-term memory retrieval of emotional and neutral material. They also point out that more research is needed to better understand their specific role. PMID:26149415

  15. The structure of optimal time- and age-dependent harvesting in the Lotka-McKendrik population model.

    PubMed

    Hritonenko, Natali; Yatsenko, Yuri

    2007-07-01

    The paper analyzes optimal harvesting of age-structured populations described by the Lotka-McKendrik model. It is shown that the optimal time- and age-dependent harvesting control involves only one age at natural conditions. This result leads to a new optimization problem with the time-dependent harvesting age as an unknown control. The integral Lotka model is employed to explicitly describe the time-varying age of harvesting. It is proven that in the case of the exponential discounting and infinite horizon the optimal strategy is a stationary solution with a constant harvesting age. A numeric example on optimal forest management illustrates the theoretical findings. Discussion and interpretation of the results are provided.

  16. AMPA receptor potentiation by acetylcholinesterase is age-dependently upregulated at synaptogenesis sites of the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Silvia; Henley, Jeremy M.; Rodriguez-Ithurralde, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We have used radioligand binding to synaptic membranes from distinct rat brain regions and quantitative autoradiography to investigate the postnatal evolution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE)-evoked up-regulation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in CNS areas undergoing synaptogenesis. Incubation of synaptosomal membranes or brain sections with purified AChE caused a developmentally modulated enhancement in the binding of [3H]-(S)–AMPA and the specific AMPA receptor ligand [3H]-(S)-5–fluorowillardiine, but did not modify binding to kainate neither N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. In all postnatal ages investigated (4, 7, 14, 20, 27, 40 days-old and adult rats), AChE effect on binding was concentration-dependent and blocked by propidium, BW 284c51, diisopropylfluorophosphonate and eserine, therefore requiring indemnity of both peripheral and active sites of the enzyme. AChE-mediated enhancement of [3H]-fluorowillardiine binding was measurable in all major CNS areas, but displayed remarkable anatomical selectivity and developmental regulation. Autoradiograph densitometry exhibited distinct temporal profiles and peaks of treated/control binding ratios for different cortices, cortical layers, and nuclei. Within the parietal, occipital and temporal neocortices, hippocampal CA1 field and cerebellum, AChE-potentiated binding ratios peaked in chronological correspondence with synaptogenesis periods of the respective AMPA-receptor containing targets. This modulation of AMPA receptors by AChE is a molecular mechanism able to transduce localized neural activity into durable modifications of synaptic molecular structure and function. It might also contribute to AChE-mediated neurotoxicity, as postulated in Alzheimer’s disease and other CNS disorders. PMID:12565696

  17. Properties of M31 . I. Dust. Basic properties and a discussion about age-dependent dust heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Seitz, S.; Riffeser, A.; Hopp, U.; Lee, C.-H.; Schönrich, R.

    2009-11-01

    Aims: Observations acquired by the Spitzer Space Telescope and improvements to theoretical modeling of dust emission properties are used to discuss the distribution of dust and its characteristics in the closest neighbor spiral galaxy M31. These data are then used with GALEX FUV, NUV, and SDSS images to study the age dependence of the dust heating process. Methods: Spitzer IRAC/MIPS maps of M31 were matched together and compared to dust emission models allowing us to constrain the dust mass, the intensity of the mean radiation field, the abundance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) particles. The total infrared emission (TIR) was analyzed as a function of UV and optical colors and compared to predictions of models that consider age-dependent dust heating. Results: We demonstrate that cold-dust component emission dominates the infrared spectral energy distribution of M31. The mean intensity of the radiation field heating the dust is low (typically U < 2, where U = 1 is the value in the solar neighborhood). Because of a lack of submillimeter observations, the dust mass (M_dust) is only weakly constrained by the infrared spectrum, but we derived a lower limit of M_dust ≳ 1.1 × 107 M⊙ with a best-fit model value of M_dust = 7.6 × 107 M⊙, in good agreement with expectations from CO and HI measurements. Across the spiral-ring structure of M31, we show that a fraction >3% of the total dust mass is in PAHs. UV and optical colors are correlated with the total infrared to far ultraviolet (TIR/FUV) ratios in ~670 pc-sized regions over the disk of M31, although deviating from the relationship between infrared excess and ultraviolet spectral slope (referred as IRX-β relationship) for starburst galaxies. In particular, redder regions have lower values of the TIR/FUV ratio for a fixed color. Considering the predictions of models that account for the dust-heating age dependence, we found that in 83% of the regions analyzed across the 10 kpc ring, more than 50% of

  18. Post-caldera volcanism: In situ measurement of U-Pb age and oxygen isotope ratio in Pleistocene zircons from Yellowstone caldera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bindeman, I.N.; Valley, J.W.; Wooden, J.L.; Persing, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field, the site of some of the largest known silicic volcanic eruptions, is the present location of NE-migrating hotspot volcanic activity. Most volcanic rocks in the Yellowstone caldera (0.6 Ma), which formed in response to the climactic eruption of 1000 km3 of Lava Creek Tuff (LCT), have unusually low oxygen isotope ratios. Ion microprobe analysis of both U-Pb age and ??18O in zircons from these low-??18O lavas reveals evidence of complex inheritance and remelting. A majority of analyzed zircons from low-??18O lavas erupted inside the Yellowstone caldera have cores that range in age from 2.4 to 0.7 Ma, significantly older than their eruption ages (0.5-0.4 Ma). These ages and the high-??18O cores indicate that these lavas are largely derived from nearly total remelting of normal-??18O Huckleberry Ridge Tuff (HRT) and other pre-LCT volcanic rocks. A post-HRT low-??18O lava shows similar inheritance of HRT-age zircons. The recycling of volcanic rocks by shallow remelting can change the water content and eruptive potential of magma. This newly proposed mechanism of intracaldera volcanism is best studied by combining in situ analysis of oxygen and U-Pb isotope ratios of individual crystals. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Membrane skeletal alterations during in vivo mouse red cell aging. Increase in the band 4.1a:4.1b ratio.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, T J; Jackson, C W; Dockter, M E; Morrison, M

    1987-01-01

    We have examined membrane protein profiles for alterations during red blood cell aging. To obtain populations of in vivo-aged red cells, we maintained mice in a state of continuous erythropoietic suppression for up to 8 wk using serial hypertransfusion. The circulating t1/2 of red cells from mice which had been erythropoietically suppressed for 8 wk was less than 1 d compared with a t1/2 of 15 d for red cells from normal animals. The most obvious alteration in membrane proteins was an increase in the ratio of the membrane skeletal components 4.1a:4.1b from 0.3 for the normal red cell population to greater than 1 for these old cells. The 4.1a:4.1b ratio thus appears to be a useful index of red cell age. Analyses of the density profile of cells aged in the hypertransfused mice disclosed that these old cells had a density range similar to that of controls, suggesting that cell density does not increase significantly with red cell age in the mouse. Images PMID:3805278

  20. Testing the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss with heavy-to-light ratios at BNL RHIC and CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Armesto, Nestor; Dainese, Andrea; Salgado, Carlos A.; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2005-03-01

    The ratio of nuclear modification factors of high-p{sub T} heavy-flavored mesons to light-flavored hadrons ('heavy-to-light ratio') in nucleus-nucleus collisions tests the partonic mechanism expected to underlie jet quenching. Heavy-to-light ratios are mainly sensitive to the mass and color-charge dependences of medium-induced parton energy loss. Here, we assess the potential for identifying these two effects in D and B meson production at RHIC and at the LHC. To this end, we supplement the perturbative QCD factorized formalism for leading hadron production with radiative parton energy loss. For D meson spectra at high but experimentally accessible transverse momentum (10 < or approx. p{sub T} < or approx. 20 GeV) in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, we find that charm quarks behave essentially like light quarks. However, since light-flavored hadron yields are dominated by gluon parents, the heavy-to-light ratio of D mesons is a sensitive probe of the color-charge dependence of parton energy loss. In contrast, due to the larger b quark mass, the medium modification of B mesons in the same kinematical regime provides a sensitive test of the mass dependence of parton energy loss. At RHIC energies, the strategies for identifying and disentangling the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss are more involved because of the smaller kinematical range accessible. We argue that at RHIC, the kinematical regime best suited for such an analysis of D mesons is 7 < or approx. p{sub T} < or approx. 12 GeV, whereas the study of lower transverse momenta is further complicated due to the known dominant contribution of additional, particle species dependent, nonperturbative effects.

  1. Generalized shear-ratio tests: A new relation between cosmological distances, and a diagnostic for a redshift-dependent multiplicative bias in shear measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We derive a new relation between cosmological distances that is valid in any (statistically) isotropic space-time and independent of cosmological parameters or even the validity of the field equation of General Relativity. In particular, this relation yields an equation between those distance ratios that are the geometrical factors determining the strength of the gravitational lensing effect of mass concentrations. Considering a combination of weak-lensing shear ratios, based on lenses at two different redshifts and sources at three different redshifts, we derive a relation between shear-ratio tests that must be identically satisfied. A redshift-dependent multiplicative bias in shear estimates will violate this relation, and thus can be probed by this generalized shear-ratio test. Combining the lensing effect for lenses at three different redshifts and three different source redshifts, a relation between shear ratios is derived that must be valid independent of a multiplicative bias. We propose these generalized shear-ratio tests as a diagnostic for the presence of systematics in upcoming weak-lensing surveys.

  2. Time dependent behavior of a graphite/thermoplastic composite and the effects of stress and physical aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Two complimentary studies were performed to determine the effects of stress and physical aging on the matrix dominated time dependent properties of IM7/8320 composite. The first of these studies, experimental in nature, used isothermal tensile creep/aging test techniques developed for polymers and adapted them for testing of the composite material. From these tests, the time dependent transverse (S22) and shear (S66) compliance's for an orthotropic plate were found from short term creep compliance measurements at constant, sub-T(sub g) temperatures. These compliance terms were shown to be affected by physical aging. Aging time shift factors and shift rates were found to be a function of temperature and applied stress. The second part of the study relied upon isothermal uniaxial tension tests of IM7/8320 to determine the effects of physical aging on the nonlinear material behavior at elevated temperature. An elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model was used to quantify the effects of aging on the rate-independent plastic and rate-dependent viscoplastic response. Sensitivity of the material constants required by the model to aging time were determined for aging times up to 65 hours. Verification of the analytical model indicated that the effects of prior aging on the nonlinear stress/strain/time data of matrix dominated laminates can be predicted.

  3. Heavy metal composition in stormwater and retention in ponds dependent on pond age, design and catchment type.

    PubMed

    Egemose, Sara; Sønderup, Melanie J; Grudinina, Anna; Hansen, Anders S; Flindt, Mogens R

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals have toxic effects on flora and fauna in the aquatic environments and are of great concern in stormwater. Heavy metal runoff was studied in 37 stormwater ponds in Denmark with varying heavy metal load, catchment type and pond design. The studied metals were Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb, Ni and Zn. The concentrations varied considerably depending on the catchment type, with the highest concentrations coming from industrial areas and the lowest from uncultivated and rural areas. Ponds can effectively remove heavy metals in particulate forms through sedimentation processes, but the dissolved forms are more difficult to retain. The removal efficiency in the ponds varied considerably, with the highest retention of Pb, Ni and Zn due to higher particulate fraction. The retention increased with increased pond volume-to-reduced catchment area ratio. In addition, the pond age affected the efficiency; whereas ponds less than 1-2 years efficiently removed all metals, 30-40-year-old ponds only removed Pb, Ni and Zn, but steeply decreasing over the years. Physical parameters such as pond size, age and sedimentation patterns were found to play a more significant role in the removal compared with chemical parameters such as pH, oxygen and organic matter. Input of metals to the ponds was reflected in the sediment content, but not significantly for all heavy metals probably due to low or varying retention caused by mineralization and re-suspension. The heavy metal concentration in the outlets was reduced to non-toxic levels, except for Cu and Cr at a few study sites. PMID:25262998

  4. Age estimation from pulp/tooth area ratio (PTR) in an Indian sample: A preliminary comparison of three mandibular teeth used alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Babshet, Medha; Acharya, Ashith B; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G

    2011-11-01

    Pulp/tooth area ratio (PTR) method of adult dental age estimation has been examined on few tooth types. We assessed the lateral incisor (LI) and first premolar (PM1) in addition to canine (C) - alone and in combination. Periapical radiographs from 61 Indians aged 21-71 years were examined. PTR of LI produced the best age correlation (r = -0.395) followed closely by PM1 (r = -0.362). The canine revealed the lowest correlation (r = -0.206); among tooth combinations, the three teeth taken together had the best R value (-0.438) followed by LI + PM1 (-0.435), LI + C (-0.406) and C + PM1 (-0.37). The standard errors of estimates (S.E.E.) of the regression analyses for the individual teeth and tooth combinations ranged from ±12.13 to 13.08 years, indicating minimal difference in age estimates using solitary or multiple teeth. Errors were higher than in European groups (±2.5-5 years) which may partly owe to moderate age correlation of secondary dentine deposition in Indians. Moreover, facial soft-tissue superimposition in living subjects evaluated herein possibly precluded optimal tooth and pulp canal visualization. These indicate that the PTR method should be used judiciously in age estimation of living Indian adults, although further studies on larger samples with evenly distributed age-groups is necessary for deriving definitive conclusions.

  5. Sensorimotor and cognitive factors associated with the age-related increase of visual field dependence: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Agathos, Catherine P; Bernardin, Delphine; Huchet, Delphine; Scherlen, Anne-Catherine; Assaiante, Christine; Isableu, Brice

    2015-08-01

    Reliance on the visual frame of reference for spatial orientation (or visual field dependence) has been reported to increase with age. This has implications on old adults' daily living tasks as it affects stability, attention, and adaptation capacities. However, the nature and underlying mechanisms of this increase are not well defined. We investigated sensorimotor and cognitive factors possibly associated with increased visual field dependence in old age, by considering functions that are both known to degrade with age and important for spatial orientation and sensorimotor control: reliance on the (somatosensory-based) egocentric frame of reference, visual fixation stability, and attentional processing of complex visual scenes (useful field of view, UFOV). Twenty young, 18 middle-aged, and 20 old adults completed a visual examination, three tests of visual field dependence (RFT, RDT, and GEFT), a test of egocentric dependence (subjective vertical estimation with the body erect and tilted at 70°), a visual fixation task, and a test of visual attentional processing (UFOV®). Increased visual field dependence with age was associated with reduced egocentric dependence, visual fixation stability, and visual attentional processing. In addition, visual fixation instability and reduced UFOV were correlated. Results of middle-aged adults fell between those of the young and old, revealing the progressive nature of the age effects we evaluated. We discuss results in terms of reference frame selection with respect to ageing as well as visual and non-visual information processing. Inter-individual differences amongst old adults are highlighted and discussed with respect to the functionality of increased visual field dependence.

  6. Male-dependent doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA and female-dependent sex-ratio in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, C; Reyero, M I; Zouros, E

    1997-04-01

    We have investigated sex ratio and mitochondrial DNA inheritance in pair-matings involving five female and five male individuals of the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The percentage of male progeny varied widely among families and was found to be a characteristic of the female parent and independent of the male to which it was mated. Thus sex-ratio in Mytilus appears to be independent of the nuclear genotype of the sperm. With a few exceptions, doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mtDNA was observed in all families fathered by four of the five males: female and male progeny contained the mother's mtDNA (the F genome), but males contained also the father's paternal mtDNA (the M genome). Two hermaphrodite individuals found among the progeny of these crosses contained the F mitochondrial genome in the female gonad and both the F and M genomes in the male gonad. All four families fathered by the fifth male showed the standard maternal inheritance (SMI) of animal mtDNA: both female and male progeny contained only the maternal mtDNA. These observations illustrate the intimate linkage between sex and mtDNA inheritance in species with DUI and suggest different major roles for each gender. We propose a model according to which development of a male gonad requires the presence in the early germ cells of an agent associated with sperm-derived mitochondria, these mitochondria are endowed with a paternally encoded replicative advantage through which they overcome their original minority in the fertilized egg and this advantage (and, therefore, the chance of an early entrance into the germ line) is countered by a maternally encoded egg factor.

  7. Male-Dependent Doubly Uniparental Inheritance of Mitochondrial DNA and Female-Dependent Sex-Ratio in the Mussel Mytilus Galloprovincialis

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, C.; Reyero, M. I.; Zouros, E.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated sex ratio and mitochondrial DNA inheritance in pair-matings involving five female and five male individuals of the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The percentage of male progeny varied widely among families and was found to be a characteristic of the female parent and independent of the male to which it was mated. Thus sex-ratio in Mytilus appears to be independent of the nuclear genotype of the sperm. With a few exceptions, doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mtDNA was observed in all families fathered by four of the five males: female and male progeny contained the mother's mtDNA (the F genome), but males contained also the father's paternal mtDNA (the M genome). Two hermaphrodite individuals found among the progeny of these crosses contained the F mitochondrial genome in the female gonad and both the F and M genomes in the male gonad. All four families fathered by the fifth male showed the standard maternal inheritance (SMI) of animal mtDNA: both female and male progeny contained only the maternal mtDNA. These observations illustrate the intimate linkage between sex and mtDNA inheritance in species with DUI and suggest different major roles for each gender. We propose a model according to which development of a male gonad requires the presence in the early germ cells of an agent associated with sperm-derived mitochondria, these mitochondria are endowed with a paternally encoded replicative advantage through which they overcome their original minority in the fertilized egg and this advantage (and, therefore, the chance of an early entrance into the germ line) is countered by a maternally encoded egg factor. PMID:9093859

  8. Effects of castration age, dietary protein level and lysine/methionine ratio on animal performance, carcass and meat quality of Friesian steers intensively reared.

    PubMed

    Prado, I N; Campo, M M; Muela, E; Valero, M V; Catalan, O; Olleta, J L; Sañudo, C

    2014-09-01

    The effects of castration age, dietary protein level and the dietary lysine/methionine (lys/met) ratio on animal performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality were studied in 64 intensively reared Friesian steers. Animals underwent castration procedures at 15 days old or at 5 months old. Dietary treatments started at 90 days old, with eight animals from each castration age randomly allocated to each treatment: 14.6% v. 16.8% CP (DM basis), and 3.0 v. 3.4 lys/met, on a 2×2×2 design. The recommended ratio of 3.0 was reached with supplementation of protected methionine. Steers were slaughtered at 443.5±26.2 kg live weight when they reached 12 months old approximately. Average daily gain, cold carcass weight or carcass classification were not affected by any studied effect. Muscle moisture (P=0.024), C18:2n-6 percentage (P=0.047), polyunsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid (P=0.049) and n-6/n-3 (P=0.003) were higher in late castrated animals. Both high levels of dietary protein (P=0.008) and lys/met ratio (P=0.048) increased the percentage of muscle in the carcass. A level of 16.8% of CP in the diet also increased the percentage of monounsaturated fatty acids in the intramuscular fat (P=0.032), whereas a ratio lys/met of 3.4 decreased the percentage of saturated fatty acids (P=0.028). Thus, it is recommended using diets with a high protein level (16.8%) and a high lys/met ratio (3.4) in animals slaughtered at a young age, in order to obtain carcasses with high muscle content without negatively affecting productive traits or intramuscular fat composition.

  9. Female-Bias in a Long-Term Study of a Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination: Monitoring Sex Ratios for Climate Change Research.

    PubMed

    Braun McNeill, Joanne; Avens, Larisa; Goodman Hall, April; Goshe, Lisa R; Harms, Craig A; Owens, David W

    2016-01-01

    Alterations have occurred and continue to manifest in the Earth's biota as a result of climate change. Animals exhibiting temperature dependent sex determination (TSD), including sea turtles, are perhaps most vulnerable to a warming of the Earth as highly skewed sex ratios can result, potentially leading to population extinction resulting from decreased male recruitment. Recent studies have begun to quantify climate change impacts to sea turtle populations, especially in terms of predicting effects on hatchling sex ratios. However, given the inherent difficulty in studying sex ratios at this life stage, a more accurate assessment of changes in population sex ratios might be derived by evaluating the juvenile portion of foraging aggregations. We investigated the long-term trend in sex ratio of a juvenile loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle population inhabiting Pamlico and Core Sounds, North Carolina, USA. We used plasma testosterone reference ranges measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA) to assign sex for 959 turtles and confirmed sex assignment of a subset (N = 58) of the sampled turtles through laparoscopic examination of their gonads. Our results demonstrate that for this particular population of loggerheads, sex ratios (3Females:1Male) had not significantly changed over a 10 year period (1998-2007), nor showed any significant difference among 5-cm straight carapace length (SCL) size classes. Ultimately, these findings provide a basis for comparison with future sex ratios, and highlight the importance of establishing similar long-term studies monitoring secondary, rather than primary, sex ratios, so that needed mitigation measures to climate change impacts can be implemented. PMID:27579608

  10. Female-Bias in a Long-Term Study of a Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination: Monitoring Sex Ratios for Climate Change Research

    PubMed Central

    Braun McNeill, Joanne; Avens, Larisa; Goodman Hall, April; Goshe, Lisa R.; Harms, Craig A.; Owens, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations have occurred and continue to manifest in the Earth’s biota as a result of climate change. Animals exhibiting temperature dependent sex determination (TSD), including sea turtles, are perhaps most vulnerable to a warming of the Earth as highly skewed sex ratios can result, potentially leading to population extinction resulting from decreased male recruitment. Recent studies have begun to quantify climate change impacts to sea turtle populations, especially in terms of predicting effects on hatchling sex ratios. However, given the inherent difficulty in studying sex ratios at this life stage, a more accurate assessment of changes in population sex ratios might be derived by evaluating the juvenile portion of foraging aggregations. We investigated the long-term trend in sex ratio of a juvenile loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle population inhabiting Pamlico and Core Sounds, North Carolina, USA. We used plasma testosterone reference ranges measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA) to assign sex for 959 turtles and confirmed sex assignment of a subset (N = 58) of the sampled turtles through laparoscopic examination of their gonads. Our results demonstrate that for this particular population of loggerheads, sex ratios (3Females:1Male) had not significantly changed over a 10 year period (1998–2007), nor showed any significant difference among 5-cm straight carapace length (SCL) size classes. Ultimately, these findings provide a basis for comparison with future sex ratios, and highlight the importance of establishing similar long-term studies monitoring secondary, rather than primary, sex ratios, so that needed mitigation measures to climate change impacts can be implemented. PMID:27579608

  11. Female-Bias in a Long-Term Study of a Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination: Monitoring Sex Ratios for Climate Change Research.

    PubMed

    Braun McNeill, Joanne; Avens, Larisa; Goodman Hall, April; Goshe, Lisa R; Harms, Craig A; Owens, David W

    2016-01-01

    Alterations have occurred and continue to manifest in the Earth's biota as a result of climate change. Animals exhibiting temperature dependent sex determination (TSD), including sea turtles, are perhaps most vulnerable to a warming of the Earth as highly skewed sex ratios can result, potentially leading to population extinction resulting from decreased male recruitment. Recent studies have begun to quantify climate change impacts to sea turtle populations, especially in terms of predicting effects on hatchling sex ratios. However, given the inherent difficulty in studying sex ratios at this life stage, a more accurate assessment of changes in population sex ratios might be derived by evaluating the juvenile portion of foraging aggregations. We investigated the long-term trend in sex ratio of a juvenile loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle population inhabiting Pamlico and Core Sounds, North Carolina, USA. We used plasma testosterone reference ranges measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA) to assign sex for 959 turtles and confirmed sex assignment of a subset (N = 58) of the sampled turtles through laparoscopic examination of their gonads. Our results demonstrate that for this particular population of loggerheads, sex ratios (3Females:1Male) had not significantly changed over a 10 year period (1998-2007), nor showed any significant difference among 5-cm straight carapace length (SCL) size classes. Ultimately, these findings provide a basis for comparison with future sex ratios, and highlight the importance of establishing similar long-term studies monitoring secondary, rather than primary, sex ratios, so that needed mitigation measures to climate change impacts can be implemented.

  12. Centrality dependence of charged antiparticle to particle ratios near midrapidity in d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Baker, M.D.; Barton, D.S.; Becker, B.; Carroll, A.; George, N.; Gushue, S.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Sedykh, I.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M.P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J.L.; Kulinich, P.; Lee, J.W.

    2004-07-01

    The ratios of the yields of charged antiparticles to particles have been obtained for pions, kaons, and protons near midrapidity for d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV as a function of centrality. The reported values represent the ratio of the yields averaged over the rapidity range of 0.1dependence is observed in all three ratios. The data are compared to results from other systems and model calculations.

  13. Seasonal Succession Leads to Habitat-Dependent Differentiation in Ribosomal RNA:DNA Ratios among Freshwater Lake Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; Schmidt, Marian L.

    2016-01-01

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA gene sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. However, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors. PMID:27199936

  14. Seasonal succession leads to habitat-dependent differentiation in ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios among freshwater lake bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; Schmidt, Marian L.

    2016-04-29

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental grad