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Sample records for age distribution parameters

  1. A partial exponential lumped parameter model to evaluate groundwater age distributions and nitrate trends in long-screened wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant; Bohlke, John Karl; Kauffman, Leon J.; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    A partial exponential lumped parameter model (PEM) was derived to determine age distributions and nitrate trends in long-screened production wells. The PEM can simulate age distributions for wells screened over any finite interval of an aquifer that has an exponential distribution of age with depth. The PEM has 3 parameters – the ratio of saturated thickness to the top and bottom of the screen and mean age, but these can be reduced to 1 parameter (mean age) by using well construction information and estimates of the saturated thickness. The PEM was tested with data from 30 production wells in a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer in California, USA. Well construction data were used to guide parameterization of a PEM for each well and mean age was calibrated to measured environmental tracer data (3H, 3He, CFC-113, and 14C). Results were compared to age distributions generated for individual wells using advective particle tracking models (PTMs). Age distributions from PTMs were more complex than PEM distributions, but PEMs provided better fits to tracer data, partly because the PTMs did not simulate 14C accurately in wells that captured varying amounts of old groundwater recharged at lower rates prior to groundwater development and irrigation. Nitrate trends were simulated independently of the calibration process and the PEM provided good fits for at least 11 of 24 wells. This work shows that the PEM, and lumped parameter models (LPMs) in general, can often identify critical features of the age distributions in wells that are needed to explain observed tracer data and nonpoint source contaminant trends, even in systems where aquifer heterogeneity and water-use complicate distributions of age. While accurate PTMs are preferable for understanding and predicting aquifer-scale responses to water use and contaminant transport, LPMs can be sensitive to local conditions near individual wells that may be inaccurately represented or missing in an aquifer-scale flow model.

  2. Using groundwater age distributions to estimate the effective parameters of Fickian and non-Fickian models of solute transport

    PubMed Central

    Engdahl, Nicholas B.; Ginn, Timothy R.; Fogg, Graham E.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater age distributions are used to estimate the parameters of Fickian, and non-Fickian, effective models of solute transport. Based on the similarities between the transport and age equations, we develop a deconvolution based approach that describes transport between two monitoring wells. We show that the proposed method gives exact estimates of the travel time distribution between two wells when the domain is stationary and that the method still provides useful information on transport when the domain is non-stationary. The method is demonstrated using idealized uniform and layered 2-D aquifers. Homogeneous transport is determined exactly and non-Fickian transport in a layered aquifer was also approximated very well, even though this example problem is shown to be scale-dependent. This work introduces a method that addresses a significant limitation of tracer tests and non-Fickian transport modeling which is the difficulty in determining the effective parameters of the transport model. PMID:25821342

  3. Fundamental Parameters and Spectral Energy Distributions of Young and Field Age Objects with Masses Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippazzo, Joseph C.; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline; Cruz, Kelle L.; Van Gordon, Mollie M.; Looper, Dagny L.

    2015-09-01

    We combine optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared spectra and photometry to construct expanded spectral energy distributions for 145 field age (>500 Myr) and 53 young (lower age estimate <500 Myr) ultracool dwarfs (M6-T9). This range of spectral types includes very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planetary mass objects, providing fundamental parameters across both the hydrogen and deuterium burning minimum masses for the largest sample assembled to date. A subsample of 29 objects have well constrained ages as probable members of a nearby young moving group. We use 182 parallaxes and 16 kinematic distances to determine precise bolometric luminosities (Lbol) and radius estimates from evolutionary models give semi-empirical effective temperatures (Teff) for the full range of young and field age late-M, L, and T dwarfs. We construct age-sensitive relationships of luminosity, temperature, and absolute magnitude as functions of spectral type and absolute magnitude to disentangle the effects of degenerate physical parameters such as Teff, surface gravity, and clouds on spectral morphology. We report bolometric corrections in J for both field age and young objects and find differences of up to a magnitude for late-L dwarfs. Our correction in Ks shows a larger dispersion but not necessarily a different relationship for young and field age sequences. We also characterize the NIR-MIR reddening of low gravity L dwarfs and identify a systematically cooler Teff of up to 300 K from field age objects of the same spectral type and 400 K cooler from field age objects of the same MH magnitude.

  4. Age Distribution of Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, U.; Daughney, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    Groundwater at the discharge point comprises a mixture of water from different flow lines with different travel time and therefore has no discrete age but an age distribution. The age distribution can be assessed by measuring how a pulse shaped tracer moves through the groundwater system. Detection of the time delay and the dispersion of the peak in the groundwater compared to the tracer input reveals the mean residence time and the mixing parameter. Tritium from nuclear weapons testing in the early 1960s resulted in a peak-shaped tritium input to the whole hydrologic system on earth. Tritium is the ideal tracer for groundwater because it is an isotope of hydrogen and therefore is part of the water molecule. Tritium time series data that encompass the passage of the bomb tritium pulse through the groundwater system in all common hydrogeologic situations in New Zealand demonstrate a semi-systematic pattern between age distribution parameters and hydrologic situation. The data in general indicate high fraction of mixing, but in some cases also indicate high piston flow. We will show that still, 45 years after the peak of the bomb tritium, it is possible to assess accurately the parameters of age distributions by measuring the tail of the bomb tritium.

  5. Fundamental Parameters and Spectral Energy Distributions of Young and Field Age Objects with Masses Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippazzo, Joe; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Godfrey, Paige A.; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    The physical and atmospheric properties of ultracool dwarfs are deeply entangled due to the degenerate effects of mass, age, metallicity, clouds and dust, activity, rotation, and possibly even formation mechanism on observed spectra. Accurate determination of fundamental parameters for a wide diversity of objects at the low end of the IMF is thus crucial to testing stellar and planetary formation theories. To determine these quantities, we constructed and flux calibrated nearly-complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 221 M, L, T, and Y dwarfs using published parallaxes and 0.3-40 μm spectra and photometry. From these homogeneous SEDs, we calculated bolometric luminosity (Lbol), effective temperature (Teff), mass, surface gravity, radius, spectral indexes, synthetic photometry, and bolometric corrections (BCs) for each object. We used these results to derive Lbol, Teff, and BC polynomial relations across the entire very-low-mass star/brown dwarf/planetary mass regime. We use a subsample of objects with age constraints based on nearby young moving group membership, companionship with a young star, or spectral signatures of low surface gravity to define new age-sensitive diagnostics and characterize the reddening of young substellar atmospheres as a redistribution of flux from the near-infrared into the mid-infrared. Consequently we find the SED flux pivots at Ks band, making BCKs as a function of spectral type a tight and age independent relationship. We find that young L dwarfs are systematically 300 K cooler than field age objects of the same spectral type and up to 600 K cooler than field age objects of the same absolute H magnitude. Finally, we present preliminary comparisons of these empirical results to best fit parameters from four different model atmosphere grids via Markov-Chain Monte Carlo analysis in order to create prescriptions for the reliable and efficient characterization of new ultracool dwarfs.

  6. Topological aspects of age parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Gawin, J.

    1985-01-01

    The well known NKG function is a very useful tool to describe the lateral extension of the electromagnetic component in Extensive Air Showers (EAS); however, in spite of non-negligible qualities (simplicity, normalization by beta function), it doesn't correspond exactly to the natural shape of the lateral electron distribution. Several bias may occur in size estimation if NKG is used without correction. It is shown that the longitudinal age parameter s sub t can be correlated with the information obtained from the lateral electron densities according to the conditions of use of the NKG function.

  7. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating vulnerability of production wells to contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberts, S.M.; Böhlke, J.K.; Kauffman, L.J.; Jurgens, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental age tracers have been used in various ways to help assess vulnerability of drinking-water production wells to contamination. The most appropriate approach will depend on the information that is available and that which is desired. To understand how the well will respond to changing nonpoint-source contaminant inputs at the water table, some representation of the distribution of groundwater ages in the well is needed. Such information for production wells is sparse and difficult to obtain, especially in areas lacking detailed field studies. In this study, age distributions derived from detailed groundwater-flow models with advective particle tracking were compared with those generated from lumped-parameter models to examine conditions in which estimates from simpler, less resource-intensive lumped-parameter models could be used in place of estimates from particle-tracking models. In each of four contrasting hydrogeologic settings in the USA, particle-tracking and lumped-parameter models yielded roughly similar age distributions and largely indistinguishable contaminant trends when based on similar conceptual models and calibrated to similar tracer data. Although model calibrations and predictions were variably affected by tracer limitations and conceptual ambiguities, results illustrated the importance of full age distributions, rather than apparent tracer ages or model mean ages, for trend analysis and forecasting.

  8. Regional Evaluation of Groundwater Age Distributions Using Lumped Parameter Models with Large, Sparse Datasets: Example from the Central Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgens, B. C.; Bohlke, J. K.; Voss, S.; Fram, M. S.; Esser, B.

    2015-12-01

    Tracer-based, lumped parameter models (LPMs) are an appealing way to estimate the distribution of age for groundwater because the cost of sampling wells is often less than building numerical groundwater flow models sufficiently complex to provide groundwater age distributions. In practice, however, tracer datasets are often incomplete because of anthropogenic or terrigenic contamination of tracers, or analytical limitations. While age interpretations using such datsets can have large uncertainties, it may still be possible to identify key parts of the age distribution if LPMs are carefully chosen to match hydrogeologic conceptualization and the degree of age mixing is reasonably estimated. We developed a systematic approach for evaluating groundwater age distributions using LPMs with a large but incomplete set of tracer data (3H, 3Hetrit, 14C, and CFCs) from 535 wells, mostly used for public supply, in the Central Valley, California, USA that were sampled by the USGS for the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment or the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Programs. In addition to mean ages, LPMs gave estimates of unsaturated zone travel times, recharge rates for pre- and post-development groundwater, the degree of age mixing in wells, proportion of young water (<60 yrs), and the depth of the boundary between post-development and predevelopment groundwater throughout the Central Valley. Age interpretations were evaluated by comparing past nitrate trends with LPM predicted trends, and whether the presence or absence of anthropogenic organic compounds was consistent with model results. This study illustrates a practical approach for assessing groundwater age information at a large scale to reveal important characteristics about the age structure of a major aquifer, and of the water supplies being derived from it.

  9. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter models for determining groundwater age distributions and nitrate in water-supply wells, Central Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgens, B. C.; Bohlke, J. K.; Kauffman, L. J.; Belitz, K.

    2013-12-01

    Age distributions for 30 production wells (mostly public-supply) were determined using two methods: 1) calibration of age tracer data with lumped parameter models (LPMs) and 2) by advective particle tracking (PT) simulations using MODPATH and a regional steady-state groundwater flow model. The LPMs were calibrated with measurements of 3H, 3He(trit), and 14C by minimizing the Chi-square test statistic using a non-linear solver. A partial exponential model (PEM) was the primary LPM used in this study and a combination of two PEMs were used in cases where binary age mixtures were identified. The PEM is a reformulated version of the exponential model that is parameterized to simulate the age distribution in a well that is screened over any finite interval within the aquifer. The regional numerical model was calibrated to water-levels and gradients, and simulated PT age tracer concentrations were calibrated to the MODPATH porosity value. Age distributions were then used to predict nitrate concentrations in wells using agricultural application rates of nitrate in the central eastside of the San Joaquin Valley, California. Both methods showed that wells in the study area captured groundwater with a broad range of ages, spanning decades to millennia. Age distributions from the LPMs predicted age tracer and nitrate concentrations more accurately than the regional PT simulation; whereas PT simulations incorporating more detailed information about water-levels and hydraulic gradients near wells also provided good fits. 14C concentrations were not simulated well by the regional steady-state model, especially for wells with a significant fraction of old groundwater, because the model simulates the current, perturbed system and does not simulate recharge rates and velocities of the predevelopment system. Results from the LPMs yielded an average recharge rate of 0.55 m/yr, which was similar to the average recharge rate of 0.54 m/yr determined from a water budget analysis for the

  10. The Age Parameter in Giant EAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Cohen, F.; Sanosyan, K.

    The age parameter from the longitudinal development can be used to describe the lateral distribution in giant EAS up to 5 km from the axis, even if the scaling properties of Approximation B in cascade theory fail after 3.5 Moliere radii. A set of analytic descriptions is proposed under the gaussian hypergeometric formalism replacing the Eulerian formalism of the classical NKG distribution, valid for electrons, muons and vertical equivalent muons (v.e.m.).

  11. Distributed transit compartments for arbitrary lifespan distributions in aging populations.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gilbert; Schropp, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    Transit compartment models (TCM) are often used to describe aging populations where every individual has its own lifespan. However, in the TCM approach these lifespans are gamma-distributed which is a serious limitation because often the Weibull or more complex distributions are realistic. Therefore, we extend the TCM concept to approximately describe any lifespan distribution and call this generalized concept distributed transit compartment models (DTCMs). The validity of DTCMs is obtained by convergence investigations. From the mechanistic perspective the transit rates are directly controlled by the lifespan distribution. Further, DTCMs could be used to approximate the convolution of a signal with a probability density function. As example a stimulatory effect of a drug in an aging population with a Weibull-distributed lifespan is presented where distribution and model parameters are estimated based on simulated data. PMID:26100181

  12. Five-Parameter Bivariate Probability Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, J.; Brewer, D.; Smith, O. W.

    1986-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum presents four papers about five-parameter bivariate gamma class of probability distributions. With some overlap of subject matter, papers address different aspects of theories of these distributions and use in forming statistical models of such phenomena as wind gusts. Provides acceptable results for defining constraints in problems designing aircraft and spacecraft to withstand large wind-gust loads.

  13. Parameter estimation for distributed parameter models of complex, flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Distributed parameter modeling of structural dynamics has been limited to simple spacecraft configurations because of the difficulty of handling several distributed parameter systems linked at their boundaries. Although there is other computer software able to generate such models or complex, flexible spacecraft, unfortunately, neither is suitable for parameter estimation. Because of this limitation the computer software PDEMOD is being developed for the express purposes of modeling, control system analysis, parameter estimation and structure optimization. PDEMOD is capable of modeling complex, flexible spacecraft which consist of a three-dimensional network of flexible beams and rigid bodies. Each beam has bending (Bernoulli-Euler or Timoshenko) in two directions, torsion, and elongation degrees of freedom. The rigid bodies can be attached to the beam ends at any angle or body location. PDEMOD is also capable of performing parameter estimation based on matching experimental modal frequencies and static deflection test data. The underlying formulation and the results of using this approach for test data of the Mini-MAST truss will be discussed. The resulting accuracy of the parameter estimates when using such limited data can impact significantly the instrumentation requirements for on-orbit tests.

  14. Multivariate distributions of soil hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wei; Pachepsky, Yakov; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Martinez, Gonzalo; Bogena, Heye; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    Statistical distributions of soil hydraulic parameters have to be known when synthetic fields of soil hydraulic properties need to be generated in ensemble modeling of soil water dynamics and soil water content data assimilation. Pedotransfer functions that provide statistical distributions of water retention and hydraulic conductivity parameters for textural classes are most often used in the parameter field generation. Presence of strong correlations can substantially influence the parameter generation results. The objective of this work was to review and evaluate available data on correlations between van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model parameters. So far, two different approaches were developed to estimate these correlations. The first approach uses pedotransfer functions to generate VGM parameters for a large number of soil compositions within a textural class, and then computes parameter correlations for each of the textural classes. The second approach computes the VGM parameter correlations directly from parameter values obtained by fitting VGM model to measured water retention and hydraulic conductivity data for soil samples belonging to a textural class. Carsel and Parish (1988) used the Rawls et al. (1982) pedotransfer functions, and Meyer et al. (1997) used the Rosetta pedotransfer algorithms (Schaap, 2002) to develop correlations according to the first approach. We used the UNSODA database (Nemes et al. 2001), the US Southern Plains database (Timlin et al., 1999), and the Belgian database (Vereecken et al., 1989, 1990) to apply the second approach. A substantial number of considerable (>0.7) correlation coefficients were found. Large differences were encountered between parameter correlations obtained with different approaches and different databases for the same textural classes. The first of the two approaches resulted in generally higher values of correlation coefficients between VGM parameters. However, results of the first approach application depend

  15. Parton Distributions in the Impact Parameter Space

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias Burkardt

    2009-08-01

    Parton distributions in impact parameter space, which are obtained by Fourier transforming GPDs, exhibit a significant deviation from axial symmetry when the target and/or quark is transversely polarized. In combination with the final state interactions, this transverse deformation provides a natural mechanism for naive-T odd transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive DIS. The deformation can also be related to the transverse force acting on the active quark in polarized DIS at higher twist.

  16. Distributed parameter statics of magnetic catheters.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Ilker

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how to use special Cosserat rod theory for deriving distributed-parameter static equilibrium equations of magnetic catheters. These medical devices are used for minimally-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and can be operated remotely or controlled by automated algorithms. The magnetic material can be lumped in rigid segments or distributed in flexible segments. The position vector of the cross-section centroid and quaternion representation of an orthonormal triad are selected as DOF. The strain energy for transversely isotropic, hyperelastic rods is augmented with the mechanical potential energy of the magnetic field and a penalty term to enforce the quaternion unity constraint. Numerical solution is found by 1D finite elements. Material properties of polymer tubes in extension, bending and twist are determined by mechanical and magnetic experiments. Software experiments with commercial FEM software indicate that the computational effort with the proposed method is at least one order of magnitude less than standard 3D FEM. PMID:22256282

  17. The global age distribution of granitic pegmatites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCauley, Andrew; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2014-01-01

    An updated global compilation of 377 new and previously published ages indicates that granitic pegmatites range in age from Mesoarchean to Neogene and have a semi-periodic age distribution. Undivided granitic pegmatites show twelve age maxima: 2913, 2687, 2501, 1853, 1379, 1174, 988, 525, 483, 391, 319, and 72 Ma. These peaks correspond broadly with various proxy records of supercontinent assembly, including the age distributions of granites, detrital zircon grains, and passive margins. Lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) pegmatites have a similar age distribution to the undivided granitic pegmatites, with maxima at 2638, 1800, 962, 529, 485, 371, 309, and 274 Ma. Lithium and Ta resources in LCT pegmatites are concentrated in the Archean and Phanerozoic. While there are some Li resources from the Proterozoic, the dominantly bimodal distribution of resources is particularly evident for Ta. This distribution is similar to that of orogenic gold deposits, and has been interpreted to reflect the preservation potential of the orogenic belts where these deposits are formed. Niobium-yttrium-fluorine (NYF) pegmatites show similar age distributions to LCT pegmatites, but with a strong maximum at ca. 1000 Ma.

  18. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  19. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  20. Some properties of a 5-parameter bivariate probability distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, J. D.; Brewer, D. W.; Smith, O. E.

    1983-01-01

    A five-parameter bivariate gamma distribution having two shape parameters, two location parameters and a correlation parameter was developed. This more general bivariate gamma distribution reduces to the known four-parameter distribution. The five-parameter distribution gives a better fit to the gust data. The statistical properties of this general bivariate gamma distribution and a hypothesis test were investigated. Although these developments have come too late in the Shuttle program to be used directly as design criteria for ascent wind gust loads, the new wind gust model has helped to explain the wind profile conditions which cause large dynamic loads. Other potential applications of the newly developed five-parameter bivariate gamma distribution are in the areas of reliability theory, signal noise, and vibration mechanics.

  1. Theoretical foundation for measuring the groundwater age distribution.

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, William Payton; Arnold, Bill Walter

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, 81Kr, 4He and themean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2-D and 3-D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3-D domains differ significantly from 2-D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3-D systems. Groundwater environmental tracers can provide important constraints for the calibration of groundwater flow models. Direct simulation of environmental tracer concentrations in models has the additional advantage of avoiding assumptions associated with using calculated groundwater age values. This study quantifies model uncertainty reduction resulting from the addition of environmental tracer concentration data. The analysis uses a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and the calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method. Results indicate a significant reduction in the uncertainty in permeability with the addition of environmental tracer data, relative

  2. Age-dependency of posture parameters in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Oliver; Mazet, Carola; Mazet, Dirk; Hammes, Annette; Schmitt, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Poor posture in children and adolescents is a well-known problem. Therefore, early detection of incorrect posture is important. Photometric posture analysis is a cost-efficient and easy method, but needs reliable reference values. As children’s posture changes as they grow, the assessment needs to be age-specific. This study aimed to investigate the development of both one-dimensional posture parameter (body inclination angle) and complex parameter (posture index) in different age groups (childhood to adolescence). [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 372 symptom-free children and adolescents (140 girls and 232 boys aged 6–17). Images of their habitual posture were obtained in the sagittal plane. High-contrast marker points and marker spheres were placed on anatomical landmarks. Based on the marker points, the body inclination angle (INC) and posture index (PI) were calculated using the Corpus concepts software. [Results] The INC angle significantly increased with age. The PI did not change significantly among the age groups. No significant differences between the corresponding age groups were found for PI and INC for both sexes. [Conclusion] When evaluating posture using the body inclination angle, the age of the subject needs to be considered. Posture assessment with an age-independent parameter may be more suitable. PMID:27313382

  3. Spatial distribution of intracortical porosity varies across age and sex

    PubMed Central

    Nirody, Jasmine A.; Cheng, Karen P.; Parrish, Robin M.; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.; Kazakia, Galateia J.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone porosity is a major determinant of strength, stiffness, and fracture toughness of cortical tissue. The goal of this work was to investigate changes in spatial distribution and microstructure of cortical porosity associated with aging in men and women. The specific aims were to: 1) develop an automated technique for spatial analysis of cortical microstructure based on HR-pQCT data, and; 2) apply this technique to explore sex- and age-specific spatial distribution and microstructure of porosity within the cortex. We evaluated HR-pQCT images of the distal tibia from a cross-sectional cohort of 145 individuals, characterizing detectable pores as being in the endosteal, midcortical, or periosteal layers of the cortex. Metrics describing porosity, pore number, and pore size were quantifiedwithin each layer and compared across sexes, age groups, and cortical layers. The elderly cohort (65–78 years, n=22) displayed higher values than the young cohort (20–29 years, n=29) for all parameters both globally and within each layer. While all three layers displayed significant age-related porosity increases, the greatest difference in porosity between the young and elderly cohort was in the midcortical layer (+344%, p < 0.001). Similarly, the midcortical layer reflected the greatest differences between young and elderly cohorts in both pore number (+243%, p < 0.001) and size (+28%, p < 0.001). Females displayed greater age-related changes in porosity and pore number than males. Females and males displayed comparable small to non-significant changes with age in pore size. In summary, considerable variability exists in the spatial distribution of detectable cortical porosity at the distal tibia, and this variability is dependent on age and sex. Intracortical pore distribution analysis may ultimately provide insight into both mechanisms of pore network expansion and biomechanical consequences of pore distribution. PMID:25701139

  4. Computational methods for the control of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Cliff, E. M.; Powers, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Finite dimensional approximation schemes that work well for distributed parameter systems are often not suitable for the analysis and implementation of feedback control systems. The relationship between approximation schemes for distributed parameter systems and their application to optimal control problems is discussed. A numerical example is given.

  5. Estimating parametric survival model parameters in gerontological aging studies: methodological problems and insights.

    PubMed

    Eakin, T; Shouman, R; Qi, Y; Liu, G; Witten, M

    1995-05-01

    Studies of the biology of aging (both experimental and evolutionary) frequently involve the estimation of parameters arising in various multi-parameter survival models such as the Gompertz or Weibull distribution. Standard parameter estimation methodologies, such as maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) or nonlinear regression (NLR), require knowledge of the actual life spans or their explicit algebraic equivalents in order to provide reliable parameter estimates. Many fundamental biological discussions and conclusions are highly dependent upon accurate estimates of these survival parameters (this has historically been the case in the study of genetic and environmental effects on longevity and the evolutionary biology of aging). In this article, we examine some of the issues arising in the estimation of gerontologic survival model parameters. We not only address issues of accuracy when the original life-span data are unknown, we consider the accuracy of the estimates even when the exact life spans are known. We examine these issues as applied to known experimental data on diet restriction and we fit the frequently used, two-parameter Gompertzian survival distribution to these experimental data. Consequences of methodological misuse are demonstrated and subsequently related to the values of the final parameter estimates and their associated errors. These results generalize to other multiparametric distributions such as the Weibull, Makeham, and logistic survival distributions. PMID:7743396

  6. Distributed activation energy model parameters of some Turkish coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gunes, M.; Gunes, S.K.

    2008-07-01

    A multi-reaction model based on distributed activation energy has been applied to some Turkish coals. The kinetic parameters of distributed activation energy model were calculated via computer program developed for this purpose. It was observed that the values of mean of activation energy distribution vary between 218 and 248 kJ/mol, and the values of standard deviation of activation energy distribution vary between 32 and 70 kJ/mol. The correlations between kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model and certain properties of coal have been investigated.

  7. Age-dependent pupillary light reflex parameters in children.

    PubMed

    Daluwatte, Chathuri; Miles, Judith H; Christ, Shawn E; Beversdorf, David Q; Lofgreen, Andrew; Berliner, Nathan; Yao, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Pupillary light reflex (PLR) refers to the phenomenon where pupil size changes in response to stimulation with a flash of light. It is a simple functional test that can reveal dysfunctions associated with the PLR pathway. Although abnormal PLR responses have been reported in many neurological disorders, few studies investigated neurodevelopmental effects on PLR parameters. We studied the effect of age on PLR in a group of 6 to 17 year old children with typical development. A significant and consistent age effect was found on PLR latency in children younger than 10 years old. Age effects were also observed in resting pupil diameter and constriction amplitude. However such age related trends were not observed in children with neurodevelopment disorders. These results suggest that PLR has the potential to be used as a simple noninvasive tool for monitoring neurodevelopment in children. PMID:23366750

  8. Efficient Calibration of Categorical Parameter Distributions using Subspace Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khambhammettu, P.; Renard, P.; Doherty, J.

    2014-12-01

    Categorical parameter distributions are common-place in hydrogeological systems consisting of rock-types / aquifer materials with distinct properties, eg: sand channels in a clay matrix. Model calibration is difficult in such systems because the inverse problem is hindered by the discontinuities in the parameter space. In this paper, we present two approaches based on sub-space methods to generate categorical parameter distributions of aquifer parameters that meet calibration constraints (eg:- measured water level data, gradients) while honoring prior geological constraints. In the first approach, the prior geological information and acceptable parameter distributions are encapsulated in a simple object-based model. In the second approach, a Multiple-Point Statistics simulator is used to represent the prior geological information. Sub-space methods in conjunction with dynamic pilot points are then employed to explore the parameter space and determine the parameter combinations that optimally honor geologic and calibration constraints. Using a simple aquifer system, we demonstrate that the new approach is capable of quickly generating multiple multiple parameter distributions that honor both geological and calibration constraints. We also explore the underlying parameter and predictive uncertainty using Null Space Monte Carlo techniques.

  9. Large capacitor performs as a distributed parameter pulse line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, T. J.

    1966-01-01

    Capacitor of extended foil construction performs as a distributed parameter pulse line in which current, amplitude, and period are readily controlled. The capacitor is used as the energy storage element in a pulsed plasma accelerator.

  10. Distributed parameter modeling for the control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The use of FEMs of spacecraft structural dynamics is a common practice, but it has a number of shortcomings. Distributed-parameter models offer an alternative, but present both advantages and difficulties. First, the model order does not have to be reduced prior to the inclusion of control system dynamics. This advantage eliminates the risk involved with model 'order reduction'. Second, distributed parameter models inherently involve fewer parameters, thereby enabling more accurate parameter estimation using experimental data. Third, it is possible to include the damping in the basic model, thereby increasing the accuracy of the structural damping. The difficulty in generating distributed parameter models of complex spacecraft configurations has been greatly alleviated by the use of PDEMOD, BUNVIS-RG, or DISTEL. PDEMOD is being developed for simultaneously modeling structural dynamics and control system dynamics.

  11. Vortex age as a wake turbulence scaling parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Marchman, J. F., III

    1973-01-01

    Research which was conducted to determine the significance of vortex age as a scaling parameter in wake turbulence development and dissipation is reported. Tests were conducted at three angles of attack, three free stream speeds, and seven downstream positions from 2 to 30 chordlengths using an NACA 0012 wing and a five hole yawhead pitot probe. The end surface of the wing tip was flat. Speeds were selected to give a predetermined range of vortex ages. The complete velocity structure of the vortex was measured at each station and speed. The resulting plots of maximum tangential velocity and vortex core diameter versus downstream distance and vortex age indicate that vortex age is not a self sufficient scaling parameter. In addition to the expected effect of lift coefficient there is also a definite free stream speed influence at high wing angles of attack. The exact cause and nature of this effect is not fully understood, but it does not appear to be explainable in terms of Mach number or Reynolds number; however, the influence of tip edge shape on spanwise flow separation appears to be an important factor.

  12. Estimation of modal parameters using bilinear joint time frequency distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan-Ghias, A.; Shamsollahi, M. B.; Mobed, M.; Behzad, M.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, a new method is proposed for modal parameter estimation using time-frequency representations. Smoothed Pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution which is a member of the Cohen's class distributions is used to decouple vibration modes completely in order to study each mode separately. This distribution reduces cross-terms which are troublesome in Wigner-Ville distribution and retains the resolution as well. The method was applied to highly damped systems, and results were superior to those obtained via other conventional methods.

  13. Distributional Phonetic Learning at 10 Months of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Katherine A.; Pons, Ferran; Maye, Jessica; Werker, Janet F.

    2010-01-01

    Infant phonetic perception reorganizes in accordance with the native language by 10 months of age. One mechanism that may underlie this perceptual change is distributional learning, a statistical analysis of the distributional frequency of speech sounds. Previous distributional learning studies have tested infants of 6-8 months, an age at which…

  14. The Power of Heterogeneity: Parameter Relationships from Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Röding, Magnus; Bradley, Siobhan J.; Williamson, Nathan H.; Dewi, Melissa R.; Nann, Thomas; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Complex scientific data is becoming the norm, many disciplines are growing immensely data-rich, and higher-dimensional measurements are performed to resolve complex relationships between parameters. Inherently multi-dimensional measurements can directly provide information on both the distributions of individual parameters and the relationships between them, such as in nuclear magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. However, when data originates from different measurements and comes in different forms, resolving parameter relationships is a matter of data analysis rather than experiment. We present a method for resolving relationships between parameters that are distributed individually and also correlated. In two case studies, we model the relationships between diameter and luminescence properties of quantum dots and the relationship between molecular weight and diffusion coefficient for polymers. Although it is expected that resolving complicated correlated relationships require inherently multi-dimensional measurements, our method constitutes a useful contribution to the modelling of quantitative relationships between correlated parameters and measurements. We emphasise the general applicability of the method in fields where heterogeneity and complex distributions of parameters are obstacles to scientific insight. PMID:27182701

  15. Distribution of coal quality parameters in lignites of northeast Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, S.S.; Warwick, P.D.; Thomas, R.E.; Mason, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    The distribution of coal quality characteristics was examined in lignites (Wilcox Group, Paleocene-Eocene) near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. Coal quality parameters including ash yield, sulfur forms, moisture, calorific value, and selected potentially hazardous trace elements were plotted on cross sections of lignite beds to determine their stratigraphic distribution. This study has been undertaken as a part of the US Geological Survey`s National Coal Resource Assessment (NCRA) program in the Gulf Coast Lignite Region. The distribution in coal of Hazardous Air Pollutant elements (HAPs), as defined in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, are an important focus of the NCRA program.

  16. Development of a distribution system for measuring nozzle integrative parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experimental system used in this study was equipped with sensors and computer-controlled processing technology. This system was used in the measurement of major performance parameters such as pressure, flux, spray angle, spray distribution character of the nozzle and its integrative performance...

  17. Distributed parameter modelling of flexible spacecraft: Where's the beef?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation discusses various misgivings concerning the directions and productivity of Distributed Parameter System (DPS) theory as applied to spacecraft vibration control. We try to show the need for greater cross-fertilization between DPS theorists and spacecraft control designers. We recommend a shift in research directions toward exploration of asymptotic frequency response characteristics of critical importance to control designers.

  18. Chandrasekhar equations and computational algorithms for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Ito, K.; Powers, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar equations arising in optimal control problems for linear distributed parameter systems are considered. The equations are derived via approximation theory. This approach is used to obtain existence, uniqueness, and strong differentiability of the solutions and provides the basis for a convergent computation scheme for approximating feedback gain operators. A numerical example is presented to illustrate these ideas.

  19. Iterative methods for distributed parameter estimation in parabolic PDE

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, C.R.; Wade, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    The goal of the work presented is the development of effective iterative techniques for large-scale inverse or parameter estimation problems. In this extended abstract, a detailed description of the mathematical framework in which the authors view these problem is presented, followed by an outline of the ideas and algorithms developed. Distributed parameter estimation problems often arise in mathematical modeling with partial differential equations. They can be viewed as inverse problems; the `forward problem` is that of using the fully specified model to predict the behavior of the system. The inverse or parameter estimation problem is: given the form of the model and some observed data from the system being modeled, determine the unknown parameters of the model. These problems are of great practical and mathematical interest, and the development of efficient computational algorithms is an active area of study.

  20. Ageing/Menopausal Status in Healthy Women and Ageing in Healthy Men Differently Affect Cardiometabolic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Campesi, Ilaria; Occhioni, Stefano; Tonolo, Giancarlo; Cherchi, Sara; Basili, Stefania; Carru, Ciriaco; Zinellu, Angelo; Franconi, Flavia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender medicine requires a global analysis of an individual's life. Menopause and ageing induce variations of some cardiometabolic parameters, but, it is unknown if this occurs in a sex-specific manner. Here, some markers of oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction are analysed in men younger and older than 45 years and in pre- and postmenopausal women. Methods: Serum and plasma sample were assayed for TNF-α and IL-6, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls and for methylated arginines using ELISA kits, colorimetric methods and capillary electrophoresis. Results: Before body weight correction, men overall had higher creatinine, red blood cells and haemoglobin and lower triglycerides than women. Men younger than 45 years had lower levels of TNF-α and malondialdehyde and higher levels of arginine than age-matched women, while postmenopausal women had higher IL-6 concentrations than men, and higher total cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine and IL-6 levels than younger women. Men younger than 45 years had lower total cholesterol and malondialdehyde than older men. After correction, some differences remained, others were amplified, others disappeared and some new differences emerged. Moreover, some parameters showed a correlation with age, and some of them correlated with each other as functions of ageing and ageing/menopausal status. Conclusions: Ageing/menopausal status increased many more cardiovascular risk factors in women than ageing in men, confirming that postmenopausal women had increased vascular vulnerability and indicating the need of early cardiovascular prevention in women. Sex-gender differences are also influenced by body weight, indicating as a matter of debate whether body weight should be seen as a true confounder or as part of the causal pathway. PMID:26941571

  1. Age distribution among NASA scientists and engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.

    1989-01-01

    The loss of technical expertise through attrition in NASA and the aerospace industry is discussed. This report documents historical age-related information for scientific and engineering personnel in general and the NASA Lewis Research Center in particular, for 1968 through 1987. Recommendations are made to promote discussion and to establish the groundwork for action.

  2. Control of Groundwater Remediation Process as Distributed Parameter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, M.; Kovács, T.; Hulkó, G.

    2014-12-01

    Pollution of groundwater requires the implementation of appropriate solutions which can be deployed for several years. The case of local groundwater contamination and its subsequent spread may result in contamination of drinking water sources or other disasters. This publication aims to design and demonstrate control of pumping wells for a model task of groundwater remediation. The task consists of appropriately spaced soil with input parameters, pumping wells and control system. Model of controlled system is made in the program MODFLOW using the finitedifference method as distributed parameter system. Control problem is solved by DPS Blockset for MATLAB & Simulink.

  3. Maximum likelihood estimation for distributed parameter models of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. W., Jr.; Williams, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A distributed-parameter model of the NASA Solar Array Flight Experiment spacecraft structure is constructed on the basis of measurement data and analyzed to generate a priori estimates of modal frequencies and mode shapes. A Newton-Raphson maximum-likelihood algorithm is applied to determine the unknown parameters, using a truncated model for the estimation and the full model for the computation of the higher modes. Numerical results are presented in a series of graphs and briefly discussed, and the significant improvement in computation speed obtained by parallel implementation of the method on a supercomputer is noted.

  4. Ocular biometric parameters among 3-year-old Chinese children: testability, distribution and association with anthropometric parameters

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dan; Chen, Xuejuan; Gong, Qi; Yuan, Chaoqun; Ding, Hui; Bai, Jing; Zhu, Hui; Fu, Zhujun; Yu, Rongbin; Liu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    This survey was conducted to determine the testability, distribution and associations of ocular biometric parameters in Chinese preschool children. Ocular biometric examinations, including the axial length (AL) and corneal radius of curvature (CR), were conducted on 1,688 3-year-old subjects by using an IOLMaster in August 2015. Anthropometric parameters, including height and weight, were measured according to a standardized protocol, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. The testability was 93.7% for the AL and 78.6% for the CR overall, and both measures improved with age. Girls performed slightly better in AL measurements (P = 0.08), and the difference in CR was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The AL distribution was normal in girls (P = 0.12), whereas it was not in boys (P < 0.05). For CR1, all subgroups presented normal distributions (P = 0.16 for boys; P = 0.20 for girls), but the distribution varied when the subgroups were combined (P < 0.05). CR2 presented a normal distribution (P = 0.11), whereas the AL/CR ratio was abnormal (P < 0.001). Boys exhibited a significantly longer AL, a greater CR and a greater AL/CR ratio than girls (all P < 0.001). PMID:27384307

  5. Ocular biometric parameters among 3-year-old Chinese children: testability, distribution and association with anthropometric parameters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dan; Chen, Xuejuan; Gong, Qi; Yuan, Chaoqun; Ding, Hui; Bai, Jing; Zhu, Hui; Fu, Zhujun; Yu, Rongbin; Liu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    This survey was conducted to determine the testability, distribution and associations of ocular biometric parameters in Chinese preschool children. Ocular biometric examinations, including the axial length (AL) and corneal radius of curvature (CR), were conducted on 1,688 3-year-old subjects by using an IOLMaster in August 2015. Anthropometric parameters, including height and weight, were measured according to a standardized protocol, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. The testability was 93.7% for the AL and 78.6% for the CR overall, and both measures improved with age. Girls performed slightly better in AL measurements (P = 0.08), and the difference in CR was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The AL distribution was normal in girls (P = 0.12), whereas it was not in boys (P < 0.05). For CR1, all subgroups presented normal distributions (P = 0.16 for boys; P = 0.20 for girls), but the distribution varied when the subgroups were combined (P < 0.05). CR2 presented a normal distribution (P = 0.11), whereas the AL/CR ratio was abnormal (P < 0.001). Boys exhibited a significantly longer AL, a greater CR and a greater AL/CR ratio than girls (all P < 0.001). PMID:27384307

  6. Control of the SCOLE configuration using distributed parameter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1994-01-01

    A continuum model for the SCOLE configuration has been derived using transfer matrices. Controller designs for distributed parameter systems have been analyzed. Pole-assignment controller design is considered easy to implement but stability is not guaranteed. An explicit transfer function of dynamic controllers has been obtained and no model reduction is required before the controller is realized. One specific LQG controller for continuum models had been derived, but other optimal controllers for more general performances need to be studied.

  7. Computational methods for the control of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Cliff, E. M.; Powers, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that care must be taken to ensure that finite dimensional approximations of distributed parameter systems preserve important system properties (i.e., controllability, observability, stabilizability, detectability, etc.). It is noted that, if the particular scheme used to construct the finite dimensional model does not take into account these system properties, the model may not be suitable for control design and analysis. These ideas are illustrated by a simple example, i.e., a cable-spring-mass system.

  8. Flaw strength distributions and statistical parameters for ceramic fibers: the normal distribution.

    PubMed

    R'mili, M; Godin, N; Lamon, J

    2012-05-01

    The present paper investigates large sets of ceramic fibre failure strengths (500 to 1000 data) produced using tensile tests on tows that contained either 500 or 1000 filaments. The probability density function was determined through acoustic emission monitoring which allowed detection and counting of filament fractures. The statistical distribution of filament strengths was described using the normal distribution. The Weibull equation was then fitted to this normal distribution for estimation of statistical parameters. A perfect agreement between both distributions was obtained, and a quite negligible scatter in statistical parameters was observed, as opposed to the wide variability that is reported in the literature. Thus it was concluded that flaw strengths are distributed normally and that the statistical parameters that were derived are the true ones. In a second step, the conventional method of estimation of Weibull parameters was applied to these sets of data and, then, to subsets selected randomly. The influence of other factors involved in the conventional method of determination of statistical parameters is discussed. It is demonstrated that selection of specimens, sample size, and method of construction of so-called Weibull plots are responsible for statistical parameters variability. PMID:23004702

  9. Flaw strength distributions and statistical parameters for ceramic fibers: The normal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R'Mili, M.; Godin, N.; Lamon, J.

    2012-05-01

    The present paper investigates large sets of ceramic fibre failure strengths (500 to 1000 data) produced using tensile tests on tows that contained either 500 or 1000 filaments. The probability density function was determined through acoustic emission monitoring which allowed detection and counting of filament fractures. The statistical distribution of filament strengths was described using the normal distribution. The Weibull equation was then fitted to this normal distribution for estimation of statistical parameters. A perfect agreement between both distributions was obtained, and a quite negligible scatter in statistical parameters was observed, as opposed to the wide variability that is reported in the literature. Thus it was concluded that flaw strengths are distributed normally and that the statistical parameters that were derived are the true ones. In a second step, the conventional method of estimation of Weibull parameters was applied to these sets of data and, then, to subsets selected randomly. The influence of other factors involved in the conventional method of determination of statistical parameters is discussed. It is demonstrated that selection of specimens, sample size, and method of construction of so-called Weibull plots are responsible for statistical parameters variability.

  10. Skeletal distribution and biochemical parameters of Paget's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Meunier, P.J.; Salson, C.; Mathieu, L.; Chapuy, M.C.; Delmas, P.; Alexandre, C.; Charhon, S.

    1987-04-01

    Quantitative bone scans were performed with /sup 99m/Tc-EHDP in 170 untreated pagetic patients (93 men, 77 women; mean age, 65.4 years). The distribution of 863 pagetic skeletal locations was analyzed. Bone scans demonstrated 8.3% more pagetic sites than roentgenograms. The extent of Paget's disease was evaluated in each patient by a scintigraphic skeletal index. This index correlated with serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) and urinary hydroxyproline (HyPro) levels, and also with hypocalcemic acute response to calcitonin. The correlation of SAP with an index of activity (extent index adjusted by uptake ratios) was better than with the nonadjusted index. Only 30.6% of pagetic sites were responsible for clinical symptoms. No correlation was found between age and skeletal index of the disease.

  11. Control of complex dynamics and chaos in distributed parameter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarti, S.; Marek, M.; Ray, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses a methodology for controlling complex dynamics and chaos in distributed parameter systems. The reaction-diffusion system with Brusselator kinetics, where the torus-doubling or quasi-periodic (two characteristic incommensurate frequencies) route to chaos exists in a defined range of parameter values, is used as an example. Poincare maps are used for characterization of quasi-periodic and chaotic attractors. The dominant modes or topos, which are inherent properties of the system, are identified by means of the Singular Value Decomposition. Tested modal feedback control schemas based on identified dominant spatial modes confirm the possibility of stabilization of simple quasi-periodic trajectories in the complex quasi-periodic or chaotic spatiotemporal patterns.

  12. Sediment load estimation using statistical distributions with streamflow dependent parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailhot, A.; Rousseau, A. N.; Talbot, G.; Quilbé, R.

    2005-12-01

    The classical approaches to estimate sediment and chemical loads are all deterministic: averaging methods, ratio estimators, regression methods (rating curves) and planning level load estimation methods. However, none of these methods is satisfactory since they are often inaccurate and do not take into account nor quantify uncertainty. To fill this gap, statistical methods have to be investigated. This presentation proposes a new statistical method in which sediment concentration is assimilated to a random variable and is described by distribution functions. Three types of distributions are considered: Log-Normal, Gamma and Weibull distributions. Correlation between sediment concentrations and streamflows is integrated to the model by assuming that distribution parameters (mean and coefficient of variation) are related to streamflow using several different functional forms: exponential, quadratic and power law forms for the mean, constant and linear for the coefficient of variation. Parameter estimation is realized through maximization of the likelihood function. This approach is applied on a data set (1989 to 2004) from the Beaurivage River (Quebec, Canada) with weekly to monthly sampling for sediment concentration. A comparison of different models (selection of a distribution function with functional forms relating the mean and the coefficient of variation to streamflow) shows that the Log-Normal distribution with power law mean and coefficient of variation independent of streamflow provides the best result. When comparing annual load results with those obtained using deterministic methods, we observe that ratio estimators values are rarely within the [0.1, 0.9] quantile interval. For the 1997-2004 period, ratio estimator values are almost systematically smaller than the 0.1 quantile. This could presumably be due to the small number of sediment concentration samples for these years. This study suggests that, if deterministic methods such as the ratio estimator

  13. Transfer function modeling of damping mechanisms in distributed parameter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, J. C.; Inman, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    This work formulates a method for the modeling of material damping characteristics in distributed parameter models which may be easily applied to models such as rod, plate, and beam equations. The general linear boundary value vibration equation is modified to incorporate hysteresis effects represented by complex stiffness using the transfer function approach proposed by Golla and Hughes. The governing characteristic equations are decoupled through separation of variables yielding solutions similar to those of undamped classical theory, allowing solution of the steady state as well as transient response. Example problems and solutions are provided demonstrating the similarity of the solutions to those of the classical theories and transient responses of nonviscous systems.

  14. Radial Distributions of Dusty Plasma Parameters in a Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, A. V.; Sukhinin, G. I.

    2011-11-29

    A self-consistent model for radial distributions of dusty plasma parameters in a DC glow discharge based on the non-local Boltzmann equation for EEDF, the drift-diffusion equation for ions, and the Poisson equation for self-consistent electric field is presented. The results show that for the case of high dust particles density when the recombination of electrons and ions exceeds the ionization near the tube axis, radial electron and ion fluxes change their direction toward the center of the tube, and the radial electric field is reversed.

  15. Tensile strength of randomly perforated aluminum plates: Weibull distribution parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Claude A.

    2008-07-01

    Recently, Yanay and collaborators [J. Appl. Phys. 101, 104911 (2007)] addressed issues regarding the fracture strength of randomly perforated aluminum plates subjected to tensile loads. Based on comprehensive measurements and computational simulations, they formulate statistical predictions for the tensile strength dependence on the hole density but conclude that their data are inadequate for the purpose of deriving the strength distribution function. The primary purpose of this contribution is to demonstrate that, on dividing the totality of applicable data into seven "bins" of comparable population, the strength distribution of perforated plates of similar hole density obeys a conventional two-parameter Weibull model. Furthermore, on examining the fracture stresses as recorded in the vicinity of the percolation threshold, we find that the strength obeys the expression σo(P -Pth)β with Pth≃0.64 and β ≃0.4. In this light, and taking advantage of percolation theory, we formulate equations that specify how the two Weibull parameters (characteristic strength and shape factor) depend on the hole density. This enables us to express the failure probability as a function of the tensile stress, over the entire range of hole densities, i.e., P =0.02 up to the percolation threshold.

  16. C -parameter distribution at N 3 LL ' including power corrections

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-15

    We compute the e⁺e⁻ C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(α3s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments Ωn. To eliminate an O(ΛQCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switchmore » from the MS¯ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter Ω1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in Ω1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for αs(mZ) and Ω1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ≅ 2.5% at Q=mZ.« less

  17. C -parameter distribution at N3LL' including power corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-01

    We compute the e+e- C -parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O (αs3), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments Ωn. To eliminate an O (ΛQCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switch from the MS ¯ to a short distance "Rgap" scheme to define the leading power correction parameter Ω1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in Ω1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C -parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for αs(mZ) and Ω1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ≃ 2.5 % at Q =mZ.

  18. The response of aggregate production to fertility-induced changes in population age distribution.

    PubMed

    Denton, F T; Mountain, D C; Spencer, B G

    1996-01-01

    With a particular focus upon long-term supply effects, the authors explored the implications of different population age distributions for the productive capacity of an economy. A multilevel aggregate production process was specified, plausible values assigned to its parameters, and steady-state solutions obtained under a range of alternative fertility assumptions. The theoretical model was calibrated to conform with Canadian data and published estimates of age-sex substitution elasticities. The study found productive capacity to be related to age distribution, although the output effects exceed 8%, regardless of the structure of the economy, only when total fertility rate is less than 1.6 or well above 3.0; within the range of variation, productive capacity and output per capita are lower for both younger and older populations; altering the elasticity of substitution between different tasks has negligible effects upon the sensitivity of the economy to changes in age distribution; altering the elasticity of substitution between different age-sex groups for a given task has a markedly greater effect; introducing either increasing or decreasing returns to scale has only a minor effect upon the sensitivity of the economy to changes in age distribution; and marginal products are quite sensitive to changes in age distribution for both younger and older workers, but far less sensitive for middle-aged workers. PMID:12320140

  19. Inversion of generalized relaxation time distributions with optimized damping parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsch, Nicolas; Revil, André; Camerlynck, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Retrieving the Relaxation Time Distribution (RDT), the Grains Size Distribution (GSD) or the Pore Size Distribution (PSD) from low-frequency impedance spectra is a major goal in geophysics. The “Generalized RTD” generalizes parametric models like Cole-Cole and many others, but remains tricky to invert since this inverse problem is ill-posed. We propose to use generalized relaxation basis function (for instance by decomposing the spectra on basis of generalized Cole-Cole relaxation elements instead of the classical Debye basis) and to use the L-curve approach to optimize the damping parameter required to get smooth and realistic inverse solutions. We apply our algorithm to three examples, one synthetic and two real data sets, and the program includes the possibility of converting the RTD into GSD or PSD by choosing the value of the constant connecting the relaxation time to the characteristic polarization size of interest. A high frequencies (typically above 1 kHz), a dielectric term in taken into account in the model. The code is provided as an open Matlab source as a supplementary file associated with this paper.

  20. Influence of inflammatory and lipidic parameters on red blood cell distribution width in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Sarnago, Ana; Fuster, Oscar; Alis, Rafael; Romagnoli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a routine red blood cell count parameter which has been shown to be associated with inflammatory parameters. Recently, some authors proposed that RDW seems to be a marker of an adverse lipidic profile. In order to clarify whether RDW is related to inflammation, plasma lipids, or both, we determined anthropometric, hematimetric, inflammatory and lipidic parameters in 1111 healthy subjects. RDW correlated directly with age, body mass index (BMI), inflammatory parameters (plasma viscosity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen, leukocyte and neutrophil count), and inversely with iron and hematimetric parameters (P <  0.05). When subjects were divided according to gender, RDW correlated inversely with triglycerides only in women (P <  0.05). When subjects were classified into RDW-quartiles, increased RDW values were accompanied by decreased serum iron levels and hematimetric indices (P <  0.01), whereas age and inflammatory markers increased according to RDW-quartiles (P <  0.001 and P <  0.05, respectively). However, plasma lipids did not change with increasing RDW-quartiles (P >  0.05). In the linear regression analysis, age, hemoglobin, MCV (beta coefficient: 0.202, -0.234, -0.316, P <  0.001) and fibrinogen (beta coefficient: 0.059, P = 0.048) were the only independent predictors of RDW. The present study indicates that RDW is associated with inflammatory markers and hematimetric indices, but not with plasma lipid levels in a healthy population. PMID:25159489

  1. Distributed parameter approach to the dynamics of complex biological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.T.; Wang, F.Y.; Newell, R.B.

    1999-10-01

    Modeling and simulation of a complex biological process for the removal of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from municipal wastewater are addressed. The model developed in this work employs a distributed-parameter approach to describe the behavior of components within three different bioreaction zones and the behavior of sludge in the anaerobic zone and soluble phosphate in the aerobic zone in two experiments. Good results are achieved despite the apparent plant-model mismatch, such as uncertainties with the behavior of phosphorus-accumulating organisms. Validation of the proposed secondary-settler model shows that it is superior to two state-of-the-art models in terms of the sum of the square relative errors.

  2. Sound propagation and absorption in foam - A distributed parameter model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Lieberman, S.

    1971-01-01

    Liquid-base foams are highly effective sound absorbers. A better understanding of the mechanisms of sound absorption in foams was sought by exploration of a mathematical model of bubble pulsation and coupling and the development of a distributed-parameter mechanical analog. A solution by electric-circuit analogy was thus obtained and transmission-line theory was used to relate the physical properties of the foams to the characteristic impedance and propagation constants of the analog transmission line. Comparison of measured physical properties of the foam with values obtained from measured acoustic impedance and propagation constants and the transmission-line theory showed good agreement. We may therefore conclude that the sound propagation and absorption mechanisms in foam are accurately described by the resonant response of individual bubbles coupled to neighboring bubbles.

  3. Numerical studies of identification in nonlinear distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Lo, C. K.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework and convergence theory for the identification of first and second order nonlinear distributed parameter systems developed previously by the authors and reported on in detail elsewhere are summarized and discussed. The theory is based upon results for systems whose dynamics can be described by monotone operators in Hilbert space and an abstract approximation theorem for the resulting nonlinear evolution system. The application of the theory together with numerical evidence demonstrating the feasibility of the general approach are discussed in the context of the identification of a first order quasi-linear parabolic model for one dimensional heat conduction/mass transport and the identification of a nonlinear dissipation mechanism (i.e., damping) in a second order one dimensional wave equation. Computational and implementational considerations, in particular, with regard to supercomputing, are addressed.

  4. Weathering of ordinary chondrites from Oman: Correlation of weathering parameters with 14C terrestrial ages and a refined weathering scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurfluh, Florian J.; Hofmann, Beda A.; Gnos, Edwin; Eggenberger, Urs; Jull, A. J. Timothy

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated 128 14C-dated ordinary chondrites from Oman for macroscopically visible weathering parameters, for thin section-based weathering degrees, and for chemical weathering parameters as analyzed with handheld X-ray fluorescence. These 128 14C-dated meteorites show an abundance maximum of terrestrial age at 19.9 ka, with a mean of 21.0 ka and a pronounced lack of samples between 0 and 10 ka. The weathering degree is evaluated in thin section using a refined weathering scale based on the current W0 to W6 classification of Wlotzka (1993), with five newly included intermediate steps resulting in a total of nine (formerly six) steps. We find significant correlations between terrestrial ages and several macroscopic weathering parameters. The correlation of various chemical parameters including Sr and Ba with terrestrial age is not very pronounced. The microscopic weathering degree of metal and sulfides with newly added intermediate steps shows the best correlation with 14C terrestrial ages, demonstrating the significance of the newly defined weathering steps. We demonstrate that the observed 14C terrestrial age distribution can be modeled from the abundance of meteorites with different weathering degrees, allowing the evaluation of an age-frequency distribution for the whole meteorite population.

  5. Weathering of ordinary chondrites from Oman: Correlation of weathering parameters with 14C terrestrial ages and a refined weathering scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurfluh, Florian J.; Hofmann, Beda A.; Gnos, Edwin; Eggenberger, Urs; Jull, A. J. Timothy

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated 128 14C-dated ordinary chondrites from Oman for macroscopically visible weathering parameters, for thin section-based weathering degrees, and for chemical weathering parameters as analyzed with handheld X-ray fluorescence. These 128 14C-dated meteorites show an abundance maximum of terrestrial age at 19.9 ka, with a mean of 21.0 ka and a pronounced lack of samples between 0 and 10 ka. The weathering degree is evaluated in thin section using a refined weathering scale based on the current W0 to W6 classification of Wlotzka (1993), with five newly included intermediate steps resulting in a total of nine (formerly six) steps. We find significant correlations between terrestrial ages and several macroscopic weathering parameters. The correlation of various chemical parameters including Sr and Ba with terrestrial age is not very pronounced. The microscopic weathering degree of metal and sulfides with newly added intermediate steps shows the best correlation with 14C terrestrial ages, demonstrating the significance of the newly defined weathering steps. We demonstrate that the observed 14C terrestrial age distribution can be modeled from the abundance of meteorites with different weathering degrees, allowing the evaluation of an age-frequency distribution for the whole meteorite population.

  6. Estimating the Age Distribution of Oceanic Dissolved Organic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follett, C. L.; Forney, D. C.; Repeta, D.; Rothman, D.

    2010-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a large, ubiquitous component of open ocean water at all depths and impacts atmospheric carbon dioxide levels at both short and long timescales. It is currently believed that oceanic DOC contains a multi-thousand-year-old refractory deep-water component which is mixed with a young labile component in surface waters. Unfortunately, the only evidence for this comes from a few isolated depth profiles of both DOC concentration and bulk radiocarbon. Although the profile data is consistent with a two-component mixing model, directly separating the two components has proven to be a challenge. We explore the validity of the two component mixing model by directly estimating the age distribution of oceanic DOC. The two-component model suggests that the age distribution is composed of two distinct peaks. In order to obtain an estimate of the age distribution we first record changes in both concentration and percent radiocarbon as a sample is oxidized under ultra-violet radiation [1]. We formulate a mathematical model relating the age distribution to these changes, assuming that they result from components of different radiocarbon age and UV-reactivity. This allows us to numerically invert the data and estimate the age distribution. We apply our procedure to DOC samples collected from three distinct depths (50, 500, and 2000 meters) in the north-central Pacific Ocean. [1] S.R. Beaupre, E.R.M. Druffel, and S. Griffin. A low-blank photochemical extraction system for concentration and isotopic analyses of marine dissolved organic carbon. Limnol. Oceanogr. Methods, 5:174-184, 2007.

  7. Effects of intraborehole flow on groundwater age distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zinn, B.A.; Konikow, L.F.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental tracers are used to estimate groundwater ages and travel times, but the strongly heterogeneous nature of many subsurface environments can cause mixing between waters of highly disparate ages, adding additional complexity to the age-estimation process. Mixing may be exacerbated by the presence of wells because long open intervals or long screens with openings at multiple depths can transport water and solutes rapidly over a large vertical distance. The effect of intraborehole flow on groundwater age was examined numerically using direct age transport simulation coupled with the Multi-Node Well Package of MODFLOW. Ages in a homogeneous, anisotropic aquifer reached a predevelopment steady state possessing strong depth dependence. A nonpumping multi-node well was then introduced in one of three locations within the system. In all three cases, vertical transport along the well resulted in substantial changes in age distributions within the system. After a pumping well was added near the nonpumping multi-node well, ages were further perturbed by a flow reversal in the nonpumping multi-node well. Results indicated that intraborehole flow can substantially alter groundwater ages, but the effects are highly dependent on local or regional flow conditions and may change with time. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  8. THE AGE AND STELLAR PARAMETERS OF THE PROCYON BINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Liebert, James; Arnett, David; Fontaine, Gilles; Young, Patrick A.; Williams, Kurtis A. E-mail: darnett@as.arizona.edu E-mail: pyoung.3@asu.edu

    2013-05-20

    The Procyon AB binary system (orbital period 40.838 yr, a newly refined determination) is near and bright enough that the component radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities are very well determined, although more than one possible solution to the masses has limited the claimed accuracy. Preliminary mass determinations for each component are available from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, supported by ground-based astrometry and an excellent Hipparcos parallax; we use these for our preferred solution for the binary system. Other values for the masses are also considered. We have employed the TYCHO stellar evolution code to match the radius and luminosity of the F5 IV-V primary star to determine the system's most likely age as 1.87 {+-} 0.13 Gyr. Since prior studies of Procyon A found its abundance indistinguishable from solar, the solar composition of Asplund, Grevesse, and Sauval (Z = 0.014) is assumed for the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram fitting. An unsuccessful attempt to fit using the older solar abundance scale of Grevesse and Sauval (Z = 0.019) is also reported. For Procyon B, 11 new sequences for the cooling of non-DA white dwarfs have been calculated to investigate the dependences of the cooling age on (1) the mass, (2) core composition, (3) helium layer mass, and (4) heavy-element opacities in the helium envelope. Our calculations indicate a cooling age of 1.19 {+-} 0.11 Gyr, which implies that the progenitor mass of Procyon B was 2.59{sub -0.26}{sup +0.44} M{sub Sun }. In a plot of initial versus final mass of white dwarfs in astrometric binaries or star clusters (all with age determinations), the Procyon B final mass lies several {sigma} below a straight line fit.

  9. Data-Driven H∞ Control for Nonlinear Distributed Parameter Systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Huang, Tingwen; Wu, Huai-Ning; Yang, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    The data-driven H∞ control problem of nonlinear distributed parameter systems is considered in this paper. An off-policy learning method is developed to learn the H∞ control policy from real system data rather than the mathematical model. First, Karhunen-Loève decomposition is used to compute the empirical eigenfunctions, which are then employed to derive a reduced-order model (ROM) of slow subsystem based on the singular perturbation theory. The H∞ control problem is reformulated based on the ROM, which can be transformed to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi-Isaacs (HJI) equation, theoretically. To learn the solution of the HJI equation from real system data, a data-driven off-policy learning approach is proposed based on the simultaneous policy update algorithm and its convergence is proved. For implementation purpose, a neural network (NN)- based action-critic structure is developed, where a critic NN and two action NNs are employed to approximate the value function, control, and disturbance policies, respectively. Subsequently, a least-square NN weight-tuning rule is derived with the method of weighted residuals. Finally, the developed data-driven off-policy learning approach is applied to a nonlinear diffusion-reaction process, and the obtained results demonstrate its effectiveness. PMID:26277007

  10. Modeling the brain morphology distribution in the general aging population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizinga, W.; Poot, D. H. J.; Roshchupkin, G.; Bron, E. E.; Ikram, M. A.; Vernooij, M. W.; Rueckert, D.; Niessen, W. J.; Klein, S.

    2016-03-01

    Both normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease cause morphological changes of the brain. To better distinguish between normal and abnormal cases, it is necessary to model changes in brain morphology owing to normal aging. To this end, we developed a method for analyzing and visualizing these changes for the entire brain morphology distribution in the general aging population. The method is applied to 1000 subjects from a large population imaging study in the elderly, from which 900 were used to train the model and 100 were used for testing. The results of the 100 test subjects show that the model generalizes to subjects outside the model population. Smooth percentile curves showing the brain morphology changes as a function of age and spatiotemporal atlases derived from the model population are publicly available via an interactive web application at agingbrain.bigr.nl.

  11. The relation between the lateral profile of giant extensive air showers and the age parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevielle, Jean-Noël; Cohen, Fabrice

    2005-05-01

    After performing extensive simulations with the code CoRSiKa, we have obtained an analytical description fitting with surprising accuracy the numerical densities up to distances larger than 5 km from the shower axis. This was achieved by using the hypergeometric formalism in place of the traditional NKG approach. The difficulty of cascade theory (validity limited to 3.5 Moliere radii), underlined with reason by the particle data group, is solved here, after overcoming the constraints of approximation B, to show that the distribution of lateral profiles at large distances is also correlated with the age parameter. This is an important step for a coherent interpretation of hybrid events recorded with both surface array and fluorescence telescopes, even with other information coming from Cerenkov or radio emission. A set of hypergeometric Gaussian functions, with a consistent relation between age parameter and total size, is proposed in the ultra-high-energy range (above 1 EeV) for electrons, muons and vertical equivalent muons.

  12. Hematopoiesis and aging. IV. Mass and distribution of erythroid marrow in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, D.R.

    1985-11-01

    Aged mice are ''anemic,'' i.e., they have a lower hematocrit than young adult mice, but this appears to be a ''dilutional'' anemia; the red cell mass is normal. Other observations have supported the hypothesis that basal erythropoiesis does not change as mice grow old. In the present study, the percentage of injected VZFe found in the skeleton and spleen, VZFe distribution between various bones and bone groups, and the number of nucleated erythroid cells per humerus were studied and the total mass of erythroid precursors was calculated. There was no significant difference in any of these values between mice aged 3-27 months. The variability of VZFe distribution within various skeletal parts was no greater in aged than in young mice. Thus, these data further strengthen the case for normal basal rates of erythropoiesis in aged mice.

  13. Aged boreal biomass burning aerosol size distributions from BORTAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K. M.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J. W.; Duck, T. J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number size-distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size-distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ∼1-2 days) from boreal wildfires in Northwestern Ontario. The composite median size-distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 230 nm (number-median diameter), σ = 1.7, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA / ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.05-0.18 μg m-3 ppbv-1 with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size-distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA / ΔCO enhancement ratios. We estimate that the fresh-plume median diameter was in the range of 59-94 nm with modal widths in the range of 1.7-2.8 (the ranges are due to uncertainty in the entrainment rate). Thus, the size of the freshly emitted particles is relatively unconstrained due to the uncertainties in

  14. Aged Boreal Biomass Burning Size Distributions from Bortas 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. R.; Sakamoto, K.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J.; Duck, T.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are strong functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number size-distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size-distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ~ 1.5 - 2 days) from boreal wildfires in Northwestern Ontario. The composite median size-distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 232 nm, σ = 1.7, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA/ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.08-0.18 μg m-3 ppbv-1 with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution and flux corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size-distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes only based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA/ΔCO enhancement ratios. Depending on the, we estimate that the fresh-plume median diameter was in the range of 59-94 nm with modal widths in the range of 1.7-2.8. Thus, the size of the freshly emitted particles is somewhat unconstrained due to the uncertainties in the plume dilution rates.

  15. Distribution system water age can create premise plumbing corrosion hotspots.

    PubMed

    Masters, Sheldon; Parks, Jeffrey; Atassi, Amrou; Edwards, Marc A

    2015-09-01

    Cumulative changes in chemical and biological properties associated with higher "water age" in distribution systems may impact water corrosivity and regulatory compliance with lead and copper action levels. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of water age and chemistry on corrosivity of various downstream premise plumbing pipe materials and configurations using a combination of controlled laboratory studies and a field survey. Examination of lead pipe, copper pipe with lead solder, and leaded brass materials in a replicated lab rig simulating premise plumbing stagnation events indicated that lead or copper release could increase as much as ∼440 % or decrease as much as 98 % relative to water treatment plant effluent. In field studies at five utilities, trends in lead and copper release were highly dependent on circumstance; for example, lead release increased with water age in 13 % of cases and decreased with water age in 33 % of conditions tested. Levels of copper in the distribution system were up to 50 % lower and as much as 30 % higher relative to levels at the treatment plant. In many cases, high-risks of elevated lead and copper did not co-occur, demonstrating that these contaminants will have to be sampled separately to identify "worst case" conditions for human exposure and monitoring. PMID:26251058

  16. Fundamental Parameters of Nearby Red Dwarfs: Stellar Radius as an Indicator of Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Michele L.; Henry, Todd J.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Riedel, Adric R.; Dieterich, Sergio; RECONS Team

    2016-01-01

    Red dwarfs dominate the Galactic population, yet determining one of their most fundamental characteristics --- age --- has proven difficult. The characterization of red dwarfs in terms of their age is fundamental to mapping the history of star and, ultimately, planet formation in the Milky Way. Here we report on a compelling technique to evaluate the radii of red dwarfs, which can be used to provide leverage in estimating their ages. These radii are also particularly valuable in the cases of transiting exoplanet hosts because accurate stellar radii are required to determine accurate planetary radii.In this work, we use the BT-Settl models in combination with Johnson-Kron-Cousins VRI, 2MASS JHK, and WISE All-Sky Release photometry to produce spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to determine the temperatures and bolometric fluxes for 500 red dwarfs, most of which are in the southern sky. The full suites of our photometric and astrometric data (including hundreds of accurate new parallaxes from the RECONS team at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9m) allow us to also determine the bolometric luminosities and radii. This method of radius determination is validated by a comparison of our measurements to those found using the CHARA Array (Boyajian et al. 2012), which match within a few percent.In addition to a compilation of red dwarf fundamental parameters, our findings provide a snapshot of relative stellar ages in the solar neighborhood. Of particular interest are the cohorts of very young and very old stars identified within 50 pc. These outliers exemplify the demographic extremes of the nearest stars.This effort has been supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402, AST-1109445, and AST-1412026, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  17. Constraining age distributions of groundwater from public supply wells in diverse hydrogeological settings in Scania, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åkesson, Maria; Suckow, Axel; Visser, Ate; Sültenfuβ, Jürgen; Laier, Troels; Purtschert, Roland; Sparrenbom, Charlotte J.

    2015-09-01

    Twenty-five public supply wells throughout the hydrogeologically diverse region of Scania, southern Sweden are subjected to environmental tracer analysis (3H-3He, 4He, CFCs, SF6 and for one well only also 85Kr and 39Ar) to study well and aquifer vulnerability and evaluate possibilities of groundwater age distribution assessment. We find CFC and SF6 concentrations well above solubility equilibrium with modern atmosphere, indicating local contamination, as well as indications of CFC degradation. The tracer-specific complications considerably constrain possibilities for sound quantitative regional groundwater age distribution assessments and demonstrate the importance of initial qualitative assessment of tracer-specific reliability, as well a need for additional, complementary tracers (e.g. 85Kr, 39Ar and potentially also 14C). Lumped parameter modelling yields credible age distribution assessments for representative wells in four type aquifers. Pollution vulnerability of the aquifer types was based on the selected LPM models and qualitative age characterisation. Most vulnerable are unconfined dual porosity and fractured bedrock aquifers, due to a large component of very young groundwater. Unconfined sedimentary aquifers are vulnerable due to young groundwater and a small pre-modern component. Less vulnerable are semi-confined sedimentary or dual-porosity aquifers, due to older age of the modern component and a larger pre-modern component. Confined aquifers appear least vulnerable, due an entirely pre-modern groundwater age distribution (recharged before 1963). Tracer complications aside, environmental tracer analyses and lumped parameter modelling aid in vulnerability assessment and protection of regional groundwater resources.

  18. Parameter estimation for the 4-parameter Asymmetric Exponential Power distribution by the method of L-moments using R

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation characteristics of two method of L-moments (MLM) algorithms for parameter estimation of the 4-parameter Asymmetric Exponential Power (AEP4) distribution are studied using the R environment for statistical computing. The objective is to validate the algorithms for general application of the AEP4 using R. An algorithm was introduced in the original study of the L-moments for the AEP4. A second or alternative algorithm is shown to have a larger L-moment-parameter domain than the original. The alternative algorithm is shown to provide reliable parameter production and recovery of L-moments from fitted parameters. A proposal is made for AEP4 implementation in conjunction with the 4-parameter Kappa distribution to create a mixed-distribution framework encompassing the joint L-skew and L-kurtosis domains. The example application provides a demonstration of pertinent algorithms with L-moment statistics and two 4-parameter distributions (AEP4 and the Generalized Lambda) for MLM fitting to a modestly asymmetric and heavy-tailed dataset using R.

  19. Estimation of Heterogeneity in Diagnostic Parameters of Age-related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Blokh, David; Stambler, Ilia

    2014-08-01

    The heterogeneity of parameters is a ubiquitous biological phenomenon, with critical implications for biological systems functioning in normal and diseased states. We developed a method to estimate the level of objects set heterogeneity with reference to particular parameters and applied it to type II diabetes and heart disease, as examples of age-related systemic dysfunctions. The Friedman test was used to establish the existence of heterogeneity. The Newman-Keuls multiple comparison method was used to determine clusters. The normalized Shannon entropy was used to provide the quantitative evaluation of heterogeneity. There was obtained an estimate for the heterogeneity of the diagnostic parameters in healthy subjects, as well as in heart disease and type II diabetes patients, which was strongly related to their age. With aging, as with the diseases, the level of heterogeneity (entropy) was reduced, indicating a formal analogy between these phenomena. The similarity of the patterns in aging and disease suggested a kind of "early aging" of the diseased subjects, or alternatively a "disease-like" aging process, with reference to these particular parameters. The proposed method and its validation on the chronic age-related disease samples may support a way toward a formal mathematical relation between aging and chronic diseases and a formal definition of aging and disease, as determined by particular heterogeneity (entropy) changes. PMID:25110613

  20. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone treatment on hormone levels and antioxidant parameters in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, F J; Kang, J; Han, N N; Ma, H T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of chronic dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) administration on steroid hormones and antioxidant parameters in aged rats. To this end, three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were compared: young (3 months of age) untreated; aged (19 months old) untreated; and aged rats treated with 20 mg/kg DHEA for 8 weeks. Major organs of aged rats in the untreated group demonstrated physiological atrophy, compared to those of young rats; this effect appeared to have been partially reversed by DHEA treatment. Testosterone and estradiol contents were significantly decreased and aldosterone significantly increased in aged untreated, compared to young untreated rats. Steroid hormone levels were obviously reversed, however, in aged rats treated with DHEA. Additionally, superoxide dismutase activity in serum, brain, heart, and liver was decreased, and maleic dialdehyde content in heart was markedly increased in untreated aged, compared to young, rats. Importantly, these changes in brain and heart of aged rats were reversed by DHEA treatment. Heme oxygenase mRNA levels were increased and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA levels decreased in aged, compared to young, rats; DHEA treatment appeared to reverse these changes. These results indicate that chronic DHEA administration may have effects on steroid hormone levels and antioxidant parameters in aged rats and result in postponement of the aging process. PMID:26400361

  1. Scale Shrinkage and the Estimation of Latent Distribution Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory

    1988-01-01

    The phenomenon of scale shrinkage is examined. Focus is on the pattern of decreasing variances in item response theory scale scores from fall to spring within a grade. It is demonstrated that questions concerning population distributions of true ability can be addressed with empirical Bayes techniques. (TJH)

  2. Methods of computing vocabulary size for the two-parameter rank distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmundson, H. P.; Fostel, G.; Tung, I.; Underwood, W.

    1972-01-01

    A summation method is described for computing the vocabulary size for given parameter values in the 1- and 2-parameter rank distributions. Two methods of determining the asymptotes for the family of 2-parameter rank-distribution curves are also described. Tables are computed and graphs are drawn relating paris of parameter values to the vocabulary size. The partial product formula for the Riemann zeta function is investigated as an approximation to the partial sum formula for the Riemann zeta function. An error bound is established that indicates that the partial product should not be used to approximate the partial sum in calculating the vocabulary size for the 2-parameter rank distribution.

  3. A distributed parameter wire model for transient electrical discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, William B., II; Kadish, A.; Sutherland, C. D.; Robiscoe, R. T.

    1990-06-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional model developed for freely propagating electrical discharges, such as lightning and punch-through arcs. In this model, charge transport is described by a nonlinear differential equation containing two phenomenological parameters characteristic of the medium and the arc; the electromagnetic field is described by Maxwell's equations. Using this model, a cylindrically symmetric small-diameter discharge is analyzed. It is shown that the model predicts discharge properties consistent with experimentally known phenomena.

  4. OTDR and OFDR for distributed multi-parameter sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiaoyi; Li, Wenhai; Qin, Zengguang; Chen, Liang

    2014-03-01

    The drive for high spatial resolution (millimeters) distributed fiber sensors has renewed the interest in optical frequency domain reflectrometry (OFDR) systems. Because millimeters equivalent spatial resolution in optical time domain reflectrometry (OTDR) systems would require a data acquisition card with a bandwidth of 10 GHz and a sampling rate of tens of G Samples/s, such a digitizer or data acquisition card plus the pulse generator and detection system will make a distributed sensors very expensive, while a tunable laser with a wide tuning range can provide millimeters resolution with short sensing range (<100m). We developed a high precision temperature (0.1°C) and strain (1μ strain) resolution and 2.5mm spatial resolution over 180m range by auto and cross-correlation of OFDR in PMF. The dual modes of PMF allow the discrimination of the temperature and strain with distinct dependency. The application of this sensor for internal crack detection of concrete beam has been demonstrated. For distributed dynamic measurement, the upper frequency is limited by the repetition rate of the laser pulse in sensing fiber; in addition the weak Rayleigh scattering signal demands many averaging to improve SNR. The continuous wavelet transform approach has been introduced in phase OTDR sensor system to suppress random noise, and multiple vibration disturbances have been measured simultaneously for power generator monitoring. For the high frequency vibration detection, the coherent detection combined with polarization diversity scheme is implemented.

  5. Characterization of aging-induced microstructural changes in M250 maraging steel using magnetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, K. V.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Kumar, Anish; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, Baldev; Ray, K. K.

    2007-05-01

    The best combinations of mechanical properties (yield stress and fracture toughness) of M250 maraging steel is obtained through short-term thermal aging (3-10 h) at 755 K. This is attributed to the microstructure containing precipitation of intermetallic phases in austenite-free low-carbon martensite matrix. Over-aged microstructure, containing reverted austenite degrades the mechanical properties drastically. Hence, it necessitates identification of a suitable non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for detecting any reverted austenite unambiguously during aging. The influence of aging on microstructure, room temperature hardness and non-destructive magnetic parameters such as coercivity ( Hc), saturation magnetization ( Ms) and magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) RMS peak voltage is studied in order to derive correlations between these parameters in aged M250 maraging steel. Hardness was found to increase with precipitation of intermetallics during initial aging and decrease at longer durations due to austenite reversion. Among the different magnetic parameters studied, MBE RMS peak voltage was found to be very sensitive to austenite reversion (non-magnetic phase) as they decreased drastically up on initiation of austenite reversion. Hence, this parameter can be effectively utilized to detect and quantify the reverted austenite in maraging steel specimen. The present study clearly indicates that the combination of MBE RMS peak voltage and hardness can be used for unambiguous characterization of microstructural features of technological and practical importance (3-10 h of aging duration at 755 K) in M250 grade maraging steel.

  6. TracerLPM (Version 1): An Excel® workbook for interpreting groundwater age distributions from environmental tracer data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    TracerLPM is an interactive Excel® (2007 or later) workbook program for evaluating groundwater age distributions from environmental tracer data by using lumped parameter models (LPMs). Lumped parameter models are mathematical models of transport based on simplified aquifer geometry and flow configurations that account for effects of hydrodynamic dispersion or mixing within the aquifer, well bore, or discharge area. Five primary LPMs are included in the workbook: piston-flow model (PFM), exponential mixing model (EMM), exponential piston-flow model (EPM), partial exponential model (PEM), and dispersion model (DM). Binary mixing models (BMM) can be created by combining primary LPMs in various combinations. Travel time through the unsaturated zone can be included as an additional parameter. TracerLPM also allows users to enter age distributions determined from other methods, such as particle tracking results from numerical groundwater-flow models or from other LPMs not included in this program. Tracers of both young groundwater (anthropogenic atmospheric gases and isotopic substances indicating post-1940s recharge) and much older groundwater (carbon-14 and helium-4) can be interpreted simultaneously so that estimates of the groundwater age distribution for samples with a wide range of ages can be constrained. TracerLPM is organized to permit a comprehensive interpretive approach consisting of hydrogeologic conceptualization, visual examination of data and models, and best-fit parameter estimation. Groundwater age distributions can be evaluated by comparing measured and modeled tracer concentrations in two ways: (1) multiple tracers analyzed simultaneously can be evaluated against each other for concordance with modeled concentrations (tracer-tracer application) or (2) tracer time-series data can be evaluated for concordance with modeled trends (tracer-time application). Groundwater-age estimates can also be obtained for samples with a single tracer measurement at one

  7. An empirical multivariate log-normal distribution representing uncertainty of biokinetic parameters for 137Cs.

    PubMed

    Miller, G; Melo, D; Martz, H; Bertelli, L

    2008-01-01

    A simplified biokinetic model for (137)Cs has six parameters representing transfer of material to and from various compartments. Using a Bayesian analysis, the joint probability distribution of these six parameters is determined empirically for two cases with quite a lot of bioassay data. The distribution is found to be a multivariate log-normal. Correlations between different parameters are obtained. The method utilises a fairly large number of pre-determined forward biokinetic calculations, whose results are stored in interpolation tables. Four different methods to sample the multidimensional parameter space with a limited number of samples are investigated: random, stratified, Latin Hypercube sampling with a uniform distribution of parameters and importance sampling using a lognormal distribution that approximates the posterior distribution. The importance sampling method gives much smaller sampling uncertainty. No sampling method-dependent differences are perceptible for the uniform distribution methods. PMID:18420573

  8. Automated CFD Parameter Studies on Distributed Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Aftosmis, Michael; Pandya, Shishir; Tejnil, Edward; Ahmad, Jasim; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the current work is to build a prototype software system which will automated the process of running CFD jobs on Information Power Grid (IPG) resources. This system should remove the need for user monitoring and intervention of every single CFD job. It should enable the use of many different computers to populate a massive run matrix in the shortest time possible. Such a software system has been developed, and is known as the AeroDB script system. The approach taken for the development of AeroDB was to build several discrete modules. These include a database, a job-launcher module, a run-manager module to monitor each individual job, and a web-based user portal for monitoring of the progress of the parameter study. The details of the design of AeroDB are presented in the following section. The following section provides the results of a parameter study which was performed using AeroDB for the analysis of a reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The paper concludes with a section on the lessons learned in this effort, and ideas for future work in this area.

  9. Applications of computer algebra to distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storch, Joel A.

    1993-01-01

    In the analysis of vibrations of continuous elastic systems, one often encounters complicated transcendental equations with roots directly related to the system's natural frequencies. Typically, these equations contain system parameters whose values must be specified before a numerical solution can be obtained. The present paper presents a method whereby the fundamental frequency can be obtained in analytical form to any desired degree of accuracy. The method is based upon truncation of rapidly converging series involving inverse powers of the system natural frequencies. A straightforward method to developing these series and summing them in closed form is presented. It is demonstrated how Computer Algebra can be exploited to perform the intricate analytical procedures which otherwise would render the technique difficult to apply in practice. We illustrate the method by developing two analytical approximations to the fundamental frequency of a vibrating cantilever carrying a rigid tip body. The results are compared to the numerical solution of the exact (transcendental) frequency equation over a range of system parameters.

  10. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  11. Probability weighted moments: definition and relation to parameters of several distributions expressable in inverse form.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, J.A.; Landwehr, J.M.; Matalas, N.C.; Wallis, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Distributions whose inverse forms are explicitly defined, such as Tukey's lambda, may present problems in deriving their parameters by more conventional means. Probability weighted moments are introduced and shown to be potentially useful in expressing the parameters of these distributions. -Authors

  12. Probabilistic approach to identify sensitive parameter distributions in multimedia pathway analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Gnanapragasam, E.; LePoire, D.; Biwer, B. M.; Cheng, J.; Arnish, J.; Yu, C.; Chen, S. Y.; Mo, T.; Abu-Eid, R.; Thaggard, M.; Environmental Assessment; NRC

    2002-01-01

    Sensitive parameter distributions were identified with the use of probabilistic analysis in the RESRAD computer code. RESRAD is a multimedia pathway analysis code designed to evaluate radiological exposures resulting from radiological contamination in soil. The dose distribution was obtained by using a set of default parameter distribution/values. Most of the variations in the output dose distribution could be attributed to uncertainty in a small set of input parameters that could be considered as sensitive parameter distributions. The identification of the sensitive parameters is a first step in the prioritization of future research and information gathering. When site-specific parameter distribution/values are available for an actual site, the same process should be used with these site-specific data. Regression analysis used to identify sensitive parameters indicated that the dominant pathways depended on the radionuclide and source configurations. However, two parameter distributions were sensitive for many radionuclides: the external shielding factor when external exposure was the dominant pathway and the plant transfer factor when plant ingestion was the dominant pathway. No single correlation or regression coefficient can be used alone to identify sensitive parameters in all the cases. The coefficients are useful guides, but they have to be used in conjunction with other aids, such as scatter plots, and should undergo further analysis.

  13. Reliability analysis of structural ceramic components using a three-parameter Weibull distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Powers, Lynn M.; Starlinger, Alois

    1992-01-01

    Described here are nonlinear regression estimators for the three-parameter Weibull distribution. Issues relating to the bias and invariance associated with these estimators are examined numerically using Monte Carlo simulation methods. The estimators were used to extract parameters from sintered silicon nitride failure data. A reliability analysis was performed on a turbopump blade utilizing the three-parameter Weibull distribution and the estimates from the sintered silicon nitride data.

  14. Computation of electromagnetic scattering parameters for lognormal distributions of magnetic spheres: Theory and algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milham, Merrill E.

    1994-10-01

    In this report, relevant parts of the scattering theory for magnetic spheres are presented. Mass extinction coefficients, and the lognormal size distribution are defined. The theory and algorithms for integrating scattering parameters over size distributions are developed. The integrations are carried out in terms of dimensionless scattering, and size distribution parameters, which are simply related to the usual mass scattering coefficients. Fortran codes, which implement the algorithmic design, are presented, and examples of code use are given. Code listings are included.

  15. SAMDIST: A Computer Code for Calculating Statistical Distributions for R-Matrix Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    The: SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  16. SAMDIST: A computer code for calculating statistical distributions for R-matrix resonance parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.

    1995-09-01

    The SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  17. Fast Airborne Size Distribution Measurements of an Aerosol Processes and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A. D.; Zhou, J.; Brekhovskikh, V.; McNaughton, C. S.; Howell, S.

    2009-12-01

    During MILAGRO/INTEX experiment the Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research (HIGEAR) deployed a wide range of aerosol instrumentation aboard NSF C-130 and NASA DC-8. These were designed to provide rapid information on aerosol composition, state of mixing (internal or external), spectral optical properties (scattering and absorption), the humidity dependence of light scattering - f(RH), and the role of condensed species in changing the absorption properties of black carbon (BC) and inferred properties of organic carbon (OC). We also flew the Fast Mobility Particle Spectrometer (FMPS, TSI Inc.) to measure aerosol size distributions in a range 5.6 - 560 nm. For all our flights around Mexico City, an aerosol number concentration usually was well above the nominal FMPS sensitivity (from ~100 particles/cc @ Dp = 5.6 nm to 1 part/cc @ 560nm), providing us with reliable size distributions even at 1 sec resolution. FMPS measurements revealed small scale structure of an aerosol and allowed us to examine size distributions varying over space and time associated with mixing processes previously unresolved. These 1-Hz measurements during aircraft profiles captured variations in size distributions within shallow layers. Other dynamic processes observed included orography induced aerosol layers and evolution of the nanoparticles formed by nucleation. We put FMPS high resolution size distribution data in a context of aerosol evolution and aging, using a range of established (for MIRAGE/INTEX) chemical, aerosol and transport aging parameters.

  18. A comparative study of ballpoint ink ageing parameters using GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Agnès; Magnolon, Sophie; Weyermann, Céline

    2015-07-01

    For more than a decade scientists tried to develop methods capable of dating ink by monitoring the loss of phenoxyethanol (PE) over time. While many methods were proposed in the literature, few were really used to solve practical cases and they still raise much concern within the scientific community. In fact, due to the complexity of ink drying processes it is particularly difficult to find a reliable ageing parameter to reproducibly follow ink ageing. Moreover, systematic experiments are required in order to evaluate how different factors actually influence the results over time. Therefore, this work aimed at evaluating the capacity of four different ageing parameters to reliably follow ink ageing over time: (1) the quantity of solvent PE in an ink line, (2) the relative peak area (RPA) normalising the PE results using stable volatile compounds present in the ink formulation, (3) the solvent loss ratio (R%) calculated from PE results obtained by the analyses of naturally and artificially aged samples, (4) a modified solvent loss ratio version (R%*) calculated from RPA results. After the determination of the limits of reliable measurements of the analytical method, the repeatability of the different ageing parameters was evaluated over time, as well as the influence of ink composition, writing pressure and storage conditions on the results. Surprisingly, our results showed that R% was not the most reliable parameter, as it showed the highest standard deviation. Discussion of the results in an ink dating perspective suggests that other proposed parameters, such as RPA values, may be more adequate to follow ink ageing over time. PMID:25989257

  19. Parameter sensitivity analysis of a simplified electrochemical and thermal model for Li-ion batteries aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edouard, C.; Petit, M.; Forgez, C.; Bernard, J.; Revel, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a simplified electrochemical and thermal model that can predict both physicochemical and aging behavior of Li-ion batteries is studied. A sensitivity analysis of all its physical parameters is performed in order to find out their influence on the model output based on simulations under various conditions. The results gave hints on whether a parameter needs particular attention when measured or identified and on the conditions (e.g. temperature, discharge rate) under which it is the most sensitive. A specific simulation profile is designed for parameters involved in aging equations in order to determine their sensitivity. Finally, a step-wise method is followed to limit the influence of parameter values when identifying some of them, according to their relative sensitivity from the study. This sensitivity analysis and the subsequent step-wise identification method show very good results, such as a better fitting of the simulated cell voltage with experimental data.

  20. Parameter Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Two Negative Binomial Distribution Population with Missing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiwen

    Our purpose is to deal with the parameter estimation and hypothesis testing on the equality of two negative binomial distribution populations with missing data. The consistency and asymptotic normality of the estimations are proved. In addition statistic on testing equality of two negative distributions and its limiting distribution are obtained.

  1. Distribution parameters of Dendroctonus frontalis in a Georgia landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christel, Lynne Marie

    model output to infestation sites resulted in Chi-squared and Cramer's V values of 55.4 and 0.16, respectively, indicating that infestation risk distributions strongly paralleled site infestation. Comparison of model output and low, medium and high infestation density clusters resulted in Chi-squared and Cramer's V values of 241.24 and 0.66, respectively, indicating a more substantive relationship between infestation density and risk classes.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of CLIMEX parameters in modeling potential distribution of Phoenix dactylifera L.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Farzin; Kumar, Lalit

    2014-01-01

    Using CLIMEX and the Taguchi Method, a process-based niche model was developed to estimate potential distributions of Phoenix dactylifera L. (date palm), an economically important crop in many counties. Development of the model was based on both its native and invasive distribution and validation was carried out in terms of its extensive distribution in Iran. To identify model parameters having greatest influence on distribution of date palm, a sensitivity analysis was carried out. Changes in suitability were established by mapping of regions where the estimated distribution changed with parameter alterations. This facilitated the assessment of certain areas in Iran where parameter modifications impacted the most, particularly in relation to suitable and highly suitable locations. Parameter sensitivities were also evaluated by the calculation of area changes within the suitable and highly suitable categories. The low temperature limit (DV2), high temperature limit (DV3), upper optimal temperature (SM2) and high soil moisture limit (SM3) had the greatest impact on sensitivity, while other parameters showed relatively less sensitivity or were insensitive to change. For an accurate fit in species distribution models, highly sensitive parameters require more extensive research and data collection methods. Results of this study demonstrate a more cost effective method for developing date palm distribution models, an integral element in species management, and may prove useful for streamlining requirements for data collection in potential distribution modeling for other species as well. PMID:24722140

  3. Age-related alterations to immune parameters in Labrador retriever dogs.

    PubMed

    Blount, Daniel G; Pritchard, David I; Heaton, Paul R

    2005-12-15

    In order to assess age-related changes in the immune status of Labrador retriever dogs, leukocyte phenotypes, lymphocyte proliferative capacity, and serum antibody levels were measured in four cohorts of dogs, ranging from 2 to 10 years of age. Absolute numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD21+ lymphocytes significantly decreased with increasing age. Relative percentages of lymphocytes and CD4 cells were significantly decreased, and relative percentages of granulocytes and CD8 cells significantly increased, with age. The CD4:CD8 ratio showed a significant age-related decrease. Proliferative responses of T-cells to mitogens in whole-blood cultures either increased (Concanavalin A) or remained the same (phytohemagglutinin) with age when data was normalised to allow for differences in responding cell number. Similarly, normalised data of proliferative response to anti-CD3 stimulation together with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate showed an age-related increase. Serum levels of total IgA significantly increased with age whereas total IgG levels remained unchanged. These observations illustrate a significant change to a number of immune parameters with age. However, further work is required to determine whether the differences reported here are sufficient to cause overt or functional immune senescence in Labrador retriever dogs. PMID:16105688

  4. Students' Perspective (Age Wise, Gender Wise and Year Wise) of Parameters Affecting the Undergraduate Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumari, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine the students' perspective (age wise, gender wise and year wise) of parameters affecting the undergraduate engineering education system present in a private technical institution in NCR [National Capital Region], Haryana. It is a descriptive type of research in nature. The data has been collected with the…

  5. Genetic parameters for weaning weight by age of dam for Brazilian Nellore

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to estimate genetic parameters by age of dam subclass for weaning weight of Nellore cattle raised on pasture in two regions of São Paulo State, Brazil, between 1975 and 2001. The data were from ABCZ / EMBRAPA and included 51,664 weights at 205 d (W205) from progeny of 24,996 cows....

  6. [The motor activity as an age parameter of the rat (authors transl)].

    PubMed

    Hofecker, G; Kment, A; Niedermüller, H

    1978-05-01

    The motor activity as an behavioural parameter provides information about the functional state of the organism as a whole. Therefore it is an important age parameter. The results of activity measurements, however, depend strongly on the method of registration. Using 3 groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats aged 9, 15 and 29 months two methods have been tested: 1) An electronic recording: the rats were registrated in their normal cages on the Animex-Activity-Meter during the dark-phase in complete darkness. The activity measured by this method has been regarded as spontaneous activity. 2) A kinematographic method: the rats were registrated in a changed environment at constant light during the dark-phase. The activity assessed by this method has been regarded as reactive activity. Spontaneous and reactive activity show a different age dependence. For the use of the motor activity as an age parameter, both, spontaneous and reactive activity, should be assessed to get a better information about the ageing of the different functional levels of the systems governing the animal's behaviour. PMID:26274

  7. Variations of immune parameters in terrestrial isopods: a matter of gender, aging and Wolbachia.

    PubMed

    Sicard, Mathieu; Chevalier, Frédéric; De Vlechouver, Mickaël; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Ecological factors modulate animal immunocompetence and potentially shape the evolution of their immune systems. Not only environmental parameters impact on immunocompetence: Aging is one major cause of variability of immunocompetence between individuals, and sex-specific levels of immunocompetence have also been frequently described. Moreover, a growing core of data put in light that vertically transmitted symbionts can dramatically modulate the immunocompetence of their hosts. In this study, we addressed the influence of gender, age and the feminising endosymbiont Wolbachia (wVulC) on variations in haemocyte density, total PO activity and bacterial load in the haemolymph of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare. This host-symbiont system is of particular interest to address this question since: (1) wVulC was previously shown as immunosuppressive in middle-aged females and (2) wVulC influences sex determination. We show that age, gender and Wolbachia modulate together immune parameters in A. vulgare. However, wVulC, which interacts with aging, appears to be the prominent factor interfering with both PO activity and haemocyte density. This interference with immune parameters is not the only aspect of wVulC virulence on its host, as reproduction and survival are also altered. PMID:20676599

  8. Variations of immune parameters in terrestrial isopods: a matter of gender, aging and Wolbachia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard, Mathieu; Chevalier, Frédéric; de Vlechouver, Mickaël; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Ecological factors modulate animal immunocompetence and potentially shape the evolution of their immune systems. Not only environmental parameters impact on immunocompetence: Aging is one major cause of variability of immunocompetence between individuals, and sex-specific levels of immunocompetence have also been frequently described. Moreover, a growing core of data put in light that vertically transmitted symbionts can dramatically modulate the immunocompetence of their hosts. In this study, we addressed the influence of gender, age and the feminising endosymbiont Wolbachia ( wVulC) on variations in haemocyte density, total PO activity and bacterial load in the haemolymph of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare. This host-symbiont system is of particular interest to address this question since: (1) wVulC was previously shown as immunosuppressive in middle-aged females and (2) wVulC influences sex determination. We show that age, gender and Wolbachia modulate together immune parameters in A. vulgare. However, wVulC, which interacts with aging, appears to be the prominent factor interfering with both PO activity and haemocyte density. This interference with immune parameters is not the only aspect of wVulC virulence on its host, as reproduction and survival are also altered.

  9. Age-dependence of lipid parameters in the general population and vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Richter, V; Rassoul, F; Hentschel, B; Kothe, K; Krobara, M; Unger, R; Purschwitz, K; Rotzsch, W; Thiery, J; Muradian, K

    2004-06-01

    Age-dependent changes of lipid metabolism may arise both as a result of mechanisms of biological ageing and factors influencing age-dependent changes. To study possible influences of nutrition and life-style of vegetarians on age-dependence of lipid parameters, subjects of general population were compared with vegetarians. In the frame of population-based lipid screening projects in the city of Leipzig/Germany (Lipid Study Leipzig, LSL) 10 550 subjects (3,816 men and 6,734 women, age 18-99 years) of general population were compared with 417 vegetarians (vegans, lacto-vegetarians, lacto-ovo-vegetarians, 148 men and 269 women, age 18-93 years). Most of the vegetarians included in the study were members of the German Society of Vegetarians. The study program included capillary blood cholesterol measurements and the determination of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, the measurement of other cardiovascular risk factors and the evaluation of dietary and life-style factors. Evaluation of cardiovascular risk profile within LSL was connected with individual consultation. The mean total cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol level and the total: HDL-cholesterol ratio showed the expected age-dependence, with maximum values within the decade 60-70 years. Vegetarians showed lower total and non-HDL-cholesterol levels in comparison with the general population. Furthermore, the age-dependent increase of these parameters is less pronounced under the conditions of vegetarian nutrition and life-style. Especially in young adulthood a significant difference is observed. Thus, the results of the present study reveal the role of nutritional and life-style factors that determine the lipid profile on a population basis and suggest that the known age-dependent rise of the level of atherogenic plasma lipoproteins is partly preventable. PMID:15224241

  10. Climatic influence on demographic parameters of a tropical seabird varies with age and sex.

    PubMed

    Oro, Daniel; Torres, Roxana; Rodríguez, Cristina; Drummond, Hugh

    2010-04-01

    In marine ecosystems climatic fluctuation and other physical variables greatly influence population dynamics, but differential effects of physical variables on the demographic parameters of the two sexes and different age classes are largely unexplored. We analyzed the effects of climate on the survival and recruitment of both sexes and several age classes of a long-lived tropical seabird, the Blue-footed Booby (Sula nebouxii), using long-term observations on marked individuals. Results demonstrated a complex interaction between yearly fluctuations in climate (both local and global indexes, during both winter and breeding season) and the sex and age of individuals. Youngest birds' survival and recruitment were commonly affected by local climate, whereas oldest birds' parameters tended to be constant and less influenced by environmental variables. These results confirm the theoretical prediction that sex- and age-related variation in life-history demographic traits is greater under poor environmental conditions, and they highlight the importance of including variability in fitness components in demographic and evolutionary models. Males and females showed similar variation in survival but different recruitment patterns, in relation to both age and the spatial scale of climatic influence (local or global). Results indicate different life-history tactics for each sex and different ages, with birds likely trying to maximize their fitness by responding to the environmental contingencies of each year. PMID:20462134

  11. Influence of emphysema distribution on pulmonary function parameters in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Helder Novais e; Neves, Inês; Redondo, Margarida; Cunha, Rui; Pereira, José Miguel; Magalhães, Adriana; Fernandes, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact that the distribution of emphysema has on clinical and functional severity in patients with COPD. METHODS: The distribution of the emphysema was analyzed in COPD patients, who were classified according to a 5-point visual classification system of lung CT findings. We assessed the influence of emphysema distribution type on the clinical and functional presentation of COPD. We also evaluated hypoxemia after the six-minute walk test (6MWT) and determined the six-minute walk distance (6MWD). RESULTS: Eighty-six patients were included. The mean age was 65.2 ± 12.2 years, 91.9% were male, and all but one were smokers (mean smoking history, 62.7 ± 38.4 pack-years). The emphysema distribution was categorized as obviously upper lung-predominant (type 1), in 36.0% of the patients; slightly upper lung-predominant (type 2), in 25.6%; homogeneous between the upper and lower lung (type 3), in 16.3%; and slightly lower lung-predominant (type 4), in 22.1%. Type 2 emphysema distribution was associated with lower FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, and DLCO. In comparison with the type 1 patients, the type 4 patients were more likely to have an FEV1 < 65% of the predicted value (OR = 6.91, 95% CI: 1.43-33.45; p = 0.016), a 6MWD < 350 m (OR = 6.36, 95% CI: 1.26-32.18; p = 0.025), and post-6MWT hypoxemia (OR = 32.66, 95% CI: 3.26-326.84; p = 0.003). The type 3 patients had a higher RV/TLC ratio, although the difference was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of COPD appears to be greater in type 4 patients, and type 3 patients tend to have greater hyperinflation. The distribution of emphysema could have a major impact on functional parameters and should be considered in the evaluation of COPD patients. PMID:26785956

  12. Model reference control of distributed parameter systems: Application to the SCOLE problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H.; Minnick, D.; Balas, M.; Musalem, A.

    1987-01-01

    The model reference control of lumped linear systems and the model reference control of the distributed parameter system (DPS) are presented with their theory and Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) applications.

  13. Frequency distributions and correlations of solar X-ray flare parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, Norma B.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1993-01-01

    Frequency distributions of flare parameters are determined from over 12,000 solar flares. The flare duration, the peak counting rate, the peak hard X-ray flux, the total energy in electrons, and the peak energy flux in electrons are among the parameters studied. Linear regression fits, as well as the slopes of the frequency distributions, are used to determine the correlations between these parameters. The relationship between the variations of the frequency distributions and the solar activity cycle is also investigated. Theoretical models for the frequency distribution of flare parameters are dependent on the probability of flaring and the temporal evolution of the flare energy build-up. The results of this study are consistent with stochastic flaring and exponential energy build-up. The average build-up time constant is found to be 0.5 times the mean time between flares.

  14. Reliability analysis of structural ceramic components using a three-parameter Weibull distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Powers, Lynn M.; Starlinger, Alois

    1992-01-01

    Described here are nonlinear regression estimators for the three-Weibull distribution. Issues relating to the bias and invariance associated with these estimators are examined numerically using Monte Carlo simulation methods. The estimators were used to extract parameters from sintered silicon nitride failure data. A reliability analysis was performed on a turbopump blade utilizing the three-parameter Weibull distribution and the estimates from the sintered silicon nitride data.

  15. Model Reference Adaptive H∞ Control for Distributed Parameter Systems of Hyperbolic Type by Finite Dimensional Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasato, Yoshihiko

    The problem of constructing model reference adaptive H∞ control for distributed parameters systems of hyperbolic type is considered in this paper. Distributed parameters systems are infinite dimensional processes, but the proposed control scheme is constructed from finite dimensional controllers. The stabilizing control signal is added to regulate the effect of spill-over terms, and it is derived as a solution of certain H∞ control problem where spill-overs are considered as external disturbances to the process.

  16. A Hierarchical Approach to Distributed Parameter Estimation in Rainfall-Runoff Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2007-12-01

    Distributed rainfall-runoff models intend to account for the heterogeneous characteristics of rainfall distributions and runoff generations thereby, improve the river forecast. In this study, a distributed river forecast model is built on the hierarchy of sub-basins connected through a river-routing system. These hydrologic units (sub-basins) possess a no-flux boundary and traditionally can be simulated by conceptual models with a limited number of parameters. However, calibration is needed to make such a model perform well. In the case of distributed modeling, the lack of streamflow observations inside a river system poses a challenge to estimate the model parameters at sub-basin scales. A hierarchical approach is proposed as follows: First, the study basin (a parent basin) is modeled in lumped mode and calibrated to obtain the optimized parameters. In the next step, the parent basin is divided into three sub-basins (children basins). The same model (with tripled parameters) is applied to the sub-basins driven by the rainfalls over the sub-basins and the model parameters for each sun-basin are calibrated using the parent parameters as their prior values. After obtaining the optimal parameters for the sub-basins, the hydrograph at the outlet of each sub-basin can be generated. Finally, by repeating the similar procedure, each sub-basin can be taken as a parent basin and obtaining the parameters for its children sub-basins. Applying this method to one of the DIMP-2 test basins: the Illinois River basin at south of Siloam Spring, the results show that (1) the streamflow results are improved by using the distributed rainfall and distributed parameters in comparing with the lumped simulation results, and (2) taking the parent basin's parameters as the priors can help to determine reasonable searching ranges when optimizing the parameters of children basins and also reduce the chance of resulting in an optimum which is not physically plausible. Applying this method to

  17. Age-density relation of Main galaxies at fixed parameters or for different galaxy families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xin-Fa; Song, Jun; Chen, Yi-Qing; Jiang, Peng; Ding, Ying-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Using two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10), we examine the environmental dependence of galaxy age at fixed parameters or for different galaxy families. Statistical results show that the environmental dependence of galaxy age is stronger for late type galaxies, but can be still observed for the early types: the age of galaxies in the densest regime is preferentially older than that in the lowest density regime with the same morphological type. We also find that the environmental dependence of galaxy age for red galaxies and Low Stellar Mass (LSM) galaxies is stronger, while the one for blue galaxies and High Stellar Mass ( HSM ) galaxies is very weak.

  18. The role of a roughness scaling parameter in describing alpine snow distribution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehning, M.; Grünewald, T.; Schirmer, M.

    2010-12-01

    The mountain snow distribution affects not only the storage of snow water and avalanche danger but also the local conditions for plant and animal life. The snow distribution in the alpine zone is shaped by a general altitudinal gradient of precipitation, the locally varying deposition of snow and subsequent redistribution processes due to wind but also to snow slides. While progress has been made in understanding of processes involved in snow distribution, it has not been possible to satisfactorily predict snow distribution on the basis of local terrain parameters. We use a unique data set of high resolution snow depth measurements from an airborne laser scanner in two small mountain catchments to predict mean snow depth in topographic control units as a function of two terrain parameters: the conventional altitudinal gradient plus a new fractal roughness parameter. The analysis showed that heterogeneous snow distribution can be captured by merely analysing the terrain and the mean precipitation.

  19. Fundamental stellar parameters and age-metallicity relation of Kepler red giants in comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Y.; Tajitsu, A.; Sato, B.; Liu, Y.-J.; Chen, Y.-Q.; Zhao, G.

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (effective temperature, metallicity, etc) were determined for a large sample of ˜100 red giants in the Kepler field, for which mass, radius, and evolutionary status had already been asteroseismologically established. These two kinds of spectroscopic and seismic information suffice to define the position on the `luminosity versus effective temperature' diagram and to assign an appropriate theoretical evolutionary track to each star. Making use of this advantage, we examined whether the stellar location on this diagram really matches the assigned track, which would make an interesting consistency check between theory and observation. It turned out that satisfactory agreement was confirmed in most cases (˜90 per cent, though appreciable discrepancies were seen for some stars such as higher mass red-clump giants), suggesting that recent stellar evolution calculations are practically reliable. Since the relevant stellar age could also be obtained by this comparison, we derived the age-metallicity relation for these Kepler giants and found the following characteristics: (1) the resulting distribution is quite similar to what was previously concluded for F-, G-, and K-type stars dwarfs; (2) the dispersion of metallicity progressively increases as the age becomes older; (3) nevertheless, the maximum metallicity at any stellar age remains almost flat, which means the existence of super/near-solar metallicity stars in a considerably wide age range from ˜(2-3) × 108 to ˜1010 yr.

  20. Investigating the Impact of Item Parameter Drift for Item Response Theory Models with Mixture Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon Soo; Lee, Young-Sun; Xing, Kuan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of item parameter drift (IPD) on parameter and ability estimation when the underlying measurement model fits a mixture distribution, thereby violating the item invariance property of unidimensional item response theory (IRT) models. An empirical study was conducted to demonstrate the occurrence of both IPD and an underlying mixture distribution using real-world data. Twenty-one trended anchor items from the 1999, 2003, and 2007 administrations of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) were analyzed using unidimensional and mixture IRT models. TIMSS treats trended anchor items as invariant over testing administrations and uses pre-calibrated item parameters based on unidimensional IRT. However, empirical results showed evidence of two latent subgroups with IPD. Results also showed changes in the distribution of examinee ability between latent classes over the three administrations. A simulation study was conducted to examine the impact of IPD on the estimation of ability and item parameters, when data have underlying mixture distributions. Simulations used data generated from a mixture IRT model and estimated using unidimensional IRT. Results showed that data reflecting IPD using mixture IRT model led to IPD in the unidimensional IRT model. Changes in the distribution of examinee ability also affected item parameters. Moreover, drift with respect to item discrimination and distribution of examinee ability affected estimates of examinee ability. These findings demonstrate the need to caution and evaluate IPD using a mixture IRT framework to understand its effects on item parameters and examinee ability. PMID:26941699

  1. Investigating the Impact of Item Parameter Drift for Item Response Theory Models with Mixture Distributions.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon Soo; Lee, Young-Sun; Xing, Kuan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of item parameter drift (IPD) on parameter and ability estimation when the underlying measurement model fits a mixture distribution, thereby violating the item invariance property of unidimensional item response theory (IRT) models. An empirical study was conducted to demonstrate the occurrence of both IPD and an underlying mixture distribution using real-world data. Twenty-one trended anchor items from the 1999, 2003, and 2007 administrations of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) were analyzed using unidimensional and mixture IRT models. TIMSS treats trended anchor items as invariant over testing administrations and uses pre-calibrated item parameters based on unidimensional IRT. However, empirical results showed evidence of two latent subgroups with IPD. Results also showed changes in the distribution of examinee ability between latent classes over the three administrations. A simulation study was conducted to examine the impact of IPD on the estimation of ability and item parameters, when data have underlying mixture distributions. Simulations used data generated from a mixture IRT model and estimated using unidimensional IRT. Results showed that data reflecting IPD using mixture IRT model led to IPD in the unidimensional IRT model. Changes in the distribution of examinee ability also affected item parameters. Moreover, drift with respect to item discrimination and distribution of examinee ability affected estimates of examinee ability. These findings demonstrate the need to caution and evaluate IPD using a mixture IRT framework to understand its effects on item parameters and examinee ability. PMID:26941699

  2. Spatial variability of the parameters of a semi-distributed hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lavenne, Alban; Thirel, Guillaume; Andréassian, Vazken; Perrin, Charles; Ramos, Maria-Helena

    2016-05-01

    Ideally, semi-distributed hydrologic models should provide better streamflow simulations than lumped models, along with spatially-relevant water resources management solutions. However, the spatial distribution of model parameters raises issues related to the calibration strategy and to the identifiability of the parameters. To analyse these issues, we propose to base the evaluation of a semi-distributed model not only on its performance at streamflow gauging stations, but also on the spatial and temporal pattern of the optimised value of its parameters. We implemented calibration over 21 rolling periods and 64 catchments, and we analysed how well each parameter is identified in time and space. Performance and parameter identifiability are analysed comparatively to the calibration of the lumped version of the same model. We show that the semi-distributed model faces more difficulties to identify stable optimal parameter sets. The main difficulty lies in the identification of the parameters responsible for the closure of the water balance (i.e. for the particular model investigated, the intercatchment groundwater flow parameter).

  3. The effect of age on pressure flow parameters in women with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Basu, M; Postlethwaite, C; Cheema, K; Duckett, J

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in voiding with age in women with different urodynamic diagnoses. Correlation was used to analyse the association between age and voiding parameters (maximum flow rate, voided volume, flow rate centile and maximum detrusor pressure - PdetMax) in 896 datasets. Multivariate analysis was used to analyse the data further by age group and diagnosis - urodynamic stress incontinence (USI); detrusor overactivity (DO); mixed USI and DO; no urodynamic abnormality. Results showed that diagnosis accounts for a significant amount of variation in all four of the dependent variables Age group shows a significant effect on voiding volume but does not show significant effects on any other variable studied. There is no significant interaction term in any of the analyses, meaning that age and diagnosis do not appear to function together, e.g. age does not relate to flow rate centile, maximum flow rate or PdetQMax. It was concluded that the data suggest that there is no significant change in voiding function related to age. In the elderly, the main alteration in voiding is due to a higher prevalence of DO. PMID:24219733

  4. Fetal kidney length as a useful adjunct parameter for better determination of gestational age

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, Mete G.; Mustafa, Aynur; Ozcan, Huseyin C.; Tepe, Neslihan B.; Kurt, Huseyin; Akcil, Emre; Gunduz, Reyhan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the validity of fetal kidney length and amniotic fluid index (AFI) in labor dating. Methods: This prospective study included 180 pregnant women followed up in the outpatient clinic at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gaziantep University, Turkey, between January 2014 and January 2015. The gestational age (GA) was estimated by early fetal ultrasound measures and last menstrual period. Routine fetal biometric parameters, fetal kidney length, and amniotic fluid index were measured. We studied the correlation between fetal kidney length, amniotic fluid index, and gestational age. Result: The mean gestational age depending on last menstrual period and early ultrasound was 31.98±4.29 (24-39 weeks). The mean kidney length was 35.66±6.61 (19-49 mm). There was a significant correlation between gestational age and fetal kidney length (r=0.947, p=0.001). However, there was a moderate negative correlation between GA and AFI. Adding fetal kidney length to the routine biometrics improved the effectiveness of the model used to estimate GA (R2=0.965 to R2=0.987). Conclusion: Gestational age can be better predicted by adding fetal kidney length to other routine parameters. PMID:27146616

  5. Statistical analysis of censored motion sickness latency data using the two-parameter Weibull distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Won J.; Crampton, George H.

    1988-01-01

    The suitability of the two-parameter Weibull distribution for describing highly censored cat motion sickness latency data was evaluated by estimating the parameters with the maximum likelihood method and testing for goodness of fit with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic. A procedure for determining confidence levels and testing for significance of the difference between Weibull parameters is described. Computer programs for these procedures may be obtained from an archival source.

  6. A Method for Determining If Unequal Shape Parameters are Necessary in a Bivariate Gamma Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure to aid in the deciding between four and five parameters in a Jensen's type bivariate gamma distribution is presented. It is based upon the CDF of the ratio of correlated gamma distributed variates. The criteria are posed in a test of hypothesis setting and results are presented.

  7. Objective Distributed-parameter Estimation Methods For Simulating Meteorological and Hydrological Processes In Mountainous Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, G.; Hay, L.; Viger, R.; de Jong, C.

    The use of distributed-parameter models in mountainous terrain requires the ability to define the spatial and temporal distributions of input meteorological variables and the physical basin characteristics that affect the processes being simulated. Application of these models to complex problems, such as assessing the impacts of land-use and climate change, limits one's ability to calibrate model parameters and necessitates the use of parameter-estimation methods that rely on measurable climate and basin char- acteristics. The increasing availability of high-resolution spatial and temporal data sets now enables the development and evaluation of a variety of parameter-estimation methods over a wide range of climatic and physiographic regions. For example, pa- rameters related to basin characteristics can be estimated from digital soils, vegetation, and topographic databases. Parameters related to the temporal and spatial distribution of meteorological variables, such as precipitation and temperature, can be estimated from multiple linear regression relations using latitude, longitude, and elevation of measurement stations and basin subareas. This approach also supports the use of sta- tistical and dynamical downscaling of atmospheric model output for use in distributed hydrological model applications. A set of tools to objectively apply and evaluate distributed meteorological and hydro- logical parameter-estimation methods, and process models, is being developed using the U.S. Geological Survey's Modular Modeling System (MMS). Tools include meth- ods to analyze model parameters and evaluate the extent to which uncertainty in model parameters affects uncertainty in simulation results. Methodologies that integrate re- motely sensed information with the distributed-model results are being incorporated in the tool set to facilitate the assessment of the spatial and temporal accuracy of model results. An application of selected models and parameter-estimation methods is

  8. Distribution and titres of rotavirus antibodies in different age groups.

    PubMed Central

    Elias, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    Three hundred and fifty-seven sera selected at random from hospital patients of all ages were examined for rotavirus antibodies using indirect immunofluorescence (FA) and complement fixation levels (CFT). Three hundred and fourteen of these were also tested for neutralizing antibodies to human rotavirus. Sera from patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis were excluded from this survey. FA antibodies were found in newborn infants but fell to undetectable titres at 3 months. The highest titres were found in children between the ages of one and three years. In older age groups, the model titre fell gradually with increasing age until, in sera from those above 70 years of age, FA antibodies were almost undetectable. The same pattern was observed with neutralizing antibodies. A high model titre of CF antibodies was only found in sera from those aged one to three years. PMID:200676

  9. Effects of Age and Oral Disease on Systemic Inflammatory and Immune Parameters in Nonhuman Primates▿

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J. L.; Steffen, M. J.; Gonzalez-Martinez, J.; Novak, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    This report evaluated systemic inflammatory and immune biomarkers in a cohort of Macaca mulatta (rhesus monkeys) maintained as a large family social unit, including an age range from <1 year to >24 years. We hypothesized that the systemic host responses would be affected by the age, gender, and clinical oral presentation of the population, each contributing to inflammatory and immune responses that would reflect chronic oral infections. The results demonstrated that the prevalence and severity of periodontitis, including missing teeth, increased significantly with age. Generally, minimal differences in clinical parameters were noted between the genders. Systemic inflammatory mediators, including acute-phase reactants, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cytokines/chemokines, and selected matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), demonstrated significant differences among the various age groups of animals. Levels of many of these were increased with age, although PGE2, RANTES, bactericidal permeability-inducing factor (BPI), MMP-1, and MMP-9 levels were significantly increased in the young group (∼1 to 3 years old) relative to those for the older animals. We observed that in the adult and aged animals, levels of the systemic inflammatory mediators related to gingival inflammation and periodontal tissue destruction were significantly elevated. Serum antibody levels in response to a battery of periodontal pathogens were generally lower in the young animals, <50% of those in the adults, and were significantly related to aging in the cohort. The levels of antibodies, particularly those to Porphorymonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Tannerella forsythia, were most significantly elevated in animals with periodontal disease, irrespective of the age of the animal. These results provide a broad description of oral health and host responses in a large cohort of nonhuman primates from very young animals to the aged of this species. The findings afford a base of data with which to

  10. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters.

    PubMed

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-10-13

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  11. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters

    PubMed Central

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  12. Joint distribution of successive wave steepness parameters. [Water wave modeling and effects on offshore oil platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D. . Dept. of Marine Hydrodynamics); Rue, H. . Division of Industrial Mathematics)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper, a joint distribution of wave steepness parameters for two successive waves is presented. The wave steepness parameters considered herein are the crest front steepness and the total wave steepness. The joint distribution of wave steepness parameters for two successive waves is represented by a two-dimensional Weibull distribution with the parameters [alpha]=0.84 and [beta]=1.40. The application of the results is illustrated by an example. Overall these results seem to be physically sound, although they are valid for the particular sea state chosen. The present approach has some basis in measured wave data, but comparison with data on the joint distribution of steepness parameters for two successive waves are needed before any conclusion can be drawn on the ability of this approach to describe measured wave data. Such a data base should be established from carefully designed field measurements in order to have the possibility to measure nonlinear properties of the waves. However, at present this joint distribution of steepness parameters for two successive waves should represent a useful tool for engineering applications.

  13. Low heel ultrasound parameters predict mortality in men: results from the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Lee, David M.; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: low bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is associated with increased mortality. The relationship between other skeletal phenotypes and mortality is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quantitative heel ultrasound parameters and mortality in a cohort of European men. Methods: men aged 40–79 years were recruited for participation in a prospective study of male ageing: the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). At baseline, subjects attended for quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel (Hologic—SAHARA) and completed questionnaires on lifestyle factors and co-morbidities. Height and weight were measured. After a median of 4.3 years, subjects were invited to attend a follow-up assessment, and reasons for non-participation, including death, were recorded. The relationship between QUS parameters (broadband ultrasound attenuation [BUA] and speed of sound [SOS]) and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: from a total of 3,244 men (mean age 59.8, standard deviation [SD] 10.8 years), 185 (5.7%) died during the follow-up period. After adjusting for age, centre, body mass index, physical activity, current smoking, number of co-morbidities and general health, each SD decrease in BUA was associated with a 20% higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] per SD = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.4). Compared with those in higher quintiles (2nd–5th), those in the lowest quintile of BUA and SOS had a greater mortality risk (BUA: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1–2.3 and SOS: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2–2.2). Conclusion: lower heel ultrasound parameters are associated with increased mortality in European men. PMID:26162912

  14. Investigation of the Gamma Distribution Shape Parameter in Shallow Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igel, A. L.; van den Heever, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Many bulk microphysics parameterizations assume that the droplet size distribution (DSD) of hydrometeor species such as cloud water and rain water conform to a gamma probability distribution function (PDF). Such an assumption is necessary in order to simplify the description of microphysical processes in such bulk parameterizations. The gamma PDF has a parameter that influences the width of the distribution that is commonly referred to as the shape parameter. In one- and two-moment bulk microphysics schemes, this parameter is often arbitrarily set to a fixed value throughout the simulation. This is in part due to limited observations of the shape parameter. While many studies have sought to understand this parameter for rain, few studies examine this parameter for cloud droplets. In this study, we use high-resolution simulations of shallow cumulus clouds with a spectral bin representation of the hydrometeor species to find best-fit parameters of the gamma PDF to the predicted cloud DSDs. These simulations reveal that the cloud shape parameter is high in the supersaturated regions of the cloud and low in regions where the cloud water is evaporating. Values many times higher than the standard values of 1-4 are not uncommon in the bin simulations. The results of this analysis are used to suggest appropriate values of the cloud shape parameter in simulations employing a bulk microphysics scheme. The sensitivity of cloud properties, dynamics, and rainfall to the cloud shape parameter are investigated in simulations in which the parameter is fixed. Conclusions about the importance of choosing an appropriate cloud shape parameter for simulating cumulus clouds in climate or weather models are drawn.

  15. Correlation between Umbilical Cord Diameter and Cross Sectional Area with Gestational Age and Foetal Anthropometric Parameters.

    PubMed

    Begum, K; Ahmed, M U; Rahman, M M; Hossain, M M; Begum, M; Sarkar, S K; Reza, M T; Hoshneara, M; Beg, A; Sultana, F; Begum, F; Akter, F A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to find out correlation between umbilical cord diameter, cross sectional area with gestational age and foetal anthropometric parameters. This cross sectional study was conducted among healthy women between the 24th and 40th completed weeks of a normal pregnancy in the Department of Radiology & Imaging, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh during the study period, from July 2009 to June 2011. A total of 230 consecutive normal pregnancy patients were included in the study. The diameter & cross-sectional area of the umbilical cord were measured on a plane adjacent to the junction of the umbilical cord and the fetal abdomen, in cross-section, with maximum magnification of the image. The cord was manually circled, and it's cross sectional areas was automatically calculated by the ultrasonograph. The mean±SD age was 24.3±4.7 years with range from 19 to 36 years. The mean gestational age was 32.1±4.5 weeks and more than a half (56.4%) of the pregnant women were nulliparas. A positive significant (p<0.001) correlation were found between umbilical cord diameter with bi-parietal diameter (r=0.548); head circumference (r=0.411); abdominal circumference (r=0.444); femur length (r=0.366) and gestational age gestation age (r=0.643). Similarly, a significant (p<0.001) positive week correlation were found between umbilical cross sectional area with bi-parietal diameter (r=0.3303); head circumference (r=0.3202); abdominal circumference (r=0.2651); femur length (r=0.3307) and gestation age (r=0.4051). A positive significant better correlation was found with umbilical cord diameter than cross sectional area with foetal anthropometric parameters. PMID:27277346

  16. Radii, masses, and ages of 18 bright stars using interferometry and new estimations of exoplanetary parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.; Creevey, O.; Mourard, D.; Crida, A.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Schultheis, M.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Accurate stellar parameters are needed in numerous domains of astrophysics. The position of stars on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is an important indication of their structure and evolution, and it helps improve stellar models. Furthermore, the age and mass of stars hosting planets are required elements for studying exoplanetary systems. Aims: We aim at determining accurate parameters of a set of 18 bright exoplanet host and potential host stars from interferometric measurements, photometry, and stellar models. Methods: Using the VEGA/CHARA interferometer operating in the visible domain, we measured the angular diameters of 18 stars, ten of which host exoplanets. We combined them with their distances to estimate their radii. We used photometry to derive their bolometric flux and, then, their effective temperature and luminosity to place them on the H-R diagram. We then used the PARSEC models to derive their best fit ages and masses, with error bars derived from Monte Carlo calculations. Results: Our interferometric measurements lead to an average of 1.9% uncertainty on angular diameters and 3% on stellar radii. There is good agreement between measured and indirect estimations of angular diameters (either from SED fitting or from surface brightness relations) for main sequence (MS) stars, but not as good for more evolved stars. For each star, we provide a likelihood map in the mass-age plane; typically, two distinct sets of solutions appear (an old and a young age). The errors on the ages and masses that we provide account for the metallicity uncertainties, which are often neglected by other works. From measurements of its radius and density, we also provide the mass of 55 Cnc independently of models. From the stellar masses, we provide new estimates of semi-major axes and minimum masses of exoplanets with reliable uncertainties. We also derive the radius, density, and mass of 55 Cnc e, a super-Earth that transits its stellar host. Our exoplanetary

  17. Chlorine decay in drinking-water transmission and distribution systems: pipe service age effect.

    PubMed

    Al-Jasser, A O

    2007-01-01

    Water quality can deteriorate in the transmission and distribution system beyond the treatment plant. Minimizing the potential for biological regrowth can be attained by chlorinating the finished water. While flowing through pipes, the chlorine concentration decreases for different reasons. Reaction with the pipe material itself and the reaction with both the biofilm and tubercles formed on the pipe wall are known as pipe wall demand, which may vary with pipe parameters. The aim of this paper was to assess the impact of the service age of pipes on the effective chlorine wall decay constant. Three hundred and two pipe sections of different sizes and eight different pipe materials were collected and tested for their chlorine first-order wall decay constants. The results showed that pipe service age was an important factor that must not be ignored in some pipes such as cast iron, steel, cement-lined ductile iron (CLDI), and cement-lined cast iron (CLCI) pipes especially when the bulk decay is not significant relative to the wall decay. For the range of the 55 years of pipe service age used in this study, effective wall decay constants ranged from a decrease by -92% to an increase by +431% from the corresponding values in the recently installed pipes. The effect of service age on the effective wall decay constants was most evident in cast iron pipes, whereas steel pipes were less affected. Effective chlorine wall decay for CLCI and CLDI pipes was less affected by service age as compared to steel and cast iron pipes. Chlorine wall decay constants for PVC, uPVC, and polyethylene pipes were affected negatively by pipe service age and such effect was relatively small. PMID:17140619

  18. Standard practice for reporting uniaxial strength data and estimating Weibull distribution parameters for advanced ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-04-01

    This practice covers the evaluation and subsequent reporting of uniaxial strength data and the estimation of probability distribution parameters for advanced ceramics that fail in a brittle fashion. The failure strength of advanced ceramics is treated as a continuous random variable. Typically, a number of test specimens with well-defined geometry are failed under well-defined isothermal loading conditions. The load at which each specimen fails is recorded. The resulting failure stresses are used to obtain parameter estimates associated with the underlying population distribution. This practice is restricted to the assumption that the distribution underlying the failure strengths is the two parameter Weibull distribution with size scaling. Furthermore, this practice is restricted to test specimens (tensile, flexural, pressurized ring, etc.) that are primarily subjected to uniaxial stress states. Section 8 outlines methods to correct for bias errors in the estimated Weibull parameters and to calculate confidence bounds on those estimates from data sets where all failures originate from a single flaw population (that is, a single failure mode). In samples where failures originate from multiple independent flaw populations (for example, competing failure modes), the methods outlined in Section 8 for bias correction and confidence bounds are not applicable. Measurements of the strength at failure are taken for one of two reasons: either for a comparison of the relative quality of two materials, or the prediction of the probability of failure (or, alternatively, the fracture strength) for a structure of interest. This practice will permit estimates of the distribution parameters that are needed for either.

  19. Data-free inference of the joint distribution of uncertain model parameters.

    SciTech Connect

    Marzouk, Youssef M.; Adalsteinsson, Helgi; Berry, Robert Dan; Debusschere, Bert J.; Najm, Habib N.

    2010-05-01

    It is known that, in general, the correlation structure in the joint distribution of model parameters is critical to the uncertainty analysis of that model. Very often, however, studies in the literature only report nominal values for parameters inferred from data, along with confidence intervals for these parameters, but no details on the correlation or full joint distribution of these parameters. When neither posterior nor data are available, but only summary statistics such as nominal values and confidence intervals, a joint PDF must be chosen. Given the summary statistics it may not be reasonable nor necessary to assume the parameters are independent random variables. We demonstrate, using a Bayesian inference procedure, how to construct a posterior density for the parameters exhibiting self consistent correlations, in the absence of data, given (1) the fit-model, (2) nominal parameter values, (3) bounds on the parameters, and (4) a postulated statistical model, around the fit-model, for the missing data. Our approach ensures external Bayesian updating while marginalizing over possible data realizations. We then address the matching of given parameter bounds through the choice of hyperparameters, which are introduced in postulating the statistical model, but are not given nominal values. We discuss some possible approaches, including (1) inferring them in a separate Bayesian inference loop and (2) optimization. We also perform an empirical evaluation of the algorithm showing the posterior obtained with this data free inference compares well with the true posterior obtained from inference against the full data set.

  20. A New Insight into the Earthquake Recurrence Studies from the Three-parameter Generalized Exponential Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasari, S.; Kundu, D.; Dikshit, O.

    2012-12-01

    Earthquake recurrence interval is one of the important ingredients towards probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) for any location. Exponential, gamma, Weibull and lognormal distributions are quite established probability models in this recurrence interval estimation. However, they have certain shortcomings too. Thus, it is imperative to search for some alternative sophisticated distributions. In this paper, we introduce a three-parameter (location, scale and shape) exponentiated exponential distribution and investigate the scope of this distribution as an alternative of the afore-mentioned distributions in earthquake recurrence studies. This distribution is a particular member of the exponentiated Weibull distribution. Despite of its complicated form, it is widely accepted in medical and biological applications. Furthermore, it shares many physical properties with gamma and Weibull family. Unlike gamma distribution, the hazard function of generalized exponential distribution can be easily computed even if the shape parameter is not an integer. To contemplate the plausibility of this model, a complete and homogeneous earthquake catalogue of 20 events (M ≥ 7.0) spanning for the period 1846 to 1995 from North-East Himalayan region (20-32 deg N and 87-100 deg E) has been used. The model parameters are estimated using maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) and method of moment estimator (MOME). No geological or geophysical evidences have been considered in this calculation. The estimated conditional probability reaches quite high after about a decade for an elapsed time of 17 years (i.e. 2012). Moreover, this study shows that the generalized exponential distribution fits the above data events more closely compared to the conventional models and hence it is tentatively concluded that generalized exponential distribution can be effectively considered in earthquake recurrence studies.

  1. Distributed and decentralized state estimation in gas networks as distributed parameter systems.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian Behrooz, Hesam; Boozarjomehry, R Bozorgmehry

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a framework for distributed and decentralized state estimation in high-pressure and long-distance gas transmission networks (GTNs) is proposed. The non-isothermal model of the plant including mass, momentum and energy balance equations are used to simulate the dynamic behavior. Due to several disadvantages of implementing a centralized Kalman filter for large-scale systems, the continuous/discrete form of extended Kalman filter for distributed and decentralized estimation (DDE) has been extended for these systems. Accordingly, the global model is decomposed into several subsystems, called local models. Some heuristic rules are suggested for system decomposition in gas pipeline networks. In the construction of local models, due to the existence of common states and interconnections among the subsystems, the assimilation and prediction steps of the Kalman filter are modified to take the overlapping and external states into account. However, dynamic Riccati equation for each subsystem is constructed based on the local model, which introduces a maximum error of 5% in the estimated standard deviation of the states in the benchmarks studied in this paper. The performance of the proposed methodology has been shown based on the comparison of its accuracy and computational demands against their counterparts in centralized Kalman filter for two viable benchmarks. In a real life network, it is shown that while the accuracy is not significantly decreased, the real-time factor of the state estimation is increased by a factor of 10. PMID:26138354

  2. The Effects of Drop Size Distribution Truncation on Rainfall Integral Parameters and Empirical Relations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Carlton W.

    1985-06-01

    A description is given of a method of estimating the effects of truncating the raindrop size distribution (DSD) at lower and upper drop diameters Dmin and Dmax which assumes that the DSD can be approximated by a gamma distribution (including the exponential distribution). The method is used to investigate the effects of DSD truncation on rainfall integral parameters (e.g., reflectivity factor, liquid water content etc.) and on empirical relations between pairs of these integral parameters. Tests of the theoretical predictions are performed using a set of drop size data collected with a Joss disdrometer. A brief description is also given of the use of the method to determine DSD truncation effects on precipitation parameters deduced from dual-measurement techniques.

  3. A hybrid optimization approach to the estimation of distributed parameters in two-dimensional confined aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidari, M.; Ranjithan, S.R.

    1998-01-01

    In using non-linear optimization techniques for estimation of parameters in a distributed ground water model, the initial values of the parameters and prior information about them play important roles. In this paper, the genetic algorithm (GA) is combined with the truncated-Newton search technique to estimate groundwater parameters for a confined steady-state ground water model. Use of prior information about the parameters is shown to be important in estimating correct or near-correct values of parameters on a regional scale. The amount of prior information needed for an accurate solution is estimated by evaluation of the sensitivity of the performance function to the parameters. For the example presented here, it is experimentally demonstrated that only one piece of prior information of the least sensitive parameter is sufficient to arrive at the global or near-global optimum solution. For hydraulic head data with measurement errors, the error in the estimation of parameters increases as the standard deviation of the errors increases. Results from our experiments show that, in general, the accuracy of the estimated parameters depends on the level of noise in the hydraulic head data and the initial values used in the truncated-Newton search technique.In using non-linear optimization techniques for estimation of parameters in a distributed ground water model, the initial values of the parameters and prior information about them play important roles. In this paper, the genetic algorithm (GA) is combined with the truncated-Newton search technique to estimate groundwater parameters for a confined steady-state ground water model. Use of prior information about the parameters is shown to be important in estimating correct or near-correct values of parameters on a regional scale. The amount of prior information needed for an accurate solution is estimated by evaluation of the sensitivity of the performance function to the parameters. For the example presented here, it is

  4. Strategic Decision-Making Learning from Label Distributions: An Approach for Facial Age Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Han

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, label distribution learning is among the state-of-the-art methodologies in facial age estimation. It takes the age of each facial image instance as a label distribution with a series of age labels rather than the single chronological age label that is commonly used. However, this methodology is deficient in its simple decision-making criterion: the final predicted age is only selected at the one with maximum description degree. In many cases, different age labels may have very similar description degrees. Consequently, blindly deciding the estimated age by virtue of the highest description degree would miss or neglect other valuable age labels that may contribute a lot to the final predicted age. In this paper, we propose a strategic decision-making label distribution learning algorithm (SDM-LDL) with a series of strategies specialized for different types of age label distribution. Experimental results from the most popular aging face database, FG-NET, show the superiority and validity of all the proposed strategic decision-making learning algorithms over the existing label distribution learning and other single-label learning algorithms for facial age estimation. The inner properties of SDM-LDL are further explored with more advantages. PMID:27367691

  5. Distributed parameter estimation for NASA Mini-Mast truss through displacement measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Shen, Ji-Yao; Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Most methods of system identification of large flexible structures by far are based on the lumped parameter approach. Because of the considerable computational burden due to the large number of unknown parameters, distributed parameter approach, which greatly decreases the number of unknowns, has being investigated. In this paper a distributed parameter model for the estimation of modal characteristics of NASA Mini-Mast truss has been formulated. Both Bernoulli-Euler beam and Timoshenko beam equations are used to characterize the lateral bending vibrations of the truss. The measurement of the lateral displacement at the tip of the truss is provided to the maximum likelihood estimator. Closed-form solutions of the partial differential equations and closed-form expressions of the sensitivity functions are derived so that the estimation algorithm is highly efficient. The resulting estimates from test data by using Timoshenko beam model are found to be comparable to those derived from finite element analysis.

  6. Parameter estimation in nonlinear distributed systems - Approximation theory and convergence results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework and convergence theory is described for Galerkin approximations applied to inverse problems involving nonlinear distributed parameter systems. Parameter estimation problems are considered and formulated as the minimization of a least-squares-like performance index over a compact admissible parameter set subject to state constraints given by an inhomogeneous nonlinear distributed system. The theory applies to systems whose dynamics can be described by either time-independent or nonstationary strongly maximal monotonic operators defined on a reflexive Banach space which is densely and continuously embedded in a Hilbert space. It is demonstrated that if readily verifiable conditions on the system's dependence on the unknown parameters are satisfied, and the usual Galerkin approximation assumption holds, then solutions to the approximating problems exist and approximate a solution to the original infinite-dimensional identification problem.

  7. Relationships between remotely sensed fisheries distribution information and selected oceanographic parameters in the Mississippi Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerer, A. J.; Benigno, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    A feasibility study to demonstrate the potential of satellites for providing fisheries significant information was conducted in the Mississippi Sound and adjacent offshore waters. Attempts were made to relate satellite acquired imagery to selected oceanographic parameters and then to relate these parameters to aircraft remotely sensed distribution patterns of resident surface schooling fishes. Initial results suggest that this approach is valid and that the satellite acquired imagery may have important fisheries resource assessment implications.

  8. Relationships between remotely sensed fisheries distribution information and selected oceanographic parameters in the Mississippi Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerer, A. J.; Benigno, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A feasibility study to demonstrate the potential of satellites for providing fisheries significant information was conducted in the Mississippi Sound and adjacent offshore waters. Attempts were made to relate satellite acquired imagery to selected oceanographic parameters and then to relate these parameters to aircraft remotely sensed distribution patterns of resident surface schooling fishes. Initial results suggest that this approach is valid and that the satellite acquired imagery may have important fisheries resource assessment implications.

  9. Factorization and reduction methods for optimal control of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Powers, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    A Chandrasekhar-type factorization method is applied to the linear-quadratic optimal control problem for distributed parameter systems. An aeroelastic control problem is used as a model example to demonstrate that if computationally efficient algorithms, such as those of Chandrasekhar-type, are combined with the special structure often available to a particular problem, then an abstract approximation theory developed for distributed parameter control theory becomes a viable method of solution. A numerical scheme based on averaging approximations is applied to hereditary control problems. Numerical examples are given.

  10. Probability distribution of the order parameter in the directed percolation universality class.

    PubMed

    Martins, P H L

    2012-04-01

    The probability distributions of the order parameter for two models in the directed percolation universality class were evaluated. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for the one-dimensional generalized contact process and the Domany-Kinzel cellular automaton. In both cases, the density of active sites was chosen as the order parameter. The criticality of those models was obtained by solely using the corresponding probability distribution function. It has been shown that the present method, which has been successfully employed in treating equilibrium systems, is indeed also useful in the study of nonequilibrium phase transitions. PMID:22680423

  11. Comparison of Two New Robust Parameter Estimation Methods for the Power Function Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Haq, Muhammad Ahsan ul; Abdulhamid, Alaa Mohamd; Faisal, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of any probability distribution parameters is vital because imprecise and biased estimates can be misleading. In this study, we investigate a flexible power function distribution and introduced new two methods such as, probability weighted moments, and generalized probability weighted methods for its parameters. We compare their results with L-moments, trimmed L-moments by a simulation study and a real data example based on performance measures such as, mean square error and total deviation. We concluded that all the methods perform well in the case of large sample size (n>30), however, the generalized probability weighted moment method performs better for small sample size. PMID:27500404

  12. The radial distributions of galactic molecular clouds and their physical parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, D.-L.; Lou, G.-F.

    In this paper, the data of 391 J = 1-0 spectra of 13CO surveys, which were made with the NRAO 11-m telescope and along the galactic plane from l = 20.50° to 40.00° with 3arcmin spacings, and 665 molecular clouds synthesized by the above-mentioned data are used to derive the galactic radial distributions of several physical parameters of molecular clouds. Comparative analyses are made between the galactic radial distributions of physical parameters of molecular clouds and the molecular counterparts of 21 cm H I spiral arms identified by Cohen et al. (1980) in their CO surveys.

  13. Comparison of Two New Robust Parameter Estimation Methods for the Power Function Distribution.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Haq, Muhammad Ahsan Ul; Hussain, Ijaz; Abdulhamid, Alaa Mohamd; Faisal, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of any probability distribution parameters is vital because imprecise and biased estimates can be misleading. In this study, we investigate a flexible power function distribution and introduced new two methods such as, probability weighted moments, and generalized probability weighted methods for its parameters. We compare their results with L-moments, trimmed L-moments by a simulation study and a real data example based on performance measures such as, mean square error and total deviation. We concluded that all the methods perform well in the case of large sample size (n>30), however, the generalized probability weighted moment method performs better for small sample size. PMID:27500404

  14. Improving flood forecasting capability of physically based distributed hydrological model by parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, J.; Xu, H.

    2015-10-01

    Physically based distributed hydrological models discrete the terrain of the whole catchment into a number of grid cells at fine resolution, and assimilate different terrain data and precipitation to different cells, and are regarded to have the potential to improve the catchment hydrological processes simulation and prediction capability. In the early stage, physically based distributed hydrological models are assumed to derive model parameters from the terrain properties directly, so there is no need to calibrate model parameters, but unfortunately, the uncertanties associated with this model parameter deriving is very high, which impacted their application in flood forecasting, so parameter optimization may also be necessary. There are two main purposes for this study, the first is to propose a parameter optimization method for physically based distributed hydrological models in catchment flood forecasting by using PSO algorithm and to test its competence and to improve its performances, the second is to explore the possibility of improving physically based distributed hydrological models capability in cathcment flood forecasting by parameter optimization. In this paper, based on the scalar concept, a general framework for parameter optimization of the PBDHMs for catchment flood forecasting is first proposed that could be used for all PBDHMs. Then, with Liuxihe model as the study model, which is a physically based distributed hydrological model proposed for catchment flood forecasting, the improverd Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is developed for the parameter optimization of Liuxihe model in catchment flood forecasting, the improvements include to adopt the linear decreasing inertia weight strategy to change the inertia weight, and the arccosine function strategy to adjust the acceleration coefficients. This method has been tested in two catchments in southern China with different sizes, and the results show that the improved PSO algorithm could be

  15. A Bayesian Modeling Approach for Estimation of a Shape-Free Groundwater Age Distribution using Multiple Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudieh, Arash; Visser, Ate; Sharifi, Soroosh; Broers, Hans Peter

    2013-10-15

    The mixing of groundwaters with different ages in aquifers, groundwater age is more appropriately represented by a distribution rather than a scalar number. To infer a groundwater age distribution from environmental tracers, a mathematical form is often assumed for the shape of the distribution and the parameters of the mathematical distribution are estimated using deterministic or stochastic inverse methods. We found that the prescription of the mathematical form limits the exploration of the age distribution to the shapes that can be described by the selected distribution. In this paper, the use of freeform histograms as groundwater age distributions is evaluated. A Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach is used to estimate the fraction of groundwater in each histogram bin. This method was able to capture the shape of a hypothetical gamma distribution from the concentrations of four age tracers. The number of bins that can be considered in this approach is limited based on the number of tracers available. The histogram method was also tested on tracer data sets from Holten (The Netherlands; 3H, 3He, 85Kr, 39Ar) and the La Selva Biological Station (Costa-Rica; SF 6, CFCs, 3H, 4He and 14C), and compared to a number of mathematical forms. According to standard Bayesian measures of model goodness, the best mathematical distribution performs better than the histogram distributions in terms of the ability to capture the observed tracer data relative to their complexity. Among the histogram distributions, the four bin histogram performs better in most of the cases. The Monte Carlo simulations showed strong correlations in the posterior estimates of bin contributions, indicating that these bins cannot be well constrained using the available age tracers. The fact that mathematical forms overall perform better than the freeform histogram does not undermine the benefit of the

  16. A Bayesian Modeling Approach for Estimation of a Shape-Free Groundwater Age Distribution using Multiple Tracers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Massoudieh, Arash; Visser, Ate; Sharifi, Soroosh; Broers, Hans Peter

    2013-10-15

    The mixing of groundwaters with different ages in aquifers, groundwater age is more appropriately represented by a distribution rather than a scalar number. To infer a groundwater age distribution from environmental tracers, a mathematical form is often assumed for the shape of the distribution and the parameters of the mathematical distribution are estimated using deterministic or stochastic inverse methods. We found that the prescription of the mathematical form limits the exploration of the age distribution to the shapes that can be described by the selected distribution. In this paper, the use of freeform histograms as groundwater age distributions is evaluated.more » A Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach is used to estimate the fraction of groundwater in each histogram bin. This method was able to capture the shape of a hypothetical gamma distribution from the concentrations of four age tracers. The number of bins that can be considered in this approach is limited based on the number of tracers available. The histogram method was also tested on tracer data sets from Holten (The Netherlands; 3H, 3He, 85Kr, 39Ar) and the La Selva Biological Station (Costa-Rica; SF 6, CFCs, 3H, 4He and 14C), and compared to a number of mathematical forms. According to standard Bayesian measures of model goodness, the best mathematical distribution performs better than the histogram distributions in terms of the ability to capture the observed tracer data relative to their complexity. Among the histogram distributions, the four bin histogram performs better in most of the cases. The Monte Carlo simulations showed strong correlations in the posterior estimates of bin contributions, indicating that these bins cannot be well constrained using the available age tracers. The fact that mathematical forms overall perform better than the freeform histogram does not undermine the benefit of the freeform approach, especially for the cases where a larger amount of observed data is

  17. Clusters and cycles in the cosmic ray age distributions of meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, M. F.; Marti, K.

    1985-01-01

    Statistically significant clusters in the cosmic ray exposure age distributions of some groups of iron and stone meteorites were observed, suggesting epochs of enhanced collision and breakups. Fourier analyses of the age distributions of chondrites reveal no significant periods, nor does the same analysis when applied to iron meteorite clusters.

  18. Effects of Exendin-4 on Male Reproductive Parameters of D-Galactose Induced Aging Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of exendin-4 on reproductive alteration in a D-galactose-induced aging mouse model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 72 male Naval Medical Research Institute mice (20~25 g) were randomly divided into six groups: control, exendin-4 (1 nmol/kg), exendin-4 (10 nmol/kg), D-galactose (500 mg/kg), D-galactose+exendin-4 (1 nmol/kg), and D-galactose+exendin-4 (10 nmol/kg). The aging model animals were gavaged with D-galactose for six weeks, and exendin-4 was injected intraperitoneally in the last 10 days. At the end of treatment serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone levels were evaluated and the cauda epididymis and testis were removed to analyze the sperm count and testis morphology. Results The testis weight and volume decreased in the D-galactose group (p<0.01 and p<0.05) respectively. Exendin-4 (1, 10 nmol/kg) increased these parameters in the normal and aging mouse models. Serum LH and FSH levels increased and the sperm count decreased in the D-galactose group (p<0.05). Further, exendin-4 (1 nmol/kg) decreased LH and FSH levels and increased the serum testosterone level and sperm count in both normal and aging animals. Conclusions D-galactose can induce aging alternations in the male reproductive system such as decreased sperm count and increased serum LH and FSH levels through reactive oxygen species over production and reduced antioxidant enzyme activity. Further, co-administration of exendin-4 reduced reproductive complications of D-galactose in an aging mouse model. PMID:25606567

  19. Variation of Biophysical Parameters of the Skin with Age, Gender, and Body Region

    PubMed Central

    Firooz, Alireza; Sadr, Bardia; Babakoohi, Shahab; Sarraf-Yazdy, Maryam; Fanian, Ferial; Kazerouni-Timsar, Ali; Nassiri-Kashani, Mansour; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Dowlati, Yahya

    2012-01-01

    Background. Understanding the physiological, chemical, and biophysical characteristics of the skin helps us to arrange a proper approach to the management of skin diseases. Objective. The aim of this study was to measure 6 biophysical characteristics of normal skin (sebum content, hydration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema index, melanin index, and elasticity) in a normal population and assess the effect of sex, age, and body location on them. Methods. Fifty healthy volunteers in 5 age groups (5 males and females in each) were enrolled in this study. A multifunctional skin physiology monitor (Courage & Khazaka electronic GmbH, Germany) was used to measure skin sebum content, hydration, TEWL, erythema index, melanin index, and elasticity in 8 different locations of the body. Results. There were significant differences between the hydration, melanin index, and elasticity of different age groups. Regarding the locations, forehead had the highest melanin index, where as palm had the lowest value. The mean values of erythema index and melanin index and TEWL were significantly higher in males and anatomic location was a significant independent factor for all of 6 measured parameters. Conclusion. Several biophysical properties of the skin vary among different gender, age groups, and body locations. PMID:22536139

  20. Evaluation of Experimental Parameters in the Accelerated Aging of Closed-Cell Foam Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K; Vanderlan, Michael; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2012-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of many closed-cell foam insulation products changes over time as production gases diffuse out of the cell matrix and atmospheric gases diffuse into the cells. Thin slicing has been shown to be an effective means of accelerating this process in such a way as to produce meaningful results. Efforts to produce a more prescriptive version of the ASTM C1303 standard test method led to the ruggedness test described here. This test program included the aging of full size insulation specimens for time periods of five years for direct comparison to the predicted results. Experimental parameters under investigation include: slice thickness, slice origin (at the surface or from the core of the slab), thin slice stack composition, product facings, original product thickness, product density, and product type. The test protocol has been completed and this report provides a detailed evaluation of the impact of the test parameters on the accuracy of the 5-year thermal conductivity prediction.

  1. Quantification of Parameter Uncertainty of a Distributed Hydraulic Model Using Ensemble Smoother

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; McLaughlin, Dennis; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Li, Wenpeng; Dong, Xinguang

    2014-05-01

    Yanqi basin is an important agricultural region in Xinjiang, in Northwest China. The irrigated agricultural land has been increasing in the past decades and made the basin suffer from many environmental problems such as soil salinization, decreased lake level, deteriorated lake water quality, decreased surface water flow to the downstream and damaged riverine forests. A 3-dimensional distributed numerical flow and transport model is built using MIKESHE/MIKE11 which contains saturated and unsaturated zones, rivers and lakes. It allows to better understand the impacts of individual hydrological units and their interactions. Before using the model for quantifying solutions for the environmental problems, the parameter uncertainties of the complex distributed model are assessed using an Ensemble Smoother (ES). ES is a data assimilation method to improve an ensemble of prior parameters by assimilating time series of observations over the whole time period available. It is basically a stochastic calibration method. In this case study, an iterative ES is applied, called Ensemble Smoother with Multiple Data Assimilation (ESMDA) (Emerick and Reynolds, 2012). Two alternatives are considered to update parameters in each iteration. One is the Ensemble Kalman Filter with perturbed observations and the other is an Unbiased Square root filter which updates parameter means and perturbations separately. Seventeen parameters are chosen from the distributed flow and transport model to quantify their uncertainty. Fifty prior replicates of each parameter are generated using the Latin Hypercube Sampling method. The distribution of posterior parameters and outputs obtained from the alternative methods are similar. The results indicate that the uncertainty of the parameters is narrowed during the smoother updating process, reflecting the information obtained from the observations. The most sensitive parameters are the dispersion coefficient of the lakes and the hydraulic conductivity of

  2. A unified framework for approximation in inverse problems for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Ito, K.

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical framework is presented that can be used to treat approximation techniques for very general classes of parameter estimation problems involving distributed systems that are either first or second order in time. Using the approach developed, one can obtain both convergence and stability (continuous dependence of parameter estimates with respect to the observations) under very weak regularity and compactness assumptions on the set of admissible parameters. This unified theory can be used for many problems found in the recent literature and in many cases offers significant improvements to existing results.

  3. Differences in selected medical care parameters in rheumatic disease ward patients of different ages of life

    PubMed Central

    Pobrotyn, Piotr; Susło, Robert; Milczanowski, Piotr; Drobnik, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic diseases are becoming more and more common in Poland with the ageing of the population. Nearly 18% of the total hospital admissions in Poland result from rheumatic diseases, which was equivalent to 350 thousand cases in the year 2008. These diseases tend to last for many decades, decreasing both the quality of life and income of the patients as well as increasing the medical institutions’ workload and society's financial burden. The aim of the study was to determine whether the medical care parameters in a rheumatic disease hospital ward show any significant differences among different patient age groups – especially such that would support taking them into account as a basis for adjusting the financial coverage level of medical services. Material and methods Data on hospitalizations at the Rheumatic Diseases Ward of Wroclaw University Hospital in Wroclaw in the years 2009–2015 were analyzed, taking into account the age groups, number of hospital admissions, their duration and causes. Relevant statistical data analysis was performed. Discussion The study revealed that the number of old patients hospitalized at the rheumatic diseases ward increased over the last 6 years and that such statistically significant differences do exist: on average the old patients not only tend to stay much longer at the hospital, but also suffer from a different and more diverse spectrum of diseases in comparison to their younger counterparts. Conclusions The detected differences in medical care parameters support the need for more individualized medical care and increased cost of the hospital stay in the case of older patients. Consequently, those factors justify the necessity to increase the value of medical services in the case of old patients, possibly also taking into account the variation between age subgroups. PMID:27407280

  4. SU-E-T-113: Dose Distribution Using Respiratory Signals and Machine Parameters During Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Imae, T; Haga, A; Saotome, N; Kida, S; Nakano, M; Takeuchi, Y; Shiraki, T; Yano, K; Yamashita, H; Nakagawa, K; Ohtomo, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a rotational intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique capable of acquiring projection images during treatment. Treatment plans for lung tumors using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) are calculated with planning computed tomography (CT) images only exhale phase. Purpose of this study is to evaluate dose distribution by reconstructing from only the data such as respiratory signals and machine parameters acquired during treatment. Methods: Phantom and three patients with lung tumor underwent CT scans for treatment planning. They were treated by VMAT while acquiring projection images to derive their respiratory signals and machine parameters including positions of multi leaf collimators, dose rates and integrated monitor units. The respiratory signals were divided into 4 and 10 phases and machine parameters were correlated with the divided respiratory signals based on the gantry angle. Dose distributions of each respiratory phase were calculated from plans which were reconstructed from the respiratory signals and the machine parameters during treatment. The doses at isocenter, maximum point and the centroid of target were evaluated. Results and Discussion: Dose distributions during treatment were calculated using the machine parameters and the respiratory signals detected from projection images. Maximum dose difference between plan and in treatment distribution was −1.8±0.4% at centroid of target and dose differences of evaluated points between 4 and 10 phases were no significant. Conclusion: The present method successfully evaluated dose distribution using respiratory signals and machine parameters during treatment. This method is feasible to verify the actual dose for moving target.

  5. Improving flood forecasting capability of physically based distributed hydrological models by parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, J.; Xu, H.

    2016-01-01

    Physically based distributed hydrological models (hereafter referred to as PBDHMs) divide the terrain of the whole catchment into a number of grid cells at fine resolution and assimilate different terrain data and precipitation to different cells. They are regarded to have the potential to improve the catchment hydrological process simulation and prediction capability. In the early stage, physically based distributed hydrological models are assumed to derive model parameters from the terrain properties directly, so there is no need to calibrate model parameters. However, unfortunately the uncertainties associated with this model derivation are very high, which impacted their application in flood forecasting, so parameter optimization may also be necessary. There are two main purposes for this study: the first is to propose a parameter optimization method for physically based distributed hydrological models in catchment flood forecasting by using particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and to test its competence and to improve its performances; the second is to explore the possibility of improving physically based distributed hydrological model capability in catchment flood forecasting by parameter optimization. In this paper, based on the scalar concept, a general framework for parameter optimization of the PBDHMs for catchment flood forecasting is first proposed that could be used for all PBDHMs. Then, with the Liuxihe model as the study model, which is a physically based distributed hydrological model proposed for catchment flood forecasting, the improved PSO algorithm is developed for the parameter optimization of the Liuxihe model in catchment flood forecasting. The improvements include adoption of the linearly decreasing inertia weight strategy to change the inertia weight and the arccosine function strategy to adjust the acceleration coefficients. This method has been tested in two catchments in southern China with different sizes, and the results show

  6. Sampling the probability distribution of Type Ia Supernova lightcurve parameters in cosmological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mi; Wang, Yun

    2016-06-01

    In order to obtain robust cosmological constraints from Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, we have applied Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to SN Ia lightcurve fitting. We develop a method for sampling the resultant probability density distributions (pdf) of the SN Ia lightcuve parameters in the MCMC likelihood analysis to constrain cosmological parameters, and validate it using simulated data sets. Applying this method to the `joint lightcurve analysis (JLA)' data set of SNe Ia, we find that sampling the SN Ia lightcurve parameter pdf's leads to cosmological parameters closer to that of a flat Universe with a cosmological constant, compared to the usual practice of using only the best-fitting values of the SN Ia lightcurve parameters. Our method will be useful in the use of SN Ia data for precision cosmology.

  7. Bayesian Inference for Time Trends in Parameter Values: Case Study for the Ageing PSA Network of the European Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Albert Malkhasyan

    2010-06-01

    There is a nearly ubiquitous assumption in PSA that parameter values are at least piecewise-constant in time. As a result, Bayesian inference tends to incorporate many years of plant operation, over which there have been significant changes in plant operational and maintenance practices, plant management, etc. These changes can cause significant changes in parameter values over time; however, failure to perform Bayesian inference in the proper time-dependent framework can mask these changes. Failure to question the assumption of constant parameter values, and failure to perform Bayesian inference in the proper time-dependent framework were noted as important issues in NUREG/CR-6813, performed for the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in 2003. That report noted that “industry lacks tools to perform time-trend analysis with Bayesian updating.” This paper describes an application of time-dependent Bayesian inference methods developed for the European Commission Ageing PSA Network. These methods utilize open-source software, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The paper also illustrates the development of a generic prior distribution, which incorporates multiple sources of generic data via weighting factors that address differences in key influences, such as vendor, component boundaries, conditions of the operating environment, etc.

  8. Atlas of relations between climatic parameters and distributions of important trees and shrubs in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Robert S.; Anderson, Katherine H.; Bartlein, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    This atlas explores the continental-scale relations between the geographic ranges of woody plant species and climate in North America. A 25-km equal-area grid of modern climatic and bioclimatic parameters was constructed from instrumental weather records. The geographic distributions of selected tree and shrub species were digitized, and the presence or absence of each species was determined for each cell on the 25-km grid, thus providing a basis for comparing climatic data and species distributions. The relations between climate and plant distributions are explored in graphical and tabular form. The results of this effort are primarily intended for use in biogeographic, paleoclimatic, and global-change research.

  9. Aging of distribution and other lifeline systems due to corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Isenberg, J. )

    1993-05-01

    Statistics derived from public works maintenance records for buried steel and cast iron pipelines indicate that aging may be seen in increasing rates of repairs. Maintenance increases with age due to cumulative traffic loads, ground settlement and, among the most important causes, corrosion. The tendency for repair rates gradually to increase and the opposing effects of corrosion control and planned replacement are punctuated by the rapid rise in leakage and required maintenance in the aftermath of an earthquake. These data were uncovered as a byproduct of studying five western US earthquakes in which performance of steel pipelines under seismic conditions and under normal operating conditions appear to be correlated. Evidence also points to temporary and, sometimes, to permanent increase in the rate of leakage and failure in the aftermath of an earthquake. The underlying cause of this correlation is thinning of pipe walls due to corrosion, which is facilitated by stray current and conductive soil. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. An EOQ Model with Two-Parameter Weibull Distribution Deterioration and Price-Dependent Demand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Sushanta; Mukherjee, R. N.; Chaudhuri, K. S.

    2005-01-01

    An inventory replenishment policy is developed for a deteriorating item and price-dependent demand. The rate of deterioration is taken to be time-proportional and the time to deterioration is assumed to follow a two-parameter Weibull distribution. A power law form of the price dependence of demand is considered. The model is solved analytically…

  11. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The research concerning the reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems is reported. The adaptive control strategy was chosen for investigation in the annular momentum control device. It is noted, that if there is no observation spill over, and no model errors, an indirect adaptive control strategy can be globally stable. Recent publications concerning adaptive control are included.

  12. ON ASYMPTOTIC DISTRIBUTION AND ASYMPTOTIC EFFICIENCY OF LEAST SQUARES ESTIMATORS OF SPATIAL VARIOGRAM PARAMETERS. (R827257)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In this article, we consider the least-squares approach for estimating parameters of a spatial variogram and establish consistency and asymptotic normality of these estimators under general conditions. Large-sample distributions are also established under a sp...

  13. The values of the parameters of some multilayer distributed RC null networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huelsman, L. P.; Raghunath, S.

    1974-01-01

    In this correspondence, the values of the parameters of some multilayer distributed RC notch networks are determined, and the usually accepted values are shown to be in error. The magnitude of the error is illustrated by graphs of the frequency response of the networks.

  14. Methods for the identification of material parameters in distributed models for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Crowley, J. M.; Rosen, I. G.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical results are presented for inverse problems involving estimation of spatially varying parameters such as stiffness and damping in distributed models for elastic structures such as Euler-Bernoulli beams. An outline of algorithms used and a summary of computational experiences are presented.

  15. Mathematical simulation application for research of nonuniform distributed-parameter circuit transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. O.; Plyusnin, A. A.; Shandarova, E. B.; Tikhomirova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers the simulation capability of nonuniform distributed-parameter circuit transients by using MatLab Simulink. This approach is capable of determining currents and voltages of nodes for power networks of any configurations and modes. The paper contains results of nonuniform line simulations in idle, short-circuit and load modes.

  16. Study of Parameters And Methods of LL-Ⅳ Distributed Hydrological Model in DMIP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wu, J.; Wang, X.; Yang, C.; Zhao, Y.; Zhou, H.

    2008-05-01

    : The Physics-based distributed hydrological model is considered as an important developing period from the traditional experience-hydrology to the physical hydrology. The Hydrology Laboratory of the NOAA National Weather Service proposes the first and second phase of the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP),that it is a great epoch-making work. LL distributed hydrological model has been developed to the fourth generation since it was established in 1997 on the Fengman-I district reservoir area (11000 km2).The LL-I distributed hydrological model was born with the applications of flood control system in the Fengman-I in China. LL-II was developed under the DMIP-I support, it is combined with GIS, RS, GPS, radar rainfall measurement.LL-III was established along with Applications of LL Distributed Model on Water Resources which was supported by the 973-projects of The Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China. LL-Ⅳ was developed to face China's water problem. Combined with Blue River and the Baron Fork River basin of DMIP-II, the convection-diffusion equation of non-saturated and saturated seepage was derived from the soil water dynamics and continuous equation. In view of the technical characteristics of the model, the advantage of using convection-diffusion equation to compute confluence overall is longer period of predictable, saving memory space, fast budgeting, clear physical concepts, etc. The determination of parameters of hydrological model is the key, including experience coefficients and parameters of physical parameters. There are methods of experience, inversion, and the optimization to determine the model parameters, and each has advantages and disadvantages. This paper briefly introduces the LL-Ⅳ distribution hydrological model equations, and particularly introduces methods of parameters determination and simulation results on Blue River and Baron Fork River basin for DMIP-II. The soil moisture diffusion

  17. Fitting Three- and Four-Parameter Probability Distributions to Daily Streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archfield, S. A.; Vogel, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Daily streamflow information is critical for solving any number of hydrologic problems. One promising approach to estimate a time series of daily streamflow at an ungauged location is to estimate a continuous, daily, period-of-record flow-duration curve (FDC) at the ungauged location and use the timing of observed streamflows from a donor streamgauge to transform the FDC at the ungauged location into a time series of streamflow. Ideally, if one were to find a suitable probability density function (pdf) to represent daily streamflow, only the parameters of the distribution would need to be estimated at the ungauged location. Determining the pdf of daily streamflow could also provide functional linkages between the pdfs of daily precipitation and other catchment processes toward a probabilistic framework which explains how catchments filter the precipitation signal. Three- and four parameter distributions were fit to daily streamflow observations from streamgauges located in the north- and southeastern United States. No suitable three or four-parameter probability distribution were found to adequately represent the distribution of daily streamflow, particularly at streamflow quantiles greater than 0.9 and less than 0.01 exceedence probabilities. Furthermore, the properties of these distributions caused estimated streamflows to be bounded at both the highest and lowest streamflow quantiles, creating a severe bias in the estimation of the FDC. Traditional goodness-of-fit statistics were also unable to revealing this lack of fit; only examination of the individual probability plots showed this inadequacy.

  18. Geostatistical analysis of tritium, groundwater age and other noble gas derived parameters in California.

    PubMed

    Visser, A; Moran, J E; Hillegonds, Darren; Singleton, M J; Kulongoski, Justin T; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, B K

    2016-03-15

    Key characteristics of California groundwater systems related to aquifer vulnerability, sustainability, recharge locations and mechanisms, and anthropogenic impact on recharge are revealed in a spatial geostatistical analysis of a unique data set of tritium, noble gases and other isotopic analyses unprecedented in size at nearly 4000 samples. The correlation length of key groundwater residence time parameters varies between tens of kilometers ((3)H; age) to the order of a hundred kilometers ((4)Heter; (14)C; (3)Hetrit). The correlation length of parameters related to climate, topography and atmospheric processes is on the order of several hundred kilometers (recharge temperature; δ(18)O). Young groundwater ages that highlight regional recharge areas are located in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, in the southern Santa Clara Valley Basin, in the upper LA basin and along unlined canals carrying Colorado River water, showing that much of the recent recharge in central and southern California is dominated by river recharge and managed aquifer recharge. Modern groundwater is found in wells with the top open intervals below 60 m depth in the southeastern San Joaquin Valley, Santa Clara Valley and Los Angeles basin, as the result of intensive pumping and/or managed aquifer recharge operations. PMID:26803267

  19. Radar meteors range distribution model. III. Ablation, shape-density and self-similarity parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecinová, D.; Pecina, P.

    2007-10-01

    The theoretical radar meteors Range Distribution of the overdense echoes developed by Pecinová and Pecina (2007 a) is applied here to observed range distributions of meteors belonging to the Quadrantid, Perseid, Leonid, Geminid, γ Draconid (Giacobinid), ζ Perseid and β Taurid streams to study the variability of the shape-density, ablation, and self-similarity parameters of meteoroids of these streams. We have found in accordance with results of photographical observations that ablation parameter σ is higher for members of showers of clearly cometary origin, and is lower for Geminid and daytime shower meteoroids. Levin's self-similarity parameter μ was found to be much greater than the classical value 2/3 for all investigated streams with the exception of Geminids, for which the value found is almost classical, i.e. 0.66 ± 0.01. The method of getting μ by means of fitting the light curve of faint TV meteors is also suggested.

  20. Comparison of Two Methods Used to Model Shape Parameters of Pareto Distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, C.; Charpentier, R.R.; Su, J.

    2011-01-01

    Two methods are compared for estimating the shape parameters of Pareto field-size (or pool-size) distributions for petroleum resource assessment. Both methods assume mature exploration in which most of the larger fields have been discovered. Both methods use the sizes of larger discovered fields to estimate the numbers and sizes of smaller fields: (1) the tail-truncated method uses a plot of field size versus size rank, and (2) the log-geometric method uses data binned in field-size classes and the ratios of adjacent bin counts. Simulation experiments were conducted using discovered oil and gas pool-size distributions from four petroleum systems in Alberta, Canada and using Pareto distributions generated by Monte Carlo simulation. The estimates of the shape parameters of the Pareto distributions, calculated by both the tail-truncated and log-geometric methods, generally stabilize where discovered pool numbers are greater than 100. However, with fewer than 100 discoveries, these estimates can vary greatly with each new discovery. The estimated shape parameters of the tail-truncated method are more stable and larger than those of the log-geometric method where the number of discovered pools is more than 100. Both methods, however, tend to underestimate the shape parameter. Monte Carlo simulation was also used to create sequences of discovered pool sizes by sampling from a Pareto distribution with a discovery process model using a defined exploration efficiency (in order to show how biased the sampling was in favor of larger fields being discovered first). A higher (more biased) exploration efficiency gives better estimates of the Pareto shape parameters. ?? 2011 International Association for Mathematical Geosciences.

  1. STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF SEVEN SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD INTERMEDIATE-AGE AND OLD STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Glatt, Katharina; Grebel, Eva K.; Kayser, Andrea; Gallagher, John S.; Harbeck, Daniel; Nota, Antonella; Sabbi, Elena; Sirianni, Marco; Clementini, Gisella; Tosi, Monica; Da Costa, Gary; Koch, Andreas

    2009-11-15

    We present structural parameters for the seven intermediate-age and old star clusters NGC 121, Lindsay 1, Kron 3, NGC 339, NGC 416, Lindsay 38, and NGC 419 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We fit King profiles and Elson, Fall, and Freeman profiles to both surface-brightness and star-count data taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Clusters older than {approx}1 Gyr show a spread in cluster core radii that increases with age, while the youngest clusters have relatively compact cores. No evidence for post-core-collapse clusters was found. We find no correlation between core radius and distance from the SMC center, although consistent with other studies of dwarf galaxies, some relatively old and massive clusters have low densities. The oldest SMC star cluster, the only globular NGC121, is the most elliptical object of the studied clusters. No correlation is seen between ellipticity and distance from the SMC center. The structures of these massive intermediate-age (1-8 Gyr) SMC star clusters thus appear to primarily result from internal evolutionary processes.

  2. Estimating distribution parameters of annual maximum streamflows in Johor, Malaysia using TL-moments approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Jan, Nur Amalina; Shabri, Ani

    2015-09-01

    TL-moments approach has been used in an analysis to identify the best-fitting distributions to represent the annual series of maximum streamflow data over seven stations in Johor, Malaysia. The TL-moments with different trimming values are used to estimate the parameter of the selected distributions namely: Three-parameter lognormal (LN3) and Pearson Type III (P3) distribution. The main objective of this study is to derive the TL-moments (t 1,0), t 1 = 1,2,3,4 methods for LN3 and P3 distributions. The performance of TL-moments (t 1,0), t 1 = 1,2,3,4 was compared with L-moments through Monte Carlo simulation and streamflow data over a station in Johor, Malaysia. The absolute error is used to test the influence of TL-moments methods on estimated probability distribution functions. From the cases in this study, the results show that TL-moments with four trimmed smallest values from the conceptual sample (TL-moments [4, 0]) of LN3 distribution was the most appropriate in most of the stations of the annual maximum streamflow series in Johor, Malaysia.

  3. Squares of different sizes: effect of geographical projection on model parameter estimates in species distribution modeling.

    PubMed

    Budic, Lara; Didenko, Gregor; Dormann, Carsten F

    2016-01-01

    In species distribution analyses, environmental predictors and distribution data for large spatial extents are often available in long-lat format, such as degree raster grids. Long-lat projections suffer from unequal cell sizes, as a degree of longitude decreases in length from approximately 110 km at the equator to 0 km at the poles. Here we investigate whether long-lat and equal-area projections yield similar model parameter estimates, or result in a consistent bias. We analyzed the environmental effects on the distribution of 12 ungulate species with a northern distribution, as models for these species should display the strongest effect of projectional distortion. Additionally we choose four species with entirely continental distributions to investigate the effect of incomplete cell coverage at the coast. We expected that including model weights proportional to the actual cell area should compensate for the observed bias in model coefficients, and similarly that using land coverage of a cell should decrease bias in species with coastal distribution. As anticipated, model coefficients were different between long-lat and equal-area projections. Having progressively smaller and a higher number of cells with increasing latitude influenced the importance of parameters in models, increased the sample size for the northernmost parts of species ranges, and reduced the subcell variability of those areas. However, this bias could be largely removed by weighting long-lat cells by the area they cover, and marginally by correcting for land coverage. Overall we found little effect of using long-lat rather than equal-area projections in our analysis. The fitted relationship between environmental parameters and occurrence probability differed only very little between the two projection types. We still recommend using equal-area projections to avoid possible bias. More importantly, our results suggest that the cell area and the proportion of a cell covered by land should be

  4. The Sensitivity of Parameter Estimates to the Latent Ability Distribution. Research Report. ETS RR-11-40

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xueli; Jia, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of item response model parameters and ability distribution parameters has been, and will remain, an important topic in the educational testing field. Much research has been dedicated to addressing this task. Some studies have focused on item parameter estimation when the latent ability was assumed to follow a normal distribution,…

  5. NASA Workshop on Distributed Parameter Modeling and Control of Flexible Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, Virginia B. (Compiler); Keckler, Claude R. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Although significant advances have been made in modeling and controlling flexible systems, there remains a need for improvements in model accuracy and in control performance. The finite element models of flexible systems are unduly complex and are almost intractable to optimum parameter estimation for refinement using experimental data. Distributed parameter or continuum modeling offers some advantages and some challenges in both modeling and control. Continuum models often result in a significantly reduced number of model parameters, thereby enabling optimum parameter estimation. The dynamic equations of motion of continuum models provide the advantage of allowing the embedding of the control system dynamics, thus forming a complete set of system dynamics. There is also increased insight provided by the continuum model approach.

  6. Distributions of electric parameters in MOS structures on 3C-SiC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskorski, Krzysztof; Przewlocki, Henryk M.; Esteve, Romain; Bakowski, Mietek

    2013-02-01

    In this work studies of some electrical parameters of the MOS structure based on 3C-SiC substrate are presented. The effective contact potential difference ϕ MS , the barrier height at the gate-dielectric interface E BG and the flat-band in semiconductor voltage V FB were measured using several electric and photoelectric techniques. Values of these parameters obtained on structures with different gate areas decrease monotonically with increasing parameter R, defined as the ratio of the gate perimeter to the gate area. Such behavior confirmed results obtained on MOS structures on silicon substrate and also supported our hypothesis that the mechanical stress in the dielectric layer under the metal gate causes non uniform distribution of some parameters over the gate area of MOS structure.

  7. Distributions of electric parameters in MOS structures on 3C-SiC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskorski, Krzysztof; Przewlocki, Henryk; Esteve, Romain; Bakowski, Mietek

    2013-02-01

    In this work studies of some electrical parameters of the MOS structure based on 3C-SiC substrate are presented. The effective contact potential difference ϕMS, the barrier height at the gate-dielectric interface E BG and the flat-band in semiconductor voltage V FB were measured using several electric and photoelectric techniques. Values of these parameters obtained on structures with different gate areas decrease monotonically with increasing parameter R, defined as the ratio of the gate perimeter to the gate area. Such behavior confirmed results obtained on MOS structures on silicon substrate and also supported our hypothesis that the mechanical stress in the dielectric layer under the metal gate causes non uniform distribution of some parameters over the gate area of MOS structure.

  8. Age-related changes in the distributions of depressive symptom items in the general population: a cross-sectional study using the exponential distribution model

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Yohei; Ide, Kazuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Toshiaki A.; Ono, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous research has reported inconsistent evidence of the trajectory of depressive symptoms across the adult lifespan. We investigated how the distributions of each item score change with age and determined whether the trajectory of depressive symptoms varied with the scoring methods of the questionnaire. Methods. We analyzed data collected from 21,040 subjects who participated in the national survey in Japan. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The CES-D has 20 items, each of which is scored in four grades of “rarely,” “some,” “much,” and “most of the time.” We used the exponential distribution model which fits the distributions of 16 negative symptom items of CES-D, with the probabilities of “some,” “much,” “most,” and “rarely” expressed as P, Pr, Pr2, and 1 − P × (r2 + r + 1). Results. The distributions of the responses to 16 negative symptom items followed the common exponential model across all age groups. The mean of the estimated parameter r of 16 negative items showed a U-shape pattern, being high during 12–29 years, remaining low during 30–50 years, and then increasing again over 60 years. The trajectory of depressive symptom scores simulating the binary method was different from that of the empirical scores using the Likert method. Conclusions. Our findings show that the increase in the depressive symptoms score during older age is based on the increase of the parameter r. The differences in the scoring method may contribute to the different age-related patterns across the adult lifespan. PMID:26788427

  9. Age-related changes in the distributions of depressive symptom items in the general population: a cross-sectional study using the exponential distribution model.

    PubMed

    Tomitaka, Shinichiro; Kawasaki, Yohei; Ide, Kazuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Toshiaki A; Ono, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous research has reported inconsistent evidence of the trajectory of depressive symptoms across the adult lifespan. We investigated how the distributions of each item score change with age and determined whether the trajectory of depressive symptoms varied with the scoring methods of the questionnaire. Methods. We analyzed data collected from 21,040 subjects who participated in the national survey in Japan. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The CES-D has 20 items, each of which is scored in four grades of "rarely," "some," "much," and "most of the time." We used the exponential distribution model which fits the distributions of 16 negative symptom items of CES-D, with the probabilities of "some," "much," "most," and "rarely" expressed as P, Pr, Pr (2), and 1 - P × (r (2) + r + 1). Results. The distributions of the responses to 16 negative symptom items followed the common exponential model across all age groups. The mean of the estimated parameter r of 16 negative items showed a U-shape pattern, being high during 12-29 years, remaining low during 30-50 years, and then increasing again over 60 years. The trajectory of depressive symptom scores simulating the binary method was different from that of the empirical scores using the Likert method. Conclusions. Our findings show that the increase in the depressive symptoms score during older age is based on the increase of the parameter r. The differences in the scoring method may contribute to the different age-related patterns across the adult lifespan. PMID:26788427

  10. Mathematical results new and revisited on the distribution of groundwater age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, T. R.; Massoudieh, A.; Foglia, L.

    2009-12-01

    The equation governing the distribution of groundwater age under transient, 3D flow conditions is analyzed under several simplifying cases to illustrate some relations among groundwater age equations and some results about steady-state and transient age distributions. First linkages are made among the various groundwater age equations recently published, showing them all to be different simplifications of the same equation. The most basic analysis in 1D shows that groundwater age is at lease inverse-Gaussian distributed. More generally, steady state age moments, when they exist, are given by breakthrough curve moments and this allows us to use the temporal moment results from the solute transport literature as steady state age moments. In particular, age moment equations with arbitrary diffusive mass transfer (two-domain, radial microscopic, powerlaw) at steady state are already available as the temporal flux moment equations for solute transport under analogous boundary conditions. Lastly transient simulations of age in 1D are calculated to illustrate several aspects of the evolution of groundwater age distributions in time in the presences of multidomain diffusive transport.

  11. Stochastic parameter estimation in nonlinear time-delayed vibratory systems with distributed delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkamani, Shahab; Butcher, Eric A.

    2013-07-01

    The stochastic estimation of parameters and states in linear and nonlinear time-delayed vibratory systems with distributed delay is explored. The approach consists of first employing a continuous time approximation to approximate the delayed integro-differential system with a large set of ordinary differential equations having stochastic excitations. Then the problem of state and parameter estimation in the resulting stochastic ordinary differential system is represented as an optimal filtering problem using a state augmentation technique. By adapting the extended Kalman-Bucy filter to the augmented filtering problem, the unknown parameters of the time-delayed system are estimated from noise-corrupted, possibly incomplete measurements of the states. Similarly, the upper bound of the distributed delay can also be estimated by the proposed technique. As an illustrative example to a practical problem in vibrations, the parameter, delay upper bound, and state estimation from noise-corrupted measurements in a distributed force model widely used for modeling machine tool vibrations in the turning operation is investigated.

  12. Precipitation classification at mid-latitudes in terms of drop size distribution parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, C.; Porcã¹, F.; Prodi, F.

    2008-04-01

    The drop size distribution (DSD) is a fundamental property of rainfall because the shape of the distribution reflects the physics of rain formation processes. Given the lack of studies on the DSD at mid-latitudes, the present work focuses on the microphysical characterization of precipitation events occurring in Italy, using two different types of disdrometer. A large number of different rain events was collected: they underwent microphysical analysis by computing the Z-R relationships, observing the average DSDs and DSD parameters, fitting the real distribution for different rainfall rate categories and applying convective (C) - stratiform (S) discrimination algorithms. A general agreement with past works at mid-latitudes is found both in the Z-R relationship and in DSD parameters. The rain distribution is well described by a gamma DSD and only in some cases (especially the light rain events) by an exponential DSD. Marked differences are observed in DSD parameters and Z-R relationships between C and S episodes. The use of disdrometers for areas covered by multiparametric radar is suggested and will be performed in the near future.

  13. Sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation for distributed hydrological modeling: potential of variational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaings, W.; Dartus, D.; Le Dimet, F.-X.; Saulnier, G.-M.

    2009-04-01

    Variational methods are widely used for the analysis and control of computationally intensive spatially distributed systems. In particular, the adjoint state method enables a very efficient calculation of the derivatives of an objective function (response function to be analysed or cost function to be optimised) with respect to model inputs. In this contribution, it is shown that the potential of variational methods for distributed catchment scale hydrology should be considered. A distributed flash flood model, coupling kinematic wave overland flow and Green Ampt infiltration, is applied to a small catchment of the Thoré basin and used as a relatively simple (synthetic observations) but didactic application case. It is shown that forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis provide a local but extensive insight on the relation between the assigned model parameters and the simulated hydrological response. Spatially distributed parameter sensitivities can be obtained for a very modest calculation effort (~6 times the computing time of a single model run) and the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the Jacobian matrix provides an interesting perspective for the analysis of the rainfall-runoff relation. For the estimation of model parameters, adjoint-based derivatives were found exceedingly efficient in driving a bound-constrained quasi-Newton algorithm. The reference parameter set is retrieved independently from the optimization initial condition when the very common dimension reduction strategy (i.e. scalar multipliers) is adopted. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis results suggest that most of the variability in this high-dimensional parameter space can be captured with a few orthogonal directions. A parametrization based on the SVD leading singular vectors was found very promising but should be combined with another regularization strategy in order to prevent overfitting.

  14. Excitation functions of parameters in Erlang distribution, Schwinger mechanism, and Tsallis statistics in RHIC BES program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Na; Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental results of the transverse-momentum distributions of φ mesons and Ω hyperons produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) collisions with different centrality intervals, measured by the STAR Collaboration at different energies (7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV) in the beam energy scan (BES) program at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC), are approximately described by the single Erlang distribution and the two-component Schwinger mechanism. Moreover, the STAR experimental transverse-momentum distributions of negatively charged particles, produced in Au-Au collisions at RHIC BES energies, are approximately described by the two-component Erlang distribution and the single Tsallis statistics. The excitation functions of free parameters are obtained from the fit to the experimental data. A weak softest point in the string tension in Ω hyperon spectra is observed at 7.7 GeV.

  15. Numerical approach for the evaluation of Weibull distribution parameters for hydrologic purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierleoni, A.; Di Francesco, S.; Biscarini, C.; Manciola, P.

    2016-06-01

    In hydrology, the statistical description of low flow phenomena is very important in order to evaluate the available water resource especially in a river and the related values can be obviously considered as random variables, therefore probability distributions dealing with extreme values (maximum and/or minimum) of the variable play a fundamental role. Computational procedures for the estimation of the parameters featuring these distributions are actually very useful especially when embedded into analysis software [1][2] or as standalone applications. In this paper a computational procedure for the evaluation of the Weibull[3] distribution is presented focusing on the case when the lower limit of the distribution is not known or not set to a specific value a priori. The procedure takes advantage of the Gumbel[4] moment approach to the problem.

  16. Optimization of hydrological parameters of a distributed runoff model based on multiple flood events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Tsuda, Morimasa; Yamakage, Yuzuru; Iwami, Yoichi; Anai, Hirokazu

    2015-04-01

    The error sources of flood forecasting by a runoff model commonly include input data, model structures, and parameter settings. This study focused on a calibration procedure to minimize errors due to parameter settings. Although many studies have been done on hydrological parameter optimization, they are mostly about individual optimization cases applying a specific optimization technique to a specific flood. Consequently, it is difficult to determine the most appropriate parameter set to make forecasts on future floods, because optimized parameter sets vary by flood type. Thus, this study aimed to develop a comprehensive method for optimizing hydrological parameters of a distributed runoff model for future flood forecasting. A distributed runoff model, PWRI-DHM, was applied to the Gokase River basin of 1,820km2 in Japan in this study. The model with gridded two-layer tanks for the entire target river basin includes hydrological parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, surface roughness and runoff coefficient, which are set according to land-use and soil-type distributions. Global data sets, e.g., Global Map and DSMW (Digital Soil Map of the World), were employed as input data such as elevation, land use and soil type. Thirteen optimization algorithms such as GA, PSO and DEA were carefully selected from seventy-four open-source algorithms available for public use. These algorithms were used with three error assessment functions to calibrate the parameters of the model to each of fifteen past floods in the predetermined search range. Fifteen optimized parameter sets corresponding to the fifteen past floods were determined by selecting the best sets from the calibration results in terms of reproducible accuracy. This process helped eliminate bias due to type of optimization algorithms. Although the calibration results of each parameter were widely distributed in the search range, statistical significance was found in comparisons between the optimized parameters

  17. Angular distribution of cosmological parameters as a probe of space-time inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, C. Sofia; Marques, Katrine

    2016-08-01

    We develop a method based on the angular distribution on the sky of cosmological parameters to probe the inhomogeneity of large-scale structure and cosmic acceleration. We demonstrate this method on the largest type Ia supernova (SN) data set available to date, as compiled by the Joint Light-curve Analysis (JLA) collaboration and, hence, consider the cosmological parameters that affect the luminosity distance. We divide the SN sample into equal surface area pixels and estimate the cosmological parameters that minimize the chi-square of the fit to the distance modulus in each pixel, hence producing maps of the cosmological parameters {ΩM,ΩΛ,H0} . In poorly sampled pixels, the measured fluctuations are mostly due to an inhomogeneous coverage of the sky by the SN surveys; in contrast, in well-sampled pixels, the measurements are robust enough to suggest a real fluctuation. We also measure the anisotropy of the parameters by computing the power spectrum of the corresponding maps of the parameters up to ℓ = 3. For an analytical toy model of an inhomogeneous ensemble of homogeneous pixels, we derive the backreaction term in the deceleration parameter due to the fluctuations of H0 across the sky and measure it to be of order 10-3 times the corresponding average over the pixels in the absence of backreaction. We conclude that, for the toy model considered, backreaction is not a viable dynamical mechanism to emulate cosmic acceleration.

  18. Tsunami source parameters estimated from slip distribution and their relation to tsunami intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakova, Anna; Nosov, Mikhail; Kolesov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    Estimation of the level of tsunami hazard on the basis of earthquake moment magnitude often fails. The most important reason for this is that tsunamis are related to earthquakes in a complex and ambiguous way. In order to reveal a measure of tsunamigenic potential of an earthquake that would be better than moment magnitude of earthquake we introduce a set of tsunami source parameters that can be calculated from co-seismic ocean-bottom deformation and bathymetry. We consider more than two hundred ocean-bottom earthquakes (1923-2014) those for which detailed slip distribution data (Finite Fault Model) are available on USGS, UCSB, Caltech, and eQuake-RC sites. Making use of the Okada formulae the vector fields of co-seismic deformation of ocean bottom are estimated from the slip distribution data. Taking into account bathymetry (GEBCO_08) we determine tsunami source parameters such as double amplitude of bottom deformation, displaced water volume, potential energy of initial elevation, etc. The tsunami source parameters are examined as a function of earthquake moment magnitude. The contribution of horisontal component of ocean bottom deformation to tsunami generation is investigated. We analyse the Soloviev-Imamura tsunami intensity as a function of tsunami source parameters. The possibility of usage of tsunami source parameters instead of moment magnitude in tsunami warning is discussed. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project 14-05-31295

  19. [Distribution of the different patterns of aging over the system of animal world].

    PubMed

    Popov, I Iu

    2011-01-01

    Since the system of animal world reflects evolutionary trends, an analysis of distribution of patterns of aging over this system provides information on the causes of the formation of differences among them. In this paper the system of the main animal groups in form of a table is presented, and the distribution of patterns demonstrating minimum and maximum of aging is discussed. Meanwhile the colonial animals are considered as a "minimum of aging", the animals demonstrating drastic self-liquidation after reproduction are considered as a "maximum of aging" (the most well-known example is the pink salmon). It is shown, that as far as the degree of difference from the simplest ancestor increases in process of evolution, the increase of the manifestations of aging takes place. Slow aging of relatively simple organisms cannot be a direct source of measures to prevent aging of complex ones. PMID:21957572

  20. Focusing surface plasmon polaritons and detecting Stokes parameters utilizing nanoslits distributed plasmonic lenses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian; Yuan, Haiming; Yang, Hanning; Li, Siren; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-04-01

    A method to detect the full Stokes parameters utilizing a double-ring and Archimedes-curves distributed nanoslits plasmonic lenses is proposed. We demonstrate theoretically and numerically that both of these two plasmonic lenses can focus surface plasmon polaritons to centrally symmetric fields with subwavelength-sized focal spots under linear, elliptical, and circular polarization incidence. The intensity at the focal spots is modulated by the polarization state of incident light. Utilizing this intensity polarization sensitivity, the full Stokes parameters of incident light are detected by recoding only four intensities at the focal spots of these two plasmonic lenses. PMID:27192318

  1. SAC-SMA a priori parameter differences and their impact on distributed hydrologic model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziya; Koren, Victor; Reed, Seann; Smith, Michael; Zhang, Yu; Moreda, Fekadu; Cosgrove, Brian

    2012-02-01

    SummaryDeriving a priori gridded parameters is an important step in the development and deployment of an operational distributed hydrologic model. Accurate a priori parameters can reduce the manual calibration effort and/or speed up the automatic calibration process, reduce calibration uncertainty, and provide valuable information at ungauged locations. Underpinned by reasonable parameter data sets, distributed hydrologic modeling can help improve water resource and flood and flash flood forecasting capabilities. Initial efforts at the National Weather Service Office of Hydrologic Development (NWS OHD) to derive a priori gridded Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model parameters for the conterminous United States (CONUS) were based on a relatively coarse resolution soils property database, the State Soil Geographic Database (STATSGO) (Soil Survey Staff, 2011) and on the assumption of uniform land use and land cover. In an effort to improve the parameters, subsequent work was performed to fully incorporate spatially variable land cover information into the parameter derivation process. Following that, finer-scale soils data (the county-level Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO) ( Soil Survey Staff, 2011a,b), together with the use of variable land cover data, were used to derive a third set of CONUS, a priori gridded parameters. It is anticipated that the second and third parameter sets, which incorporate more physical data, will be more realistic and consistent. Here, we evaluate whether this is actually the case by intercomparing these three sets of a priori parameters along with their associated hydrologic simulations which were generated by applying the National Weather Service Hydrology Laboratory's Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (HL-RDHM) ( Koren et al., 2004) in a continuous fashion with an hourly time step. This model adopts a well-tested conceptual water balance model, SAC-SMA, applied on a regular spatial grid, and links to physically

  2. Mind the gap: the distributional effects of raising the early eligibility age and full retirement age.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Anya

    2012-01-01

    Policymakers have proposed increases to the early eligibility age (EEA) and/or full retirement age (FRA) to address increasing life expectancy and Social Security solvency issues. This analysis uses the Social Security Administration's Modeling Income in the Near Term, version 6 (MINT6) model to compare three retirement-age increases suggested by the Social Security Advisory Board: increase the gap between the EEA and FRA by raising only the FRA, increase both the EEA and FRA to maintain a 4-year gap between them, and increase both the EEA and FRA to maintain a 5-year gap between them. Although all three options would improve system solvency by similar proportions, their effect on individual beneficiaries in the future would vary. Benefit reductions are greater under the proposals with more months between the EEA and FRA, while the option that maintains a 4-year gap results in benefit increases for some beneficiaries compared with current law. PMID:23397744

  3. Collisionless relaxation of non-gyrotropic downstream ion distributions: dependence on shock parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedalin, M.

    2015-12-01

    > Upon crossing the shock front, ions begin to gyrate. The ion distribution just behind the ramp is manifestly non-gyrotropic. The gyration of the ion distribution as a whole results in spatially periodic oscillations of the ion pressure. The magnetic pressure must oscillate in the opposite phase to ensure the maintenance of the pressure balance throughout the shock front. The ion non-gyrotropy and the pressure oscillations gradually damp due to the collisionless gyrophase mixing. The rate of this relaxation depends on the basic shock parameters. The most influential are the angle between the shock normal and the magnetic field, the upstream ion temperature and the magnetic compression.

  4. Spatial measurements of electron energy distribution and plasma parameters in a weakly magnetized inductive discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Do; Lee, Young-Kwang; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-02-15

    Spatial characteristics of plasma parameters such as electron temperature, plasma density, plasma potential, and electron energy distribution (EED) were studied in inductively coupled plasma with an axial dc magnetic field. With dc magnetic field, the measured EEDs in the total electron energy scale are spatially coincided except cutting of the low electron energy part indicating the conserved non-local electron kinetics in an axial direction, even though the dc magnetic field is applied. Spatial distributions of the plasma densities at axial positions have almost same trends with various magnetic field strengths. We also discuss the reduction of the ambipolar potential along the axial direction as the applied magnetic field increased.

  5. Statistical study of chorus wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere using Ae and solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryan, Homayon; Yearby, Keith; Balikhin, Michael; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Boynton, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Energetic electrons within the Earth's radiation belts represent a serious hazard to geostationary satellites. The interactions of electrons with chorus waves play an important role in both the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons. The common approach is to present model wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere under different values of geomagnetic activity as expressed by the geomagnetic indices. However, it has been shown that only around 50% of geomagnetic storms increase flux of relativistic electrons at geostationary orbit while 20% causes a decrease and the remaining 30% has relatively no effect. This emphasizes the importance of including solar wind parameters such as bulk velocity (V), density (n), flow pressure (P), and the vertical interplanetary magnetic field component (Bz) that are known to be predominately effective in the control of high energy fluxes at the geostationary orbit. Therefore, in the present study the set of parameters of the wave distributions is expanded to include the solar wind parameters in addition to the geomagnetic activity. The present study examines almost 4 years (1 January 2004 to 29 September 2007) of Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuation data from Double Star TC1 combined with geomagnetic indices and solar wind parameters from OMNI database in order to present a comprehensive model of wave magnetic field intensities for the chorus waves as a function of magnetic local time, L shell (L), magnetic latitude (λm), geomagnetic activity, and solar wind parameters. Generally, the results indicate that the intensity of chorus emission is not only dependent upon geomagnetic activity but also dependent on solar wind parameters with velocity and southward interplanetary magnetic field Bs (Bz < 0), evidently the most influential solar wind parameters. The largest peak chorus intensities in the order of 50 pT are observed during active conditions, high solar wind velocities, low solar wind densities, high

  6. Age-distribution estimation for karst groundwater: Issues of parameterization and complexity in inverse modeling by convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Andrew J.; Putnam, Larry D.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryConvolution modeling is useful for investigating the temporal distribution of groundwater age based on environmental tracers. The framework of a quasi-transient convolution model that is applicable to two-domain flow in karst aquifers is presented. The model was designed to provide an acceptable level of statistical confidence in parameter estimates when only chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and tritium ( 3H) data are available. We show how inverse modeling and uncertainty assessment can be used to constrain model parameterization to a level warranted by available data while allowing major aspects of the flow system to be examined. As an example, the model was applied to water from a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in central USA with input functions of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and 3H, and was calibrated to several samples collected during a 16-year period. A bimodal age distribution was modeled to represent quick and slow flow less than 50 years old. The effects of pumping and hydraulic head on the relative volumetric fractions of these domains were found to be influential factors for transient flow. Quick flow and slow flow were estimated to be distributed mainly within the age ranges of 0-2 and 26-41 years, respectively. The fraction of long-term flow (>50 years) was estimated but was not dateable. The different tracers had different degrees of influence on parameter estimation and uncertainty assessments, where 3H was the most critical, and CFC-113 was least influential.

  7. Age-distribution estimation for karst groundwater: Issues of parameterization and complexity in inverse modeling by convolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Putnam, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    Convolution modeling is useful for investigating the temporal distribution of groundwater age based on environmental tracers. The framework of a quasi-transient convolution model that is applicable to two-domain flow in karst aquifers is presented. The model was designed to provide an acceptable level of statistical confidence in parameter estimates when only chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and tritium (3H) data are available. We show how inverse modeling and uncertainty assessment can be used to constrain model parameterization to a level warranted by available data while allowing major aspects of the flow system to be examined. As an example, the model was applied to water from a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in central USA with input functions of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and 3H, and was calibrated to several samples collected during a 16-year period. A bimodal age distribution was modeled to represent quick and slow flow less than 50 years old. The effects of pumping and hydraulic head on the relative volumetric fractions of these domains were found to be influential factors for transient flow. Quick flow and slow flow were estimated to be distributed mainly within the age ranges of 0-2 and 26-41 years, respectively. The fraction of long-term flow (>50 years) was estimated but was not dateable. The different tracers had different degrees of influence on parameter estimation and uncertainty assessments, where 3H was the most critical, and CFC-113 was least influential.

  8. Lower bound on reliability for Weibull distribution when shape parameter is not estimated accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhaofeng; Porter, Albert A.

    1991-01-01

    The mathematical relationships between the shape parameter Beta and estimates of reliability and a life limit lower bound for the two parameter Weibull distribution are investigated. It is shown that under rather general conditions, both the reliability lower bound and the allowable life limit lower bound (often called a tolerance limit) have unique global minimums over a range of Beta. Hence lower bound solutions can be obtained without assuming or estimating Beta. The existence and uniqueness of these lower bounds are proven. Some real data examples are given to show how these lower bounds can be easily established and to demonstrate their practicality. The method developed here has proven to be extremely useful when using the Weibull distribution in analysis of no-failure or few-failures data. The results are applicable not only in the aerospace industry but anywhere that system reliabilities are high.

  9. Lower bound on reliability for Weibull distribution when shape parameter is not estimated accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhaofeng; Porter, Albert A.

    1990-01-01

    The mathematical relationships between the shape parameter Beta and estimates of reliability and a life limit lower bound for the two parameter Weibull distribution are investigated. It is shown that under rather general conditions, both the reliability lower bound and the allowable life limit lower bound (often called a tolerance limit) have unique global minimums over a range of Beta. Hence lower bound solutions can be obtained without assuming or estimating Beta. The existence and uniqueness of these lower bounds are proven. Some real data examples are given to show how these lower bounds can be easily established and to demonstrate their practicality. The method developed here has proven to be extremely useful when using the Weibull distribution in analysis of no-failure or few-failures data. The results are applicable not only in the aerospace industry but anywhere that system reliabilities are high.

  10. Effects of Forest Bathing on Cardiovascular and Metabolic Parameters in Middle-Aged Males

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Maiko; Kumeda, Shigeyoshi; Ochiai, Toshiya; Miura, Takashi; Imai, Michiko; Wang, Zhiyu; Otsuka, Toshiaki; Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of a forest bathing on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters. Nineteen middle-aged male subjects were selected after they provided informed consent. These subjects took day trips to a forest park in Agematsu, Nagano Prefecture, and to an urban area of Nagano Prefecture as control in August 2015. On both trips, they walked 2.6 km for 80 min each in the morning and afternoon on Saturdays. Blood and urine were sampled before and after each trip. Cardiovascular and metabolic parameters were measured. Blood pressure and pulse rate were measured during the trips. The Japanese version of the profile of mood states (POMS) test was conducted before, during, and after the trips. Ambient temperature and humidity were monitored during the trips. The forest bathing program significantly reduced pulse rate and significantly increased the score for vigor and decreased the scores for depression, fatigue, anxiety, and confusion. Urinary adrenaline after forest bathing showed a tendency toward decrease. Urinary dopamine after forest bathing was significantly lower than that after urban area walking, suggesting the relaxing effect of the forest bathing. Serum adiponectin after the forest bathing was significantly greater than that after urban area walking. PMID:27493670

  11. Effects of Forest Bathing on Cardiovascular and Metabolic Parameters in Middle-Aged Males.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Kobayashi, Maiko; Kumeda, Shigeyoshi; Ochiai, Toshiya; Miura, Takashi; Kagawa, Takahide; Imai, Michiko; Wang, Zhiyu; Otsuka, Toshiaki; Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of a forest bathing on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters. Nineteen middle-aged male subjects were selected after they provided informed consent. These subjects took day trips to a forest park in Agematsu, Nagano Prefecture, and to an urban area of Nagano Prefecture as control in August 2015. On both trips, they walked 2.6 km for 80 min each in the morning and afternoon on Saturdays. Blood and urine were sampled before and after each trip. Cardiovascular and metabolic parameters were measured. Blood pressure and pulse rate were measured during the trips. The Japanese version of the profile of mood states (POMS) test was conducted before, during, and after the trips. Ambient temperature and humidity were monitored during the trips. The forest bathing program significantly reduced pulse rate and significantly increased the score for vigor and decreased the scores for depression, fatigue, anxiety, and confusion. Urinary adrenaline after forest bathing showed a tendency toward decrease. Urinary dopamine after forest bathing was significantly lower than that after urban area walking, suggesting the relaxing effect of the forest bathing. Serum adiponectin after the forest bathing was significantly greater than that after urban area walking. PMID:27493670

  12. On the design derivatives of eigenvalues and eigenvectors for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, R.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, analytic expressions are obtained for the design derivatives of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of self-adjoint linear distributed parameter systems. Explicit treatment of boundary conditions is avoided by casting the eigenvalue equation into integral form. Results are expressed in terms of the linear operators defining the eigenvalue problem, and are therefore quite general. Sufficiency conditions appropriate to structural optimization of eigenvalues are obtained.

  13. Pseudorational Impulse Responses — Algebraic System Theory for Distributed Parameter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yutaka

    This paper gives a comprehensive account on a class of distributed parameter systems, whose impulse response is called pseudorational. This notion was introduced by the author in 1980's, and is particularly amenable for the study of systems with bounded-time memory. We emphasize algebraic structures induced by this class of systems. Some recent results on coprimeness issues and H∞ control are discussed and illustrated.

  14. Reconstruction of air-shower parameters for large-scale radio detectors using the lateral distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostunin, D.; Bezyazeekov, P. A.; Hiller, R.; Schröder, F. G.; Lenok, V.; Levinson, E.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate features of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of the radio signal emitted by cosmic ray air-showers with primary energies Epr > 0.1 EeV and its connection to air-shower parameters such as energy and shower maximum using CoREAS simulations made for the configuration of the Tunka-Rex antenna array. Taking into account all significant contributions to the total radio emission, such as by the geomagnetic effect, the charge excess, and the atmospheric refraction we parameterize the radio LDF. This parameterization is two-dimensional and has several free parameters. The large number of free parameters is not suitable for experiments of sparse arrays operating at low SNR (signal-to-noise ratios). Thus, exploiting symmetries, we decrease the number of free parameters based on the shower geometry and reduce the LDF to a simple one-dimensional function. The remaining parameters can be fit with a small number of points, i.e. as few as the signal from three antennas above detection threshold. Finally, we present a method for the reconstruction of air-shower parameters, in particular, energy and Xmax (shower maximum), which can be reached with a theoretical accuracy of better than 15% and 30 g/cm2, respectively.

  15. Paleoclimate signals and age distributions from 41 public water works in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broers, Hans Peter; de Weert, Jasperien; Sueltenfuss, Juergen; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Vonhof, Hubert; Casteleijns, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    Knowing the age distribution of water abstracted from public water supply wells is of prime importance to ensure customer trust and to underpin predictions of water quality evolution in time. Especially, age distributions enable the assessment of the vulnerability of well fields, both in relation to surface sources of contamination as in relation to subsurface sources, such as possibly related to shale gas extraction. We sampled the raw water of 41 large public supply well fields which represents a mixture of groundwaters and used the a discrete travel time distribution model (DTTDM, Visser et al. 2013, WRR) in order to quantify the age distribution of the mixture. Measurements included major ion chemistry, 3H, 3He, 4He, 18O, 2H, 14C, 13CDIC and 13CCH4 and the full range of noble gases. The heavier noble gases enable the calculation of the Noble Gas Temperature (NGT) which characterizes the temperature of past recharge conditions. The 14C apparent age of each mixture was derived correcting for dead carbon sources and included carbonate dissolution and methanogenesis as the defining processes. The DTTDM used the 3H and 4He concentrations, the 14C apparent age and the NGT as the four distinctive tracers to estimate the age distributions. The use of 18O was less effective because the processes that led to more enriched values are too uncertain . Especially 4He and NGT provide extra information on the older part of the age distributions and showed that the 14C apparent ages are often the result of mixing of waters ranging between 2.000 and 35.000 years old, instead of being discrete ages with a limited .variance as sometimes assumed. The results show a large range of age distributions, comprising vulnerable well fields with >60% young water (< 100 yrs) and well-protected well fields with >85% very old groundwater (> 25 kyrs) and all forms of TTD's in between. The age distributions are well in correspondence with the hydrogeological setting of the well fields; all well

  16. Paleoclimate Signals and Age Distributions from 41 Public Water Works in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broers, H. P.; Weert, J. D.; Sültenfuß, J.; Aeschbach, W.; Vonhof, H.; Casteleijns, J.

    2015-12-01

    Knowing the age distribution of water abstracted from public water supply wells is of prime importance to ensure customer trust and to underpin predictions of water quality evolution in time. Especially, age distributions enable the assessment of the vulnerability of well fields, both in relation to surface sources of contamination as in relation to subsurface sources, such as possibly related to shale gas extraction. We sampled the raw water of 41 large public supply well fields which represents a mixture of groundwaters and used the a discrete travel time distribution model (DTTDM, Visser et al. 2013, WRR) in order to quantify the age distribution of the mixture. Measurements included major ion chemistry, 3H, 3He, 4He, 18O, 2H, 14C, 13CDIC and 13CCH4 and the full range of noble gases. The heavier noble gases enable the calculation of the Noble Gas Temperature (NGT) which characterizes the temperature of past recharge conditions. The 14C apparent age of each mixture was derived correcting for dead carbon sources. The DTTDM used the 3H and 4He concentrations, the 14C apparent age and the NGT as the four distinctive tracers to estimate the age distributions. Especially 4He and NGT provide extra information on the older part of the age distributions and showed that the 14C apparent ages are often the result of mixing of waters ranging between 2.000 and 35.000 years old, instead of being discrete ages with a limited .variance as sometimes assumed.The results show a large range of age distributions, comprising vulnerable well fields with >60% young water (< 100 yrs) and well-protected well fields with >85% very old groundwater (> 25 kyrs) and all forms of TTD's in between. The age distributions are well in correspondence with the hydrogeological setting of the well fields; all well fields with an age distribution skewed towards older ages are in the Roer Valley Graben structure, where fluvial and marine aquitards provide protection from recent recharge. Especially

  17. Different Estimation Procedures for the Parameters of the Extended Exponential Geometric Distribution for Medical Data.

    PubMed

    Louzada, Francisco; Ramos, Pedro L; Perdoná, Gleici S C

    2016-01-01

    We have considered different estimation procedures for the unknown parameters of the extended exponential geometric distribution. We introduce different types of estimators such as the maximum likelihood, method of moments, modified moments, L-moments, ordinary and weighted least squares, percentile, maximum product of spacings, and minimum distance estimators. The different estimators are compared by using extensive numerical simulations. We discovered that the maximum product of spacings estimator has the smallest mean square errors and mean relative estimates, nearest to one, for both parameters, proving to be the most efficient method compared to other methods. Combining these results with the good properties of the method such as consistency, asymptotic efficiency, normality, and invariance we conclude that the maximum product of spacings estimator is the best one for estimating the parameters of the extended exponential geometric distribution in comparison with its competitors. For the sake of illustration, we apply our proposed methodology in two important data sets, demonstrating that the EEG distribution is a simple alternative to be used for lifetime data. PMID:27579052

  18. Shape parameters and distribution of macroborings: St. Croix, US Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.B.

    1983-03-01

    Many marine invertebrates that inhabit coral reefs excavate the coral substrate in order to create protective domiciles. In turn, the organisms comprising the coral-reef community display a pronounced biotic zonation that can be closely correlated to bathymetry. This study considers the distribution of these endolithic organisms covering a variety of reef habitats. Vast differences in the major environmental parameters have a profound effect upon the distribution patterns of macroboring organisms and govern the boring morphologies. Of these parameters, hydraulic energy has the strongest influences on the morphotypes and distributions of the macroborings. An equivalent macroboring assemblage dominated by sponges and bivalves prevails in both the shallow back-reef zone and the deep fore-reef zone, both of which are low-energy settings. Boring assemblages in more turbulent zones within the reef consist of polychaete and sipunculid worms, sea urchins, and barnacles, with sponges and bivalves less dominant and less abundant. Other environmental factors which may be important locally include: nutrient availability, photic energy, sediment size and sedimentation rate, competition for substrate, and predation pressure upon the live coral tissue. Shape parameters for different boring types are provided as a means of identification and as an indication of the environmental control upon boring shape. An understanding of the variability of boring types with respect to the ambient environment within modern reefs facilitates the use of borings as paleoenvironmental indicators within Cenozoic carbonate systems.

  19. An alternating direction algorithm for total variation reconstruction of distributed parameters.

    PubMed

    Brás, Nuno B; Bioucas-Dias, J; Martins, Raul C; Serra, A C

    2012-06-01

    Augmented Lagrangian variational formulations and alternating optimization have been adopted to solve distributed parameter estimation problems. The alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) is one of such formulations/optimization methods. Very recently, the number of applications of the ADMM, or variants of it, to solve inverse problems in image and signal processing has increased at an exponential rate. The reason for this interest is that ADMM decomposes a difficult optimization problem into a sequence of much simpler problems. In this paper, we use the ADMM to reconstruct piecewise-smooth distributed parameters of elliptical partial differential equations from noisy and linear (blurred) observations of the underlying field. The distributed parameters are estimated by solving an inverse problem with total variation (TV) regularization. The proposed instance of the ADMM solves, in each iteration, an l(2) and a decoupled l(2) - l(1) optimization problems. An operator splitting is used to simplify the treatment of the TV regularizer, avoiding its smooth approximation and yielding a simple yet effective ADMM reconstruction method compared with previously proposed approaches. The competitiveness of the proposed method, with respect to the state-of-the-art, is illustrated in simulated 1-D and 2-D elliptical equation problems, which are representative of many real applications. PMID:22345538

  20. Different Estimation Procedures for the Parameters of the Extended Exponential Geometric Distribution for Medical Data

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Pedro L.; Perdoná, Gleici S. C.

    2016-01-01

    We have considered different estimation procedures for the unknown parameters of the extended exponential geometric distribution. We introduce different types of estimators such as the maximum likelihood, method of moments, modified moments, L-moments, ordinary and weighted least squares, percentile, maximum product of spacings, and minimum distance estimators. The different estimators are compared by using extensive numerical simulations. We discovered that the maximum product of spacings estimator has the smallest mean square errors and mean relative estimates, nearest to one, for both parameters, proving to be the most efficient method compared to other methods. Combining these results with the good properties of the method such as consistency, asymptotic efficiency, normality, and invariance we conclude that the maximum product of spacings estimator is the best one for estimating the parameters of the extended exponential geometric distribution in comparison with its competitors. For the sake of illustration, we apply our proposed methodology in two important data sets, demonstrating that the EEG distribution is a simple alternative to be used for lifetime data.

  1. Improving flash flood forecasting with distributed hydrological model by parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangbo

    2016-04-01

    In China, flash food is usually regarded as flood occured in small and medium sized watersheds with drainage area less than 200 km2, and is mainly induced by heavy rains, and occurs in where hydrological observation is lacked. Flash flood is widely observed in China, and is the flood causing the most casualties nowadays in China. Due to hydrological data scarcity, lumped hydrological model is difficult to be employed for flash flood forecasting which requires lots of observed hydrological data to calibrate model parameters. Physically based distributed hydrological model discrete the terrain of the whole watershed into a number of grid cells at fine resolution, assimilate different terrain data and precipitation to different cells, and derive model parameteris from the terrain properties, thus having the potential to be used in flash flood forecasting and improving flash flood prediction capability. In this study, the Liuxihe Model, a physically based distributed hydrological model mainly proposed for watershed flood forecasting is employed to simulate flash floods in the Ganzhou area in southeast China, and models have been set up in 5 watersheds. Model parameters have been derived from the terrain properties including the DEM, the soil type and land use type, but the result shows that the flood simulation uncertainty is high, which may be caused by parameter uncertainty, and some kind of uncertainty control is needed before the model could be used in real-time flash flood forecastin. Considering currently many Chinese small and medium sized watersheds has set up hydrological observation network, and a few flood events could be collected, it may be used for model parameter optimization. For this reason, an automatic model parameter optimization algorithm using Particle Swam Optimization(PSO) is developed to optimize the model parameters, and it has been found that model parameters optimized even only with one observed flood events could largely reduce the flood

  2. Development of a distributed-parameter mathematical model for simulation of cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A one-dimensional distributed-parameter dynamic model of a cryogenic wind tunnel was developed which accounts for internal and external heat transfer, viscous momentum losses, and slotted-test-section dynamics. Boundary conditions imposed by liquid-nitrogen injection, gas venting, and the tunnel fan were included. A time-dependent numerical solution to the resultant set of partial differential equations was obtained on a CDC CYBER 203 vector-processing digital computer at a usable computational rate. Preliminary computational studies were performed by using parameters of the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Studies were performed by using parameters from the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The NTF wind-tunnel model was used in the design of control loops for Mach number, total temperature, and total pressure and for determining interactions between the control loops. It was employed in the application of optimal linear-regulator theory and eigenvalue-placement techniques to develop Mach number control laws.

  3. EFFECTS OF MIXING AND AGING ON WATER QUALITY IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM STORAGE FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging of water in distribution system storage facilities can lead to deterioration of the water quality due to loss of disinfectant residual and bacterial regrowth. Facilities should be operated to insure that the age of the water is not excessive taking into account the quality...

  4. Hematite and Goethite (U-Th)/He/Ne ages interpretation using crystallographic data and diffusion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautheron, Cécile; Balout, Hilal; Roques, Jérôme; Allard, Thierry; Morin, Guillaume; Tassan-Got, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    At the Earth's surface, hematite and goethite are common minerals occurring in soils and sediments, including ores. The understanding of the corresponding alteration and weathering processes relies on our ability to perform the dating of formation of these minerals. Two relevant and recent dating methods have been developed, which are related to (U-Th)/He and (U-Th)/Ne geochronometers. They are based on accumulation of 4He and 21Ne associated with the alpha decay of U and Th. Both methods are of particular interest because of possible He and Ne retention over geological ages at surface temperature. However, because of different atomic radius between He and Ne, retention behavior of these two species can be quite different. Moreover, the dating procedure is particularly challenging because of the small crystals size and frequent polycrystalline structure of hematite and goethite. As a matter of fact, some uncertainty exists about He and Ne diffusion parameters, due to the nanometric to micrometric crystal size of natural iron oxide mineral. Accordingly, the determination of (U-Th)/He and (U-Th)/Ne ages requires the understanding of He and Ne production and retention (which may be partial) in iron oxide crystals. In this study, we theoretically investigate and discuss for the first time the age evolution for pure goethite and hematite crystals with different thermal histories, including reheating to simulate burial. The aim is to quantify the He and/or Ne loss by ejection and diffusion for crystals of different morphology and polycrystalline structures. This will allow one to provide some correction factor for the age. For this purpose, we used new He and Ne diffusion coefficients obtained by multi-scale theoretical approach using Density Functional Theory (DFT) (Balout et al., submitted, a,b), associated with 3D production and diffusion code (Gautheron and Tassan-Got, 2010). The impact of Multi Diffusion Domains simulating polycrystalline structure has been

  5. An analysis of the size distribution of Italian firms by age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, Pasquale

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we analyze the size distribution of Italian firms by age. In other words, we want to establish whether the way that the size of firms is distributed varies as firms become old. As a proxy of size we use capital. In [L.M.B. Cabral, J. Mata, On the evolution of the firm size distribution: Facts and theory, American Economic Review 93 (2003) 1075-1090], the authors study the distribution of Portuguese firms and they find out that, while the size distribution of all firms is fairly stable over time, the distributions of firms by age groups are appreciably different. In particular, as the age of the firms increases, their size distribution on the log scale shifts to the right, the left tails becomes thinner and the right tail thicker, with a clear decrease of the skewness. In this paper, we perform a similar analysis with Italian firms using the CEBI database, also considering firms’ growth rates. Although there are several papers dealing with Italian firms and their size distribution, to our knowledge a similar study concerning size and age has not been performed yet for Italy, especially with such a big panel.

  6. PATTERNS OF ROOT GROWTH, TURNOVER, AND DISTRIBUTION IN DIFFERENT AGED PONDEROSA PINE STANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study are to examine the spatial distribution of roots in relation to canopy size and tree distribution, and to determine if rates of fine root production and turnover are similar in the different aged stands. During the fall of 1998, 54 clear plexiglass t...

  7. Past and present seafloor age distributions and the temporal evolution of plate tectonic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Thorsten W.; Conrad, Clinton P.; Buffett, Bruce; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2009-02-01

    Variations in Earth's rates of seafloor generation and recycling have far-reaching consequences for sea level, ocean chemistry, and climate. However, there is little agreement on the correct parameterization for the time-dependent evolution of plate motions. A strong constraint is given by seafloor age distributions, which are affected by variations in average spreading rate, ridge length, and the age distribution of seafloor being removed by subduction. Using a simplified evolution model, we explore which physical parameterizations of these quantities are compatible with broad trends in the area per seafloor age statistics for the present-day and back to 140 Ma from paleo-age reconstructions. We show that a probability of subduction based on plate buoyancy (slab-pull, or "sqrt(age)") and a time-varying spreading rate fits the observed age distributions as well as, or better than, a subduction probability consistent with an unvarying "triangular" age distribution and age-independent destruction of ocean floor. Instead, we interpret the present near-triangular distribution of ages as a snapshot of a transient state of the evolving oceanic plate system. Current seafloor ages still contain hints of a ˜ 60 Myr periodicity in seafloor production, and using paleoages, we find that a ˜ 250 Myr period variation is consistent with geologically-based reconstructions of production rate variations. These long-period variations also imply a decrease of oceanic heat flow by ˜ - 0.25%/Ma during the last 140 Ma, caused by a 25-50% decrease in the rate of seafloor production. Our study offers an improved understanding of the non-uniformitarian evolution of plate tectonics and the interplay between continental cycles and the self-organization of the oceanic plates.

  8. A theory of the cancer age-specific incidence data based on extreme value distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Ortiz, Luis; Brody, James P.

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of cancers varies with age, if normalized this is called the age-specific incidence. A mathematical model that describes this variation should provide a better understanding of how cancers develop. We suggest that the age-specific incidence should follow an extreme value distribution, based on three widely accepted assumptions: (1) a tumor develops from a single cell, (2) many potential tumor progenitor cells exist in a tissue, and (3) cancer is diagnosed when the first of these many potential tumor cells develops into a tumor. We tested this by comparing the predicted distribution to the age-specific incidence data for colon and prostate carcinomas collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results network of 17 cancer registries. We found that colon carcinoma age-specific incidence data is consistent with an extreme value distribution, while prostate carcinomas age-specific incidence data generally follows the distribution. This model indicates that both colon and prostate carcinomas only occur in a subset of the population (22% for prostate and 13.5% for colon.) Because of their very general nature, extreme value distributions might be applicable to understanding other chronic human diseases.

  9. Uranium distribution and 'excessive' U-He ages in iron meteoritic troilite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D. E.

    1985-03-01

    Fission tracking techniques were used to measure the uranium distribution in meteoritic troilite and graphite. The obtained fission tracking data showed a heterogeneous distribution of tracks with a significant portion of track density present in the form of uranium clusters at least 10 microns in size. The matrix containing the clusters was also heterogeneous in composition with U concentrations of about 0.2-4.7 ppb. U/He ages could not be estimated on the basis of the heterogeneous U distributions, so previously reported estimates of U/He ages in the presolar range are probably invalid.

  10. Uranium distribution and 'excessive' U-He ages in iron meteoritic troilite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Fission tracking techniques were used to measure the uranium distribution in meteoritic troilite and graphite. The obtained fission tracking data showed a heterogeneous distribution of tracks with a significant portion of track density present in the form of uranium clusters at least 10 microns in size. The matrix containing the clusters was also heterogeneous in composition with U concentrations of about 0.2-4.7 ppb. U/He ages could not be estimated on the basis of the heterogeneous U distributions, so previously reported estimates of U/He ages in the presolar range are probably invalid.

  11. Nonlinear and distributed parameter models of the mini-mast truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Large spacecraft such as Space Station Freedom employ large trusses in their construction. The structural dynamics of such trusses often exhibit nonlinear behavior and little damping which can impact significantly the performance of control systems. The Mini-MAST truss was constructed to research such structural dynamics and control systems. The Mini-MAST truss is an object of study for the guest investigator program as part of NASA's controls-structures interaction program. The Mini-MAST truss is deployable and about 65 ft long. Although the bending characteristics of the Mini-MAST truss are essentially linear, the angular deflection under torsional loading has exhibited significant hysteresis and nonlinear stiffness. It is the purpose to develop nonlinear and distributed parameter models of the truss and to compare the model dynamics with actual measurements. Distributed parameter models have the advantage of requiring fewer model parameters. A tangent function is used to describe the nonlinear stiffness in torsion, partly because of the convenience of its easily expressed inverse. Hysteretic slip elements are introduced and extended to a continuum to account for the observed hysteresis in torsion. The contribution of slipping to the structural damping is analyzed and found to be strongly dependent on the applied loads. Because of the many factors which affect the damping and stiffness in a truss, it is risky to assume linearity.

  12. An evaluation of earthquake hazard parameters in the Iranian Plateau based on the Gumbel III distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hiwa; Bayrak, Yusuf

    2016-04-01

    The Gumbel's third asymptotic distribution (GIII) of the extreme value method is employed to evaluate the earthquake hazard parameters in the Iranian Plateau. This research quantifies spatial mapping of earthquake hazard parameters like annual and 100-year mode beside their 90 % probability of not being exceeded (NBE) in the Iranian Plateau. Therefore, we used a homogeneous and complete earthquake catalogue during the period 1900-2013 with magnitude M w ≥ 4.0, and the Iranian Plateau is separated into equal area mesh of 1° late × 1° long. The estimated result of annual mode with 90 % probability of NBE is expected to exceed the values of M w 6.0 in the Eastern part of Makran, most parts of Central and East Iran, Kopeh Dagh, Alborz, Azerbaijan, and SE Zagros. The 100-year mode with 90 % probability of NBE is expected to overpass the value of M w 7.0 in the Eastern part of Makran, Central and East Iran, Alborz, Kopeh Dagh, and Azerbaijan. The spatial distribution of 100-year mode with 90 % probability of NBE uncovers the high values of earthquake hazard parameters which are frequently connected with the main tectonic regimes of the studied area. It appears that there is a close communication among the seismicity and the tectonics of the region.

  13. Parameter estimation in distributed hydrological catchment modelling using automatic calibration with multiple objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Henrik

    A consistent framework for parameter estimation in distributed hydrological catchment modelling using automatic calibration is formulated. The framework focuses on the different steps in the estimation process from model parameterisation and selection of calibration parameters, formulation of calibration criteria, and choice of optimisation algorithm. The calibration problem is formulated in a general multi-objective context in which different objective functions that measure individual process descriptions can be optimised simultaneously. Within this framework it is possible to tailor the model calibration to the specific objectives of the model application being considered. A test example is presented that illustrates the use of the calibration framework for parameter estimation in the MIKE SHE integrated and distributed hydrological modelling system. A significant trade-off between the performance of the groundwater level simulations and the catchment runoff is observed in this case, defining a Pareto front with a very sharp structure. The Pareto optimum solution corresponding to a proposed balanced aggregated objective function is seen to provide a proper balance between the two objectives. Compared to a manual expert calibration, the balanced Pareto optimum solution provides generally better simulation of the runoff, whereas virtually similar performance is obtained for the groundwater level simulations.

  14. Centrifugal spreader mass and nutrients distribution patterns for application of fresh and aged poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Temple, W D; Skowrońska, M; Bomke, A A

    2014-06-15

    A spin-type centrifugal spreader was evaluated using fresh and aged poultry litter upon dry mass, product nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K), incubation study soil available N and particle size distribution patterns. Relative to the aged litter (37% moisture content), the fresh litter (17% moisture content) had greater <1.00 mm particle size fraction weights and atmospheric particulate was launched, which posed as a potential fallout to adjacent fields, waterways and residences. Relative to the aged litter, the broadcast fresh litter resulted in higher coefficients of variation (CV) over its transverse distance, a narrower calculated space distance between passes for uniform spread and lower soil available N concentrations. For nitrogen application over the broadcast transverse distance the fresh litter displayed a high R(2) best fit 4th order polynomial distribution pattern, while the aged litter showed high R(2) best fit 6th order polynomial distribution pattern. A soil incubation study of the fresh and aged broadcast litter resulted in a more variable or lower R(2) best fit 2nd order polynomial distribution pattern. For both the fresh and aged litter, the calculated distance between passes to achieve a uniform mass distribution was greater than that required for the broadcast of soil available N. For the fresh litter, the soil available N and litter P concentration levels strongly correlated (relatively high p and R(2) values) with the <1.00 mm fraction weight, while for the aged litter this relationship was not as significant. In addition to reducing the health risk (i.e. pathogens, antibiotic residues and resistant bacteria) and/or environment issues (particulate fallout onto waterways, adjacent fields and/or residences) our study mass, particulate and N distribution patterns results suggest that poultry litter should be allowed to age before broadcast application is attempted. PMID:24705099

  15. Distributed Bees Algorithm Parameters Optimization for a Cost Efficient Target Allocation in Swarms of Robots

    PubMed Central

    Jevtić, Aleksandar; Gutiérrez, Álvaro

    2011-01-01

    Swarms of robots can use their sensing abilities to explore unknown environments and deploy on sites of interest. In this task, a large number of robots is more effective than a single unit because of their ability to quickly cover the area. However, the coordination of large teams of robots is not an easy problem, especially when the resources for the deployment are limited. In this paper, the Distributed Bees Algorithm (DBA), previously proposed by the authors, is optimized and applied to distributed target allocation in swarms of robots. Improved target allocation in terms of deployment cost efficiency is achieved through optimization of the DBA’s control parameters by means of a Genetic Algorithm. Experimental results show that with the optimized set of parameters, the deployment cost measured as the average distance traveled by the robots is reduced. The cost-efficient deployment is in some cases achieved at the expense of increased robots’ distribution error. Nevertheless, the proposed approach allows the swarm to adapt to the operating conditions when available resources are scarce. PMID:22346677

  16. Distributed bees algorithm parameters optimization for a cost efficient target allocation in swarms of robots.

    PubMed

    Jevtić, Aleksandar; Gutiérrez, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Swarms of robots can use their sensing abilities to explore unknown environments and deploy on sites of interest. In this task, a large number of robots is more effective than a single unit because of their ability to quickly cover the area. However, the coordination of large teams of robots is not an easy problem, especially when the resources for the deployment are limited. In this paper, the distributed bees algorithm (DBA), previously proposed by the authors, is optimized and applied to distributed target allocation in swarms of robots. Improved target allocation in terms of deployment cost efficiency is achieved through optimization of the DBA's control parameters by means of a genetic algorithm. Experimental results show that with the optimized set of parameters, the deployment cost measured as the average distance traveled by the robots is reduced. The cost-efficient deployment is in some cases achieved at the expense of increased robots' distribution error. Nevertheless, the proposed approach allows the swarm to adapt to the operating conditions when available resources are scarce. PMID:22346677

  17. Determination of the age distribution of sea ice from Lagrangian observations of ice motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, R.; Cunningham, G.F.; Rothrock, D.A.; Stern, H.L.

    1995-03-01

    A procedure for monitoring the local age distribution of the Arctic sea ice cover is presented. The age distribution specifies the area covered by ice in different age classes. In the authors` approach, a regular array of grid points is defined initially on the first image of a long time series, and an ice tracker finds the positions of those points in all subsequent images of the series. These Lagrangian points mark the corners of a set of cells that move and deform with the ice cover. The area of each cell changes with each new image or time step. A positive change indicates that ice in a new age class was formed in the cell. A negative change is assumed to have ridged the youngest ice in the cell, reducing its area. The ice in each cell ages as it progresses through the time series. The area of multiyear ice in each cell is computed using an ice classification algorithm. Any area that is not accounted for by the young ice or multiyear ice is assigned to a category of older first-year ice. They thus have a fine age resolution in the young end of the age distribution, and coarse resolution for older ice. The age distribution of the young ice can be converted to a thickness distribution using a simple empirical relation between accumulated freezing-degree days and ice thickness, or using a more complicated thermodynamic model. They describe a general scheme for implementing this procedure for the Arctic Ocean from fall freeze-up until the onset of melt in the spring. The concept is illustrated with a time series of five ERS-1 SAR images spanning a period of 12 days. Such a scheme could be implemented with RADARSAT SAR imagery to provide basin-wide ice age and thickness information.

  18. An approximation theory for the identification of nonlinear distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1990-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework for the identification of nonlinear distributed parameter systems is developed. Inverse problems for nonlinear systems governed by strongly maximal monotone operators (satisfying a mild continuous dependence condition with respect to the unknown parameters to be identified) are treated. Convergence of Galerkin approximations and the corresponding solutions of finite dimensional approximating identification problems to a solution of the original finite dimensional identification problem is demonstrated using the theory of nonlinear evolution systems and a nonlinear analog of the Trotter-Kato appproximation result for semigroups of bounded linear operators. The nonlinear theory developed here is shown to subsume an existing linear theory as a special case. It is also shown to be applicable to a broad class of nonlinear elliptic operators and the corresponding nonlinear parabolic partial differential equations to which they lead. An application of the theory to a quasilinear model for heat conduction or mass transfer is discussed.

  19. An approximation theory for the identification of nonlinear distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework for the identification of nonlinear distributed parameter systems is developed. Inverse problems for nonlinear systems governed by strongly maximal monotone operators (satisfying a mild continuous dependence condition with respect to the unknown parameters to be identified) are treated. Convergence of Galerkin approximations and the corresponding solutions of finite dimensional approximating identification problems to a solution of the original finite dimensional identification problem is demonstrated using the theory of nonlinear evolution systems and a nonlinear analog of the Trotter-Kato approximation result for semigroups of bounded linear operators. The nonlinear theory developed here is shown to subsume an existing linear theory as a special case. It is also shown to be applicable to a broad class of nonlinear elliptic operators and the corresponding nonlinear parabolic partial differential equations to which they lead. An application of the theory to a quasilinear model for heat conduction or mass transfer is discussed.

  20. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  1. Realistic modeling of environmental tracer migration and composite age distributions in a pine beetle impacted watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engdahl, N. B.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Descriptions of age in hydrologic systems are often limited to the residence time in the surface water system or the subsurface with little consideration of the interaction between the two, or the different ways geochemical tracers are altered in each domain. Understanding the way tracer concentrations change in each domain is essential to accurate estimation of age, but few models have explicitly modeled the fully coupled system or considered distributions of age. This work presents a numerical laboratory that is specifically designed to investigate composite age distributions (CADs) and their connections to tracer concentrations. The CAD is defined here as the combination of the residence time distributions for surface flows, vadose zone, and groundwater systems, providing an accounting for the total time a discrete fluid parcel has spent within the integrated hydrologic system. CADs are generated by particle tracking through a fully integrated flow model and it is straight forward to realistically simulate the transport of environmental tracers such as 85-Krypton and 39-Argon that can be used for estimating water ages. This framework allows explicit modeling of the different processes in each domain that affect tracer concentrations including the mixing of different source waters, partial equilibrium with the atmosphere through the vadose zone, evaporative enrichment in surface flows, and diffusive fractionation in the subsurface. Transient forcings, such as seasonal or daily variations in precipitation, can also be simulated and the effects of this transience on concentrations and age distributions can easily be investigated. The model domain used to demonstrate these tools is based on a well-defined watershed within Rocky Mountain National Park. The mountain pine beetle has devastated the park's forests and the massive tree-kill has begun to affect the quality and distribution of the water resources. Accurate modeling of the CADs in the park is a crucial step

  2. Synoptic thermal and oceanographic parameter distributions in the New York Bight Apex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Bahn, G. S.; Thomas, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Concurrent surface water measurements made from a moving oceanographic research vessel were used to calibrate and interpret remotely sensed data collected over a plume in the New York Bight Apex on 23 June 1977. Multiple regression techniques were used to develop equations to map synoptic distributions of chlorophyll a and total suspended matter in the remotely sensed scene. Thermal (which did not have surface calibration values) and water quality parameter distributions indicated a cold mass of water in the Bight Apex with an overflowing nutrient-rich warm water plume that originated in the Sandy Hook Bay and flowed south near the New Jersey shoreline. Data analysis indicates that remotely sensed data may be particularly useful for studying physical and biological processes in the top several metres of surface water at plume boundaries.

  3. Universal scaling of the order-parameter distribution in strongly disordered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarié, G.; Kamlapure, A.; Bucheli, D.; Benfatto, L.; Lorenzana, J.; Seibold, G.; Ganguli, S. C.; Raychaudhuri, P.; Castellani, C.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the statistical properties of the inhomogeneous order-parameter distribution (OPD) at the verge of the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT). We find within two prototype fermionic and bosonic models for disordered superconductors that one can identify a universal rescaling of the OPD. By performing scanning-tunneling microscopy experiments in three samples of NbN with increasing disorder we show that such a rescaling also describes the experimental data with excellent accuracy. These results can provide a breakthrough in our understanding of the SIT.

  4. Factorization and the synthesis of optimal feedback gains for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    An approach based on Volterra factorization leads to a new methodology for the analysis and synthesis of the optimal feedback gain in the finite-time linear quadratic control problem for distributed parameter systems. The approach circumvents the need for solving and analyzing Riccati equations and provides a more transparent connection between the system dynamics and the optimal gain. The general results are further extended and specialized for the case where the underlying state is characterized by autonomous differential-delay dynamics. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the second-order convergence rate that is derived for an approximation scheme for the optimal feedback gain in the differential-delay problem.

  5. OPTIMAL SHRINKAGE ESTIMATION OF MEAN PARAMETERS IN FAMILY OF DISTRIBUTIONS WITH QUADRATIC VARIANCE

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xianchao; Kou, S. C.; Brown, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the simultaneous inference of mean parameters in a family of distributions with quadratic variance function. We first introduce a class of semi-parametric/parametric shrinkage estimators and establish their asymptotic optimality properties. Two specific cases, the location-scale family and the natural exponential family with quadratic variance function, are then studied in detail. We conduct a comprehensive simulation study to compare the performance of the proposed methods with existing shrinkage estimators. We also apply the method to real data and obtain encouraging results. PMID:27041778

  6. Geotechnical parameter spatial distribution stochastic analysis based on multi-precision information assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Rubin, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial distribution of important geotechnical parameter named compression modulus Es contributes considerably to the understanding of the underlying geological processes and the adequate assessment of the Es mechanics effects for differential settlement of large continuous structure foundation. These analyses should be derived using an assimilating approach that combines in-situ static cone penetration test (CPT) with borehole experiments. To achieve such a task, the Es distribution of stratum of silty clay in region A of China Expo Center (Shanghai) is studied using the Bayesian-maximum entropy method. This method integrates rigorously and efficiently multi-precision of different geotechnical investigations and sources of uncertainty. Single CPT samplings were modeled as a rational probability density curve by maximum entropy theory. Spatial prior multivariate probability density function (PDF) and likelihood PDF of the CPT positions were built by borehole experiments and the potential value of the prediction point, then, preceding numerical integration on the CPT probability density curves, the posterior probability density curve of the prediction point would be calculated by the Bayesian reverse interpolation framework. The results were compared between Gaussian Sequential Stochastic Simulation and Bayesian methods. The differences were also discussed between single CPT samplings of normal distribution and simulated probability density curve based on maximum entropy theory. It is shown that the study of Es spatial distributions can be improved by properly incorporating CPT sampling variation into interpolation process, whereas more informative estimations are generated by considering CPT Uncertainty for the estimation points. Calculation illustrates the significance of stochastic Es characterization in a stratum, and identifies limitations associated with inadequate geostatistical interpolation techniques. This characterization results will provide a multi

  7. A two-parameter exponential rainfall depth-intensity distribution applied to runoff and erosion modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; Meesters, A. G. C. A.; Schellekens, J.; Bruijnzeel, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    Most runoff and erosion models require rainfall intensity data of high temporal resolution, which restricts their application and predictive potential. In this paper, a simple exponential rainfall depth-intensity distribution (ERDID) was tested, involving only two storm characteristics that are easily calculated from rainfall intensity measurements: rainfall depth ( P) and depth-averaged rainfall intensity ( Ř). This distribution fitted well to tipping bucket rainfall intensity measurements during 30 storms of 33-81 mm in West Java, Indonesia. The ERDID was used to derive analytical expressions for the hydrological model variables of two commonly used erosion models, i.e. the 'R' factor in RUSLE and normalised soil loss in GUEST. The ERDID-based expressions reproduced hydrological variables for the 30 storms with high accuracy for both models (mean difference of ±4-17% for individual storms and between -2 and 14% on aggregate). A comparison of results obtained with the original (high temporal resolution) measurements and data resampled into 5-min intervals shows that resampling had a significant effect on calculations with the original models (cumulative values were decreased by 2-26%). In some cases the use of ERDID-based expressions with distribution parameters calculated from resampled data partially corrected this underestimation. The proposed rainfall depth-intensity distribution combines physically meaningful, clearly defined variables with theoretical simplicity and high descriptive accuracy and so provides a good scope for further application in runoff and erosion modelling.

  8. Applications of the theory of optimal control of distributed-parameter systems to structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    An extension of classical methods of optimal control theory for systems described by ordinary differential equations to distributed-parameter systems described by partial differential equations is presented. An application is given involving the minimum-mass design of a simply-supported shear plate with a fixed fundamental frequency of vibration. An optimal plate thickness distribution in analytical form is found. The case of a minimum-mass design of an elastic sandwich plate whose fundamental frequency of free vibration is fixed. Under the most general conditions, the optimization problem reduces to the solution of two simultaneous partial differential equations involving the optimal thickness distribution and the modal displacement. One equation is the uniform energy distribution expression which was found by Ashley and McIntosh for the optimal design of one-dimensional structures with frequency constraints, and by Prager and Taylor for various design criteria in one and two dimensions. The second equation requires dynamic equilibrium at the preassigned vibration frequency.

  9. Two bootstrapping routines for obtaining imprecision estimates for nonparametric parameter distributions in nonlinear mixed effects models.

    PubMed

    Baverel, Paul G; Savic, Radojka M; Karlsson, Mats O

    2011-02-01

    When parameter estimates are used in predictions or decisions, it is important to consider the magnitude of imprecision associated with the estimation. Such imprecision estimates are, however, presently lacking for nonparametric algorithms intended for nonlinear mixed effects models. The objective of this study was to develop resampling-based methods for estimating imprecision in nonparametric distribution (NPD) estimates obtained in NONMEM. A one-compartment PK model was used to simulate datasets for which the random effect of clearance conformed to a (i) normal (ii) bimodal and (iii) heavy-tailed underlying distributional shapes. Re-estimation was conducted assuming normality under FOCE, and NPDs were estimated sequential to this step. Imprecision in the NPD was then estimated by means of two different resampling procedures. The first (full) method relies on bootstrap sampling from the raw data and a re-estimation of both the preceding parametric (FOCE) and the nonparametric step. The second (simplified) method relies on bootstrap sampling of individual nonparametric probability distributions. Nonparametric 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were obtained and mean errors (MEs) of the 95% CI width were computed. Standard errors (SEs) of nonparametric population estimates were obtained using the simplified method and evaluated through 100 stochastic simulations followed by estimations (SSEs). Both methods were successfully implemented to provide imprecision estimates for NPDs. The imprecision estimates adequately reflected the reference imprecision in all distributional cases and regardless of the numbers of individuals in the original data. Relative MEs of the 95% CI width of CL marginal density when original data contained 200 individuals were equal to: (i) -22 and -12%, (ii) -22 and -9%, (iii) -13 and -5% for the full and simplified (n = 100), respectively. SEs derived from the simplified method were consistent with the ones obtained from 100 SSEs. In conclusion

  10. Transit times and age distributions for reservoir models represented as nonlinear non-autonomuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Meztler, Holger; Glatt, Anna; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We present theoretical methods to compute dynamic residence and transit time distributions for non-autonomous systems of pools governed by coupled nonlinear differential equations. Although transit time and age distributions have been used to describe reservoir models for a long time, a closer look to their assumptions reveals two major restrictions of generality in previous studies. First, the systems are assumed to be in equilibrium; and second, the equations under consideration are assumed to be linear. While both these assumptions greatly ease the computation and interpretation of transit time and age distributions they are not applicable to a wide range of problems. Moreover, the transfer of previous results learned from linear systems in steady state to the more complex nonlinear non-autonomous systems that do not even need to have equilibria, can be dangerously misleading. Fortunately the topic of time dependent age and transit time distributions has received some attention recently in hydrology, we aim to compute these distributions for systems of multiple reservoirs. We will discuss how storage selection functions can augment the information represented in an ODE system describing a system of reservoirs. We will present analytical and numerical algorithms and a Monte Carlo simulator to compute solutions for system transit time and age distributions for system-wide storage selection functions including the most simple, but important case of well mixed pools.

  11. Estimating Age Distributions of Base Flow in Watersheds Underlain by Single and Dual Porosity Formations Using Groundwater Transport Simulation and Weighted Weibull Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Age distributions of base flow to streams are important to estimate for predicting the timing of water-quality responses to changes in distributed inputs of nutrients or pollutants at the land surface. Simple models of shallow aquifers will predict exponential age distributions, but more realistic 3-D stream-aquifer geometries will cause deviations from an exponential curve. In addition, in fractured rock terrains the dual nature of the effective and total porosity of the system complicates the age distribution further. In this study shallow groundwater flow and advective transport were simulated in two regions in the Eastern United States—the Delmarva Peninsula and the upper Potomac River basin. The former is underlain by layers of unconsolidated sediment, while the latter consists of folded and fractured sedimentary rocks. Transport of groundwater to streams was simulated using the USGS code MODPATH within 175 and 275 watersheds, respectively. For the fractured rock terrain, calculations were also performed along flow pathlines to account for exchange between mobile and immobile flow zones. Porosities at both sites were calibrated using environmental tracer data (3H, 3He, CFCs and SF6) in wells and springs, and with a 30-year tritium record from the Potomac River. Carbonate and siliciclastic rocks were calibrated to have mobile porosity values of one and six percent, and immobile porosity values of 18 and 12 percent, respectively. The age distributions were fitted to Weibull functions. Whereas an exponential function has one parameter that controls the median age of the distribution, a Weibull function has an extra parameter that controls the slope of the curve. A weighted Weibull function was also developed that potentially allows for four parameters, two that control the median age and two that control the slope, one of each weighted toward early or late arrival times. For both systems the two-parameter Weibull function nearly always produced a substantially

  12. Polyneuropathy and dementia in old age: common inflammatory and vascular parameters.

    PubMed

    Leblhuber, Friedrich; Schroecksnadel, Katharina; Beran-Praher, Margit; Haller, Herbert; Steiner, Kostja; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2011-05-01

    Thirty-three inpatients (22 females, 11 males, aged 79.4 ± 9.5 years) were investigated in this prospective cohort study to study the prevalence of polyneuropathy (PNP) and dementia in geriatric inpatients. Clinical and electrodiagnostic investigations, routine laboratory, including thyroid parameters, folic acid, vitamin B(12), homocysteine, neopterin, fibrinogen and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured in serum, the mini-mental state examination and computed tomographic scanning were performed in each patient. PNP was found clinically and electrodiagnostically in 96% of patients. Age was the most precipitating factor for PNP, and was significantly correlated to electrodiagnostic changes in the nerves investigated in both, upper and lower extremities, while clinical symptoms were confined only to the feet. Correlation was seen between homocysteine and the amplitude of the sural nerve (surAmpl) (rs = -0.406, p = 0.029) as well as the sural nerve conduction velocity (surNCV) (rs = -0.389, p = 0.037), and between neopterin and the grade of denervation (rs = 0.445, p = 0.014) in our patients. Neopterin and fibrinogen did not correlate significantly, but there was a trend to higher fibrinogen concentrations in patients with higher neopterin levels (rs = 0.344, p = 0.062). A trend of a correlation was seen between higher homocysteine concentrations and the number of changes in electrodiagnostic measurements (rs = 0.354, p = 0.055). Twenty-one of the 33 patients (64%) were demented, 9 (27%) presented clinically as mild cognitive impairment, 3 (9%) were not demented. Vascular risk factors were found in 83%: hypertension in 58%, hypercholesterinemia in 39%, cardiac disease in 36%, diabetes mellitus (DM) in 21%, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in 9%. A significant correlation was found between homocysteine and folic acid concentrations (rs = -0.401, p = 0.028). Falls were reported in 48% of cases, indicating PNP as a risk factor in this group of patients. In conclusion

  13. Factors affecting the distribution of hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters in a shallow sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Cheon, J Y; Lee, K K; Lee, S Y; Lee, M H

    2001-07-01

    The distributions of hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters were investigated in a shallow sand aquifer highly contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons leaked from solvent storage tanks. For these purposes, a variety of field investigations and studies were performed, which included installation of over 100 groundwater monitoring wells and piezometers at various depths, soil logging and analyses during well and piezometer installation, chemical analysis of groundwater, pump tests, and slug tests. Continuous water level monitoring at three selected wells using automatic data-logger and manual measuring at other wells were also conducted. Based on analyses of the various investigations and tests, a number of factors were identified to explain the distribution of the hydrocarbon contaminants and hydrogeochemical parameters. These factors include indigenous biodegradation, hydrostratigraphy, preliminary pump-and-treat remedy, recharge by rainfall, and subsequent water level fluctuation. The permeable sandy layer, in which the mean water table elevation is maintained, provided a dominant pathway for contaminant transport. The preliminary pump-and-treat action accelerated the movement of the hydrocarbon contaminants and affected the redox evolution pattern. Seasonal recharge by rain, together with indigenous biodegradation, played an important role in the natural attenuation of the petroleum hydrocarbons via mixing/dilution and biodegradation. The water level fluctuations redistributed the hydrocarbon contaminants by partitioning them into the soil and groundwater. The identified factors are not independent but closely inter-correlated. PMID:11475158

  14. Exponential Sum-Fitting of Dwell-Time Distributions without Specifying Starting Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Landowne, David; Yuan, Bin; Magleby, Karl L.

    2013-01-01

    Fitting dwell-time distributions with sums of exponentials is widely used to characterize histograms of open- and closed-interval durations recorded from single ion channels, as well as for other physical phenomena. However, it can be difficult to identify the contributing exponential components. Here we extend previous methods of exponential sum-fitting to present a maximum-likelihood approach that consistently detects all significant exponentials without the need for user-specified starting parameters. Instead of searching for exponentials, the fitting starts with a very large number of initial exponentials with logarithmically spaced time constants, so that none are missed. Maximum-likelihood fitting then determines the areas of all the initial exponentials keeping the time constants fixed. In an iterative manner, with refitting after each step, the analysis then removes exponentials with negligible area and combines closely spaced adjacent exponentials, until only those exponentials that make significant contributions to the dwell-time distribution remain. There is no limit on the number of significant exponentials and no starting parameters need be specified. We demonstrate fully automated detection for both experimental and simulated data, as well as for classical exponential-sum-fitting problems. PMID:23746510

  15. Estimating Model Parameter Uncertainty Using A Distribution Oriented Approach and a Similarity Measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcherednichenko, I. A.; Bastidas, L. A.; Lansey, K.

    2004-12-01

    We use two very recently introduced in hydrology measures of performance: the Distributions Oriented (DO) approach and a set theory-based similarity metric - the Hausdorff Norm (HN) to evaluate the performance of two extensively used distributed rainfall-runoff models: Topmodel and PRMS. The distribution oriented approach considers the bivariate distribution of model outputs and observations and the corresponding marginal distributions. The Hausdorff norm allows for the inclusion, within the same framework or measure, both the spatial and temporal scales as a single multi-dimensional array. The performance evaluation is carried out over different time and spatial scales. The models are run over two nested catchments located in different climatic environments - one relatively wet, the Blue River in Oklahoma, and other semi-arid - the Sycamore Creek in Arizona. The levels and quality of input information are very dissimilar. To drive the models radar precipitation is used for the Blue River while the products generated at the University of Washington and gage measurements are used for Sycamore Creek. Both catchments have nested gages and the models are run to simulate 10 years of daily runoff at those points with different levels of discretization/resolution. Both measures: the DO and the HN, are used for parameter estimation using the multiple objective framework developed at the University of Arizona -that allows for the inclusion of trade-off uncertainties of the objective functions, and are compared against each other and against traditional scalar measures of performance as Nash Sutcliffe efficiency, bias, and general duration curves. In the Sycamore Creek a PRMS parameterization of the channel transmission losses is also considered for evaluation because of the important role played by those losses in the shape of the hydrographs.

  16. Snow surface roughness as a function of terrain parameters and snow depth distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitinger, J.; Sovilla, B.; Purves, R.

    2012-12-01

    During and after a snowfall, wind, snow gliding and avalanches redistribute snow and smooth the geomorphology of the terrain by filling irregularities. Terrain smoothing is believed to be an important factor in avalanche formation. In avalanche release zones, it influences fracture initiation and propagation as well as the resistance to slab motion and thus affects its location and extension. In avalanche paths, terrain smoothing changes the terrain-avalanche friction and thus has an impact on avalanche dynamics. Moreover, smoothing of terrain irregularities by snow also affects surface heat transfer and energy balance as well as snow depth distribution. Thus, understanding snow smoothing on topography is very important in avalanche hazard assessment, run-off modelling and water resource management. To characterize the smoothing effect of snow on terrain we use the concept of roughness. Roughness is calculated for several snow surfaces and its corresponding underlying terrain within two selected high alpine test sites in the Swiss Alps. High resolution snow depth measurements were performed by airborne and terrestrial LIDAR to produce the elevation models of the snow covered terrain. The difference in surface roughness between snow cover and terrain is modelled as a function of geomorphological parameters (terrain roughness and slope) and snow depth (mean and standard deviation) and ultimately validated against the experimental data. The model uses a multi-scale approach in assessing the different parameters and results for different scales are presented. Finally, we discuss to which extent snow depth distribution can be explained by terrain parameters and in particular by terrain roughness.

  17. Innovative Meta-Heuristic Approach Application for Parameter Estimation of Probability Distribution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. S.; Yoon, S.; Jeong, C.

    2012-12-01

    The primary purpose of frequency analysis in hydrology is to estimate the magnitude of an event with a given frequency of occurrence. The precision of frequency analysis depends on the selection of an appropriate probability distribution model (PDM) and parameter estimation techniques. A number of PDMs have been developed to describe the probability distribution of the hydrological variables. For each of the developed PDMs, estimated parameters are provided based on alternative estimation techniques, such as the method of moments (MOM), probability weighted moments (PWM), linear function of ranked observations (L-moments), and maximum likelihood (ML). Generally, the results using ML are more reliable than the other methods. However, the ML technique is more laborious than the other methods because an iterative numerical solution, such as the Newton-Raphson method, must be used for the parameter estimation of PDMs. In the meantime, meta-heuristic approaches have been developed to solve various engineering optimization problems (e.g., linear and stochastic, dynamic, nonlinear). These approaches include genetic algorithms, ant colony optimization, simulated annealing, tabu searches, and evolutionary computation methods. Meta-heuristic approaches use a stochastic random search instead of a gradient search so that intricate derivative information is unnecessary. Therefore, the meta-heuristic approaches have been shown to be a useful strategy to solve optimization problems in hydrology. A number of studies focus on using meta-heuristic approaches for estimation of hydrological variables with parameter estimation of PDMs. Applied meta-heuristic approaches offer reliable solutions but use more computation time than derivative-based methods. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to enhance the meta-heuristic approach for the parameter estimation of PDMs by using a recently developed algorithm known as a harmony search (HS). The performance of the HS is compared to the

  18. Angular distribution of cosmological parameters as a probe of inhomogeneities: a kinematic parametrisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, C. Sofia; Basilakos, Spyros

    2016-08-01

    We use a kinematic parametrisation of the luminosity distance to measure the angular distribution on the sky of time derivatives of the scale factor, in particular the Hubble parameter H0, the deceleration parameter q0, and the jerk parameter j0. We apply a recently published method to complement probing the inhomogeneity of the large-scale structure by means of the inhomogeneity in the cosmic expansion. This parametrisation is independent of the cosmological equation of state, which renders it adequate to test interpretations of the cosmic acceleration alternative to the cosmological constant. For the same analytical toy model of an inhomogeneous ensemble of homogenous pixels, we derive the backreaction term in j0 due to the fluctuations of { H0,q0 } and measure it to be of order 10-2 times the corresponding average over the pixels in the absence of backreaction. In agreement with that computed using a ΛCDM parametrisation of the luminosity distance, the backreaction effect on q0 remains below the detection threshold. Although the backreaction effect on j0 is about ten times that on q0, it is also below the detection threshold. Hence backreaction remains unobservable both in q0 and in j0.

  19. The identification of a distributed parameter model for a flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Gates, S. S.; Rosen, I. G.; Wang, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A computational method is developed for the estimation of parameters in a distributed model for a flexible structure. The structure we consider (part of the RPL experiment) consists of a cantilevered beam with a thruster and linear accelerometer at the free end. The thruster is fed by a pressurized hose whose horizontal motion effects the transverse vibration of the beam. The Euler-Bernoulli theory is used to model the vibration of the beam and treat the hose thruster assembly as a lumped or point mass dashpot spring system at the tip. Measurements of linear acceleration at the tip are used to estimate the hose parameters (mass, stiffness, damping) and a Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic structural damping parameter for the beam using a least squares fit to the data. Spline based approximations are considered to the hybrid (coupled ordinary and partial differential equations) systems; theoretical convergence results and numerical studies with both simulation and actual experimental data obtained from the structure are presented and discussed.

  20. The identification of a distributed parameter model for a flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Gates, S. S.; Rosen, I. G.; Wang, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A computational method is developed for the estimation of parameters in a distributed model for a flexible structure. The structure we consider (part of the RPL experiment) consists of a cantilevered beam with a thruster and linear accelerometer at the free end. The thruster is fed by a pressurized hose whose horizontal motion effects the transverse vibration of the beam. The Euler-Bernoulli theory is used to model the vibration of the beam and treat the hose-thruster assembly as a lumped or point mass-dashpot-spring system at the tip. Using measurements of linear acceleration at the tip, it is estimated that the parameters (mass, stiffness, damping) and a Voight-Kelvin viscoelastic structural damping parameter for the beam using a least squares fit to the data. Spline based approximations to the hybrid (coupled ordinary and partial differential equations) system are considered; theoretical convergence results and numerical studies with both simulation and actual experimental data obtained from the structure are presented and discussed.

  1. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the RF negative ion source prototype for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-08

    A numerical model, based on the fluid plasma theory, has been used for description of the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature, plasma potential as well as densities of the three types of positive hydrogen ions) in the IPP prototype RF negative hydrogen ion source. The model covers the driver and the expansion plasma region of the source with their actual size and accounts for the presence of the magnetic filter field with its actual value and location as well as for the bias potential applied to the plasma grid. The obtained results show that without a magnetic filter the two 2D geometries considered, respectively, with an axial symmetry and a planar one, represent accurately the complex 3D structure of the source. The 2D model with a planar symmetry (where the E×B and diamagnetic drifts could be involved in the description) has been used for analysis of the influence, via the charged-particle and electron-energy fluxes, of the magnetic filter and of the bias potential on the spatial structure of the plasma parameters in the source. Benchmarking of results from the code to experimental data shows that the model reproduces the general trend in the axial behavior of the plasma parameters in the source.

  2. Cumulative distribution function solutions of advection–reaction equations with uncertain parameters

    PubMed Central

    Boso, F.; Broyda, S. V.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We derive deterministic cumulative distribution function (CDF) equations that govern the evolution of CDFs of state variables whose dynamics are described by the first-order hyperbolic conservation laws with uncertain coefficients that parametrize the advective flux and reactive terms. The CDF equations are subjected to uniquely specified boundary conditions in the phase space, thus obviating one of the major challenges encountered by more commonly used probability density function equations. The computational burden of solving CDF equations is insensitive to the magnitude of the correlation lengths of random input parameters. This is in contrast to both Monte Carlo simulations (MCSs) and direct numerical algorithms, whose computational cost increases as correlation lengths of the input parameters decrease. The CDF equations are, however, not exact because they require a closure approximation. To verify the accuracy and robustness of the large-eddy-diffusivity closure, we conduct a set of numerical experiments which compare the CDFs computed with the CDF equations with those obtained via MCSs. This comparison demonstrates that the CDF equations remain accurate over a wide range of statistical properties of the two input parameters, such as their correlation lengths and variance of the coefficient that parametrizes the advective flux. PMID:24910529

  3. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the RF negative ion source prototype for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    A numerical model, based on the fluid plasma theory, has been used for description of the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature, plasma potential as well as densities of the three types of positive hydrogen ions) in the IPP prototype RF negative hydrogen ion source. The model covers the driver and the expansion plasma region of the source with their actual size and accounts for the presence of the magnetic filter field with its actual value and location as well as for the bias potential applied to the plasma grid. The obtained results show that without a magnetic filter the two 2D geometries considered, respectively, with an axial symmetry and a planar one, represent accurately the complex 3D structure of the source. The 2D model with a planar symmetry (where the E×B and diamagnetic drifts could be involved in the description) has been used for analysis of the influence, via the charged-particle and electron-energy fluxes, of the magnetic filter and of the bias potential on the spatial structure of the plasma parameters in the source. Benchmarking of results from the code to experimental data shows that the model reproduces the general trend in the axial behavior of the plasma parameters in the source.

  4. Extraction of Clan Model Parameters from Multiplicity Distributions Measured in pp Collisions at Lhc Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S.; Jasvantlal, J. K.; Dewanto, A.; Chan, A. H.; Oh, C. H.

    This paper presents the variation of clan model parameters nc and bar N with energy for p-p collisions at √ {s} = 900 and 2360 GeV using ALICE and CMS as the detectors. The data for multiplicity distribution was reported by the ALICE and CMS collaborations. The values of bar nc and bar N are evaluated from the NBD fit parameters bar n and k. Hegyi [Phys. Lett. B 274, 214 (1992)] suggested an alternative method for determination of clan model parameters from void probability. A comparison of values obtained from the two methods is also done. A close agreement of values obtained from the two methods was observed for 546 GeV p--bar p collisions. However for LHC data the agreement is not very well. Void probability overestimates the value of bar nc and underestimates the value of bar N compared to that obtained from NBD. bar nc is found to increase with energy for both ALICE and CMS data. Contrary to the observation at lower energies that bar N does not depend on energy, it is found to vary with energy. The variation of bar N with energy is more prominent for CMS data. The results are discussed in detail. For CMS data, comparison of the results with the 7000 GeV data is also shown.

  5. A new study of shower age distribution in near vertical showers by EAS air shower array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, N.; Goswami, G. C.; Basak, D. K.; Ghosh, B.

    1984-01-01

    The air shower array has been developed since it started operation in 1931. The array covering an area of 900 sq m now incorporates 21 particle density sampling detectors around two muon magnetic spectrographs. The air showers are detected in the size range 10 to the 4th power to 10 to the 6th power particles. A total of 11000 showers has so far been detected. Average values of shower age have been obtained in various shower size ranges to study the dependence of shower age on shower size. The core distance dependence of shower age parameter has also been analyzed for presentation.

  6. Inverse planning in the age of digital LINACs: station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-03-01

    The last few years have seen a number of technical and clinical advances which give rise to a need for innovations in dose optimization and delivery strategies. Technically, a new generation of digital linac has become available which offers features such as programmable motion between station parameters and high dose-rate Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams. Current inverse planning methods are designed for traditional machines and cannot accommodate these features of new generation linacs without compromising either dose conformality and/or delivery efficiency. Furthermore, SBRT is becoming increasingly important, which elevates the need for more efficient delivery, improved dose distribution. Here we will give an overview of our recent work in SPORT designed to harness the digital linacs and highlight the essential components of SPORT. We will summarize the pros and cons of traditional beamlet-based optimization (BBO) and direct aperture optimization (DAO) and introduce a new type of algorithm, compressed sensing (CS)-based inverse planning, that is capable of automatically removing the redundant segments during optimization and providing a plan with high deliverability in the presence of a large number of station control points (potentially non-coplanar, non-isocentric, and even multi-isocenters). We show that CS-approach takes the interplay between planning and delivery into account and allows us to balance the dose optimality and delivery efficiency in a controlled way and, providing a viable framework to address various unmet demands of the new generation linacs. A few specific implementation strategies of SPORT in the forms of fixed-gantry and rotational arc delivery are also presented.

  7. Angular anisotropy parameters and recoil-ion momentum distribution in two-photon double ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, A. S.; Ivanov, I. A.; Bray, Igor

    2007-08-15

    We present convergent-close-coupling (CCC) calculations of the angular anisotropy parameters {beta}{sub 2},{beta}{sub 4} and the recoil ion momentum distribution d{sigma}/dp in two-photon double ionization (TPDI) of helium. In a stark contrast to single-photon double ionization (SPDI), where the {beta}{sub 2} parameter varies widely changing the angular distribution from isotropic to nearly dipole for slow and fast photoelectrons, respectively, the {beta} parameters for TPDI show very little change. The angular distribution of the recoil ion is fairly isotropic in TPDI as opposed to a strong alignment with the polarization of light in SPDI.

  8. Age incidence and site distribution of mammary dysplasias in young beagle bitches.

    PubMed

    Warner, M R

    1976-07-01

    The age incidence and site distribution of 2,142 mammary dysplasias were documented for 39 beagle bitches 6 months to 4 years of age. Lesion onset was at 2-3 years of age, at which time more than 50% of the females had dysplasias. Dysplasias appeared before palpable tumors. Posterior mammae developed more lesions than did anterior mammae. Thus the gradient for early onset of lesions coincided with the gradient for tumor frequency reported previously; a preneoplastic potential is suggested for (some) dysplasias. Problems of defining normal tissue are discussed. PMID:1034018

  9. Sensitivity of postplanning target and OAR coverage estimates to dosimetric margin distribution sampling parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Huijun; Gordon, J. James; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A dosimetric margin (DM) is the margin in a specified direction between a structure and a specified isodose surface, corresponding to a prescription or tolerance dose. The dosimetric margin distribution (DMD) is the distribution of DMs over all directions. Given a geometric uncertainty model, representing inter- or intrafraction setup uncertainties or internal organ motion, the DMD can be used to calculate coverage Q, which is the probability that a realized target or organ-at-risk (OAR) dose metric D{sub v} exceeds the corresponding prescription or tolerance dose. Postplanning coverage evaluation quantifies the percentage of uncertainties for which target and OAR structures meet their intended dose constraints. The goal of the present work is to evaluate coverage probabilities for 28 prostate treatment plans to determine DMD sampling parameters that ensure adequate accuracy for postplanning coverage estimates. Methods: Normally distributed interfraction setup uncertainties were applied to 28 plans for localized prostate cancer, with prescribed dose of 79.2 Gy and 10 mm clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. Using angular or isotropic sampling techniques, dosimetric margins were determined for the CTV, bladder and rectum, assuming shift invariance of the dose distribution. For angular sampling, DMDs were sampled at fixed angular intervals {omega} (e.g., {omega}=1 deg., 2 deg., 5 deg., 10 deg., 20 deg.). Isotropic samples were uniformly distributed on the unit sphere resulting in variable angular increments, but were calculated for the same number of sampling directions as angular DMDs, and accordingly characterized by the effective angular increment {omega}{sub eff}. In each direction, the DM was calculated by moving the structure in radial steps of size {delta}(=0.1,0.2,0.5,1 mm) until the specified isodose was crossed. Coverage estimation accuracy {Delta}Q was quantified as a function of the sampling parameters {omega} or

  10. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Power and distribution transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.

    1994-05-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in power and distribution transformers important to license renewal in commercial nuclear power plants. The intent of this AMG to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner which allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  11. A snapshot of the age distribution of psychological well-being in the United States.

    PubMed

    Stone, Arthur A; Schwartz, Joseph E; Broderick, Joan E; Deaton, Angus

    2010-06-01

    Psychological well-being (WB) includes a person's overall appraisal of his or her life (Global WB) and affective state (Hedonic WB), and it is considered a key aspect of the health of individuals and groups. Several cross-sectional studies have documented a relation between Global WB and age. Little is known, however, about the age distribution of Hedonic WB. It may yield a different view of aging because it is less influenced by the cognitive reconstruction inherent in Global WB measures and because it includes both positive and negative components of WB. In this study we report on both Global and Hedonic WB assessed in a 2008 telephone survey of 340,847 people in the United States. Consistent with prior studies, Global WB and positive Hedonic WB generally had U-shaped age profiles showing increased WB after the age of 50 years. However, negative Hedonic WB variables showed distinctly different and stronger patterns: Stress and Anger steeply declined from the early 20s, Worry was elevated through middle age and then declined, and Sadness was essentially flat. Unlike a prior study, men and women had very similar age profiles of WB. Several measures that could plausibly covary with the age-WB association (e.g., having children at home) did not alter the age-WB patterns. Global and Hedonic WB measures appear to index different aspects of WB over the lifespan, and the postmidlife increase in WB, especially in Hedonic WB, deserves continued exploration. PMID:20479218

  12. The influence of persistent crowding on the age changes of behavioral parameters and survival characteristics of rats.

    PubMed

    Skalicky, M; Bubna-Littitz, H; Hofecker, G

    1984-12-01

    One hundred fifty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to crowding (12 rats/Makrolon-IV cage) from an age of 5 months onwards. An equal number from the same age cohort served as a control (6 rats/Makrolon-IV cage). As part of an age-test program, behavioral parameters (spontaneous motor activity, reactive motor activity and maze-learning ability) were measured at various ages between 8 and 30 months. The rats were sacrificed for additional measurements after the behavioral tests. Survival curves and age-specific mortality rates were calculated for those rats which died spontaneously in the course of the study. Control rats showed a significant decrease in spontaneous motor activity after an age of 18 months. Reactive motor activity of the controls revealed a fall in the number of large movements between 9 and 15 months, whereas the number of small movements increased up to an age of 30 months. Crowding conditions increased significantly both spontaneous and reactive activity. Maze-learning ability declined significantly with age in the controls whereas crowded rats revealed a tendency to better performance which seemed to be submitted to a seasonal rhythm. Crowded rats showed an improved survival characteristic, beginning at an age of 700 days. Mortality curves turned out to be distinct and parallel by straight line regression. It has been concluded that the positive effects of crowding on behavioral parameters and survival could be attributed to a decrease in vulnerability rather than to a lowered rate of aging. PMID:6521513

  13. On the distribution of scaling hydraulic parameters in a spatially anisotropic banana field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalado, Carlos M.

    2005-06-01

    When modeling soil hydraulic properties at field scale it is desirable to approximate the variability in a given area by means of some scaling transformations which relate spatially variable local hydraulic properties to global reference characteristics. Seventy soil cores were sampled within a drip irrigated banana plantation greenhouse on a 14×5 array of 2.5 m×5 m rectangles at 15 cm depth, to represent the field scale variability of flow related properties. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and water retention characteristics were measured in these 70 soil cores. van Genuchten water retention curves (WRC) with optimized m ( m≠1-1/ n) were fitted to the WR data and a general Mualem-van Genuchten model was used to predict hydraulic conductivity functions for each soil core. A scaling law, of the form ν=ανi*, was fitted to soil hydraulic data, such that the original hydraulic parameters νi were scaled down to a reference curve with parameters νi*. An analytical expression, in terms of Beta functions, for the average suction value, hc, necessary to apply the above scaling method, was obtained. A robust optimization procedure with fast convergence to the global minimum is used to find the optimum hc, such that dispersion is minimized in the scaled data set. Via the Box-Cox transformation P(τ)=(αiτ-1)/τ, Box-Cox normality plots showed that scaling factors for the suction ( αh) and hydraulic conductivity ( αk) were approximately log-normally distributed (i.e. τ=0), as it would be expected for such dynamic properties involving flow. By contrast static soil related properties as αθ were found closely Gaussian, although a power τ=3/4 was best for approaching normality. Application of four different normality tests (Anderson-Darling, Shapiro-Wilk, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and χ2 goodness-of-fit tests) rendered some contradictory results among them, thus suggesting that this widely extended practice is not recommended for providing a suitable probability

  14. Past and present seafloor age distributions and the temporal evolution of plate tectonic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Conrad, C. P.; Buffett, B.; Muller, D.; Loyd, S.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Corsetti, F.

    2008-12-01

    Variations in the rates of seafloor generation and recycling have potentially far-reaching consequences for sea level, ocean chemistry and climate. A parameterized framework to describe such variations could guide the study of non-uniformitarian plate tectonic activity, but there is little agreement on the appropriate mechanical description of the surface boundary layer. A strong constraint on the statistics of oceanic convection systems comes from the preserved seafloor age distribution, and additional inferences are possible when paleo-seafloor is modeled based on plate motion reconstructions. Based on previously reconstructed seafloor ages, we recently inferred that oceanic heat flow was larger by ~15% at 60~Ma than today. This signal is mainly caused by the smaller plates that existed previously in the Pacific basin with relatively larger ridge-proximal area of young seafloor. The associated decrease in heat flow is larger than any plausible decrease due to cooling, and therefore hint at cyclic behavior in plate tectonics. We also consider area-per-age statistics for the present-day and back to 140~Ma from new paleo-age reconstructions. Using a simplified seafloor age evolution model we explore which physical parameterizations for the average behavior of the oceanic lithosphere are compatible with broad trends in the data. In particular, we show that a subduction probability based on lithospheric buoyancy ("sqrt(age)") leads to results that are comparable to, or better than, that of the probability distribution that is required to obtain the "triangular" age distribution with age-independent destruction of ocean floor. The current, near triangular distribution of ages and the relative lull in heat flow are likely only snapshots of a transient state during the Wilson cycle. Current seafloor ages still contain hints of a ≤sssim 60~Myr period, cyclic variation of seafloor production, and using paleo-ages for 140~Ma, we find a ~ 400~Myr best-fitting variation

  15. Sub-Daily Runoff Simulations with Parameters Inferred at the Daily Time Scale: Impacts of the temporal distribution of rainfall in parameter inference.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds Puga, Jose Eduardo; Halldin, Sven; Xu, Chong-Yu; Seibert, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Flood forecasting at sub-daily time scales are commonly required in regions where sub-daily observational data are not available. This has led to approaches to estimate model parameters at sub-daily time scales from data with a lower time resolution. Reynolds et al. (2015) show that parameters inferred at one time scale (e.g., daily) may be used directly for runoff simulations at other time scales (e.g., 1 h) when the modelling time step is the same and sufficiently small during calibration and simulation periods. Their approach produced parameter distributions at daily and sub-daily time scales that were similar and relatively constant across the time scales. The transfer of parameter values across time scales resulted in small model-performance decrease as opposed to when the parameter sets inferred at their respective time scale were used. This decrease in performance may be attributed to the degree of information lost, in terms of the physical processes occurring at short time scales, when the rainfall-runoff data used during the parameter-inference phase become coarser. It is not yet fully understood how the aggregation (or disaggregation) of the rainfall-runoff data affects parameter inference. In this study we analyse the impacts of the temporal distribution of rainfall for inferring model parameters at a coarse time scale and their effects in model performance when they are used at finer time scales, where data may not be available for calibration. The motivation is to improve runoff predictions and model performance at sub-daily time scales when parameters inferred at the daily scale are used for simulating at these scales. First, we calibrated the HBV-light conceptual hydrological model at the daily scale, but modelled discharge internally in 1-h time steps using 3 disaggregation procedures of the rainfall data. This was done in an attempt to maximise the information content of the input data used for calibration at the daily scale. One disaggregation

  16. State and model error estimation for distributed parameter systems. [in large space structure control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1979-01-01

    In-flight estimation of large structure model errors in order to detect inevitable deficiencies in large structure controller/estimator models is discussed. Such an estimation process is particularly applicable in the area of shape control system design required to maintain a prescribed static structural shape and, in addition, suppress dynamic disturbances due to the vehicle vibrational modes. The paper outlines a solution to the problem of static shape estimation where the vehicle shape must be reconstructed from a set of measurements discretely located throughout the structure. The estimation process is based on the principle of least-squares that inherently contains the definition and explicit computation of model error estimates that are optimal in some sense. Consequently, a solution is provided for the problem of estimation of static model errors (e.g., external loads). A generalized formulation applicable to distributed parameters systems is first worked out and then applied to a one-dimensional beam-like structural configuration.

  17. Finite-dimensional approximation for optimal fixed-order compensation of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Dennis S.; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    In controlling distributed parameter systems it is often desirable to obtain low-order, finite-dimensional controllers in order to minimize real-time computational requirements. Standard approaches to this problem employ model/controller reduction techniques in conjunction with LQG theory. In this paper we consider the finite-dimensional approximation of the infinite-dimensional Bernstein/Hyland optimal projection theory. This approach yields fixed-finite-order controllers which are optimal with respect to high-order, approximating, finite-dimensional plant models. The technique is illustrated by computing a sequence of first-order controllers for one-dimensional, single-input/single-output, parabolic (heat/diffusion) and hereditary systems using spline-based, Ritz-Galerkin, finite element approximation. Numerical studies indicate convergence of the feedback gains with less than 2 percent performance degradation over full-order LQG controllers for the parabolic system and 10 percent degradation for the hereditary system.

  18. Photoionization of He above the N =2 threshold. II. Angular distribution of photoelectrons and asymmetry parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, I.; Martin, F. )

    1992-04-01

    We report theoretical calculations for the {beta}{sub 2{ital p}}-asymmetry parameter in the photoionization of He(1{ital s}{sup 2}) above the {ital N}=2 ionization threshold. We use an extension of a method recently proposed (I. Sanchez and F. Martin, Phys. Rev. A 44, 7318 (1991)) that makes use of a Feshbach partitioning of the final-state wave function and an {ital L}{sup 2} representation of the coupled continuum states. Partial differential cross sections at emission angles 0{degree} and 90{degree} are also provided. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental data, thus showing the accuracy of the present method to study electron angular-distribution properties.

  19. New Directions in Asymptotically Stable Finite-dimensional Adaptive Control of Linear Distributed Parameter Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Distributed Parameter Systems (DPS), such as systems described by partial differential equations, require infinite-dimensional state space descriptions to correctly model their dynamical behavior. However, any adaptive control algorithm must be finite-dimensional in order to be implemented via on-line digital computers. Finite-dimensional adaptive control of linear DPS requires stability analysis of nonlinear, time-varying, infinite-dimensional systems. The structure of nonadaptive finite-dimensional control of linear DPS is summarized as it relates to the existence of limiting systems for adaptive control. Two candidate schemes for finite-dimensional adaptive control of DPS are described and critical issues in infinite-dimensional stability analysis are discussed, in particular, the invariance principle, center manifold theory, and relationships between input-output and internal stability.

  20. Distributed Parameter Control of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for Diesel-Powered Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakravesh, Hallas

    The main scope of this work is to design a distributed parameter control for SCR, which is modelled by using coupled hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs). This is a boundary control problem where the control objectives are to reduce the amount of NOx emissions and ammonia slip as far as possible. Two strategies are used to control SCR. The first strategy includes using the direct transcription (DT) as the open-loop control technique. The second strategy includes the design of a closed-loop control technique that uses a new numerical method developed in this work, which combines the method of characteristics and spectral decomposition, and the characteristic-based nonlinear model predictive control (CBNMPC) as the control algorithm. The results show that the designed advanced controllers are able to achieve very high control performance in terms of NOx and ammonia slip reduction.

  1. The influence of some model parameters on the impurity distribution implanted into substrate surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfenova, E. S.; Knyazeva, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model for description of the initial stage of ion implantation into the surface layer of the metal is presented. The interdependence of embedded impurity concentration and deformations arising from the impact of particles on the surface is investigated. The model takes into account the particle diffusion, the finite time of mass flux relaxation; the stress appearance due to a composition change of the surface layer and a mass transfer phenomenon under a stress gradient action. It is established that the interaction of mechanical waves and concentration leads to a distribution of concentration not corresponding to a pure diffusion process. The examples of coupled problems solution for different sets of model parameters are presented.

  2. Study on spatial distribution of plasma parameters in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, Hee-Woon; Lee, Woohyun; Kim, Ji-Won; Whang, Ki-Woong; Kim, Hyuk; Park, Wanjae

    2015-07-15

    Spatial distributions of various plasma parameters such as plasma density, electron temperature, and radical density in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (M-ICP) were investigated and compared. Electron temperature in between the rf window and the substrate holder of M-ICP was higher than that of ICP, whereas the one just above the substrate holder of M-ICP was similar to that of ICP when a weak (<8 G) magnetic field was employed. As a result, radical densities in M-ICP were higher than those in ICP and the etch rate of oxide in M-ICP was faster than that in ICP without severe electron charging in 90 nm high aspect ratio contact hole etch.

  3. On maximum likelihood estimation of the concentration parameter of von Mises-Fisher distributions.

    PubMed

    Hornik, Kurt; Grün, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Maximum likelihood estimation of the concentration parameter of von Mises-Fisher distributions involves inverting the ratio [Formula: see text] of modified Bessel functions and computational methods are required to invert these functions using approximative or iterative algorithms. In this paper we use Amos-type bounds for [Formula: see text] to deduce sharper bounds for the inverse function, determine the approximation error of these bounds, and use these to propose a new approximation for which the error tends to zero when the inverse of [Formula: see text] is evaluated at values tending to [Formula: see text] (from the left). We show that previously introduced rational bounds for [Formula: see text] which are invertible using quadratic equations cannot be used to improve these bounds. PMID:25309045

  4. Distributed Parameter Analysis of Pressure and Flow Disturbances in Rocket Propellant Feed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Wood, Don J.; Lightner, Charlene

    1966-01-01

    A digital distributed parameter model for computing the dynamic response of propellant feed systems is formulated. The analytical approach used is an application of the wave-plan method of analyzing unsteady flow. Nonlinear effects are included. The model takes into account locally high compliances at the pump inlet and at the injector dome region. Examples of the calculated transient and steady-state periodic responses of a simple hypothetical propellant feed system to several types of disturbances are presented. Included are flow disturbances originating from longitudinal structural motion, gimbaling, throttling, and combustion-chamber coupling. The analytical method can be employed for analyzing developmental hardware and offers a flexible tool for the calculation of unsteady flow in these systems.

  5. Model Predictive Optimal Control of a Time-Delay Distributed-Parameter Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal control method for a class of distributed-parameter systems governed by first order, quasilinear hyperbolic partial differential equations that arise in many physical systems. Such systems are characterized by time delays since information is transported from one state to another by wave propagation. A general closed-loop hyperbolic transport model is controlled by a boundary control embedded in a periodic boundary condition. The boundary control is subject to a nonlinear differential equation constraint that models actuator dynamics of the system. The hyperbolic equation is thus coupled with the ordinary differential equation via the boundary condition. Optimality of this coupled system is investigated using variational principles to seek an adjoint formulation of the optimal control problem. The results are then applied to implement a model predictive control design for a wind tunnel to eliminate a transport delay effect that causes a poor Mach number regulation.

  6. Impact of seasonal variation, age and smoking status on human semen parameters: The Massachusetts General Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zuying; Godfrey-Bailey, Linda; Schiff, Isaac; Hauser, Russ

    2004-01-01

    Background To investigate the relationship of human semen parameters with season, age and smoking status. Methods The present study used data from subjects recruited into an ongoing cross-sectional study on the relationship between environmental agents and semen characteristics. Our population consisted of 306 patients who presented to the Vincent Memorial Andrology Laboratory of Massachusetts General Hospital for semen evaluation. Sperm concentration and motility were measured with computer aided sperm analysis (CASA). Sperm morphology was scored using Tygerberg Kruger strict criteria. Regression analyses were used to investigate the relationships between semen parameters and season, age and smoking status, adjusting for abstinence interval. Results Sperm concentration in the spring was significantly higher than in winter, fall and summer (p < 0.05). There was suggestive evidence of higher sperm motility and percent of sperm with normal morphology in the spring than in the other seasons. There were no statistically significant relationships between semen parameters and smoking status, though current smokers tended to have lower sperm concentration. We also did not find a statistically significant relationship between age and semen parameters. Conclusions We found seasonal variations in sperm concentration and suggestive evidence of seasonal variation in sperm motility and percent sperm with normal morphology. Although smoking status was not a significant predictor of semen parameters, this may have been due to the small number of current smokers in the study. PMID:15507127

  7. Cobalt Distribution and Speciation: Effect of Aging, Intermittent Submergence, In situ Rice Roots

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciation and distribution of cobalt (Co) in soils is poorly understood. This study was conducted using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques to examine the influence of soluble Co(II) aging, submergence-dried cycling, and the presence of in vivo rice roots on the...

  8. Recent Changes in the U.S. Age at Death Distribution: Further Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, George C.; Manton, Kenneth G.

    1984-01-01

    Responds to discussion (Fries, 1984) of an earlier article (Myers and Manton, 1984) presenting empirical evidence on changes in the distribution of ages at death. Further analysis of the data is presented, including life expectancy changes from 1950-1978 and comparison of data for men and women from several countries. (JAC)

  9. Age distribution and seasonal dynamics of abomasal helminths in wild red deer from central Spain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study on age distribution and seasonal dynamics of abomasal helminths in wild red deer was conducted in Central Spain, by monthly samplings of fawns ( 2 yr) animals. Both intensity and prevalence of abomasal parasitism was higher in older animals, particularl...

  10. Impact of Hydrologic Variability on Nutrient Age Distribution in Intensively Managed Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Woo, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution, concentration, and transport of nutrients in agricultural landscapes are of significant societal concern. Our interests in reactive nitrogen and the nitrogen cycle have shifted from increasing the efficiency of nitrogen delivery to target crop species to decreasing environmental damage caused by intensive agricultural practices. Enhancing the reactive nitrogen use efficiency to increase food production to meet future demand inevitably contributes to an increase in the reactive nitrogen load in the ecosystem, and damaging the environment. However, due to the complexity of the nitrogen cycle, the dynamics of nitrogen in soils and its interactions with ecohydrological processes at the watershed and regional scales are not well understood to enable adequate remedial measures. To unravel the complexity of this dynamics we have developed a model for characterizing the nitrogen age (elapsed time) distribution. The goal of our study is to develop and analyze the dynamics of nitrogen in the context of age and transit times resulting from advection, mixing, and production/destruction processes; evaluate the effects of micro-topographic variability on the nitrogen age distributions; and investigate how the temporal dynamics of the nitrogen age distribution are affected by changes in the variability of climate drivers. Our study is performed for the Upper Sangamon River Basin in the Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively Managed Landscapes (IML-CZO).

  11. Age Dating Fluvial Sediment Storage Reservoirs to Construct Sediment Waiting Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalak, K.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Benthem, A.; Karwan, D. L.; Mahan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Suspended sediment transport is an important geomorphic process that can often control the transport of nutrients and contaminants. The time a particle spends in storage remains a critical knowledge gap in understanding particle trajectories through landscapes. We dated floodplain deposits in South River, VA, using fallout radionuclides (Pb-210, Cs-137), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and radiocarbon dating to determine sediment ages and construct sediment waiting time distributions. We have a total of 14 age dates in two eroding banks. We combine these age dates with a well-constrained history of mercury concentrations on suspended sediment in the river from an industrial release. Ages from fallout radionuclides document sedimentation from the early 1900s to the present, and agree with the history of mercury contamination. OSL dates span approximately 200 to 17,000 years old. We performed a standard Weibull analysis of nonexceedance to construct a waiting time distribution of floodplain sediment for the South River. The mean waiting time for floodplain sediment is 2930 years, while the median is approximately 710 years. When the floodplain waiting time distribution is combined with the waiting time distribution for in-channel sediment storage (available from previous studies), the mean waiting time shifts to approximately 680 years, suggesting that quantifying sediment waiting times for both channel and floodplain storage is critical in advancing knowledge of particle trajectories through watersheds.

  12. EFFECTS OF TOLUENE ON BRAIN OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging-related susceptibility to environmental chemicals is poorly understood. Oxidative stress (OS) appears to play an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to test whether OS is a potential toxicity pathway for tol...

  13. Working Memory Deficits in ADHD: The Contribution of Age, Learning/Language Difficulties, and Task Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowerby, Paula; Seal, Simon; Tripp, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To further define the nature of working memory (WM) impairments in children with combined-type ADHD. Method: A total of 40 Children with ADHD and an age and gender-matched control group (n = 40) completed two measures of visuo-spatial WM and two measures of verbal WM. The effects of age and learning/language difficulties on performance…

  14. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [adaptive control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control is investigated. A comprehensive examination of real-time centralized adaptive control options for flexible spacecraft is provided.

  15. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation.

  16. Determination of chronological aging parameters in epidermal keratinocytes by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Chen, Szu-Yu; Chou, Sin-Yo; Wang, Pei-Hsun; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is an important issue in geriatric and cosmetic dermatology. To quantitatively analyze changes in keratinocytes related to intrinsic aging, we exploited a 1230 nm-based in vivo harmonic generation microscopy, combining second- and third-harmonic generation modalities. 52 individuals (21 men and 31 women, age range 19–79) were examined on the sun-protected volar forearm. Through quantitative analysis by the standard algorithm provided, we found that the cellular and nuclear size of basal keratinocytes, but not that of granular cells, was significantly increased with advancing age. The cellular and nuclear areas, which have an increase of 0.51 μm2 and 0.15 μm2 per year, respectively, can serve as scoring indices for intrinsic skin aging. PMID:23304649

  17. Parameter identification of a distributed runoff model by the optimization software Colleo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Mamoru; Yamakage, Yuzuru; Tsuda, Morimasa; Anai, Hirokazu; Iwami, Yoichi

    2015-04-01

    The introduction of Colleo (Collection of Optimization software) is presented and case studies of parameter identification for a distributed runoff model are illustrated. In order to calculate discharge of rivers accurately, a distributed runoff model becomes widely used to take into account various land usage, soil-type and rainfall distribution. Feasibility study of parameter optimization is desired to be done in two steps. The first step is to survey which optimization algorithms are suitable for the problems of interests. The second step is to investigate the performance of the specific optimization algorithm. Most of the previous studies seem to focus on the second step. This study will focus on the first step and complement the previous studies. Many optimization algorithms have been proposed in the computational science field and a large number of optimization software have been developed and opened to the public with practically applicable performance and quality. It is well known that it is important to use suitable algorithms for the problems to obtain good optimization results efficiently. In order to achieve algorithm comparison readily, optimization software is needed with which performance of many algorithms can be compared and can be connected to various simulation software. Colleo is developed to satisfy such needs. Colleo provides a unified user interface to several optimization software such as pyOpt, NLopt, inspyred and R and helps investigate the suitability of optimization algorithms. 74 different implementations of optimization algorithms, Nelder-Mead, Particle Swarm Optimization and Genetic Algorithm, are available with Colleo. The effectiveness of Colleo was demonstrated with the cases of flood events of the Gokase River basin in Japan (1820km2). From 2002 to 2010, there were 15 flood events, in which the discharge exceeded 1000m3/s. The discharge was calculated with the PWRI distributed hydrological model developed by ICHARM. The target

  18. A distributed fault-detection and diagnosis system using on-line parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, T.-H.; Merrill, W.; Duyar, A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a model-based fault-detection and diagnosis system (FDD) is reviewed. The system can be used as an integral part of an intelligent control system. It determines the faults of a system from comparison of the measurements of the system with a priori information represented by the model of the system. The method of modeling a complex system is described and a description of diagnosis models which include process faults is presented. There are three distinct classes of fault modes covered by the system performance model equation: actuator faults, sensor faults, and performance degradation. A system equation for a complete model that describes all three classes of faults is given. The strategy for detecting the fault and estimating the fault parameters using a distributed on-line parameter identification scheme is presented. A two-step approach is proposed. The first step is composed of a group of hypothesis testing modules, (HTM) in parallel processing to test each class of faults. The second step is the fault diagnosis module which checks all the information obtained from the HTM level, isolates the fault, and determines its magnitude. The proposed FDD system was demonstrated by applying it to detect actuator and sensor faults added to a simulation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The simulation results show that the proposed FDD system can adequately detect the faults and estimate their magnitudes.

  19. Effect of water vapor on the distribution of the parameters of a turbulent wake

    SciTech Connect

    Pilyugin, N.N.; Tikhomirov, S.G.

    1985-07-01

    In the experimental study of phenomena occurring in the flow of air round models flying along a aeroballistic range with hypersonic velocities, the question arises of the effect of water vapor along the range on the measurements of the gas parameters, for example, on the electron concentration or on the intensity of the radiation. Water vapor is usually present in atmospheric air and, in the absence of special measures to remove it, it may have an influence on the results of measurements. In an earlier paper, a theoretical study was made of the effect of chemical reactions involving the participation of water vapor in the air on the chemiluminescent radiation in the wake alone. In particular, there was no consideration of the effect of water vapor on the electron concentration. In the present study, the results are given of calculations of the distributions of the nonequilibrium parameters in the wake, with allowance for the occurrence of chemical reactions in the air and water vapor under conditions characteristic of aeroballistic experiments.

  20. Solar cycle variation of the statistical distribution of the solar wind ɛ parameter and its constituent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindale, E.; Chapman, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    We use 20 years of Wind solar wind observations to investigate the solar cycle variation of the solar wind driving of the magnetosphere. For the first time, we use generalized quantile-quantile plots to compare the statistical distribution of four commonly used solar wind coupling parameters, Poynting flux, B2, the ɛ parameter, and vB, between the maxima and minima of solar cycles 23 and 24. We find the distribution is multicomponent and has the same functional form at all solar cycle phases; the change in distribution is captured by a simple transformation of variables for each component. The ɛ parameter is less sensitive than its constituent variables to changes in the distribution of extreme values between successive solar maxima. The quiet minimum of cycle 23 manifests only in lower extreme values, while cycle 24 was less active across the full distribution range.

  1. Typical Profiles and Distributions of Plasma and Magnetic Field Parameters in Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.; Démoulin, P.; Zhukov, A. N.; Gulisano, A. M.; Mierla, M.; Kilpua, E.; West, M.; Lacatus, D.; Paraschiv, A.; Janvier, M.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). They are important because of their simple internal magnetic field configuration, which resembles a magnetic flux rope, and because they represent one of the most geoeffective types of solar transients. In this study, we analyze their internal structure using a superposed epoch method on 63 events observed at L1 by the Advance Composition Explorer (ACE), between 1998 and 2006. In this way, we obtain an average profile for each plasma and magnetic field parameter at each point of the cloud. Furthermore, we take a fixed time-window upstream and downstream from the MC to also sample the regions preceding the cloud and the wake trailing it. We then perform a detailed analysis of the internal characteristics of the clouds and their surrounding solar wind environments. We find that the parameters studied are compatible with log-normal distribution functions. The plasma β and the level of fluctuations in the magnetic field vector are the best parameters to define the boundaries of MCs. We find that one third of the events shows a peak in plasma density close to the trailing edge of the flux ropes. We provide several possible explanations for this result and investigate if the density peak is of a solar origin (e.g. erupting prominence material) or formed during the magnetic cloud travel from the Sun to 1 AU. The most plausible explanation is the compression due to a fast overtaking flow, coming from a coronal hole located to the east of the solar source region of the magnetic cloud.

  2. Typical Profiles and Distributions of Plasma and Magnetic Field Parameters in Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.; Démoulin, P.; Zhukov, A. N.; Gulisano, A. M.; Mierla, M.; Kilpua, E.; West, M.; Lacatus, D.; Paraschiv, A.; Janvier, M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). They are important because of their simple internal magnetic field configuration, which resembles a magnetic flux rope, and because they represent one of the most geoeffective types of solar transients. In this study, we analyze their internal structure using a superposed epoch method on 63 events observed at L1 by the Advance Composition Explorer (ACE), between 1998 and 2006. In this way, we obtain an average profile for each plasma and magnetic field parameter at each point of the cloud. Furthermore, we take a fixed time-window upstream and downstream from the MC to also sample the regions preceding the cloud and the wake trailing it. We then perform a detailed analysis of the internal characteristics of the clouds and their surrounding solar wind environments. We find that the parameters studied are compatible with log-normal distribution functions. The plasma β and the level of fluctuations in the magnetic field vector are the best parameters to define the boundaries of MCs. We find that one third of the events shows a peak in plasma density close to the trailing edge of the flux ropes. We provide several possible explanations for this result and investigate if the density peak is of a solar origin ( e.g. erupting prominence material) or formed during the magnetic cloud travel from the Sun to 1 AU. The most plausible explanation is the compression due to a fast overtaking flow, coming from a coronal hole located to the east of the solar source region of the magnetic cloud.

  3. SAR imagery of moving targets: application of time-frequency distributions for estimating motion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimovich, Alexander M.; Peckham, C. D.; Teti, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-06-01

    It is well known that targets moving along track within a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) field of view are imaged as defocused objects. The SAR stripmap mode is tuned to stationary ground targets and the mismatch between the SAR processing parameters and the target motion parameters causes the energy to spill over to adjacent image pixels, thus not only hindering target feature extraction, but also reducing the probability of detection. The problem can be remedied by generating the image using a filter matched to the actual target motion parameters, effectively focusing the SAR image on the target. For a fixed rate of motion the target velocity can be estimated from the slope of the Doppler frequency characteristic. The processing is carried out on the range compressed data but before azimuth compression. The problem is similar to the classical problem of estimating the instantaneous frequency of a linear FM signal (chirp). This paper investigates the application of three different time-frequency analysis techniques to estimate the instantaneous Doppler frequency of range compressed SAR data. In particular, we compare the Wigner-Ville distribution, the Gabor expansion and the Short-Time Fourier transform with respect to their performance in noisy SAR data. Criteria are suggested to quantify the performance of each method in the joint time- frequency domain. It is shown that these methods exhibit sharp signal-to-noise threshold effects, i.e., a certain SNR below which the accuracy of the velocity estimation deteriorates rapidly. It is also shown that the methods differ with respect to their representation of the SAR data.

  4. A one-parameter family of transforms, linearizing convolution laws for probability distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Alexandru

    1995-03-01

    We study a family of transforms, depending on a parameter q∈[0,1], which interpolate (in an algebraic framework) between a relative (namely: - iz(log ℱ(·)) '(-iz)) of the logarithm of the Fourier transform for probability distributions, and its free analogue constructed by D. Voiculescu ([16, 17]). The classical case corresponds to q=1, and the free one to q=0. We describe these interpolated transforms: (a) in terms of partitions of finite sets, and their crossings; (b) in terms of weighted shifts; (c) by a matrix equation related to the method of Stieltjes for expanding continued J-fractions as power series. The main result of the paper is that all these descriptions, which extend basic approaches used for q=0 and/or q=1, remain equivalent for arbitrary q∈[0, 1]. We discuss a couple of basic properties of the convolution laws (for probability distributions) which are linearized by the considered family of transforms (these convolution laws interpolate between the usual convolution — at q=1, and the free convolution introduced by Voiculescu — at q=0). In particular, we note that description (c) mentioned in the preceding paragraph gives an insight of why the central limit law for the interpolated convolution has to do with the q-continuous Hermite orthogonal polynomials.

  5. Age-Related Modifications of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Parameters and White Matter Hyperintensities as Inter-Dependent Processes

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Amandine; Periot, Olivier; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Hiba, Bassem; Bordessoules, Martine; Chanraud, Sandra; Pérès, Karine; Amieva, Hélène; Dartigues, Jean-François; Allard, Michèle; Catheline, Gwénaëlle

    2016-01-01

    Microstructural changes of White Matter (WM) associated with aging have been widely described through Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) parameters. In parallel, White Matter Hyperintensities (WMH) as observed on a T2-weighted MRI are extremely common in older individuals. However, few studies have investigated both phenomena conjointly. The present study investigates aging effects on DTI parameters in absence and in presence of WMH. Diffusion maps were constructed based on 21 directions DTI scans of young adults (n = 19, mean age = 33 SD = 7.4) and two age-matched groups of older adults, one presenting low-level-WMH (n = 20, mean age = 78, SD = 3.2) and one presenting high-level-WMH (n = 20, mean age = 79, SD = 5.4). Older subjects with low-level-WMH presented modifications of DTI parameters in comparison to younger subjects, fitting with the DTI pattern classically described in aging, i.e., Fractional Anisotropy (FA) decrease/Radial Diffusivity (RD) increase. Furthermore, older subjects with high-level-WMH showed higher DTI modifications in Normal Appearing White Matter (NAWM) in comparison to those with low-level-WMH. Finally, in older subjects with high-level-WMH, FA, and RD values of NAWM were associated with to WMH burden. Therefore, our findings suggest that DTI modifications and the presence of WMH would be two inter-dependent processes but occurring within different temporal windows. DTI changes would reflect the early phase of white matter changes and WMH would appear as a consequence of those changes. PMID:26834625

  6. Analysis of the Parameters Influencing the Quench-Aging Behavior of Ultra-Low-Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massardier, V.; Merlin, J.

    2009-05-01

    The influence of the annealing temperature and of the grain size on the quench-aging behavior of ultra-low-carbon (ULC) steels was investigated by thermoelectric power measurements (TEPs) and mechanical testing. The TEP technique showed that the quench aging of ULC steels occurs in two distinct stages: (1) the segregation of carbon atoms to the grain boundaries and (2) the precipitation of iron carbides. It was suggested that the degree of grain boundary coverage by the carbon atoms resulting from the annealing or aging conditions influences the development of the yield point of ULC steels.

  7. Aging Stem Cells Lose the Capability to Distribute Damaged Proteins Asymmetrically.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the interplay between reversible epigenetic changes and potentially more difficult to reverse accumulation of damaged macromolecules is a central challenge in developing treatments for aging-associated dysfunction. One hypothesis is that epigenetic drift leads to subtle losses of homeostatic maintenance mechanisms, that in turn, lead to the accumulation of damaged macromolecules, which then further degrade homeostasis. A key mechanism of maintaining optimal cell function is asymmetrical division, whereby cellular damage is segregated away from cells that need to undergo further proliferation, such as stem cells. Such asymmetrical distribution of damaged macromolecules has been observed during cell division in many organisms, from yeast to human embryonic stem cells, and depends on diffusion barriers (DBs) in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In a recent study, these results have been extended to neural stem cells (NSCs), in which the ability of the ER DB to promote asymmetrical distribution of damaged proteins deteriorates with age. NSC function declines with age as proliferative capacity is reduced. The loss of asymmetric protein distribution correlates with the loss of NSC proliferative capacity. Ectopic expression of progerin, an altered form of lamin A, is associated with the premature aging disorder, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Progerin's expression also increases with normal aging due to mis-splicing, weakening the ER DB. Recent work suggests that many cell signaling pathway changes associated with HGPS are replicated during normal aging in cultured cells. Moreover, the detrimental changes associated with progerin expression in HGPS are partially reversible experimentally after treatment with statins, a farnesyltransferase inhibitor, a isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase inhibitor, or sulforaphane. It will be of great interest if these compounds can also reverse the aging-associated permeability of the ER

  8. Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

    2013-12-31

    This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based

  9. Impact of Hydrologic and Micro-topographic Variabilities on Spatial Distribution of Mean Soil-Nitrogen Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, D.; Kumar, P.

    2015-12-01

    Excess reactive nitrogen in soils of intensively managed agricultural fields causes adverse environmental impact, and continues to remain a global concern. Many novel strategies have been developed to provide better management practices and, yet, the problem remains unresolved. The objective of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional model to characterize the spatially distributed ``age" of soil-nitrogen (nitrate and ammonia-ammonium) across a watershed. We use the general theory of age, which provides an assessment of the elapsed time since nitrogen is introduced into the soil system. Micro-topographic variability incorporates heterogeneity of nutrient transformations and transport associated with topographic depressions that form temporary ponds and produce prolonged periods of anoxic conditions, and roadside agricultural ditches that support rapid surface movement. This modeling effort utilizes 1-m Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. We find a significant correlation between hydrologic variability and mean nitrate age that enables assessment of preferential flow paths of nitrate leaching. The estimation of the mean nitrogen age can thus serve as a tool to disentangle complex nitrogen dynamics by providing the analysis of the time scales of soil-nitrogen transformation and transport processes without introducing additional parameters.

  10. Delayed Adulthood, Delayed Desistance? Trends in the Age Distribution of Problem Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Hayford, Sarah R.; Furstenberg, Frank F.

    2009-01-01

    As the transition to adulthood becomes more protracted and less orderly, fewer young people occupy adult roles and experience the social control associated with these roles. One might therefore expect behaviors associated with the teenage years to spill over into older age groups, reflecting postponed entrance into full social adulthood. We test this hypothesis by examining trends over time in the age distribution of crime, substance use, and violent death. We find little evidence that behaviors typical of adolescence are moving upward to older ages. Although the achievement of adult roles is being pushed to older ages, this stretching of the transition to adulthood is not reflected in the observed patterns of substance use, violent death, and arrests. PMID:19633730

  11. Uncertainty propagation in up-scaling of subsoil parameters, no fixed distributions allowed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourens, Aris; van Geer, Frans C.

    2013-04-01

    When creating numerical groundwater models, the structure and properties of the subsoil is indispensable information. Like all model data, these data are subject to uncertainty. Building a groundwater model, the available geological information, like the geological structure and parameter values, has to be up-scaled and aggregated to layers at model scale. If the uncertainty of the geological data is known, in principle, the uncertainty of the up-scaled model layer can be evaluated. The up-scaling from borehole point data to aquifer scale data can be performed by kriging interpolation. However, using this technique, the possibilities to propagate the uncertainty of the borehole data are limited. The most common way to assess the uncertainty is to use kriging in combination with methods like Monte Carlo simulation. If many parameters are involved this is a time consuming process, which does not always yield a useful result. We propose a method, in combination with kriging interpolation, to perform the uncertainty propagation of the subsoil parameters by taking into account the complete probability density functions (PDF) of all individual parameters. This method does not rely on a specific type of distribution function of the PDFs and can therefore widely be used. In the Netherlands, like in many other countries, a large database is available containing borehole data. Interpretation of these data involves assigning hydraulic conductivity values to all the identified thin geological layers. These conductivity values, derived from all kinds of tests, are not fixed values but are represented by a certain range that can be described by a (log-normal) PDF. Beside the uncertainty of the conductivities also the layer depth and thickness are subject to uncertainty and can be described by PDFs. When performing the interpolation of the borehole point data to the desired groundwater model grid, the PDFs of the conductivities and layer depths are used throughout all

  12. Selecting robust solutions from a trade-off surface through the evaluation of the distribution of parameter sets in objective space and parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumedah, G.; Berg, A. A.; Wineberg, M.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrological models are increasingly been calibrated using multi-objective genetic algorithms (GAs). Multi-objective GAs facilitate the evaluation of several model evaluation objectives and the examination of massive combinations of parameter sets. Usually, the outcome is a set of several equally-accurate parameter sets which make-up a trade-off surface between the objective functions often referred to as Pareto set. The Pareto set describes a decision-front in a way that each solution has unique values in parameter space with competing accuracy in objective space. An automated framework of choosing a single from such a trade-off surface has not been thoroughly investigated in the model calibration literature. As a result, this presentation will demonstrate an automated selection of robust solutions from a trade-off surface using the distribution of solutions in both objective space and parameter space. The trade-off surface was generated using the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II) to calibrate the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for streamflow simulation based on model bias and root mean square error. Our selection method generates solutions with unique properties including a representative pathway in parameter space, a basin of attraction or the center of mass in objective space, and a proximity to the origin in objective space. Additionally, our framework determines a robust solution as a balanced compromise for the distribution of solutions in objective space and parameter space. That is, the robust solution emphasizes stability in model parameter values and in objective function values in a way that similarity in parameter space implies similarity in objective space.

  13. The Age, Mass, and Size Distributions of Star Clusters in M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Rupali; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Dinino, Daiana; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Chien, L.-H.; Schinnerer, Eva; Meidt, Sharon

    2016-06-01

    We present a new catalog of 3816 compact star clusters in the grand design spiral galaxy M51 based on observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. The age distribution of the clusters declines starting at very young ages, and can be represented by a power law, {dN}/dτ \\propto {τ }γ , with γ =-0.65+/- 0.15. No significant changes in the shape of the age distribution at different masses is observed. The mass function of the clusters younger than τ ≈ 400 {{Myr}} can also be described by a power law, {dN}/{dM}\\propto {M}β , with β ≈ \\-2.1+/- 0.2. We compare these distributions with the predictions from various cluster disruption models, and find that they are consistent with models where clusters disrupt approximately independent of their initial mass, but not with models where lower mass clusters are disrupted earlier than their higher mass counterparts. We find that the half-light radii of clusters more massive than M ≈ 3× {10}4 {M}ȯ and with ages between 100 and 400 {{Myr}} are larger by a factor of ≈3–4 than their counterparts that are younger than 107 years old, suggesting that the clusters physically expand during their early life.

  14. Relation of thromboelastography parameters to conventional coagulation tests used to evaluate the hypercoagulable state of aged fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Guan, Zhao; Xu, Qinzhu; Zhao, Lei; Song, Ying; Wang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Fractures are common among aged people, and rapid assessment of the coagulation status is important. The thromboelastography (TEG) test can give a series of coagulation parameters and has been widely used in clinics. In this research, we looked at fracture patients over 60 and compared their TEG results with those of healthy controls. Since there is a paucity of studies comparing TEG assessments with conventional coagulation tests, we aim to clarify the relationship between TEG values and the values given by conventional coagulation tests.Forty fracture patients (27 femur and 13 humerus) over 60 years old were included in the study. The change in their coagulation status was evaluated by TEG before surgery within 4 hours after the fracture. Changes in TEG parameters were analyzed compared with controls. Conventional coagulation test results for the patients, including activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), international normalized ratio (INR), fibrinogen, and platelets, were also acquired, and correlation analysis was done with TEG parameters, measuring similar aspects of the coagulation cascade. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of TEG parameters for detecting raised fibrinogen levels were also analyzed.The K (time to 20 mm clot amplitude) and R (reaction time) values of aged fracture patients were lower than controls. The values for angle, maximal amplitude (MA), and coagulation index (CI) were raised compared with controls, indicating a hypercoagulable state. Correlation analysis showed that there were significant positive correlations between fibrinogen and MA/angle, between platelets and MA, and between APTT and R as well. There was significant negative correlation between fibrinogen and K. In addition, K values have better sensitivity and specificity for detecting elevated fibrinogen concentration than angle and MA values.Aged fracture patients tend to be in a hypercoagulable state, and this could be effectively reflected by a TEG test

  15. Reconstructing merger timelines using star cluster age distributions: the case of MCG+08-11-002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Medling, Anne M.; U, Vivian; Max, Claire E.; Sanders, David; Kewley, Lisa J.

    2016-05-01

    We present near-infrared imaging and integral field spectroscopy of the centre of the dusty luminous infrared galaxy merger MCG+08-11-002, taken using the Near InfraRed Camera 2 (NIRC2) and the OH-Suppressing InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (OSIRIS) on Keck II. We achieve a spatial resolution of ˜25 pc in the K band, allowing us to resolve 41 star clusters in the NIRC2 images. We calculate the ages of 22/25 star clusters within the OSIRIS field using the equivalent widths of the CO 2.3 μm absorption feature and the Br γ nebular emission line. The star cluster age distribution has a clear peak at ages ≲ 20 Myr, indicative of current starburst activity associated with the final coalescence of the progenitor galaxies. There is a possible second peak at ˜65 Myr which may be a product of the previous close passage of the galaxy nuclei. We fit single and double starburst models to the star cluster age distribution and use Monte Carlo sampling combined with two-sided Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests to calculate the probability that the observed data are drawn from each of the best-fitting distributions. There is a >90 per cent chance that the data are drawn from either a single or double starburst star formation history, but stochastic sampling prevents us from distinguishing between the two scenarios. Our analysis of MCG+08-11-002 indicates that star cluster age distributions provide valuable insights into the timelines of galaxy interactions and may therefore play an important role in the future development of precise merger stage classification systems.

  16. Social network analysis - centrality parameters and individual network positions of agonistic behavior in pigs over three different age levels.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Kathrin; Scheffler, Katharina; Czycholl, Irena; Krieter, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the network structure of agonistic interactions helps to understand the formation and the development of aggressive behavior. Therefore, video observation data of 149 pigs over three different age levels were investigated for 2 days each directly after mixing (65 groups in the rearing area, 24 groups in the growing stable and 12 groups in the breeding stable). The aim of the study was to use network analysis to investigate the development of individual network positions of specific animals and to determine whether centrality parameters in previous mixing situations have an impact on the future behavior of the animals. The results of the weighted degree centrality indicated that weaned pigs had a higher fighting intensity directly after mixing compared to growing pigs and gilts. Also, the number of different opponents (degree centrality) was higher compared to the older age groups. The betweenness centrality showed relatively small values and no significant differences between the different age levels, whereas the closeness centrality showed high values at all observed age levels. Experiences gained in previous agonistic interactions had an impact on the centrality parameters in subsequent mixing situations. It was shown that the position of individual animals in agonistic interaction networks can be characterized using social network analysis and that changes over different age levels can be detected. Therefore, social network analysis provides insights into the formation and evolution of behavioral patterns which could be of particular interest for the identification of key factors with regard to abnormal behavior (e.g. tail biting). PMID:25932371

  17. Age-Associated Changes in the Spectral and Statistical Parameters of Surface Electromyogram of Tibialis Anterior.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Ariba; Arjunan, Sridhar Poosapadi; Kumar, Dinesh Kant

    2016-01-01

    Age-related neuromuscular change of Tibialis Anterior (TA) is a leading cause of muscle strength decline among the elderly. This study has established the baseline for age-associated changes in sEMG of TA at different levels of voluntary contraction. We have investigated the use of Gaussianity and maximal power of the power spectral density (PSD) as suitable features to identify age-associated changes in the surface electromyogram (sEMG). Eighteen younger (20-30 years) and 18 older (60-85 years) cohorts completed two trials of isometric dorsiflexion at four different force levels between 10% and 50% of the maximal voluntary contraction. Gaussianity and maximal power of the PSD of sEMG were determined. Results show a significant increase in sEMG's maximal power of the PSD and Gaussianity with increase in force for both cohorts. It was also observed that older cohorts had higher maximal power of the PSD and lower Gaussianity. These age-related differences observed in the PSD and Gaussianity could be due to motor unit remodelling. This can be useful for noninvasive tracking of age-associated neuromuscular changes. PMID:27610379

  18. Age-Associated Changes in the Spectral and Statistical Parameters of Surface Electromyogram of Tibialis Anterior

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Age-related neuromuscular change of Tibialis Anterior (TA) is a leading cause of muscle strength decline among the elderly. This study has established the baseline for age-associated changes in sEMG of TA at different levels of voluntary contraction. We have investigated the use of Gaussianity and maximal power of the power spectral density (PSD) as suitable features to identify age-associated changes in the surface electromyogram (sEMG). Eighteen younger (20–30 years) and 18 older (60–85 years) cohorts completed two trials of isometric dorsiflexion at four different force levels between 10% and 50% of the maximal voluntary contraction. Gaussianity and maximal power of the PSD of sEMG were determined. Results show a significant increase in sEMG's maximal power of the PSD and Gaussianity with increase in force for both cohorts. It was also observed that older cohorts had higher maximal power of the PSD and lower Gaussianity. These age-related differences observed in the PSD and Gaussianity could be due to motor unit remodelling. This can be useful for noninvasive tracking of age-associated neuromuscular changes. PMID:27610379

  19. Estimating the spatiotemporal distribution of geochemical parameters associated with biostimulation using spectral induced polarization data and hierarchical Bayesian models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinsong; Hubbard, Susan S.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Flores Orozco, AdriáN.; Kemna, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    We developed a hierarchical Bayesian model to estimate the spatiotemporal distribution of aqueous geochemical parameters associated with in-situ bioremediation using surface spectral induced polarization (SIP) data and borehole geochemical measurements collected during a bioremediation experiment at a uranium-contaminated site near Rifle, Colorado (USA). The SIP data were first inverted for Cole-Cole parameters, including chargeability, time constant, resistivity at the DC frequency, and dependence factor, at each pixel of two-dimensional grids using a previously developed stochastic method. Correlations between the inverted Cole-Cole parameters and the wellbore-based groundwater chemistry measurements indicative of key metabolic processes within the aquifer (e.g., ferrous iron, sulfate, uranium) were established and used as a basis for petrophysical model development. The developed Bayesian model consists of three levels of statistical submodels: (1) data model, providing links between geochemical and geophysical attributes, (2) process model, describing the spatial and temporal variability of geochemical properties in the subsurface system, and (3) parameter model, describing prior distributions of various parameters and initial conditions. The unknown parameters were estimated using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. By combining the temporally distributed geochemical data with the spatially distributed geophysical data, we obtained the spatiotemporal distribution of ferrous iron, sulfate, and sulfide, and their associated uncertainty information. The obtained results can be used to assess the efficacy of the bioremediation treatment over space and time and to constrain reactive transport models.

  20. Aged boreal biomass-burning aerosol size distributions from BORTAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K. M.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J. W.; Duck, T. J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number-size distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellite) measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ~ 1-2 days) from boreal wildfires in northwestern Ontario. The composite median size distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 230 nm (number-median diameter) and σ = 1.5, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA / ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.09-0.17 μg m-3 ppbv-1 (parts per billion by volume) with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA (organic aerosol) production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period (plume age: 1-2 days), though it does not preclude OA production/loss at earlier stages. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA / ΔCO enhancement ratios. We

  1. Determining probability distributions of parameter performances for time-series model calibration: A river system trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Shaun Sang Ho; Hughes, Justin Douglas; Chen, Jie; Dutta, Dushmanta; Vaze, Jai

    2015-11-01

    A calibration method is presented that uses a sub-period resampling method to estimate probability distributions of performance for different parameter sets. Where conventional calibration methods implicitly identify the best performing parameterisations on average, the new method looks at the consistency of performance during sub-periods. The method is implemented with the conceptual river reach algorithms within the Australian Water Resources Assessments River (AWRA-R) model in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. The new method is tested for 192 reaches in a cross-validation scheme and results are compared to a traditional split-sample calibration-validation implementation. This is done to evaluate the new technique's ability to predict daily streamflow outside the calibration period. The new calibration method produced parameterisations that performed better in validation periods than optimum calibration parameter sets for 103 reaches and produced the same parameterisations for 35 reaches. The method showed a statistically significant improvement to predictive performance and potentially provides more rational flux terms over traditional split-sample calibration methods. Particular strengths of the proposed calibration method is that it avoids extra weighting towards rare periods of good agreement and also prevents compensating biases through time. The method can be used as a diagnostic tool to evaluate stochasticity of modelled systems and used to determine suitable model structures of different time-series models. Although the method is demonstrated using a hydrological model, the method is not limited to the field of hydrology and could be adopted for many different time-series modelling applications.

  2. Transfer of antioxidants at the interfaces of model food emulsions: distributions and thermodynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Losada-Barreiro, Sonia; Sánchez-Paz, Verónica; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos

    2015-01-21

    Knowledge on the driving force for the hydrophobic effect that partitions antioxidants (AOs) between the oil (O), aqueous (W) and interfacial (I) regions of food emulsions is crucial to predict their efficiency in inhibiting lipid oxidation and to preserve the organoleptic properties of lipid-based foods. Here, we have investigated the effects of temperature and surfactant volume fraction (ΦI) on the distribution of two representative AOs, the water insoluble α-tocopherol (TOC) and the oil insoluble caffeic acid (CA), in a model food emulsion composed of stripped corn oil, acidic water and the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. The distribution of the AOs is assessed in the intact emulsions by employing a well-established kinetic method based on the reaction between a hydrophobic arenediazonium ion and the AOs. The variations of the observed rate constant, kobs, with ΦI are interpreted on the grounds of the pseudophase kinetic model, which provides values for the interfacial rate constant kI and the partition constants between the aqueous-interfacial (P) and oil-interfacial (P) regions of the emulsions. From the variations of P, P and kI at a series of temperatures, we determined the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy values for the transfer of CA from the water to the interfacial (W → I) region and of TOC from the oil to the interfacial (O → I) regions of the emulsions, and the activation parameters for the reaction in the interfacial region. Activation energy values are in line with those expected for a bimolecular reaction. Results show that the W → I and O → I transfer processes are spontaneous and entropy driven. PMID:25408193

  3. Behavioral responses to and brain distribution of morphine in mature adult and aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, C.K.; Ho, I.K.; Hoskins, B.

    1986-03-01

    Mature adult (3-6 mo old) and aged (2 yr old) male ICR mice were injected with 10 to 100 mg/kg morphine, s.c. The ED50 values for running behavior (as measured using Stoelting activity monitors and having each mouse serve as its own control) representing 5 times control activity was approximately 7.5 mg/kg for aged mice and approximately 17.5 mg/kg for the mature adults. The ED50 values for analgesia 1 hr after morphine administration using the tail-flick method (max. response time = 8 sec) were approx. 70 mg/kg for the aged mice and 15 mg/kg for the mature adults. One hour after injecting /sup 3/H-morphine at doses of 30 and 100 mg/kg, 0.13 and 0.14% of the doses appeared in brains of aged and mature adult mice, respectively. Regional distribution of the morphine was the same for both age groups. Expressed as percent of total brain morphine, it was as follows: cortex, 30%; midbrain, 18%; cerebellum, 17%; medulla, 12%; pons, 9%; striatum, 8% and periaqueductal gray, 6%. Expressed as g morphine/g tissue for the 2 doses, the distribution was; periaqueductal gray, 30 and 80; striatum, 9 and 34; medulla, 6 and 20 pons; 5 and 19; cerebellum, 4 and 13; midbrain 2.5 and 8.5 and cortex, 2 and 8. These results suggest that the differences in response to morphine by the two age groups were due to age-related differences in opioid receptor populations and/or affinities.

  4. Age-specific changes in electrocardiographic parameters in bipolar limb leads of conscious female native cats of Odisha

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Subhashree; Mahapatra, A. P. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Kundu, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study and compare the age-specific changes in electrocardiographic (ECG) parameters in bipolar limb leads of conscious female native cats of Odisha. Materials and Methods: 20 healthy female native cats aged between 4 and 36 months of age were selected for the study. These queens were divided into two groups of 10 animals each. Group 1 constituted the queens aged 4-10 months (before puberty) with a mean weight of 2.28 kg (±0.4 standard error [SE]), and those aged 11-36 months (after puberty) with a mean weight of 3.72 kg (±0.6 SE) were in Group 2. The ECG was recorded with a 12-lead standard ECG recorder, Cardiart 108 T-MK VII-BPL (India) in the Leads I, II, and III. Results: The mean heart rates were 160.73 (±7.83) beats/min and 139.09 (±2.72) beats/min in the cats aged 4-10 months and 11-36 months, respectively. Significant differences existed among Q- and R-wave amplitudes and duration of QT-interval in Lead I. In Lead II, duration of QT and RR intervals, duration of ST-segment and amplitudes of P- and R-waves varied significantly. Significant differences were also observed in the P- and R-wave amplitudes in Lead III. The mean electrical axis was 63.11 (±1.98°) and 50.03 (±4.86°) in the cats aged 4-10 months and 11-36 months, respectively. Conclusion: Since the ECG studies on conscious cats are scanty, and the number of native cats being presented in veterinary hospitals and clinics has increased drastically, there is a need to establish the reference values for ECG parameters in conscious native cats so that the cardiovascular abnormalities can be predicted. PMID:27051200

  5. [Age dynamics of functional parameters in men in the Polar region].

    PubMed

    Solonin, Iu G; Boĭko, E R; Markov, A L

    2013-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis about rapid involution of functional parameters in residents in the Polar region, the functional parameters in men of 20-69 years have been compared in cross-sectional study. There is a tendency to a steady decrease of height, strength indices, parameter of muscle working capacity, balancing of the body when standing on one leg, vital capacity, cardiac output, tolerance to hypoxemia, level of physical health, adrenocorticotropic hormone and testosterone levels and an increase of body mass index, index of coordination (impairment of motor coordination), time of visual-motor response, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, index of functional changes, insulin level. More pronounced decline of functions is observed in men after 50 years. PMID:24738254

  6. Ages and metallicities for quiescent galaxies in the Shapley supercluster: driving parameters of the stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Hudson, Michael J.

    2009-12-01

    We use high signal-to-noise spectroscopy for a sample of 232 quiescent galaxies in the Shapley supercluster, to investigate how their stellar populations depend on velocity dispersion (σ), luminosity and stellar mass. The sample spans a large range in velocity dispersion (30-300kms-1) and in luminosity (MR from -18.7 to -23.2). Estimates of age, total metallicity (Z/H) and α-element abundance ratio (α/Fe) were derived from absorption-line analysis, using single-burst models of Thomas and collaborators. Using the Rose CaII index, we conclude that recent star formation (frosting) events are not responsible for the intermediate ages observed in some of the galaxies. Age, Z/H and α/Fe are correlated positively with velocity dispersion, but we also find significant residual trends with luminosity: at given σ, the brighter galaxies are younger, less α-enriched and have higher Z/H. At face value, these results might suggest that the stellar populations depend on stellar mass as well as on velocity dispersion. However, we show that the observed trends can be reproduced by models in which the stellar populations depend systematically only on σ, and are independent of stellar mass M*. For age, the observed luminosity correlation arises because young galaxies are brighter, at fixed M*. For metallicity, the observed luminosity dependence arises because metal-rich galaxies, at fixed mass, tend also to be younger, and hence brighter. We find a good match to the observed luminosity correlations with age ~σ+0.40, Z/H~σ+0.35,α/Fe ~σ+0.20, where the slopes are close to those found when fitting traditional scaling relations. We conclude that the star formation and enrichment histories of galaxies are determined primarily by the depth of their gravitational potential wells. The observed residual correlations with luminosity do not imply a corresponding dependence on stellar mass.

  7. Modeling and control for heave dynamics of a flexible wing micro aerial vehicle distributed parameter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Lisa M.

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, much research has been motivated by the idea of biologically-inspired flight. It is a conjecture of the United States Air Force that incorporating characteristics of biological flight into air vehicles will significantly improve the maneuverability and performance of modern aircraft. Although there are studies which involve the aerodynamics, structural dynamics, modeling, and control of flexible wing micro aerial vehicles (MAVs), issues of control and vehicular modeling as a whole are largely unexplored. Modeling with such dynamics lends itself to systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) with nonlinearities, and limited control theory is available for such systems. In this work, a multiple component structure consisting of two Euler-Bernoulli beams connected to a rigid mass is used to model the heave dynamics of an aeroelastic wing MAV, which is acted upon by a nonlinear aerodynamic lift force. We seek to employ tools from distributed parameter modeling and linear control theory in an effort to achieve agile flight potential of flexible, morphable wing MAV airframes. Theoretical analysis of the model is conducted, which includes generating solutions to the eigenvalue problem for the system and determining well-posedness and the attainment of a C 0-semigroup for the linearly approximated model. In order to test the model's ability to track to a desired state and to gain insight into optimal morphing trajectories, two control objectives are employed on the model: target state tracking and morphing trajectory over time.

  8. Characterization of Vertical Velocity and Drop Size Distribution Parameters in Widespread Precipitation at ARM Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Giangrande S. E.; Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

    2012-02-01

    Extended, high-resolution measurements of vertical air motion and median volume drop diameter D0 in widespread precipitation from three diverse Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) locations [Lamont, Oklahoma, Southern Great Plains site (SGP); Niamey, Niger; and Black Forest, Germany] are presented. The analysis indicates a weak (0-10 cm{sup -1}) downward air motion beneath the melting layer for all three regions, a magnitude that is to within the typical uncertainty of the retrieval methods. On average, the hourly estimated standard deviation of the vertical air motion is 0.25 m s{sup -1} with no pronounced vertical structure. Profiles of D0 vary according to region and rainfall rate. The standard deviation of 1-min-averaged D0 profiles for isolated rainfall rate intervals is 0.3-0.4 mm. Additional insights into the form of the raindrop size distribution are provided using available dual-frequency Doppler velocity observations at SGP. The analysis suggests that gamma functions better explain paired velocity observations and radar retrievals for the Oklahoma dataset. This study will be useful in assessing uncertainties introduced in the measurement of precipitation parameters from ground-based and spaceborne remote sensors that are due to small-scale variability.

  9. Transmission integral analysis of Mössbauer spectra displaying hyperfine parameter distributions with arbitrary profile

    SciTech Connect

    Klencsár, Zoltán

    2014-10-27

    Accurate quantitative analysis of Mössbauer spectra displaying thickness effects requires the consideration of the so-called transmission integral when modeling the spectral shape. Whereas this is straightforward when the correct model for the decomposition of the absorber's nuclear resonance absorption cross-section into individual components is a priori known, in the absence of such knowledge and notably in the presence of hyperfine parameter distributions with an unknown profile, the so-called model-independent evaluation methods could be used to fit the spectra. However, the methods available for this purpose were developed for the analysis of spectra for which the thin absorber approximation is valid, and thus they do not take the sample thickness and related effects into account. Consequently, in order to use them for spectra displaying thickness effects, their usage needs to be generalized by combining them with transmission integral fitting. A new algorithm realizing such a generalized version of the Hesse-Rübartsch model-independent evaluation method was developed recently as an integral part of the MossWinn program. In the present work, the working principle of the newly developed algorithm is described in details along with examples illustrating the capabilities of the method for the case of {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  10. Distributions and averages of electron density parameters: Explaining the effects of gradient corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupan, Ales; Burke, Kieron; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Perdew, John P.

    1997-06-01

    We analyze the electron densities n(r) of atoms, molecules, solids, and surfaces. The distributions of values of the Seitz radius rs=(3/4πn)1/3 and the reduced density gradient s=|∇n|/(2(3π2)1/3n4/3) in an electron density indicate which ranges of these variables are significant for physical processes. We also define energy-weighted averages of these variables, and , from which local spin density (LSD) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation energies may be estimated. The changes in these averages upon rearrangement of the nuclei (atomization of molecules or solids, stretching of bond lengths or lattice parameters, change of crystal structure, etc.) are used to explain why GGA corrects LSD in the way it does. A thermodynamic-like inequality (essentially d/>d/2) determines whether the gradient corrections drive a process forward. We use this analysis to explain why gradient corrections usually stretch bonds (but not for example H-H bonds), reduce atomization and surface energies, and raise energy barriers to formation at transition states.

  11. Vibration suppression of distributed parameter flexible structures by Integral Consensus Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Ehsan; Mahmoodi, S. Nima

    2016-03-01

    Integral Consensus Control (ICC) is proposed and implemented in this paper for the first time, as a novel approach for vibration control in distributed parameter flexible structures. The ICC consists of multiple parallel first-order lossy integrators, with the goal of targeting all major participating resonant modes in the oscillation of the structure. The vibration control design is taken to a different level, by integrating the concept of consensus control design into the new dynamics. Each control patch on the flexible structure is considered as a node of a network, and a communication topology with consensus control terms are augmented in the controller design dynamics. The result is an effective vibration controller, which is also robust to failures and inconsistencies in the control system. A cantilever is used as a sample flexible structure to investigate the control method. Multi-agent representation of the system, state estimator dynamics and the ICC model are designed for the structure. Extensive numerical simulations have been conducted to show the suppression performance of the ICC under different input disturbances. A comparative study is presented to show the advantage of the decentralized design over the conventional centralized approach. The new consensus control design provides new possibilities to vibration control problems, where an effective, robust and synchronized suppression is needed.

  12. Calibration of rainfall-runoff models: The effect of the temporal distribution of rainfall on uncertainties in model parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleris, Vassilios; Kourakos, Vassilios; Langousis, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The temporal distribution of rainfall, which is used as input in rainfall-runoff simulations, determines (along with the model parameters) the form of the simulated hydrographs of the total runoff. Independent of the method used for the calibration of a rainfall-runoff model, the uncertainty in estimating the model parameters depends on the smoothness of the measured hydrographs. For instance, the estimation of those parameters that determine the recession limp of a hydrograph, which is relatively smooth, is less uncertain than the estimation of the parameters determining the peaks of a hydrograph. The smoothness of a runoff hydrograph mainly depends on the temporal distribution of rainfall, which enforces the runoff in the catchment. In this study we investigate the uncertainty in model parameter estimation with respect to the temporal distribution of rainfall. To do so we use smoothed rainfall distributions to study the efficiency of adaptive methods when calibrating rainfall-runoff models. The investigations are performed using the ENNS rainfall-runoff model (Nachtnebel et al., 1993), as follows: (a) The equations used in ENNS are written in dimensionless form to reduce the number of model parameters. (b) Starting with smooth rainfall distributions over the wet period of the year (e.g. uniform, sinusoidal or other distributions) and proceeding with measured distributions smoothed to different degrees, we investigate the sensitivity of the total runoff and its particular components to different model parameters. In this way we assess the effects of the temporal distribution of rainfall on the uncertainty in model parameter estimation. (c) We produce synthetic time series of rainfall smoothed to different degrees and, then, we select a set of model parameters to simulate runoff hydrographs using ENNS. Finally, we apply the uniform random sampling procedure (see e.g. Duan et al., 1992) to identify the parameter set that best approximates the simulated runoff

  13. Characteristic Age Distribution of Plasmodium vivax Infections after Malaria Elimination on Aneityum Island, Vanuatu

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Luis F.; Taleo, George; Kalkoa, Morris; Isozumi, Rie; Wickremasinghe, Renu; Perlmann, Hedvig; Takeo, Satoru; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Tachibana, Shin-Ichiro; Kimura, Masatsugu; Björkman, Anders; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Drakeley, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Resurgence is a major concern after malaria elimination. After the initiation of the elimination program on Aneityum Island in 1991, microscopy showed that Plasmodium falciparum disappeared immediately, whereas P. vivax disappeared from 1996 onward, until P. vivax cases were reported in January 2002. By conducting malariometric surveys of the entire population of Aneityum, we investigated the age distribution of individuals with parasites during this epidemic in the context of antimalarial antibody levels and parasite antigen diversity. In July 2002, P. vivax infections were detected by microscopy in 22/759 individuals: 20/298 born after the beginning of the elimination program in 1991, 2/126 born between 1982 and 1991, and none of 335 born before 1982. PCR increased the number of infections detected to 77, distributed among all age groups. Prevalences were 12.1%, 16.7%, and 6.0%, respectively (P < 0.001). In November, a similar age pattern was found, but with fewer infections: 6/746 and 39/741 individuals were found to be infected by microscopy and PCR, respectively. The frequencies of antibody responses to P. vivax were significantly higher in individuals born before 1991 than in younger age groups and were similar to those on Malakula Island, an area of endemicity. Remarkably low antigen diversity (h, 0.15) of P. vivax infections was observed on Aneityum compared with the other islands (h, 0.89 to 1.0). A P. vivax resurgence was observed among children and teenagers on Aneityum, an age distribution similar to those before elimination and on islands where P. vivax is endemic, suggesting that in the absence of significant exposure, immunity may persist, limiting infection levels in adults. The limited parasite gene pool on islands may contribute to this protection. PMID:24166950

  14. Effect of age and chemical treatments on characteristic parameters for active and porous sublayers of polymeric composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Benavente, J; Vázquez, M I

    2004-05-15

    Changes in the transport parameters and the chemical nature of the surface of composite polyamide/polysulfone membranes due to both aging and treatment with chemical products (HCl, H(3)NO, and NaOH) have been considered. Hydraulic and salt permeability were obtained from water flow and salt diffusion measurements, respectively, and their values seem to indicate a modification in the structural parameters (porosity/thickness) of aging samples, while HCl and HNO(3) treatments will act in the opposite way. Chemical modifications in the membrane surfaces were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which mainly show the effect of H(3)NO and HCl on the polyamide active layer of the membranes (polyamide oxidation), but no chemical damage for that sublayer. Electrical characterization of both sublayers of the composite membranes were determined from impedance spectroscopy (IS) measurements using equivalent circuits as models, and these results indicate: (i) a strong increase of the membrane electrical resistance as a consequence of aging, mainly that associated with the active sublayer (30 times higher for an old sample than for a fresh one) and treatment with NaOH; (ii) the reduction of this effect when the samples were treated with HCl and HNO(3) solutions. Changes in the values of the electrical resistance of the composite membranes are in agreement with those obtained for permeabilities, but the electrical parameter also allows the determination of the contribution of each sublayer. PMID:15082393

  15. Predictive parameters of Legionella pneumophila occurrence in hospital water: HPCs and plumbing system installation age.

    PubMed

    Ghanizadeh, Ghader; Mirmohamadlou, Ali; Esmaeli, Davoud

    2016-09-01

    Occurrence of Legionella pneumophila can be relevant to the installation age and the presence of heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs). This research illustrates L. pneumophila contamination of hospital water in accordance with the installation age and the presence of HPCs. One hundred and fifty samples were collected from hot and cold water systems and cultured on R2A and BCYE agar. L. pneumophila identification was done via specific biochemical tests. HPCs and L. pneumophila were detected in 96 and 37.3 % of the samples, respectively. The mean of HPCs density was 947 ± 998 CFU/ml; therefore, 52 % of the samples had higher densities than 500 CFU/ml. High densities of HPCs (>500 CFU/ml) led to colonization of L. pneumophila (≥1000 CFU/ml), mainly observed in cooling systems, gynecological, sonography, and NICU wards. Chi(2) test demonstrated that higher densities (>500 CFU/ml) of HPCs and L. pneumophila contamination in cold water were more frequent than warm water (OR: 2.3 and 1.49, respectively). Univariate regressions implied a significant difference between HPCs density and installation age in positive and negative tests of L. pneumophila (OR = 1.1, p < 0.001, OR = 1.2, p < 0.001). Mann-Whitney U test implied the significant effects of HPCs and installation age on L. pneumophila occurrences (p < 0.001). Spearman correlation and multivariate linear regression revealed significant differences between L. pneumophila and HPCs densities (r s  = 0.33, p < 0.001 and ß = 0.11, p = 0.02), but nonsignificant difference with installation age (r s  = 0.33, p < 0.001 and ß = 0.0, p = 0.91). The occurrence of L. pneumophila, HPCs, and installation age are relevant; so, plumbing system renovation with appropriate materials and promotion of the effective efforts for hospital's water quality assurance is highly recommended. PMID:27573071

  16. An increase of structural order parameter in Fe-Co-V soft magnetic alloy after thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; Li, L.; Masteller, M. S.; Del Corso, G. J.

    1996-12-01

    Alloys of Fe49Co49V2 (Hiperco Alloy 50) (Hiperco is a registered trademark of CRS Holdings, Inc.), both annealed and thermally aged, were studied using anomalous synchrotron x-ray and neutron powder diffraction. Rietveld and diffraction profile analysis indicated both an increase in the structural order parameter and a small lattice expansion (˜0.0004 Å) after aging at 450 °C for 200 h. In addition, a cubic minority phase (<0.3%) was identified in the ``annealed'' sample, which increased noticeably (0.3%→0.8%) as a result of aging. The presence of antiphase domain boundaries in the alloys was also revealed. These results directly correlate with the observed changes in the magnetization behavior and challenge the notion that a ``fully'' ordered Fe-Co alloy demonstrates optimum soft magnetic properties.

  17. Competition and Habitat Quality Influence Age and Sex Distribution in Wintering Rusty Blackbirds

    PubMed Central

    Mettke-Hofmann, Claudia; Hamel, Paul B.; Hofmann, Gerhard; Zenzal Jr., Theodore J.; Pellegrini, Anne; Malpass, Jennifer; Garfinkel, Megan; Schiff, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Bird habitat quality is often inferred from species abundance measures during the breeding and non-breeding season and used for conservation management decisions. However, during the non-breeding season age and sex classes often occupy different habitats which suggest a need for more habitat-specific data. Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) is a forested wetland specialist wintering in bottomland hardwood forests in the south-eastern U. S. and belongs to the most steeply declining songbirds in the U.S. Little information is available to support priority birds such as the Rusty Blackbird wintering in this threatened habitat. We assessed age and sex distribution and body condition of Rusty Blackbirds among the three major habitats used by this species in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and also measured food availability. Overall, pecan groves had the highest biomass mainly driven by the amount of nuts. Invertebrate biomass was highest in forests but contributed only a small percentage to overall biomass. Age and sex classes were unevenly distributed among habitats with adult males primarily occupying pecan groves containing the highest nut biomass, females being found in forests which had the lowest nut biomass and young males primarily staying in forest fragments along creeks which had intermediate nut biomass. Males were in better body condition than females and were in slightly better condition in pecan groves. The results suggest that adult males occupy the highest quality habitat and may competitively exclude the other age and sex classes. PMID:25946335

  18. Studies on canine mammary tumours. I. Age, seasonal and breed distribution.

    PubMed

    Boldizsár, H; Szenci, O; Muray, T; Csenki, J

    1992-01-01

    The incidence as well as age, seasonal and breed distribution of canine mammary tumours (n = 521) were studied at the Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the University of Veterinary Science, Budapest, between 1985 and 1989. In 39 cases of mammary tumour, blood plasma oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) concentrations were also determined. Of all dogs referred to the clinics of the University in 1985, 0.7% had mammary tumour. On the average, 104 +/- 9.3 cases of mammary tumour were recorded at the Clinic of Obstetrics per year. This number did not increase after the Chernobyl atomic reactor catastrophe of 1986. The age distribution of canine mammary tumour found in this study shows good agreement with earlier data of the literature: mammary tumour showed the highest incidence in 10 years old dogs. The incidence of mammary tumour kept increasing with age until the 14th year of life (as expressed in per cent of animals of identical age). The number of mammary tumours was markedly higher in the spring (April-May) and autumn (September). This seasonality was demonstrable in 11 to 16 years old bitches, too. On the basis of the blood plasma E2 and P profiles, 61.5% of the clinically anoestrous animals were found to be cycling. The strikingly high ratio of pulis among dogs with mammary cancer was suggestive of a breed disposition. PMID:1476093

  19. Competition and habitat quality influence age and sex distribution in wintering rusty blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Mettke-Hofmann, Claudia; Hamel, Paul B; Hofmann, Gerhard; Zenzal, Theodore J; Pellegrini, Anne; Malpass, Jennifer; Garfinkel, Megan; Schiff, Nathan; Greenberg, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Bird habitat quality is often inferred from species abundance measures during the breeding and non-breeding season and used for conservation management decisions. However, during the non-breeding season age and sex classes often occupy different habitats which suggest a need for more habitat-specific data. Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) is a forested wetland specialist wintering in bottomland hardwood forests in the south-eastern U. S. and belongs to the most steeply declining songbirds in the U.S. Little information is available to support priority birds such as the Rusty Blackbird wintering in this threatened habitat. We assessed age and sex distribution and body condition of Rusty Blackbirds among the three major habitats used by this species in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and also measured food availability. Overall, pecan groves had the highest biomass mainly driven by the amount of nuts. Invertebrate biomass was highest in forests but contributed only a small percentage to overall biomass. Age and sex classes were unevenly distributed among habitats with adult males primarily occupying pecan groves containing the highest nut biomass, females being found in forests which had the lowest nut biomass and young males primarily staying in forest fragments along creeks which had intermediate nut biomass. Males were in better body condition than females and were in slightly better condition in pecan groves. The results suggest that adult males occupy the highest quality habitat and may competitively exclude the other age and sex classes. PMID:25946335

  20. Age-related change of technetium-99m-HMDP distribution in the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Kigami, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Ohnishi, Hideo

    1996-05-01

    To understand age-related changes of whole-body and regional skeletal metabolism, it is important to investigate the mechanisms of age-related bone loss and to develop suitable treatments for it. Bone biopsies show metabolism of the particular site examined while biochemical markers for bone metabolism reflect total skeletal metabolis. Bone scintigraphy is a convenient and simple way to analyze whole-body and regional skeletal metabolism. We attempted to study and understand age-related changes in bone metabolism by quantifying the bone scan and correlating it with biochemical bone metabolic markers. The whole-body skeletal uptake (WBSU) and whole-body skeletal tracer distribution pattern were studied in men and women by bone scintigraphy using {sup 99m}Tc-hydroxy-methane-diphosphonate (HMDP). Bone scans were performed using a standard protocol and quantified by setting regions of interest (ROIs) on selected regions. WBSU and the skeletal distribution pattern were compared with simultaneously obtained serum biochemical markers. WBSU showed an increase with age in both sexes, but in women, uptake in the head and legs increased more relatively than in the thoracic region, while in men no such tendency was observed. Increase of WBSU and relative increase of uptakes in the head demonstrated a weak correlation with the serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and type 1 collagen metabolites. These results show an age-related increase of skeletal turnover and sex-dependent regional skeletal metabolism. The age-related changes seen in bone scintigrams might be a sign of progressive bone loss, reflecting changes in local bone matabolism. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Implications of Differential Age Distribution of Disease-Associated Meningococcal Lineages for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Caroline L.; Ramsay, Mary E.; Chandra, Manosree; Jolley, Keith A.; van der Ende, Arie; Carion, Françoise; Berthelsen, Lene; Hoffmann, Steen; Harðardóttir, Hjördís; Vazquez, Julio A.; Murphy, Karen; Toropainen, Maija; Caniça, Manuela; Ferreira, Eugenia; Diggle, Mathew; Edwards, Giles F.; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Stefanelli, Paola; Kriz, Paula; Gray, Steve J.; Fox, Andrew J.; Jacobsson, Susanne; Claus, Heike; Vogel, Ulrich; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Heuberger, Sigrid; Caugant, Dominique A.; Frosch, Matthias; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2014-01-01

    New vaccines targeting meningococci expressing serogroup B polysaccharide have been developed, with some being licensed in Europe. Coverage depends on the distribution of disease-associated genotypes, which may vary by age. It is well established that a small number of hyperinvasive lineages account for most disease, and these lineages are associated with particular antigens, including vaccine candidates. A collection of 4,048 representative meningococcal disease isolates from 18 European countries, collected over a 3-year period, were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Age data were available for 3,147 isolates. The proportions of hyperinvasive lineages, identified as particular clonal complexes (ccs) by MLST, differed among age groups. Subjects <1 year of age experienced lower risk of sequence type 11 (ST-11) cc, ST-32 cc, and ST-269 cc disease and higher risk of disease due to unassigned STs, 1- to 4-year-olds experienced lower risk of ST-11 cc and ST-32 cc disease, 5- to 14-year-olds were less likely to experience ST-11 cc and ST-269 cc disease, and ≥25-year-olds were more likely to experience disease due to less common ccs and unassigned STs. Younger and older subjects were vulnerable to a more diverse set of genotypes, indicating the more clonal nature of genotypes affecting adolescents and young adults. Knowledge of temporal and spatial diversity and the dynamics of meningococcal populations is essential for disease control by vaccines, as coverage is lineage specific. The nonrandom age distribution of hyperinvasive lineages has consequences for the design and implementation of vaccines, as different variants, or perhaps targets, may be required for different age groups. PMID:24695776

  2. A priori parameter estimates for a distributed, grid-based Xinanjiang model using geographically based information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Cheng; Li, Zhijia; Yu, Zhongbo; Zhang, Ke

    2012-10-01

    SummaryAn improved form of spatially distributed Grid-Xinanjiang model (GXM), which integrates features of a well-tested conceptual rainfall-runoff model and a physically based flow routing model, has been proposed for simulating hydrologic processes and forecasting flood events in watersheds. The digital elevation model (DEM) is utilized in the GXM to derive computational flow direction, routing sequencing, and hillslope and channel slopes. The processes in the model include canopy interception, direct channel precipitation, evapotranspiration, as well as runoff generation via a saturation excess mechanism. A two-step finite difference solution of the diffusion wave approximation of the St. Venant equations with second-order accuracy is used in the model to simulate the flow routed along the hillslope and channel on a cell basis with consideration of upstream inflow and flow partition to the channels. A physically, empirically based approach using geographically based information such as topography, soil data and land use/land cover data is employed for estimating spatially varied parameters. GXM is applied at a 1-km grid scale to a nested watershed located in Anhui province, China. The parent Tunxi watershed, with a drainage area of 2692.7 km2, contains five internal points with available observed streamflow data, allowing us to evaluate model's ability to simulate the hydrologic processes within the watershed. Calibration and verification of the proposed GXM are carried out for both daily and hourly time scales using daily rainfall-runoff data and hourly streamflow data. Model performance is assessed by comparing simulated and observed flows at the watershed outlet and interior gauging stations. Initial tests indicate that the parameter estimation approach is efficient and the developed model can satisfactorily simulate not only the streamflow at the parent watershed outlet, but also the flood hydrograph at the interior gauging points without model recalibration

  3. [Distribution, population parameters, and diet of Astropecten marginatus (Asteroidea: Astropectinidae) in the Venezuelan Atlantic coast].

    PubMed

    Ortega, Ileana; Martín, Alberto; Díaz, Yusbelly

    2011-03-01

    Astropecten marginatus is a sea star widely distributed in Northern and Eastern South America, found on sandy and muddy bottoms, in shallow and deep waters. To describe some of its ecological characteristics, we calculated it spatial-temporal distribution, population parameters (based on size and weight) and diet in the Orinoco Delta ecoregion (Venezuela). The ecoregion was divided in three sections: Golfo de Paria, Boca de Serpiente and Plataforma Deltana. Samples for the rainy and dry seasons came from megabenthos surveys of the "Línea Base Ambiental Plataforma Deltana (LBAPD)" and "Corocoro Fase I (CFI)" projects. The collected sea stars were measured, weighted and dissected by the oral side to extract their stomach and identify the preys consumed. A total of 570 sea stars were collected in LBAPD project and 306 in CFI one. The highest densities were found during the dry season in almost all sections. In LBAPD project the highest density was in "Plataforma Deltana" section (0.007 +/- 0.022 ind/m2 in dry season and 0.014 +/- 0.06 ind/m2 in rainy season) and in the CFI project the densities in "Golfo de Paria" section were 0.705 +/- 0.829 ind/m2 in rainy season and 1.027 +/- 1.107 ind/m2 in dry season. The most frequent size range was 3.1-4.6cm. The highest biomass was found in "Golfo de Paria" section (7.581 +/- 0.018 mg/m2 in dry season and 0.005 +/- 6.542 x 10(-06) mg/m2 in rainy season for 2004-2005 and 3.979 +/- 4.024 mg/m2 in dry season; and 3.117 +/- 3.137 mg/m2 in rainy season for 2006). A linear relationship was found between the sea star size and its weight but no relationship was observed between its size and the depth where it was collected. Mollusks are dominant in the sea star diet (47.4% in abundance). The diet in any of the sections, seasons or between projects or size class was heterogeneous, using multivariate ordinations (MDS) and SIMPER analysis and there was no difference in the prey number or food elements that a sea star can eat. Although A

  4. Interaction between aging and syndrome X: new insights on the pathophysiology of fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, N; Gupta, G

    1999-11-18

    Increased fat mass (FM), and in particular a specific increase in visceral fat (VF), may account for the age-associated decrease in insulin action and the development of Syndrome X. Utilizing chronic caloric restriction (CR) with aging in a rodent model, we dissociated the effects of VF and FM, and demonstrated that the decrease in VF accumulation was sufficient to prevent the marked decrease in hepatic insulin action. This suggests that the typical increase in VF with aging, rather than aging per se, determines hepatic insulin resistance. To directly assess the role of VF, we studied rats after surgical removal of VF or sham operation. Surgical extraction of VF (which accounts for approximately 10% of total fat) improved hepatic insulin action by more than twofold. We studied the role of fat-derived peptides in the regulation of body composition and insulin action. While VF extraction resulted in decreased gene expression for leptin and TNF-alpha in the subcutaneous adipose, administration of leptin selectively decreased visceral fat (approximately 60%), and enhanced the action of insulin on inhibiting hepatic glucose production (approximately 80%). Thus, the cause-effect relationship between the age-related increase in VF and the decrease in hepatic insulin action may involve the failure of leptin to "cross talk" with other fat depots to regulate fat distribution. PMID:10842652

  5. Pre-atmospheric parameters and fragment distribution: Case study for the Kosice meteoroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsevich, M.; Vinnikov, V.; Kuznetsova, D.; Kohout, T.; Pupyrev, Y.; Peltoniemi, J.; Tóth, J.; Britt, D.; Turchak, L.; Virtanen, J.

    2014-07-01

    We present results on our investigation on the Košice meteorite --- one of the recent falls with a well-derived trajectory and large number of recovered fragments. A fireball appeared over central-eastern Slovakia on February 28, 2010. The bolide reached an absolute magnitude of at least -18, enabling radiometers of the European Fireball Network to track the fireball despite the cloudy and rainy weather. The landing area was successfully computed on the basis of data from the surveillance cameras operating in Hungary and led to a fast meteorite recovery (Borovička et al. 2013). The first reported fragment of the meteorite was located northwest of the city of Košice in eastern Slovakia (Tóth et al. 2014). 218 fragments of the Košice meteorite, with a total mass of 11.285 kg, have been documented with almost 7 kg belonging to the collection of the Comenius University in Bratislava and Astronomical Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences (Gritsevich et al. 2014). Based on the statistical investigation of the recovered fragments, bimodal Weibull, bimodal Grady, and bimodal lognormal distributions are found to be the most appropriate distributions for describing the Košice fragmentation process. The most probable scenario suggests that the Košice meteoroid, prior to further extensive fragmentation in the lower atmosphere, was initially represented by two independent pieces with cumulative residual masses of approximately 2 kg and 9 kg respectively (Gritsevich et al. 2014). About 1/3 of the recovered Košice fragments were thoroughly studied, including magnetic susceptibility, bulk and grain density measurements reported by Kohout et al. (2014). This analysis revealed that the Košice meteorites are H5 ordinary chondrites that originated from a homogenous parent meteoroid. To estimate the dynamic mass of the main fragment, we studied the first integral of the drag and mass-loss equations, and the geometrical relation along the meteor trajectory in the atmosphere

  6. Mapping post-disturbance stand age distribution in Siberian larch forest based on a novel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Loboda, T. V.; Krylov, A.; Potapov, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Siberian larch forest, which accounts for nearly 20% of the global boreal forest biome, is unique, important, yet significantly understudied. These deciduous needleleaf forests with a single species dominance over a large continuous area are not found anywhere except the extreme continental zones of Siberia and the Russian Far East. Most of these forests are located in remote and sparsely populated areas and, therefore, little is known about spatial variability of their structure and dynamics. Wall-to-wall repeated observations of this area are available only since the 2000s. Previously, we developed methods for reconstruction of stand-age distribution from a sample of 1980-2000 disturbances in Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery. However, availability of those images in Siberian larch forests is particularly limited. Built upon the hypothesis that the spectral characteristics of the disturbed forest in the region change with time consistently, this paper proposes a novel method utilizing the newly released Global Forest Change (GFC) 2000-2012 dataset. We exploit the data-rich era of annual forest disturbance samples identified between 2000 and 2012 in the Siberian larch forest by the GFC dataset to build a robust training set of spectral signatures from regrowing larch forests as they appear in Landsat imagery in 2012. The extracted statistics are ingested into a random forest, which predicts the approximate stand age for every forested pixel in the circa 2000 composite. After merging the estimated stand age distribution for 1989-2000 with the observed disturbance records for 2001-2012, a gap-free 30 m resolution 24-year long record of stand age distribution is obtained. A preliminary accuracy assessment against the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) burned area product suggested satisfactory performance of the proposed method.

  7. Age discrimination among eruptives of Menengai Caldera, Kenya, using vegetation parameters from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blodget, Herbert W.; Heirtzler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation to determine the degree to which digitally processed Landsat TM imagery can be used to discriminate among vegetated lava flows of different ages in the Menengai Caldera, Kenya. A selective series of five images, consisting of a color-coded Landsat 5 classification and four color composites, are compared with geologic maps. The most recent of more than 70 postcaldera flows within the caldera are trachytes, which are variably covered by shrubs and subsidiary grasses. Soil development evolves as a function of time, and as such supports a changing plant community. Progressively older flows exhibit the increasing dominance of grasses over bushes. The Landsat images correlated well with geologic maps, but the two mapped age classes could be further subdivided on the basis of different vegetation communities. It is concluded that field maps can be modified, and in some cases corrected by use of such imagery, and that digitally enhanced Landsat imagery can be a useful aid to field mapping in similar terrains.

  8. Modeling the Global Distribution of Plasma Parameters on Coronal Source Surface for Different Solar Phases Using 1AU Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Shen, F.; Feng, X.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we have developed an empirical model of the global distribution of plasma parameters on the coronal source surface (at 2.5 solar radii (Rs) in our study) by analyzing observations from Ulysses and OMNI data. We use this model to construct the global map of source surface plasma for four typical Carrington Rotations (CRs) during different phases of solar activity, and analyze the basic characteristics of the distribution. A simple validation of the model is made by comparing the density and velocity distribution with the pB-inversed density and Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model velocity. The preliminary results show that our model gives reasonable large scale distribution of source surface plasma parameters at different phases of solar activity.

  9. Model Reference Adaptive H∞ Control for Distributed Parameter Systems of Hyperbolic Type with Input Nonlinearity by Finite Dimensional Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasato, Yoshihiko

    The problem of constructing model reference adaptive H∞ control for distributed parameter systems of hyperbolic type preceded by unknown input nonlinearity such as dead zone or backlash, is considered in this paper. Distributed parameter systems are infinite dimensional processes, but the proposed control scheme is constructed from finite dimensional controllers. An adaptive inverse model is introduced to estimate and compensate the input nonlinearity. The stabilizing control signal is added to regulate the effect of spill-over terms, and it is derived as a solution of certain H∞ control problem where the residual part of the inverse model and the spill-over term are considered as external disturbances to the process.

  10. Atlas of Relations Between Climatic Parameters and Distributions of Important Trees and Shrubs in North America - Alaska Species and Ecoregions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Robert S.; Anderson, Katherine H.; Strickland, Laura E.; Shafer, Sarah L.; Pelltier, Richard T.; Bartlein, Patrick J.

    2006-01-01

    Climate is the primary factor in controlling the continental-scale distribution of plant species, although the relations between climatic parameters and species' ranges is only now beginning to be quantified. Preceding volumes of this atlas explored the continental-scale relations between climatic parameters and the distributions of woody plant species across all of the continent of North America. This volume presents similar information for important woody species, groups of species, and ecoregions in more detail for the State of Alaska. For these analyses, we constructed a 25-kilometer equal-area grid of modern climatic and bioclimatic parameters for North America from instrumental weather records. We obtained a digital representation of the geographic distribution of each species or ecoregion, either from a published source or by digitizing the published distributions ourselves. The presence or absence of each species or ecoregion was then determined for each point on the 25-kilometer grid, thus providing a basis for comparison of the climatic data with the geographic distribution of each species or ecoregion. The relations between climate and these distributions are presented in graphical and tabular form.

  11. Do predators influence the distribution of age-0 kokanee in a Colorado Reservoir?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardiman, J.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Martinez, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal changes in reservoir conditions such as productivity, light, and temperature create spatiotemporal variation in habitat that may segregate or aggregate predators and prey, producing implications for the distribution, growth, and survival of fishes. We used hydroacoustics to document the diel vertical distribution of age-0 kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka relative to environmental gradients at Blue Mesa Reservoir, Colorado, during May-August of 2002. Temperature, light, and zooplankton density profiles were examined relative to foraging conditions for kokanee and their primary predator, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. Age-0 kokanee displayed large diel vertical migrations in May despite the lack of an energetic advantage before reservoir stratification. Age-0 kokanee minimized near-surface foraging at this time, perhaps to avoid predation by visual predators, such as lake trout, in the well-lit surface waters. Strong reservoir stratification in midsummer appeared to provide a thermal refuge from lake trout that the kokanee exploited. By August vertical migrations were shallow and most kokanee remained in the epilimnion throughout the day. Although the energetic implications of the late-summer strategy are unclear, it appears that kokanee were responding to changes in their predator environment. A robust model for kokanee diel vertical migration across a range of systems should include a predator avoidance component.

  12. Epigenetic contribution to age distribution of mortality within the Penna model.

    PubMed

    Magdoń-Maksymowicz, M S; Maksymowicz, A Z

    2015-06-01

    Some modifications of the simple asexual Penna model, enriched by epigenetic contributions, are presented. The standard bit-string Penna model of biological aging and population evolution is based on an inherited DNA structure which defines the future life of a newly born individuals, when genes are activated by the biological clock, and the predefined genetic death is fully controlled by the number of defected genes. Epigenomes allow to introduce additional mechanism of gene activation or silencing without affecting the DNA genome itself. It may be either inherited or may reflect external, environmental factors. In the presented model, information read from the introduced epigenome may alter gene expression that may be stopped or re-activated. We concentrate on the influence of epigenetics on the age a distribution of genetic mortality m(a). Changes in m(a) are strong for the case of inherited epigenetic contribution with nearly perfect inheritance and 'positive' epigenome that partly ignores the 'bad' mutations. We conclude that the epigenetic contribution may influence population structure m(a) and could be, at least partly, responsible for deviation of m(a) distribution from the Gompertz law. In short, we claim that proposed epigenetic contribution may be seen as a candidate for possible explanation of observed deviation from the Gompertz law, also among senior members of society. A very simple model was used in this paper and many crucial mechanisms of biological aging were omitted. Therefore, further work based on a more realistic models is necessary. PMID:25666268

  13. Simulating the grain-size distribution of Wisconsinan age glaciofluvial sediments: Applications to fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, E.K.; Anderson, M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    A sedimentary deposition model, SEDSIM, was used to simulate the deposition of glaciofluvial sediments in south-central Wisconsin. These types of deposits are present at or near the surface over much of the northern United States and have a high contamination potential. They also represent relatively recent analogs for ancient braided stream systems. Sixty sediment samples were used to determine the average sediment properties for a facies assemblage located 8-10 km from the ice margin. A regional depositional system was simulated, using SEDSIM, to determine the range of input values that reproduced the observed average sediment characteristics. Progressively smaller scale models were constructed to produce more detailed estimates of the grain-size distribution. the grain-size estimates from the finest scale model were translated into relative hydraulic conductivity values using the method of Hazen. The resulting conductivities were incorporated into a fluid flow model to illustrate the control that heterogeneity of petrologic properties has on the direction and rate of fluid movement. This work indicates that a wide range of input parameters will reproduce the bulk sediment properties. Furthermore, small-scale features may not be reproduced under the assumptions incorporated in the current SEDSIM code. Thus, for sedimentary depositional models to be used to predict permeability and porosity distributions, or to interpret paleo-flow conditions, one must determine calibration targets that are more sensitive to flow parameters than bulk grain-size distributions.

  14. A pilot study on the effect of Lactobacillus casei Zhang on intestinal microbiota parameters in Chinese subjects of different age.

    PubMed

    Kwok, L Y; Wang, L; Zhang, J; Guo, Z; Zhang, H

    2014-09-01

    Ageing of the population is an imminent global problem. Lactobacillus casei Zhang (LcZ) was isolated from Inner Mongolian fermented milk, koumiss. LcZ possesses numerous probiotic properties in in vitro tests and in animal models. However, it has never been tested in any human trial. In the current study, the impact of oral consumption of LcZ on different age groups was tested. Chinese subjects, including 10 young, 7 middle-aged and 7 elderly volunteers (with mean age of 24.3, 47.6 and 64.7, respectively), were recruited. Each subject took 10.6 log10 cfu LcZ daily for a continuous period of 28 days. Several parameters, including the amounts of LcZ and four selected groups of bacteria, change of bacterial diversity, short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and total bile acids (TBA), were monitored in faecal samples collected from the subjects before starting, during and after stopping oral LcZ consumption. The consumption of LcZ exhibited beneficial effects to the subjects by modulating faecal microbiota in a temporal manner with a prolonged elevation of SCFA and reduction of TBA. The potentially harmful Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter genera were suppressed by the probiotic administration. Furthermore, a moderately divergent response was observed in the indigenous gut populations of Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides fragilis group in different age subjects. Taken together, the current study has provided proof on the positive effect of probiotic consumption and crucial insights into the design and application of probiotic-based products to users of different age segments. PMID:24854958

  15. Gender- and Age-Specific REE and REE/FFM Distributions in Healthy Chinese Adults.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Yang, Xue; Na, Li-Xin; Li, Ying; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Basic data on the resting energy expenditure (REE) of healthy populations are currently rare, especially for developing countries. The aims of the present study were to describe gender- and age-specific REE distributions and to evaluate the relationships among glycolipid metabolism, eating behaviors, and REE in healthy Chinese adults. This cross-sectional survey included 540 subjects (343 women and 197 men, 20-79 years old). REE was measured by indirect calorimetry and expressed as kcal/day/kg total body weight. The data were presented as the means and percentiles for REE and the REE to fat-free mass (FFM) ratio; differences were described by gender and age. Partial correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlations between REE, tertiles of REE/FFM, and glycolipid metabolism and eating behaviors. In this study, we confirmed a decline in REE with age in women (p = 0.000) and men (p = 0.000), and we found that men have a higher REE (p = 0.000) and lower REE/FFM (p = 0.021) than women. Furthermore, we observed no associations among glycolipid metabolism, eating behaviors, and REE in healthy Chinese adults. In conclusion, the results presented here may be useful to clinicians and nutritionists for comparing healthy and ill subjects and identifying changes in REE that are related to aging, malnutrition, and chronic diseases. PMID:27598192

  16. Radiocarbon age distribution of groundwater in the Konya Closed Basin, central Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayari, C. Serdar; Ozyurt, N. Nur; Kilani, Susan

    2009-03-01

    Annual abstraction of 2.6 × 109 m3 of groundwater in the 53,000 km2 Konya Closed Basin of central Turkey has caused a head decline of 1 m/year over the last few decades. Therefore, understanding the hydrogeology of this large endorheic basin, in a semi-arid climate, is important to sustainable resource management. For this purpose, the groundwater’s radiocarbon age distribution has been investigated along a 150-km transect parallel to regional flow. Results show that the groundwater ranges in age from Recent at the main recharge area of the Taurus Mountains in the south, to about 40,000 years around the terminal Salt Lake located in the north. In this predominantly confined flow system, radiocarbon ages increase linearly by distance from the main recharge area and are in agreement with the hydraulic ages. The mean velocity of regional groundwater flow (3 m/year) is determined by the rate of regional groundwater discharge into the Salt Lake. Calcite dissolution, dedolomitization and geogenic carbon dioxide influx appear to be the dominant geochemical processes that determine the carbon isotope composition along the regional flow path. The groundwater’s oxygen-18 content indicates more humid and cooler paleorecharge. A maximum drop of 5°C is inferred for the past recharge temperature.

  17. Estimation of Genetic Parameters for Real-time Ultrasound Measurements for Hanwoo Cows at Different Ages and Pregnancy Status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. H.; Lee, Y. M.; Oh, S.-H.; Son, H. J.; Jeong, D. J.; Whitley, Niki; Kim, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate genetic parameters of ultrasound measurements for longissimus dorsi muscle area (LMA), backfat thickness (BFT), and marbling score (MS) in Hanwoo cows (N = 3,062) at the ages between 18 and 42 months. Data were collected from 100 Hanwoo breeding farms in Gyeongbuk province, Korea, in 2007 and 2008. The cows were classified into four different age groups, i.e. 18 to 22 months (the first pregnancy period), 23 to 27 (the first parturition), 28 to 32 (the second pregnancy), and 33 to 42 (the second parturition), respectively. For each age group, a multi-trait animal model was used to estimate variance components and heritabilities of the three traits. The averages of LMA, BFT, and MS measurements across the cows of all age groups were 50.1 cm2, 4.62 mm, and 3.04, respectively and heritability estimates were 0.09, 0.10, and 0.08 for the respective traits. However, when the data were analyzed in different age groups, heritability estimates of LMA and BFT were 0.24 and 0.47, respectively, for the cows of 18 to 22 months of age, and 0.21 for MS in the 28 to 32 months old cows. When the cows of all age groups were used, the estimates of genetic (phenotypic) correlations were 0.43 (0.35), −0.06 (0.34) and 0.21 (0.32) between LMA and BFT, LMA and MS, and BFT and MS, respectively. However, in the cow age group between 28 and 32 (18 and 22) months, the estimates of genetic (phenotypic) correlations were 0.05 (0.29), −0.15 (0.24) and 0.38 (0.24), for the respective pairs of traits. These results suggest that genetic, environmental, and phenotypic variations differ depending on cow age, such that care must be taken when ultrasound measurements are applied to selection of cows for meat quality. PMID:25049938

  18. The age of the globular cluster NGC 288, the formation of the Galactic halo, and the second parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Bolte, M. )

    1989-06-01

    A differential comparison of precise CCD photometry in the globular clusters NGC 288, NGC 362, and NGC 1261 shows that differences exist in the positions of the main-sequence turnoff in these clusters that are most naturally explained if NGC 288 is some 3 billion yr older than NGC 362 and about 1 to 2 billion yr older than NGC 1261. This implies that the formation time for the Galactic halo is significantly longer than a freefall time. Consideration of the inferred ages and horizontal-branch morphologies of the clusters Pal 12, NGC 288, NGC 362, and NGC 1261, all with similar metal abundances, suggests that age may be the parameter that, after overall metal abundance, most determines horizontal-branch morphology. 56 refs.

  19. Effect of Age, Sex, and Race Distance on Front Crawl Stroke Parameters in Subelite Adolescent Swimmers During Competition.

    PubMed

    Dormehl, Shilo J; Osborough, Conor D

    2015-08-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effect of age, sex and race distance on velocity (v), stroke rate (SR), stroke length (SL) and stroke index (SI) of subelite adolescent swimmers in competition, and to investigate their pacing strategies during the 100-m and 200-m events. Video footage of 112 adolescent swimmers (56 female; 56 male), competing in the 100-m and 200-m freestyle events, in two age groups (12-14; 15-18 years) was recorded and subsequently analyzed. A MANOVA showed that all stroke parameters significantly differed between sexes and between race distances. The older adolescents had a higher v, a longer SL and a greater SI (p < .01) than the younger adolescents. There were significant interaction effects between age and sex for v, SL and SI. Most adolescents had a SL that was within 7% of that reported for 1992 Olympians, but had up to 16% lower SRs. Separate Friedman's ANOVAs showed that SL differed between successive race quarters for both age groups, both sexes and both race distances. It is likely that physical immaturity, inexperience in competition pacing and within-race fatigue strongly influence the performances of subelite adolescent front crawl swimmers. PMID:25902554

  20. [Biochemical parameters of blood plasma of the harp seal Pagophilus groenlandicus Erxleben, 1777 (Pinnipedia, Procidae) of various ages].

    PubMed

    Erokhina, I A

    2007-01-01

    Results of study of several blood biochemical parameters of the harp seal Pagophilus groenlandicus Erxleben, 1777, from birth to the adult state are presented. The following age groups of the animals have been studied--newborns, 1.5-2 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, and adults (older than 6 months). The content of total protein and its fractions, free amine nitrogen, urea, creatinine, glucose, total lipids, total calcium, and inorganic phosphorus was determined in the seal blood plasma. Differences of the degree of expression of levels of all studied parameters in the course of early postnatal ontogenesis of the animals have been established. The most significant metabolic changes in the harp seals were revealed at the period of end of weaning and transition to independent ingestion and then after the first year of life. PMID:17725029

  1. Injection of Contaminants into a Simulated Water Distribution System Equipped with Continuous Multi-Parameter Water Monitors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA’s Technology Testing and Evaluation Program has been charged by EPA to evaluate the performance of commercially available water security-related technologies. Multi-parameter water monitors for distributions systems have been evaluated as such a water security techn...

  2. Mapping for maternal and newborn health: the distributions of women of childbearing age, pregnancies and births

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The health and survival of women and their new-born babies in low income countries has been a key priority in public health since the 1990s. However, basic planning data, such as numbers of pregnancies and births, remain difficult to obtain and information is also lacking on geographic access to key services, such as facilities with skilled health workers. For maternal and newborn health and survival, planning for safer births and healthier newborns could be improved by more accurate estimations of the distributions of women of childbearing age. Moreover, subnational estimates of projected future numbers of pregnancies are needed for more effective strategies on human resources and infrastructure, while there is a need to link information on pregnancies to better information on health facilities in districts and regions so that coverage of services can be assessed. Methods This paper outlines demographic mapping methods based on freely available data for the production of high resolution datasets depicting estimates of numbers of people, women of childbearing age, live births and pregnancies, and distribution of comprehensive EmONC facilities in four large high burden countries: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Tanzania. Satellite derived maps of settlements and land cover were constructed and used to redistribute areal census counts to produce detailed maps of the distributions of women of childbearing age. Household survey data, UN statistics and other sources on growth rates, age specific fertility rates, live births, stillbirths and abortions were then integrated to convert the population distribution datasets to gridded estimates of births and pregnancies. Results and conclusions These estimates, which can be produced for current, past or future years based on standard demographic projections, can provide the basis for strategic intelligence, planning services, and provide denominators for subnational indicators to track progress. The datasets

  3. Approximation techniques for parameter estimation and feedback control for distributed models of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    Approximation ideas are discussed that can be used in parameter estimation and feedback control for Euler-Bernoulli models of elastic systems. Focusing on parameter estimation problems, ways by which one can obtain convergence results for cubic spline based schemes for hybrid models involving an elastic cantilevered beam with tip mass and base acceleration are outlined. Sample numerical findings are also presented.

  4. A General Approach for Specifying Informative Prior Distributions for PBPK Model Parameters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characterization of uncertainty in model predictions is receiving more interest as more models are being used in applications that are critical to human health. For models in which parameters reflect biological characteristics, it is often possible to provide estimates of paramet...

  5. Atlas of Relations Between Climatic Parameters and Distributions of Important Trees and Shrubs in North America - Ecoregions of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Robert S.; Anderson, Katherine H.; Pelltier, Richard T.; Shafer, Sarah L.; Bartlein, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    Climate is the primary factor controlling the continental-scale distribution of plant species, although the relations between climatic parameters and species' ranges are only now beginning to be quantified. This volume examines the relations between climate and the distributions of (1) Kuchler's 'potential natural vegetation' categories for the 48 contiguous States of the United States of America, (2) Bailey's ecoregions of North America, and (3) World Wildlife Fund's ecoregions of North America. For these analyses, we employed a 25-kilometer equal-area grid of modern climatic and bioclimatic parameters for North America, coupled with presence-absence data for the occurrence of each ecoregion under the three classification systems under consideration. The resulting relations between climate and ecoregion distributions are presented in graphical and tabular form. Presentation of ecoregion-climate relations here is intended to be useful for a greater understanding of ecosystem evolution, ecosystem dynamics, and potential effects of future climate change on ecoregions.

  6. Size frequency distributions of key epibenthic organisms in the eastern Chukchi Sea and their correlations with environmental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, B.; Ravelo, A.; Grebmeier, J.; Trefry, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    Epibenthic communities play a key role in ecosystem functioning in Arctic shelf Seas, such as in the Chukchi Sea in the Pacific Arctic. These communities, however, are patchily distributed and are influenced by various environmental parameters. Along with taxonomic composition, another community aspect that may vary spatially and be influenced by the environment is the distribution of organism sizes. This study presents the first size frequency distributions of nine epifaunal taxa that were determined to be dominant in the eastern Chukchi Sea in July/August 2009 and 2010, including male, female and gravid Chionoecetes opilio and Hyas coarctatus crabs, the gastropods Neptunea spp., Plicifusus spp., Colus spp., and Cryptonatica spp., and the echinoderms Gorgonocephalus spp., Leptasterias spp., and Echinarachnius parma. Some abundant taxa exhibited a wide range of sizes (i.e. C. opilio, Neptunea spp., and Leptasterias spp.), while others had a much smaller size range (i.e. Cryptonatica spp. and E. parma). We also found that size distributions of these taxa correlated with various combinations of the environmental parameters that have been shown to be important in structuring the general distribution patterns for the epibenthic invertebrate communities in the study area, including percent total sediment organic carbon, sediment chlorophyll a, temperature, latitude, sediment grain size 2 and 4 phi, pH, and dissolved oxygen. Our findings present benchmark information that is needed to detect future alterations in body-size frequency distributions that are likely to happen in response to the predicted climate and environmental changes in the Chukchi Sea region.

  7. Effects of Time Parameter in Pulse Plasma CVD on Narrow-Chirality Distributed growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Kato, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising materials in industry application, since they have many brilliant characteristics However, since the electronic and optical properties of SWNTs strongly depend on chirality, the selective synthesis of SWNTs with desired chiralities is one of the major challenges in nanotubes science and applications. In this study, time-controlled pulse plasma CVD has been developed aiming for the mass production of narrow chirality distributed SWNTs. Through the comparison of continuous plasma CVD and pulse plasma CVD, it is found that the amount of SWNTs can be increased in keeping with the initial narrow chirality distribution by repeating pulse plasma CVD. The effects of pulse time parameter, plasma off time, on the chirality distribution of SWNTs are also investigated. The chirality distribution becomes narrow with an increase in the plasma off time up to 60 sec, then it becomes broad with an increase in the off time. These indicate, adjustment of plasma time parameter in pulse plasma CVD can improve the uniformity of chirality distribution, resulting in the mass production of very narrow chirality distributed SWNTs. This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows Grant Number 15J01481.

  8. Effect of backpack position on foot weight distribution of school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung; Kim, Chang Ju; Oh, Duck-Won

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] In the present study, we aimed to determine the effects of backpack position on foot weight distribution of standing school-aged children. [Subjects] Thirty school-aged children volunteered to participate in this study. [Methods] The subjects randomly performed four types of carrying a backpack: no backpack (condition-1), carrying a backpack at C7 (condition-2), carrying a backpack at 10 cm below C7 (condition-3), and carrying a backpack at 20 cm below C7 (condition-4). [Results] Statistically significant differences were noted in the anterior and posterior pressure values, and in the anterior-to-posterior ratio, among the four conditions (p < 0.05). Post-hoc analysis indicated that the pressure value of condition-4 was significantly lower in the anterior foot region and higher in the posterior foot region than in condition-2 and condition-3. In addition, the anterior-to-posterior ratio was lower in condition-4 than in condition-2 and condition-3. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that carrying a backpack in a higher position, with fastening of the shoulder strap, may be more favorable for normalizing the foot weight distribution. PMID:25931722

  9. Temperature, age and crust thickness distributions of Loki Patera on Io: implications for resurfacing mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    A high-spatial-resolution, multi-wavelength observation by the Galileo NIMS instrument has been analysed to determine the temperature and area distribution of a large portion of the ionian volcano Loki Patera. The temperatures of the cooler components from a two-temperature fit to the data can be used to determine ages of the surface. The age of the floor along a profile across the floor of the caldera ranges from 10 to 80 days. This puts the start of the resurfacing in July/early August 2001, yielding a resurfacing rate of approximately 1 km/day, with the new lava spreading from the SW corner of the caldera in a NE direction. This rate is consistent with resurfacing by foundering of the crust on a lava lake. However,the temperature distribution may also result from the emplacement of flows. Implied crust thicknesses (derived using a lava cooling model) range from 2.6 to 0.9 m.

  10. Effect of backpack position on foot weight distribution of school-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung; Kim, Chang Ju; Oh, Duck-Won

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] In the present study, we aimed to determine the effects of backpack position on foot weight distribution of standing school-aged children. [Subjects] Thirty school-aged children volunteered to participate in this study. [Methods] The subjects randomly performed four types of carrying a backpack: no backpack (condition-1), carrying a backpack at C7 (condition-2), carrying a backpack at 10 cm below C7 (condition-3), and carrying a backpack at 20 cm below C7 (condition-4). [Results] Statistically significant differences were noted in the anterior and posterior pressure values, and in the anterior-to-posterior ratio, among the four conditions (p < 0.05). Post-hoc analysis indicated that the pressure value of condition-4 was significantly lower in the anterior foot region and higher in the posterior foot region than in condition-2 and condition-3. In addition, the anterior-to-posterior ratio was lower in condition-4 than in condition-2 and condition-3. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that carrying a backpack in a higher position, with fastening of the shoulder strap, may be more favorable for normalizing the foot weight distribution. PMID:25931722

  11. Using imaging ellipsometry to determine angular distribution of ellipsometric parameters without scanning mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chien-Jen; Chang, Ruey-Shyan; Han, Chien-Yuan

    2016-02-01

    This work presents a focused beam approach using a polarizer-sample-analyzer (PSA) imaging ellipsometer to deduce multiple sets of ellipsometric parameters with the information of multiple incident angles in one measurement. Using a three-intensity measurement technique, an additional parameter α can be obtained to locate the ideal incident plane of a focused beam. Meanwhile, the ellipsometric parameters on the ideal incident plane are also analyzed. Based on α and the ellipsometric parameters, the variation in the intensity and phase response with a range of incident angles are examined without using a mechanical scanning apparatus. Measurements made of two zones on a reference wafer with different film thicknesses demonstrate results that are almost consistent with those predicted by the theoretical model.

  12. Distribution pattern and the risks of OPCs, PHAs and PCBs in aged refuses from landfill.

    PubMed

    Lou, Ziyang; Li, Anding; Tai, Jun; Yuan, Wenxiang; Zhu, Nanwen; Zhao, Youcai

    2016-09-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are the urgent risk for landfill, and should be considered before the landfill reclamation and resource. In this work, the distribution pattern of selected POPs in landfill and their ecological risks were investigated and assessed. The Σ20OCPs, Σ16PAHs and Σ19PCBs were around 157.4-329.2, 4103-19,190, and 79.1-340.3μgkg(-1) in aged refuses, with the mean value of 206.6, 8645.4, and 155.1μgkg(-1). While those in soil covers were only 6.3-75.4, 125.5-515.3 and 2.6-43.4μgkg(-1), with the mean value of 33.7, 257.7, and 24.0μgkg(-1), respectively. The maximum OPCs, PHAs and PCBs were in aged refuse with 13, 7, 10 disposal years. Whereas, the corresponding top content in soil covers were in 10, 13 and 16years, meaning that aged refuses were not the direct source for soil covers. Among 20 OCPs measured, α-HCH, δ-HCH, Dieldrin, and Endrin were presented in all aged refuses, with the mean concentration of 93.6, 52.1, 3.9 and 4.7μgkg(-1), respectively. For PAHs, PHE, FLU and PYR were the main composition, and reached to 1535, 1224, 1187μgkg(-1). The Σ7CarPAHs occupied around 33.3-49.9% of total Σ16PAHs tested, and could be used as the indictor for PAHs pollutant in landfill. PCB-5 content was around 40.7-263.3μgkg(-1) in aged refuses, and occupied around 51.5-81.8% of Σ19PCBs measured. The HCHs and DDTs in aged refuses were below the national standard GB15618-1995, and the corresponding Σ19PCBs concentrations met the standard of GB 13015-91, suggesting that aged refuse are accepted for the further utilization process. PMID:26994555

  13. Aging affects spatial distribution of leg muscle oxygen saturation during ramp cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Murase, Norio; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Osada, Takuya; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2013-01-01

    We compared muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) responses in several leg muscles and within a single muscle during ramp cycling exercise between elderly men (n = 8; age, 65 ± 3 years; ELD) and young men (n = 10; age, 23 ± 3 years; YNG). SmO2 was monitored at the distal site of the vastus lateralis (VLd), proximal site of the vastus lateralis (VLp), rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VM), biceps femoris (BF), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and tibialis anterior (TA) by near-infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy. During submaximal exercise, significantly lower SmO2 at a given absolute work rate was observed in VLd, RF, BF, GL, and TA but not in VLp, VM, and GM in ELD than in YNG. In contrast, at all measurement sites, SmO2 at peak exercise was not significantly different between groups. These results indicate that the effects of aging on SmO2 responses are heterogeneous between leg muscles and also within a single muscle. The lower SmO2 in older men may have been caused by reduced muscle blood flow or altered blood flow distribution. PMID:23852490

  14. Ages, distributions, and origins of upland coastal dune sheets in Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, C.D.; Stock, E.; Price, D.M.; Hart, R.; Reckendorf, F.; Erlandson, J.M.; Hostetler, S.W.

    2007-01-01

    A total of ten upland dune sheets, totaling 245??km in combined length, have been investigated for their origin(s) along the Oregon coast (500??km in length). The ages of dune emplacement range from 0.1 to 103??ka based on radiocarbon (36 samples) and luminescence (46 samples) dating techniques. The majority of the emplacement dates fall into two periods of late-Pleistocene age (11-103??ka) and mid-late-Holocene age (0.1-8??ka) that correspond to marine low-stand and marine high-stand conditions, respectively. The distribution of both the late-Pleistocene dune sheets (516??km2 total surface area) and the late-Holocene dune sheets (184??km2) are concentrated (90% of total surface area) along a 100??km coastal reach of the south-central Oregon coast. This coastal reach lies directly landward of a major bight (Heceta-Perpetua-Stonewall Banks) on the continental shelf, at depths of 30-200??m below present mean sea level (MSL). The banks served to trap northward littoral drift during most of the late-Pleistocene conditions of lowered sea level (- 50 ?? 20??m MSL). The emerged inner-shelf permitted cross-shelf, eolian sand transport (10-50??km distance) by onshore winds. The depocenter sand deposits were reworked by the Holocene marine transgression and carried landward by asymmetric wave transport during early- to mid-Holocene time. The earliest dated onset of Holocene dune accretion occurred at 8??ka in the central Oregon coast. A northward migration of Northeast Pacific storm tracks to the latitude of the shelf depocenter (Stonewall, Perpetua, Heceta Banks) in Holocene time resulted in eastward wave transport from the offshore depocenter. The complex interplay of coastal morphology, paleosea-level, and paleoclimate yielded the observed peak distribution of beach and dune sand observed along the south-central Oregon coast. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An increase of structural order parameter in Fe{endash}Co{endash}V soft magnetic alloy after thermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Q.; Li, L.; Masteller, M.S.; Del Corso, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Alloys of Fe{sub 49}Co{sub 49}V{sub 2} (Hiperco Alloy 50) (Hiperco is a registered trademark of CRS Holdings, Inc.), both annealed and thermally aged, were studied using anomalous synchrotron x-ray and neutron powder diffraction. Rietveld and diffraction profile analysis indicated both an {ital increase} in the structural order parameter and a small lattice {ital expansion} ({approximately}0.0004 A) after aging at 450{degree}C for 200 h. In addition, a cubic minority phase ({lt}0.3{percent}) was identified in the {open_quote}{open_quote}annealed{close_quote}{close_quote} sample, which increased noticeably (0.3{percent}{r_arrow}0.8{percent}) as a result of aging. The presence of antiphase domain boundaries in the alloys was also revealed. These results directly correlate with the observed changes in the magnetization behavior and challenge the notion that a {open_quote}{open_quote}fully{close_quote}{close_quote} ordered Fe{endash}Co alloy demonstrates optimum soft magnetic properties. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. INTERRELATIONSHIP OF BACTERIAL COUNTS WITH OTHER FINISHED WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS WITHIN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research program was to obtain realistic information concerning the interrelationships between temperature, chlorine, turbidity, coliforms, and Standard Plate Count (SPC) densities present in finished water after treatment and distribution. Bacterial identif...

  17. Determine the Dose Distribution Using Ultrasound Parameters in MAGIC-f Polymer Gels

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Hossein; Arbabi, Azim; Bakhshandeh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, using methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper (MAGIC-f) polymer gel after megavoltage energy exposure, the sensitivity of the ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient dose-dependent parameters was evaluated. The MAGIC-f polymer gel was irradiated under 1.25 MeV cobalt-60, ranging from 0 to 60 Gy in 2-Gy steps, and received dose uniformity and accuracy of ±2%. After calibration of the ultrasonic systems with a frequency of 500 kHz, the parameters of ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient of the irradiated gel samples were measured. According to the dose–response curve, the ability of ultrasonic parameters was evaluated in dose rate readings. Based on a 4-order polynomial curve, fitted on the dose–response parameters of ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient and observed at 24 hours after irradiation, ultrasonic parameters had more sensitivity. The sensitivity of the dose–velocity and dose-attenuation coefficient curves was observed as 50 m/s/Gy and 0.06 dB/MHz/Gy over the linear range of 4 to 44 Gy, respectively. The ultrasonic parameters at 5°C, 15°C, and 25°C on the gel dosimeter after 0 to 60 Gy irradiation showed that readings at 25°C have higher sensitivity compared to 15°C and 5°C. Maximum sensitivity time and temperature readings of the MAGIC-f ultrasonic parameters were concluded 24 hours after irradiation and at a temperature of 25°C. PMID:26924952

  18. ANALYSIS OF AGED IN-HOME CARPETING TO DETERMINE THE DISTRIBUTION OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES BETWEEN DUST, CARPET, AND PAD COMPARTMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents results of a study to determine the distribution of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) between dust and carpet components in aged carpeting. Carpeting in eight homes in the Research Triangle Area, which...

  19. Submarine Landslides along the U.S. Atlantic Margin: Their Distribution, Failure Processes, and Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaytor, J. D.; ten Brink, U. S.; Twichell, D. C.; Baxter, C. D.; Hallam, T. D.; Brothers, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the size, distribution, failure mode, and age of submarine landslides on the seafloor along the U.S. Atlantic continental slope and rise, using near-complete multibeam bathymetry coverage, together with new and existing seismic reflection, core, and photographic data sets. These data show that open-slope and canyon-related landslides are ubiquitous features of the continental margin and in places have been a dominant mechanism of downslope sediment transport and slope-rise modification. Retrogressive and translational mechanisms are prevailing modes of failure, although earth-flows, rare in the marine realm, are present along seafloor gradients of less than 1o on the upper rise. Individual and composite open-slope landslides with scar dimensions that exceed 900 km2 in area and 100 km3 in volume and deposit run-out distances greater than 200 km are present off Georges Bank (Munson-Nygren-Retriever complex), southern New England, Cape Hatteras (Currituck and Cape Lookout landslides), and the Blake Plateau (Cape Fear landslide). While dating of several landslides along the margin suggests a link to mechanisms driven by environmental changes at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum, the ages of the majority of the observed landslides are still unknown. In an effort to address the scarcity of age information required to investigate failure process and geohazards, we are utilizing both absolute (radiocarbon and oxygen isotope) and relative dating techniques. Radiocarbon dating of shallow water mollusks from recently collected piston cores in landslide scars and debris deposits offshore of southern New England record multiple landslide events over the last 50,000 years originating from both the continental slope and upper rise. Relative ages of landslide features are obtained from cross-cutting relationships between canyons and landslide scars and related mass-transport deposits.

  20. Reconstruction of lattice parameters and beam momentum distribution from turn-by-turn beam position monitor readings in circular accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, C. S.; Gratus, J.; Hock, K. M.; Machida, S.; Muratori, B. D.; Torromé, R. G.; Wolski, A.

    2014-05-01

    In high chromaticity circular accelerators, rapid decoherence of the betatron motion of a particle beam can make the measurement of lattice and bunch values, such as Courant-Snyder parameters and betatron amplitude, difficult. A method for reconstructing the momentum distribution of a beam from beam position measurements is presented. Further analysis of the same beam position monitor data allows estimates to be made of the Courant-Snyder parameters and the amplitude of coherent betatron oscillation of the beam. The methods are tested through application to data taken on the linear nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator, EMMA.

  1. Site and age class variation of hematologic parameters for female Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) of Northern Nevada.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Kathryn J; Perryman, Barry L; Holcombe, Dale W

    2010-01-01

    Decreases in Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) numbers throughout the western United States have been attributed to declining habitat quantity and quality. Improving our understanding of how interannual ecologic site variability affects nutritional status and fitness of different bird age classes will lead to improved land management and conservation strategies. Greater Sage Grouse were sampled from two Population Management Units located in northern Nevada, United States: Tuscarora (TU) and Lone Willow (LW) during 15 March-11 April 2004 and 14-20 March 2005. Twenty (16 yearlings, four adults) and 17 (7 yearlings, 10 adults) female Sage Grouse were captured and bled during 2004, and 12 (four yearlings, eight adults) and 14 (10 yearlings, four adults) were sampled during 2005 in TU and LW, respectively. Samples were evaluated to examine the effect of site, age, and year on specific hematologic and serum chemistry parameters. Several differences between age classes, sites, and years were detected for a number of fitness indicators; however, actual values fell within normal ranges of variation for Sage Grouse or other avian species. Differences were also detected for several parameters more closely related to reproductive fitness, including total plasma and serum proteins, and serum calcium and phosphorus. Yearlings had lower plasma protein (P<0.0001) and lower serum protein than did adults (P=0.0003). In 2004, TU yearlings had lower serum calcium levels than the adults, and in 2005, LW yearlings had lower levels than adults (P=0.008). Females on the TU site had lower serum phosphorus than the LW females (P<0.0001). Overall, adult females weighed more than yearlings (P=0.0004). Lower values found in yearlings, and on the TU management unit, indicate a lower production potential, particularly in unfavorable years. A lower intrinsic ability of yearlings to reproduce, combined with lower nutrition potentials and associated annual variations on certain types

  2. Prevalence, Type, Distribution, and Severity of Cerebral Palsy in Relation to Gestational Age: A Meta-Analytic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himpens, E.; Van den Broeck, C.; Oostra, A.; Calders, P.; Vanhaesebrouck, P.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this review is to determine the relationship between gestational age (GA) and prevalence, type, distribution, and severity of cerebral palsy (CP). Epidemiological studies with cohorts expressed by GA were assessed. A comprehensive meta-analysis and meta-regression was performed on four fetal age categories. Studies of children with CP…

  3. Precise determination of αs from the C -parameter distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-01

    We present a global fit for αs(mZ), analyzing the available C -parameter data measured at center-of-mass energies between Q =35 and 207 GeV. The experimental data is compared to a N3LL'+O (αs3)+Ω1 theoretical prediction (up to the missing four-loop cusp anomalous dimension), which includes power corrections coming from a field-theoretical nonperturbative soft function. The dominant hadronic parameter is its first moment Ω1 , which is defined in a scheme which eliminates the O (ΛQCD) renormalon ambiguity. The resummation region plays a dominant role in the C -parameter spectrum, and in this region a fit for αs(mZ) and Ω1 is sufficient. We find αs(mZ)=0.1123 ±0.0015 and Ω1=0.421 ±0.063 GeV with χ2/d .o .f .=0.988 for 404 bins of data. These results agree with the prediction of universality for Ω1 between thrust and C -parameter within 1-σ .

  4. On-Line Water Quality Parameters as Indicators of Distribution System Contamination

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a time when the safety and security of services we have typically taken for granted are under question, a real-time or near real-time method of monitoring changes in water quality parameters could provide a critical line of defense in protecting public health. This study was u...

  5. The Use of Prior Distributions in Marginalized Bayesian Item Parameter Estimation: A Didactic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Michael R.; Baker, Frank B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous work on the mathematical and implementation details of the marginalized maximum likelihood estimation procedure is extended to encompass the marginalized Bayesian procedure for estimating item parameters of R. J. Mislevy (1986) and to communicate this procedure to users of the BILOG computer program. (SLD)

  6. Effect of process parameters on temperature distribution in twin-electrode TIG coupling arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Xiong, Jun; Gao, Hongming; Wu, Lin

    2012-10-01

    The twin-electrode TIG coupling arc is a new type of welding heat source, which is generated in a single welding torch that has two tungsten electrodes insulated from each other. This paper aims at determining the distribution of temperature for the coupling arc using the Fowler-Milne method under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The influences of welding current, arc length, and distance between both electrode tips on temperature distribution of the coupling arc were analyzed. Based on the results, a better understanding of the twin-electrode TIG welding process was obtained.

  7. Measurement Technique of Dose Rate Distribution of Ionization Sources with Unstable in Time Beam Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchebrov, S. G.; Miloichikova, I. A.; Danilova, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a new technique for the average values of radiation dose measurement for the unstable gamma-ray sources which are used in non-destructive testing. The method is based on usage of different types of compact accumulative dosimeters. Spatially distributed position sensitive dosimetry system based on compact sensitive elements was created. Size and spatial resolution of the system of the dosimetry system are chosen taking into account sources characteristics. The proposed method has been tested on the measurement of dose distribution of several sources of X-ray and gamma-radiation based on X-ray tubes, electronic accelerator betatrons and linear electron accelerators.

  8. The Finite-Size Scaling Relation for the Order-Parameter Probability Distribution of the Six-Dimensional Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdan, Ziya; Karakuş, Özlem

    2016-07-01

    The six dimensional Ising model with nearest-neighbor pair interactions has been simulated and verified numerically on the Creutz Cellular Automaton by using five bit demons near the infinite-lattice critical temperature with the linear dimensions L=4,6,8,10. The order parameter probability distribution for six dimensional Ising model has been calculated at the critical temperature. The constants of the analytical function have been estimated by fitting to probability function obtained numerically at the finite size critical point.

  9. Distributed-parameter solar cells - Volt-ampere characteristics under uniform and nonuniform illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aripov, Kh. K.; Rumiantsev, V. D.

    A theoretical investigation is presented of a multicomponent equivalent circuit of solar cells of circular configuration intended for operation with radiation concentrators. Working formulas are obtained for the discrete coordinates of the load volt-ampere characteristics as well as for effective values of distributed and lumped resistances characterizing solar cells of arbitrary configuration under uniform illumination.

  10. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LEVELS OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA AND WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS IN A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional plating methods were used to quantify heterotrophic bacteria from a drinking water distribution system. Three media, plate count agar (PCA), R2A agar and sheep blood agar (TSA-SB) were used to determine heterotrophic plate count (HPC) levels. Grab samples were collec...

  11. Parametric distributions of underdiagnosis parameters used to estimate annual burden of illness for five foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ebel, Eric D; Williams, Michael S; Schlosser, Wayne D

    2012-04-01

    Estimates of the burden of bacterial foodborne illness are used in applications ranging from determining economic losses due to a particular pathogenic organism to improving our understanding of the effects of antimicrobial resistance or changes in pathogen serotype. Estimates of the total number of illnesses can be derived by multiplying the number of observed illnesses, as reported by a specific active surveillance system, by an underdiagnosis factor that describes the relationship between observed and unobserved cases. The underdiagnosis factor can be a fixed value, but recent research efforts have focused on characterizing the inherent uncertainty in the surveillance system with a computer simulation. Although the inclusion of uncertainty is beneficial, re-creating the simulation results for every application can be burdensome. An alternative approach is to describe the underdiagnosis factor and its uncertainty with a parametric distribution. The use of such a distribution simplifies analyses by providing a closed-form definition of the underdiagnosis factor and allows this factor to be easily incorporated into Bayesian models. In this article, we propose and estimate parametric distributions for the underdiagnosis multipliers developed for the FoodNet surveillance systems in the United States. Distributions are provided for the five foodborne pathogens deemed most relevant to meat and poultry. PMID:22488071

  12. The smoothness of shaven beards: the relation between stubble length distribution and skin parameters and tactile smoothness.

    PubMed

    Westerink, Joyce; van den Berg, Frank; van Eemeren, Johan

    2004-01-01

    In this report we describe how the tactile smoothness of shaven beards depends on the distribution of the stubble lengths remaining after shaving and on various skin parameters like coarseness and scaliness. To this end, we set up two experiments on perceived smoothness with blinded human judges. In the first experiment we used artificial beards with various stubble length distributions and stubble densities as stimuli. In the second experiment we presented freshly shaven human beards, for which a wide range of objective skin and stubble parameters had been measured, as stimuli. The results of the two experiments are mostly in line with each other. We can conclude that there are individual differences between judges in the aspects they pay attention to when judging tactile smoothness. Nevertheless, a general line is discernable, and we can identify three parameters that influence the impression of tactile smoothness: the orientation of the stubble, the density of the stubble, and the length of the hairs in the stubble length distribution. We have also established the relative importance of the latter two effects. PMID:15645110

  13. Extended moment series and the parameters of the negative binomial distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.O.

    1984-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that, for finite sample sizes, moment estimators may be superior to maximum likelihood estimators in some regions of parameter space. In this paper a statistic based on the central moment of the sample is expanded in a Taylor series using 24 derivatives and many more terms than previous expansions. A summary algorithm is required to find meaningful approximants using the higher-order coefficients. A example is presented and a comparison between theoretical assessment and simulation results is made.

  14. Distribution, geochemistry and age of the Millennium eruptives of Changbaishan volcano, Northeast China -- A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chunqing; You, Haitao; Liu, Jiaqi; Li, Xin; Gao, Jinliang; Chen, Shuangshuang

    2014-04-01

    Large explosive volcanic eruptions generate extensive regional tephra deposits that provide favorable conditions for identifying the source of volcanoes, comparing the sedimentary strata of a region and determining their ages. The tephra layer, referred to as BTm, generated by the Millennium eruption of Changbaishan volcano, is widely distributed in Northeast China, Japan, D.P.R. Korea, and the nearby coastal area of Russia. It forms part of the widespread northeast Asian strata and is significant for establishing an isochronal stratigraphic framework. However, research on the temporal characterization and stratigraphic correlation of associated strata using this tephra layer is mainly concentrated in and near Japan. In northeastern China, this tephra layer is seldom seen and its application in stratigraphic correlations is even rarer. More importantly, the determination of accurate ages for both distal and proximal tephras has been debated, leading to controversy in discussions of its environmental impacts. Stratigraphic records from both distal and proximal Changbaishan ash show that this eruption generally occurred between 1,012 and 1,004 cal yr BP. Geochemical comparison between Changbaishan ash and the Quaternary widespread ash around Japan illustrates that Changbaishan ash is a continuous composition from rhyolitic to trachytic and its ratio of FeOT to CaO is usually greater than 4, which can be used as a distinguishing identifier among worldwide contemporary eruptions.

  15. Distribution, geochemistry and age of the Millennium eruptives of Changbaishan volcano, Northeast China — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chunqing; You, Haitao; Liu, Jiaqi; Li, Xin; Gao, Jinliang; Chen, Shuangshuang

    2014-06-01

    Large explosive volcanic eruptions generate extensive regional tephra deposits that provide favorable conditions for identifying the source of volcanoes, comparing the sedimentary strata of a region and determining their ages. The tephra layer, referred to as B-Tm, generated by the Millennium eruption of Changbaishan volcano, is widely distributed in Northeast China, Japan, D.P.R. Korea, and the nearby coastal area of Russia. It forms part of the widespread northeast Asian strata and is significant for establishing an isochronal stratigraphic framework. However, research on the temporal characterization and stratigraphic correlation of associated strata using this tephra layer is mainly concentrated in and near Japan. In northeastern China, this tephra layer is seldom seen and its application in stratigraphic correlations is even rarer. More importantly, the determination of accurate ages for both distal and proximal tephras has been debated, leading to controversy in discussions of its environmental impacts. Stratigraphic records from both distal and proximal Changbaishan ash show that this eruption generally occurred between 1,012 and 1,004 cal yr BP. Geochemical comparison between Changbaishan ash and the Quaternary widespread ash around Japan illustrates that Changbaishan ash is a continuous composition from rhyolitic to trachytic and its ratio of FeOT to CaO is usually greater than 4, which can be used as a distinguishing identifier among worldwide contemporary eruptions.

  16. Age distribution types of bladder cancers and their relationship with opium consumption and smoking

    PubMed Central

    Aliramaji, Arsalan; Kaseean, Aliakbar; Yousefnia Pasha, Yousef Reza; Shafi, Hamid; Kamali, Sekineh; Safari, Mohsen; Moudi, Emaduddin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recognition of the predisposing factors of bladder cancer is very important and provides possible prevention measures. The aim of this study was to investigate the types, distribution of bladder tumors and their relationship with opium consumption and smoking in patients who referred to Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case-control study, all patients diagnosed with bladder cancer who underwent surgery during 2001-2012 were enrolled. The subjects of the control group were selected among the patients who underwent ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) for gallstone and had no tumors and genitourinary problems. Data regarding demographic, pathology reports and tumor type, smoking status, history of opium consumption and its duration were collected. Patients and controls were compared using t-test and chi-square test. SPSS software Version 20 was used for analysis. Results: In this study, 175 patients with an average age of 63.30±15.29 years and 175 age- matched controls were studied. A significant association was observed between smoking and opium consumption with bladder cancer (P=0.001 for both). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that opium consumption and smoking are associated with bladder cancer PMID:26221505

  17. Age- and sex-dependent distribution of persistent organochlorine pollutants in urban foxes.

    PubMed Central

    Dip, Ramiro; Hegglin, Daniel; Deplazes, Peter; Dafflon, Oscar; Koch, Herbert; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2003-01-01

    The colonization of urban and suburban habitats by red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) provides a novel sentinel species to monitor the spread of anthropogenic pollutants in densely populated human settlements. Here, red foxes were collected in the municipal territory of Zürich, Switzerland, and their perirenal adipose tissue was examined for persistent organochlorine residues. This pilot study revealed an unexpected pattern of contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), with significantly higher levels of the predominant congeners PCB-138, PCB-153, and PCB-180 in juvenile foxes relative to adult animals. Further data analysis demonstrated that the observed difference was attributable to an age-dependent reduction of PCB concentrations in females, whereas male foxes retained approximately the same PCB burden throughout their life span. A similar sex-related bias between population members has been observed, primarily in marine mammals. Interestingly, the reduction of organochlorine contents with progressive age is reminiscent of human studies, where an extensive maternal transfer of xenobiotics to the offspring has been shown to result in increased exposure levels of infants relative to adults. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an urban wildlife species that faithfully reflects the dynamic distribution of toxic contaminants in the corresponding human population. Suburban and urban foxes occupy habitats in close proximity to humans, depend on anthropogenic food supplies, are relatively long-lived and readily available for sampling, can be easily aged and sexed, have a limited home range, and, therefore, meet several important requirements to serve as a surrogate species for the assessment of toxic health hazards. PMID:14527839

  18. Age- and sex-dependent distribution of persistent organochlorine pollutants in urban foxes.

    PubMed

    Dip, Ramiro; Hegglin, Daniel; Deplazes, Peter; Dafflon, Oscar; Koch, Herbert; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2003-10-01

    The colonization of urban and suburban habitats by red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) provides a novel sentinel species to monitor the spread of anthropogenic pollutants in densely populated human settlements. Here, red foxes were collected in the municipal territory of Zürich, Switzerland, and their perirenal adipose tissue was examined for persistent organochlorine residues. This pilot study revealed an unexpected pattern of contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), with significantly higher levels of the predominant congeners PCB-138, PCB-153, and PCB-180 in juvenile foxes relative to adult animals. Further data analysis demonstrated that the observed difference was attributable to an age-dependent reduction of PCB concentrations in females, whereas male foxes retained approximately the same PCB burden throughout their life span. A similar sex-related bias between population members has been observed, primarily in marine mammals. Interestingly, the reduction of organochlorine contents with progressive age is reminiscent of human studies, where an extensive maternal transfer of xenobiotics to the offspring has been shown to result in increased exposure levels of infants relative to adults. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an urban wildlife species that faithfully reflects the dynamic distribution of toxic contaminants in the corresponding human population. Suburban and urban foxes occupy habitats in close proximity to humans, depend on anthropogenic food supplies, are relatively long-lived and readily available for sampling, can be easily aged and sexed, have a limited home range, and, therefore, meet several important requirements to serve as a surrogate species for the assessment of toxic health hazards. PMID:14527839

  19. ADNP: A major autism mutated gene is differentially distributed (age and gender) in the songbird brain.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, Gal Hacohen; Barnea, Anat; Gozes, Illana

    2015-10-01

    ADNP is a protein necessary for brain development, important for brain plasticity, cognitive and social functioning, characteristics that are all impaired in autism and in the Adnp(+/-) mouse model, in a sex-dependent manner. ADNP was originally discovered as a protein that is secreted from glial cells in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP is a major neuroprotective peptide in the CNS and PNS and was also associated with social recognition in rodents and aggression, pair-bonding and parental behaviors in birds. Comparative sequence alignment revealed high evolutionary conservation of ADNP in Chordata. Despite its importance in brain function, ADNP has never been studied in birds. Zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) are highly social songbirds that have a sexually dichotomous anatomical brain structure, with males demonstrating a developed song system, presenting a model to study behavior and potential sexually dependent fundamental differences. Here, using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we discovered sexually dichotomous and age related differences in ADNP mRNA expression in three different regions of the song bird brain-cerebellum, cerebrum, and brain stem. Higher levels of ADNP mRNA were specifically found in young male compared to the female cerebrum, while aging caused a significant 2 and 3-fold decrease in the female and male cerebrum, respectively. Furthermore, a comparison between the three tested brain regions revealed unique sex-dependent ADNP mRNA distribution patterns, affected by aging. Future studies are aimed at deciphering the function of ADNP in birds, toward a better molecular understanding of sexual dichotomy in singing behavior in birds. PMID:25895853

  20. Aging.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Choon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2013-09-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  1. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  2. Effects of coolant parameters on steady state temperature distribution in phospheric-acid fuel cell electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Abdul-Aziz, A.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of thermophysical properties and flow rate on the steady-state temperature distribution in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell electrode plate was experimentally investigated. An experimental setup that simulates the operating conditions prevailing in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell stack was used. The fuel cell cooling system utilized three types of coolants to remove excess heat generated in the cell electrode and to maintain a reasonably uniform temperature distribution in the electrode plate. The coolants used were water, engine oil, and air. These coolants were circulated at Reynolds number ranging from 1165 to 6165 for water; 3070 to 6864 for air; and 15 to 79 for oil. Experimental results are presented.

  3. Chiral-odd generalized parton distributions in transverse and longitudinal impact parameter spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, D.; Manohar, R.; Mukherjee, A.

    2009-02-01

    We investigate the chiral-odd generalized parton distributions for nonzero skewness {zeta} in transverse and longitudinal position spaces by taking Fourier transform with respect to the transverse and longitudinal momentum transfer, respectively. We present overlap formulas for the chiral-odd generalized parton distributions in terms of light-front wave functions (LFWFs) of the proton both in the Efremov-Radyushkin-Brodsky-Lepage and Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi regions. We calculate them in a field theory inspired model of a relativistic spin-1/2 composite state with the correct correlation between the different LFWFs in Fock space, namely, that of the quantum fluctuations of an electron in a generalized form of QED. We show the spin-orbit correlation effect of the two-particle LFWF as well as the correlation between the constituent spin and the transverse spin of the target.

  4. Chiral-odd generalized parton distributions in transverse and longitudinal impact parameter spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, D.; Manohar, R.; Mukherjee, A.

    2009-02-01

    We investigate the chiral-odd generalized parton distributions for nonzero skewness ζ in transverse and longitudinal position spaces by taking Fourier transform with respect to the transverse and longitudinal momentum transfer, respectively. We present overlap formulas for the chiral-odd generalized parton distributions in terms of light-front wave functions (LFWFs) of the proton both in the Efremov-Radyushkin-Brodsky-Lepage and Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi regions. We calculate them in a field theory inspired model of a relativistic spin-1/2 composite state with the correct correlation between the different LFWFs in Fock space, namely, that of the quantum fluctuations of an electron in a generalized form of QED. We show the spin-orbit correlation effect of the two-particle LFWF as well as the correlation between the constituent spin and the transverse spin of the target.

  5. Quality and Safety of General Anesthesia with Propofol and Sevoflurane in Children Aged 1-14 Based on Laboratory Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Vanis-Vatrenjak, Selma; Mesic, Amira; Abdagic, Ines; Mujezinovic, Djenita; Zvizdic, Zlatan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge of anatomic, physiological, biochemical and physical characteristics of children of all age groups, the existing illness and possible pathological response of the organism to the existing situation, require a pediatric anesthesiologist to participate in the preparation of a child for surgical treatment, to choose the best anesthesia technique and medications, and manipulative techniques to enable the scheduled surgical treatment with minimum anesthesia risks. The aim of this clinical study was to prove reliability and quality of propofol or sevoflurane general anesthesia in children in the age group of 1-14 years from the ASA I group and in the elective surgical treatments in duration of 60 minutes, based on preoperative and postoperative levels of laboratory findings (transaminases, blood sugar, urea and creatinine). Materials and methods: the study included 160 patients randomized in two groups based on different approaches: total intravenous anesthesia was used for the propofol group (n=80) (TIVA) and the inhalation technique was used for the sevoflurane group (n=80). Results: statistical evaluation of the obtained results indicates stability of laboratory findings in the immediate postoperative course (after 24 hours) in respect to the preoperative period. Based on the Mann Whitney test (P), preoperative and postoperative blood sugar levels in the sevoflurane vs. propofol group were P=0.152 vs. 0.021; creatinine levels P=0.113 vs. 0.325; urea levels P= 0.016 vs. 0.900; AST levels P=0,031 vs. 0,268 and ALT levels P=0.021 vs. 0.058. Level of significance was P<0.5. Conclusion: Analysis of the examined laboratory parameters show that propofol and sevoflurane provide full security and quality of general anesthesia in children age group 1-14 years, from the ASA I group. All analyzed laboratory levels in the postoperative course remained in their referential values in both groups of participants. PMID:26543304

  6. Age distributions and dynamically changing hydrologic systems: Exploring topography-driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J. D.; Wilson, J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Natural systems are driven by dynamic forcings that change in time as well as space, behavior that is inherited by the system flow field and results in time-varying age distributions (ADs). This work presents a review of the mathematical tools and solution approaches used to model ADs in dynamic time-varying flow systems. A simple conceptual, numerical model is then used to explore the role of flow dynamics in ADs for topography-driven flow systems. This model is an analog for regional groundwater systems and hyporheic zones. This model demonstrates that relatively small fluctuations in the forcing, even though importantly affecting the flow in the system, can have minimal effects in ADs. However, as the intensity of fluctuation increases, still within the bounds observed in natural systems, ADs in shallow parts of the system become highly sensitive to dynamic flow conditions, leading to considerable changes in the moments and modality of the distributions with time. In particular, transient flow can lead to emergence of new modes in the AD, which would not be present under steady flow conditions. The discrepancy observed between ADs under steady and transient flow conditions is explained by enhancement of mixing due to temporal variations in the flow field. ADs in deeper parts of the system are characterized by multimodality and tend to be more stable over time even for large forcing fluctuations.

  7. Parameter estimation of magnetospheric particle distributions in the energy range 20 to 500 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K. M.

    1982-04-01

    A computer program which analyzes the energy spectra of energetic magnetospheric particles is described. The instrument characteristics and experimental design of the geostationary satellite GEOS-2 which provided the raw data are indicated. The program is designed to run on a UNIVAC 1100/81 computer and requires a plotter and a terminal with basic display enhancement features. Three dimensional charts showing the spectral distribution of energetic electrons are included.

  8. A modular approach to addressing model design, scale, and parameter estimation issues in distributed hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, G. H.; Markstrom, S. L.; Restrepo, P. J.; Viger, R. J.

    2002-02-01

    A modular approach to model design and construction provides a flexible framework in which to focus the multidisciplinary research and operational efforts needed to facilitate the development, selection, and application of the most robust distributed modelling methods. A variety of modular approaches have been developed, but with little consideration for compatibility among systems and concepts. Several systems are proprietary, limiting any user interaction. The US Geological Survey modular modelling system (MMS) is a modular modelling framework that uses an open source software approach to enable all members of the scientific community to address collaboratively the many complex issues associated with the design, development, and application of distributed hydrological and environmental models. Implementation of a common modular concept is not a trivial task. However, it brings the resources of a larger community to bear on the problems of distributed modelling, provides a framework in which to compare alternative modelling approaches objectively, and provides a means of sharing the latest modelling advances. The concepts and components of the MMS are described and an example application of the MMS, in a decision-support system context, is presented to demonstrate current system capabilities.

  9. A modular approach to addressing model design, scale, and parameter estimation issues in distributed hydrological modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leavesley, G.H.; Markstrom, S.L.; Restrepo, P.J.; Viger, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A modular approach to model design and construction provides a flexible framework in which to focus the multidisciplinary research and operational efforts needed to facilitate the development, selection, and application of the most robust distributed modelling methods. A variety of modular approaches have been developed, but with little consideration for compatibility among systems and concepts. Several systems are proprietary, limiting any user interaction. The US Geological Survey modular modelling system (MMS) is a modular modelling framework that uses an open source software approach to enable all members of the scientific community to address collaboratively the many complex issues associated with the design, development, and application of distributed hydrological and environmental models. Implementation of a common modular concept is not a trivial task. However, it brings the resources of a larger community to bear on the problems of distributed modelling, provides a framework in which to compare alternative modelling approaches objectively, and provides a means of sharing the latest modelling advances. The concepts and components of the MMS are described and an example application of the MMS, in a decision-support system context, is presented to demonstrate current system capabilities. Copyright ?? 2002 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  10. Ground water age and nitrate distribution within a glacial aquifer beneath a thick unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, C.T.; Cook, P.G.; Frape, S.K.; Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.; Blackport, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The impact on ground water quality from increasing fertilizer application rates over the past 40 years is evaluated within a glacial aquifer system beneath a thick unsaturated zone. Ground water ages within the aquifer could not be accurately determined from the measured distribution of 3H and as a result, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and 3H/3He dating techniques were applied. Beneath a 25 m thick unsaturated zone, ground water ages based on CFC-11 concentrations were greater than 3H/3He ground water ages by 6 to 10 years, due to the time lag associated with the diffusion of CFCs through the unsaturated zone. Using the corrected CFC-11 and 3H/3He ground water ages and the estimated travel time of 3H within the unsaturated zone, the approximate position of ground water recharged since the mid-1960s was determined. Nitrate concentrations within post mid-1960s recharge were generally elevated and near or above the drinking water limit of 10 mg-N/L. In comparison, pre mid-1960s recharge had nitrate concentrations <2.5 mg-N/L. The elevated NO3- concentrations in post mid-1960s recharge are attributed mainly to increasing fertilizer application rates between 1970 and the mid- to late 1980s. Anaerobic conditions suitable for denitrification are present within pre mid-1960s recharge indicating that removal of DO is a slow process taking tens of years. Over the next 10 to 20 years, nitrate concentrations at municipal well fields that are currently capturing aerobic ground water recharged near the mid-1960s are expected to increase because of the higher fertilizer application rates beginning in the 1970s and 1980s.The impact on ground water quality from increasing fertilizer application rates over the past 40 years is evaluated within a glacial aquifer system beneath a thick unsaturated zone. Beneath a 25 m thick unsaturated zone, ground water ages based on CFC-11 concentrations were greater than 3H/3He ground water ages by 6 to 10 years, due to the time lag associated with the

  11. Age spectra of riverine POC - does variability within or between river basins have a larger impact on POC age distributions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenheim, B. E.; Galy, V.; Roberts, B. J.; Allison, M. A.; Kolker, A.

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of riverine particulate organic carbon (POC) in terms of age and source is important for constraining biogeochemical models of carbon cycling. Most of the progress made in characterizing riverine POC has been through analysis of bulk carbon and the small percentage of extractable compounds in the POC. We present ramped pyrolysis 14C and δ13C data from two rivers with different transport and depositional characteristics - the Narayani River, a tributary feeding the Ganges River at the slope break of the Himalayas, and the lowermost Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system (MARS) - in order to compare and contrast the radiocarbon age spectra of the two systems. The results show that variability within basins (i.e. high discharge events) indeed affects the POC age spectra, but the variability between the two basins is far more illustrative of contrasts in carbon cycling between small mountainous rivers (SMRs) and large basins such as the Mississippi/Atchafalaya. In the Narayani River, POC is bimodal with respect to radiocarbon age and shows 14C age ranges (~30,000 14C y) one order of magnitude higher than POC from the MARS (~1,700 14C y). In both basins, discharge plays a demonstrable role in POC age spectrum, but likely not the main role. The data from both systems are unique because they represent the spectrum of all components of the POC, rather than bulk 14C ages which can average disparate sources of POC with significantly different ages. As such, we constrain proportions of carbon from very old sources (petrogenic and fossil carbon) that are difficult to quantifiably extract and we improve existing estimates of POC transport to potentially long-term marine sediment sinks. The results corroborate emerging theories relating basin type to POC storage potential (Blair and Aller, 2012), with smaller, steeper basins potentially having a higher storage potential and a higher degree of fossil and petrogenic carbon. References: Blair, N. E., and R. C. Aller

  12. Assessment of optimum threshold and particle shape parameter for the image analysis of aggregate size distribution of concrete sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozen, Murat; Guler, Murat

    2014-02-01

    Aggregate gradation is one of the key design parameters affecting the workability and strength properties of concrete mixtures. Estimating aggregate gradation from hardened concrete samples can offer valuable insights into the quality of mixtures in terms of the degree of segregation and the amount of deviation from the specified gradation limits. In this study, a methodology is introduced to determine the particle size distribution of aggregates from 2D cross sectional images of concrete samples. The samples used in the study were fabricated from six mix designs by varying the aggregate gradation, aggregate source and maximum aggregate size with five replicates of each design combination. Each sample was cut into three pieces using a diamond saw and then scanned to obtain the cross sectional images using a desktop flatbed scanner. An algorithm is proposed to determine the optimum threshold for the image analysis of the cross sections. A procedure was also suggested to determine a suitable particle shape parameter to be used in the analysis of aggregate size distribution within each cross section. Results of analyses indicated that the optimum threshold hence the pixel distribution functions may be different even for the cross sections of an identical concrete sample. Besides, the maximum ferret diameter is the most suitable shape parameter to estimate the size distribution of aggregates when computed based on the diagonal sieve opening. The outcome of this study can be of practical value for the practitioners to evaluate concrete in terms of the degree of segregation and the bounds of mixture's gradation achieved during manufacturing.

  13. Probabilistic collocation method for NDE problems with uncertain parameters with arbitrary distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, M. R.; Knopp, J. S.; Blodgett, M. P.

    2012-05-01

    In order to quantify the reliability of NDE systems, large numbers of experiments are performed to develop a probability of detection (POD) curve for the system. These POD studies require a substantial amount of experimentation which can sometimes be cost prohibitive. To expedite the process of developing these curves, highly precise numerical models are used in conjunction with NDE sensors to understand the uncertainties associated with the inspections. Numerical models are also used in stochastic inversion methods such as Bayesian inversion, which provide a means of characterizing system properties with uncertainties. A strong basis has been developed in the modeling and simulation community for deterministic forward models in NDE, but to fully incorporate these models in model-assisted probability of detection (MAPOD) studies or stochastic inversion schemes, the models must be treated in a stochastic sense. A method of taking random inputs to a "black box" forward model and developing the full probability distribution function (PDF) of the response has been proposed. This method, called the probabilistic collocation method (PCM), takes random inputs to a forward model and uses orthogonal polynomials to construct a surrogate model in the area of the expected values of the inputs which is solved much quicker than the original forward model. In the NDE community, this method has only been used with inputs of known, named distributions. In this work, inputs of arbitrary distribution were used and the orthogonal polynomials for these inputs were developed with a recursion relationship that has been shown to produce orthogonal polynomials with respect to a given, continuous function. A concise code was written to make testing the method and incorporating it into MAPOD studies and inversion schemes relatively easy. The routine was tested with academic problems as well as eddy current problems.

  14. Parameters inversing of polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function model for target rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Zhan, Yong-hong; Yang, Di; Zeng, Chang-e.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we try to find a model that can apply to predict the polarization characteristics of the targets on the ground correctly. In the first place, we give an introduction to several kinds of existing models which are divided into three categories: Empirical models are precise but occupy too much source of computer; Physical-based models can predict the phenomenon of reflection exactly but hardly get the final results; Semi-empirical models have both advantages mentioned above and avoid their disadvantages effectively. Then we make an analysis of the Priest-Germer (PG) pBRDF model, one of semi-empirical models, which is suitable for our study. The methods of parameters inversing and testing are proposed based on this model and the test system from which we can get enough data to verify the accuracy of the model is designed independently. At last, we make a simulation of the whole process of the parameters inversing based on PG pBRDF model. From the analysis of the simulation curves, we briefly know the direction we go in the following work to make an amendment.

  15. Parameter Estimation in Astronomy with Poisson-Distributed Data. 1; The (CHI)2(gamma) Statistic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    1999-01-01

    Applying the standard weighted mean formula, [Sigma (sub i)n(sub i)ssigma(sub i, sup -2)], to determine the weighted mean of data, n(sub i), drawn from a Poisson distribution, will, on average, underestimate the true mean by approx. 1 for all true mean values larger than approx.3 when the common assumption is made that the error of the i th observation is sigma(sub i) = max square root of n(sub i), 1).This small, but statistically significant offset, explains the long-known observation that chi-square minimization techniques which use the modified Neyman'chi(sub 2) statistic, chi(sup 2, sub N) equivalent Sigma(sub i)((n(sub i) - y(sub i)(exp 2)) / max(n(sub i), 1), to compare Poisson - distributed data with model values, y(sub i), will typically predict a total number of counts that underestimates the true total by about 1 count per bin. Based on my finding that weighted mean of data drawn from a Poisson distribution can be determined using the formula [Sigma(sub i)[n(sub i) + min(n(sub i), 1)](n(sub i) + 1)(exp -1)] / [Sigma(sub i)(n(sub i) + 1)(exp -1))], I propose that a new chi(sub 2) statistic, chi(sup 2, sub gamma) equivalent, should always be used to analyze Poisson- distributed data in preference to the modified Neyman's chi(exp 2) statistic. I demonstrated the power and usefulness of,chi(sub gamma, sup 2) minimization by using two statistical fitting techniques and five chi(exp 2) statistics to analyze simulated X-ray power - low 15 - channel spectra with large and small counts per bin. I show that chi(sub gamma, sup 2) minimization with the Levenberg - Marquardt or Powell's method can produce excellent results (mean slope errors approx. less than 3%) with spectra having as few as 25 total counts.

  16. Calibration and data collection protocols for reliable lattice parameter values in electron pair distribution function studies

    SciTech Connect

    Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Hu, Hefei; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2015-01-30

    Different protocols for calibrating electron pair distribution function (ePDF) measurements are explored and described for quantitative studies on nanomaterials. It is found that the most accurate approach to determine the camera length is to use a standard calibration sample of Au nanoparticles from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Different protocols for data collection are also explored, as are possible operational errors, to find the best approaches for accurate data collection for quantitative ePDF studies.

  17. One shot methods for optimal control of distributed parameter systems 1: Finite dimensional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, Shlomo

    1991-01-01

    The efficient numerical treatment of optimal control problems governed by elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) and systems of elliptic PDEs, where the control is finite dimensional is discussed. Distributed control as well as boundary control cases are discussed. The main characteristic of the new methods is that they are designed to solve the full optimization problem directly, rather than accelerating a descent method by an efficient multigrid solver for the equations involved. The methods use the adjoint state in order to achieve efficient smoother and a robust coarsening strategy. The main idea is the treatment of the control variables on appropriate scales, i.e., control variables that correspond to smooth functions are solved for on coarse grids depending on the smoothness of these functions. Solution of the control problems is achieved with the cost of solving the constraint equations about two to three times (by a multigrid solver). Numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the method proposed in distributed control case, pointwise control and boundary control problems.

  18. The YNP Metagenome Project: Environmental Parameters Responsible for Microbial Distribution in the Yellowstone Geothermal Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Inskeep, William P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Herrgård, Markus J.; Rusch, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex contains over 10,000 diverse geothermal features that host numerous phylogenetically deeply rooted and poorly understood archaea, bacteria, and viruses. Microbial communities in high-temperature environments are generally less diverse than soil, marine, sediment, or lake habitats and therefore offer a tremendous opportunity for studying the structure and function of different model microbial communities using environmental metagenomics. One of the broader goals of this study was to establish linkages among microbial distribution, metabolic potential, and environmental variables. Twenty geochemically distinct geothermal ecosystems representing a broad spectrum of Yellowstone hot-spring environments were used for metagenomic and geochemical analysis and included approximately equal numbers of: (1) phototrophic mats, (2) “filamentous streamer” communities, and (3) archaeal-dominated sediments. The metagenomes were analyzed using a suite of complementary and integrative bioinformatic tools, including phylogenetic and functional analysis of both individual sequence reads and assemblies of predominant phylotypes. This volume identifies major environmental determinants of a large number of thermophilic microbial lineages, many of which have not been fully described in the literature nor previously cultivated to enable functional and genomic analyses. Moreover, protein family abundance comparisons and in-depth analyses of specific genes and metabolic pathways relevant to these hot-spring environments reveal hallmark signatures of metabolic capabilities that parallel the distribution of phylotypes across specific types of geochemical environments. PMID:23653623

  19. The YNP Metagenome Project: Environmental Parameters Responsible for Microbial Distribution in the Yellowstone Geothermal Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Tringe, Susannah G; Herrgård, Markus J; Rusch, Douglas B

    2013-01-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex contains over 10,000 diverse geothermal features that host numerous phylogenetically deeply rooted and poorly understood archaea, bacteria, and viruses. Microbial communities in high-temperature environments are generally less diverse than soil, marine, sediment, or lake habitats and therefore offer a tremendous opportunity for studying the structure and function of different model microbial communities using environmental metagenomics. One of the broader goals of this study was to establish linkages among microbial distribution, metabolic potential, and environmental variables. Twenty geochemically distinct geothermal ecosystems representing a broad spectrum of Yellowstone hot-spring environments were used for metagenomic and geochemical analysis and included approximately equal numbers of: (1) phototrophic mats, (2) "filamentous streamer" communities, and (3) archaeal-dominated sediments. The metagenomes were analyzed using a suite of complementary and integrative bioinformatic tools, including phylogenetic and functional analysis of both individual sequence reads and assemblies of predominant phylotypes. This volume identifies major environmental determinants of a large number of thermophilic microbial lineages, many of which have not been fully described in the literature nor previously cultivated to enable functional and genomic analyses. Moreover, protein family abundance comparisons and in-depth analyses of specific genes and metabolic pathways relevant to these hot-spring environments reveal hallmark signatures of metabolic capabilities that parallel the distribution of phylotypes across specific types of geochemical environments. PMID:23653623

  20. Niche distribution and influence of environmental parameters in marine microbial communities: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Felipe H.; Meirelles, Pedro M.; Moreira, Ana Paula B.; Paranhos, Rodolfo P.; Dutilh, Bas E.

    2015-01-01

    Associations between microorganisms occur extensively throughout Earth’s oceans. Understanding how microbial communities are assembled and how the presence or absence of species is related to that of others are central goals of microbial ecology. Here, we investigate co-occurrence associations between marine prokaryotes by combining 180 new and publicly available metagenomic datasets from different oceans in a large-scale meta-analysis. A co-occurrence network was created by calculating correlation scores between the abundances of microorganisms in metagenomes. A total of 1,906 correlations amongst 297 organisms were detected, segregating them into 11 major groups that occupy distinct ecological niches. Additionally, by analyzing the oceanographic parameters measured for a selected number of sampling sites, we characterized the influence of environmental variables over each of these 11 groups. Clustering organisms into groups of taxa that have similar ecology, allowed the detection of several significant correlations that could not be observed for the taxa individually. PMID:26157601

  1. Dependence of plasmaspheric hiss on solar wind parameters and geomagnetic activity and modeling of its global distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Lee, Dae-Young; Shprits, Yuri

    2015-02-01

    Accurate knowledge of the global distribution of plasmaspheric hiss is essential for the radiation belt modeling because it provides a direct link to understanding the radiation belt loss in the slot region. In this paper, we study the dependence of hiss activity on solar wind parameters and geomagnetic activity indices using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms hiss measurements made from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2012 based on a correlation analysis. We find that hiss amplitudes are well correlated with the preceding solar wind speed VSW, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) BZ, and interplanetary electric field (IEF) EY with delay times of 5-6 h for VSW and 3-4 h for IMF BZ and IEF EY, while the best correlation with the geomagnetic indices, AE, Kp, and SYM-H, occurs at a delay time of 2-3 h for AE and SYM-H and 3-4 h for Kp. Of the solar wind parameters, the dawn-to-dusk component of IEF EY yields the best correlation with the variation of hiss wave. More interestingly, the global distribution of hiss waves shows a significant dependence on the VSW and IMF BZ: the most intense hiss region tends to occur at prenoon sector for a more southward IMF BZ, while the tendency is opposite with increasing VSW. This implies different origins of hiss activity. Also, we employ an artificial neural network technique to develop models of the global distribution of hiss amplitudes based on the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. The solely solar wind parameter-based model generally results in a higher correlation between the measured and modeled hiss amplitudes than any other models based on the geomagnetic indices. Finally, we use the solar wind parameter-based model to investigate hiss activity during storm events by distinguishing between coronal mass ejection-driven storms and corotating interaction region-driven storms. The result shows that in spite of the differences in the behavior of solar wind parameters between the two storm

  2. Comparison of deconvolution techniques using a distribution mixture parameter estimation: application in single photon emission computed tomography imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignotte, Max; Meunier, Jean; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Janicki, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Thanks to its ability to yield functionally rather than anatomically-based information, the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imagery technique has become a great help in the diagnostic of cerebrovascular diseases which are the third most common cause of death in the USA and Europe. Nevertheless, SPECT images are very blurred and consequently their interpretation is difficult. In order to improve the spatial resolution of these images and then to facilitate their interpretation by the clinician, we propose to implement and to compare the effectiveness of different existing 'blind' or 'supervised' deconvolution methods. To this end, we present an accurate distribution mixture parameter estimation procedure which takes into account the diversity of the laws in the distribution mixture of a SPECT image. In our application, parameters of this distribution mixture are efficiently exploited in order to prevent overfitting of the noisy data for the iterative deconvolution techniques without regularization term, or to determine the exact support of the object to be restored when this one is needed. Recent blind deconvolution techniques such as the NAS--RIF algorithm, combined with this estimation procedure, can be efficiently applied in SPECT imagery and yield promising results.

  3. Solar cells with distributed parameters: Current-voltage characteristics under uniform and nonuniform illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aripov, K. K.; Rumyantsev, V. D.

    1984-02-01

    A simple method of calculating the current voltage characteristics of solar cells, based on an equivalent resistance diode ladder network with stripline contacts, is applied to such cells with uniform thickness and various shapes of the active surface. Distributed resistance are represented by equivalent lumped ones. This procedure is applied first to the case of uniform illumination, using measured current voltage characteristics of cells and very precisely piecewise linearly approximated exponential current voltage characteristics of diodes. In the case of nonuniform illumination the latter is assumed to be axisymmetric, with the surface consisting of completely dark and uniformly bright segments. Numerical data is generated on this basis for GaAs cells of rectangular or sectoral shape uniformly illuminated and in the shape of circular disks either completely uniformly illuminated or with various configurations of concentric dark and bright zones. Nonuniform illumination is found to result in a flatter current voltage characteristic with a lower open circuit voltage.

  4. Distribution of crack density parameter in Central Betic Cordillera (Southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Inmaculada; Torcal, Federico; Morales, José

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have used high-resolution P- and S-wave velocity results to estimate crack density (ɛ, epsilon) and saturation ratio (ξ, xi) at a depth of 2 km in an intramountain basin and surrounding regions. Detailed observations of gravity, seismic profile and geological data reveal high ɛ consistent with large sedimentary thickness and minimum ɛ coinciding with elevations arising from the basement of the basin. From the distribution of seismic measurements of ξ it is possible to identify the presence of aquifers in detrital sediments, sandstone and dolostone. However, ξ does not show significant changes for the aquifers in geological formations made up also of schists and marbles. A low ξ anomaly in the western part could be associated with Triassic evaporite and clay rocks, and high values of ξ in the southwestern part near thermal springs may be imaging the intricate system of fractures which connect at depth with aquifer rocks.

  5. Mapping stand-age distribution of Russian forests from satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Loboda, T. V.; Hall, A.; Channan, S.; Weber, C. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Russian boreal forest is a critical component of the global boreal biome as approximately two thirds of the boreal forest is located in Russia. Numerous studies have shown that wildfire and logging have led to extensive modifications of forest cover in the region since 2000. Forest disturbance and subsequent regrowth influences carbon and energy budgets and, in turn, affect climate. Several global and regional satellite-based data products have been developed from coarse (>100m) and moderate (10-100m) resolution imagery to monitor forest cover change over the past decade, record of forest cover change pre-dating year 2000 is very fragmented. Although by using stacks of Landsat images, some information regarding the past disturbances can be obtained, the quantity and locations of such stacks with sufficient number of images are extremely limited, especially in Eastern Siberia. This paper describes a modified method which is built upon previous work to hindcast the disturbance history and map stand-age distribution in the Russian boreal forest. Utilizing data from both Landsat and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), a wall-to-wall map indicating the estimated age of forest in the Russian boreal forest is created. Our previous work has shown that disturbances can be mapped successfully up to 30 years in the past as the spectral signature of regrowing forests is statistically significantly different from that of mature forests. The presented algorithm ingests 55 multi-temporal stacks of Landsat imagery available over Russian forest before 2001 and processes through a standardized and semi-automated approach to extract training and validation data samples. Landsat data, dating back to 1984, are used to generate maps of forest disturbance using temporal shifts in Disturbance Index through the multi-temporal stack of imagery in selected locations. These maps are then used as reference data to train a decision tree classifier on 50 MODIS

  6. Utilization of temperature distribution in expiratory speaking flow as a new parameter for speech production analysis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, G F; Vargas, J V C; Filho, E D M

    2004-01-01

    A new instrument with potential use for speech production analysis is utilized in this study to measure the temperature and velocity of the expiratory speaking flow outside the oral cavity. From a physical point of view, the temperature patterns of individuals with healthy voices are expected to be different from individuals with breathy voices, since their air flow patterns are different: during breathy speech production, the glottis does not close completely, and the leakage of warm air through the glottis increases the extent of the hotter-than-ambient temperature field outside the oral cavity. The instrument is a pipe through which the tested individual breathes out while producing a sustained vowel. A tap water heat exchanger keeps the pipe wall at a temperature level considerably lower than the body temperature. The temperature gradient along the pipe centreline is measured and related to the average air velocity at the oral cavity. The measurements were performed in 30 male and 30 female subjects without vocal complaints. The objective of this initial investigation was to evaluate the possibility of establishing patterns of normality for the temperature distribution outside the oral cavity in expiratory speaking flow. In the experiments, all the temperature measurements increased as the expiratory air flow of the individual increased during speech production, therefore the instrument results agree with the physical behavior predicted by fluid mechanics and heat transfer principles. The collected data allowed for the construction of charts with two distinct normalized temperature distributions outside the oral cavity, for male and female individuals, respectively. These charts have the potential for future utilization in a follow-up study for comparison with similar measurements obtained with individuals with vocal fold pathologies, aiming to eventually produce a reliable new instrument for early detection of vocal problems through a non-invasive procedure

  7. Slip-Related Changes in Plantar Pressure Distribution, and Parameters for Early Detection of Slip Events

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seungyoung; Cho, Hyungpil; Kang, Boram; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Mi Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate differences in plantar pressure distribution between a normal gait and unpredictable slip events to predict the initiation of the slipping process. Methods Eleven male participants were enrolled. Subjects walked onto a wooden tile, and two layers of oily vinyl sheet were placed on the expected spot of the 4th step to induce a slip. An insole pressure-measuring system was used to monitor plantar pressure distribution. This system measured plantar pressure in four regions (the toes, metatarsal head, arch, and heel) for three events: the step during normal gait; the recovered step, when the subject recovered from a slip; and the uncorrected, harmful slipped step. Four variables were analyzed: peak pressure (PP), contact time (CT), the pressure-time integral (PTI), and the instant of peak pressure (IPP). Results The plantar pressure pattern in the heel was unique, as compared with other parts of the sole. In the heel, PP, CT, and PTI values were high in slipped and recovered steps compared with normal steps. The IPP differed markedly among the three steps. The IPPs in the heel for the three events were, in descending order (from latest to earliest), slipped, recovered, and normal steps, whereas in the other regions the order was normal, recovered, and slipped steps. Finally, the metatarsal head-to-heel IPP ratios for the normal, recovered, and slipped steps were 6.1±2.9, 3.1±3.0, and 2.2±2.5, respectively. Conclusion A distinctive plantar pressure pattern in the heel might be useful for early detection of a slip event to prevent slip-related injuries. PMID:26798603

  8. Land use as a Parameter of Distributed Hydrological Modeling at the CATIE Farm, Turrialba, Costa Rica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, R.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E.; Jones, J.

    2007-05-01

    As distributed hydrological models continue to develop, their amount of spatial detail requires the evaluation of a larger set of variables. Deforestation is often cited as a principal cause of changing hydrological regimes in the tropics. However, many studies debate the exact mechanism of change. Also, much of the tropics have been permanently deforested for agricultural expansion. Therefore, in this study we instrumented fields (1-6 ha) of four common land uses (forest, coffee agroforestry, sugar cane, and pasture) with meteorological stations, soil moisture probes, and H-flumes. Additional field measurements have shown differences in bulk density, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and soil moisture dynamics between land uses. Hydrograph analysis suggests that the pasture site responds differently to rainfall than the other land uses. Runoff from the pasture site results in higher intensity, greater volume, and shorter duration runoff events than the other land uses. However, the other land uses respond more frequently with lower maximum event intensities, lower volumes and longer durations. In the forest and coffee sites, soil moisture dynamics suggest the importance of lateral preferential flow paths due to root influenced soil structure for runoff response. Therefore, while vertical Ksat values may be greater at all sites than most rainfall intensities, lateral Ksat values may differ significantly between sites. Field measurements and the distributed physically based Soil Moisture Routing (SMR) model are being used test hypotheses, and direct further field research. These results will prove important to understand hydrological connectivity in fragmented landscapes, and the potential recovery of hydrological services within a typical humid tropical environment.

  9. Effect of dopant distribution on aging of catalytic Cr-doped transition aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, Albina; Rashkeev, Sergey; Wang, Sanwu; Glazoff, Michael; Sohlberg, Karl; Pennycook, Stephen; Pantelides, Sokrates

    2004-03-01

    Metastable (transition) aluminas, in particular γ -Al_2O3 and η -Al_2O_3, are widely used as catalysts as well as supports for different transition metals. When doped with Cr, the two modifications exhibit remarkably different aging behavior: γ -Al_2O_3-supported catalysts degrade two orders of magnitude faster than those based on η -Al_2O_3. Here we use a combination of Z-contrast aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies with first-principles calculations to determine the origin of this disparity. EXAFS data reveal that the coordination environments of Cr in the two forms are significantly different. STEM and EELS observations demonstrate that on γ -Al_2O3 Cr tends to segregate and form Cr_2O_3, while on η -Al_2O3 Cr is uniformly distributed. The reason for the dissimilarity, as shown by first-principles calculations, lies in the different reconstruction of the preferentially exposed 110 surface. In γ -Al_2O_3, it serves to destabilize the catalytically active Cr sites, at the same time inducing the formation of Cr_2O_3, while in η -Al_2O3 Cr atoms stay dispersed on the surface and catalytically active. This work provides interesting insights in the aging behavior of transition-metal based catalysts. Authors thank Dr. Saeed Alerasool (Engelhard Corp., Beechwood, OH) for providing samples and DOE (Grants DE-AC05-00OR22725 and DE-FC02-01CH11085) and NSF (Grant DMR-0111841) for financial support.

  10. Numerical analysis of seismic events distributions on the planetary scale and celestial bodies astrometrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatova, Dr.

    2012-04-01

    Modern research in the domains of Earth sciences is developing from the descriptions of each individual natural phenomena to the systematic complex research in interdisciplinary areas. For studies of its kind in the form numerical analysis of three-dimensional (3D) systems, the author proposes space-time Technology (STT), based on a Ptolemaic geocentric system, consist of two modules, each with its own coordinate system: (1) - 3D model of a Earth, the coordinates of which provides databases of the Earth's events (here seismic), and (2) - a compact model of the relative motion of celestial bodies in space - time on Earth known as the "Method of a moving source" (MDS), which was developed in MDS (Bulatova, 1998-2000) for the 3D space. Module (2) was developed as a continuation of the geocentric Ptolemaic system of the world, built on the astronomical parameters heavenly bodies. Based on the aggregation data of Space and Earth Sciences, systematization, and cooperative analysis, this is an attempt to establish a cause-effect relationship between the position of celestial bodies (Moon, Sun) and Earth's seismic events.

  11. A New Database of Globular Clusters Parameters: Distributions of Cluster Properties and Correlations Between Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S.; Meylan, G.

    1993-05-01

    The forthcoming ASPCS volume, ``Structure and Dynamics of Globular Clusters'' (expected publication date: early summer of 1993) will contain a set of appendices with data resources on Galactic globular clusters; the authors of these papers include I.R. King, S. Peterson, C.T. Pryor, S.C. Trager, and ourselves. From these papers we have compiled a data base of various observed and derived parameters for globular clusters (143 of them at last count). Our main purpose is to use these data for correlative studies of globular cluster properties. Others may find it useful for similar purposes, for planning and support of observations, for testing of theoretical models, etc. We will describe the data base, and present some simple analysis of the cluster properties and correlations among them. The data will be made available to the community in a computer form, as ASCII files. Interested users should send an email message to the Internet address: george @ deimos.caltech.edu, and may also find the above mentioned ASPCS volume useful in their work. We thank our colleagues who contributed data for this compilation for their efforts. S.D. acknowledges a partial support from the NASA contract NAS5-31348, and the NSF PYI award AST-9157412.

  12. Toward the Distribution of Orbital Parameters of Nearby Major Galaxy Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi Karvani, Seyed Alireza

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis project our goal is to measure the initial conditions of a sample of ~20 local disk-disk major galaxy mergers. Measuring the orbital parameters is possible by findingthe most similar galaxy merger simulation to the morphology and kinematics of the data.We have developed an automated modeling method based on the Identikit software package,which also estimates the uncertainty of the measured initial conditions. We tested our modeling method using an independent set of GADGET simulations, and we acquired reliable results onprograde merger systems. We observed the Hα kinematics of our sample using SparsePak IFU on the WIYN telescope at KPNO, and DIS on the 3.5m telescope at APO. For the few merger systems in our sample with archival HI data available, we compare the use of HI vs Hα as the kinematic tracer. This work lays the ground-work for the analysis of larger statistical samples of mergers from on-going IFU galaxy survey such as MaNGA.

  13. Quality parameter for coherent transmissions with Gaussian-distributed nonlinear noise.

    PubMed

    Grellier, Edouard; Bononi, Alberto

    2011-06-20

    By assuming the nonlinear noise as a signal-independent circular gaussian noise, a typical case in non-dispersion managed links with coherent multilevel modulation formats, we provide several analytical properties of a new quality parameter--playing the role of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) at the sampling gate in the coherent receiver--which carry over to the Q-factor versus power (or "bell") curves. We show that the maximum Q is reached at an optimal power, the nonlinear threshold, at which the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise power is twice the nonlinear noise power, and the SNR penalty with respect to linear propagation is 10Log(3/2) ≃ 1.76  dB,, although the Q-penalty is somewhat larger and increases at lower Q-factors, as we verify for the polarization-division multiplexing quadrature phase shift keying (PDM-QPSK) format. As we vary the ASE power, the maxima of the SNR vs. power curves are shown to slide along a straight-line with slope ≃-2 dB/dB. A similar behavior is followed by the Q-factor maxima, although for PDM-QPSK the local slope is around -2.7 dB/dB for Q-values of practical interest. PMID:21716520

  14. A two-parameter model for the infrared/submillimeter/radio spectral energy distributions of galaxies and active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Daniel A.; Helou, George; Magdis, Georgios E.; Armus, Lee; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Shi, Yong

    2014-03-20

    A two-parameter semi-empirical model is presented for the spectral energy distributions of galaxies with contributions to their infrared-submillimeter-radio emission from both star formation and accretion disk-powered activity. This model builds upon a previous one-parameter family of models for star-forming galaxies, and includes an update to the mid-infrared emission using an average template obtained from Spitzer Space Telescope observations of normal galaxies. Star-forming/active galactic nucleus (AGN) diagnostics based on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon equivalent widths and broadband infrared colors are presented, and example mid-infrared AGN fractional contributions are estimated from model fits to the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey sample of nearby U/LIRGS and the Five mJy Unbiased Spitzer Extragalactic Survey sample of 24 μm selected sources at redshifts 0 ≲ z ≲ 4.

  15. Muscle-specific 4E-BP1 signaling activation improves metabolic parameters during aging and obesity.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shihyin; Sitzmann, Joanna M; Dastidar, Somasish G; Rodriguez, Ariana A; Vu, Stephanie L; McDonald, Circe E; Academia, Emmeline C; O'Leary, Monique N; Ashe, Travis D; La Spada, Albert R; Kennedy, Brian K

    2015-08-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) is a key downstream effector of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) that represses cap-dependent mRNA translation initiation by sequestering the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Reduced mTORC1 signaling is associated with life span extension and improved metabolic homeostasis, yet the downstream targets that mediate these benefits are unclear. Here, we demonstrated that enhanced 4E-BP1 activity in mouse skeletal muscle protects against age- and diet-induced insulin resistance and metabolic rate decline. Transgenic animals displayed increased energy expenditure; altered adipose tissue distribution, including reduced white adipose accumulation and preserved brown adipose mass; and were protected from hepatic steatosis. Skeletal muscle-specific 4E-BP1 mediated metabolic protection directly through increased translation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and enhanced respiratory function. Non-cell autonomous protection was through preservation of brown adipose tissue metabolism, which was increased in 4E-BP1 transgenic animals during normal aging and in a response to diet-induced type 2 diabetes. Adipose phenotypes may derive from enhanced skeletal muscle expression and secretion of the known myokine FGF21. Unlike skeletal muscle, enhanced adipose-specific 4E-BP1 activity was not protective but instead was deleterious in response to the same challenges. These findings indicate that regulation of 4E-BP1 in skeletal muscle may serve as an important conduit through which mTORC1 controls metabolism. PMID:26121750

  16. Muscle-specific 4E-BP1 signaling activation improves metabolic parameters during aging and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shihyin; Sitzmann, Joanna M.; Dastidar, Somasish G.; Rodriguez, Ariana A.; Vu, Stephanie L.; McDonald, Circe E.; Academia, Emmeline C.; O’Leary, Monique N.; Ashe, Travis D.; La Spada, Albert R.; Kennedy, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E–binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) is a key downstream effector of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) that represses cap-dependent mRNA translation initiation by sequestering the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Reduced mTORC1 signaling is associated with life span extension and improved metabolic homeostasis, yet the downstream targets that mediate these benefits are unclear. Here, we demonstrated that enhanced 4E-BP1 activity in mouse skeletal muscle protects against age- and diet-induced insulin resistance and metabolic rate decline. Transgenic animals displayed increased energy expenditure; altered adipose tissue distribution, including reduced white adipose accumulation and preserved brown adipose mass; and were protected from hepatic steatosis. Skeletal muscle–specific 4E-BP1 mediated metabolic protection directly through increased translation of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and enhanced respiratory function. Non–cell autonomous protection was through preservation of brown adipose tissue metabolism, which was increased in 4E-BP1 transgenic animals during normal aging and in a response to diet-induced type 2 diabetes. Adipose phenotypes may derive from enhanced skeletal muscle expression and secretion of the known myokine FGF21. Unlike skeletal muscle, enhanced adipose-specific 4E-BP1 activity was not protective but instead was deleterious in response to the same challenges. These findings indicate that regulation of 4E-BP1 in skeletal muscle may serve as an important conduit through which mTORC1 controls metabolism. PMID:26121750

  17. Geographical distribution of organochlorine contaminants and reproductive parameters in Herring Gulls on Lake Superior in 1983.

    PubMed

    Chip Weseloh, D V; Ewins, P J; Struger, J; Mineau, P; Norstrom, R J

    1994-02-01

    As part of the Great Lakes International Surveillance Plan, 1978-83, egg contaminant levels and reproductive output were determined for Herring Gull colonies on Lake Superior in 1983. Since 1974, the Herring Gull has been widely used in the Great Lakes as a spatial and temporal monitor of organochlorine (OC) contaminant levels and associated biological effects. Most eggs contained a wide range of OCs, the main compounds being DDE, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, hexachlorobenzene and mirex. Levels of an additional ten OCs and five polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) congeners were also determined for some sites. Overall, levels varied significantly among colonies, but there was no obvious relationship to spatial distribution of contaminants in sediments or fish species. OC levels in eggs had declined by up to 84% since 1974. Eggshells were only 8% thinner than before the introduction of DDT, and shell thinning was not a cause of breeding failure. Average reproductive output varied from 0.15 to 1.57 young per apparently occupied nest in 1983: at 56% of colonies the value was below that thought necessary to maintain stable populations. The main causes of failure were egg disappearence and cannibalism of chicks. Despite this, the population appeared to have been increasing at about 4% per annum. Reduced availability of forage fish during the early 1980s was the most likely reason for the poor reproductive output in 1983. PMID:24221346

  18. Stereophotogrammetrie Mass Distribution Parameter Determination Of The Lower Body Segments For Use In Gait Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffer, Daniel B.; Schaer, Alex R.; Baumann, Juerg U.

    1989-04-01

    Inclusion of mass distribution information in biomechanical analysis of motion is a requirement for the accurate calculation of external moments and forces acting on the segmental joints during locomotion. Regression equations produced from a variety of photogrammetric, anthropometric and cadaeveric studies have been developed and espoused in literature. Because of limitations in the accuracy of predicted inertial properties based on the application of regression equation developed on one population and then applied on a different study population, the employment of a measurement technique that accurately defines the shape of each individual subject measured is desirable. This individual data acquisition method is especially needed when analyzing the gait of subjects with large differences in their extremity geo-metry from those considered "normal", or who may possess gross asymmetries in shape in their own contralateral limbs. This study presents the photogrammetric acquisition and data analysis methodology used to assess the inertial tensors of two groups of subjects, one with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy and the other considered normal.

  19. Photoacoustic drug delivery: the effect of laser parameters on the spatial distribution of delivered drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, HanQun; Casperson, Lee W.; Shearin, Alan; Gregory, Kenton W.; Prahl, Scott A.

    1995-05-01

    Photoacoustic drug delivery is a technique for delivering drugs to localized areas by timing laser-induced pressure transients to coincide with a bolus of drug. This study explores the effects of target material, laser energy, absorption coefficient, fiber size, repetition rate, and number of pulses on the spatial distribution of delivered drug. A microsecond flash-lamp pumped dye laser delivered 30-100 mJ pulses through optical fibers with diameters of 300-1000 micrometers . Vapor bubbles were created 1-5 mm above clear gelatin targets submerged in mineral oil containing a hydrophobic dye (D&C Red#17). The absorption coefficient of the oil-dye solution was varied from 50-300 cm-1. Spatially unconfined geometry was investigated. We have found that while the dye can be driven a few millimeters into the gels in both the axial and radial directions, the penetration was less than 500 micrometers when the gel surface remained macroscopically undamaged. Increasing the distance between the fiber tip and target, or decreasing the pulse energy reduced the extend of the delivery.

  20. Incorporating uncertainty of distribution parameters due to sampling errors in flood-damage-reduction project evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hsin-Ting; Tung, Yeou-Koung

    2013-03-01

    Epistemic uncertainty is a result of knowledge deficiency about the system. Sampling error exists when limited amounts of hydrologic data are used to estimate a T year event quantile. Both the natural randomness of hydrologic data and the sampling error in design quantile estimation contribute to the uncertainty in flood damage estimation. This paper presents a framework for evaluating a flood-damage-mitigation project in which both the hydrologic randomness and epistemic uncertainty due to sampling error are considered in flood damage estimation. Different risk-based decision-making criteria are used to evaluate project merits based on the mean, standard deviation, and probability distribution of the project net benefits. The results show that the uncertainty of the project net benefits is quite significant. Ignoring the data sampling error will underestimate the potential risk of each project. It can be clearly shown that adding data to existing sample observations leads to improved quality of information, enhanced reliability of the estimators, and reduced sampling error and uncertainty in the project net benefits. Through the proposed framework, the proper length of the extended record for risk reduction can be determined to achieve the required level of acceptable risk.

  1. Joint min-max distribution and Edwards-Anderson's order parameter of the circular 1/f-noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiangyu; Le Doussal, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the joint min-max distribution and the Edwards-Anderson's order parameter for the circular model of 1/f-noise. Both quantities, as well as generalisations, are obtained exactly by combining the freezing-duality conjecture and Jack-polynomial techniques. Numerical checks come with significantly improved control of finite-size effects in the glassy phase, and the results convincingly validate the freezing-duality conjecture. Application to diffusive dynamics is discussed. We also provide a formula for the pre-factor ratio of the joint/marginal Carpentier-Le Doussal tail for minimum/maximum which applies to any logarithmic random energy model.

  2. Iron concentrations and distributions in the parkinsonian substantia nigra of aged and young primate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M. Q.; Xie, J. P.; Wang, X. S.; Ong, W. Y.; Leong, S. K.; Watt, F.

    2001-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neuronal degenerative brain disease of the elderly, and is caused by the selective degeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the brain, resulting in a reduced production of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Iron has been linked to dopaminergic cell death in Parkinson's disease because of its potential to promote free radicals, leading to oxidative stress. The present study is aimed at using the techniques of nuclear microscopy to elucidate the iron concentrations and distributions in the SN of both young and old monkeys following unilateral 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioning. A group of three old monkeys (older than 7 years) and a group of three young monkeys (younger than 7 years) were unilaterally MPTP-lesioned (right side) to induce parkinsonism and sacrificed after 35 days. The left side SN was used as a control. This time interval was chosen to correspond to an average 50% loss of dopamine producing cells in the lesioned right side SN. We have observed a significant difference in iron concentrations between the SNs of the young and old monkeys (increasing from an average of 233 to 1092 parts per million dry weight). When comparing the lesioned and non-lesioned SNs of the same animal, we found no significant difference in iron levels for each young monkey. However we have found a slight increase in iron (approximately 10%) between the lesioned SN and control SN for old monkeys. We have also observed that in the SN of younger primates, there is a weak anti-correlation in the SN iron levels with the neuron distribution. In the older monkeys, however, we have observed a proliferation of iron-rich granules, which appear to be more strongly anti-correlated with the distribution of neurons. The iron-cell anti-correlation occurs both in the control as well as the lesioned SN. Our results suggest that iron, particularly in the form of iron-rich deposits, accumulates in specific sites

  3. Effects of Initial Values and Convergence Criterion in the Two-Parameter Logistic Model When Estimating the Latent Distribution in BILOG-MG 3

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Ingo W.; Tran, Ulrich S.; Voracek, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Parameters of the two-parameter logistic model are generally estimated via the expectation-maximization algorithm, which improves initial values for all parameters iteratively until convergence is reached. Effects of initial values are rarely discussed in item response theory (IRT), but initial values were recently found to affect item parameters when estimating the latent distribution with full non-parametric maximum likelihood. However, this method is rarely used in practice. Hence, the present study investigated effects of initial values on item parameter bias and on recovery of item characteristic curves in BILOG-MG 3, a widely used IRT software package. Results showed notable effects of initial values on item parameters. For tighter convergence criteria, effects of initial values decreased, but item parameter bias increased, and the recovery of the latent distribution worsened. For practical application, it is advised to use the BILOG default convergence criterion with appropriate initial values when estimating the latent distribution from data. PMID:26452264

  4. Effects of Bak Foong Pills and Menoease Pills on white blood cell distribution in old age female rats.

    PubMed

    Ho, Alice Lok Sze; Gou, Yu Lin; Rowlands, Dewi Kenneth; Chung, Yiu Wa; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2003-12-01

    This study examined the effects of Bak Foong Pills (BFP) and the new BFP-derived post-menopause formula, Menoease Pills (MBFP), on the distribution of peripheral white blood cells (WBC) between BFP/MBFP-treated and non-treated rats. Eighteen months old female SD rats were used to mimic post-menopausal and old age animal models. The percentage distribution of lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes were measured using flow cytometry with and without treatments of BFP or MBFP. Results showed that WBC distribution in old age rats were significantly different from that of adult rats, suggesting that as the animal aged, their WBC distributions were altered. Old age rats were observed to have much lower percentages of lymphocytes, but higher percentages of granulocytes when compared to the adult rats, indicating possible attenuated immunity. Following treatment with BFP or MBFP, WBC populations were found to be redistributed back into the ranges observed in adult animals. Furthermore, MBFP, was found to alter WBC distribution in a dose-dependent manner. When compared to estrogen (E(2)), a well documented regulator of immune function, results showed that MBFP was able to show significantly greater effects on WBC redistribution compared to E(2). However, in ovariectomised (ovx) old age rats, neither MBFP nor E(2) treated groups showed any changes in WBC redistribution. These results indicate that MBFP may share similarities to E(2). Indeed, the effect of MBFP and E(2) seems to require intact ovaries, which are believed to be necessary for the modulation of WBC distributions and immune functions. Overall, our findings suggest that BFP and MBFP may be able to regulate WBC population in old age female rats, and thus, indicate their potential role on improving the attenuated immunity evident in post-menopausal and elderly women. PMID:14646184

  5. Long-term distribution patterns of remotely sensed water quality parameters in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Chengfeng; Hu, Chuanmin; Cannizzaro, Jennifer; Duan, Hongtao

    2013-08-01

    Chesapeake Bay is the largest and one of the most productive estuaries in the U.S., where long-term monitoring and assessment of its water quality are necessary to understand trends and events in order to support management decisions. Significant progress has been made during the past decade in developing remote sensing algorithms for estimating two key water quality parameters, chlorophyll-a concentration (Chla, mg m-3) and diffuse light attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (Kd (490), m-1), from satellite ocean color measurements in oceanic, coastal, and estuarine waters. Yet deriving a robust Chla data product for Chesapeake Bay still remains a challenge because of its complex optical properties. Here, a recently developed algorithm approach (Red-Green Chlorophyll Index or RGCI, based on red-green remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs (λ)) ratios) was tested, validated, and applied to Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to establish a 14-year (September 1997 to December 2011) Chla Environmental Data Record (EDR). The new approach showed significant improvement over the traditional blue-green Rrs (λ) band-ratio algorithms (e.g., OC4, OC3M), with consistent performance for MODIS (mean relative error = 40.9%, mean ratio = 1.09) and SeaWiFS (MRE = 45.8%, mean ratio = 1.09) for Chla ranging between 1 and 50 mg m-3. Anomaly and EOF analyses revealed strong spatial gradients, seasonality, and climate-driven inter-annual changes in the satellite-based Chla EDR. These changes were highly correlated with satellite-based Kd (490) EDR, leading to the development of a Water Quality Decision Matrix (WQDM) and providing support to on-going nutrient reduction management programs for this estuary.

  6. Three-parameter lognormal distribution ubiquitously found in cDNA microarray data and its application to parametric data treatment

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Tomokazu

    2004-01-01

    Background To cancel experimental variations, microarray data must be normalized prior to analysis. Where an appropriate model for statistical data distribution is available, a parametric method can normalize a group of data sets that have common distributions. Although such models have been proposed for microarray data, they have not always fit the distribution of real data and thus have been inappropriate for normalization. Consequently, microarray data in most cases have been normalized with non-parametric methods that adjust data in a pair-wise manner. However, data analysis and the integration of resultant knowledge among experiments have been difficult, since such normalization concepts lack a universal standard. Results A three-parameter lognormal distribution model was tested on over 300 sets of microarray data. The model treats the hybridization background, which is difficult to identify from images of hybridization, as one of the parameters. A rigorous coincidence of the model to data sets was found, proving the model's appropriateness for microarray data. In fact, a closer fitting to Northern analysis was obtained. The model showed inconsistency only at very strong or weak data intensities. Measurement of z-scores as well as calculated ratios was reproducible only among data in the model-consistent intensity range; also, the ratios were independent of signal intensity at the corresponding range. Conclusion The model could provide a universal standard for data, simplifying data analysis and knowledge integration. It was deduced that the ranges of inconsistency were caused by experimental errors or additive noise in the data; therefore, excluding the data corresponding to those marginal ranges will prevent misleading analytical conclusions. PMID:14718068

  7. Crater size-frequency distribution measurements and age of the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, K. A.; Zanetti, M.; Jolliff, B.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Hiesinger, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex (CBVC) is a 25 × 35 km feature on the lunar farside marked by elevated topography, high albedo, high thorium concentration, and high silica content. Morphologies indicate that the complex is volcanic in origin and compositions indicate that it represents rare silicic volcanism on the Moon. Constraining the timing of silicic volcanism at the complex is necessary to better understand the development of evolved magmas and when they were active on the lunar surface. We employ image analysis and crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements on several locations within the complex and at surrounding impact craters, Hayn (87 km diameter), and Compton (160 km diameter), to determine relative and absolute model ages of regional events. Using CSFD measurements, we establish a chronology dating regional resurfacing events and the earliest possible onset of CBVC volcanism at ∼3.8 Ga, the formation of Compton Crater at 3.6 Ga, likely resurfacing by volcanism at the CBVC at ∼3.5 Ga, and the formation of Hayn Crater at ∼1 Ga. For the CBVC, we find the most consistent results are obtained using craters larger than 300 m in diameter; the small crater population is affected by their approach to an equilibrium condition and by the physical properties of regolith at the CBVC.

  8. Clean Kinematic Samples in Dwarf Spheroidals: An Algorithm for Evaluating Membership and Estimating Distribution Parameters When Contamination is Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Sen, Bodhisattva; Woodroofe, Michael

    2009-02-01

    We develop an algorithm for estimating parameters of a distribution sampled with contamination. We employ a statistical technique known as "expectation maximization" (EM). Given models for both member and contaminant populations, the EM algorithm iteratively evaluates the membership probability of each discrete data point, then uses those probabilities to update parameter estimates for member and contaminant distributions. The EM approach has wide applicability to the analysis of astronomical data. Here we tailor an EM algorithm to operate on spectroscopic samples obtained with the Michigan-MIKE Fiber System (MMFS) as part of our Magellan survey of stellar radial velocities in nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. These samples, to be presented in a companion paper, contain discrete measurements of line-of-sight velocity, projected position, and pseudo-equivalent width of the Mg-triplet feature, for ~1000-2500 stars per dSph, including some fraction of contamination by foreground Milky Way stars. The EM algorithm uses all of the available data to quantify dSph and contaminant distributions. For distributions (e.g., velocity and Mg-index of dSph stars) assumed to be Gaussian, the EM algorithm returns maximum-likelihood estimates of the mean and variance, as well as the probability that each star is a dSph member. These probabilities can serve as weights in subsequent analyses. Applied to our MMFS data, the EM algorithm identifies more than 5000 stars as probable dSph members. We test the performance of the EM algorithm on simulated data sets that represent a range of sample size, level of contamination, and amount of overlap between dSph and contaminant velocity distributions. The simulations establish that for samples ranging from large (N ~ 3000, characteristic of the MMFS samples) to small (N ~ 30), resembling new samples for extremely faint dSphs), the EM algorithm distinguishes members from contaminants and returns accurate parameter estimates much more

  9. Analysis of luminosity distributions and the shape parameters of strong gravitational lensing elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernaux, J.; Magain, P.; Sluse, D.; Chantry, V.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The luminosity profiles of galaxies acting as strong gravitational lenses can be tricky to study. Indeed, strong gravitational lensing images display several lensed components, both point-like and diffuse, around the lensing galaxy. Those objects limit the study of the galaxy luminosity to its inner parts. Therefore, the usual fitting methods perform rather badly on such images. Previous studies of strong lenses luminosity profiles using software such as GALFIT or IMFITFITS and various PSF-determining methods have resulted in somewhat discrepant results. Aims: The present work aims at investigating the causes of those discrepancies, as well as at designing more robust techniques for studying the morphology of early-type lensing galaxies with the ability to subtract a lensed signal from their luminosity profiles. Methods: We design a new method to independently measure each shape parameter, namely, the position angle, ellipticity, and half-light radius of the galaxy. Our half-light radius measurement method is based on an innovative scheme for computing isophotes that is well suited to measuring the morphological properties of gravititational lensing galaxies. Its robustness regarding various specific aspects of gravitational lensing image processing is analysed and tested against GALFIT. It is then applied to a sample of systems from the CASTLES database. Results: Simulations show that, when restricted to small, inner parts of the lensing galaxy, the technique presented here is more trustworthy than GALFIT. It gives more robust results than GALFIT, which shows instabilities regarding the fitting region, the value of the Sérsic index, and the signal-to-noise ratio. It is therefore better suited than GALFIT for gravitational lensing galaxies. It is also able to study lensing galaxies that are not much larger than the PSF. New values for the half-light radius of the objects in our sample are presented and compared to previous works. Table 6 is only available

  10. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: II. Control of the H II Region Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A; Leitherer, C

    2006-03-01

    We examine from a theoretical viewpoint how the physical parameters of H II regions are controlled both in normal galaxies and in starburst environments. These parameters are the H II region luminosity function, the time-dependent size, the covering fraction of molecular clouds, the pressure in the ionized gas and the ionization parameter. The factors which control them are the initial mass function of the exciting stars, the cluster mass function, the metallicity and the mean pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. We investigate the sensitivity of the H{alpha} luminosity to the IMF, and find that this can translate to about 30% variation in derived star formation rates. The molecular cloud dissipation timescale is estimated from a case study of M17 to be {approx} 1 Myr. Based upon H II luminosity function fitting for nearby galaxies, we propose that the cluster mass function has a log-normal form peaking at {approx} 185M{sub {circle_dot}}. This suggests that the cluster mass function is the continuation of the stellar IMF to higher mass. The pressure in the H II regions is controlled by the mechanical luminosity flux from the central cluster. Since this is closely related to the ionizing photon flux, we show that the ionization parameter is not a free variable, and that the diffuse ionized medium may be composed of many large, faint and old H II regions. Finally, we derive theoretical probability distributions for the ionization parameter as a function of metallicity and compare these to those derived for SDSS galaxies.

  11. Illumination-parameter adjustable and illumination-distribution visible LED helmet for low-level light therapy on brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengbo; Gao, Yuan; Chen, Xiao; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been clinically applied. Recently, more and more cases are reported with positive therapeutic effect by using transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs) illumination. Here, we developed a LLLT helmet for treating brain injuries based on LED arrays. We designed the LED arrays in circle shape and assembled them in multilayered 3D printed helmet with water-cooling module. The LED arrays can be adjust to touch the head of subjects. A control circuit was developed to drive and control the illumination of the LLLT helmet. The software portion provides the control of on and off of each LED arrays, the setup of illumination parameters, and 3D distribution of LLLT light dose in human subject according to the illumination setups. This LLLT light dose distribution was computed by a Monte Carlo model for voxelized media and the Visible Chinese Human head dataset and displayed in 3D view at the background of head anatomical structure. The performance of the whole system was fully tested. One stroke patient was recruited in the preliminary LLLT experiment and the following neuropsychological testing showed obvious improvement in memory and executive functioning. This clinical case suggested the potential of this Illumination-parameter adjustable and illuminationdistribution visible LED helmet as a reliable, noninvasive, and effective tool in treating brain injuries.

  12. Fully Atomistic Simulations of the Ionic Liquid Crystal [C16mim][NO3]: Orientational Order Parameters and Voids Distribution.

    PubMed

    Saielli, Giacomo

    2016-03-10

    We present a fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of the smectic phase of the ionic liquid crystal (ILC) 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, [C16MIm][NO3]. We have characterized the structure of the phase by means of a set of radial distribution functions resolved along the director and in the plane of the smectic layers. The results obtained allow us to discuss the similarities in the microscopic structure of ionic liquids (ILs) and ILCs. In addition to this, we have calculated the orientational order parameters, S, of the methylene groups of the alkyl chain and compared them with the results obtained for phospholipidic membranes from (2)H NMR experiments. We also discuss the orientational order parameters of the imidazolium ring. Finally, we analyze the distribution of voids in the ILC phase. We have found that voids of considerable volume to host a nonpolar gas, e.g. xenon, are localized in the hydrophobic layers and almost absent in the ionic layers. PMID:26849800

  13. Distribution of Hydrothermal Activity at the Lau ISS: Possible Controlling Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, F.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Edwards, M. H.; Walker, S. L.; Buck, N.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic tomographic studies of intermediate to fast spreading rate mid-ocean ridges (MORs) interpret zones of rapid crustal cooling a few (3-4) km off axis surrounding the axial seismic low velocity zone (LVZ). These zones of rapid cooling also broadly correlate with the initiation and growth of large abyssal hill faults. The close association of both high thermal gradients and development of fault permeability at crustal scales suggests the hypothesis that these areas may be favorable locations for off-axis high temperature hydrothermal activity. In March-May 2008 on R/V Kilo Moana we conducted a near-bottom sidescan sonar and oceanographic survey along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Lau back-arc basin to map the distribution of hydrothermal activity within this region. The survey utilized the deep-towed DSL120A (IMI120) sonar, an array of miniature autonomous plume recorders (MAPRs) attached to the tow cable and tethered beneath the sonar's depressor weight, an in situ chemical scanner (VISA) and 23 CTD hydrocasts (see Baker et al., this session). At the ELSC the survey spanned ~100 x 10 km area encompassing the ABE, Tow Cam and Kilo Moana vent fields with ~ 1 km spaced lines overall and ~500 m spaced lines in the area of the ABE vent field. On the VFR the survey spanned a distance of ~100 km along axis by ~5 km across axis with 700 m spaced lines encompassing the Vai Lili, Mariner and Tui Malila vent sites. Initial results identified particle plumes, indicative of high temperature venting, only within about a km of the ridge axis at the ELSC and VFR with possible diffuse venting indicated by MAPR oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) measurements at flank sites at VFR. The expanded sonar coverage better defines the volcano-tectonic context of the hydrothermal signals and previously mapped vent sites. Initial results suggest, however, no high-T venting more than about 1 km from the ridge axis, an apparently negative test of

  14. Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate Metabolites in Urine Show Age-Related Changes and Associations with Adiposity and Parameters of Insulin Sensitivity in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Smerieri, Arianna; Testa, Chiara; Lazzeroni, Pietro; Nuti, Francesca; Grossi, Enzo; Cesari, Silvia; Montanini, Luisa; Latini, Giuseppe; Bernasconi, Sergio; Papini, Anna Maria; Street, Maria E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Phthalates might be implicated with obesity and insulin sensitivity. We evaluated the levels of primary and secondary metabolites of Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in urine in obese and normal-weight subjects both before and during puberty, and investigated their relationships with auxological parameters and indexes of insulin sensitivity. Design and Methods DEHP metabolites (MEHP, 6-OH-MEHP, 5-oxo-MEHP, 5-OH-MEHP, and 5-CX-MEHP), were measured in urine by RP-HPLC-ESI-MS. Traditional statistical analysis and a data mining analysis using the Auto-CM analysis were able to offer an insight into the complex biological connections between the studied variables. Results The data showed changes in DEHP metabolites in urine related with obesity, puberty, and presence of insulin resistance. Changes in urine metabolites were related with age, height and weight, waist circumference and waist to height ratio, thus to fat distribution. In addition, clear relationships in both obese and normal-weight subjects were detected among MEHP, its products of oxidation and measurements of insulin sensitivity. Conclusion It remains to be elucidated whether exposure to phthalates per se is actually the risk factor or if the ability of the body to metabolize phthalates is actually the key point. Further studies that span from conception to elderly subjects besides further understanding of DEHP metabolism are warranted to clarify these aspects. PMID:25706863

  15. Changes in Angiotensin Receptor Distribution and in Aortic Morphology Are Associated with Blood Pressure Control in Aged Metabolic Syndrome Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Torrico-Lavayen, Rocío; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; Carvajal-Aguilera, Karla G.; Castrejón-Tellez, Vicente; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther

    2016-01-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in blood pressure regulation in MS during aging is unknown. It participates in metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging regulating vascular tone and remodeling. RAS might participate in a compensatory mechanism decreasing blood pressure and allowing MS rats to reach 18 months of age and it might form part of therapeutical procedures to ameliorate MS. We studied histological changes and distribution of RAS receptors in aortas of MS aged rats. Electron microscopy images showed premature aging in MS since the increased fibrosis, enlarged endothelium, and invasion of this layer by muscle cells that was present in control 18-month-old aortas were also found in 6-month-old aortas from MS rats. AT1, AT2, and Mas receptors mediate the effects of Ang II and Ang 1-7, respectively. Fluorescence from AT2 decreased with age in control and MS aortas, while fluorescence of AT1 increased in aortas from MS rats at 6 months and diminished during aging. Mas expression increased in MS rats and remained unchanged in control rats. In conclusion, there is premature aging in the aortas from MS rats and the elevated expression of Mas receptor might contribute to decrease blood pressure during aging in MS. PMID:27293881

  16. Ultraviolet to near-infrared spectral distributions of star-forming galaxies: Metallicity and age effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Calzetti, Daniela; Kinney, Anne L.

    1994-01-01

    Spectral distributions from the UV to the near-IR of a sample of 44 star-forming galaxies are used to calculate the metallicity (O/H), star-formation rate (SFR) and age of the starbursts. The oxygen abundance covers the range 8.3 less than O/H less than 9.4 and nitrogen (N) is found to be mostly a product of secondary nucleosynthesis for O/H greater than 8.4. Due to its secondary origin, N/O ratios up to approximately equals 4 times the solar value can be obtained for metal-rich starbursts. The SFR ranges 0.01 to 100 solar mass/year. The lower metallicity galaxies seem to be experiencing an instantaneous burst of star formation, with ages ranging from under 5 x 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7) yr. The highest metallicity galaxies are most probably experiencing a continuous burst. Correlations between the calculated quantities and several spectral features are investigated. We found a highly significant correlation between the equivalent width W(C IV lambda 1550)-a stellar (absorption) feature- and the oxygen abundance of the emitting gas (O/H). Thus we show for the first time that the stellar metallicity is well correlated with the gas metallicity in star-bursting galaxies. The equivalent width W(Si IV lambda 1400) and the emission line ratio (N II) lambda lambda 6548.84/H(sub alpha) also correlate well with O/H, and all three features can be used as metallicity indicators for star-forming galaxies. The continuum color between lambda 1400 and lambda 3500 (C(14 - 35)) is shown to correlate with O/H, although it is better correlated with E(B - V). It was not possible to disentangle the metallicity from the reddening effect in C(14- 35). We estimate that the reddening affecting the UV continuum is about half the one derived from the Balmer decrement of the emitting gas. The SFR correlates well with the galaxy luminosity and there is no dependence of the continuum color on the SFR. The higher metallicities are only found in the more luminous galaxies, while low metallicities are

  17. Ages of Globally Distributed Lunar Paleoregoliths and Soils from 3.9 Ga to the Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Amy L.; Joy, Katherine H.; Bogard, Donald D.; Kring, David A.

    2014-08-01

    This study determines the ages of 191 discrete lunar regolith samples from the Apollo, Luna, and meteorite collections. Model closure ages (for lithified breccias) and appearance ages (for unconsolidated soils) are calculated using the trapped 40Ar and 36Ar abundances of each sample, determined from published Ar data. Model closure ages of regolith breccias span ~3.9 to 0.01 Ga and appearance ages of soils range from ~3.6 to 0.03 Ga; 169 of these ages are published here for the first time, while 22 are recalculated ages. The regolith breccias with the oldest closure ages originate from the ancient highlands and oldest mare surfaces sampled by the Apollo missions. Soils generally have similar ages to each other, regardless of location and collection depth, with most model ages <2.0 Ga. Together, the soils and regolith breccias represent a record of regolith processes over the past 3.9 Ga. The data illustrate that individual landing sites can provide a diversity of ages, which has implications for planning future missions. Differences in maturity between older and younger regolith samples may reflect a change in collisional regimes over time. We note, too, that the closure ages published here are critical data needed for selecting temporally appropriate regolith samples used to decipher the diversity of impactors hitting the lunar surface over time and how the Sun has changed in time.

  18. An improved model to estimate trapping parameters in polymeric materials and its application on normal and aged low-density polyethylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; He, Miao; Alghamdi, Hisham; Chen, George; Fu, Mingli; Li, Ruihai; Hou, Shuai

    2015-08-01

    Trapping parameters can be considered as one of the important attributes to describe polymeric materials. In the present paper, a more accurate charge dynamics model has been developed, which takes account of charge dynamics in both volts-on and off stage into simulation. By fitting with measured charge data with the highest R-square value, trapping parameters together with injection barrier of both normal and aged low-density polyethylene samples were estimated using the improved model. The results show that, after long-term ageing process, the injection barriers of both electrons and holes is lowered, overall trap depth is shallower, and trap density becomes much greater. Additionally, the changes in parameters for electrons are more sensitive than those of holes after ageing.

  19. An improved model to estimate trapping parameters in polymeric materials and its application on normal and aged low-density polyethylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning He, Miao; Alghamdi, Hisham; Chen, George; Fu, Mingli; Li, Ruihai; Hou, Shuai

    2015-08-14

    Trapping parameters can be considered as one of the important attributes to describe polymeric materials. In the present paper, a more accurate charge dynamics model has been developed, which takes account of charge dynamics in both volts-on and off stage into simulation. By fitting with measured charge data with the highest R-square value, trapping parameters together with injection barrier of both normal and aged low-density polyethylene samples were estimated using the improved model. The results show that, after long-term ageing process, the injection barriers of both electrons and holes is lowered, overall trap depth is shallower, and trap density becomes much greater. Additionally, the changes in parameters for electrons are more sensitive than those of holes after ageing.

  20. Effects of age and season on haematological parameters of donkeys during the rainy and cold-dry seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakari, Friday Ocheja; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun; Rekwot, Peter Ibrahim; Kawu, Mohammed Umar

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of age and season on haematological parameters of donkeys at rest during the rainy and cold-dry seasons. Thirty healthy donkeys divided into three groups based on their age served as the subjects. During each season, blood sample was collected from each donkey thrice, 2 weeks apart, for haematological analysis, and the dry-bulb temperature (DBT), relative humidity (RH) and temperature-humidity index (THI) were obtained thrice each day during the experimental period using standard procedures. During the rainy season, the mean DBT (33.05 ± 0.49 °C), RH (73.63 ± 1.09 %) and THI (84.39 ± 0.71) were higher ( P < 0.0001) than the corresponding values of 24.00 ± 0.44 °C, 36.80 ± 0.92 % and 64.80 ± 0.62, during the cold-dry season. Packed cell volume (PCV), erythrocyte count [red blood cell (RBC)], haemoglobin concentration (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), platelet count (PLT), leucocyte count [white blood cell (WBC)], lymphocyte count (LYM) and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (N/L) were higher ( P < 0.05) in adults than foals during the rainy season. The MCV, MCH, WBC, NEU, LYM and PLT of adult and yearling donkeys were higher ( P < 0.05) during the rainy than the cold-dry season. The PCV, RBC, Hb, MCV, MCH, and NEU of foals were higher in the rainy than the cold-dry season. The N/L of adult and foal donkeys were higher ( P < 0.05) in the rainy than in the cold-dry season. In conclusion, PCV, RBC, Hb and LYM were considerably higher in foals than yearlings or adults during the rainy season, while erythrocytic indices and platelet counts were higher in adults or yearlings than in foals in both seasons. Erythrocytic indices, PLT and N/L were higher in the rainy than the cold-dry season in adults, yearlings and foals.

  1. Aftershocks hazard in Italy Part I: Estimation of time-magnitude distribution model parameters and computation of probabilities of occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, Barbara; Gasperini, Paolo

    We analyzed the available instrumental data on Italian earthquakes from1960 to 1996 to compute the parameters of the time-magnitudedistribution model proposed by Reasenberg and Jones (1989) andcurrently used to make aftershock forecasting in California. From 1981 to1996 we used the recently released Catalogo Strumentale deiTerremoti `Italiani' (CSTI) (Instrumental Catalog Working Group, 2001)joining the data of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia(INGV) and of the Italian major local seismic network, with magnituderevalued according to Gasperini (2001). From 1960 to 1980 we usedinstead the Progetto Finalizzato Geodinamica (PFG) catalog(Postpischl, 1985) with magnitude corrected to be homogeneous with thefollowing period. About 40 sequences are detected using two differentalgorithms and the results of the modeling for the corresponding ones arecompared. The average values of distribution parameters (p= 0.93±0.21, Log10(c) = -1.53±0.54, b = 0.96±0.18 and a = -1.66±0.72) are in fair agreementwith similar computations performed in other regions of the World. We alsoanalyzed the spatial variation of model parameters that can be used topredict the sequence behavior in the first days of future Italian seismic crisis,before a reliable modeling of the ongoing sequence is available. Moreoversome nomograms to expeditiously estimate probabilities and rates ofaftershock in Italy are also computed.

  2. Effects of five-year treatment with testosterone undecanoate on metabolic and hormonal parameters in ageing men with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Francomano, Davide; Lenzi, Andrea; Aversa, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic and hormonal modifications after long-term testosterone (T) treatment have never been investigated. 20 hypogonadal men (mean T = 241 ng/dL-8.3 nmol/L) with metabolic syndrome (MS, mean age 58) were treated with T-undecanoate injections every 12 weeks for 60 months. 20 matched subjects in whom T was unaccepted or contraindicated served as controls. Primary endpoints were variations from baseline of metabolic and hormonal parameters. In T-group, significant reductions in waist circumference (-9.6 ± 3.8 cm, P < 0.0001), body weight (-15 ± 2.8 Kg, P < 0.0001), and glycosylated hemoglobin (-1.6  ±  0.5%, P < 0.0001) occurred, along with improvements in insulin sensitivity (HOMA-I; -2.8  ±  0.6, P < 0.0001), lipid profile (total/HDL-cholesterol ratio -2.9 ± 1.5, P < 0.0001), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (-23 ± 10 and -16 ± 8 mm Hg, P < 0.0001, resp.), and neck and lumbar T-scores (+0.5 ± 0.15 gr/cm(2), P < 0.0001; +0.7 ± 0.8, P < 0.0001, resp.). Also, serum vitamin D (+14.0 ± 1.3 ng/mL, P < 0.01), TSH (- 0.9 ± 0.3 mUI/mL, P < 0.01), GH (0.74 ± 0.2 ng/mL, P < 0.0001), and IGF1 (105 ± 11 ng/mL, P < 0.01) levels changed in T-group but not in controls. Normalization of T levels in men with MS improved obesity, glycemic control, blood pressure, lipid profile, and bone mineral density compared with controls. Amelioration in hormonal parameters, that is, vitamin D, growth hormone, and thyrotropin plasma levels, were reported. PMID:24688542

  3. Integrated Evaluation of Age-Related Changes in Structural and Functional Vascular Parameters Used to Assess Arterial Aging, Subclinical Atherosclerosis, and Cardiovascular Risk in Uruguayan Adults: CUiiDARTE Project

    PubMed Central

    Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Torrado, Juan; Farro, Federico; Florio, Lucía; Olascoaga, Alicia; Brum, Javier; Alallón, Walter; Negreira, Carlos; Lluberas, Ricardo; Armentano, Ricardo L.

    2011-01-01

    This work was carried out in a Uruguayan (South American) population to characterize aging-associated physiological arterial changes. Parameters markers of subclinical atherosclerosis and that associate age-related changes were evaluated in healthy people. A conservative approach was used and people with nonphysiological and pathological conditions were excluded. Then, we excluded subjects with (a) cardiovascular (CV) symptoms, (b) CV disease, (c) diabetes mellitus or renal failure, and (d) traditional CV risk factors (other than age and gender). Subjects (n = 388) were submitted to non-invasive vascular studies (gold-standard techniques), to evaluate (1) common (CCA), internal, and external carotid plaque prevalence, (2) CCA intima-media thickness and diameter, (3) CCA stiffness (percentual pulsatility, compliance, distensibility, and stiffness index), (4) aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), and (5) peripheral and central pressure wave-derived parameters. Age groups: ≤20, 21–30, 31–40, 41–50, 51–60, 61–70, and 71–80 years old. Age-related structural and functional vascular parameters profiles were obtained and analyzed considering data from other populations. The work has the strength of being the first, in Latin America, that uses an integrative approach to characterize vascular aging-related changes. Data could be used to define vascular aging and abnormal or disease-related changes. PMID:22187622

  4. Integrated Evaluation of Age-Related Changes in Structural and Functional Vascular Parameters Used to Assess Arterial Aging, Subclinical Atherosclerosis, and Cardiovascular Risk in Uruguayan Adults: CUiiDARTE Project.

    PubMed

    Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Torrado, Juan; Farro, Federico; Florio, Lucía; Olascoaga, Alicia; Brum, Javier; Alallón, Walter; Negreira, Carlos; Lluberas, Ricardo; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2011-01-01

    This work was carried out in a Uruguayan (South American) population to characterize aging-associated physiological arterial changes. Parameters markers of subclinical atherosclerosis and that associate age-related changes were evaluated in healthy people. A conservative approach was used and people with nonphysiological and pathological conditions were excluded. Then, we excluded subjects with (a) cardiovascular (CV) symptoms, (b) CV disease, (c) diabetes mellitus or renal failure, and (d) traditional CV risk factors (other than age and gender). Subjects (n = 388) were submitted to non-invasive vascular studies (gold-standard techniques), to evaluate (1) common (CCA), internal, and external carotid plaque prevalence, (2) CCA intima-media thickness and diameter, (3) CCA stiffness (percentual pulsatility, compliance, distensibility, and stiffness index), (4) aortic stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), and (5) peripheral and central pressure wave-derived parameters. Age groups: ≤20, 21-30, 31-40, 41-50, 51-60, 61-70, and 71-80 years old. Age-related structural and functional vascular parameters profiles were obtained and analyzed considering data from other populations. The work has the strength of being the first, in Latin America, that uses an integrative approach to characterize vascular aging-related changes. Data could be used to define vascular aging and abnormal or disease-related changes. PMID:22187622

  5. Benign epithelial gastric polyps--frequency, location, and age and sex distribution.

    PubMed

    Ljubicić, N; Kujundzić, M; Roić, G; Banić, M; Cupić, H; Doko, M; Zovak, M

    2002-06-01

    Prospective investigation has been undertaken with the aim to study the frequency, location and age and sex distribution of various histological types of benign gastric epithelial polyps. Histological type--adenomatous, hyperplastic and fundic gland polyps--was diagnosed on the basis of at least three histological samples taken from the polyp. Biopsy samples were also taken from the antrum and the body of the stomach so that gastritis could be graded and classified, and the presence of H. pylori could be determined by histology. All 6,700 patients, who had undergone upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in a one-year period, participated in this study. Among them 42 benign gastric epithelial polyp were found in 31 patients: adenomatous gastric polyps in 7 patients, hyperplastic gastric polyp in 21 and fundic gland polyp in 3 patients. All patients with hyperplastic polyps had chronic active superficial gastritis, whereas most of the patients with adenomatous polyps had a chronic atrophic gastritis with high prevalence of intestinal metaplasia. Among 21 patients with hyperplastic gastric polyps, 16 (76%) patients were positive for H. pylori infection in contrast to only 2 patients (29%) with adenomatous gastric polyps and 1 patient (33%) with fundic gland polyp. Presented data indicates that hyperplastic gastric polyps are the most common and they are associated with the presence of chronic active superficial gastritis and concomitant H. pylori infection. Adenomatous polyps are rarer and they tend to be associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Fundic gland polyp is the rarest type of gastric polyps. PMID:12137323

  6. Cometary water-group ions in the region surrounding Comet Giacobini-Zinner - Distribution functions and bulk parameter estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staines, K.; Balogh, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Hynds, R. J.; Yates, T. S.; Richardson, I. G.; Sanderson, T. R.; Wenzel, K. P.; McComas, D. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1991-03-01

    The bulk parameters (number density and thermal energy density) of cometary water-group ions in the region surrounding Comet Giacobini-Zinner have been derived using data from the EPAS instrument on the ICE spacecraft. The derivation is based on the assumption that the pick-up ion distribution function is isotropic in the frame of the bulk flow, an approximation which has previously been shown to be reasonable within about 400,000 km of the comet nucleus along the spacecraft trajectory. The transition between the pick-up and mass-loaded regions occurs at the cometary shock, which was traversed at a cometocentric distance of about 100,000 km along the spacecraft track. Examination of the ion distribution functions in this region, transformed to the bulk flow frame, indicates the occurrence of a flattened distribution in the vicinity of the local pick-up speed, and a steeply falling tail at speeds above, which may be approximated as an exponential in ion speed.

  7. Aging stability of complete blood count and white blood cell differential parameters analyzed by Abbott CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, P; Lehto, T

    2009-02-01

    This study presents the results of an aging stability study of complete blood count (CBC) and leukocyte differential parameters using the Abbott CELL-DYN Sapphire hematology analyzer. Stability studies showed no substantial change in CBC parameters up to 24-48 h at +23 +/- 2 degrees C (room temperature), except for optical platelet count (PLTo). For specimens aged over 24, the value of impedance platelet count yielded more reliable results than the routine PLTo. White blood cell (WBC) differential parameters, except eosinophils, were stable for up to 48 h at +23 +/- 2 degrees C. CBC parameters were stable for 72 h, except mean platelet volume, which slightly increased between 48 and 72 h, at +4 degrees C. WBC differentials were stable 48-72 h, with a slight decrease observed in absolute neutrophils and lymphocytes at +4 degrees C. PMID:18190587

  8. A distributed parameter physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for dermal and inhalation exposure to volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.; Weisel, C.P.; Lioy, P.J.; Georgopouelous, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    Estimates of dermal dose from exposures to toxic chemicals are typically derived using models that assume instantaneous establishment of steady-state dermal mass flux. However, dermal absorption theory indicates that this assumption is invalid for short-term exposures to volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). A generalized distributed parameter physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model (DP-PBPK), which describes unsteady state dermal mass flux via a partial differential equation (Fickian diffusion), has been developed for inhalation and dermal absorption of VOCs. In the present study, the DP-PBPK model has been parameterized for chloroform, and compared with two simpler PBPK models of chloroform. The latter are lumped parameter models, employing ordinary differential equations, that do not account for the dermal absorption time lag associated with the accumulation of permeant chemical in tissue represented by permeability coefficients. All three models were evaluated by comparing simulated post-exposure exhaled breath concentration profiles with measured concentrations following environmental chloroform exposures. The DP-PBPK model predicted a time-lag in the exhaled breath concentration profile, consistent with the experimental data. The DP-PBPK model also predicted significant volatilization of chloroform, for a simulated dermal exposure scenario. The end-exposure dermal dose predicted by the DP-PBPK model is similar to that predicted by the EPA recommended method for short-term exposures, and is significantly greater than the end-exposure dose predicted by the lumped parameter models. However, the net dermal dose predicted by the DP-PBPK model is substantially less than that predicted by the EPA method, due to the post-exposure volatilization predicted by the DP-PBPK model. The net dermal dose of chloroform predicted by all three models was nearly the same, even though the lumped parameter models did not predict substantial volatilization. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Uncertainty reduction and parameter estimation of a distributed hydrological model with ground and remote-sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestro, F.; Gabellani, S.; Rudari, R.; Delogu, F.; Laiolo, P.; Boni, G.

    2015-04-01

    During the last decade the opportunity and usefulness of using remote-sensing data in hydrology, hydrometeorology and geomorphology has become even more evident and clear. Satellite-based products often allow for the advantage of observing hydrologic variables in a distributed way, offering a different view with respect to traditional observations that can help with understanding and modeling the hydrological cycle. Moreover, remote-sensing data are fundamental in scarce data environments. The use of satellite-derived digital elevation models (DEMs), which are now globally available at 30 m resolution (e.g., from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission, SRTM), have become standard practice in hydrologic model implementation, but other types of satellite-derived data are still underutilized. As a consequence there is the need for developing and testing techniques that allow the opportunities given by remote-sensing data to be exploited, parameterizing hydrological models and improving their calibration. In this work, Meteosat Second Generation land-surface temperature (LST) estimates and surface soil moisture (SSM), available from European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) H-SAF, are used together with streamflow observations (S. N.) to calibrate the Continuum hydrological model that computes such state variables in a prognostic mode. The first part of the work aims at proving that satellite observations can be exploited to reduce uncertainties in parameter calibration by reducing the parameter equifinality that can become an issue in forecast mode. In the second part, four parameter estimation strategies are implemented and tested in a comparative mode: (i) a multi-objective approach that includes both satellite and ground observations which is an attempt to use different sources of data to add constraints to the parameters; (ii and iii) two approaches solely based on remotely sensed data that reproduce the case of a scarce data

  10. Variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum flow transport model for compound channels accounting for distributed non-uniform lateral flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Ratnakar; Sahoo, Bhabagrahi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the fully volume conservative simplified hydrodynamic-based variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum (VPMM) flow transport model advocated by Perumal and Price in 2013 is extended to exclusively incorporate the distributed non-uniform lateral flow in the routing scheme accounting for compound river channel flows. The revised VPMM formulation is exclusively derived from the combined form of the de Saint-Venant's continuity and momentum equations with the spatiotemporally distributed lateral flow which is solved using the finite difference box scheme. This revised model could address the earlier model limitations of: (i) non-accounting non-uniformly distributed lateral flow, (ii) ignoring floodplain flow, and (iii) non-consideration of catchment dynamics of lateral flow generation restricting its real-time application. The efficacy of the revised formulation is tested to simulate 16 years (1980-1995) river runoff from real-time storm events under scarce morpho-hydrological data conditions in a tropical monsoon-type 48 km Bolani-Gomlai reach of the Brahmani River in eastern India. The spatiotemporally distributed lateral flows generated in real-time is computed by water balance approach accounting for catchment characteristics of normalized network area function, land use land cover classes, and soil textural classes; and hydro-meteorological variables of precipitation, soil moisture, minimum and maximum temperatures, wind speed, relative humidity, and solar radiation. The multiple error measures used in this study and the simulation results reveal that the revised VPMM model has a greater practical utility in estimating the event-based and long-term meso-scale river runoff (both discharge and its stage) at any ungauged site, enhancing its application for real-time flood estimation.

  11. A fuzzy adaptive network approach to parameter estimation in cases where independent variables come from an exponential distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalkilic, Turkan Erbay; Apaydin, Aysen

    2009-11-01

    In a regression analysis, it is assumed that the observations come from a single class in a data cluster and the simple functional relationship between the dependent and independent variables can be expressed using the general model; Y=f(X)+[epsilon]. However; a data cluster may consist of a combination of observations that have different distributions that are derived from different clusters. When faced with issues of estimating a regression model for fuzzy inputs that have been derived from different distributions, this regression model has been termed the [`]switching regression model' and it is expressed with . Here li indicates the class number of each independent variable and p is indicative of the number of independent variables [J.R. Jang, ANFIS: Adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system, IEEE Transaction on Systems, Man and Cybernetics 23 (3) (1993) 665-685; M. Michel, Fuzzy clustering and switching regression models using ambiguity and distance rejects, Fuzzy Sets and Systems 122 (2001) 363-399; E.Q. Richard, A new approach to estimating switching regressions, Journal of the American Statistical Association 67 (338) (1972) 306-310]. In this study, adaptive networks have been used to construct a model that has been formed by gathering obtained models. There are methods that suggest the class numbers of independent variables heuristically. Alternatively, in defining the optimal class number of independent variables, the use of suggested validity criterion for fuzzy clustering has been aimed. In the case that independent variables have an exponential distribution, an algorithm has been suggested for defining the unknown parameter of the switching regression model and for obtaining the estimated values after obtaining an optimal membership function, which is suitable for exponential distribution.

  12. Distributions of spin/shape parameters of asteroid families and targeted photometry by ProjectSoft robotic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broz, Miroslav; Durech, Josef; Hanus, Josef; Lehky, Martin

    2014-11-01

    In our recent work (Hanus et al. 2013) we studied dynamics of asteroid families constrained by the distribution of pole latitudes vs semimajor axis. The model contained the following ingredients: (i) the Yarkovsky semimajor-axis drift, (ii) secular spin evolution due to the YORP effect, (iii) collisional reorientations, (iv) a simple treatment of spin-orbit resonances and (v) of mass shedding.We suggest to use a different complementary approach, based on distribution functions of shape parameters. Based on ~1000 old and new convex-hull shape models, we construct the distributions of suitable quantities (ellipticity, normalized facet areas, etc.) and we discuss differences among asteroid populations. We also check for outlier points which may then serve as a possible identification of (large) interlopers among "real" family members.This has also implications for SPH models of asteroid disruptions which can be possibly further constrained by the shape models of resulting fragments. Up to now, the observed size-frequency distribution and velocity field were used as constraints, sometimes allowing for a removal of interlopers (Michel et al. 2011).We also describe ongoing observations by the ProjectSoft robotic observatory called "Blue Eye 600", which supports our efforts to complete the sample of shapes for a substantial fraction of (large) family members. Dense photometry is targeted in such a way to maximize a possibility to derive a new pole/shape model.Other possible applications of the observatory include: (i) fast resolved observations of fireballs (thanks to a fast-motion capability, up to 90 degrees/second), or (ii) an automatic survey of a particular population of objects (MBAs, NEAs, variable stars, novae etc.)Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic (grant no. TA03011171) and Czech Science Foundation (grant no. 13-01308S).

  13. Distribution functions and statistical parameters that may be used to characterize limb sounders gravity wave climatologies in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, P.; Luna, D.; de la Torre, A.; Schmidt, T.

    2015-08-01

    The number of gravity wave (GW) activity climatologies in the stratosphere started to increase more than 10 years ago since the appearance of large amounts of limb and nadir satellite sounders data. There have been very few discussions regarding the adequate statistical description of GW activity in terms of a distribution function and its parameters. We put forward the question whether a general statistical functional representation adaptable to the characteristics of GW activity in diverse geographic regions and seasons exists. Here we approach this issue for two different types of limb sounders and in particular we try to find out which parameters may represent at best the climatological features. We study results for a region close to the Patagonian Andes and their prolongation in the Antarctic Peninsula, which is well-known for the generation by topography of intense stratospheric GW, specially during winter and spring. Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) records presently provide over 2000 profiles per day. We used 5 years of COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) mission GPS RO data, which supplied almost 150,000 retrievals for our study. Three different distribution functions have been approached to describe the GW activity climatologies: gaussian, log-normal and gamma. The latter function has not been used in previous work. It has been shown here that it is a competitive option to the log-normal distribution. In addition, its use allows not only to quantify the GW activity level of each climatology in the stratosphere, but also to find out the number of significant modes that essentially determine it. Alternative parameters to the mean like the median may be used to characterize the climatologies. The use of the median may exhibit advantages in cases where the presence of spurious large GW activity measurements are suspected in GPS RO data. The mean is equally suitable to establish GW activity

  14. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project; dose code recovery activities; Calculation 005

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow`s milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  15. Influences of Sr dose on the crystal structure parameters and Sr distributions of Sr-incorporated hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Guo, D G; Hao, Y Z; Li, H Y; Fang, C Q; Sun, L J; Zhu, H; Wang, J; Huang, X F; Ni, P F; Xu, K W

    2013-10-01

    Stoichiometric strontium-incorporated hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) with different Sr concentrations [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] were synthesized using a wet chemical approach and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transformed infrared absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Rietveld Structure Refinement. The crystal lattice parameter, Sr distribution, chemical state of Sr, and also the relationships between their variations and the Sr concentrations have been intensively studied. The results show that both the crystal lattice parameters and crystal plane space of Sr-HA remarkably increase with the Sr concentration increasing. Whether Sr preferably occupies the Ca(I) site or Ca(II) site after incorporated into apatite lattice depends on the Sr number incorporated into apatite. All the Sr ions completely occupy the Ca(II) sites when the Sr concentration is below 5%. With the exception of partial Sr ions occupying the Ca(II) sites, the other Sr ions start to occupy the Ca(I) sites when the Sr concentration doped in HA is beyond 10%. The ratio of Sr ions occupying the Ca(I) sites increases with the further raising Sr concentration up to 20%. The Sr ions inherit the chemical state and environment of the original Ca(I) or Ca(II) site after incorporated into apatite. PMID:23661409

  16. Distribution of aged atrazine related 14C-residues in natural soil following incubation with the earthworm Apporectodea caliginosa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreou, K.; Jablonowski, N.; Jones, K.; Burauel, P.; Semple, K.

    2009-04-01

    The distribution and localisation of atrazine related 14C-residues into the different physical fractions of soil may reveal information on processes taking place in soil. Soils amended with 14C-atrazine, were aged for 22 years under environmental conditions in a lysimeter in Germany. The soil was sampled and subjected to physical and chemical fractionation before and after incubation for 7 days with the earthworm Apporectodea caliginosa. No significant change in the soil physical and chemical fractionation of the atrazine related 14C-residues and organic carbon was observed in this study due to the activity of the A. caliginosa. The smaller size soil fractions (Microaggregates and Colloids) were highly enriched with aged atrazine 14C-residues equivalents and organic carbon. Also the humic acid extracted using a simple alkaline extraction have were also enriched with aged atrazine 14C-residues equivalents. The low organic carbon content of the soil, the absence of relatively fresh organic matter and the long ageing time might explain the limited bioavailability of the atrazine related 14C-residues to the earthworm. This finding is of particular importance given that the soil used here was aged under natural environmental conditions compared to laboratory studies. Earthworms are important species in soil ecology and thus, the question of the bioavailability of aged pesticide residues to such organism is critical. The bioavalability of the atrazine 14C-residues equivalent was absent in the current study illustrating that those aged residues posed minimal risk to earthworms.

  17. Distribution of aged atrazine related 14C-residues in natural soil following incubation with the earthworm Apporectodea caliginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreou, Kostas; Semple, Kirk; Jones, Kevin

    2010-05-01

    The distribution and localisation of atrazine related 14C-residues into the different physical fractions of soil may reveal information on processes taking place in soil. Soils amended with 14C-atrazine, were aged for 22 years under environmental conditions in a lysimeter in Germany. The soil was sampled and subjected to physical and chemical fractionation before and after incubation for 7 days with the earthworm Apporectodea caliginosa. No significant change in the soil physical and chemical fractionation of the atrazine related 14C-residues and organic carbon was observed in this study due to the activity of the A. caliginosa. The smaller size soil fractions (Microaggregates and Colloids) were highly enriched with aged atrazine 14C-residues equivalents and organic carbon. Also the humic acid extracted using a simple alkaline extraction have were also enriched with aged atrazine 14C-residues equivalents. The low organic carbon content of the soil, the absence of relatively fresh organic matter and the long ageing time might explain the limited bioavailability of the atrazine related 14C-residues to the earthworm. This finding is of particular importance given that the soil used here was aged under natural environmental conditions compared to laboratory studies. Earthworms are important species in soil ecology and thus, the question of the bioavailability of aged pesticide residues to such organism is critical. The bioavalability of the atrazine 14C-residues equivalent was absent in the current study illustrating that those aged residues posed minimal risk to earthworms.

  18. Changes in the mineral density distribution in human bone with age: image analysis using backscattered electrons in the SEM.

    PubMed

    Reid, S A; Boyde, A

    1987-02-01

    We report a study to test the feasibility of studying mineral density distributions in bone using the backscattered electron signal in scanning electron microscopy. Samples were human sixth ribs ranging in age from 8 weeks to 59 years, embedded in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), cut, polished, and carbon coated. The proportions of pixels falling in a uniform set of gray level slices of the BSE signal were determined using a microcomputer-based image analysis system interfaced directly to the SEM. The amount of high-density bone gradually increased with age at the expense of low-density bone, and there was an associated compression of the range of the mineral density distribution. Age-related differences were noted between the density distributions in the outer and inner rib cortices. The distribution in the inner cortex in neonates was influenced by the inclusion of densely mineralized endochondral bone and cartilage trabeculae formed at the growth cartilage zone. In adults it appeared that greater bone turnover occurred in the outer cortex, perhaps reflecting a differential mechanical loading across the rib. The technique enabled rapid, unbiased discrimination between the bone of neonates, children, and adults. PMID:3455153

  19. Deep-sea scleractinian coral age and depth distributions in the northwest Atlantic for the last 225,000 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, L.F.; Adkins, J.F.; Scheirer, D.S.; Fernandez, D.P.; Gagnon, A.; Waller, R.G.

    2007-01-01

    Deep-sea corals have grown for over 200,000 yrs on the New England Seamounts in the northwest Atlantic, and this paper describes their distribution both with respect to depth and time. Many thousands of fossil scleractinian corals were collected on a series of cruises from 2003-2005; by contrast, live ones were scarce. On these seamounts, the depth distribution of fossil Desmophyllum dianthus (Esper, 1794) is markedly different to that of the colonial scleractinian corals, extending 750 m deeper in the water column to a distinct cut-off at 2500 m. This cut-off is likely to be controlled by the maximum depth of a notch-shaped feature in the seamount morphology. The ages of D. dianthus corals as determined by U-series measurements range from modern to older than 200,000 yrs. The age distribution is not constant over time, and most corals have ages from the last glacial period. Within the glacial period, increases in coral population density at Muir and Manning Seamounts coincided with times at which large-scale ocean circulation changes have been documented in the deep North Atlantic. Ocean circulation changes have an effect on coral distributions, but the cause of the link is not known. ?? 2007 Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science of the University of Miami.

  20. Setting method of parameters for SN transition fault current limiter into 6.6kV distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda (Criepi, H.; Torii(Criepi, S.

    2008-02-01

    A fault current limiter (FCL) is an outstanding apparatus which the impedance does not appear when no fault occurs, but the impedance appears only when a fault occurs in a power system. The operation of the FCL causes the effective reduction of the fault current. Although there are various kinds of FCLs in principles which have ever proposed, we think that a SN transition FCL with small normal loss will be promising since it is connected in series. However, we need to solve many problems toward practical use. In this paper, we propose the setting method of the parameters in the case of applying a SN transition FCLs to the feeders, or the busbar, or the lower voltage side of the transformers in the 6.6kV model distribution system. And we evaluate how to introduce the FCLs into it from the point of the requirements and the design. Finally, we suggest the hopeful installation of the FCLs into the distribution system.

  1. Monitoring of Interaction-Point Parameters Using the 3-Dimensional Luminosity Distribution Measured at PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Viaud, B.F.; Kozanecki, W.; O'Grady, C.; Thompson, J.; Weaver, M.; /SLAC

    2006-07-28

    The 3-D luminosity distribution at the IP of the SLAC B-Factory is monitored using e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} events reconstructed online in the BABAR detector. The transverse centroid and spatial orientation of the luminosity ellipsoid reliably monitor IP orbit drifts. The longitudinal centroid is sensitive to small variations in the average relative RF phase of the beams and provides a detailed measurement of the phase transient along the bunch train. The longitudinal luminosity distribution depends on the e{sup +,-} overlap bunch length and the vertical IP {beta}-functions. Relative variations in horizontal luminous size are detectable at the micron level. In addition to continuous on-line monitoring of all the parameters above, we performed detailed studies of their variation along the bunch train to investigate a temporary luminosity degradation. We also compare {beta}*{sub y} measurements, collected over a year of high-luminosity operation, with HER and LER lattice functions measured by resonant transverse excitation. Our bunch-length measurements are consistent with those obtained by other methods and provide direct evidence for bunch-length modulation.

  2. Spatial distribution of coke residues in porous catalyst pellets analyzed by field-cycling relaxometry and parameter imaging.

    PubMed

    Stapf, Siegfried; Ren, Xiaohong; Talnishnikh, Elena; Blümich, Bernhard

    2005-02-01

    The distribution of coke residues inside porous catalyst pellets was investigated on the molecular as well as the macroscopic scale. The presence of coke on the pore surface affects the relaxation properties of adsorbed liquid species; these were determined by field-cycling relaxometry for different polar and nonpolar liquids in metal-doped and metal-free catalyst carrier materials. The presence of metal in the Al2O3 matrix had only a minor influence on the dispersion behavior, while the interaction of the adsorbates with the coke layer leads to considerable changes in the relaxation times at low Larmor frequencies. Lowering the temperature to well below the bulk freezing point of dimethyl sulfoxide resulted in a slightly stronger frequency dependence of T1. Not only relaxation times but also the diffusion coefficient is affected by the presence of coke residues in the pores. For macroscopically heterogeneous samples, they offer the possibility to generate maps of the local coke concentration by introducing appropriate filters into NMR imaging sequences. High-temperature regeneration of coked catalysts leads to such heterogeneous distributions which is visualized by T1 parameter imaging. PMID:15833654

  3. Lipid-laden cells differentially distributed in the aging brain are functionally active and correspond to distinct phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Langhi, Larissa Gutman Paranhos; Cordeiro, Ingrid; Brito, José M; Batista, Claudia Maria de Castro; Mattson, Mark P; Mello Coelho, Valeria de

    2016-01-01

    We characterized cerebral Oil Red O-positive lipid-laden cells (LLC) of aging mice evaluating their distribution, morphology, density, functional activities and inflammatory phenotype. We identified LLC in meningeal, cortical and neurogenic brain regions. The density of cerebral LLC increased with age. LLC presenting small lipid droplets were visualized adjacent to blood vessels or deeper in the brain cortical and striatal parenchyma of aging mice. LLC with larger droplets were asymmetrically distributed in the cerebral ventricle walls, mainly located in the lateral wall. We also found that LLC in the subventricular region co-expressed beclin-1 or LC3, markers for autophagosome or autophagolysosome formation, and perilipin (PLIN), a lipid droplet-associated protein, suggesting lipophagic activity. Some cerebral LLC exhibited β galactosidase activity indicating a senescence phenotype. Moreover, we detected production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in cortical PLIN(+) LLC. Some cortical NeuN(+) neurons, GFAP(+) glia limitans astrocytes, Iba-1(+) microglia and S100β(+) ependymal cells expressed PLIN in the aging brain. Our findings suggest that cerebral LLC exhibit distinct cellular phenotypes and may participate in the age-associated neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:27029648

  4. Lipid-laden cells differentially distributed in the aging brain are functionally active and correspond to distinct phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Shimabukuro, Marilia Kimie; Langhi, Larissa Gutman Paranhos; Cordeiro, Ingrid; Brito, José M.; Batista, Claudia Maria de Castro; Mattson, Mark P.; de Mello Coelho, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    We characterized cerebral Oil Red O-positive lipid-laden cells (LLC) of aging mice evaluating their distribution, morphology, density, functional activities and inflammatory phenotype. We identified LLC in meningeal, cortical and neurogenic brain regions. The density of cerebral LLC increased with age. LLC presenting small lipid droplets were visualized adjacent to blood vessels or deeper in the brain cortical and striatal parenchyma of aging mice. LLC with larger droplets were asymmetrically distributed in the cerebral ventricle walls, mainly located in the lateral wall. We also found that LLC in the subventricular region co-expressed beclin-1 or LC3, markers for autophagosome or autophagolysosome formation, and perilipin (PLIN), a lipid droplet-associated protein, suggesting lipophagic activity. Some cerebral LLC exhibited β galactosidase activity indicating a senescence phenotype. Moreover, we detected production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in cortical PLIN+ LLC. Some cortical NeuN+ neurons, GFAP+ glia limitans astrocytes, Iba-1+ microglia and S100β+ ependymal cells expressed PLIN in the aging brain. Our findings suggest that cerebral LLC exhibit distinct cellular phenotypes and may participate in the age-associated neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:27029648

  5. AGING AND LIFE-STAGE SUSCEPTIBILITY: TOLUENE EFFECTS ON BRAIN OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS IN BROWN NORWAY RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental contaminants is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to test whether oxi