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Sample records for age distribution parameters

  1. A partial exponential lumped parameter model to evaluate groundwater age distributions and nitrate trends in long-screened wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Böhlke, J. K.; Kauffman, Leon J.; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-12-01

    A partial exponential lumped parameter model (PEM) was derived to determine age distributions and nitrate trends in long-screened production wells. The PEM can simulate age distributions for wells screened over any finite interval of an aquifer that has an exponential distribution of age with depth. The PEM has 3 parameters - the ratio of saturated thickness to the top and bottom of the screen and mean age, but these can be reduced to 1 parameter (mean age) by using well construction information and estimates of the saturated thickness. The PEM was tested with data from 30 production wells in a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer in California, USA. Well construction data were used to guide parameterization of a PEM for each well and mean age was calibrated to measured environmental tracer data (3H, 3He, CFC-113, and 14C). Results were compared to age distributions generated for individual wells using advective particle tracking models (PTMs). Age distributions from PTMs were more complex than PEM distributions, but PEMs provided better fits to tracer data, partly because the PTMs did not simulate 14C accurately in wells that captured varying amounts of old groundwater recharged at lower rates prior to groundwater development and irrigation. Nitrate trends were simulated independently of the calibration process and the PEM provided good fits for at least 11 of 24 wells. This work shows that the PEM, and lumped parameter models (LPMs) in general, can often identify critical features of the age distributions in wells that are needed to explain observed tracer data and nonpoint source contaminant trends, even in systems where aquifer heterogeneity and water-use complicate distributions of age. While accurate PTMs are preferable for understanding and predicting aquifer-scale responses to water use and contaminant transport, LPMs can be sensitive to local conditions near individual wells that may be inaccurately represented or missing in an aquifer-scale flow model.

  2. A partial exponential lumped parameter model to evaluate groundwater age distributions and nitrate trends in long-screened wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant; Böhlke, John Karl; Kauffman, Leon J.; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    A partial exponential lumped parameter model (PEM) was derived to determine age distributions and nitrate trends in long-screened production wells. The PEM can simulate age distributions for wells screened over any finite interval of an aquifer that has an exponential distribution of age with depth. The PEM has 3 parameters – the ratio of saturated thickness to the top and bottom of the screen and mean age, but these can be reduced to 1 parameter (mean age) by using well construction information and estimates of the saturated thickness. The PEM was tested with data from 30 production wells in a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer in California, USA. Well construction data were used to guide parameterization of a PEM for each well and mean age was calibrated to measured environmental tracer data (3H, 3He, CFC-113, and 14C). Results were compared to age distributions generated for individual wells using advective particle tracking models (PTMs). Age distributions from PTMs were more complex than PEM distributions, but PEMs provided better fits to tracer data, partly because the PTMs did not simulate 14C accurately in wells that captured varying amounts of old groundwater recharged at lower rates prior to groundwater development and irrigation. Nitrate trends were simulated independently of the calibration process and the PEM provided good fits for at least 11 of 24 wells. This work shows that the PEM, and lumped parameter models (LPMs) in general, can often identify critical features of the age distributions in wells that are needed to explain observed tracer data and nonpoint source contaminant trends, even in systems where aquifer heterogeneity and water-use complicate distributions of age. While accurate PTMs are preferable for understanding and predicting aquifer-scale responses to water use and contaminant transport, LPMs can be sensitive to local conditions near individual wells that may be inaccurately represented or missing in an aquifer-scale flow model.

  3. Using groundwater age distributions to estimate the effective parameters of Fickian and non-Fickian models of solute transport

    PubMed Central

    Engdahl, Nicholas B.; Ginn, Timothy R.; Fogg, Graham E.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater age distributions are used to estimate the parameters of Fickian, and non-Fickian, effective models of solute transport. Based on the similarities between the transport and age equations, we develop a deconvolution based approach that describes transport between two monitoring wells. We show that the proposed method gives exact estimates of the travel time distribution between two wells when the domain is stationary and that the method still provides useful information on transport when the domain is non-stationary. The method is demonstrated using idealized uniform and layered 2-D aquifers. Homogeneous transport is determined exactly and non-Fickian transport in a layered aquifer was also approximated very well, even though this example problem is shown to be scale-dependent. This work introduces a method that addresses a significant limitation of tracer tests and non-Fickian transport modeling which is the difficulty in determining the effective parameters of the transport model. PMID:25821342

  4. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS AND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF YOUNG AND FIELD AGE OBJECTS WITH MASSES SPANNING THE STELLAR TO PLANETARY REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Filippazzo, Joseph C.; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline; Cruz, Kelle L.; Van Gordon, Mollie M.; Looper, Dagny L.

    2015-09-10

    We combine optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared spectra and photometry to construct expanded spectral energy distributions for 145 field age (>500 Myr) and 53 young (lower age estimate <500 Myr) ultracool dwarfs (M6-T9). This range of spectral types includes very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planetary mass objects, providing fundamental parameters across both the hydrogen and deuterium burning minimum masses for the largest sample assembled to date. A subsample of 29 objects have well constrained ages as probable members of a nearby young moving group. We use 182 parallaxes and 16 kinematic distances to determine precise bolometric luminosities (L{sub bol}) and radius estimates from evolutionary models give semi-empirical effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) for the full range of young and field age late-M, L, and T dwarfs. We construct age-sensitive relationships of luminosity, temperature, and absolute magnitude as functions of spectral type and absolute magnitude to disentangle the effects of degenerate physical parameters such as T{sub eff}, surface gravity, and clouds on spectral morphology. We report bolometric corrections in J for both field age and young objects and find differences of up to a magnitude for late-L dwarfs. Our correction in Ks shows a larger dispersion but not necessarily a different relationship for young and field age sequences. We also characterize the NIR–MIR reddening of low gravity L dwarfs and identify a systematically cooler T{sub eff} of up to 300 K from field age objects of the same spectral type and 400 K cooler from field age objects of the same M{sub H} magnitude.

  5. Age Distribution of Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, U.; Daughney, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    Groundwater at the discharge point comprises a mixture of water from different flow lines with different travel time and therefore has no discrete age but an age distribution. The age distribution can be assessed by measuring how a pulse shaped tracer moves through the groundwater system. Detection of the time delay and the dispersion of the peak in the groundwater compared to the tracer input reveals the mean residence time and the mixing parameter. Tritium from nuclear weapons testing in the early 1960s resulted in a peak-shaped tritium input to the whole hydrologic system on earth. Tritium is the ideal tracer for groundwater because it is an isotope of hydrogen and therefore is part of the water molecule. Tritium time series data that encompass the passage of the bomb tritium pulse through the groundwater system in all common hydrogeologic situations in New Zealand demonstrate a semi-systematic pattern between age distribution parameters and hydrologic situation. The data in general indicate high fraction of mixing, but in some cases also indicate high piston flow. We will show that still, 45 years after the peak of the bomb tritium, it is possible to assess accurately the parameters of age distributions by measuring the tail of the bomb tritium.

  6. Fundamental Parameters and Spectral Energy Distributions of Young and Field Age Objects with Masses Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippazzo, Joe; Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Godfrey, Paige A.; BDNYC

    2016-01-01

    The physical and atmospheric properties of ultracool dwarfs are deeply entangled due to the degenerate effects of mass, age, metallicity, clouds and dust, activity, rotation, and possibly even formation mechanism on observed spectra. Accurate determination of fundamental parameters for a wide diversity of objects at the low end of the IMF is thus crucial to testing stellar and planetary formation theories. To determine these quantities, we constructed and flux calibrated nearly-complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 221 M, L, T, and Y dwarfs using published parallaxes and 0.3-40 μm spectra and photometry. From these homogeneous SEDs, we calculated bolometric luminosity (Lbol), effective temperature (Teff), mass, surface gravity, radius, spectral indexes, synthetic photometry, and bolometric corrections (BCs) for each object. We used these results to derive Lbol, Teff, and BC polynomial relations across the entire very-low-mass star/brown dwarf/planetary mass regime. We use a subsample of objects with age constraints based on nearby young moving group membership, companionship with a young star, or spectral signatures of low surface gravity to define new age-sensitive diagnostics and characterize the reddening of young substellar atmospheres as a redistribution of flux from the near-infrared into the mid-infrared. Consequently we find the SED flux pivots at Ks band, making BCKs as a function of spectral type a tight and age independent relationship. We find that young L dwarfs are systematically 300 K cooler than field age objects of the same spectral type and up to 600 K cooler than field age objects of the same absolute H magnitude. Finally, we present preliminary comparisons of these empirical results to best fit parameters from four different model atmosphere grids via Markov-Chain Monte Carlo analysis in order to create prescriptions for the reliable and efficient characterization of new ultracool dwarfs.

  7. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating vulnerability of production wells to contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberts, S. M.; Böhlke, J. K.; Kauffman, L. J.; Jurgens, B. C.

    2012-03-01

    Environmental age tracers have been used in various ways to help assess vulnerability of drinking-water production wells to contamination. The most appropriate approach will depend on the information that is available and that which is desired. To understand how the well will respond to changing nonpoint-source contaminant inputs at the water table, some representation of the distribution of groundwater ages in the well is needed. Such information for production wells is sparse and difficult to obtain, especially in areas lacking detailed field studies. In this study, age distributions derived from detailed groundwater-flow models with advective particle tracking were compared with those generated from lumped-parameter models to examine conditions in which estimates from simpler, less resource-intensive lumped-parameter models could be used in place of estimates from particle-tracking models. In each of four contrasting hydrogeologic settings in the USA, particle-tracking and lumped-parameter models yielded roughly similar age distributions and largely indistinguishable contaminant trends when based on similar conceptual models and calibrated to similar tracer data. Although model calibrations and predictions were variably affected by tracer limitations and conceptual ambiguities, results illustrated the importance of full age distributions, rather than apparent tracer ages or model mean ages, for trend analysis and forecasting.

  8. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating vulnerability of production wells to contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberts, S.M.; Böhlke, J.K.; Kauffman, L.J.; Jurgens, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental age tracers have been used in various ways to help assess vulnerability of drinking-water production wells to contamination. The most appropriate approach will depend on the information that is available and that which is desired. To understand how the well will respond to changing nonpoint-source contaminant inputs at the water table, some representation of the distribution of groundwater ages in the well is needed. Such information for production wells is sparse and difficult to obtain, especially in areas lacking detailed field studies. In this study, age distributions derived from detailed groundwater-flow models with advective particle tracking were compared with those generated from lumped-parameter models to examine conditions in which estimates from simpler, less resource-intensive lumped-parameter models could be used in place of estimates from particle-tracking models. In each of four contrasting hydrogeologic settings in the USA, particle-tracking and lumped-parameter models yielded roughly similar age distributions and largely indistinguishable contaminant trends when based on similar conceptual models and calibrated to similar tracer data. Although model calibrations and predictions were variably affected by tracer limitations and conceptual ambiguities, results illustrated the importance of full age distributions, rather than apparent tracer ages or model mean ages, for trend analysis and forecasting.

  9. Distribution of Groundwater Ages at Public-Supply Wells: Comparison of Results from Lumped Parameter and Numerical Inverse Models with Multiple Environmental Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberts, S.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    Estimates of groundwater age distributions at public-supply wells can provide insight into the vulnerability of these wells to contamination. Such estimates can be used to explore past and future water-quality trends and contaminant peak concentrations when combined with information on contaminant input at the water table. Information on groundwater age distributions, however, is not routinely applied to water quality issues at public-supply wells. This may be due, in part, to the difficulty in obtaining such estimates from poorly characterized aquifers with limited environmental tracer data. To this end, we compared distributions of groundwater ages in discharge from public-supply wells estimated from age tracer data (SF6, CFCs, 3H, 3He) using two different inverse modeling approaches: relatively simple lumped parameter models and more complex distributed-parameter numerical flow models with particle tracking. These comparisons were made in four contrasting hydrogeologic settings across the United States: unconsolidated alluvial fan sediments, layered confined unconsolidated sediments, unconsolidated valley-fill sediments, and carbonate rocks. In all instances, multiple age tracer measurements for the public-supply well of interest were available. We compared the following quantities, which were derived from simulated breakthrough curves that were generated using the various estimated age distributions for the selected wells and assuming the same hypothetical contaminant input: time lag to peak concentration, dilution at peak concentration, and contaminant arrival and flush times. Apparent tracer-based ages and mean and median simulated ages also were compared. For each setting, both types of models yielded similar age distributions and concentration trends, when based on similar conceptual models of local hydrogeology and calibrated to the same tracer measurements. Results indicate carefully chosen and calibrated simple lumped parameter age distribution models

  10. Regional Evaluation of Groundwater Age Distributions Using Lumped Parameter Models with Large, Sparse Datasets: Example from the Central Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgens, B. C.; Bohlke, J. K.; Voss, S.; Fram, M. S.; Esser, B.

    2015-12-01

    Tracer-based, lumped parameter models (LPMs) are an appealing way to estimate the distribution of age for groundwater because the cost of sampling wells is often less than building numerical groundwater flow models sufficiently complex to provide groundwater age distributions. In practice, however, tracer datasets are often incomplete because of anthropogenic or terrigenic contamination of tracers, or analytical limitations. While age interpretations using such datsets can have large uncertainties, it may still be possible to identify key parts of the age distribution if LPMs are carefully chosen to match hydrogeologic conceptualization and the degree of age mixing is reasonably estimated. We developed a systematic approach for evaluating groundwater age distributions using LPMs with a large but incomplete set of tracer data (3H, 3Hetrit, 14C, and CFCs) from 535 wells, mostly used for public supply, in the Central Valley, California, USA that were sampled by the USGS for the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment or the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Programs. In addition to mean ages, LPMs gave estimates of unsaturated zone travel times, recharge rates for pre- and post-development groundwater, the degree of age mixing in wells, proportion of young water (<60 yrs), and the depth of the boundary between post-development and predevelopment groundwater throughout the Central Valley. Age interpretations were evaluated by comparing past nitrate trends with LPM predicted trends, and whether the presence or absence of anthropogenic organic compounds was consistent with model results. This study illustrates a practical approach for assessing groundwater age information at a large scale to reveal important characteristics about the age structure of a major aquifer, and of the water supplies being derived from it.

  11. Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter models for determining groundwater age distributions and nitrate in water-supply wells, Central Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgens, B. C.; Bohlke, J. K.; Kauffman, L. J.; Belitz, K.

    2013-12-01

    Age distributions for 30 production wells (mostly public-supply) were determined using two methods: 1) calibration of age tracer data with lumped parameter models (LPMs) and 2) by advective particle tracking (PT) simulations using MODPATH and a regional steady-state groundwater flow model. The LPMs were calibrated with measurements of 3H, 3He(trit), and 14C by minimizing the Chi-square test statistic using a non-linear solver. A partial exponential model (PEM) was the primary LPM used in this study and a combination of two PEMs were used in cases where binary age mixtures were identified. The PEM is a reformulated version of the exponential model that is parameterized to simulate the age distribution in a well that is screened over any finite interval within the aquifer. The regional numerical model was calibrated to water-levels and gradients, and simulated PT age tracer concentrations were calibrated to the MODPATH porosity value. Age distributions were then used to predict nitrate concentrations in wells using agricultural application rates of nitrate in the central eastside of the San Joaquin Valley, California. Both methods showed that wells in the study area captured groundwater with a broad range of ages, spanning decades to millennia. Age distributions from the LPMs predicted age tracer and nitrate concentrations more accurately than the regional PT simulation; whereas PT simulations incorporating more detailed information about water-levels and hydraulic gradients near wells also provided good fits. 14C concentrations were not simulated well by the regional steady-state model, especially for wells with a significant fraction of old groundwater, because the model simulates the current, perturbed system and does not simulate recharge rates and velocities of the predevelopment system. Results from the LPMs yielded an average recharge rate of 0.55 m/yr, which was similar to the average recharge rate of 0.54 m/yr determined from a water budget analysis for the

  12. Age- and Sex-Dependent Values of the Distribution of Body Composition Parameters Among Chinese Children Using the Hattori Chart.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Hu, Li; Wu, Qiulian; Gong, Jian; Xu, Hao

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between the fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM) and between the fat-free mass index (FFMI) and fat mass index (FMI) in Chinese children using the Hattori chart and to compare the changing pattern with Korean counterparts. In this study, 1541 (764 girls) children and adolescents aged 5-19 yr were recruited from southern China. The subjects' body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The relationship between FFM and FM and between FFMI and FMI were delineated using the Hattori chart. Between 5 and 12 yr, a concurrent increase in FFM and FM and in FFMI and FMI was found in both sexes. After 12 yr, the age-related changing patterns are generally characterized by a sharp increase in FM, with a relatively small increase in FFM for girls, and a sharp increase in FFM, with a relatively little fluctuation in FM for boys. The increase in weight and BMI with age for this stage is largely due to the increase in FFM and FFMI in boys and in both the FFM and FM and FFMI and FMI components in girls. Sex differences in the patterns of body composition were found in Chinese children and adolescents.

  13. Influence of secondary preparative parameters and aging effects on PLGA particle size distribution: a sedimentation field flow fractionation investigation.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Vighi, Eleonora; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Leo, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles in the 200-400-nm size range were formulated through nanoprecipitation and solvent evaporation methods. Different concentrations of the polymer and stabilizer (Pluronic® F 68) were tested in order to identify the best conditions for making poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles of suitable size, stable in time, and to be used as carriers for brain-targeting drugs. The particles with the best characteristics for delivery system design were those formulated by nanoprecipitation with an organic/water phase ratio of 2:30, a polymer concentration of 25 mg/mL, and a surfactant concentration of 0.83 mg/mL; their surface charge was reasonably negative (approximately -27 mV) and the average size of the almost monodisperse population was roughly 250 nm. Particle characterization was obtained through ζ-potential measurements, scanning electron microscope observations, and particle size distribution determinations; the latter achieved by both photon-correlation spectroscopy and sedimentation field flow fractionation. Sedimentation field flow fractionation, which is considered more reliable than photon-correlation spectroscopy in describing the possible particle size distribution modifications, was used to investigate the effects of 3 months of storage at 4 °C had on the lyophilized particles. Figure Particle size ditribution from the SdFFF and the PCS techniques.

  14. Modeled ground water age distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolfenden, Linda R.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    The age of ground water in any given sample is a distributed quantity representing distributed provenance (in space and time) of the water. Conventional analysis of tracers such as unstable isotopes or anthropogenic chemical species gives discrete or binary measures of the presence of water of a given age. Modeled ground water age distributions provide a continuous measure of contributions from different recharge sources to aquifers. A numerical solution of the ground water age equation of Ginn (1999) was tested both on a hypothetical simplified one-dimensional flow system and under real world conditions. Results from these simulations yield the first continuous distributions of ground water age using this model. Complete age distributions as a function of one and two space dimensions were obtained from both numerical experiments. Simulations in the test problem produced mean ages that were consistent with the expected value at the end of the model domain for all dispersivity values tested, although the mean ages for the two highest dispersivity values deviated slightly from the expected value. Mean ages in the dispersionless case also were consistent with the expected mean ages throughout the physical model domain. Simulations under real world conditions for three dispersivity values resulted in decreasing mean age with increasing dispersivity. This likely is a consequence of an edge effect. However, simulations for all three dispersivity values tested were mass balanced and stable demonstrating that the solution of the ground water age equation can provide estimates of water mass density distributions over age under real world conditions.

  15. Modeled ground water age distributions.

    PubMed

    Woolfenden, Linda R; Ginn, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    The age of ground water in any given sample is a distributed quantity representing distributed provenance (in space and time) of the water. Conventional analysis of tracers such as unstable isotopes or anthropogenic chemical species gives discrete or binary measures of the presence of water of a given age. Modeled ground water age distributions provide a continuous measure of contributions from different recharge sources to aquifers. A numerical solution of the ground water age equation of Ginn (1999) was tested both on a hypothetical simplified one-dimensional flow system and under real world conditions. Results from these simulations yield the first continuous distributions of ground water age using this model. Complete age distributions as a function of one and two space dimensions were obtained from both numerical experiments. Simulations in the test problem produced mean ages that were consistent with the expected value at the end of the model domain for all dispersivity values tested, although the mean ages for the two highest dispersivity values deviated slightly from the expected value. Mean ages in the dispersionless case also were consistent with the expected mean ages throughout the physical model domain. Simulations under real world conditions for three dispersivity values resulted in decreasing mean age with increasing dispersivity. This likely is a consequence of an edge effect. However, simulations for all three dispersivity values tested were mass balanced and stable demonstrating that the solution of the ground water age equation can provide estimates of water mass density distributions over age under real world conditions.

  16. Control technology development. [distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1981-01-01

    Static and dynamic control design approaches were developed for distributed parameter systems. A hardware flexible beam facility was constructed to demonstrate and verify the theoretical control concepts. Efforts were made in the area of model order estimation for control systems with uncertain or time varying parameters.

  17. Five-Parameter Bivariate Probability Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, J.; Brewer, D.; Smith, O. W.

    1986-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum presents four papers about five-parameter bivariate gamma class of probability distributions. With some overlap of subject matter, papers address different aspects of theories of these distributions and use in forming statistical models of such phenomena as wind gusts. Provides acceptable results for defining constraints in problems designing aircraft and spacecraft to withstand large wind-gust loads.

  18. LMC clusters - Age calibration and age distribution revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elson, Rebecca A.; Fall, S. Michael

    1988-01-01

    The empirical age relation for star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud presented by Elson and Fall (1985) are reexamined using ages based only on main-sequence turnoffs. The present sample includes 57 clusters, 24 of which have color-magnitude diagrams published since 1985. The new calibration is very similar to that found previously, and the scatter in the relation corresponds to uncertainties of about a factor of 2 in age. The age distribution derived from the new calibration does not differ significantly from that derived in earlier work. It is compared with age distributions estimated by other authors for different samples of clusters, and the results are discussed.

  19. Distributed parameter statics of magnetic catheters.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Ilker

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how to use special Cosserat rod theory for deriving distributed-parameter static equilibrium equations of magnetic catheters. These medical devices are used for minimally-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and can be operated remotely or controlled by automated algorithms. The magnetic material can be lumped in rigid segments or distributed in flexible segments. The position vector of the cross-section centroid and quaternion representation of an orthonormal triad are selected as DOF. The strain energy for transversely isotropic, hyperelastic rods is augmented with the mechanical potential energy of the magnetic field and a penalty term to enforce the quaternion unity constraint. Numerical solution is found by 1D finite elements. Material properties of polymer tubes in extension, bending and twist are determined by mechanical and magnetic experiments. Software experiments with commercial FEM software indicate that the computational effort with the proposed method is at least one order of magnitude less than standard 3D FEM.

  20. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  1. The global age distribution of granitic pegmatites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCauley, Andrew; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2014-01-01

    An updated global compilation of 377 new and previously published ages indicates that granitic pegmatites range in age from Mesoarchean to Neogene and have a semi-periodic age distribution. Undivided granitic pegmatites show twelve age maxima: 2913, 2687, 2501, 1853, 1379, 1174, 988, 525, 483, 391, 319, and 72 Ma. These peaks correspond broadly with various proxy records of supercontinent assembly, including the age distributions of granites, detrital zircon grains, and passive margins. Lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) pegmatites have a similar age distribution to the undivided granitic pegmatites, with maxima at 2638, 1800, 962, 529, 485, 371, 309, and 274 Ma. Lithium and Ta resources in LCT pegmatites are concentrated in the Archean and Phanerozoic. While there are some Li resources from the Proterozoic, the dominantly bimodal distribution of resources is particularly evident for Ta. This distribution is similar to that of orogenic gold deposits, and has been interpreted to reflect the preservation potential of the orogenic belts where these deposits are formed. Niobium-yttrium-fluorine (NYF) pegmatites show similar age distributions to LCT pegmatites, but with a strong maximum at ca. 1000 Ma.

  2. Transient age distributions in subsurface hydrologic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engdahl, Nicholas B.; McCallum, James L.; Massoudieh, Arash

    2016-12-01

    Transient age distributions have received relatively little attention in the literature over the years compared to their steady-state counterparts. All natural systems are transient given enough time and it is becoming increasingly clear that understanding these effects and how they deviate from steady conditions will be important in the future. This article provides a high-level overview of the equations, techniques, and challenges encountered when considering transient age distributions. The age distribution represents the amount of water in a sample belonging to a particular age and the transient case implies that sampling the same location at two different times will result in different age distributions. These changes may be caused by transience in the boundary conditions, forcings (inputs), or physical changes in the geometry of the flow system. The governing equation for these problems contains separate dimensions for age and time and its solutions are more involved than the solute transport or steady-state age equations. Despite the complexity, many solutions have been derived for simplified, but transient, approximations and several numerical techniques exist for modeling more complex transient age distributions. This paper presents an overview of the existing solutions and contributes new examples of transient characteristic solutions and transient particle tracking simulations. The limitations for applying the techniques described herein are no longer theoretical or technological, but are now dominated by uncertainty in the physical properties of the flow systems and the lack of data for the historic inputs.

  3. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  4. Some properties of a 5-parameter bivariate probability distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, J. D.; Brewer, D. W.; Smith, O. E.

    1983-01-01

    A five-parameter bivariate gamma distribution having two shape parameters, two location parameters and a correlation parameter was developed. This more general bivariate gamma distribution reduces to the known four-parameter distribution. The five-parameter distribution gives a better fit to the gust data. The statistical properties of this general bivariate gamma distribution and a hypothesis test were investigated. Although these developments have come too late in the Shuttle program to be used directly as design criteria for ascent wind gust loads, the new wind gust model has helped to explain the wind profile conditions which cause large dynamic loads. Other potential applications of the newly developed five-parameter bivariate gamma distribution are in the areas of reliability theory, signal noise, and vibration mechanics.

  5. Theoretical foundation for measuring the groundwater age distribution.

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, William Payton; Arnold, Bill Walter

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, 81Kr, 4He and themean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2-D and 3-D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3-D domains differ significantly from 2-D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3-D systems. Groundwater environmental tracers can provide important constraints for the calibration of groundwater flow models. Direct simulation of environmental tracer concentrations in models has the additional advantage of avoiding assumptions associated with using calculated groundwater age values. This study quantifies model uncertainty reduction resulting from the addition of environmental tracer concentration data. The analysis uses a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and the calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method. Results indicate a significant reduction in the uncertainty in permeability with the addition of environmental tracer data, relative

  6. Computational methods for the control of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Cliff, E. M.; Powers, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Finite dimensional approximation schemes that work well for distributed parameter systems are often not suitable for the analysis and implementation of feedback control systems. The relationship between approximation schemes for distributed parameter systems and their application to optimal control problems is discussed. A numerical example is given.

  7. A Comparative Study of Distribution System Parameter Estimation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yannan; Williams, Tess L.; Gourisetti, Sri Nikhil Gup

    2016-07-17

    In this paper, we compare two parameter estimation methods for distribution systems: residual sensitivity analysis and state-vector augmentation with a Kalman filter. These two methods were originally proposed for transmission systems, and are still the most commonly used methods for parameter estimation. Distribution systems have much lower measurement redundancy than transmission systems. Therefore, estimating parameters is much more difficult. To increase the robustness of parameter estimation, the two methods are applied with combined measurement snapshots (measurement sets taken at different points in time), so that the redundancy for computing the parameter values is increased. The advantages and disadvantages of both methods are discussed. The results of this paper show that state-vector augmentation is a better approach for parameter estimation in distribution systems. Simulation studies are done on a modified version of IEEE 13-Node Test Feeder with varying levels of measurement noise and non-zero error in the other system model parameters.

  8. Large capacitor performs as a distributed parameter pulse line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, T. J.

    1966-01-01

    Capacitor of extended foil construction performs as a distributed parameter pulse line in which current, amplitude, and period are readily controlled. The capacitor is used as the energy storage element in a pulsed plasma accelerator.

  9. H-Infinity-Optimal Control for Distributed Parameter Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-28

    F. Callier and C.A. Desoer , "An Algebra of Transfer Functions for Distributed Linear Time-Invariant Systems," IEEE Trans. Circuits Syst., Sept. 1978...neeuey and -f by blog* nu"bM) This report describes progress in the development and application of H-infinity-optimal control theory to distributed...parameter systems. This research is intended to develop both theory and algorithms capable of providing realistic control systems for physical plants which

  10. The Power of Heterogeneity: Parameter Relationships from Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Röding, Magnus; Bradley, Siobhan J.; Williamson, Nathan H.; Dewi, Melissa R.; Nann, Thomas; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Complex scientific data is becoming the norm, many disciplines are growing immensely data-rich, and higher-dimensional measurements are performed to resolve complex relationships between parameters. Inherently multi-dimensional measurements can directly provide information on both the distributions of individual parameters and the relationships between them, such as in nuclear magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. However, when data originates from different measurements and comes in different forms, resolving parameter relationships is a matter of data analysis rather than experiment. We present a method for resolving relationships between parameters that are distributed individually and also correlated. In two case studies, we model the relationships between diameter and luminescence properties of quantum dots and the relationship between molecular weight and diffusion coefficient for polymers. Although it is expected that resolving complicated correlated relationships require inherently multi-dimensional measurements, our method constitutes a useful contribution to the modelling of quantitative relationships between correlated parameters and measurements. We emphasise the general applicability of the method in fields where heterogeneity and complex distributions of parameters are obstacles to scientific insight. PMID:27182701

  11. White LED compared with other light sources: age-dependent photobiological effects and parameters for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rebec, Katja Malovrh; Klanjšek-Gunde, Marta; Bizjak, Grega; Kobav, Matej B

    2015-01-01

    Ergonomic science at work and living places should appraise human factors concerning the photobiological effects of lighting. Thorough knowledge on this subject has been gained in the past; however, few attempts have been made to propose suitable evaluation parameters. The blue light hazard and its influence on melatonin secretion in age-dependent observers is considered in this paper and parameters for its evaluation are proposed. New parameters were applied to analyse the effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources and to compare them with the currently applied light sources. The photobiological effects of light sources with the same illuminance but different spectral power distribution were determined for healthy 4-76-year-old observers. The suitability of new parameters is discussed. Correlated colour temperature, the only parameter currently used to assess photobiological effects, is evaluated and compared to new parameters.

  12. Three-parameter probability distribution density for statistical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schau, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Statistical analysis of 2-D image data or data gathered from a scanning radiometer requires that both the non-Gaussian nature and finite sample size of the process be considered. To aid the statistical analysis of this data, a higher moment description density function has been defined, and parameters have been identified with the estimated moments of the data. It is shown that the first two moments may be computed from a knowledge of the Weiner spectrum, whereas all higher moments require the complex spatial frequency spectrum. Parameter identification is carried out for a three-parameter density function and applied to a scene in the IR region, 8-14 microns. Results indicate that a three-parameter distribution density generally provides different probabilities than does a two-parameter Gaussian description if maximum entropy (minimum bias) forms are sought.

  13. Distributed parameter modelling of flexible spacecraft: Where's the beef?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation discusses various misgivings concerning the directions and productivity of Distributed Parameter System (DPS) theory as applied to spacecraft vibration control. We try to show the need for greater cross-fertilization between DPS theorists and spacecraft control designers. We recommend a shift in research directions toward exploration of asymptotic frequency response characteristics of critical importance to control designers.

  14. Development of a distribution system for measuring nozzle integrative parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experimental system used in this study was equipped with sensors and computer-controlled processing technology. This system was used in the measurement of major performance parameters such as pressure, flux, spray angle, spray distribution character of the nozzle and its integrative performance...

  15. Chandrasekhar equations and computational algorithms for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Ito, K.; Powers, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar equations arising in optimal control problems for linear distributed parameter systems are considered. The equations are derived via approximation theory. This approach is used to obtain existence, uniqueness, and strong differentiability of the solutions and provides the basis for a convergent computation scheme for approximating feedback gain operators. A numerical example is presented to illustrate these ideas.

  16. On the optimal parameter and noise identification on the basis of three parameter probability distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Nikola

    2015-03-01

    The optimality of the procedure of parameter identification is scrutinized in this paper. It was shown, with the relations between the mathematical theory of function approximation, three parameter probability distributions, which can adjust their shape, and the maximum-likelihood method, that the optimal expression of the distance between measured data and model fitting it can be established by using the three parameter probability distributions on the basis of iteration procedure, where the noise contained in the measured signal is extracted as well. The iterative method for optimal system/model parameter identification is presented and tested by the numerical experimentation. Four types of noise added to the simple single-degree-of-freedom system response are considered: Gauss, Cauchy, Laplace and Uniform. The method performs well for the noise types at relatively high noise content in the signal.

  17. Prior Distributions of Material Parameters for Bayesian Calibration of Growth and Remodeling Computational Model of Abdominal Aortic Wall.

    PubMed

    Seyedsalehi, Sajjad; Zhang, Liangliang; Choi, Jongeun; Baek, Seungik

    2015-10-01

    For the accurate prediction of the vascular disease progression, there is a crucial need for developing a systematic tool aimed toward patient-specific modeling. Considering the interpatient variations, a prior distribution of model parameters has a strong influence on computational results for arterial mechanics. One crucial step toward patient-specific computational modeling is to identify parameters of prior distributions that reflect existing knowledge. In this paper, we present a new systematic method to estimate the prior distribution for the parameters of a constrained mixture model using previous biaxial tests of healthy abdominal aortas (AAs). We investigate the correlation between the estimated parameters for each constituent and the patient's age and gender; however, the results indicate that the parameters are correlated with age only. The parameters are classified into two groups: Group-I in which the parameters ce, ck1, ck2, cm2,Ghc, and ϕe are correlated with age, and Group-II in which the parameters cm1, Ghm, G1e, G2e, and α are not correlated with age. For the parameters in Group-I, we used regression associated with age via linear or inverse relations, in which their prior distributions provide conditional distributions with confidence intervals. For Group-II, the parameter estimated values were subjected to multiple transformations and chosen if the transformed data had a better fit to the normal distribution than the original. This information improves the prior distribution of a subject-specific model by specifying parameters that are correlated with age and their transformed distributions. Therefore, this study is a necessary first step in our group's approach toward a Bayesian calibration of an aortic model. The results from this study will be used as the prior information necessary for the initialization of Bayesian calibration of a computational model for future applications.

  18. Iterative methods for distributed parameter estimation in parabolic PDE

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, C.R.; Wade, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    The goal of the work presented is the development of effective iterative techniques for large-scale inverse or parameter estimation problems. In this extended abstract, a detailed description of the mathematical framework in which the authors view these problem is presented, followed by an outline of the ideas and algorithms developed. Distributed parameter estimation problems often arise in mathematical modeling with partial differential equations. They can be viewed as inverse problems; the `forward problem` is that of using the fully specified model to predict the behavior of the system. The inverse or parameter estimation problem is: given the form of the model and some observed data from the system being modeled, determine the unknown parameters of the model. These problems are of great practical and mathematical interest, and the development of efficient computational algorithms is an active area of study.

  19. New parameter in diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Platelet distribution width

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Bulent; Oskay, Alten; Dinc, Selcan Enver; Bas, Bilge; Tekin, Sabri

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of the mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width in acute appendicitis. METHODS: This retrospective, case-controlled study compared 295 patients with acute appendicitis (Group I), 100 patients with other intra-abdominal infections (Group II), and 100 healthy individuals (Group III) between January 2012 and January 2013. The age, gender, and white blood cell count, neutrophil percentage, mean platelet volume, and platelet distribution width values from blood samples were compared among the groups. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS for Windows 21.0 software. In addition, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and likelihood ratios, and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. RESULTS: The mean ages of patients were 29.9 ± 12.0 years for Group I, 31.5 ± 14.0 years for Group II, and 30.4 ± 13.0 years for Group III. Demographic features such as age and gender were not significantly different among the groups. White blood cell count, neutrophil percentage and platelet distribution width were significantly higher in Group I compared to groups II and III (P < 0.05). Diagnostically, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 73.1%, 94.0%, and 78% for white blood cell count, 70.0%, 96.0%, and 76.0% for neutrophil percentage, 29.5%, 49.0%, and 34.0% for mean platelet volume, and 97.1%, 93.0%, and 96.0% for platelet distribution width, respectively. The highest diagnostic accuracy detected was for platelet distribution width between Group I and Group III (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Platelet distribution width analysis can be used for diagnosis of acute appendicitis without requiring additional tests, thus reducing the cost and loss of time. PMID:25684947

  20. Data-Dependent Label Distribution Learning for Age Estimation.

    PubMed

    He, Zhouzhou; Li, Xi; Zhang, Zhongfei; Wu, Fei; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Yaqing; Yang, Ming-Hsuan; Zhuang, Yueting

    2017-01-18

    As an important and challenging problem in computer vision, face age estimation is typically cast as a classification or regression problem over a set of face samples with respect to several ordinal age labels, which have intrinsically cross-age correlations across adjacent age dimensions. As a result, such correlations usually lead to the age label ambiguities of the face samples. Namely, each face sample is associated with a latent label distribution that encodes the cross-age correlation information on label ambiguities. Motivated by this observation, we propose a totally data-driven label distribution learning approach to adaptively learn the latent label distributions. The proposed approach is capable of effectively discovering the intrinsic age distribution patterns for cross-age correlation analysis on the basis of the local context structures of face samples. Without any prior assumptions on the forms of label distribution learning, our approach is able to flexibly model the sample-specific context aware label distribution properties by solving a multi-task problem, which jointly optimizes the tasks of age-label distribution learning and age prediction for individuals. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  1. Martian crater size distributions and terrain age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, N. G.; Strom, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The crater size/frequency distributions of large ( 8 km) craters on the Moon and terrestrial planets display two very different curves representing two crater populations. The heavily cratered regions of the Moon, Mercury, and Mars show the same highly structured curve which cannot be represented by a single slope distribution function. In contrast, the lunar post mare crater population has a size/frequency distribution which differs significantly from that in the highlands over the same diameter range, and can be represented by a single-slope distribution function of -2.8 differential. On areas of martian lightly cratered northern plains, the crater population is essentially identical to that of the post mare population. This indicates that the same two families of impacting objects were responsible for the cratering records on both Moon and Mars. The thickness of mantling material varies among the various plains units, and can be calculated from the depth/diameter scaling relations for martian craters.

  2. Ocular biometric parameters among 3-year-old Chinese children: testability, distribution and association with anthropometric parameters

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dan; Chen, Xuejuan; Gong, Qi; Yuan, Chaoqun; Ding, Hui; Bai, Jing; Zhu, Hui; Fu, Zhujun; Yu, Rongbin; Liu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    This survey was conducted to determine the testability, distribution and associations of ocular biometric parameters in Chinese preschool children. Ocular biometric examinations, including the axial length (AL) and corneal radius of curvature (CR), were conducted on 1,688 3-year-old subjects by using an IOLMaster in August 2015. Anthropometric parameters, including height and weight, were measured according to a standardized protocol, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. The testability was 93.7% for the AL and 78.6% for the CR overall, and both measures improved with age. Girls performed slightly better in AL measurements (P = 0.08), and the difference in CR was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The AL distribution was normal in girls (P = 0.12), whereas it was not in boys (P < 0.05). For CR1, all subgroups presented normal distributions (P = 0.16 for boys; P = 0.20 for girls), but the distribution varied when the subgroups were combined (P < 0.05). CR2 presented a normal distribution (P = 0.11), whereas the AL/CR ratio was abnormal (P < 0.001). Boys exhibited a significantly longer AL, a greater CR and a greater AL/CR ratio than girls (all P < 0.001). PMID:27384307

  3. Testing nonlinear regression parameters under heteroscedastic, normally distributed errors.

    PubMed

    Kimura, D K

    1990-09-01

    Likelihood ratio tests for parameters estimated assuming normally distributed errors are examined under a variety of homoscedastic and heteroscedastic variance assumptions. It is assumed that gamma ij, the jth observation from the ith population, is distributed as N[mu(chi ij, beta i), (sigma i mu(chi ij, beta i)theta i)2]. By varying sigma 2i and theta i, this model contains the most obvious examples of homoscedastic and heteroscedastic variability. Under this model, the null hypothesis of equal beta i's can easily be tested using the likelihood ratio criterion. Also considered is the two-sample chi-square statistic, chi 2t = U'S-1 U, where U is the difference vector of nonlinear least squares parameter estimates and S is an estimate of the covariance matrix of U. Monte Carlo simulation using the von Bertalanffy growth curve as an example is used to evaluate several test statistics for Type I error rates under different sampling assumptions.

  4. Normal and diseased personal eye modeling using age-appropriate lens parameters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Ling; Shi, L.; Lewis, J. W. L.; Wang, M.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized eye modeling of normal and diseased eye conditions is attractive due to the recent availability of detailed ocular measurements in clinic environments and the promise of its medical and industrial applications. In the customized modeling, the optical properties of the crystalline lens including the gradient refractive index, the lens bio-geometry and orientation are typically assigned with average lens parameters from literature since typically they are not clinically available. Although, through the optical optimization by assigning lens parameters as variables, the clinical measured wavefront aberration can be achieved, the optimized lens biometry and orientation often end up at edges of the statistical distribution. Without an effective validation of these models today, the fidelity of the final lens (and therefore the model) remains questionable. To develop a more reliable customized model without detailed lens information, we incorporate age-appropriate lens parameters as the initial condition of optical optimization. A biconic lens optimization was first performed to provide a correct lens profile for accurate lower order aberration and then followed by the wavefront optimization. Clinical subjects were selected from all ages with both normal and diseased corneal and refractive conditions. 19 ammetropic eyes ( + 4D to −11D), and 16 keratoconus eyes (mild to moderate with cylinder 0.25 to 6D) were modeled. Age- and gender-corrected refractive index was evaluated. Final models attained the lens shapes comparable to the statistical distribution in their age. PMID:22714237

  5. Control of the SCOLE configuration using distributed parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1994-06-01

    A continuum model for the SCOLE configuration has been derived using transfer matrices. Controller designs for distributed parameter systems have been analyzed. Pole-assignment controller design is considered easy to implement but stability is not guaranteed. An explicit transfer function of dynamic controllers has been obtained and no model reduction is required before the controller is realized. One specific LQG controller for continuum models had been derived, but other optimal controllers for more general performances need to be studied.

  6. Age distribution among NASA scientists and engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.

    1989-01-01

    The loss of technical expertise through attrition in NASA and the aerospace industry is discussed. This report documents historical age-related information for scientific and engineering personnel in general and the NASA Lewis Research Center in particular, for 1968 through 1987. Recommendations are made to promote discussion and to establish the groundwork for action.

  7. Flaw strength distributions and statistical parameters for ceramic fibers: The normal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R'Mili, M.; Godin, N.; Lamon, J.

    2012-05-01

    The present paper investigates large sets of ceramic fibre failure strengths (500 to 1000 data) produced using tensile tests on tows that contained either 500 or 1000 filaments. The probability density function was determined through acoustic emission monitoring which allowed detection and counting of filament fractures. The statistical distribution of filament strengths was described using the normal distribution. The Weibull equation was then fitted to this normal distribution for estimation of statistical parameters. A perfect agreement between both distributions was obtained, and a quite negligible scatter in statistical parameters was observed, as opposed to the wide variability that is reported in the literature. Thus it was concluded that flaw strengths are distributed normally and that the statistical parameters that were derived are the true ones. In a second step, the conventional method of estimation of Weibull parameters was applied to these sets of data and, then, to subsets selected randomly. The influence of other factors involved in the conventional method of determination of statistical parameters is discussed. It is demonstrated that selection of specimens, sample size, and method of construction of so-called Weibull plots are responsible for statistical parameters variability.

  8. Ageing/Menopausal Status in Healthy Women and Ageing in Healthy Men Differently Affect Cardiometabolic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Campesi, Ilaria; Occhioni, Stefano; Tonolo, Giancarlo; Cherchi, Sara; Basili, Stefania; Carru, Ciriaco; Zinellu, Angelo; Franconi, Flavia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gender medicine requires a global analysis of an individual's life. Menopause and ageing induce variations of some cardiometabolic parameters, but, it is unknown if this occurs in a sex-specific manner. Here, some markers of oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction are analysed in men younger and older than 45 years and in pre- and postmenopausal women. Methods: Serum and plasma sample were assayed for TNF-α and IL-6, malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls and for methylated arginines using ELISA kits, colorimetric methods and capillary electrophoresis. Results: Before body weight correction, men overall had higher creatinine, red blood cells and haemoglobin and lower triglycerides than women. Men younger than 45 years had lower levels of TNF-α and malondialdehyde and higher levels of arginine than age-matched women, while postmenopausal women had higher IL-6 concentrations than men, and higher total cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine and IL-6 levels than younger women. Men younger than 45 years had lower total cholesterol and malondialdehyde than older men. After correction, some differences remained, others were amplified, others disappeared and some new differences emerged. Moreover, some parameters showed a correlation with age, and some of them correlated with each other as functions of ageing and ageing/menopausal status. Conclusions: Ageing/menopausal status increased many more cardiovascular risk factors in women than ageing in men, confirming that postmenopausal women had increased vascular vulnerability and indicating the need of early cardiovascular prevention in women. Sex-gender differences are also influenced by body weight, indicating as a matter of debate whether body weight should be seen as a true confounder or as part of the causal pathway. PMID:26941571

  9. Martian valleys: morphology, distribution, age, and origin.

    PubMed

    Pieri, D C

    1980-11-21

    Branching valley networks throughout the heavily cratered terrain of Mars exhibit no compelling evidence for formation by rainfall-fed erosion. The networks are diffuse and inefficient, with irregular tributary junction angles and large, undissected intervalley areas. Rather, the deeply entrenched canyons, with blunt amphitheater terminations, cliff-bench wall topography, lack of evidence of interior erosion by flow, and clear structural control, suggest headward extension by basal sapping. The size-frequency distributions of impact craters in these valleys and in the heavily cratered terrain that surrounds them are statistically indistinguishable, suggesting that valley formation has not occurred on Mars for billions of years.

  10. Control of complex dynamics and chaos in distributed parameter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarti, S.; Marek, M.; Ray, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses a methodology for controlling complex dynamics and chaos in distributed parameter systems. The reaction-diffusion system with Brusselator kinetics, where the torus-doubling or quasi-periodic (two characteristic incommensurate frequencies) route to chaos exists in a defined range of parameter values, is used as an example. Poincare maps are used for characterization of quasi-periodic and chaotic attractors. The dominant modes or topos, which are inherent properties of the system, are identified by means of the Singular Value Decomposition. Tested modal feedback control schemas based on identified dominant spatial modes confirm the possibility of stabilization of simple quasi-periodic trajectories in the complex quasi-periodic or chaotic spatiotemporal patterns.

  11. Skeletal distribution and biochemical parameters of Paget's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Meunier, P.J.; Salson, C.; Mathieu, L.; Chapuy, M.C.; Delmas, P.; Alexandre, C.; Charhon, S.

    1987-04-01

    Quantitative bone scans were performed with /sup 99m/Tc-EHDP in 170 untreated pagetic patients (93 men, 77 women; mean age, 65.4 years). The distribution of 863 pagetic skeletal locations was analyzed. Bone scans demonstrated 8.3% more pagetic sites than roentgenograms. The extent of Paget's disease was evaluated in each patient by a scintigraphic skeletal index. This index correlated with serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) and urinary hydroxyproline (HyPro) levels, and also with hypocalcemic acute response to calcitonin. The correlation of SAP with an index of activity (extent index adjusted by uptake ratios) was better than with the nonadjusted index. Only 30.6% of pagetic sites were responsible for clinical symptoms. No correlation was found between age and skeletal index of the disease.

  12. Sediment load estimation using statistical distributions with streamflow dependent parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailhot, A.; Rousseau, A. N.; Talbot, G.; Quilbé, R.

    2005-12-01

    The classical approaches to estimate sediment and chemical loads are all deterministic: averaging methods, ratio estimators, regression methods (rating curves) and planning level load estimation methods. However, none of these methods is satisfactory since they are often inaccurate and do not take into account nor quantify uncertainty. To fill this gap, statistical methods have to be investigated. This presentation proposes a new statistical method in which sediment concentration is assimilated to a random variable and is described by distribution functions. Three types of distributions are considered: Log-Normal, Gamma and Weibull distributions. Correlation between sediment concentrations and streamflows is integrated to the model by assuming that distribution parameters (mean and coefficient of variation) are related to streamflow using several different functional forms: exponential, quadratic and power law forms for the mean, constant and linear for the coefficient of variation. Parameter estimation is realized through maximization of the likelihood function. This approach is applied on a data set (1989 to 2004) from the Beaurivage River (Quebec, Canada) with weekly to monthly sampling for sediment concentration. A comparison of different models (selection of a distribution function with functional forms relating the mean and the coefficient of variation to streamflow) shows that the Log-Normal distribution with power law mean and coefficient of variation independent of streamflow provides the best result. When comparing annual load results with those obtained using deterministic methods, we observe that ratio estimators values are rarely within the [0.1, 0.9] quantile interval. For the 1997-2004 period, ratio estimator values are almost systematically smaller than the 0.1 quantile. This could presumably be due to the small number of sediment concentration samples for these years. This study suggests that, if deterministic methods such as the ratio estimator

  13. Radial Distributions of Dusty Plasma Parameters in a Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, A. V.; Sukhinin, G. I.

    2011-11-29

    A self-consistent model for radial distributions of dusty plasma parameters in a DC glow discharge based on the non-local Boltzmann equation for EEDF, the drift-diffusion equation for ions, and the Poisson equation for self-consistent electric field is presented. The results show that for the case of high dust particles density when the recombination of electrons and ions exceeds the ionization near the tube axis, radial electron and ion fluxes change their direction toward the center of the tube, and the radial electric field is reversed.

  14. Transfer function modeling of damping mechanisms in distributed parameter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, J. C.; Inman, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    This work formulates a method for the modeling of material damping characteristics in distributed parameter models which may be easily applied to models such as rod, plate, and beam equations. The general linear boundary value vibration equation is modified to incorporate hysteresis effects represented by complex stiffness using the transfer function approach proposed by Golla and Hughes. The governing characteristic equations are decoupled through separation of variables yielding solutions similar to those of undamped classical theory, allowing solution of the steady state as well as transient response. Example problems and solutions are provided demonstrating the similarity of the solutions to those of the classical theories and transient responses of nonviscous systems.

  15. Martian valleys - Morphology, distribution, age, and origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieri, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    The article summarizes the geological and geomorphological evidence concerning the formation of the valley networks of Mars which were observed in the Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter images. There is no clear evidence of direct fluid erosion in any Martian valley. The networks are diffuse and inefficient, with irregular tributary junction angles and large, undissected intervalley regions. The deeply entrenched canyons, with steep-walled amphitheater terminations suggest headward extension (sapping) by basal undermining and wall collapse. It is believed that valley formation has not occurred on Mars for billions of years because the size-frequency distributions of impact craters in these valleys and in the heavily cratered terrain which surrounds them are statistically insignificant.

  16. More Effective Distributed ML via a Stale Synchronous Parallel Parameter Server

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Qirong; Cipar, James; Cui, Henggang; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Seunghak; Gibbons, Phillip B.; Gibson, Garth A.; Ganger, Gregory R.; Xing, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a parameter server system for distributed ML, which follows a Stale Synchronous Parallel (SSP) model of computation that maximizes the time computational workers spend doing useful work on ML algorithms, while still providing correctness guarantees. The parameter server provides an easy-to-use shared interface for read/write access to an ML model’s values (parameters and variables), and the SSP model allows distributed workers to read older, stale versions of these values from a local cache, instead of waiting to get them from a central storage. This significantly increases the proportion of time workers spend computing, as opposed to waiting. Furthermore, the SSP model ensures ML algorithm correctness by limiting the maximum age of the stale values. We provide a proof of correctness under SSP, as well as empirical results demonstrating that the SSP model achieves faster algorithm convergence on several different ML problems, compared to fully-synchronous and asynchronous schemes. PMID:25400488

  17. C -parameter distribution at N3LL' including power corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-01

    We compute the e+e- C -parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O (αs3), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments Ωn. To eliminate an O (ΛQCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switch from the MS ¯ to a short distance "Rgap" scheme to define the leading power correction parameter Ω1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in Ω1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C -parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for αs(mZ) and Ω1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ≃ 2.5 % at Q =mZ.

  18. C -parameter distribution at N 3 LL ' including power corrections

    DOE PAGES

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; ...

    2015-05-15

    We compute the e⁺e⁻ C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(α3s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments Ωn. To eliminate an O(ΛQCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switchmore » from the MS¯ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter Ω1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in Ω1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for αs(mZ) and Ω1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ≅ 2.5% at Q=mZ.« less

  19. Inversion of generalized relaxation time distributions with optimized damping parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florsch, Nicolas; Revil, André; Camerlynck, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Retrieving the Relaxation Time Distribution (RDT), the Grains Size Distribution (GSD) or the Pore Size Distribution (PSD) from low-frequency impedance spectra is a major goal in geophysics. The “Generalized RTD” generalizes parametric models like Cole-Cole and many others, but remains tricky to invert since this inverse problem is ill-posed. We propose to use generalized relaxation basis function (for instance by decomposing the spectra on basis of generalized Cole-Cole relaxation elements instead of the classical Debye basis) and to use the L-curve approach to optimize the damping parameter required to get smooth and realistic inverse solutions. We apply our algorithm to three examples, one synthetic and two real data sets, and the program includes the possibility of converting the RTD into GSD or PSD by choosing the value of the constant connecting the relaxation time to the characteristic polarization size of interest. A high frequencies (typically above 1 kHz), a dielectric term in taken into account in the model. The code is provided as an open Matlab source as a supplementary file associated with this paper.

  20. Aging of distribution composite insulators under environmental and electrical stresses

    SciTech Connect

    de Oliveira, S.M. ); de Tourreil, C.H

    1990-04-01

    Seven types of commercially available distribution composite insulators with sheds made of EPR or epoxy resin have been subjected to various functional aging tests recommended by the IEC or the IEEE. The influence of UV radiation on the aging of the shed materials was also evaluated. The usefulness of the various aging and diagnostic tests is discussed and a modification of the recommended test procedures is proposed in order to improve the evaluation of the long term performance of these insulators.

  1. Sound propagation and absorption in foam - A distributed parameter model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Lieberman, S.

    1971-01-01

    Liquid-base foams are highly effective sound absorbers. A better understanding of the mechanisms of sound absorption in foams was sought by exploration of a mathematical model of bubble pulsation and coupling and the development of a distributed-parameter mechanical analog. A solution by electric-circuit analogy was thus obtained and transmission-line theory was used to relate the physical properties of the foams to the characteristic impedance and propagation constants of the analog transmission line. Comparison of measured physical properties of the foam with values obtained from measured acoustic impedance and propagation constants and the transmission-line theory showed good agreement. We may therefore conclude that the sound propagation and absorption mechanisms in foam are accurately described by the resonant response of individual bubbles coupled to neighboring bubbles.

  2. Numerical studies of identification in nonlinear distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Lo, C. K.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework and convergence theory for the identification of first and second order nonlinear distributed parameter systems developed previously by the authors and reported on in detail elsewhere are summarized and discussed. The theory is based upon results for systems whose dynamics can be described by monotone operators in Hilbert space and an abstract approximation theorem for the resulting nonlinear evolution system. The application of the theory together with numerical evidence demonstrating the feasibility of the general approach are discussed in the context of the identification of a first order quasi-linear parabolic model for one dimensional heat conduction/mass transport and the identification of a nonlinear dissipation mechanism (i.e., damping) in a second order one dimensional wave equation. Computational and implementational considerations, in particular, with regard to supercomputing, are addressed.

  3. Influence of the source distribution on the age distribution of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerche, I.; Schlickeiser, R.

    1985-01-01

    The age distribution of galactic cosmic rays in the diffusion approximation is calculated. The influence of the scale height of the spatial source distribution on the mean age of particles arriving at the solar system is discussed. The broader the source distribution with respect to the galactic plane, the longer the mean age. This result provides a natural explanation for the shorter mean age of secondary cosmic rays compared to primary cosmic rays necessary for the understanding of the observed secondary/primary ratio.

  4. Weathering of ordinary chondrites from Oman: Correlation of weathering parameters with 14C terrestrial ages and a refined weathering scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurfluh, Florian J.; Hofmann, Beda A.; Gnos, Edwin; Eggenberger, Urs; Jull, A. J. Timothy

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated 128 14C-dated ordinary chondrites from Oman for macroscopically visible weathering parameters, for thin section-based weathering degrees, and for chemical weathering parameters as analyzed with handheld X-ray fluorescence. These 128 14C-dated meteorites show an abundance maximum of terrestrial age at 19.9 ka, with a mean of 21.0 ka and a pronounced lack of samples between 0 and 10 ka. The weathering degree is evaluated in thin section using a refined weathering scale based on the current W0 to W6 classification of Wlotzka (1993), with five newly included intermediate steps resulting in a total of nine (formerly six) steps. We find significant correlations between terrestrial ages and several macroscopic weathering parameters. The correlation of various chemical parameters including Sr and Ba with terrestrial age is not very pronounced. The microscopic weathering degree of metal and sulfides with newly added intermediate steps shows the best correlation with 14C terrestrial ages, demonstrating the significance of the newly defined weathering steps. We demonstrate that the observed 14C terrestrial age distribution can be modeled from the abundance of meteorites with different weathering degrees, allowing the evaluation of an age-frequency distribution for the whole meteorite population.

  5. Semigroup approximation and robust stabilization of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurdila, A. J.; Fabiano, R.; Strganac, T.; Hsu, S.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical results that enable rigorous statements of convergence and exponential stability of Galerkin approximations of LQR controls for infinite dimensional, or distributed parameter, systems have proliferated over the past ten years. In addition, extensive progress has been made over the same time period in the derivation of robust control design strategies for finite dimensional systems. However, the study of the convergence of robust finite dimensional controllers to robust controllers for infinite dimensional systems remains an active area of research. We consider a class of soft-constrained differential games evolving in a Hilbert space. Under certain conditions, a saddle point control can be given in feedback form in terms of a solution to a Riccati equation. By considering a related LQR problem, we can show a convergence result for finite dimensional approximations of this differential game. This yields a computational algorithm for the feedback gain that can be derived from similar strategies employed in infinite dimensional LQR control design problems. The approach described in this paper also inherits the additional properties of stability robustness common to game theoretic methods in finite dimensional analysis. These theoretical convergence and stability results are verified in several numerical experiments.

  6. DNN-state identification of 2D distributed parameter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chairez, I.; Fuentes, R.; Poznyak, A.; Poznyak, T.; Escudero, M.; Viana, L.

    2012-02-01

    There are many examples in science and engineering which are reduced to a set of partial differential equations (PDEs) through a process of mathematical modelling. Nevertheless there exist many sources of uncertainties around the aforementioned mathematical representation. Moreover, to find exact solutions of those PDEs is not a trivial task especially if the PDE is described in two or more dimensions. It is well known that neural networks can approximate a large set of continuous functions defined on a compact set to an arbitrary accuracy. In this article, a strategy based on the differential neural network (DNN) for the non-parametric identification of a mathematical model described by a class of two-dimensional (2D) PDEs is proposed. The adaptive laws for weights ensure the 'practical stability' of the DNN-trajectories to the parabolic 2D-PDE states. To verify the qualitative behaviour of the suggested methodology, here a non-parametric modelling problem for a distributed parameter plant is analysed.

  7. Data-Driven H∞ Control for Nonlinear Distributed Parameter Systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Huang, Tingwen; Wu, Huai-Ning; Yang, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    The data-driven H∞ control problem of nonlinear distributed parameter systems is considered in this paper. An off-policy learning method is developed to learn the H∞ control policy from real system data rather than the mathematical model. First, Karhunen-Loève decomposition is used to compute the empirical eigenfunctions, which are then employed to derive a reduced-order model (ROM) of slow subsystem based on the singular perturbation theory. The H∞ control problem is reformulated based on the ROM, which can be transformed to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi-Isaacs (HJI) equation, theoretically. To learn the solution of the HJI equation from real system data, a data-driven off-policy learning approach is proposed based on the simultaneous policy update algorithm and its convergence is proved. For implementation purpose, a neural network (NN)- based action-critic structure is developed, where a critic NN and two action NNs are employed to approximate the value function, control, and disturbance policies, respectively. Subsequently, a least-square NN weight-tuning rule is derived with the method of weighted residuals. Finally, the developed data-driven off-policy learning approach is applied to a nonlinear diffusion-reaction process, and the obtained results demonstrate its effectiveness.

  8. Age and task parameters in continuous performance tests for preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Hagelthorn, Kathleen M; Hiemenz, Jennifer R; Pillion, Joseph P; Mahone, E Mark

    2003-06-01

    66 children (M=56.2 mo., SD=10.9), recruited from preschool and daycare centers, were administered two continuous performance tests, one auditory and one visual. Both tests utilized a format with one target and one nontarget. Interstimulus interval was fixed at 1350 msec. for the visual test and 5000 msec. for the auditory test. The visual test produced greater rates of omission and commission errors than the auditory test. Age was significantly related to mean reaction time and response variability for both tests; however, the visual test produced an unexpected pattern of increasing response time across age groups. On both tests omission rates improved significantly with age, while commission rates were consistent across ages 3-6 years. When considering continuous performance test paradigms for preschoolers, 3-yr.-olds may need at least a 4000-msec. interstimulus interval to make a choice for the stimulus cue. Hits following an interstimulus interval shorter than 1400 msec. may reflect younger preschoolers' response to a previous stimulus.

  9. Bayesian evaluation of groundwater age distribution using radioactive tracers and anthropogenic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoudieh, Arash; Sharifi, Soroosh; Solomon, D. Kip

    2012-09-01

    The development of a Bayesian modeling approach for estimation of the age distribution of groundwater using radioactive isotopes and anthropogenic chemicals is described. The model considers the uncertainties associated with the measured tracer concentrations as well as the parameters affecting the concentration of tracers in the groundwater, and it provides the posterior probability densities of the parameters defining the groundwater age distribution using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The model also incorporates the effect of dissolution of aquifer minerals on diluting the 14C signature and the uncertainties associated with this process on the inferred age distribution parameters. Two demonstration modeling cases have been performed. First, the method was applied to simulated tracer concentrations at a discharge point of a hypothetical 2-D vertical aquifer with two recharge zones, leading to a mixed groundwater age distribution under different presumed uncertainties. When the error variance of the observed tracer concentrations is considered unknown, the method can estimate the parameters of the fitted exponential-lognormal distribution with a relatively narrow credible interval when five hypothetical samples are assumed to be collected at the discharge point. However, when a single sample is assumed, the credible intervals become wider, and credible estimations of the parameters are not obtained. Second, the method was applied to the data collected at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. In this demonstration application, nine different forms of presumed groundwater age distributions have been considered, including four single forms and five mixed forms, assuming the groundwater consists of distinct young and old fractions. For the medium geometrical standard deviationδc,i = 1.41, the model estimates a young groundwater age of between 0 and 350 years, with the largest odds being given to a mean age of approximately 100 years, and a fraction of young

  10. Optic Nerve Head Parameters in a Turkish Population Over Forty Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Niyaz, Leyla; Yıldırım, Nilgün; Musmul, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the optic disc area and cup area in a normal population over 40 years of age. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed in Eskişehir. Fundus photographs were obtained using a nonmydriatic fundus camera. Planimetric measurements of the optic disc and cup area were performed with VK-2 digital imaging software. Optic nerve parameters were then compared between sex and age groups. Results: A total of 3,038 subjects were evaluated. Mean age was 56.6±10.4 years (range 40-91 years). The median disc area of the subjects was 2.87 (2.53-3.23) mm2 in the right eyes and 2.89 (2.55-3.25) mm2 in the left eyes (p<0.001). The median cup area of the subjects was 0.46 mm2 (0.33-0.64 mm2) in the right eyes and 0.44 mm2 (0.33-0.61 mm2) in the left eyes (p<0.001). The differences in disc and cup area between male and female subjects were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusion: We report the normal distribution of disc area and cup area measurements and their association with age and sex. PMID:28058153

  11. THE AGE AND STELLAR PARAMETERS OF THE PROCYON BINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Liebert, James; Arnett, David; Fontaine, Gilles; Young, Patrick A.; Williams, Kurtis A. E-mail: darnett@as.arizona.edu E-mail: pyoung.3@asu.edu

    2013-05-20

    The Procyon AB binary system (orbital period 40.838 yr, a newly refined determination) is near and bright enough that the component radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities are very well determined, although more than one possible solution to the masses has limited the claimed accuracy. Preliminary mass determinations for each component are available from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, supported by ground-based astrometry and an excellent Hipparcos parallax; we use these for our preferred solution for the binary system. Other values for the masses are also considered. We have employed the TYCHO stellar evolution code to match the radius and luminosity of the F5 IV-V primary star to determine the system's most likely age as 1.87 {+-} 0.13 Gyr. Since prior studies of Procyon A found its abundance indistinguishable from solar, the solar composition of Asplund, Grevesse, and Sauval (Z = 0.014) is assumed for the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram fitting. An unsuccessful attempt to fit using the older solar abundance scale of Grevesse and Sauval (Z = 0.019) is also reported. For Procyon B, 11 new sequences for the cooling of non-DA white dwarfs have been calculated to investigate the dependences of the cooling age on (1) the mass, (2) core composition, (3) helium layer mass, and (4) heavy-element opacities in the helium envelope. Our calculations indicate a cooling age of 1.19 {+-} 0.11 Gyr, which implies that the progenitor mass of Procyon B was 2.59{sub -0.26}{sup +0.44} M{sub Sun }. In a plot of initial versus final mass of white dwarfs in astrometric binaries or star clusters (all with age determinations), the Procyon B final mass lies several {sigma} below a straight line fit.

  12. The Age and Stellar Parameters of the Procyon Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, James; Fontaine, Gilles; Young, Patrick A.; Williams, Kurtis A.; Arnett, David

    2013-05-01

    The Procyon AB binary system (orbital period 40.838 yr, a newly refined determination) is near and bright enough that the component radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities are very well determined, although more than one possible solution to the masses has limited the claimed accuracy. Preliminary mass determinations for each component are available from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, supported by ground-based astrometry and an excellent Hipparcos parallax; we use these for our preferred solution for the binary system. Other values for the masses are also considered. We have employed the TYCHO stellar evolution code to match the radius and luminosity of the F5 IV-V primary star to determine the system's most likely age as 1.87 ± 0.13 Gyr. Since prior studies of Procyon A found its abundance indistinguishable from solar, the solar composition of Asplund, Grevesse, and Sauval (Z = 0.014) is assumed for the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram fitting. An unsuccessful attempt to fit using the older solar abundance scale of Grevesse & Sauval (Z = 0.019) is also reported. For Procyon B, 11 new sequences for the cooling of non-DA white dwarfs have been calculated to investigate the dependences of the cooling age on (1) the mass, (2) core composition, (3) helium layer mass, and (4) heavy-element opacities in the helium envelope. Our calculations indicate a cooling age of 1.19 ± 0.11 Gyr, which implies that the progenitor mass of Procyon B was 2.59_{-0.26}^{+0.44} M ⊙. In a plot of initial versus final mass of white dwarfs in astrometric binaries or star clusters (all with age determinations), the Procyon B final mass lies several σ below a straight line fit.

  13. Magnesium and fluoride distribution in human cementum with age.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, S; Nakagaki, H; Takami, Y; Eba, H; Kirkham, J; Robinson, C

    2000-12-01

    Sixty-two human teeth, obtained from subjects aged 11 to 80 years, were used to determine the magnesium and fluoride concentration and distribution with age in human cementum. Transverse sections were prepared from the root region of teeth. Samples, each 30 microm thick, were abraded in sequence from the cementum surface and the cemento-dentine junction by an abrasive micro-sampling technique. Magnesium concentrations were lower in the cementum surface, and increased towards the cemento-dentine junction (CDJ), while fluoride concentrations were higher in cementum surfaces and tended to decrease towards CDJ. Fluoride distribution patterns were similar to that reported earlier while average fluoride concentration increased with age, however, either no change or decreasing tendencies were observed with magnesium.

  14. Parameter specification for the degree distribution of simulated Barabási-Albert graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd-Zaid, Fairul; Kabban, Christine M. Schubert; Deckro, Richard F.; White, Edward D.

    2017-01-01

    The degree distribution of a simulated Barabási-Albert graph under linear preferential attachment is investigated. Specifically, the parameters of the power law distribution are estimated and compared against the theoretical values derived using mean field theory. Least squares method and MLE-nonparametric method were utilized to estimate the distribution parameters on 1000 simulated Barabási-Albert graphs for edge parameter m ∈ { 2 , 4 , 6 } and size n ∈ {2k : k = 5 , 6 , … , 14 , 15 } . Goodness of fit metrics were computed on a second set of simulated graphs for the median of the estimated parameters and other hypothetical values for the distribution parameters. The results suggest that the distribution of the parameters from simulated graphs are significantly different from the theoretical distribution and is also dependent on m. Further results confirm the finding that the parameter of the power law distribution, β, increases as m increases.

  15. Modeling the brain morphology distribution in the general aging population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizinga, W.; Poot, D. H. J.; Roshchupkin, G.; Bron, E. E.; Ikram, M. A.; Vernooij, M. W.; Rueckert, D.; Niessen, W. J.; Klein, S.

    2016-03-01

    Both normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease cause morphological changes of the brain. To better distinguish between normal and abnormal cases, it is necessary to model changes in brain morphology owing to normal aging. To this end, we developed a method for analyzing and visualizing these changes for the entire brain morphology distribution in the general aging population. The method is applied to 1000 subjects from a large population imaging study in the elderly, from which 900 were used to train the model and 100 were used for testing. The results of the 100 test subjects show that the model generalizes to subjects outside the model population. Smooth percentile curves showing the brain morphology changes as a function of age and spatiotemporal atlases derived from the model population are publicly available via an interactive web application at agingbrain.bigr.nl.

  16. Parameter induction in continuous univariate distributions: Well-established G families.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Muhammad H; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2015-01-01

    The art of parameter(s) induction to the baseline distribution has received a great deal of attention in recent years. The induction of one or more additional shape parameter(s) to the baseline distribution makes the distribution more flexible especially for studying the tail properties. This parameter(s) induction also proved helpful in improving the goodness-of-fit of the proposed generalized family of distributions. There exist many generalized (or generated) G families of continuous univariate distributions since 1985. In this paper, the well-established and widely-accepted G families of distributions like the exponentiated family, Marshall-Olkin extended family, beta-generated family, McDonald-generalized family, Kumaraswamy-generalized family and exponentiated generalized family are discussed. We provide lists of contributed literature on these well-established G families of distributions. Some extended forms of the Marshall-Olkin extended family and Kumaraswamy-generalized family of distributions are proposed.

  17. [Change of clinical stomatological parameters in ageing (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fassauer, H; Schottke, C

    1978-01-01

    Morphological-functional changes occur in the oral cavity also in depended from the age. The morphological changes of the enamel, dentin, dental pulp, periodont, oral mucosa, salivary glands, tongue, maxillary bone and temporo-mandibular-joint change not only the functional cooperation of all parts in the orofacial system. They show effects for the whole body also. A complete gerostomatological standard does not exist for the whole gnathological system. But single indices for some partial components are known. For the judgement of the caries involvement it is possible to use the DMF-index, for which a special gerostomatological type exist. The periodontal diseases are classified adequately to the ARPA-nomenclature. For the judgement of odontolithiasis and oral hygienic conditions you can use the so called odontolith-Index (CI), the OH (oral hygienic debris) and the so called calculus-index (OHI-S). It is refered to different possibilities for classification of dentition with gaps.

  18. Distribution of GPs in Scotland by age, gender and deprivation.

    PubMed

    Blane, David N; McLean, Gary; Watt, Graham

    2015-11-01

    General practice in the UK is widely reported to be in crisis, with particular concerns about recruitment and retention of family doctors. This study assessed the distribution of GPs in Scotland by age, gender and deprivation, using routinely available data. We found that there are more GPs (and fewer patients per GP) in the least deprived deciles than there are in the most deprived deciles. Furthermore, there are a higher proportion of older GPs in the most deprived deciles. There are also important gender differences in the distribution of GPs. We discuss the implications of these findings for policymakers and practitioners.

  19. Impact of Radionuclide Physical Distribution on Brachytherapy Dosimetry Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, M.J.; Kirk, B.L.; Leal, L.C.

    2005-01-15

    Radiation dose distributions of brachytherapy sources are generally characterized with the assumption that all internal components are equally radioactive. Autoradiographs and discussions with source manufacturers indicated this assumption of the radionuclide physical distribution may be invalid. Consequently, clinical dose distributions would be in error when not accounting for these internal variations. Many implants use brachytherapy sources with four {sup 125}I resin beads and two radiopaque markers used for imaging. Monte Carlo methods were used to determine dose contributions from each of the resin beads. These contributions were compared with those from an idealized source having a uniform physical distribution. Upon varying the {sup 125}I physical distribution while retaining the same overall radioactivity, the dose distribution along the transverse plane remained constant within 5% for r > 0.5 cm. For r {<=} 0.5 cm, relative positioning of the resin beads dominated the shielding effects, and dose distributions varied up to a factor of 3 at r = 0.05 cm. For points off the transverse plane, comparisons of the uniform and nonuniform dose distributions produced larger variations. Shielding effects within the capsule were virtually constant along the source long axis and demonstrated that anisotropy variations among the four resin beads were dependent on internal component positioning.

  20. Estimating the Parameters of the Beta-Binomial Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Rand R.

    1979-01-01

    For some situations the beta-binomial distribution might be used to describe the marginal distribution of test scores for a particular population of examinees. Several different methods of approximating the maximum likelihood estimate were investigated, and it was found that the Newton-Raphson method should be used when it yields admissable…

  1. Distribution system water age can create premise plumbing corrosion hotspots.

    PubMed

    Masters, Sheldon; Parks, Jeffrey; Atassi, Amrou; Edwards, Marc A

    2015-09-01

    Cumulative changes in chemical and biological properties associated with higher "water age" in distribution systems may impact water corrosivity and regulatory compliance with lead and copper action levels. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of water age and chemistry on corrosivity of various downstream premise plumbing pipe materials and configurations using a combination of controlled laboratory studies and a field survey. Examination of lead pipe, copper pipe with lead solder, and leaded brass materials in a replicated lab rig simulating premise plumbing stagnation events indicated that lead or copper release could increase as much as ∼440 % or decrease as much as 98 % relative to water treatment plant effluent. In field studies at five utilities, trends in lead and copper release were highly dependent on circumstance; for example, lead release increased with water age in 13 % of cases and decreased with water age in 33 % of conditions tested. Levels of copper in the distribution system were up to 50 % lower and as much as 30 % higher relative to levels at the treatment plant. In many cases, high-risks of elevated lead and copper did not co-occur, demonstrating that these contaminants will have to be sampled separately to identify "worst case" conditions for human exposure and monitoring.

  2. Parameter estimation for the 4-parameter Asymmetric Exponential Power distribution by the method of L-moments using R

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation characteristics of two method of L-moments (MLM) algorithms for parameter estimation of the 4-parameter Asymmetric Exponential Power (AEP4) distribution are studied using the R environment for statistical computing. The objective is to validate the algorithms for general application of the AEP4 using R. An algorithm was introduced in the original study of the L-moments for the AEP4. A second or alternative algorithm is shown to have a larger L-moment-parameter domain than the original. The alternative algorithm is shown to provide reliable parameter production and recovery of L-moments from fitted parameters. A proposal is made for AEP4 implementation in conjunction with the 4-parameter Kappa distribution to create a mixed-distribution framework encompassing the joint L-skew and L-kurtosis domains. The example application provides a demonstration of pertinent algorithms with L-moment statistics and two 4-parameter distributions (AEP4 and the Generalized Lambda) for MLM fitting to a modestly asymmetric and heavy-tailed dataset using R.

  3. Nonlinear state estimation and feedback control of nonlinear and bilinear distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a theory of nonlinear state observers for nonlinear and bilinear distributed parameter systems. Convergence results are proved for these observers. Linear feedback control derived from such state observers is applied to the distributed parameter system and conditions are presented for closed-loop stability. The emphasis is on finite dimensional state observers and controllers (which can be implemented with on-line computers) and conditions for their successful operation with infinite dimensional distributed parameter systems.

  4. Probability distributions for parameters of the Munson-Dawson salt creep model

    SciTech Connect

    Fossum, A.F.; Pfeifle, T.W.; Mellegard, K.D.

    1993-12-31

    Stress-related probability distribution functions are determined for the random variable material model parameters of the Munson-Dawson multi-mechanism deformation creep model for salt. These functions are obtained indirectly from experimental creep data for clean salt. The parameter distribution functions will form the basis for numerical calculations to generate an appropriate distribution function for room closure. Also included is a table that gives the values of the parameters for individual specimens of clean salt under different stresses.

  5. Fundamental Parameters of Nearby Red Dwarfs: Stellar Radius as an Indicator of Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Michele L.; Henry, Todd J.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Riedel, Adric R.; Dieterich, Sergio; RECONS Team

    2016-01-01

    Red dwarfs dominate the Galactic population, yet determining one of their most fundamental characteristics --- age --- has proven difficult. The characterization of red dwarfs in terms of their age is fundamental to mapping the history of star and, ultimately, planet formation in the Milky Way. Here we report on a compelling technique to evaluate the radii of red dwarfs, which can be used to provide leverage in estimating their ages. These radii are also particularly valuable in the cases of transiting exoplanet hosts because accurate stellar radii are required to determine accurate planetary radii.In this work, we use the BT-Settl models in combination with Johnson-Kron-Cousins VRI, 2MASS JHK, and WISE All-Sky Release photometry to produce spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to determine the temperatures and bolometric fluxes for 500 red dwarfs, most of which are in the southern sky. The full suites of our photometric and astrometric data (including hundreds of accurate new parallaxes from the RECONS team at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9m) allow us to also determine the bolometric luminosities and radii. This method of radius determination is validated by a comparison of our measurements to those found using the CHARA Array (Boyajian et al. 2012), which match within a few percent.In addition to a compilation of red dwarf fundamental parameters, our findings provide a snapshot of relative stellar ages in the solar neighborhood. Of particular interest are the cohorts of very young and very old stars identified within 50 pc. These outliers exemplify the demographic extremes of the nearest stars.This effort has been supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402, AST-1109445, and AST-1412026, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  6. Methods of computing vocabulary size for the two-parameter rank distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmundson, H. P.; Fostel, G.; Tung, I.; Underwood, W.

    1972-01-01

    A summation method is described for computing the vocabulary size for given parameter values in the 1- and 2-parameter rank distributions. Two methods of determining the asymptotes for the family of 2-parameter rank-distribution curves are also described. Tables are computed and graphs are drawn relating paris of parameter values to the vocabulary size. The partial product formula for the Riemann zeta function is investigated as an approximation to the partial sum formula for the Riemann zeta function. An error bound is established that indicates that the partial product should not be used to approximate the partial sum in calculating the vocabulary size for the 2-parameter rank distribution.

  7. Improving Distribution Resiliency with Microgrids and State and Parameter Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Williams, Tess L.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Sun, Yannan; Liu, Chen-Ching; Xu, Yin; Gourisetti, Sri Nikhil Gup

    2015-09-30

    Modern society relies on low-cost reliable electrical power, both to maintain industry, as well as provide basic social services to the populace. When major disturbances occur, such as Hurricane Katrina or Hurricane Sandy, the nation’s electrical infrastructure can experience significant outages. To help prevent the spread of these outages, as well as facilitating faster restoration after an outage, various aspects of improving the resiliency of the power system are needed. Two such approaches are breaking the system into smaller microgrid sections, and to have improved insight into the operations to detect failures or mis-operations before they become critical. Breaking the system into smaller sections of microgrid islands, power can be maintained in smaller areas where distribution generation and energy storage resources are still available, but bulk power generation is no longer connected. Additionally, microgrid systems can maintain service to local pockets of customers when there has been extensive damage to the local distribution system. However, microgrids are grid connected a majority of the time and implementing and operating a microgrid is much different than when islanded. This report discusses work conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that developed improvements for simulation tools to capture the characteristics of microgrids and how they can be used to develop new operational strategies. These operational strategies reduce the cost of microgrid operation and increase the reliability and resilience of the nation’s electricity infrastructure. In addition to the ability to break the system into microgrids, improved observability into the state of the distribution grid can make the power system more resilient. State estimation on the transmission system already provides great insight into grid operations and detecting abnormal conditions by leveraging existing measurements. These transmission-level approaches are expanded to using

  8. Age-related trends in genetic parameters for Larix kaempferi and their implications for early selection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi) has been introduced in China at the end of the 19th century, and as one successful exotic species, is becoming the preferred coniferous in northern China and sub-tropical alpine region. The rotation age is about 25-28 years for L. kaempferi as pulpwood in Henan province. Waiting for even one-half rotation age for final evaluation will be inefficient due to accumulated testing costs and delayed return on investment, which suggests that selection at an early age is highly desirable for L. kaempferi improvement programs in Henan province. In this study, we determined age trends of genetic parameters and evaluated early selection efficiency for L. kaempferi in Henan province to find out the appropriate trait for early selection and its selection age. Results Growth traits of 78 clones were measured periodically from age 2 to age 15 in a clonal trial of Larix kaempferi establishted at Son town, Henan Province. The genetic variation among clones, age-age correlations, and age trends in genetic parameters for growth traits were analyzed. Variant analysis revealed that tree height (HGT) and diameter at breast (DBH) were significant (1% level) among clones at every ages. The clonal repeatability of growth traits varied year-by-year, reaching the highest levels at different ages for different traits (0.77 at age 2 for HGT, 0.70 at age 5 for DBH and 0.66 from age 8 to age 10 for volume, respectively). The age-age genetic correlations ranged from 0.904 to 1.000 for HGT, and from 0943 to 1.000 for DBH. DBH at different ages was more genetically correlated to volume-15 than HGT. At the phenotypic level, HGT was always less correlated to volume-15 than DBH. With the estimates of efficiencies of early selection, the recommendation from present study was that the optimum age of early selection was age 2 for HGT and age 5 for DBH. Conclusions Our study showed that there were significant (1% level) on growth traits among clones at every

  9. Regional specificity of MRI contrast parameter changes in normal ageing revealed by voxel-based quantification (VBQ).

    PubMed

    Draganski, B; Ashburner, J; Hutton, C; Kherif, F; Frackowiak, R S J; Helms, G; Weiskopf, N

    2011-04-15

    Normal ageing is associated with characteristic changes in brain microstructure. Although in vivo neuroimaging captures spatial and temporal patterns of age-related changes of anatomy at the macroscopic scale, our knowledge of the underlying (patho)physiological processes at cellular and molecular levels is still limited. The aim of this study is to explore brain tissue properties in normal ageing using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alongside conventional morphological assessment. Using a whole-brain approach in a cohort of 26 adults, aged 18-85years, we performed voxel-based morphometric (VBM) analysis and voxel-based quantification (VBQ) of diffusion tensor, magnetization transfer (MT), R1, and R2* relaxation parameters. We found age-related reductions in cortical and subcortical grey matter volume paralleled by changes in fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), MT and R2*. The latter were regionally specific depending on their differential sensitivity to microscopic tissue properties. VBQ of white matter revealed distinct anatomical patterns of age-related change in microstructure. Widespread and profound reduction in MT contrasted with local FA decreases paralleled by MD increases. R1 reductions and R2* increases were observed to a smaller extent in overlapping occipito-parietal white matter regions. We interpret our findings, based on current biophysical models, as a fingerprint of age-dependent brain atrophy and underlying microstructural changes in myelin, iron deposits and water. The VBQ approach we present allows for systematic unbiased exploration of the interaction between imaging parameters and extends current methods for detection of neurodegenerative processes in the brain. The demonstrated parameter-specific distribution patterns offer insights into age-related brain structure changes in vivo and provide essential baseline data for studying disease against a background of healthy ageing.

  10. Applications of computer algebra to distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storch, Joel A.

    1993-01-01

    In the analysis of vibrations of continuous elastic systems, one often encounters complicated transcendental equations with roots directly related to the system's natural frequencies. Typically, these equations contain system parameters whose values must be specified before a numerical solution can be obtained. The present paper presents a method whereby the fundamental frequency can be obtained in analytical form to any desired degree of accuracy. The method is based upon truncation of rapidly converging series involving inverse powers of the system natural frequencies. A straightforward method to developing these series and summing them in closed form is presented. It is demonstrated how Computer Algebra can be exploited to perform the intricate analytical procedures which otherwise would render the technique difficult to apply in practice. We illustrate the method by developing two analytical approximations to the fundamental frequency of a vibrating cantilever carrying a rigid tip body. The results are compared to the numerical solution of the exact (transcendental) frequency equation over a range of system parameters.

  11. Parameter estimation using carbon-14 ages: Lessons from the Danube-Tisza interfluvial region of Hungary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, W.E.; Deak, J.; Revesz, K.

    2002-01-01

    Parameter estimation was conducted on a groundwater model of the Danube-Tisza interfluvial region of Hungary. The model was calibrated using 300 water levels and 48 14C ages. The model provided a test of regression methods for a system with a large number of observations. Up to 103 parameters representing horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities and boundary conductances were assigned using point values and bilinear interpolation between points. The lowest errors were obtained using an iterative approach with groups of parameters, rather than estimating all of the parameters simultaneously. The model with 48 parameters yielded the lowest standard error of regression.

  12. On compactness of admissible parameter sets: Convergence and stability in inverse problems for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Iles, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    A series of numerical examples is reported and several algorithms compared for estimation of coefficients in differential equation models. Unconstrained, constrained and Tikhonov regularization methods are tested for their behavior with regard to both convergence (of approximation methods for the states and parameters) and stability (continuity of the estimates with respect to perturbations in the data or observed states).

  13. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  14. TracerLPM (Version 1): An Excel® workbook for interpreting groundwater age distributions from environmental tracer data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    TracerLPM is an interactive Excel® (2007 or later) workbook program for evaluating groundwater age distributions from environmental tracer data by using lumped parameter models (LPMs). Lumped parameter models are mathematical models of transport based on simplified aquifer geometry and flow configurations that account for effects of hydrodynamic dispersion or mixing within the aquifer, well bore, or discharge area. Five primary LPMs are included in the workbook: piston-flow model (PFM), exponential mixing model (EMM), exponential piston-flow model (EPM), partial exponential model (PEM), and dispersion model (DM). Binary mixing models (BMM) can be created by combining primary LPMs in various combinations. Travel time through the unsaturated zone can be included as an additional parameter. TracerLPM also allows users to enter age distributions determined from other methods, such as particle tracking results from numerical groundwater-flow models or from other LPMs not included in this program. Tracers of both young groundwater (anthropogenic atmospheric gases and isotopic substances indicating post-1940s recharge) and much older groundwater (carbon-14 and helium-4) can be interpreted simultaneously so that estimates of the groundwater age distribution for samples with a wide range of ages can be constrained. TracerLPM is organized to permit a comprehensive interpretive approach consisting of hydrogeologic conceptualization, visual examination of data and models, and best-fit parameter estimation. Groundwater age distributions can be evaluated by comparing measured and modeled tracer concentrations in two ways: (1) multiple tracers analyzed simultaneously can be evaluated against each other for concordance with modeled concentrations (tracer-tracer application) or (2) tracer time-series data can be evaluated for concordance with modeled trends (tracer-time application). Groundwater-age estimates can also be obtained for samples with a single tracer measurement at one

  15. Reliability analysis of structural ceramic components using a three-parameter Weibull distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Powers, Lynn M.; Starlinger, Alois

    1992-01-01

    Described here are nonlinear regression estimators for the three-parameter Weibull distribution. Issues relating to the bias and invariance associated with these estimators are examined numerically using Monte Carlo simulation methods. The estimators were used to extract parameters from sintered silicon nitride failure data. A reliability analysis was performed on a turbopump blade utilizing the three-parameter Weibull distribution and the estimates from the sintered silicon nitride data.

  16. SAMDIST: A Computer Code for Calculating Statistical Distributions for R-Matrix Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    The: SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  17. A Comparison of Estimation Techniques for the Three Parameter Pareto Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    1897 Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923), an Italian-born Swiss professor of economics, formulated an empirical law which bears his name (16:233). Pareto’s Law...DTIC00• _ZLECTE! CD S A COMPARISON OF ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES FOR THICTHE REE PARAMETER PARETO DISTRIBUTION THESIS "Dennis J. Charek Major, USAF AFIT...TECHNIQUES FOR THE THREE PARAMETER PARETO DISTRIBUTION THESIS Dennis J. Charek Major, USAF AFIT/GSO/MA/8SD-3 Approved for public release; distribution

  18. Characterization of aging-induced microstructural changes in M250 maraging steel using magnetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, K. V.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Kumar, Anish; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, Baldev; Ray, K. K.

    2007-05-01

    The best combinations of mechanical properties (yield stress and fracture toughness) of M250 maraging steel is obtained through short-term thermal aging (3-10 h) at 755 K. This is attributed to the microstructure containing precipitation of intermetallic phases in austenite-free low-carbon martensite matrix. Over-aged microstructure, containing reverted austenite degrades the mechanical properties drastically. Hence, it necessitates identification of a suitable non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for detecting any reverted austenite unambiguously during aging. The influence of aging on microstructure, room temperature hardness and non-destructive magnetic parameters such as coercivity ( Hc), saturation magnetization ( Ms) and magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) RMS peak voltage is studied in order to derive correlations between these parameters in aged M250 maraging steel. Hardness was found to increase with precipitation of intermetallics during initial aging and decrease at longer durations due to austenite reversion. Among the different magnetic parameters studied, MBE RMS peak voltage was found to be very sensitive to austenite reversion (non-magnetic phase) as they decreased drastically up on initiation of austenite reversion. Hence, this parameter can be effectively utilized to detect and quantify the reverted austenite in maraging steel specimen. The present study clearly indicates that the combination of MBE RMS peak voltage and hardness can be used for unambiguous characterization of microstructural features of technological and practical importance (3-10 h of aging duration at 755 K) in M250 grade maraging steel.

  19. Simulation of Transient Groundwater Age Distribution in Space and Time, Wairarapa Valley, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toews, M. W.; Daughney, C.; Morgenstern, U.; Petrus, K.; Evison, R.; Jackson, B. M.; Cornaton, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    The 3000 km2 Wairarapa Valley is an important agricultural region near Wellington, New Zealand. Improved management of land and water within the region requires understanding of the spatial and temporal variations of water age. This study combines the two main methods currently available for determination of water age: numerical groundwater models and hydrological tracers. A transient finite element groundwater flow and mass transport model was calibrated to match time series measurements of groundwater level and tritium concentration. The groundwater flow model incorporates spatio-temporal recharge, variable stream flow and levels, and variable pump rates. The time-marching Laplace transform Galerkin (TMLTG) technique was then used to evaluate the full spectrum of groundwater age (i.e. age distribution) at each model node and at each time step. To our knowledge this study is the first application of the TMLTG technique to a real-world example, made possible by the rich time-series dataset of tritium measurements that exists for the Wairarapa Valley. Results showed that travel time from the land surface through the aquifer system varies from a few years to several decades and is strongly dependent on location and time. Results also demonstrated important differences between the transient age distributions derived from the TMLTG technique compared to the much simpler steady-state lumped parameter models that are frequently applied to interpret age tracer data. Finally, results had direct application to land and water management, for example for identification of land areas where age distributions vary seasonally, affecting the security of groundwater supplies used for drinking water.

  20. Hematological parameters in relation to age, sex and biochemical values for mute swans (Cygnus olor).

    PubMed

    Dolka, B; Włodarczyk, R; Zbikowski, A; Dolka, I; Szeleszczuk, P; Kluciński, W

    2014-06-01

    The knowledge of the correct morphological and biochemical parameters in mute swans is an important indicator of their health status, body condition, adaptation to habitat and useful diagnostic tools in veterinary practice and ecological research. The aim of the study was to obtain hematological parameters in relation to age, sex and serum biochemistry values in wild-living mute swans. We found the significant differences in the erythrocyte count, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in relation to age of mute swans. There were no differences in hematological values between males and females. The leukogram and H/L ratio did not vary by age and sex in swans. Among of biochemical parameters the slightly increased AST, ALP, CK, K, urea, decreased CHOL and TG values were recorded. As far as we know, this is the first study in which the morphometric parameters of blood cells in mute swans were presented. We found extremely low concentration of lead in blood (at subthreshold level). No blood parasites were found in blood smears. The analysis of body mass and biometric parameters revealed a significant differences dependent on age and sex. No differences in the scaled mass index were found. Our results represent a normal hematologic and blood chemistry values and age-sex related changes, as reference values for the mute swan.

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of CLIMEX Parameters in Modelling Potential Distribution of Lantana camara L.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Subhashni; Kumar, Lalit

    2012-01-01

    A process-based niche model of L. camara L. (lantana), a highly invasive shrub species, was developed to estimate its potential distribution using CLIMEX. Model development was carried out using its native and invasive distribution and validation was carried out with the extensive Australian distribution. A good fit was observed, with 86.7% of herbarium specimens collected in Australia occurring within the suitable and highly suitable categories. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to identify the model parameters that had the most influence on lantana distribution. The changes in suitability were assessed by mapping the regions where the distribution changed with each parameter alteration. This allowed an assessment of where, within Australia, the modification of each parameter was having the most impact, particularly in terms of the suitable and highly suitable locations. The sensitivity of various parameters was also evaluated by calculating the changes in area within the suitable and highly suitable categories. The limiting low temperature (DV0), limiting high temperature (DV3) and limiting low soil moisture (SM0) showed highest sensitivity to change. The other model parameters were relatively insensitive to change. Highly sensitive parameters require extensive research and data collection to be fitted accurately in species distribution models. The results from this study can inform more cost effective development of species distribution models for lantana. Such models form an integral part of the management of invasive species and the results can be used to streamline data collection requirements for potential distribution modelling. PMID:22815881

  2. Sensitivity analysis of CLIMEX parameters in modelling potential distribution of Lantana camara L.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Subhashni; Kumar, Lalit

    2012-01-01

    A process-based niche model of L. camara L. (lantana), a highly invasive shrub species, was developed to estimate its potential distribution using CLIMEX. Model development was carried out using its native and invasive distribution and validation was carried out with the extensive Australian distribution. A good fit was observed, with 86.7% of herbarium specimens collected in Australia occurring within the suitable and highly suitable categories. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to identify the model parameters that had the most influence on lantana distribution. The changes in suitability were assessed by mapping the regions where the distribution changed with each parameter alteration. This allowed an assessment of where, within Australia, the modification of each parameter was having the most impact, particularly in terms of the suitable and highly suitable locations. The sensitivity of various parameters was also evaluated by calculating the changes in area within the suitable and highly suitable categories. The limiting low temperature (DV0), limiting high temperature (DV3) and limiting low soil moisture (SM0) showed highest sensitivity to change. The other model parameters were relatively insensitive to change. Highly sensitive parameters require extensive research and data collection to be fitted accurately in species distribution models. The results from this study can inform more cost effective development of species distribution models for lantana. Such models form an integral part of the management of invasive species and the results can be used to streamline data collection requirements for potential distribution modelling.

  3. The rate of change in declining steroid hormones: a new parameter of healthy aging in men?

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Andreas; Philipp, Michel; Lozza, Niclà; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Research on healthy aging in men has increasingly focused on age-related hormonal changes. Testosterone (T) decline is primarily investigated, while age-related changes in other sex steroids (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA], estradiol [E2], progesterone [P]) are mostly neglected. An integrated hormone parameter reflecting aging processes in men has yet to be identified. 271 self-reporting healthy men between 40 and 75 provided both psychometric data and saliva samples for hormone analysis. Correlation analysis between age and sex steroids revealed negative associations for the four sex steroids (T, DHEA, E2, and P). Principal component analysis including ten salivary analytes identified a principal component mainly unifying the variance of the four sex steroid hormones. Subsequent principal component analysis including the four sex steroids extracted the principal component of declining steroid hormones (DSH). Moderation analysis of the association between age and DSH revealed significant moderation effects for psychosocial factors such as depression, chronic stress and perceived general health. In conclusion, these results provide further evidence that sex steroids decline in aging men and that the integrated hormone parameter DSH and its rate of change can be used as biomarkers for healthy aging in men. Furthermore, the negative association of age and DSH is moderated by psychosocial factors. PMID:27589836

  4. Immune function parameters as markers of biological age and predictors of longevity

    PubMed Central

    de Toda, Irene Martínez; Maté, Ianire; Vida, Carmen; Cruces, Julia; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Chronological age is not a good indicator of how each individual ages and thus how to maintain good health. Due to the long lifespan in humans and the consequent difficulty of carrying out longitudinal studies, finding valid biomarkers of the biological age has been a challenge both for research and clinical studies. The aim was to identify and validate several immune cell function parameters as markers of biological age. Adult, mature, elderly and long-lived human volunteers were used. The chemotaxis, phagocytosis, natural killer activity and lymphoproliferation in neutrophils and lymphocytes of peripheral blood were analyzed. The same functions were measured in peritoneal immune cells from mice, at the corresponding ages (adult, mature, old and long lived) in a longitudinal study. The results showed that the evolution of these functions was similar in humans and mice, with a decrease in old subjects. However, the long-lived individuals maintained values similar to those in adults. In addition, the values of these functions in adult prematurely aging mice were similar to those in chronologically old animals, and they died before their non-prematurely aging mice counterparts. Thus, the parameters studied are good markers of the rate of aging, allowing the determination of biological age. PMID:27899767

  5. The rate of change in declining steroid hormones: a new parameter of healthy aging in men?

    PubMed

    Walther, Andreas; Philipp, Michel; Lozza, Niclà; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2016-09-20

    Research on healthy aging in men has increasingly focused on age-related hormonal changes. Testosterone (T) decline is primarily investigated, while age-related changes in other sex steroids (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA], estradiol [E2], progesterone [P]) are mostly neglected. An integrated hormone parameter reflecting aging processes in men has yet to be identified. 271 self-reporting healthy men between 40 and 75 provided both psychometric data and saliva samples for hormone analysis. Correlation analysis between age and sex steroids revealed negative associations for the four sex steroids (T, DHEA, E2, and P). Principal component analysis including ten salivary analytes identified a principal component mainly unifying the variance of the four sex steroid hormones. Subsequent principal component analysis including the four sex steroids extracted the principal component of declining steroid hormones (DSH). Moderation analysis of the association between age and DSH revealed significant moderation effects for psychosocial factors such as depression, chronic stress and perceived general health. In conclusion, these results provide further evidence that sex steroids decline in aging men and that the integrated hormone parameter DSH and its rate of change can be used as biomarkers for healthy aging in men. Furthermore, the negative association of age and DSH is moderated by psychosocial factors.

  6. Saline or plant-incorporated methylmercury effects on distribution, demethylation, and blood parameters in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Czuba, M.; Komsta-Szumska, E.; Mortimer, D.C.; Champagne, C.

    1987-03-01

    The influence of diet is recognized as a significant factor in the expression of toxicity. This applies particularly to toxins like methylmercury (MeHg) which are metabolically incorporated into growing food plants and biotransformed within the plant before ingestion. Methylmercury in this form may influence the early physiological and biochemical events which lead to development of toxicity. In a previous study, a single dose of plant-incorporated methylmercury (MeHg) had a different route of distribution and accumulation in rat organs after 48 h than an equivalent dose of saline MeHg with the greatest accumulation being in red blood cells. Creatine, an important storage form of high energy phosphate in muscles is a primary indicator of erythropoietic dynamics under hypoxia, a sensitive indicator of hemolytic disease, red blood cell aging and impaired marrow efficiency. Since changes in creatine levels occur sooner than changes in other blood parameters, itself being neither synthesized nor metabolized by red blood cells, it can be used as a sensitive indicator of toxicity. The present work investigates the difference in a longer term, multiple-dose regime of saline or bean-incorporated MeHg ingestion with special attention being given to various blood parameters.

  7. Parameter sensitivity analysis of a simplified electrochemical and thermal model for Li-ion batteries aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edouard, C.; Petit, M.; Forgez, C.; Bernard, J.; Revel, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a simplified electrochemical and thermal model that can predict both physicochemical and aging behavior of Li-ion batteries is studied. A sensitivity analysis of all its physical parameters is performed in order to find out their influence on the model output based on simulations under various conditions. The results gave hints on whether a parameter needs particular attention when measured or identified and on the conditions (e.g. temperature, discharge rate) under which it is the most sensitive. A specific simulation profile is designed for parameters involved in aging equations in order to determine their sensitivity. Finally, a step-wise method is followed to limit the influence of parameter values when identifying some of them, according to their relative sensitivity from the study. This sensitivity analysis and the subsequent step-wise identification method show very good results, such as a better fitting of the simulated cell voltage with experimental data.

  8. A comparative study of ballpoint ink ageing parameters using GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Agnès; Magnolon, Sophie; Weyermann, Céline

    2015-07-01

    For more than a decade scientists tried to develop methods capable of dating ink by monitoring the loss of phenoxyethanol (PE) over time. While many methods were proposed in the literature, few were really used to solve practical cases and they still raise much concern within the scientific community. In fact, due to the complexity of ink drying processes it is particularly difficult to find a reliable ageing parameter to reproducibly follow ink ageing. Moreover, systematic experiments are required in order to evaluate how different factors actually influence the results over time. Therefore, this work aimed at evaluating the capacity of four different ageing parameters to reliably follow ink ageing over time: (1) the quantity of solvent PE in an ink line, (2) the relative peak area (RPA) normalising the PE results using stable volatile compounds present in the ink formulation, (3) the solvent loss ratio (R%) calculated from PE results obtained by the analyses of naturally and artificially aged samples, (4) a modified solvent loss ratio version (R%*) calculated from RPA results. After the determination of the limits of reliable measurements of the analytical method, the repeatability of the different ageing parameters was evaluated over time, as well as the influence of ink composition, writing pressure and storage conditions on the results. Surprisingly, our results showed that R% was not the most reliable parameter, as it showed the highest standard deviation. Discussion of the results in an ink dating perspective suggests that other proposed parameters, such as RPA values, may be more adequate to follow ink ageing over time.

  9. Paleodemographic age-at-death distributions of two Mexican skeletal collections: a comparison of transition analysis and traditional aging methods.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Meggan; Márquez, Lourdes; Hernández, Patricia; Ruíz, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    Traditional methods of aging adult skeletons suffer from the problem of age mimicry of the reference collection, as described by Bocquet-Appel and Masset (1982). Transition analysis (Boldsen et al., 2002) is a method of aging adult skeletons that addresses the problem of age mimicry of the reference collection by allowing users to select an appropriate prior probability. In order to evaluate whether transition analysis results in significantly different age estimates for adults, the method was applied to skeletal collections from Postclassic Cholula and Contact-Period Xochimilco. The resulting age-at-death distributions were then compared with age-at-death distributions for the two populations constructed using traditional aging methods. Although the traditional aging methods result in age-at-death distributions with high young adult mortality and few individuals living past the age of 50, the age-at-death distributions constructed using transition analysis indicate that most individuals who lived into adulthood lived past the age of 50.

  10. Frequency distributions and correlations of solar X-ray flare parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, Norma B.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1993-01-01

    Frequency distributions of flare parameters are determined from over 12,000 solar flares. The flare duration, the peak counting rate, the peak hard X-ray flux, the total energy in electrons, and the peak energy flux in electrons are among the parameters studied. Linear regression fits, as well as the slopes of the frequency distributions, are used to determine the correlations between these parameters. The relationship between the variations of the frequency distributions and the solar activity cycle is also investigated. Theoretical models for the frequency distribution of flare parameters are dependent on the probability of flaring and the temporal evolution of the flare energy build-up. The results of this study are consistent with stochastic flaring and exponential energy build-up. The average build-up time constant is found to be 0.5 times the mean time between flares.

  11. Influence of emphysema distribution on pulmonary function parameters in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Helder Novais e; Neves, Inês; Redondo, Margarida; Cunha, Rui; Pereira, José Miguel; Magalhães, Adriana; Fernandes, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact that the distribution of emphysema has on clinical and functional severity in patients with COPD. METHODS: The distribution of the emphysema was analyzed in COPD patients, who were classified according to a 5-point visual classification system of lung CT findings. We assessed the influence of emphysema distribution type on the clinical and functional presentation of COPD. We also evaluated hypoxemia after the six-minute walk test (6MWT) and determined the six-minute walk distance (6MWD). RESULTS: Eighty-six patients were included. The mean age was 65.2 ± 12.2 years, 91.9% were male, and all but one were smokers (mean smoking history, 62.7 ± 38.4 pack-years). The emphysema distribution was categorized as obviously upper lung-predominant (type 1), in 36.0% of the patients; slightly upper lung-predominant (type 2), in 25.6%; homogeneous between the upper and lower lung (type 3), in 16.3%; and slightly lower lung-predominant (type 4), in 22.1%. Type 2 emphysema distribution was associated with lower FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, and DLCO. In comparison with the type 1 patients, the type 4 patients were more likely to have an FEV1 < 65% of the predicted value (OR = 6.91, 95% CI: 1.43-33.45; p = 0.016), a 6MWD < 350 m (OR = 6.36, 95% CI: 1.26-32.18; p = 0.025), and post-6MWT hypoxemia (OR = 32.66, 95% CI: 3.26-326.84; p = 0.003). The type 3 patients had a higher RV/TLC ratio, although the difference was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of COPD appears to be greater in type 4 patients, and type 3 patients tend to have greater hyperinflation. The distribution of emphysema could have a major impact on functional parameters and should be considered in the evaluation of COPD patients. PMID:26785956

  12. Reliability analysis of structural ceramic components using a three-parameter Weibull distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Powers, Lynn M.; Starlinger, Alois

    1992-01-01

    Described here are nonlinear regression estimators for the three-Weibull distribution. Issues relating to the bias and invariance associated with these estimators are examined numerically using Monte Carlo simulation methods. The estimators were used to extract parameters from sintered silicon nitride failure data. A reliability analysis was performed on a turbopump blade utilizing the three-parameter Weibull distribution and the estimates from the sintered silicon nitride data.

  13. The role of a roughness scaling parameter in describing alpine snow distribution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehning, M.; Grünewald, T.; Schirmer, M.

    2010-12-01

    The mountain snow distribution affects not only the storage of snow water and avalanche danger but also the local conditions for plant and animal life. The snow distribution in the alpine zone is shaped by a general altitudinal gradient of precipitation, the locally varying deposition of snow and subsequent redistribution processes due to wind but also to snow slides. While progress has been made in understanding of processes involved in snow distribution, it has not been possible to satisfactorily predict snow distribution on the basis of local terrain parameters. We use a unique data set of high resolution snow depth measurements from an airborne laser scanner in two small mountain catchments to predict mean snow depth in topographic control units as a function of two terrain parameters: the conventional altitudinal gradient plus a new fractal roughness parameter. The analysis showed that heterogeneous snow distribution can be captured by merely analysing the terrain and the mean precipitation.

  14. Investigating the Impact of Item Parameter Drift for Item Response Theory Models with Mixture Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon Soo; Lee, Young-Sun; Xing, Kuan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of item parameter drift (IPD) on parameter and ability estimation when the underlying measurement model fits a mixture distribution, thereby violating the item invariance property of unidimensional item response theory (IRT) models. An empirical study was conducted to demonstrate the occurrence of both IPD and an underlying mixture distribution using real-world data. Twenty-one trended anchor items from the 1999, 2003, and 2007 administrations of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) were analyzed using unidimensional and mixture IRT models. TIMSS treats trended anchor items as invariant over testing administrations and uses pre-calibrated item parameters based on unidimensional IRT. However, empirical results showed evidence of two latent subgroups with IPD. Results also showed changes in the distribution of examinee ability between latent classes over the three administrations. A simulation study was conducted to examine the impact of IPD on the estimation of ability and item parameters, when data have underlying mixture distributions. Simulations used data generated from a mixture IRT model and estimated using unidimensional IRT. Results showed that data reflecting IPD using mixture IRT model led to IPD in the unidimensional IRT model. Changes in the distribution of examinee ability also affected item parameters. Moreover, drift with respect to item discrimination and distribution of examinee ability affected estimates of examinee ability. These findings demonstrate the need to caution and evaluate IPD using a mixture IRT framework to understand its effects on item parameters and examinee ability. PMID:26941699

  15. Statistical analysis of censored motion sickness latency data using the two-parameter Weibull distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Won J.; Crampton, George H.

    1988-01-01

    The suitability of the two-parameter Weibull distribution for describing highly censored cat motion sickness latency data was evaluated by estimating the parameters with the maximum likelihood method and testing for goodness of fit with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic. A procedure for determining confidence levels and testing for significance of the difference between Weibull parameters is described. Computer programs for these procedures may be obtained from an archival source.

  16. Martian channels and valleys - Their characteristics, distribution, and age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.; Clow, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution and ages of Martian channels and valleys, which are generally believed to have been cut by running water, are examined with particular emphasis on the small branching networks referred to as runoff channels or valley networks. Valleys at latitudes from 65 deg S to 65 deg N were surveyed on Viking images at resolutions between 125 and 300 m. Almost all of the valleys are found in the old cratered terrain, in areas characterized by high elevations, low albedos and low violet/red ratios. The networks are deduced to have formed early in the history of the planet, with a formation rate declining rapidly shortly after the decline of the cratering rate 3.9 billion years ago. Two types of outflow channels are distinguished: unconfined, in which broad swaths of terrain are scoured, and confined, in which flow is restricted to discrete channels. Both types start at local sources, and have formed episodically throughout Martian history. Fretted channels, found mainly in two latitude belts characterized by relatively rapid erosion along escarpments, are explained by the lateral enlargement of other channels by mass wasting.

  17. Students' Perspective (Age Wise, Gender Wise and Year Wise) of Parameters Affecting the Undergraduate Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumari, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine the students' perspective (age wise, gender wise and year wise) of parameters affecting the undergraduate engineering education system present in a private technical institution in NCR [National Capital Region], Haryana. It is a descriptive type of research in nature. The data has been collected with the…

  18. Variations of immune parameters in terrestrial isopods: a matter of gender, aging and Wolbachia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard, Mathieu; Chevalier, Frédéric; de Vlechouver, Mickaël; Bouchon, Didier; Grève, Pierre; Braquart-Varnier, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Ecological factors modulate animal immunocompetence and potentially shape the evolution of their immune systems. Not only environmental parameters impact on immunocompetence: Aging is one major cause of variability of immunocompetence between individuals, and sex-specific levels of immunocompetence have also been frequently described. Moreover, a growing core of data put in light that vertically transmitted symbionts can dramatically modulate the immunocompetence of their hosts. In this study, we addressed the influence of gender, age and the feminising endosymbiont Wolbachia ( wVulC) on variations in haemocyte density, total PO activity and bacterial load in the haemolymph of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare. This host-symbiont system is of particular interest to address this question since: (1) wVulC was previously shown as immunosuppressive in middle-aged females and (2) wVulC influences sex determination. We show that age, gender and Wolbachia modulate together immune parameters in A. vulgare. However, wVulC, which interacts with aging, appears to be the prominent factor interfering with both PO activity and haemocyte density. This interference with immune parameters is not the only aspect of wVulC virulence on its host, as reproduction and survival are also altered.

  19. A distribution parameter derived for rectangular channels and simulated subchannel geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, H.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    The distribution parameter of the drift-flux model has been developed for a rectangular channel and a simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) subchannel. The void fraction prediction by the subchannel drift-flux code CANAL is demonstrated for heated rectangular channels. Intrasubchannel flow and void profiles are considered for subchannel model development. Distribution parameter C{sub 0} is found to be very sensitive to variation of the geometric parameters and subchannel types. Since void fraction measurements corresponding to the rectangular subchannel of a BWR rod bundle are unavailable at present, assessment of the derived models remains to be performed.

  20. A Bayesian approach to parameter and reliability estimation in the Poisson distribution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavos, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    For life testing procedures, a Bayesian analysis is developed with respect to a random intensity parameter in the Poisson distribution. Bayes estimators are derived for the Poisson parameter and the reliability function based on uniform and gamma prior distributions of that parameter. A Monte Carlo procedure is implemented to make possible an empirical mean-squared error comparison between Bayes and existing minimum variance unbiased, as well as maximum likelihood, estimators. As expected, the Bayes estimators have mean-squared errors that are appreciably smaller than those of the other two.

  1. Effect of age, anthropometry, and distance in stroke parameters of young swimmers.

    PubMed

    Mezzaroba, Paulo V; Machado, Fabiana A

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of age, anthropometry, and distance on stroke parameters of 10- to 17-y-old swimmers. Forty-six male swimmers were divided into 4 chronological age groups. Anthropometry and sexual maturity were assessed, and maximal efforts of 100, 200, and 400 m using front-crawl style were performed to determine stroke rate (SR), length (SL), and index (SI). Multiple linear regression, 1-way, and mixed ANOVA for repeated measures were used for statistical analyses. There was significant effect of distance for all stroke parameters (P < .001) and an age effect only for SL and SI (P < .001). Post hoc showed that the 10- to 17-year-old group significantly reduced SR with increasing distance (effect size -0.8 to -1.5 comparing 100, 200, and 400 m) but were not effective in offsetting this adaptation with increased SL, especially from 200- to 400-m distance, at which no group made both adjustments, highlighting the decreased efficiency with significant SI reduction (effect size -0.2 to -0.4 comparing 100, 200, and 400 m). Considering all stroke parameters, the performances were almost 100% explained, but SI itself could explain around 90% of the performance; furthermore, limb length contributed to explain all stroke parameter, and SI was the variable best predicted (around 75%) by anthropometrical (upper limbs and height) and descriptive variables (age and y of systematic training).Thus, distinct effects of distance and advancing age were found during childhood and adolescence on stroke parameters, and SI was highlighted as the best predictor of 100-, 200-, and 400-m maximal performances.

  2. [The specific distribution of erythrocytes and blood platelets according to the volume of cells in different-age children].

    PubMed

    Matiushichev, V B; Sharmatova, V G

    2005-01-01

    The reference volumes of erythrocytes and blood platelets were evaluated for different age groups of children. The mean volume of cells and the parameters of its distribution, i.e. SD, As and Ex, were found. The mean volume of erythrocytes and the value of positive Ex for the volume of blood platelets were shown to be reliably higher in adults. The investigated blood parameters in children were proven to depend in children on their age and sex. It was concluded that the mentioned peculiarities should be considered in the practice of clinical laboratory examinations.

  3. Estimating the distribution of radionuclides in agricultural soils - dependence on soil parameters.

    PubMed

    Hormann, Volker; Fischer, Helmut W

    2013-10-01

    In this study it is shown how radionuclide distributions in agricultural soils and their dependence on soil parameters can be quantitatively estimated. The most important sorption and speciation processes have been implemented into a numerical model using the geochemical code PHREEQC that is able to include specific soil and soil solution compositions. Using this model, distribution coefficients (Kd values) for the elements Cs, Ni, U and Se have been calculated for two different soil types. Furthermore, the dependencies of these Kd values on various soil parameters (e.g. pH value or organic matter content) have been evaluated. It is shown that for each element, an individual set of soil parameters is relevant for its solid-liquid distribution. The model may be used for the calculation of input parameters used by reference biosphere models (e.g. used for the risk assessment of nuclear waste repositories).

  4. Climatic influence on demographic parameters of a tropical seabird varies with age and sex.

    PubMed

    Oro, Daniel; Torres, Roxana; Rodríguez, Cristina; Drummond, Hugh

    2010-04-01

    In marine ecosystems climatic fluctuation and other physical variables greatly influence population dynamics, but differential effects of physical variables on the demographic parameters of the two sexes and different age classes are largely unexplored. We analyzed the effects of climate on the survival and recruitment of both sexes and several age classes of a long-lived tropical seabird, the Blue-footed Booby (Sula nebouxii), using long-term observations on marked individuals. Results demonstrated a complex interaction between yearly fluctuations in climate (both local and global indexes, during both winter and breeding season) and the sex and age of individuals. Youngest birds' survival and recruitment were commonly affected by local climate, whereas oldest birds' parameters tended to be constant and less influenced by environmental variables. These results confirm the theoretical prediction that sex- and age-related variation in life-history demographic traits is greater under poor environmental conditions, and they highlight the importance of including variability in fitness components in demographic and evolutionary models. Males and females showed similar variation in survival but different recruitment patterns, in relation to both age and the spatial scale of climatic influence (local or global). Results indicate different life-history tactics for each sex and different ages, with birds likely trying to maximize their fitness by responding to the environmental contingencies of each year.

  5. Canonical-Dissipative Nonequilibrium Energy Distributions: Parameter Estimation via Implicit Moment Method, Implementation and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.; Kim, S.; Dotov, D. G.

    2013-11-01

    Canonical-dissipative nonequilibrium energy distributions play an important role in the life sciences. In one of the most fundamental forms, such energy distributions correspond to two-parametric normal distributions truncated to the left. We present an implicit moment method involving the first and second energy moments to estimate the distribution parameters. It is shown that the method is consistent with Cohen's 1949 formula. The implementation of the algorithm is discussed and the range of admissible parameter values is identified. In addition, an application to an earlier study on human oscillatory hand movements is presented. In this earlier study, energy was conceptualized as the energy of a Hamiltonian oscillator model. The canonical-dissipative approach allows for studying the systematic change of the model parameters with oscillation frequency. It is shown that the results obtained with the implicit moment method are consistent with those derived in the earlier study by other means.

  6. Distributed parameter identification for a label-structured cell population dynamics model using CFSE histogram time-series data.

    PubMed

    Luzyanina, Tatyana; Roose, Dirk; Bocharov, Gennady

    2009-11-01

    In this work we address the problem of the robust identification of unknown parameters of a cell population dynamics model from experimental data on the kinetics of cells labelled with a fluorescence marker defining the division age of the cell. The model is formulated by a first order hyperbolic PDE for the distribution of cells with respect to the structure variable x (or z) being the intensity level (or the log(10)-transformed intensity level) of the marker. The parameters of the model are the rate functions of cell division, death, label decay and the label dilution factor. We develop a computational approach to the identification of the model parameters with a particular focus on the cell birth rate alpha(z) as a function of the marker intensity, assuming the other model parameters are scalars to be estimated. To solve the inverse problem numerically, we parameterize alpha(z) and apply a maximum likelihood approach. The parametrization is based on cubic Hermite splines defined on a coarse mesh with either equally spaced a priori fixed nodes or nodes to be determined in the parameter estimation procedure. Ill-posedness of the inverse problem is indicated by multiple minima. To treat the ill-posed problem, we apply Tikhonov regularization with the regularization parameter determined by the discrepancy principle. We show that the solution of the regularized parameter estimation problem is consistent with the data set with an accuracy within the noise level in the measurements.

  7. Fundamental stellar parameters and age-metallicity relation of Kepler red giants in comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Y.; Tajitsu, A.; Sato, B.; Liu, Y.-J.; Chen, Y.-Q.; Zhao, G.

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (effective temperature, metallicity, etc) were determined for a large sample of ˜100 red giants in the Kepler field, for which mass, radius, and evolutionary status had already been asteroseismologically established. These two kinds of spectroscopic and seismic information suffice to define the position on the `luminosity versus effective temperature' diagram and to assign an appropriate theoretical evolutionary track to each star. Making use of this advantage, we examined whether the stellar location on this diagram really matches the assigned track, which would make an interesting consistency check between theory and observation. It turned out that satisfactory agreement was confirmed in most cases (˜90 per cent, though appreciable discrepancies were seen for some stars such as higher mass red-clump giants), suggesting that recent stellar evolution calculations are practically reliable. Since the relevant stellar age could also be obtained by this comparison, we derived the age-metallicity relation for these Kepler giants and found the following characteristics: (1) the resulting distribution is quite similar to what was previously concluded for F-, G-, and K-type stars dwarfs; (2) the dispersion of metallicity progressively increases as the age becomes older; (3) nevertheless, the maximum metallicity at any stellar age remains almost flat, which means the existence of super/near-solar metallicity stars in a considerably wide age range from ˜(2-3) × 108 to ˜1010 yr.

  8. Serum Biochemical and Hematological Parameters in Crossbred Swine from Birth Through Eight Weeks of Age

    PubMed Central

    Tumbleson, M. E.; Kalish, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    Nineteen serum biochemical and seven hematological parameters were determined for crossbred swine from birth through eight weeks of age. From birth (before nursing) to eight hours (after ingestion of colostrum) of age, there was an increase in concentrations of serum total protein, blood urea nitrogen and total bilirubin and increased activities of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and lactic dehydrogenase. There was a decrease in serum sodium, chloride and potassium concentrations, hemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume during the same period. There was an increase in both serum potassium concentration and erythrocyte count from five (weaning) to six weeks of age. At the same time, there was a decrease in serum sodium and chloride concentrations. The mean concentration of serum cholesterol did not change during the first 24 hours of neonatal life; however, it increased during the 24 to 72 hour period with a linear decrease to six weeks of age. PMID:4261834

  9. Off-line tracking of series parameters in distribution systems using AMI data

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Tess L.; Sun, Yannan; Schneider, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    Electric distribution systems have historically lacked measurement points, and equipment is often operated to its failure point, resulting in customer outages. The widespread deployment of sensors at the distribution level is enabling observability. This paper presents an off-line parameter value tracking procedure that takes advantage of the increasing number of measurement devices being deployed at the distribution level to estimate changes in series impedance parameter values over time. The tracking of parameter values enables non-diurnal and non-seasonal change to be flagged for investigation. The presented method uses an unbalanced Distribution System State Estimation (DSSE) and a measurement residual-based parameter estimation procedure. Measurement residuals from multiple measurement snapshots are combined in order to increase the effective local redundancy and improve the robustness of the calculations in the presence of measurement noise. Data from devices on the primary distribution system and from customer meters, via an AMI system, form the input data set. Results of simulations on the IEEE 13-Node Test Feeder are presented to illustrate the proposed approach applied to changes in series impedance parameters. A 5% change in series resistance elements can be detected in the presence of 2% measurement error when combining less than 1 day of measurement snapshots into a single estimate.

  10. Fetal kidney length as a useful adjunct parameter for better determination of gestational age

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, Mete G.; Mustafa, Aynur; Ozcan, Huseyin C.; Tepe, Neslihan B.; Kurt, Huseyin; Akcil, Emre; Gunduz, Reyhan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the validity of fetal kidney length and amniotic fluid index (AFI) in labor dating. Methods: This prospective study included 180 pregnant women followed up in the outpatient clinic at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gaziantep University, Turkey, between January 2014 and January 2015. The gestational age (GA) was estimated by early fetal ultrasound measures and last menstrual period. Routine fetal biometric parameters, fetal kidney length, and amniotic fluid index were measured. We studied the correlation between fetal kidney length, amniotic fluid index, and gestational age. Result: The mean gestational age depending on last menstrual period and early ultrasound was 31.98±4.29 (24-39 weeks). The mean kidney length was 35.66±6.61 (19-49 mm). There was a significant correlation between gestational age and fetal kidney length (r=0.947, p=0.001). However, there was a moderate negative correlation between GA and AFI. Adding fetal kidney length to the routine biometrics improved the effectiveness of the model used to estimate GA (R2=0.965 to R2=0.987). Conclusion: Gestational age can be better predicted by adding fetal kidney length to other routine parameters. PMID:27146616

  11. Groundwater ages in an alluvial aquifer: Confronting lumped parameter models (3H, CFCs and SF6) and numerical transport modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouloudi, R.; Gourcy, L.; Kloppmann, W.; Violette, S.

    2012-04-01

    Groundwater age dating using tritium and dissolved gases was undertaken in an alluvial aquifer to determine groundwater transit time and flow rate as key parameters for assessing diffuse nitrate pollution.The studied site of about 260 km2 is crossed by the Ain River and bordered by the Rhône River which is the natural drain for the aquifer. It is mainly recharged by precipitation but also receives water from the Dombes plain (NW and W), intensively cultivated, and from the Bugey and Jura karstic mountains (NE and E part). In this study, we investigated the relevance of the gas-tracers CFCs and SF6 as age dating tools in alluvial shallow aquifers. The exponential model was chosen to conceptualize the alluvial aquifer recharge, 3H also used. Age-dating gave a mean recharge date of 5 to 18 years. CFCs, SF6 and 3H age estimation was confronted with the results of 2D transport modelling. Lumped parameter models were used to estimate the distribution of CFC and SF6 ages. Groundwater age is a measurable quantity, provided many assumptions. One of the underlying questions is the physical meaning of "ages" obtained by the lumped parameter models. Indeed, knowledge of an apparent age does not necessarily imply knowledge of the groundwater residence time. An independent approach of groundwater age determination is based on solving the solute transport problem. Few studies seek to compare the hydrodynamic and tracers approaches. This comparison aims to increase our hydrogeological understanding of the Ain alluvial plain and to better define " groundwater age" and its meanings. The hydrodynamic modelling was performed using MARTHE code (Thiéry, 2004). It was calibrated over a period of 8 years at a 10 days' time step. Results of the transitory regime calibration are satisfactory and allowed the use of this model for solute transport of 3H, CFCs and SF6. Different approaches are possible for the comparison of tracer and hydrodynamic models. The first is to reproduce the tracer

  12. Cauchy prior distribution-based AVO elastic parameter estimation via weakly nonlinear waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji-Qiang; Geng, Jian-Hua

    2013-12-01

    Cauchy priori distribution-based Bayesian AVO reflectivity inversion may lead to sparse estimates that are sensitive to large reflectivities. For the inversion, the computation of the covariance matrix and regularized terms requires prior estimation of model parameters, which makes the iterative inversion weakly nonlinear. At the same time, the relations among the model parameters are assumed linear. Furthermore, the reflectivities, the results of the inversion, or the elastic parameters with cumulative error recovered by integrating reflectivities are not well suited for detecting hydrocarbons and fluids. In contrast, in Bayesian linear AVO inversion, the elastic parameters can be directly extracted from prestack seismic data without linear assumptions for the model parameters. Considering the advantages of the abovementioned methods, the Bayesian AVO reflectivity inversion process is modified and Cauchy distribution is explored as a prior probability distribution and the time-variant covariance is also considered. Finally, we propose a new method for the weakly nonlinear AVO waveform inversion. Furthermore, the linear assumptions are abandoned and elastic parameters, such as P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, and density, can be directly recovered from seismic data especially for interfaces with large reflectivities. Numerical analysis demonstrates that all the elastic parameters can be estimated from prestack seismic data even when the signal-to-noise ratio of the seismic data is low.

  13. Evolutionary theory of ageing and the problem of correlated Gompertz parameters.

    PubMed

    Burger, Oskar; Missov, Trifon I

    2016-11-07

    The Gompertz mortality model is often used to evaluate evolutionary theories of ageing, such as the Medawar-Williams' hypothesis that high extrinsic mortality leads to faster ageing. However, fits of the Gompertz mortality model to data often find the opposite result that mortality is negatively correlated with the rate of ageing. This negative correlation has been independently discovered in several taxa and is known in actuarial studies of ageing as the Strehler-Mildvan correlation. We examine the role of mortality selection in determining late-life variation in susceptibility to death, which has been suggested to be the cause of this negative correlation. We demonstrate that fixed-frailty models that account for heterogeneity in frailty do not remove the correlation and that the correlation is an inherent statistical property of the Gompertz distribution. Linking actuarial and biological rates of ageing will continue to be a pressing challenge, but the Strehler-Mildvan correlation itself should not be used to diagnose any biological, physiological, or evolutionary process. These findings resolve some key tensions between theory and data that affect evolutionary and biological studies of ageing and mortality. Tests of evolutionary theories of ageing should include direct measures of physiological performance or condition.

  14. Accuracy of Determination of the Parameters of Exotic Nuclei Nuclear Density Distributions in the Glauber Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueter, Keiti; Novikov, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Parameters of a nuclear density distribution for an exotic nuclei with halo or skin structures can be determined from the experimentally measure interaction cross-section. In the presented work, to extract parameters for a halo and core, we compare experimental data on interaction cross section with reaction cross-sections calculated using expressions obtained in the Glauber Model and its optical approximation. These calculations are performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. In addition, we discuss the accuracy of the Monte Carlo approach to calculating the interaction and reaction cross-sections. The dependence of the accuracy of the density parameters of various exotic nuclei on the ``quality'' of the random numbers chains (here, ``quality'' is defined by lag-1 autocorrelation time of a sequence of random numbers) is obtained for the Gaussian density distribution for a core and the Gaussian density distribution for a halo. KY NSF EPSCoR Research Scholars Program.

  15. Distributed and decentralized state estimation in gas networks as distributed parameter systems.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian Behrooz, Hesam; Boozarjomehry, R Bozorgmehry

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a framework for distributed and decentralized state estimation in high-pressure and long-distance gas transmission networks (GTNs) is proposed. The non-isothermal model of the plant including mass, momentum and energy balance equations are used to simulate the dynamic behavior. Due to several disadvantages of implementing a centralized Kalman filter for large-scale systems, the continuous/discrete form of extended Kalman filter for distributed and decentralized estimation (DDE) has been extended for these systems. Accordingly, the global model is decomposed into several subsystems, called local models. Some heuristic rules are suggested for system decomposition in gas pipeline networks. In the construction of local models, due to the existence of common states and interconnections among the subsystems, the assimilation and prediction steps of the Kalman filter are modified to take the overlapping and external states into account. However, dynamic Riccati equation for each subsystem is constructed based on the local model, which introduces a maximum error of 5% in the estimated standard deviation of the states in the benchmarks studied in this paper. The performance of the proposed methodology has been shown based on the comparison of its accuracy and computational demands against their counterparts in centralized Kalman filter for two viable benchmarks. In a real life network, it is shown that while the accuracy is not significantly decreased, the real-time factor of the state estimation is increased by a factor of 10.

  16. A hybrid optimization approach to the estimation of distributed parameters in two-dimensional confined aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidari, M.; Ranjithan, S.R.

    1998-01-01

    In using non-linear optimization techniques for estimation of parameters in a distributed ground water model, the initial values of the parameters and prior information about them play important roles. In this paper, the genetic algorithm (GA) is combined with the truncated-Newton search technique to estimate groundwater parameters for a confined steady-state ground water model. Use of prior information about the parameters is shown to be important in estimating correct or near-correct values of parameters on a regional scale. The amount of prior information needed for an accurate solution is estimated by evaluation of the sensitivity of the performance function to the parameters. For the example presented here, it is experimentally demonstrated that only one piece of prior information of the least sensitive parameter is sufficient to arrive at the global or near-global optimum solution. For hydraulic head data with measurement errors, the error in the estimation of parameters increases as the standard deviation of the errors increases. Results from our experiments show that, in general, the accuracy of the estimated parameters depends on the level of noise in the hydraulic head data and the initial values used in the truncated-Newton search technique.In using non-linear optimization techniques for estimation of parameters in a distributed ground water model, the initial values of the parameters and prior information about them play important roles. In this paper, the genetic algorithm (GA) is combined with the truncated-Newton search technique to estimate groundwater parameters for a confined steady-state ground water model. Use of prior information about the parameters is shown to be important in estimating correct or near-correct values of parameters on a regional scale. The amount of prior information needed for an accurate solution is estimated by evaluation of the sensitivity of the performance function to the parameters. For the example presented here, it is

  17. Effect of the Aging Temperature of Steel on the Parameters of Fatigue Resistance and Microstrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myl'nikov, V. V.; Romanov, A. D.; Shetulov, D. I.; Khlybov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The interrelation of the parameters of microplastic strain, the slope of the left-hand branch of the fatigue curve, and the fatigue limit of a maraging steel is studied. The growth in the microplastic strain is shown to match the growth in the fatigue limit and the decrease in the slope of the left-hand branch of the fatigue curve. The strength of the steel decreases with decrease in the temperature of post-quenching aging.

  18. Distributed parameter estimation for NASA Mini-Mast truss through displacement measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jen-Kuang; Shen, Ji-Yao; Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Most methods of system identification of large flexible structures by far are based on the lumped parameter approach. Because of the considerable computational burden due to the large number of unknown parameters, distributed parameter approach, which greatly decreases the number of unknowns, has being investigated. In this paper a distributed parameter model for the estimation of modal characteristics of NASA Mini-Mast truss has been formulated. Both Bernoulli-Euler beam and Timoshenko beam equations are used to characterize the lateral bending vibrations of the truss. The measurement of the lateral displacement at the tip of the truss is provided to the maximum likelihood estimator. Closed-form solutions of the partial differential equations and closed-form expressions of the sensitivity functions are derived so that the estimation algorithm is highly efficient. The resulting estimates from test data by using Timoshenko beam model are found to be comparable to those derived from finite element analysis.

  19. Parameter estimation in nonlinear distributed systems - Approximation theory and convergence results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework and convergence theory is described for Galerkin approximations applied to inverse problems involving nonlinear distributed parameter systems. Parameter estimation problems are considered and formulated as the minimization of a least-squares-like performance index over a compact admissible parameter set subject to state constraints given by an inhomogeneous nonlinear distributed system. The theory applies to systems whose dynamics can be described by either time-independent or nonstationary strongly maximal monotonic operators defined on a reflexive Banach space which is densely and continuously embedded in a Hilbert space. It is demonstrated that if readily verifiable conditions on the system's dependence on the unknown parameters are satisfied, and the usual Galerkin approximation assumption holds, then solutions to the approximating problems exist and approximate a solution to the original infinite-dimensional identification problem.

  20. The eye lens: age-related trends and individual variations in refractive index and shape parameters

    PubMed Central

    Pierscionek, Barbara; Bahrami, Mehdi; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Regini, Justyn; Yagi, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    The eye lens grows throughout life by cell accrual on its surface and can change shape to adjust the focussing power of the eye. Varying concentrations of proteins in successive cell layers create a refractive index gradient. The continued growth of the lens and age-related changes in proteins render it less able to alter shape with loss of capacity by the end of the sixth decade of life. Growth and protein ageing alter the refractive index but as accurate measurement of this parameter is difficult, the nature of such alterations remains uncertain. The most accurate method to date for measuring refractive index in intact lenses has been developed at the SPring-8 synchrotron. The technique, based on Talbot interferometry, has an X-ray source and was used to measure refractive index in sixty-six human lenses, aged from 16 to 91 years. Height and width were measured for forty-five lenses. Refractive index contours show decentration in some older lenses but individual variations mask age-related trends. Refractive index profiles along the optic axis have relatively flat central sections with distinct micro-fluctuations and a steep gradient in the cortex but do not exhibit an age-related trend. The refractive index profiles in the equatorial aspect show statistical significance with age, particularly for lenses below the age of sixty that had capacity to alter shape in vivo. The maximum refractive index in the lens centre decreases slightly with age with considerable scatter in the data and there are age-related variations in sagittal thickness and equatorial height. PMID:26416418

  1. Nutritional status and growth parameters of school-age Roma children in the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Spiroski, Igor; Dimitrovska, Zlatanka; Gjorgjev, Dragan; Mikik, Vladimir; Efremova-Stefanoska, Vesna; Naunova-Spiroska, Daniela; Kendrovski, Vladimir

    2011-06-01

    Main objective of the study was to assess the nutritional status of school age Roma children in Macedonia in order to detect precursors of possible health risks at an early age. The study was designed as a comparative case control study. Study group consisted of 229 Roma school children from the 1st and 272 from the 5th grade residing in different towns in Macedonia. The control group was recruited from other than Roma ethnic background and consisted of 283 children attending 1st and 356 children attending 5th grade. Every participant was measured for his/hers body height and weight. The t-test and Chi square (Chi2) were applied to test statistical significance of variables. The WHO's AnthroPlus software was applied to assess growth parameters and population at risk. There were significant differences in values of the body weight (p = 0.001) and height (p = 0.001) between Roma and non-Roma children attending the 1st grade of primary school. Weight-for-age, height-for-age and BMI-for-age indexes of the 1st grade children significantly differred in in the same intervals of SD (> or = -2SD and < -1SD; > or = -1SD and median; > +1SD and < or = +2SD; between Roma and non-Roma 5th graders. Anthropometric parameters of nutritional status of Roma children in Macedonia are significantly different than those of their non-Roma peers. Their health risks are predominantly related to underweight. The parameters related to health risks of overweight or obesity are lower in Roma than in non-Roma children.

  2. Low heel ultrasound parameters predict mortality in men: results from the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Lee, David M.; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: low bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is associated with increased mortality. The relationship between other skeletal phenotypes and mortality is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quantitative heel ultrasound parameters and mortality in a cohort of European men. Methods: men aged 40–79 years were recruited for participation in a prospective study of male ageing: the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). At baseline, subjects attended for quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel (Hologic—SAHARA) and completed questionnaires on lifestyle factors and co-morbidities. Height and weight were measured. After a median of 4.3 years, subjects were invited to attend a follow-up assessment, and reasons for non-participation, including death, were recorded. The relationship between QUS parameters (broadband ultrasound attenuation [BUA] and speed of sound [SOS]) and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: from a total of 3,244 men (mean age 59.8, standard deviation [SD] 10.8 years), 185 (5.7%) died during the follow-up period. After adjusting for age, centre, body mass index, physical activity, current smoking, number of co-morbidities and general health, each SD decrease in BUA was associated with a 20% higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] per SD = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.4). Compared with those in higher quintiles (2nd–5th), those in the lowest quintile of BUA and SOS had a greater mortality risk (BUA: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1–2.3 and SOS: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2–2.2). Conclusion: lower heel ultrasound parameters are associated with increased mortality in European men. PMID:26162912

  3. Relationships between remotely sensed fisheries distribution information and selected oceanographic parameters in the Mississippi Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerer, A. J.; Benigno, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A feasibility study to demonstrate the potential of satellites for providing fisheries significant information was conducted in the Mississippi Sound and adjacent offshore waters. Attempts were made to relate satellite acquired imagery to selected oceanographic parameters and then to relate these parameters to aircraft remotely sensed distribution patterns of resident surface schooling fishes. Initial results suggest that this approach is valid and that the satellite acquired imagery may have important fisheries resource assessment implications.

  4. Relationships between remotely sensed fisheries distribution information and selected oceanographic parameters in the Mississippi Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerer, A. J.; Benigno, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    A feasibility study to demonstrate the potential of satellites for providing fisheries significant information was conducted in the Mississippi Sound and adjacent offshore waters. Attempts were made to relate satellite acquired imagery to selected oceanographic parameters and then to relate these parameters to aircraft remotely sensed distribution patterns of resident surface schooling fishes. Initial results suggest that this approach is valid and that the satellite acquired imagery may have important fisheries resource assessment implications.

  5. Factorization and reduction methods for optimal control of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Powers, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    A Chandrasekhar-type factorization method is applied to the linear-quadratic optimal control problem for distributed parameter systems. An aeroelastic control problem is used as a model example to demonstrate that if computationally efficient algorithms, such as those of Chandrasekhar-type, are combined with the special structure often available to a particular problem, then an abstract approximation theory developed for distributed parameter control theory becomes a viable method of solution. A numerical scheme based on averaging approximations is applied to hereditary control problems. Numerical examples are given.

  6. Age estimation methods using anthropological parameters on human teeth-(A0736).

    PubMed

    Brkic, H; Milicevic, M; Petrovecki, M

    2006-10-16

    The research was conducted on the 160 intact extracted human teeth with one and two roots of the known age and sex. The teeth were disinfected, dried and X-rayed. After that the section of the longitudinal cut through the teeth was performed in order to facilitate monitoring of all tissues and morphological characteristics of the teeth. The age was determined in three ways: Method 1 [G.Bang, E. Ramm, Determination of age in humans from root dentin transparency, Acta Odontol. Scand. 28 (1970) 3-35]--analysis of the translucency of the root dentine, Method 2 [S. Kvaal, T. Solheim, A non-destructive dental method for age estimation, J. Forensic Odonto-stomatol. 12 (1994) 6-11]--analysis of the root and the root canal from the X-ray, Method 3 [G. Johanson, Age determination from human teeth, Odontol. Revy. 22 (1971) 1-126]--analysis of six parameters on each teeth. All data were subject to the correlation and regression analysis which showed the following: all of the three applied methods were in the significant correlation with the real age, and the best of them proved to be Method 3 where the coefficient of correlation was 0.85, p<0.001. The teeth of the maxilla are more convenient for the age determination than the teeth of mandible. They are in the significant strong correlation with the known real age, and in Method 3, the coefficient of correlation is 0.78, p<0.001. Age determination of the teeth with two roots is in significant correlation with the known real age p<0.001 in relation to the determined age on the teeth with one root. The results show that sex too, is in significant correlation with the real age, p<0.001. In practice, the methods used and the results achieved in this research have been enabling the dental age estimation of human remains from mass graves after the 1991 war in Croatia.

  7. Chlorine decay in drinking-water transmission and distribution systems: pipe service age effect.

    PubMed

    Al-Jasser, A O

    2007-01-01

    Water quality can deteriorate in the transmission and distribution system beyond the treatment plant. Minimizing the potential for biological regrowth can be attained by chlorinating the finished water. While flowing through pipes, the chlorine concentration decreases for different reasons. Reaction with the pipe material itself and the reaction with both the biofilm and tubercles formed on the pipe wall are known as pipe wall demand, which may vary with pipe parameters. The aim of this paper was to assess the impact of the service age of pipes on the effective chlorine wall decay constant. Three hundred and two pipe sections of different sizes and eight different pipe materials were collected and tested for their chlorine first-order wall decay constants. The results showed that pipe service age was an important factor that must not be ignored in some pipes such as cast iron, steel, cement-lined ductile iron (CLDI), and cement-lined cast iron (CLCI) pipes especially when the bulk decay is not significant relative to the wall decay. For the range of the 55 years of pipe service age used in this study, effective wall decay constants ranged from a decrease by -92% to an increase by +431% from the corresponding values in the recently installed pipes. The effect of service age on the effective wall decay constants was most evident in cast iron pipes, whereas steel pipes were less affected. Effective chlorine wall decay for CLCI and CLDI pipes was less affected by service age as compared to steel and cast iron pipes. Chlorine wall decay constants for PVC, uPVC, and polyethylene pipes were affected negatively by pipe service age and such effect was relatively small.

  8. Mean age distribution of inorganic soil-nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Dong K.; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-07-01

    Excess reactive nitrogen in soils of intensively managed landscapes causes adverse environmental impact, and continues to remain a global concern. Many novel strategies have been developed to provide better management practices and, yet, the problem remains unresolved. The objective of this study is to develop a model to characterize the "age" of inorganic soil-nitrogen (nitrate, and ammonia/ammonium). We use the general theory of age, which provides an assessment of the time elapsed since inorganic nitrogen has been introduced into the soil system. We analyze a corn-corn-soybean rotation, common in the Midwest United States, as an example application. We observe two counter-intuitive results: (1) the mean nitrogen age in the topsoil layer is relatively high; and (2) mean nitrogen age is lower under soybean cultivation compared to corn although no fertilizer is applied for soybean cultivation. The first result can be explained by cation-exchange of ammonium that retards the leaching of nitrogen, resulting in an increase in the mean nitrogen age near the soil surface. The second result arises because the soybean utilizes the nitrogen fertilizer left from the previous year, thereby removing the older nitrogen and reducing mean nitrogen age. Estimating the mean nitrogen age can thus serve as an important tool to disentangle complex nitrogen dynamics by providing a nuanced characterization of the time scales of soil-nitrogen transformation and transport processes.

  9. Radii, masses, and ages of 18 bright stars using interferometry and new estimations of exoplanetary parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, R.; Creevey, O.; Mourard, D.; Crida, A.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Schultheis, M.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Accurate stellar parameters are needed in numerous domains of astrophysics. The position of stars on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is an important indication of their structure and evolution, and it helps improve stellar models. Furthermore, the age and mass of stars hosting planets are required elements for studying exoplanetary systems. Aims: We aim at determining accurate parameters of a set of 18 bright exoplanet host and potential host stars from interferometric measurements, photometry, and stellar models. Methods: Using the VEGA/CHARA interferometer operating in the visible domain, we measured the angular diameters of 18 stars, ten of which host exoplanets. We combined them with their distances to estimate their radii. We used photometry to derive their bolometric flux and, then, their effective temperature and luminosity to place them on the H-R diagram. We then used the PARSEC models to derive their best fit ages and masses, with error bars derived from Monte Carlo calculations. Results: Our interferometric measurements lead to an average of 1.9% uncertainty on angular diameters and 3% on stellar radii. There is good agreement between measured and indirect estimations of angular diameters (either from SED fitting or from surface brightness relations) for main sequence (MS) stars, but not as good for more evolved stars. For each star, we provide a likelihood map in the mass-age plane; typically, two distinct sets of solutions appear (an old and a young age). The errors on the ages and masses that we provide account for the metallicity uncertainties, which are often neglected by other works. From measurements of its radius and density, we also provide the mass of 55 Cnc independently of models. From the stellar masses, we provide new estimates of semi-major axes and minimum masses of exoplanets with reliable uncertainties. We also derive the radius, density, and mass of 55 Cnc e, a super-Earth that transits its stellar host. Our exoplanetary

  10. Quantification of Parameter Uncertainty of a Distributed Hydraulic Model Using Ensemble Smoother

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; McLaughlin, Dennis; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Li, Wenpeng; Dong, Xinguang

    2014-05-01

    Yanqi basin is an important agricultural region in Xinjiang, in Northwest China. The irrigated agricultural land has been increasing in the past decades and made the basin suffer from many environmental problems such as soil salinization, decreased lake level, deteriorated lake water quality, decreased surface water flow to the downstream and damaged riverine forests. A 3-dimensional distributed numerical flow and transport model is built using MIKESHE/MIKE11 which contains saturated and unsaturated zones, rivers and lakes. It allows to better understand the impacts of individual hydrological units and their interactions. Before using the model for quantifying solutions for the environmental problems, the parameter uncertainties of the complex distributed model are assessed using an Ensemble Smoother (ES). ES is a data assimilation method to improve an ensemble of prior parameters by assimilating time series of observations over the whole time period available. It is basically a stochastic calibration method. In this case study, an iterative ES is applied, called Ensemble Smoother with Multiple Data Assimilation (ESMDA) (Emerick and Reynolds, 2012). Two alternatives are considered to update parameters in each iteration. One is the Ensemble Kalman Filter with perturbed observations and the other is an Unbiased Square root filter which updates parameter means and perturbations separately. Seventeen parameters are chosen from the distributed flow and transport model to quantify their uncertainty. Fifty prior replicates of each parameter are generated using the Latin Hypercube Sampling method. The distribution of posterior parameters and outputs obtained from the alternative methods are similar. The results indicate that the uncertainty of the parameters is narrowed during the smoother updating process, reflecting the information obtained from the observations. The most sensitive parameters are the dispersion coefficient of the lakes and the hydraulic conductivity of

  11. SU-E-T-113: Dose Distribution Using Respiratory Signals and Machine Parameters During Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Imae, T; Haga, A; Saotome, N; Kida, S; Nakano, M; Takeuchi, Y; Shiraki, T; Yano, K; Yamashita, H; Nakagawa, K; Ohtomo, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a rotational intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique capable of acquiring projection images during treatment. Treatment plans for lung tumors using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) are calculated with planning computed tomography (CT) images only exhale phase. Purpose of this study is to evaluate dose distribution by reconstructing from only the data such as respiratory signals and machine parameters acquired during treatment. Methods: Phantom and three patients with lung tumor underwent CT scans for treatment planning. They were treated by VMAT while acquiring projection images to derive their respiratory signals and machine parameters including positions of multi leaf collimators, dose rates and integrated monitor units. The respiratory signals were divided into 4 and 10 phases and machine parameters were correlated with the divided respiratory signals based on the gantry angle. Dose distributions of each respiratory phase were calculated from plans which were reconstructed from the respiratory signals and the machine parameters during treatment. The doses at isocenter, maximum point and the centroid of target were evaluated. Results and Discussion: Dose distributions during treatment were calculated using the machine parameters and the respiratory signals detected from projection images. Maximum dose difference between plan and in treatment distribution was −1.8±0.4% at centroid of target and dose differences of evaluated points between 4 and 10 phases were no significant. Conclusion: The present method successfully evaluated dose distribution using respiratory signals and machine parameters during treatment. This method is feasible to verify the actual dose for moving target.

  12. Impact of video parameters on the DCT coefficient distribution for H.264-like video coders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaci, Nejat; Al-Regib, Ghassan

    2012-01-01

    We examine the impact of various encoding parameters on the distribution of the DCT coefficients for H.264-like video coders. We model the distribution of the frame DCT coefficients using the most common Laplacian and Cauchy distributions. We show that the resolution, the quantization levels and the coding type have significant impact on the accuracy of the Laplacian and Cauchy distribution based models. We also show that the transform kernel (4 ×4 vs 8 × 8) has little impact. Moreover, we show that for the video sources that have little temporal or spatial detail, such as flat regions, the distribution of the frame DCT coefficients resembles a Laplacian distribution. When the video source exhibits more detail, such as texture and edges, the distribution of the frame DCT coefficients resembles a Cauchy distribution. The correlation between the details of the video source to the two probability distributions can be used to further improve the estimation of the distribution of the frame DCT coefficients, by using a classification based approach.

  13. Sampling the probability distribution of Type Ia Supernova lightcurve parameters in cosmological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mi; Wang, Yun

    2016-06-01

    In order to obtain robust cosmological constraints from Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, we have applied Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to SN Ia lightcurve fitting. We develop a method for sampling the resultant probability density distributions (pdf) of the SN Ia lightcuve parameters in the MCMC likelihood analysis to constrain cosmological parameters, and validate it using simulated data sets. Applying this method to the `joint lightcurve analysis (JLA)' data set of SNe Ia, we find that sampling the SN Ia lightcurve parameter pdf's leads to cosmological parameters closer to that of a flat Universe with a cosmological constant, compared to the usual practice of using only the best-fitting values of the SN Ia lightcurve parameters. Our method will be useful in the use of SN Ia data for precision cosmology.

  14. Estimation of distributional parameters for censored trace level water quality data. 2. Verification and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helsel, D.R.; Gilliom, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Estimates of distributional parameters (mean, standard deviation, median, interquartile range) are often desired for data sets containing censored observations. Eight methods for estimating these parameters have been evaluated by R. J. Gilliom and D. R. Helsel (this issue) using Monte Carlo simulations. To verify those findings, the same methods are now applied to actual water quality data. The best method (lowest root-mean-squared error (rmse)) over all parameters, sample sizes, and censoring levels is log probability regression (LR), the method found best in the Monte Carlo simulations. Best methods for estimating moment or percentile parameters separately are also identical to the simulations. Reliability of these estimates can be expressed as confidence intervals using rmse and bias values taken from the simulation results. Finally, a new simulation study shows that best methods for estimating uncensored sample statistics from censored data sets are identical to those for estimating population parameters.

  15. Atlas of relations between climatic parameters and distributions of important trees and shrubs in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Robert S.; Anderson, Katherine H.; Bartlein, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    This atlas explores the continental-scale relations between the geographic ranges of woody plant species and climate in North America. A 25-km equal-area grid of modern climatic and bioclimatic parameters was constructed from instrumental weather records. The geographic distributions of selected tree and shrub species were digitized, and the presence or absence of each species was determined for each cell on the 25-km grid, thus providing a basis for comparing climatic data and species distributions. The relations between climate and plant distributions are explored in graphical and tabular form. The results of this effort are primarily intended for use in biogeographic, paleoclimatic, and global-change research.

  16. Calibration of Distributed Hydrologic Models Considering the Heterogeneity of the Parameters across the Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athira, P.; Sudheer, K.

    2013-12-01

    Parameter estimation is one of the major tasks in the application of any physics based distributed model. Generally the calibration does not consider the heterogeneity of the parameters across the basin, and as a result the model simulation conforms to the location for which it has been calibrated for. However, the major advantage of distributed hydrological models is to have reasonably good simulations on various locations in the watershed, including ungauged locations. While multi-site calibration can address this issue to some extent, the availability of more gauge sites in a watershed is always not guaranteed. When single site calibration is performed, generally a uniform variation of the parameters is considered across the basin which does not ensure the true heterogeneity of the parameters in the basin. The primary objective of this study is to compare the effect of uniform variation of the parameter with a procedure that identifies actual heterogeneity of the parameters across the basin, while performing calibration of distributed hydrological models. In order to demonstrate the objective, a case study of two watersheds in the USA using the model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is presented and discussed. Initially, the SWAT model is calibrated for both the watersheds in the traditional way considering uniform variation of the sensitive parameters during the calibration. Further, the hydrological response units (HRU) delineated in the SWAT are classified into various clusters based the land use, soil type and slope. A random perturbation of the parameters is performed in these clusters during calibration. The rationale behind this approach was to identify plausible parameter values that simulate the hydrological process in these clusters appropriately. The proposed procedure is applied to both the basins. The results indicate that the simulations obtained for upstream ungauged locations (other than that used for calibration) are much better when a

  17. ON ASYMPTOTIC DISTRIBUTION AND ASYMPTOTIC EFFICIENCY OF LEAST SQUARES ESTIMATORS OF SPATIAL VARIOGRAM PARAMETERS. (R827257)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In this article, we consider the least-squares approach for estimating parameters of a spatial variogram and establish consistency and asymptotic normality of these estimators under general conditions. Large-sample distributions are also established under a sp...

  18. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The research concerning the reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems is reported. The adaptive control strategy was chosen for investigation in the annular momentum control device. It is noted, that if there is no observation spill over, and no model errors, an indirect adaptive control strategy can be globally stable. Recent publications concerning adaptive control are included.

  19. The values of the parameters of some multilayer distributed RC null networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huelsman, L. P.; Raghunath, S.

    1974-01-01

    In this correspondence, the values of the parameters of some multilayer distributed RC notch networks are determined, and the usually accepted values are shown to be in error. The magnitude of the error is illustrated by graphs of the frequency response of the networks.

  20. Mathematical simulation application for research of nonuniform distributed-parameter circuit transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. O.; Plyusnin, A. A.; Shandarova, E. B.; Tikhomirova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers the simulation capability of nonuniform distributed-parameter circuit transients by using MatLab Simulink. This approach is capable of determining currents and voltages of nodes for power networks of any configurations and modes. The paper contains results of nonuniform line simulations in idle, short-circuit and load modes.

  1. Angular distribution of undulator power for an arbitrary deflection parameter K

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1985-08-01

    A calculation of the angular distribution of power generated from an undulator, integrated over all frequencies, is presented. The result, valid for any arbitrary value of the deflection parameter K, reduces to the known expressions in the cases K ..-->.. infinity and K ..-->.. 0.

  2. Methods for the identification of material parameters in distributed models for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Crowley, J. M.; Rosen, I. G.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical results are presented for inverse problems involving estimation of spatially varying parameters such as stiffness and damping in distributed models for elastic structures such as Euler-Bernoulli beams. An outline of algorithms used and a summary of computational experiences are presented.

  3. An EOQ Model with Two-Parameter Weibull Distribution Deterioration and Price-Dependent Demand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukhopadhyay, Sushanta; Mukherjee, R. N.; Chaudhuri, K. S.

    2005-01-01

    An inventory replenishment policy is developed for a deteriorating item and price-dependent demand. The rate of deterioration is taken to be time-proportional and the time to deterioration is assumed to follow a two-parameter Weibull distribution. A power law form of the price dependence of demand is considered. The model is solved analytically…

  4. Strategic Decision-Making Learning from Label Distributions: An Approach for Facial Age Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Han

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, label distribution learning is among the state-of-the-art methodologies in facial age estimation. It takes the age of each facial image instance as a label distribution with a series of age labels rather than the single chronological age label that is commonly used. However, this methodology is deficient in its simple decision-making criterion: the final predicted age is only selected at the one with maximum description degree. In many cases, different age labels may have very similar description degrees. Consequently, blindly deciding the estimated age by virtue of the highest description degree would miss or neglect other valuable age labels that may contribute a lot to the final predicted age. In this paper, we propose a strategic decision-making label distribution learning algorithm (SDM-LDL) with a series of strategies specialized for different types of age label distribution. Experimental results from the most popular aging face database, FG-NET, show the superiority and validity of all the proposed strategic decision-making learning algorithms over the existing label distribution learning and other single-label learning algorithms for facial age estimation. The inner properties of SDM-LDL are further explored with more advantages. PMID:27367691

  5. Study of Parameters And Methods of LL-Ⅳ Distributed Hydrological Model in DMIP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wu, J.; Wang, X.; Yang, C.; Zhao, Y.; Zhou, H.

    2008-05-01

    : The Physics-based distributed hydrological model is considered as an important developing period from the traditional experience-hydrology to the physical hydrology. The Hydrology Laboratory of the NOAA National Weather Service proposes the first and second phase of the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP),that it is a great epoch-making work. LL distributed hydrological model has been developed to the fourth generation since it was established in 1997 on the Fengman-I district reservoir area (11000 km2).The LL-I distributed hydrological model was born with the applications of flood control system in the Fengman-I in China. LL-II was developed under the DMIP-I support, it is combined with GIS, RS, GPS, radar rainfall measurement.LL-III was established along with Applications of LL Distributed Model on Water Resources which was supported by the 973-projects of The Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China. LL-Ⅳ was developed to face China's water problem. Combined with Blue River and the Baron Fork River basin of DMIP-II, the convection-diffusion equation of non-saturated and saturated seepage was derived from the soil water dynamics and continuous equation. In view of the technical characteristics of the model, the advantage of using convection-diffusion equation to compute confluence overall is longer period of predictable, saving memory space, fast budgeting, clear physical concepts, etc. The determination of parameters of hydrological model is the key, including experience coefficients and parameters of physical parameters. There are methods of experience, inversion, and the optimization to determine the model parameters, and each has advantages and disadvantages. This paper briefly introduces the LL-Ⅳ distribution hydrological model equations, and particularly introduces methods of parameters determination and simulation results on Blue River and Baron Fork River basin for DMIP-II. The soil moisture diffusion

  6. A Bayesian Modeling Approach for Estimation of a Shape-Free Groundwater Age Distribution using Multiple Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudieh, Arash; Visser, Ate; Sharifi, Soroosh; Broers, Hans Peter

    2013-10-15

    The mixing of groundwaters with different ages in aquifers, groundwater age is more appropriately represented by a distribution rather than a scalar number. To infer a groundwater age distribution from environmental tracers, a mathematical form is often assumed for the shape of the distribution and the parameters of the mathematical distribution are estimated using deterministic or stochastic inverse methods. We found that the prescription of the mathematical form limits the exploration of the age distribution to the shapes that can be described by the selected distribution. In this paper, the use of freeform histograms as groundwater age distributions is evaluated. A Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach is used to estimate the fraction of groundwater in each histogram bin. This method was able to capture the shape of a hypothetical gamma distribution from the concentrations of four age tracers. The number of bins that can be considered in this approach is limited based on the number of tracers available. The histogram method was also tested on tracer data sets from Holten (The Netherlands; 3H, 3He, 85Kr, 39Ar) and the La Selva Biological Station (Costa-Rica; SF 6, CFCs, 3H, 4He and 14C), and compared to a number of mathematical forms. According to standard Bayesian measures of model goodness, the best mathematical distribution performs better than the histogram distributions in terms of the ability to capture the observed tracer data relative to their complexity. Among the histogram distributions, the four bin histogram performs better in most of the cases. The Monte Carlo simulations showed strong correlations in the posterior estimates of bin contributions, indicating that these bins cannot be well constrained using the available age tracers. The fact that mathematical forms overall perform better than the freeform histogram does not undermine the benefit of the

  7. A Bayesian Modeling Approach for Estimation of a Shape-Free Groundwater Age Distribution using Multiple Tracers

    DOE PAGES

    Massoudieh, Arash; Visser, Ate; Sharifi, Soroosh; ...

    2013-10-15

    The mixing of groundwaters with different ages in aquifers, groundwater age is more appropriately represented by a distribution rather than a scalar number. To infer a groundwater age distribution from environmental tracers, a mathematical form is often assumed for the shape of the distribution and the parameters of the mathematical distribution are estimated using deterministic or stochastic inverse methods. We found that the prescription of the mathematical form limits the exploration of the age distribution to the shapes that can be described by the selected distribution. In this paper, the use of freeform histograms as groundwater age distributions is evaluated.more » A Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach is used to estimate the fraction of groundwater in each histogram bin. This method was able to capture the shape of a hypothetical gamma distribution from the concentrations of four age tracers. The number of bins that can be considered in this approach is limited based on the number of tracers available. The histogram method was also tested on tracer data sets from Holten (The Netherlands; 3H, 3He, 85Kr, 39Ar) and the La Selva Biological Station (Costa-Rica; SF 6, CFCs, 3H, 4He and 14C), and compared to a number of mathematical forms. According to standard Bayesian measures of model goodness, the best mathematical distribution performs better than the histogram distributions in terms of the ability to capture the observed tracer data relative to their complexity. Among the histogram distributions, the four bin histogram performs better in most of the cases. The Monte Carlo simulations showed strong correlations in the posterior estimates of bin contributions, indicating that these bins cannot be well constrained using the available age tracers. The fact that mathematical forms overall perform better than the freeform histogram does not undermine the benefit of the freeform approach, especially for the cases where a larger amount of observed data is

  8. Fitting Three- and Four-Parameter Probability Distributions to Daily Streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archfield, S. A.; Vogel, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Daily streamflow information is critical for solving any number of hydrologic problems. One promising approach to estimate a time series of daily streamflow at an ungauged location is to estimate a continuous, daily, period-of-record flow-duration curve (FDC) at the ungauged location and use the timing of observed streamflows from a donor streamgauge to transform the FDC at the ungauged location into a time series of streamflow. Ideally, if one were to find a suitable probability density function (pdf) to represent daily streamflow, only the parameters of the distribution would need to be estimated at the ungauged location. Determining the pdf of daily streamflow could also provide functional linkages between the pdfs of daily precipitation and other catchment processes toward a probabilistic framework which explains how catchments filter the precipitation signal. Three- and four parameter distributions were fit to daily streamflow observations from streamgauges located in the north- and southeastern United States. No suitable three or four-parameter probability distribution were found to adequately represent the distribution of daily streamflow, particularly at streamflow quantiles greater than 0.9 and less than 0.01 exceedence probabilities. Furthermore, the properties of these distributions caused estimated streamflows to be bounded at both the highest and lowest streamflow quantiles, creating a severe bias in the estimation of the FDC. Traditional goodness-of-fit statistics were also unable to revealing this lack of fit; only examination of the individual probability plots showed this inadequacy.

  9. Estimation of distributional parameters for censored trace level water quality data. 1. Estimation techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilliom, R.J.; Helsel, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    A recurring difficulty encountered in investigations of many metals and organic contaminants in ambient waters is that a substantial portion of water sample concentrations are below limits of detection established by analytical laboratories. Several methods were evaluated for estimating distributional parameters for such censored data sets using only uncensored observations. Their reliabilities were evaluated by a Monte Carlo experiment in which small samples were generated from a wide range of parent distributions and censored at varying levels. Eight methods were used to estimate the mean, standard deviation, median, and interquartile range. Criteria were developed, based on the distribution of uncensored observations, for determining the best performing parameter estimation method for any particular data set. The most robust method for minimizing error in censored-sample estimates of the four distributional parameters over all simulation conditions was the log-probability regression method. With this method, censored observations are assumed to follow the zero-to-censoring level portion of a lognormal distribution obtained by a least squares regression between logarithms of uncensored concentration observations and their z scores.

  10. Comparison of Two Methods Used to Model Shape Parameters of Pareto Distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, C.; Charpentier, R.R.; Su, J.

    2011-01-01

    Two methods are compared for estimating the shape parameters of Pareto field-size (or pool-size) distributions for petroleum resource assessment. Both methods assume mature exploration in which most of the larger fields have been discovered. Both methods use the sizes of larger discovered fields to estimate the numbers and sizes of smaller fields: (1) the tail-truncated method uses a plot of field size versus size rank, and (2) the log-geometric method uses data binned in field-size classes and the ratios of adjacent bin counts. Simulation experiments were conducted using discovered oil and gas pool-size distributions from four petroleum systems in Alberta, Canada and using Pareto distributions generated by Monte Carlo simulation. The estimates of the shape parameters of the Pareto distributions, calculated by both the tail-truncated and log-geometric methods, generally stabilize where discovered pool numbers are greater than 100. However, with fewer than 100 discoveries, these estimates can vary greatly with each new discovery. The estimated shape parameters of the tail-truncated method are more stable and larger than those of the log-geometric method where the number of discovered pools is more than 100. Both methods, however, tend to underestimate the shape parameter. Monte Carlo simulation was also used to create sequences of discovered pool sizes by sampling from a Pareto distribution with a discovery process model using a defined exploration efficiency (in order to show how biased the sampling was in favor of larger fields being discovered first). A higher (more biased) exploration efficiency gives better estimates of the Pareto shape parameters. ?? 2011 International Association for Mathematical Geosciences.

  11. Clusters and cycles in the cosmic ray age distributions of meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, M. F.; Marti, K.

    1985-01-01

    Statistically significant clusters in the cosmic ray exposure age distributions of some groups of iron and stone meteorites were observed, suggesting epochs of enhanced collision and breakups. Fourier analyses of the age distributions of chondrites reveal no significant periods, nor does the same analysis when applied to iron meteorite clusters.

  12. Association between obesity and femoral neck strength according to age, sex, and fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Lee, S H; Kim, B J; Koh, J M

    2017-03-29

    Indicators of total and abdominal obesity were negatively associated with femoral neck strength indices. There are age-, sex-, and fat distribution-specific differences in the magnitude of these associations. These suggested that indicators of obesity with different magnitude according to age, sex, and fat distribution associated with poor bone health.

  13. Estimating distribution parameters of annual maximum streamflows in Johor, Malaysia using TL-moments approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Jan, Nur Amalina; Shabri, Ani

    2017-01-01

    TL-moments approach has been used in an analysis to identify the best-fitting distributions to represent the annual series of maximum streamflow data over seven stations in Johor, Malaysia. The TL-moments with different trimming values are used to estimate the parameter of the selected distributions namely: Three-parameter lognormal (LN3) and Pearson Type III (P3) distribution. The main objective of this study is to derive the TL-moments ( t 1,0), t 1 = 1,2,3,4 methods for LN3 and P3 distributions. The performance of TL-moments ( t 1,0), t 1 = 1,2,3,4 was compared with L-moments through Monte Carlo simulation and streamflow data over a station in Johor, Malaysia. The absolute error is used to test the influence of TL-moments methods on estimated probability distribution functions. From the cases in this study, the results show that TL-moments with four trimmed smallest values from the conceptual sample (TL-moments [4, 0]) of LN3 distribution was the most appropriate in most of the stations of the annual maximum streamflow series in Johor, Malaysia.

  14. The Sensitivity of Parameter Estimates to the Latent Ability Distribution. Research Report. ETS RR-11-40

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xueli; Jia, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of item response model parameters and ability distribution parameters has been, and will remain, an important topic in the educational testing field. Much research has been dedicated to addressing this task. Some studies have focused on item parameter estimation when the latent ability was assumed to follow a normal distribution,…

  15. Squares of different sizes: effect of geographical projection on model parameter estimates in species distribution modeling.

    PubMed

    Budic, Lara; Didenko, Gregor; Dormann, Carsten F

    2016-01-01

    In species distribution analyses, environmental predictors and distribution data for large spatial extents are often available in long-lat format, such as degree raster grids. Long-lat projections suffer from unequal cell sizes, as a degree of longitude decreases in length from approximately 110 km at the equator to 0 km at the poles. Here we investigate whether long-lat and equal-area projections yield similar model parameter estimates, or result in a consistent bias. We analyzed the environmental effects on the distribution of 12 ungulate species with a northern distribution, as models for these species should display the strongest effect of projectional distortion. Additionally we choose four species with entirely continental distributions to investigate the effect of incomplete cell coverage at the coast. We expected that including model weights proportional to the actual cell area should compensate for the observed bias in model coefficients, and similarly that using land coverage of a cell should decrease bias in species with coastal distribution. As anticipated, model coefficients were different between long-lat and equal-area projections. Having progressively smaller and a higher number of cells with increasing latitude influenced the importance of parameters in models, increased the sample size for the northernmost parts of species ranges, and reduced the subcell variability of those areas. However, this bias could be largely removed by weighting long-lat cells by the area they cover, and marginally by correcting for land coverage. Overall we found little effect of using long-lat rather than equal-area projections in our analysis. The fitted relationship between environmental parameters and occurrence probability differed only very little between the two projection types. We still recommend using equal-area projections to avoid possible bias. More importantly, our results suggest that the cell area and the proportion of a cell covered by land should be

  16. Evaluation of Experimental Parameters in the Accelerated Aging of Closed-Cell Foam Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K; Vanderlan, Michael; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2012-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of many closed-cell foam insulation products changes over time as production gases diffuse out of the cell matrix and atmospheric gases diffuse into the cells. Thin slicing has been shown to be an effective means of accelerating this process in such a way as to produce meaningful results. Efforts to produce a more prescriptive version of the ASTM C1303 standard test method led to the ruggedness test described here. This test program included the aging of full size insulation specimens for time periods of five years for direct comparison to the predicted results. Experimental parameters under investigation include: slice thickness, slice origin (at the surface or from the core of the slab), thin slice stack composition, product facings, original product thickness, product density, and product type. The test protocol has been completed and this report provides a detailed evaluation of the impact of the test parameters on the accuracy of the 5-year thermal conductivity prediction.

  17. Age-related changes in physical examination and gait parameters in normally developing children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yeol; Lee, Sang Hyeong; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Kyoung Min; Akhmedov, Bekhzad; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon; Sung, Ki Hyuk

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to examine the correlations between physical examinations and gait kinematics, and age-related changes in 47 normally developing children. Physical examinations were not found to be significantly correlated with kinematics, except for Thomas and Staheli tests. Unilateral and bilateral popliteal angles decreased significantly by 2.2 and 1.6° per annum, and ankle dorsiflexion with knee extension and 90° flexion decreased significantly by 0.7 and 0.8°. Physical examinations and gait parameters might represent different dimensions of gait, and care should be taken when assessing gait problems. Age-related changes should be considered when interpreting physical examination and gait kinematics for surgery.

  18. Modified polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function with diffuse scattering: surface parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hanyu; Voelz, David G.

    2016-12-01

    The polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (pBRDF) describes the relationships between incident and scattered Stokes parameters, but the familiar surface-only microfacet pBRDF cannot capture diffuse scattering contributions and depolarization phenomena. We propose a modified pBRDF model with a diffuse scattering component developed from the Kubelka-Munk and Le Hors et al. theories, and apply it in the development of a method to jointly estimate refractive index, slope variance, and diffuse scattering parameters from a series of Stokes parameter measurements of a surface. An application of the model and estimation approach to experimental data published by Priest and Meier shows improved correspondence with measurements of normalized Mueller matrix elements. By converting the Stokes/Mueller calculus formulation of the model to a degree of polarization (DOP) description, the estimation results of the parameters from measured DOP values are found to be consistent with a previous DOP model and results.

  19. NASA Workshop on Distributed Parameter Modeling and Control of Flexible Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, Virginia B. (Compiler); Keckler, Claude R. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Although significant advances have been made in modeling and controlling flexible systems, there remains a need for improvements in model accuracy and in control performance. The finite element models of flexible systems are unduly complex and are almost intractable to optimum parameter estimation for refinement using experimental data. Distributed parameter or continuum modeling offers some advantages and some challenges in both modeling and control. Continuum models often result in a significantly reduced number of model parameters, thereby enabling optimum parameter estimation. The dynamic equations of motion of continuum models provide the advantage of allowing the embedding of the control system dynamics, thus forming a complete set of system dynamics. There is also increased insight provided by the continuum model approach.

  20. Bayesian Inference for Time Trends in Parameter Values: Case Study for the Ageing PSA Network of the European Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Albert Malkhasyan

    2010-06-01

    There is a nearly ubiquitous assumption in PSA that parameter values are at least piecewise-constant in time. As a result, Bayesian inference tends to incorporate many years of plant operation, over which there have been significant changes in plant operational and maintenance practices, plant management, etc. These changes can cause significant changes in parameter values over time; however, failure to perform Bayesian inference in the proper time-dependent framework can mask these changes. Failure to question the assumption of constant parameter values, and failure to perform Bayesian inference in the proper time-dependent framework were noted as important issues in NUREG/CR-6813, performed for the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in 2003. That report noted that “industry lacks tools to perform time-trend analysis with Bayesian updating.” This paper describes an application of time-dependent Bayesian inference methods developed for the European Commission Ageing PSA Network. These methods utilize open-source software, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The paper also illustrates the development of a generic prior distribution, which incorporates multiple sources of generic data via weighting factors that address differences in key influences, such as vendor, component boundaries, conditions of the operating environment, etc.

  1. Variation of Biophysical Parameters of the Skin with Age, Gender, and Body Region

    PubMed Central

    Firooz, Alireza; Sadr, Bardia; Babakoohi, Shahab; Sarraf-Yazdy, Maryam; Fanian, Ferial; Kazerouni-Timsar, Ali; Nassiri-Kashani, Mansour; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Dowlati, Yahya

    2012-01-01

    Background. Understanding the physiological, chemical, and biophysical characteristics of the skin helps us to arrange a proper approach to the management of skin diseases. Objective. The aim of this study was to measure 6 biophysical characteristics of normal skin (sebum content, hydration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema index, melanin index, and elasticity) in a normal population and assess the effect of sex, age, and body location on them. Methods. Fifty healthy volunteers in 5 age groups (5 males and females in each) were enrolled in this study. A multifunctional skin physiology monitor (Courage & Khazaka electronic GmbH, Germany) was used to measure skin sebum content, hydration, TEWL, erythema index, melanin index, and elasticity in 8 different locations of the body. Results. There were significant differences between the hydration, melanin index, and elasticity of different age groups. Regarding the locations, forehead had the highest melanin index, where as palm had the lowest value. The mean values of erythema index and melanin index and TEWL were significantly higher in males and anatomic location was a significant independent factor for all of 6 measured parameters. Conclusion. Several biophysical properties of the skin vary among different gender, age groups, and body locations. PMID:22536139

  2. Correcting cosmological parameter biases for all redshift surveys induced by estimating and reweighting redshift distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Markus Michael; Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Seitz, Stella

    2017-04-01

    Photometric redshift uncertainties are a major source of systematic error for ongoing and future photometric surveys. We study different sources of redshift error caused by choosing a suboptimal redshift histogram bin width and propose methods to resolve them. The selection of a too large bin width is shown to oversmooth small-scale structure of the radial distribution of galaxies. This systematic error can significantly shift cosmological parameter constraints by up to 6σ for the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w. Careful selection of bin width can reduce this systematic by a factor of up to 6 as compared with commonly used current binning approaches. We further discuss a generalized resampling method that can correct systematic and statistical errors in cosmological parameter constraints caused by uncertainties in the redshift distribution. This can be achieved without any prior assumptions about the shape of the distribution or the form of the redshift error. Our methodology allows photometric surveys to obtain unbiased cosmological parameter constraints using a minimum number of spectroscopic calibration data. For a DES-like galaxy clustering forecast, we obtain unbiased results with respect to errors caused by suboptimal histogram bin width selection, using only 5k representative spectroscopic calibration objects per tomographic redshift bin.

  3. Sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation for distributed hydrological modeling: potential of variational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaings, W.; Dartus, D.; Le Dimet, F.-X.; Saulnier, G.-M.

    2009-04-01

    Variational methods are widely used for the analysis and control of computationally intensive spatially distributed systems. In particular, the adjoint state method enables a very efficient calculation of the derivatives of an objective function (response function to be analysed or cost function to be optimised) with respect to model inputs. In this contribution, it is shown that the potential of variational methods for distributed catchment scale hydrology should be considered. A distributed flash flood model, coupling kinematic wave overland flow and Green Ampt infiltration, is applied to a small catchment of the Thoré basin and used as a relatively simple (synthetic observations) but didactic application case. It is shown that forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis provide a local but extensive insight on the relation between the assigned model parameters and the simulated hydrological response. Spatially distributed parameter sensitivities can be obtained for a very modest calculation effort (~6 times the computing time of a single model run) and the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the Jacobian matrix provides an interesting perspective for the analysis of the rainfall-runoff relation. For the estimation of model parameters, adjoint-based derivatives were found exceedingly efficient in driving a bound-constrained quasi-Newton algorithm. The reference parameter set is retrieved independently from the optimization initial condition when the very common dimension reduction strategy (i.e. scalar multipliers) is adopted. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis results suggest that most of the variability in this high-dimensional parameter space can be captured with a few orthogonal directions. A parametrization based on the SVD leading singular vectors was found very promising but should be combined with another regularization strategy in order to prevent overfitting.

  4. Numerical simulation of transient groundwater age distributions assisting land and water management in the Middle Wairarapa Valley, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toews, Michael W.; Daughney, Christopher J.; Cornaton, Fabien J.; Morgenstern, Uwe; Evison, Ryan D.; Jackson, Bethanna M.; Petrus, Karine; Mzila, Doug

    2016-12-01

    This study used numerical models to simulate transient groundwater age distributions using a time-marching Laplace transform Galerkin (TMLTG) technique. First, the TMLTG technique was applied to simple box models configured to match idealized lumped parameter models (LPMs). Even for simple box models, time-varying recharge can generate groundwater age distributions with highly irregular shapes that vary over time in response to individual recharge events. Notably, the transient numerical simulations showed that the breakthrough and mean ages are younger than in the steady flow case, and that this difference is greater for sporadic recharge time series than for more regular recharge time series. Second, the TMLTG technique was applied to a transient numerical model of the 270 km2 Middle Wairarapa Valley, New Zealand. To our knowledge this study is the first application of the TMLTG technique to a real-world example, made possible by the data set of tritium measurements that exists for the Wairarapa Valley. Results from a transient mean age simulation shows variation from a few days to over a decade in either temporal or spatial dimensions. Temporal variations of mean age are dependent on seasonal climate and groundwater abstraction. Results also demonstrated important differences between the transient age distributions derived from the TMLTG technique compared to the much simpler steady-state LPMs that are frequently applied to interpret age tracer data. Finally, results had direct application to land and water management, for example for identification of land areas where age distributions vary seasonally, affecting the security of groundwater supplies used for drinking water.

  5. Tsunami source parameters estimated from slip distribution and their relation to tsunami intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakova, Anna; Nosov, Mikhail; Kolesov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    Estimation of the level of tsunami hazard on the basis of earthquake moment magnitude often fails. The most important reason for this is that tsunamis are related to earthquakes in a complex and ambiguous way. In order to reveal a measure of tsunamigenic potential of an earthquake that would be better than moment magnitude of earthquake we introduce a set of tsunami source parameters that can be calculated from co-seismic ocean-bottom deformation and bathymetry. We consider more than two hundred ocean-bottom earthquakes (1923-2014) those for which detailed slip distribution data (Finite Fault Model) are available on USGS, UCSB, Caltech, and eQuake-RC sites. Making use of the Okada formulae the vector fields of co-seismic deformation of ocean bottom are estimated from the slip distribution data. Taking into account bathymetry (GEBCO_08) we determine tsunami source parameters such as double amplitude of bottom deformation, displaced water volume, potential energy of initial elevation, etc. The tsunami source parameters are examined as a function of earthquake moment magnitude. The contribution of horisontal component of ocean bottom deformation to tsunami generation is investigated. We analyse the Soloviev-Imamura tsunami intensity as a function of tsunami source parameters. The possibility of usage of tsunami source parameters instead of moment magnitude in tsunami warning is discussed. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project 14-05-31295

  6. Globally Optimal Multisensor Distributed Random Parameter Matrices Kalman Filtering Fusion with Applications.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yingting; Zhu, Yunmin; Luo, Dandan; Zhou, Jie; Song, Enbin; Wang, Donghua

    2008-12-08

    This paper proposes a new distributed Kalman filtering fusion with random state transition and measurement matrices, i.e., random parameter matrices Kalman filtering. It is proved that under a mild condition the fused state estimate is equivalent to the centralized Kalman filtering using all sensor measurements; therefore, it achieves the best performance. More importantly, this result can be applied to Kalman filtering with uncertain observations including the measurement with a false alarm probability as a special case, as well as, randomly variant dynamic systems with multiple models. Numerical examples are given which support our analysis and show significant performance loss of ignoring the randomness of the parameter matrices.

  7. Globally Optimal Multisensor Distributed Random Parameter Matrices Kalman Filtering Fusion with Applications

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yingting; Zhu, Yunmin; Luo, Dandan; Zhou, Jie; Song, Enbin; Wang, Donghua

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a new distributed Kalman filtering fusion with random state transition and measurement matrices, i.e., random parameter matrices Kalman filtering. It is proved that under a mild condition the fused state estimate is equivalent to the centralized Kalman filtering using all sensor measurements; therefore, it achieves the best performance. More importantly, this result can be applied to Kalman filtering with uncertain observations including the measurement with a false alarm probability as a special case, as well as, randomly variant dynamic systems with multiple models. Numerical examples are given which support our analysis and show significant performance loss of ignoring the randomness of the parameter matrices. PMID:27873977

  8. Angular distributions of the quenched energy flow from dijets with different radius parameters in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinn, Christopher F.

    2016-12-01

    The flow of the quenched energy in imbalanced dijet events has been previously studied by transverse vector sum of charged particles with the CMS detector, namely the missing pT measurement. The results have led to new theoretical insights to order to explain the wide angle radiation. The missing pT technique has been improved so that it allows the study of angular distribution of the energy flow with respect to the dijet axis. The measurements are performed using different distance parameters R with the anti-kT clustering algorithm, which provide information about how the angular distribution of the quenched energy depends on the jet width.

  9. Geostatistical analysis of tritium, groundwater age and other noble gas derived parameters in California.

    PubMed

    Visser, A; Moran, J E; Hillegonds, Darren; Singleton, M J; Kulongoski, Justin T; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, B K

    2016-03-15

    Key characteristics of California groundwater systems related to aquifer vulnerability, sustainability, recharge locations and mechanisms, and anthropogenic impact on recharge are revealed in a spatial geostatistical analysis of a unique data set of tritium, noble gases and other isotopic analyses unprecedented in size at nearly 4000 samples. The correlation length of key groundwater residence time parameters varies between tens of kilometers ((3)H; age) to the order of a hundred kilometers ((4)Heter; (14)C; (3)Hetrit). The correlation length of parameters related to climate, topography and atmospheric processes is on the order of several hundred kilometers (recharge temperature; δ(18)O). Young groundwater ages that highlight regional recharge areas are located in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, in the southern Santa Clara Valley Basin, in the upper LA basin and along unlined canals carrying Colorado River water, showing that much of the recent recharge in central and southern California is dominated by river recharge and managed aquifer recharge. Modern groundwater is found in wells with the top open intervals below 60 m depth in the southeastern San Joaquin Valley, Santa Clara Valley and Los Angeles basin, as the result of intensive pumping and/or managed aquifer recharge operations.

  10. Statistical study of chorus wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere using Ae and solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryan, Homayon; Yearby, Keith; Balikhin, Michael; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Boynton, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Energetic electrons within the Earth's radiation belts represent a serious hazard to geostationary satellites. The interactions of electrons with chorus waves play an important role in both the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons. The common approach is to present model wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere under different values of geomagnetic activity as expressed by the geomagnetic indices. However, it has been shown that only around 50% of geomagnetic storms increase flux of relativistic electrons at geostationary orbit while 20% causes a decrease and the remaining 30% has relatively no effect. This emphasizes the importance of including solar wind parameters such as bulk velocity (V), density (n), flow pressure (P), and the vertical interplanetary magnetic field component (Bz) that are known to be predominately effective in the control of high energy fluxes at the geostationary orbit. Therefore, in the present study the set of parameters of the wave distributions is expanded to include the solar wind parameters in addition to the geomagnetic activity. The present study examines almost 4 years (1 January 2004 to 29 September 2007) of Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuation data from Double Star TC1 combined with geomagnetic indices and solar wind parameters from OMNI database in order to present a comprehensive model of wave magnetic field intensities for the chorus waves as a function of magnetic local time, L shell (L), magnetic latitude (λm), geomagnetic activity, and solar wind parameters. Generally, the results indicate that the intensity of chorus emission is not only dependent upon geomagnetic activity but also dependent on solar wind parameters with velocity and southward interplanetary magnetic field Bs (Bz < 0), evidently the most influential solar wind parameters. The largest peak chorus intensities in the order of 50 pT are observed during active conditions, high solar wind velocities, low solar wind densities, high

  11. Lower bound on reliability for Weibull distribution when shape parameter is not estimated accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhaofeng; Porter, Albert A.

    1990-01-01

    The mathematical relationships between the shape parameter Beta and estimates of reliability and a life limit lower bound for the two parameter Weibull distribution are investigated. It is shown that under rather general conditions, both the reliability lower bound and the allowable life limit lower bound (often called a tolerance limit) have unique global minimums over a range of Beta. Hence lower bound solutions can be obtained without assuming or estimating Beta. The existence and uniqueness of these lower bounds are proven. Some real data examples are given to show how these lower bounds can be easily established and to demonstrate their practicality. The method developed here has proven to be extremely useful when using the Weibull distribution in analysis of no-failure or few-failures data. The results are applicable not only in the aerospace industry but anywhere that system reliabilities are high.

  12. Lower bound on reliability for Weibull distribution when shape parameter is not estimated accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhaofeng; Porter, Albert A.

    1991-01-01

    The mathematical relationships between the shape parameter Beta and estimates of reliability and a life limit lower bound for the two parameter Weibull distribution are investigated. It is shown that under rather general conditions, both the reliability lower bound and the allowable life limit lower bound (often called a tolerance limit) have unique global minimums over a range of Beta. Hence lower bound solutions can be obtained without assuming or estimating Beta. The existence and uniqueness of these lower bounds are proven. Some real data examples are given to show how these lower bounds can be easily established and to demonstrate their practicality. The method developed here has proven to be extremely useful when using the Weibull distribution in analysis of no-failure or few-failures data. The results are applicable not only in the aerospace industry but anywhere that system reliabilities are high.

  13. Self-consistent physical parameters for five intermediate-age SMC stellar clusters from CMD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, B.; Kerber, L. O.; Barbuy, B.; Santiago, B.; Ortolani, S.; Balbinot, E.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Stellar clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are useful probes for studying the chemical and dynamical evolution of this neighbouring dwarf galaxy, enabling inspection of a large period covering over 10 Gyr. Aims: The main goals of this work are the derivation of age, metallicity, distance modulus, reddening, core radius, and central density profiles for six sample clusters, in order to place them in the context of the Small Cloud evolution. The studied clusters are AM 3, HW 1, HW 34, HW 40, Lindsay 2, and Lindsay 3; HW 1, HW 34, and Lindsay 2 are studied for the first time. Methods: Optical colour-magnitude diagrams (V,B - V CMDs) and radial density profiles were built from images obtained with the 4.1 m Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, reaching V ~ 23. The determination of structural parameters were carried out by applying King profile fitting. The other parameters were derived in a self-consistent way by means of isochrone fitting, which uses likelihood statistics to identify the synthetic CMDs that best reproduce the observed ones. Membership probabilities were determined comparing the cluster and control field CMDs. Completeness and photometric uncertainties were obtained by performing artificial star tests. Results: The results confirm that these clusters (except HW 34, identified as a field fluctuation) are intermediate-age clusters, with ages between 1.2 Gyr (Lindsay 3) and ~5.0 Gyr (HW 1). In particular HW 1, Lindsay 2 and Lindsay 3 are located in a region that we called West Halo, where studies of ages and metallicity gradients are still lacking. Moreover, Lindsay 2 was identified as a moderately metal-poor cluster with [Fe/H] = -1.4 ± 0.2 dex, lower than expected from the age-metallicity relation by Pagel & Tautvaisiene (1998). We also found distances varying from ~53 kpc to 66 kpc, compatible with the large depth of the SMC. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which

  14. Modifications to Computer Program for Parameter Estimation for the Generalized Gamma Distribution,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    10 EVALUATION OF MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD METHOD .. .. ..... 13 DIGITAL PROGRAM DESCRIPTION .. .... ...... .... 14 INPUT DATA...Unit Number 1-1506-012. INTRODUCTION A computerized procedure for evaluating the parameters of the generalized gamma distribution from a set of random...0n 0" 0" C/) Cd) V) 12 EVALUATION OF THE MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD METHOD The method previously employed to determine estimation param- eters for the

  15. Structural Parameters of Seven Small Magellanic Cloud Intermediate-Age and Old Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatt, Katharina; Grebel, Eva K.; Gallagher, John S., III; Nota, Antonella; Sabbi, Elena; Sirianni, Marco; Clementini, Gisella; Da Costa, Gary; Tosi, Monica; Harbeck, Daniel; Koch, Andreas; Kayser, Andrea

    2009-11-01

    We present structural parameters for the seven intermediate-age and old star clusters NGC 121, Lindsay 1, Kron 3, NGC 339, NGC 416, Lindsay 38, and NGC 419 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We fit King profiles and Elson, Fall, and Freeman profiles to both surface-brightness and star-count data taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Clusters older than ~1 Gyr show a spread in cluster core radii that increases with age, while the youngest clusters have relatively compact cores. No evidence for post-core-collapse clusters was found. We find no correlation between core radius and distance from the SMC center, although consistent with other studies of dwarf galaxies, some relatively old and massive clusters have low densities. The oldest SMC star cluster, the only globular NGC121, is the most elliptical object of the studied clusters. No correlation is seen between ellipticity and distance from the SMC center. The structures of these massive intermediate-age (1-8 Gyr) SMC star clusters thus appear to primarily result from internal evolutionary processes. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-10396.

  16. Reconstruction of air-shower parameters for large-scale radio detectors using the lateral distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostunin, D.; Bezyazeekov, P. A.; Hiller, R.; Schröder, F. G.; Lenok, V.; Levinson, E.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate features of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of the radio signal emitted by cosmic ray air-showers with primary energies Epr > 0.1 EeV and its connection to air-shower parameters such as energy and shower maximum using CoREAS simulations made for the configuration of the Tunka-Rex antenna array. Taking into account all significant contributions to the total radio emission, such as by the geomagnetic effect, the charge excess, and the atmospheric refraction we parameterize the radio LDF. This parameterization is two-dimensional and has several free parameters. The large number of free parameters is not suitable for experiments of sparse arrays operating at low SNR (signal-to-noise ratios). Thus, exploiting symmetries, we decrease the number of free parameters based on the shower geometry and reduce the LDF to a simple one-dimensional function. The remaining parameters can be fit with a small number of points, i.e. as few as the signal from three antennas above detection threshold. Finally, we present a method for the reconstruction of air-shower parameters, in particular, energy and Xmax (shower maximum), which can be reached with a theoretical accuracy of better than 15% and 30 g/cm2, respectively.

  17. Different Estimation Procedures for the Parameters of the Extended Exponential Geometric Distribution for Medical Data

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Pedro L.; Perdoná, Gleici S. C.

    2016-01-01

    We have considered different estimation procedures for the unknown parameters of the extended exponential geometric distribution. We introduce different types of estimators such as the maximum likelihood, method of moments, modified moments, L-moments, ordinary and weighted least squares, percentile, maximum product of spacings, and minimum distance estimators. The different estimators are compared by using extensive numerical simulations. We discovered that the maximum product of spacings estimator has the smallest mean square errors and mean relative estimates, nearest to one, for both parameters, proving to be the most efficient method compared to other methods. Combining these results with the good properties of the method such as consistency, asymptotic efficiency, normality, and invariance we conclude that the maximum product of spacings estimator is the best one for estimating the parameters of the extended exponential geometric distribution in comparison with its competitors. For the sake of illustration, we apply our proposed methodology in two important data sets, demonstrating that the EEG distribution is a simple alternative to be used for lifetime data. PMID:27579052

  18. Shape parameters and distribution of macroborings: St. Croix, US Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.B.

    1983-03-01

    Many marine invertebrates that inhabit coral reefs excavate the coral substrate in order to create protective domiciles. In turn, the organisms comprising the coral-reef community display a pronounced biotic zonation that can be closely correlated to bathymetry. This study considers the distribution of these endolithic organisms covering a variety of reef habitats. Vast differences in the major environmental parameters have a profound effect upon the distribution patterns of macroboring organisms and govern the boring morphologies. Of these parameters, hydraulic energy has the strongest influences on the morphotypes and distributions of the macroborings. An equivalent macroboring assemblage dominated by sponges and bivalves prevails in both the shallow back-reef zone and the deep fore-reef zone, both of which are low-energy settings. Boring assemblages in more turbulent zones within the reef consist of polychaete and sipunculid worms, sea urchins, and barnacles, with sponges and bivalves less dominant and less abundant. Other environmental factors which may be important locally include: nutrient availability, photic energy, sediment size and sedimentation rate, competition for substrate, and predation pressure upon the live coral tissue. Shape parameters for different boring types are provided as a means of identification and as an indication of the environmental control upon boring shape. An understanding of the variability of boring types with respect to the ambient environment within modern reefs facilitates the use of borings as paleoenvironmental indicators within Cenozoic carbonate systems.

  19. Improving flash flood forecasting with distributed hydrological model by parameter optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yangbo

    2016-04-01

    In China, flash food is usually regarded as flood occured in small and medium sized watersheds with drainage area less than 200 km2, and is mainly induced by heavy rains, and occurs in where hydrological observation is lacked. Flash flood is widely observed in China, and is the flood causing the most casualties nowadays in China. Due to hydrological data scarcity, lumped hydrological model is difficult to be employed for flash flood forecasting which requires lots of observed hydrological data to calibrate model parameters. Physically based distributed hydrological model discrete the terrain of the whole watershed into a number of grid cells at fine resolution, assimilate different terrain data and precipitation to different cells, and derive model parameteris from the terrain properties, thus having the potential to be used in flash flood forecasting and improving flash flood prediction capability. In this study, the Liuxihe Model, a physically based distributed hydrological model mainly proposed for watershed flood forecasting is employed to simulate flash floods in the Ganzhou area in southeast China, and models have been set up in 5 watersheds. Model parameters have been derived from the terrain properties including the DEM, the soil type and land use type, but the result shows that the flood simulation uncertainty is high, which may be caused by parameter uncertainty, and some kind of uncertainty control is needed before the model could be used in real-time flash flood forecastin. Considering currently many Chinese small and medium sized watersheds has set up hydrological observation network, and a few flood events could be collected, it may be used for model parameter optimization. For this reason, an automatic model parameter optimization algorithm using Particle Swam Optimization(PSO) is developed to optimize the model parameters, and it has been found that model parameters optimized even only with one observed flood events could largely reduce the flood

  20. Development of a distributed-parameter mathematical model for simulation of cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A one-dimensional distributed-parameter dynamic model of a cryogenic wind tunnel was developed which accounts for internal and external heat transfer, viscous momentum losses, and slotted-test-section dynamics. Boundary conditions imposed by liquid-nitrogen injection, gas venting, and the tunnel fan were included. A time-dependent numerical solution to the resultant set of partial differential equations was obtained on a CDC CYBER 203 vector-processing digital computer at a usable computational rate. Preliminary computational studies were performed by using parameters of the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Studies were performed by using parameters from the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The NTF wind-tunnel model was used in the design of control loops for Mach number, total temperature, and total pressure and for determining interactions between the control loops. It was employed in the application of optimal linear-regulator theory and eigenvalue-placement techniques to develop Mach number control laws.

  1. Photoelectron Angular Distribution Asymmetry Parameters for Photodetachment of Li^- and Al^-.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Nan; Starace, Anthony F.

    1997-04-01

    Calculation of photoelectron angular distribution asymmetry parameters for photodetachment precesses is a more stringent test for theory than calculation of partial or total cross sections. Since asymmetry parameters involve ratios of transition matrix elements of different channels, they are particularly sensitive to the resonance behavior of transition matrix elements. We present the asymmetry parameters for photodetachment of Li^- (2s^2 ^1S) and Al^- (3s^23p^2 ^3P) using the eigenchannel R-matrix method(U.Fano and C.M. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 31), 1573 (1973)^,(C.H. Greene, in Fundamental Processes of Atomic Dynamics,) edited by J.S. Briggs, H. Kleinpoppen, and H.O. Lutz (Plenum, New York, 1988), pp.105-127.. Our results are in good agreement with the available Al^- photodetachment measurements(A.M. Covington et al.), U of Nevada-Reno, private communication..

  2. Mathematical results new and revisited on the distribution of groundwater age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, T. R.; Massoudieh, A.; Foglia, L.

    2009-12-01

    The equation governing the distribution of groundwater age under transient, 3D flow conditions is analyzed under several simplifying cases to illustrate some relations among groundwater age equations and some results about steady-state and transient age distributions. First linkages are made among the various groundwater age equations recently published, showing them all to be different simplifications of the same equation. The most basic analysis in 1D shows that groundwater age is at lease inverse-Gaussian distributed. More generally, steady state age moments, when they exist, are given by breakthrough curve moments and this allows us to use the temporal moment results from the solute transport literature as steady state age moments. In particular, age moment equations with arbitrary diffusive mass transfer (two-domain, radial microscopic, powerlaw) at steady state are already available as the temporal flux moment equations for solute transport under analogous boundary conditions. Lastly transient simulations of age in 1D are calculated to illustrate several aspects of the evolution of groundwater age distributions in time in the presences of multidomain diffusive transport.

  3. The Aging Teaching Workforce: A Snapshot. Age Distribution of Public School Teachers, by State, 2003-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This analysis on the age distribution of public school teachers have been prepared by Dr. Richard Ingersoll for the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF), using data gathered through the U.S. Department of Education's Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), which is administered every four years. The data for this analysis are…

  4. Robust Estimation of the Parameters of g - and - h Distributions, with Applications to Outlier Detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yihuan; Iglewicz, Boris; Chervoneva, Inna

    2014-07-01

    The g - and - h distributional family is generated from a relatively simple transformation of the standard normal and can approximate a broad spectrum of distributions. Consequently, it is easy to use in simulation studies and has been applied in multiple areas, including risk management, stock return analysis and missing data imputation studies. A rapidly convergent quantile based least squares (QLS) estimation method to fit the g - and - h distributional family parameters is proposed and then extended to a robust version. The robust version is then used as a more general outlier detection approach. Several properties of the QLS method are derived and comparisons made with competing methods through simulation. Real data examples of microarray and stock index data are used as illustrations.

  5. [Distribution of the different patterns of aging over the system of animal world].

    PubMed

    Popov, I Iu

    2011-01-01

    Since the system of animal world reflects evolutionary trends, an analysis of distribution of patterns of aging over this system provides information on the causes of the formation of differences among them. In this paper the system of the main animal groups in form of a table is presented, and the distribution of patterns demonstrating minimum and maximum of aging is discussed. Meanwhile the colonial animals are considered as a "minimum of aging", the animals demonstrating drastic self-liquidation after reproduction are considered as a "maximum of aging" (the most well-known example is the pink salmon). It is shown, that as far as the degree of difference from the simplest ancestor increases in process of evolution, the increase of the manifestations of aging takes place. Slow aging of relatively simple organisms cannot be a direct source of measures to prevent aging of complex ones.

  6. Age-distribution estimation for karst groundwater: Issues of parameterization and complexity in inverse modeling by convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Andrew J.; Putnam, Larry D.

    2009-10-01

    SummaryConvolution modeling is useful for investigating the temporal distribution of groundwater age based on environmental tracers. The framework of a quasi-transient convolution model that is applicable to two-domain flow in karst aquifers is presented. The model was designed to provide an acceptable level of statistical confidence in parameter estimates when only chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and tritium ( 3H) data are available. We show how inverse modeling and uncertainty assessment can be used to constrain model parameterization to a level warranted by available data while allowing major aspects of the flow system to be examined. As an example, the model was applied to water from a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in central USA with input functions of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and 3H, and was calibrated to several samples collected during a 16-year period. A bimodal age distribution was modeled to represent quick and slow flow less than 50 years old. The effects of pumping and hydraulic head on the relative volumetric fractions of these domains were found to be influential factors for transient flow. Quick flow and slow flow were estimated to be distributed mainly within the age ranges of 0-2 and 26-41 years, respectively. The fraction of long-term flow (>50 years) was estimated but was not dateable. The different tracers had different degrees of influence on parameter estimation and uncertainty assessments, where 3H was the most critical, and CFC-113 was least influential.

  7. Age-distribution estimation for karst groundwater: Issues of parameterization and complexity in inverse modeling by convolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Putnam, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    Convolution modeling is useful for investigating the temporal distribution of groundwater age based on environmental tracers. The framework of a quasi-transient convolution model that is applicable to two-domain flow in karst aquifers is presented. The model was designed to provide an acceptable level of statistical confidence in parameter estimates when only chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and tritium (3H) data are available. We show how inverse modeling and uncertainty assessment can be used to constrain model parameterization to a level warranted by available data while allowing major aspects of the flow system to be examined. As an example, the model was applied to water from a pumped well open to the Madison aquifer in central USA with input functions of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and 3H, and was calibrated to several samples collected during a 16-year period. A bimodal age distribution was modeled to represent quick and slow flow less than 50 years old. The effects of pumping and hydraulic head on the relative volumetric fractions of these domains were found to be influential factors for transient flow. Quick flow and slow flow were estimated to be distributed mainly within the age ranges of 0-2 and 26-41 years, respectively. The fraction of long-term flow (>50 years) was estimated but was not dateable. The different tracers had different degrees of influence on parameter estimation and uncertainty assessments, where 3H was the most critical, and CFC-113 was least influential.

  8. Martian channels and valleys: Their characteristics, distribution, and age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Clow, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    All Martian channels and valleys visible at a resolution of 125 to 300 meters between 65??N and 65??S were mapped at a scale of 1:5,000,000 and the maps then digitized. Correlations of valley presence with other surface features show that almost all valleys are in the old cratered terrain. preferentially in areas of low albedo, low violet/red ratios, and high elevation. The networks are open, the individual drainage basins are small relative to Earth, and large distances separate the basins, features which all suggest an immature drainage system. The simplest explanation of the correlations and the restriction of valley networks to old terrain is that the channels themselves are old, and that the climatic conditions necessary for their formation did not prevail for long after the decline in the cratering rate around 3.9 billion years ago. Two types of outflow channel are distinguished: unconfined, in which broad swaths of terrain are scoured, and confined, in which flow is restricted to discrete channels. The outflow channels have a wide range of ages and may form under present climatic conditions. Fretted channels are largely restrited to two latitude belts centered on 40??N and 45??S, where relatively rapid erosion along escarpments results from mass wasting. They probably form by enlargement of preexisting channels by escarpment retreat. ?? 1981.

  9. Investigating the age distribution of fracture discharge using multiple environmental tracers, Bedrichov Tunnel, Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, W. Payton; Hokr, Milan; Shao, Hua; Balvin, Ales; Kunz, Herbert; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-10-19

    We investigated the transit time distribution (TTD) of discharge collected from fractures in the Bedrichov Tunnel, Czech Republic, using lumped parameter models and multiple environmental tracers. We then utilize time series of δ18O, δ2H and 3H along with CFC measurements from individual fractures in the Bedrichov Tunnel of the Czech Republic to investigate the TTD, and the uncertainty in estimated mean travel time in several fracture networks of varying length and discharge. We also compare several TTDs, including the dispersion distribution, the exponential distribution, and a developed TTD which includes the effects of matrix diffusion. The effect of seasonal recharge is explored by comparing several seasonal weighting functions to derive the historical recharge concentration. We identify best fit mean ages for each TTD by minimizing the error-weighted, multi-tracer χ2 residual for each seasonal weighting function. We use this methodology to test the ability of each TTD and seasonal input function to fit the observed tracer concentrations, and the effect of choosing different TTD and seasonal recharge functions on the mean age estimation. We find that the estimated mean transit time is a function of both the assumed TTD and seasonal weighting function. Best fits as measured by the χ2 value were achieved for the dispersion model using the seasonal input function developed here for two of the three modeled sites, while at the third site, equally good fits were achieved with the exponential model and the dispersion model and our seasonal input function. The average mean transit time for all TTDs and seasonal input functions converged to similar values at each location. The sensitivity of the estimated mean transit time to the seasonal weighting function was equal to that of the TTD. These results indicated that understanding seasonality of recharge is at least as important as the uncertainty in the flow path distribution in

  10. Investigating the age distribution of fracture discharge using multiple environmental tracers, Bedrichov Tunnel, Czech Republic

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, W. Payton; Hokr, Milan; Shao, Hua; ...

    2016-10-19

    We investigated the transit time distribution (TTD) of discharge collected from fractures in the Bedrichov Tunnel, Czech Republic, using lumped parameter models and multiple environmental tracers. We then utilize time series of δ18O, δ2H and 3H along with CFC measurements from individual fractures in the Bedrichov Tunnel of the Czech Republic to investigate the TTD, and the uncertainty in estimated mean travel time in several fracture networks of varying length and discharge. We also compare several TTDs, including the dispersion distribution, the exponential distribution, and a developed TTD which includes the effects of matrix diffusion. The effect of seasonal rechargemore » is explored by comparing several seasonal weighting functions to derive the historical recharge concentration. We identify best fit mean ages for each TTD by minimizing the error-weighted, multi-tracer χ2 residual for each seasonal weighting function. We use this methodology to test the ability of each TTD and seasonal input function to fit the observed tracer concentrations, and the effect of choosing different TTD and seasonal recharge functions on the mean age estimation. We find that the estimated mean transit time is a function of both the assumed TTD and seasonal weighting function. Best fits as measured by the χ2 value were achieved for the dispersion model using the seasonal input function developed here for two of the three modeled sites, while at the third site, equally good fits were achieved with the exponential model and the dispersion model and our seasonal input function. The average mean transit time for all TTDs and seasonal input functions converged to similar values at each location. The sensitivity of the estimated mean transit time to the seasonal weighting function was equal to that of the TTD. These results indicated that understanding seasonality of recharge is at least as important as the uncertainty in the flow path distribution in fracture networks and that

  11. The distribution of waves in the inner magnetosphere as a function of solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryan, Homayon; Balikhin, Michael A.; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Yearby, Keith

    Energetic electrons within the Earth’s radiation belts represent a serious hazard to geostationary satellites. The interactions of electrons with chorus waves play an important role in both the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons. Studies of the evolution of energetic electron fluxes rely heavily on numerical codes in order to model energy and pitch angle diffusion due to electron interaction with plasma waves in the frame of quasilinear approximation. Application of these codes requires knowledge of statistical wave models to present wave distributions in the magnetosphere. A number of such models are based on CRESS, Cluster, THEMIS and other mission data. These models present wave distributions as a function of L-shell, magnetic local time, magnetic latitude and geomagnetic activity expressed by geomagnetic indices (Kp or Ae). However, it has been shown by G. Reeves and co-authors that only 50% of geomagnetic storms increase flux of relativistic electrons at GEO while 20% cause a decrease. This emphasizes the importance of including solar wind parameters in addition to geomagnetic indices. The present study examines almost four years (01, January, 2004 to 29, September, 2007) of STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuation) data from Double Star TC1 combined with geomagnetic indices and solar wind parameters from OMNI database in order to present a comprehensive model of chorus wave intensities as a function of L-shell, magnetic local time, magnetic latitude, geomagnetic indices and solar wind parameters. The results show that chorus emission is not only sub-storm dependent but also dependent upon solar wind parameters with solar wind velocity evidently the most influential solar wind parameter. The largest peak intensities are observed for lower band chorus during active conditions, high solar wind velocity, low density and high pressure.

  12. Paleoclimate Signals and Age Distributions from 41 Public Water Works in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broers, H. P.; Weert, J. D.; Sültenfuß, J.; Aeschbach, W.; Vonhof, H.; Casteleijns, J.

    2015-12-01

    Knowing the age distribution of water abstracted from public water supply wells is of prime importance to ensure customer trust and to underpin predictions of water quality evolution in time. Especially, age distributions enable the assessment of the vulnerability of well fields, both in relation to surface sources of contamination as in relation to subsurface sources, such as possibly related to shale gas extraction. We sampled the raw water of 41 large public supply well fields which represents a mixture of groundwaters and used the a discrete travel time distribution model (DTTDM, Visser et al. 2013, WRR) in order to quantify the age distribution of the mixture. Measurements included major ion chemistry, 3H, 3He, 4He, 18O, 2H, 14C, 13CDIC and 13CCH4 and the full range of noble gases. The heavier noble gases enable the calculation of the Noble Gas Temperature (NGT) which characterizes the temperature of past recharge conditions. The 14C apparent age of each mixture was derived correcting for dead carbon sources. The DTTDM used the 3H and 4He concentrations, the 14C apparent age and the NGT as the four distinctive tracers to estimate the age distributions. Especially 4He and NGT provide extra information on the older part of the age distributions and showed that the 14C apparent ages are often the result of mixing of waters ranging between 2.000 and 35.000 years old, instead of being discrete ages with a limited .variance as sometimes assumed.The results show a large range of age distributions, comprising vulnerable well fields with >60% young water (< 100 yrs) and well-protected well fields with >85% very old groundwater (> 25 kyrs) and all forms of TTD's in between. The age distributions are well in correspondence with the hydrogeological setting of the well fields; all well fields with an age distribution skewed towards older ages are in the Roer Valley Graben structure, where fluvial and marine aquitards provide protection from recent recharge. Especially

  13. Paleoclimate signals and age distributions from 41 public water works in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broers, Hans Peter; de Weert, Jasperien; Sueltenfuss, Juergen; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Vonhof, Hubert; Casteleijns, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    Knowing the age distribution of water abstracted from public water supply wells is of prime importance to ensure customer trust and to underpin predictions of water quality evolution in time. Especially, age distributions enable the assessment of the vulnerability of well fields, both in relation to surface sources of contamination as in relation to subsurface sources, such as possibly related to shale gas extraction. We sampled the raw water of 41 large public supply well fields which represents a mixture of groundwaters and used the a discrete travel time distribution model (DTTDM, Visser et al. 2013, WRR) in order to quantify the age distribution of the mixture. Measurements included major ion chemistry, 3H, 3He, 4He, 18O, 2H, 14C, 13CDIC and 13CCH4 and the full range of noble gases. The heavier noble gases enable the calculation of the Noble Gas Temperature (NGT) which characterizes the temperature of past recharge conditions. The 14C apparent age of each mixture was derived correcting for dead carbon sources and included carbonate dissolution and methanogenesis as the defining processes. The DTTDM used the 3H and 4He concentrations, the 14C apparent age and the NGT as the four distinctive tracers to estimate the age distributions. The use of 18O was less effective because the processes that led to more enriched values are too uncertain . Especially 4He and NGT provide extra information on the older part of the age distributions and showed that the 14C apparent ages are often the result of mixing of waters ranging between 2.000 and 35.000 years old, instead of being discrete ages with a limited .variance as sometimes assumed. The results show a large range of age distributions, comprising vulnerable well fields with >60% young water (< 100 yrs) and well-protected well fields with >85% very old groundwater (> 25 kyrs) and all forms of TTD's in between. The age distributions are well in correspondence with the hydrogeological setting of the well fields; all well

  14. Statistical study of waves distribution in the inner magnetosphere using geomagnetic indices and solar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryan, H.; Yearby, K.; Balikhin, M. A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Agapitov, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction of gyroresonant wave particles with chorus waves largely determine the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts that effects the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons. The common approach is to present model waves distribution in the inner magnetosphere under different values of geomagnetic activity as expressed by the geomagnetic indices. However it is known that solar wind parameters such as bulk velocity (V) and density (n) are more effective in the control of high energy fluxes at the geostationary orbit. Therefore in the present study the set of parameters of the wave distribution is expanded to include the solar wind parameters in addition to the geomagnetic indices. The present study examines almost four years (01, January, 2004 to 29, September, 2007) of Cluster STAFF-SA, Double Star TC1 and OMNI data in order to present a combined model of wave magnetic field intensities for the chorus waves as a function of magnetic local time (MLT), L-shell (L*), geomagnetic activity, and solar wind velocity and density. Generally, the largest wave intensities are observed during average solar wind velocities (3006cm-3. On the other hand the wave intensity is lower and limited between 06:00 to 18:00 MLT for V<300kms-1 and V>700kms-1.

  15. Scaling Relations Between Mainshock Source Parameters and Aftershock Distributions for Use in Aftershock Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, J.; Jordan, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    Aftershocks are often used to delineate the mainshock rupture zone retrospectively. In aftershock forecasting on the other hand, the problem is to use mainshock rupture area to determine the aftershock zone prospectively. The procedures for this type of prediction are not as well developed and have been restricted to simple parameterizations such as the Utsu-Seki (1955) scaling relation between mainshock energy and aftershock area (Ogata and Zhueng, 2006). With a focus on improving current forecasting methods, we investigate the relationship between spatial source parameters that can be rapidly computed (spatial centroid and characteristic dimensions) and corresponding spatial measures of the aftershock distribution. For a set of about 30 large events, we either extracted source parameters from the McGuire et al (2002) finite moment tensor (FMT) catalog, or computed them from the online SRCMOD database (Mai, 2004). We identified aftershocks with windowing and scale-free methods, and computed both L1 and L2 measures of their distributions. Our comparisons produce scaling relations among the characteristic dimensions that can be used to initiate aftershock forecasts. By using rapidly-determined source parameters, we can decrease the forecasting latency and thus improve the probability gain of the forecasting methods.

  16. An evaluation of earthquake hazard parameters in the Iranian Plateau based on the Gumbel III distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hiwa; Bayrak, Yusuf

    2016-04-01

    The Gumbel's third asymptotic distribution (GIII) of the extreme value method is employed to evaluate the earthquake hazard parameters in the Iranian Plateau. This research quantifies spatial mapping of earthquake hazard parameters like annual and 100-year mode beside their 90 % probability of not being exceeded (NBE) in the Iranian Plateau. Therefore, we used a homogeneous and complete earthquake catalogue during the period 1900-2013 with magnitude M w ≥ 4.0, and the Iranian Plateau is separated into equal area mesh of 1° late × 1° long. The estimated result of annual mode with 90 % probability of NBE is expected to exceed the values of M w 6.0 in the Eastern part of Makran, most parts of Central and East Iran, Kopeh Dagh, Alborz, Azerbaijan, and SE Zagros. The 100-year mode with 90 % probability of NBE is expected to overpass the value of M w 7.0 in the Eastern part of Makran, Central and East Iran, Alborz, Kopeh Dagh, and Azerbaijan. The spatial distribution of 100-year mode with 90 % probability of NBE uncovers the high values of earthquake hazard parameters which are frequently connected with the main tectonic regimes of the studied area. It appears that there is a close communication among the seismicity and the tectonics of the region.

  17. Size-Structured Population Model with Distributed States in The Recruitment: Approximation and Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyu

    We consider a size-structured population model where individuals may be recruited into the population at different sizes. First and second order finite difference schemes are developed to approximate the solution of the model. The convergence of the approximations to a unique weak solution is proved. We then show that as the distribution of the new recruits become concentrated at the smallest size, the weak solution of the distributed states-at-birth model converges to the weak solution of the classical Sinko-Streifer type size-structured model in the weak* topology. Numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the achievement of the desired accuracy of the two methods for smooth solutions as well as the superior performance of the second-order method in resolving solution-discontinuities. A least-squares method is developed for estimating parameters in a size-structured population model with distributed states-at-birth from field data. The first and second order finite difference schemes for approximating solution of the model are utilized in the least-squares problem. Convergence results for the computed parameters are established. Numerical results demonstrating the efficiency of the technique are provided.

  18. Distributed bees algorithm parameters optimization for a cost efficient target allocation in swarms of robots.

    PubMed

    Jevtić, Aleksandar; Gutiérrez, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Swarms of robots can use their sensing abilities to explore unknown environments and deploy on sites of interest. In this task, a large number of robots is more effective than a single unit because of their ability to quickly cover the area. However, the coordination of large teams of robots is not an easy problem, especially when the resources for the deployment are limited. In this paper, the distributed bees algorithm (DBA), previously proposed by the authors, is optimized and applied to distributed target allocation in swarms of robots. Improved target allocation in terms of deployment cost efficiency is achieved through optimization of the DBA's control parameters by means of a genetic algorithm. Experimental results show that with the optimized set of parameters, the deployment cost measured as the average distance traveled by the robots is reduced. The cost-efficient deployment is in some cases achieved at the expense of increased robots' distribution error. Nevertheless, the proposed approach allows the swarm to adapt to the operating conditions when available resources are scarce.

  19. Distributed Bees Algorithm Parameters Optimization for a Cost Efficient Target Allocation in Swarms of Robots

    PubMed Central

    Jevtić, Aleksandar; Gutiérrez, Álvaro

    2011-01-01

    Swarms of robots can use their sensing abilities to explore unknown environments and deploy on sites of interest. In this task, a large number of robots is more effective than a single unit because of their ability to quickly cover the area. However, the coordination of large teams of robots is not an easy problem, especially when the resources for the deployment are limited. In this paper, the Distributed Bees Algorithm (DBA), previously proposed by the authors, is optimized and applied to distributed target allocation in swarms of robots. Improved target allocation in terms of deployment cost efficiency is achieved through optimization of the DBA’s control parameters by means of a Genetic Algorithm. Experimental results show that with the optimized set of parameters, the deployment cost measured as the average distance traveled by the robots is reduced. The cost-efficient deployment is in some cases achieved at the expense of increased robots’ distribution error. Nevertheless, the proposed approach allows the swarm to adapt to the operating conditions when available resources are scarce. PMID:22346677

  20. Bayesian inference of genetic parameters based on conditional decompositions of multivariate normal distributions.

    PubMed

    Hallander, Jon; Waldmann, Patrik; Wang, Chunkao; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2010-06-01

    It is widely recognized that the mixed linear model is an important tool for parameter estimation in the analysis of complex pedigrees, which includes both pedigree and genomic information, and where mutually dependent genetic factors are often assumed to follow multivariate normal distributions of high dimension. We have developed a Bayesian statistical method based on the decomposition of the multivariate normal prior distribution into products of conditional univariate distributions. This procedure permits computationally demanding genetic evaluations of complex pedigrees, within the user-friendly computer package WinBUGS. To demonstrate and evaluate the flexibility of the method, we analyzed two example pedigrees: a large noninbred pedigree of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) that includes additive and dominance polygenic relationships and a simulated pedigree where genomic relationships have been calculated on the basis of a dense marker map. The analysis showed that our method was fast and provided accurate estimates and that it should therefore be a helpful tool for estimating genetic parameters of complex pedigrees quickly and reliably.

  1. College and University Age Distribution of Students New York State, Fall 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Information Center on Education.

    Data summaries on college and university age distribution of New York State students in the fall of 1987 are presented. Information was obtained from the 1987-88 HEDS/IPEDS survey from NYSED-2.6, "Enrollment by Level, Age, Cohort, and Sex, Fall 1987." The 12 tables are as follows (all for institutions of higher education by institutional…

  2. Gender-specific impact of personal health parameters on individual brain aging in cognitively unimpaired elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Katja; Ristow, Michael; Gaser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Aging alters brain structure and function. Personal health markers and modifiable lifestyle factors are related to individual brain aging as well as to the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study used a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based biomarker to assess the effects of 17 health markers on individual brain aging in cognitively unimpaired elderly subjects. By employing kernel regression methods, the expression of normal brain-aging patterns forms the basis to estimate the brain age of a given new subject. If the estimated age is higher than the chronological age, a positive brain age gap estimation (BrainAGE) score indicates accelerated atrophy and is considered a risk factor for developing AD. Within this cross-sectional, multi-center study 228 cognitively unimpaired elderly subjects (118 males) completed an MRI at 1.5Tesla, physiological and blood parameter assessments. The multivariate regression model combining all measured parameters was capable of explaining 39% of BrainAGE variance in males (p < 0.001) and 32% in females (p < 0.01). Furthermore, markers of the metabolic syndrome as well as markers of liver and kidney functions were profoundly related to BrainAGE scores in males (p < 0.05). In females, markers of liver and kidney functions as well as supply of vitamin B12 were significantly related to BrainAGE (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in cognitively unimpaired elderly subjects several clinical markers of poor health were associated with subtle structural changes in the brain that reflect accelerated aging, whereas protective effects on brain aging were observed for markers of good health. Additionally, the relations between individual brain aging and miscellaneous health markers show gender-specific patterns. The BrainAGE approach may thus serve as a clinically relevant biomarker for the detection of subtly abnormal patterns of brain aging probably preceding cognitive decline and development of AD. PMID:24904408

  3. PATTERNS OF ROOT GROWTH, TURNOVER, AND DISTRIBUTION IN DIFFERENT AGED PONDEROSA PINE STANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study are to examine the spatial distribution of roots in relation to canopy size and tree distribution, and to determine if rates of fine root production and turnover are similar in the different aged stands. During the fall of 1998, 54 clear plexiglass t...

  4. Creating Composite Age Groups to Smooth Percentile Rank Distributions of Small Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Francesca; Olson, Amy; Bansal, Naveen

    2011-01-01

    Individually administered tests are often normed on small samples, a process that may result in irregularities within and across various age or grade distributions. Test users often smooth distributions guided by Thurstone assumptions (normality and linearity) to result in norms that adhere to assumptions made about how the data should look. Test…

  5. Radar detection of signals with unknown parameters in K-distributed clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, E.; Longo, M.; Lops, M.; Ullo, S. L.

    1991-04-01

    The detection of signals with unknown parameters in correlated K-distributed noise, using the generalized Neyman-Pearson strategy, is considered. The a priori uncertainty on the signal is removed by performing a maximum likelihood estimate of the unknown parameters. The resulting receivers can be regarded as a generalization of the conventional detector, but for a zero-memory nonlinearity depending on the amplitude probability density function of the noise as well as on the number of integrated pulses. It is shown that the performance for uncorrelated observations is unaffected by the specific signal pattern, but depends only on the signal-to-noise ratio; moreover, the effect of the clutter correlation on the performance can be accounted for simply by a detection gain. A performance assessment, carried out by computer simulation, shows that the proposed receivers significantly out-perform conventional ones as the noise amplitude probability density function markedly deviates from the Rayleigh law.

  6. Quantal release of neurotransmitter: an iterative method for the automatic computation of binomial distribution parameters.

    PubMed

    Belluzzi, O

    1984-01-01

    A computational method is presented by which, when the amplitude-frequency histogram of the excitatory post-synaptic potentials shows a binomial distribution, an accurate evaluation of the statistical parameters p and n may be obtained. The entire procedure is a combination of 3 basic methods: steepest descent, parabolic interpolation and Montecarlo technique. The two statistical parameters are evaluated independently with respect to each other, which makes an effective control of the accuracy of the calculation possible by comparing the p by n product with the average number of quanta released in response to each nerve impulse, conventionally computed. Applications to quantal release studies in both rat and guinea-pig superior cervical ganglia are also presented.

  7. An approximation theory for the identification of nonlinear distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1990-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework for the identification of nonlinear distributed parameter systems is developed. Inverse problems for nonlinear systems governed by strongly maximal monotone operators (satisfying a mild continuous dependence condition with respect to the unknown parameters to be identified) are treated. Convergence of Galerkin approximations and the corresponding solutions of finite dimensional approximating identification problems to a solution of the original finite dimensional identification problem is demonstrated using the theory of nonlinear evolution systems and a nonlinear analog of the Trotter-Kato appproximation result for semigroups of bounded linear operators. The nonlinear theory developed here is shown to subsume an existing linear theory as a special case. It is also shown to be applicable to a broad class of nonlinear elliptic operators and the corresponding nonlinear parabolic partial differential equations to which they lead. An application of the theory to a quasilinear model for heat conduction or mass transfer is discussed.

  8. An approximation theory for the identification of nonlinear distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Reich, Simeon; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    An abstract approximation framework for the identification of nonlinear distributed parameter systems is developed. Inverse problems for nonlinear systems governed by strongly maximal monotone operators (satisfying a mild continuous dependence condition with respect to the unknown parameters to be identified) are treated. Convergence of Galerkin approximations and the corresponding solutions of finite dimensional approximating identification problems to a solution of the original finite dimensional identification problem is demonstrated using the theory of nonlinear evolution systems and a nonlinear analog of the Trotter-Kato approximation result for semigroups of bounded linear operators. The nonlinear theory developed here is shown to subsume an existing linear theory as a special case. It is also shown to be applicable to a broad class of nonlinear elliptic operators and the corresponding nonlinear parabolic partial differential equations to which they lead. An application of the theory to a quasilinear model for heat conduction or mass transfer is discussed.

  9. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    PubMed Central

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  10. Research on human physiological parameters intelligent clothing based on distributed Fiber Bragg Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Changyun; Shi, Boya; Li, Hongqiang

    2008-12-01

    A human physiological parameters intelligent clothing is researched with FBG sensor technology. In this paper, the principles and methods of measuring human physiological parameters including body temperature and heart rate in intelligent clothing with distributed FBG are studied, the mathematical models of human physiological parameters measurement are built; the processing method of body temperature and heart rate detection signals is presented; human physiological parameters detection module is designed, the interference signals are filtered out, and the measurement accuracy is improved; the integration of the intelligent clothing is given. The intelligent clothing can implement real-time measurement, processing, storage and output of body temperature and heart rate. It has accurate measurement, portability, low cost, real-time monitoring, and other advantages. The intelligent clothing can realize the non-contact monitoring between doctors and patients, timely find the diseases such as cancer and infectious diseases, and make patients get timely treatment. It has great significance and value for ensuring the health of the elders and the children with language dysfunction.

  11. Hematite and Goethite (U-Th)/He/Ne ages interpretation using crystallographic data and diffusion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautheron, Cécile; Balout, Hilal; Roques, Jérôme; Allard, Thierry; Morin, Guillaume; Tassan-Got, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    At the Earth's surface, hematite and goethite are common minerals occurring in soils and sediments, including ores. The understanding of the corresponding alteration and weathering processes relies on our ability to perform the dating of formation of these minerals. Two relevant and recent dating methods have been developed, which are related to (U-Th)/He and (U-Th)/Ne geochronometers. They are based on accumulation of 4He and 21Ne associated with the alpha decay of U and Th. Both methods are of particular interest because of possible He and Ne retention over geological ages at surface temperature. However, because of different atomic radius between He and Ne, retention behavior of these two species can be quite different. Moreover, the dating procedure is particularly challenging because of the small crystals size and frequent polycrystalline structure of hematite and goethite. As a matter of fact, some uncertainty exists about He and Ne diffusion parameters, due to the nanometric to micrometric crystal size of natural iron oxide mineral. Accordingly, the determination of (U-Th)/He and (U-Th)/Ne ages requires the understanding of He and Ne production and retention (which may be partial) in iron oxide crystals. In this study, we theoretically investigate and discuss for the first time the age evolution for pure goethite and hematite crystals with different thermal histories, including reheating to simulate burial. The aim is to quantify the He and/or Ne loss by ejection and diffusion for crystals of different morphology and polycrystalline structures. This will allow one to provide some correction factor for the age. For this purpose, we used new He and Ne diffusion coefficients obtained by multi-scale theoretical approach using Density Functional Theory (DFT) (Balout et al., submitted, a,b), associated with 3D production and diffusion code (Gautheron and Tassan-Got, 2010). The impact of Multi Diffusion Domains simulating polycrystalline structure has been

  12. Synoptic thermal and oceanographic parameter distributions in the New York Bight Apex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Bahn, G. S.; Thomas, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Concurrent surface water measurements made from a moving oceanographic research vessel were used to calibrate and interpret remotely sensed data collected over a plume in the New York Bight Apex on 23 June 1977. Multiple regression techniques were used to develop equations to map synoptic distributions of chlorophyll a and total suspended matter in the remotely sensed scene. Thermal (which did not have surface calibration values) and water quality parameter distributions indicated a cold mass of water in the Bight Apex with an overflowing nutrient-rich warm water plume that originated in the Sandy Hook Bay and flowed south near the New Jersey shoreline. Data analysis indicates that remotely sensed data may be particularly useful for studying physical and biological processes in the top several metres of surface water at plume boundaries.

  13. Influence of Geant4 parameters on dose distribution and computation time for carbon ion therapy simulation.

    PubMed

    Zahra, Nabil; Frisson, Thibault; Grevillot, Loic; Lautesse, Philippe; Sarrut, David

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of Geant4 parameters on dose distribution and computational time for simulations of carbon ion therapy. The study was done using Geant4 version 9.0. The dose distribution in water for incident monoenergetic carbon ion beams of 300 MeV/u were compared for different values of secondary particle production threshold and different step limits. Variations of depth dose of about 2 mm were observed in some cases, which induced a 30% variation of dose deposit in the Bragg peak region. Other tests were done using Geant4 version 9.2 to verify the results from this study. The two versions provided converging results and led to the same conclusions.

  14. Parameters of the proteome evolution from the distribution of sequence identities of paralogous proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Koon-Kiu; Axelsen, Jacob; Maslov, Sergei

    2006-03-01

    The evolution of the full repertoire of proteins encoded in a given genome is driven by gene duplications, deletions and modifications of amino-acid sequences of already existing proteins. The information about relative rates and other intrinsic parameters of these three basic processes is contained in the distribution of sequence identities of pairs of paralogous proteins. We introduced a simple mathematical framework that allows one to extract some of this hidden information. It was then applied to the proteome-wide set of paralogous proteins in H. pylori, E. coli, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens. We estimated the stationary per-gene deletion and duplication rates, the distribution of amino-acid substitution rate of these organisms. The validity of our mathematical framework was further confirmed by numerical simulations of a simple evolutionary model of a fixed-size proteome.

  15. Improving control and estimation for distributed parameter systems utilizing mobile actuator-sensor network.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wenying; Cui, Baotong; Li, Wen; Jiang, Zhengxian

    2014-07-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for non-collocated moving actuating and sensing devices which is unitized for improving performance in distributed parameter systems. By Lyapunov stability theorem, each moving actuator/sensor agent velocity is obtained. To enhance state estimation of a spatially distributes process, two kinds of filters with consensus terms which penalize the disagreement of the estimates are considered. Both filters can result in the well-posedness of the collective dynamics of state errors and can converge to the plant state. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the effectiveness of such a moving actuator-sensor network in enhancing system performance and the consensus filters converge faster to the plant state when consensus terms are included.

  16. Factorization and the synthesis of optimal feedback gains for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Scheid, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    An approach based on Volterra factorization leads to a new methodology for the analysis and synthesis of the optimal feedback gain in the finite-time linear quadratic control problem for distributed parameter systems. The approach circumvents the need for solving and analyzing Riccati equations and provides a more transparent connection between the system dynamics and the optimal gain. The general results are further extended and specialized for the case where the underlying state is characterized by autonomous differential-delay dynamics. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the second-order convergence rate that is derived for an approximation scheme for the optimal feedback gain in the differential-delay problem.

  17. OPTIMAL SHRINKAGE ESTIMATION OF MEAN PARAMETERS IN FAMILY OF DISTRIBUTIONS WITH QUADRATIC VARIANCE

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xianchao; Kou, S. C.; Brown, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the simultaneous inference of mean parameters in a family of distributions with quadratic variance function. We first introduce a class of semi-parametric/parametric shrinkage estimators and establish their asymptotic optimality properties. Two specific cases, the location-scale family and the natural exponential family with quadratic variance function, are then studied in detail. We conduct a comprehensive simulation study to compare the performance of the proposed methods with existing shrinkage estimators. We also apply the method to real data and obtain encouraging results. PMID:27041778

  18. Adjustable Parameter-Based Distributed Fault Estimation Observer Design for Multiagent Systems With Directed Graphs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Peng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a novel adjustable parameter (AP)-based distributed fault estimation observer (DFEO) is proposed for multiagent systems (MASs) with the directed communication topology. First, a relative output estimation error is defined based on the communication topology of MASs. Then a DFEO with AP is constructed with the purpose of improving the accuracy of fault estimation. Based on H ∞ and H 2 with pole placement, multiconstrained design is given to calculate the gain of DFEO. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed DFEO design with AP.

  19. Approximation Methods for the Identification and Control of Distributed Parameter Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-20

    Computacional , 5 (1986), 139-168. 12. The Identification of a Distributed Parameter Model for a Flexible Structure, (with H.T. Banks, S.S. Gates and Y. Wang...Science and Engineering, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, and Mat. Applicada e Computacional , 5 (1986). [7] H.T. Banks and P.L. Daniel (Lamm...Bericht 83-26, Techn. Universitat Graz, December 1983; Mat. Aplicada e Computacional 4 (1985), pp. 95-124. [27] J.L. Lions, Optimal Control of

  20. Past and present seafloor age distributions and the temporal evolution of plate tectonic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Thorsten W.; Conrad, Clinton P.; Buffett, Bruce; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2009-02-01

    Variations in Earth's rates of seafloor generation and recycling have far-reaching consequences for sea level, ocean chemistry, and climate. However, there is little agreement on the correct parameterization for the time-dependent evolution of plate motions. A strong constraint is given by seafloor age distributions, which are affected by variations in average spreading rate, ridge length, and the age distribution of seafloor being removed by subduction. Using a simplified evolution model, we explore which physical parameterizations of these quantities are compatible with broad trends in the area per seafloor age statistics for the present-day and back to 140 Ma from paleo-age reconstructions. We show that a probability of subduction based on plate buoyancy (slab-pull, or "sqrt(age)") and a time-varying spreading rate fits the observed age distributions as well as, or better than, a subduction probability consistent with an unvarying "triangular" age distribution and age-independent destruction of ocean floor. Instead, we interpret the present near-triangular distribution of ages as a snapshot of a transient state of the evolving oceanic plate system. Current seafloor ages still contain hints of a ˜ 60 Myr periodicity in seafloor production, and using paleoages, we find that a ˜ 250 Myr period variation is consistent with geologically-based reconstructions of production rate variations. These long-period variations also imply a decrease of oceanic heat flow by ˜ - 0.25%/Ma during the last 140 Ma, caused by a 25-50% decrease in the rate of seafloor production. Our study offers an improved understanding of the non-uniformitarian evolution of plate tectonics and the interplay between continental cycles and the self-organization of the oceanic plates.

  1. [Maternal mortality in Spain, 1980-1992. Relationship with birth distributions according to the mother's age].

    PubMed

    Valero Juan, L F; Sáenz González, M C

    1997-11-01

    The maternal mortality evolution in Spain during the 1980-1992 period is reported. The influence of birth distribution according to maternal age is analyzed. The information was gathered from vital statistics published by Instituto Nacional de Estadística. The mortality rates have stabilized since 1985 (4.8 per 10(5) for 1992) associated with the increase in the proportion of births in women aged > or = 30 years (40.6% for 1992). Birth distributions according to maternal age account for 13.1% of the deaths observed. The predictions point to an increase in maternal mortality for the year 2000.

  2. Geotechnical parameter spatial distribution stochastic analysis based on multi-precision information assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Rubin, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial distribution of important geotechnical parameter named compression modulus Es contributes considerably to the understanding of the underlying geological processes and the adequate assessment of the Es mechanics effects for differential settlement of large continuous structure foundation. These analyses should be derived using an assimilating approach that combines in-situ static cone penetration test (CPT) with borehole experiments. To achieve such a task, the Es distribution of stratum of silty clay in region A of China Expo Center (Shanghai) is studied using the Bayesian-maximum entropy method. This method integrates rigorously and efficiently multi-precision of different geotechnical investigations and sources of uncertainty. Single CPT samplings were modeled as a rational probability density curve by maximum entropy theory. Spatial prior multivariate probability density function (PDF) and likelihood PDF of the CPT positions were built by borehole experiments and the potential value of the prediction point, then, preceding numerical integration on the CPT probability density curves, the posterior probability density curve of the prediction point would be calculated by the Bayesian reverse interpolation framework. The results were compared between Gaussian Sequential Stochastic Simulation and Bayesian methods. The differences were also discussed between single CPT samplings of normal distribution and simulated probability density curve based on maximum entropy theory. It is shown that the study of Es spatial distributions can be improved by properly incorporating CPT sampling variation into interpolation process, whereas more informative estimations are generated by considering CPT Uncertainty for the estimation points. Calculation illustrates the significance of stochastic Es characterization in a stratum, and identifies limitations associated with inadequate geostatistical interpolation techniques. This characterization results will provide a multi

  3. Applications of the theory of optimal control of distributed-parameter systems to structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    An extension of classical methods of optimal control theory for systems described by ordinary differential equations to distributed-parameter systems described by partial differential equations is presented. An application is given involving the minimum-mass design of a simply-supported shear plate with a fixed fundamental frequency of vibration. An optimal plate thickness distribution in analytical form is found. The case of a minimum-mass design of an elastic sandwich plate whose fundamental frequency of free vibration is fixed. Under the most general conditions, the optimization problem reduces to the solution of two simultaneous partial differential equations involving the optimal thickness distribution and the modal displacement. One equation is the uniform energy distribution expression which was found by Ashley and McIntosh for the optimal design of one-dimensional structures with frequency constraints, and by Prager and Taylor for various design criteria in one and two dimensions. The second equation requires dynamic equilibrium at the preassigned vibration frequency.

  4. Experimental validation of a distributed parameter piezoelectric bimorph cantilever energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, S.; Bonello, P.

    2010-09-01

    Recent rapid advances in low-power portable electronic applications have motivated researchers and industry to explore schemes to embed an endless power supply mechanism within these systems. These self-charging embedded power supply systems convert ambient energy (vibration, solar, wind, etc) into electrical energy and subsequently provide power to these portable applications. Ambient vibration is one of the most promising sources of energy as it is abundantly present in indoor/outdoor systems. This paper discusses briefly the mathematical model of a bimorph piezoelectric cantilever beam with distributed inertia, and its experimental validation. Research on such a component typically included a tip mass, which reduced the influence of the distributed inertia of the beam and restricted effective operation to low frequencies. The present work excludes the tip mass and only the distributed mass of the harvester is considered. Due to the coupled electromechanical nature of piezoelectric materials, the effects of electrical coupling on the mechanical properties of the harvester are investigated, particularly the dependence of the induced additional stiffness and damping on the electrical load. Both the model and the experimental results show that the resonance frequency and the response amplitude of the harvester exhibit considerable shifts due to the electrical coupling. The experimental work uses both magnitude and Nyquist plots of the electromechanical frequency response functions to thoroughly validate the accuracy and applicability of the distributed parameter model at higher frequencies than previously considered.

  5. Uranium distribution and 'excessive' U-He ages in iron meteoritic troilite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Fission tracking techniques were used to measure the uranium distribution in meteoritic troilite and graphite. The obtained fission tracking data showed a heterogeneous distribution of tracks with a significant portion of track density present in the form of uranium clusters at least 10 microns in size. The matrix containing the clusters was also heterogeneous in composition with U concentrations of about 0.2-4.7 ppb. U/He ages could not be estimated on the basis of the heterogeneous U distributions, so previously reported estimates of U/He ages in the presolar range are probably invalid.

  6. A theory of the cancer age-specific incidence data based on extreme value distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Ortiz, Luis; Brody, James P.

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of cancers varies with age, if normalized this is called the age-specific incidence. A mathematical model that describes this variation should provide a better understanding of how cancers develop. We suggest that the age-specific incidence should follow an extreme value distribution, based on three widely accepted assumptions: (1) a tumor develops from a single cell, (2) many potential tumor progenitor cells exist in a tissue, and (3) cancer is diagnosed when the first of these many potential tumor cells develops into a tumor. We tested this by comparing the predicted distribution to the age-specific incidence data for colon and prostate carcinomas collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results network of 17 cancer registries. We found that colon carcinoma age-specific incidence data is consistent with an extreme value distribution, while prostate carcinomas age-specific incidence data generally follows the distribution. This model indicates that both colon and prostate carcinomas only occur in a subset of the population (22% for prostate and 13.5% for colon.) Because of their very general nature, extreme value distributions might be applicable to understanding other chronic human diseases.

  7. Spatial distribution of attentional inhibition is not altered in healthy aging

    PubMed Central

    Gayzur, Nora D.; Saville, Alyson L.; Morlock, Shanna L.; Bagne, Angela G.

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) is a phenomenon of attentional orienting that is indexed by slower responses to targets presented at previously attended locations. The purpose of this study was to examine adult age differences in the distribution of IOR to multiple locations. In three experiments, young adults (ages 18–30 years) and older adults (ages 60–87 years) completed an IOR task that varied in the number of simultaneous onset cues (one to seven) and the number of display locations (four or eight). Analyses were conducted to explore whether IOR patterns were most consistent with limited inhibitory resources, with regional distribution of inhibition, or with vector averaging of cues. The IOR effects were most consistent with vector averaging, such that multiple cues initiated a directional gradient of inhibition centered on the average direction of the cues. The IOR patterns varied minimally with age, consistent with the conclusion that older adults and young adults distributed inhibition in a similar manner. PMID:21264706

  8. Some bounds in classes of {open_quotes}aging{close_quotes} distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kotlyar, V.Yu.

    1995-03-01

    Reliability of technical systems is closely linked with {open_quotes}aging{close_quotes} properties of the components. So-called monotone systems whose components have certain aging characteristics are of considerable importance in this field of research. Efficient bounds of reliability, mean time to failure, and other parameters can be obtained for such systems. The bounds in literature were obtained under the least restrictive assumptions on aging. In this paper, we generalize some results of literature to the case of even more general aging principles, specifically, when the system components are HNBUE, HNWUE, NBAFR, NWAFR in terms of their reliability properties. We start with a definition of these properties.

  9. Determination of the age distribution of sea ice from Lagrangian observations of ice motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, R.; Cunningham, G.F.; Rothrock, D.A.; Stern, H.L.

    1995-03-01

    A procedure for monitoring the local age distribution of the Arctic sea ice cover is presented. The age distribution specifies the area covered by ice in different age classes. In the authors` approach, a regular array of grid points is defined initially on the first image of a long time series, and an ice tracker finds the positions of those points in all subsequent images of the series. These Lagrangian points mark the corners of a set of cells that move and deform with the ice cover. The area of each cell changes with each new image or time step. A positive change indicates that ice in a new age class was formed in the cell. A negative change is assumed to have ridged the youngest ice in the cell, reducing its area. The ice in each cell ages as it progresses through the time series. The area of multiyear ice in each cell is computed using an ice classification algorithm. Any area that is not accounted for by the young ice or multiyear ice is assigned to a category of older first-year ice. They thus have a fine age resolution in the young end of the age distribution, and coarse resolution for older ice. The age distribution of the young ice can be converted to a thickness distribution using a simple empirical relation between accumulated freezing-degree days and ice thickness, or using a more complicated thermodynamic model. They describe a general scheme for implementing this procedure for the Arctic Ocean from fall freeze-up until the onset of melt in the spring. The concept is illustrated with a time series of five ERS-1 SAR images spanning a period of 12 days. Such a scheme could be implemented with RADARSAT SAR imagery to provide basin-wide ice age and thickness information.

  10. Effect of tissue and atmosphere's parameters on human eye temperature distribution.

    PubMed

    Firoozan, Mohammad Sadegh; Porkhial, Soheil; Nejad, Ali Salmani

    2015-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element method analysis was employed to investigate the effect of tissue and atmosphere parameters namely, ambient temperature, ambient convection coefficient, local blood temperature, and blood convection coefficient upon temperature distribution of human eyes. As a matter of simplification, only eye ball and skull bone are considered as the system of eye modeling. Decreasing the local blood temperature and keeping it cool is one of the most important ways to control bleeding during surgeries. By lower temperature of body organs such as the eye, the need for oxygenated blood is reduced, allowing for an extension in time for surgery. With this in mind, this study is done to see which one of parameters, such as ambient temperature, ambient convection coefficient, local blood temperature, and blood convection coefficient, has an effective role in decreasing the temperature of the eye. To this end, 3 different paths were employed to find out about the temperature distribution through the eye. The analysis of the three paths demonstrates the interaction of ambient and blood temperature in modeling temperature changes in specific locations of the eye. These data will be important in applications such as eye surgery, relaxation, and sleep therapy.

  11. Distributed parameters deterministic model for treatment of brain tumors using Galerkin finite element method.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P; Hanson, Floyd B

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we present a distributed parameters deterministic model for treatment of brain tumors using Galerkin finite element method. The dynamic model comprises system of three coupled reaction-diffusion models, involving the tumor cells, the normal tissues and the drug concentration. An optimal control problem is formulated with the goal of minimizing the tumor cell density and reducing the side effects of the drug. A distributed parameters method based on the application of variational calculus is used on an integral-Hamiltonian, which is then used to obtain an optimal coupled system of forward state equations and backward co-state equations. The Galerkin finite element method is used to realistically represent the brain structure as well as to facilitate computation. Finally a three-dimensional test case is considered and partitioned into a set of spherical finite elements, using tri-linear basis functions, except for the elements affected by singularities of polar and azimuthal angles, as well as the origin.

  12. Aerodynamic parameters from distributed heterogeneous CNT hair sensors with a feedforward neural network.

    PubMed

    Magar, Kaman Thapa; Reich, Gregory W; Kondash, Corey; Slinker, Keith; Pankonien, Alexander M; Baur, Jeffery W; Smyers, Brian

    2016-11-10

    Distributed arrays of artificial hair sensors have bio-like sensing capabilities to obtain spatial and temporal surface flow information which is an important aspect of an effective fly-by-feel system. The spatiotemporal surface flow measurement enables further exploration of additional flow features such as flow stagnation, separation, and reattachment points. Due to their inherent robustness and fault tolerant capability, distributed arrays of hair sensors are well equipped to assess the aerodynamic and flow states in adverse conditions. In this paper, a local flow measurement from an array of artificial hair sensors in a wind tunnel experiment is used with a feedforward artificial neural network to predict aerodynamic parameters such as lift coefficient, moment coefficient, free-stream velocity, and angle of attack on an airfoil. We find the prediction error within 6% and 10% for lift and moment coefficients. The error for free-stream velocity and angle of attack were within 0.12 mph and 0.37 degrees. Knowledge of these parameters are key to finding the real time forces and moments which paves the way for effective control design to increase flight agility, stability, and maneuverability.

  13. Single parameter of inverse proportion between mortality and age could determine all mortality indicators in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Dolejs, Josef

    2016-05-21

    Mortality increase with age in adult population has been studied and modeled by many authors, but relatively little attention has been given to mortality decrease with age after birth. Data split in more detailed age categories can newly test mortality decrease with age. Age trajectories of mortality are studied in 20 age categories in the specific age interval 1-365 days. Four basic models mentioned in literature are tested here. The linear model and the linear model with the specific slope -1 in the log-log scale represent the most successful formalism. Mortality indicators describing the first year could be determined by a single parameter of the model with slope -1 in the log-log scale. All conclusions are based on published data which are presented as a supplement.

  14. The abundance and age distributions of 500 F stars in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, R. E. S.; Bell, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The uvby catalog of Perry has been used, in conjunction with theoretical uvby colors and stellar evolutionary tracks, to obtain the metal abundance distribution and age distribution of F and G type dwarf stars within 100 pc of the sun. Eighty-three per cent of stars with spectral type F5-G2 have metal content within a factor of 2.5 of the solar abundance, and only 2% have less than one-quarter the solar abundance. The metal abundance distribution, which contains more metal-rich stars than found in previous investigations of F and G dwarfs, has also been compared with the observed metal abundance distribution of G and K giants and the model galaxy calculations of Truran and Cameron (1971). A comparison of the age distribution with evolutionary calculations implies that the rate of star formation in the galaxy may not have decreased by a large factor in the last 10 billion years.

  15. The identification of a distributed parameter model for a flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Gates, S. S.; Rosen, I. G.; Wang, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A computational method is developed for the estimation of parameters in a distributed model for a flexible structure. The structure we consider (part of the RPL experiment) consists of a cantilevered beam with a thruster and linear accelerometer at the free end. The thruster is fed by a pressurized hose whose horizontal motion effects the transverse vibration of the beam. The Euler-Bernoulli theory is used to model the vibration of the beam and treat the hose thruster assembly as a lumped or point mass dashpot spring system at the tip. Measurements of linear acceleration at the tip are used to estimate the hose parameters (mass, stiffness, damping) and a Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic structural damping parameter for the beam using a least squares fit to the data. Spline based approximations are considered to the hybrid (coupled ordinary and partial differential equations) systems; theoretical convergence results and numerical studies with both simulation and actual experimental data obtained from the structure are presented and discussed.

  16. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the RF negative ion source prototype for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-08

    A numerical model, based on the fluid plasma theory, has been used for description of the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature, plasma potential as well as densities of the three types of positive hydrogen ions) in the IPP prototype RF negative hydrogen ion source. The model covers the driver and the expansion plasma region of the source with their actual size and accounts for the presence of the magnetic filter field with its actual value and location as well as for the bias potential applied to the plasma grid. The obtained results show that without a magnetic filter the two 2D geometries considered, respectively, with an axial symmetry and a planar one, represent accurately the complex 3D structure of the source. The 2D model with a planar symmetry (where the E×B and diamagnetic drifts could be involved in the description) has been used for analysis of the influence, via the charged-particle and electron-energy fluxes, of the magnetic filter and of the bias potential on the spatial structure of the plasma parameters in the source. Benchmarking of results from the code to experimental data shows that the model reproduces the general trend in the axial behavior of the plasma parameters in the source.

  17. Cumulative distribution function solutions of advection-reaction equations with uncertain parameters.

    PubMed

    Boso, F; Broyda, S V; Tartakovsky, D M

    2014-06-08

    We derive deterministic cumulative distribution function (CDF) equations that govern the evolution of CDFs of state variables whose dynamics are described by the first-order hyperbolic conservation laws with uncertain coefficients that parametrize the advective flux and reactive terms. The CDF equations are subjected to uniquely specified boundary conditions in the phase space, thus obviating one of the major challenges encountered by more commonly used probability density function equations. The computational burden of solving CDF equations is insensitive to the magnitude of the correlation lengths of random input parameters. This is in contrast to both Monte Carlo simulations (MCSs) and direct numerical algorithms, whose computational cost increases as correlation lengths of the input parameters decrease. The CDF equations are, however, not exact because they require a closure approximation. To verify the accuracy and robustness of the large-eddy-diffusivity closure, we conduct a set of numerical experiments which compare the CDFs computed with the CDF equations with those obtained via MCSs. This comparison demonstrates that the CDF equations remain accurate over a wide range of statistical properties of the two input parameters, such as their correlation lengths and variance of the coefficient that parametrizes the advective flux.

  18. Cumulative distribution function solutions of advection–reaction equations with uncertain parameters

    PubMed Central

    Boso, F.; Broyda, S. V.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We derive deterministic cumulative distribution function (CDF) equations that govern the evolution of CDFs of state variables whose dynamics are described by the first-order hyperbolic conservation laws with uncertain coefficients that parametrize the advective flux and reactive terms. The CDF equations are subjected to uniquely specified boundary conditions in the phase space, thus obviating one of the major challenges encountered by more commonly used probability density function equations. The computational burden of solving CDF equations is insensitive to the magnitude of the correlation lengths of random input parameters. This is in contrast to both Monte Carlo simulations (MCSs) and direct numerical algorithms, whose computational cost increases as correlation lengths of the input parameters decrease. The CDF equations are, however, not exact because they require a closure approximation. To verify the accuracy and robustness of the large-eddy-diffusivity closure, we conduct a set of numerical experiments which compare the CDFs computed with the CDF equations with those obtained via MCSs. This comparison demonstrates that the CDF equations remain accurate over a wide range of statistical properties of the two input parameters, such as their correlation lengths and variance of the coefficient that parametrizes the advective flux. PMID:24910529

  19. The identification of a distributed parameter model for a flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Gates, S. S.; Rosen, I. G.; Wang, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A computational method is developed for the estimation of parameters in a distributed model for a flexible structure. The structure we consider (part of the RPL experiment) consists of a cantilevered beam with a thruster and linear accelerometer at the free end. The thruster is fed by a pressurized hose whose horizontal motion effects the transverse vibration of the beam. The Euler-Bernoulli theory is used to model the vibration of the beam and treat the hose-thruster assembly as a lumped or point mass-dashpot-spring system at the tip. Using measurements of linear acceleration at the tip, it is estimated that the parameters (mass, stiffness, damping) and a Voight-Kelvin viscoelastic structural damping parameter for the beam using a least squares fit to the data. Spline based approximations to the hybrid (coupled ordinary and partial differential equations) system are considered; theoretical convergence results and numerical studies with both simulation and actual experimental data obtained from the structure are presented and discussed.

  20. Cartographic analysis of the distribution of saline soils in Russia depending on some climatic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinina, N. V.; Rukhovich, D. I.; Pankova, E. I.; Chernousenko, G. I.; Koroleva, P. V.

    2016-11-01

    The subdistrict zoning map distinguishes 27 subjects of the Russian Federation, 109 municipal districts, and 142 districts and subdistricts along the latitude line at 53°44' N in Russia. Among them, soil salinization is observed in 13 subjects of the Russian Federation, 39 municipal districts, and 41 districts and subdistricts. The total length of the transect is 6354 m. The relationship between the distribution of saline soils and climatic parameters has been analyzed in the districts and subdistricts of the subdistrict zoning map. Information about soil salinity has been borrowed from the Soil Salinization Map of Russia (2003) and some regional salinization maps (Khakassia, Barguzin Depression). Climate is the main factor affecting the distribution of soil salinity. Among the analyzed climatic parameters, the Ivanov wetting coefficient (WC) best describes the relationship between climate and soil salinity. The share of saline soils in a district is inversely proportional to the WC value. The degrees of drainage and dissection of the area limit the effect of climate on soil salinity. It is proposed to subdivide the relief into three groups depending on the degree of dissection in order to correct the calculations of relationship between WC and soil salinity. With consideration for relief features, the relationship between soil salinity and WC is represented by a segment of the coordinate plane with WC as the ordinate and the share of saline soils as the abscissa. The segment is limited by two lines corresponding to the maximum and minimum soil salinities at given WC values. The use of the limiting equations allows predicting, with a high probability, the presence and distribution area of saline soils at a given latitude at 0.85 ≥ WC ≥ 0.5.

  1. Estimating Age Distributions of Base Flow in Watersheds Underlain by Single and Dual Porosity Formations Using Groundwater Transport Simulation and Weighted Weibull Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Age distributions of base flow to streams are important to estimate for predicting the timing of water-quality responses to changes in distributed inputs of nutrients or pollutants at the land surface. Simple models of shallow aquifers will predict exponential age distributions, but more realistic 3-D stream-aquifer geometries will cause deviations from an exponential curve. In addition, in fractured rock terrains the dual nature of the effective and total porosity of the system complicates the age distribution further. In this study shallow groundwater flow and advective transport were simulated in two regions in the Eastern United States—the Delmarva Peninsula and the upper Potomac River basin. The former is underlain by layers of unconsolidated sediment, while the latter consists of folded and fractured sedimentary rocks. Transport of groundwater to streams was simulated using the USGS code MODPATH within 175 and 275 watersheds, respectively. For the fractured rock terrain, calculations were also performed along flow pathlines to account for exchange between mobile and immobile flow zones. Porosities at both sites were calibrated using environmental tracer data (3H, 3He, CFCs and SF6) in wells and springs, and with a 30-year tritium record from the Potomac River. Carbonate and siliciclastic rocks were calibrated to have mobile porosity values of one and six percent, and immobile porosity values of 18 and 12 percent, respectively. The age distributions were fitted to Weibull functions. Whereas an exponential function has one parameter that controls the median age of the distribution, a Weibull function has an extra parameter that controls the slope of the curve. A weighted Weibull function was also developed that potentially allows for four parameters, two that control the median age and two that control the slope, one of each weighted toward early or late arrival times. For both systems the two-parameter Weibull function nearly always produced a substantially

  2. Estimation of genetic parameters for longevity considering the cow's age at last calving.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Sabrina L; Rosa, Guilherme J M; Savegnago, Rodrigo P; Ramos, Salvador B; Bernardes, Priscila A; Bezerra, Luiz A F; Lôbo, Raysildo B; de Paz, Claudia C P; Munari, Danísio Prado

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate heritability and predict breeding values for longevity among cows in herds of Nellore breed, considering the trait cow's age at last calving (ALC), by means of survival analysis methodology. The records of 11,791 animals from 22 farms were used. The variable ALC has been used by a criterion that made it possible to include cows not only at their first calving but also at their ninth calving. The criterion used was the difference between the date of each cow's last calving and the date of the last calving on each farm. If this difference was greater than 36 months, the cow was considered to have failed and uncensored. If not, this cow was censored, thus indicating that future calving remained possible for this cow. The survival model used for the analyses was the proportional hazards model, and the base risk was given by a Weibull distribution. The heritability estimate obtained was equal to 0.25. It was found that the ALC variable had the capacity to respond to selection for the purpose of increasing the longevity of the cows in the herds.

  3. Transit times and age distributions for reservoir models represented as nonlinear non-autonomuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Meztler, Holger; Glatt, Anna; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We present theoretical methods to compute dynamic residence and transit time distributions for non-autonomous systems of pools governed by coupled nonlinear differential equations. Although transit time and age distributions have been used to describe reservoir models for a long time, a closer look to their assumptions reveals two major restrictions of generality in previous studies. First, the systems are assumed to be in equilibrium; and second, the equations under consideration are assumed to be linear. While both these assumptions greatly ease the computation and interpretation of transit time and age distributions they are not applicable to a wide range of problems. Moreover, the transfer of previous results learned from linear systems in steady state to the more complex nonlinear non-autonomous systems that do not even need to have equilibria, can be dangerously misleading. Fortunately the topic of time dependent age and transit time distributions has received some attention recently in hydrology, we aim to compute these distributions for systems of multiple reservoirs. We will discuss how storage selection functions can augment the information represented in an ODE system describing a system of reservoirs. We will present analytical and numerical algorithms and a Monte Carlo simulator to compute solutions for system transit time and age distributions for system-wide storage selection functions including the most simple, but important case of well mixed pools.

  4. Sensitivity of postplanning target and OAR coverage estimates to dosimetric margin distribution sampling parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Huijun; Gordon, J. James; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A dosimetric margin (DM) is the margin in a specified direction between a structure and a specified isodose surface, corresponding to a prescription or tolerance dose. The dosimetric margin distribution (DMD) is the distribution of DMs over all directions. Given a geometric uncertainty model, representing inter- or intrafraction setup uncertainties or internal organ motion, the DMD can be used to calculate coverage Q, which is the probability that a realized target or organ-at-risk (OAR) dose metric D{sub v} exceeds the corresponding prescription or tolerance dose. Postplanning coverage evaluation quantifies the percentage of uncertainties for which target and OAR structures meet their intended dose constraints. The goal of the present work is to evaluate coverage probabilities for 28 prostate treatment plans to determine DMD sampling parameters that ensure adequate accuracy for postplanning coverage estimates. Methods: Normally distributed interfraction setup uncertainties were applied to 28 plans for localized prostate cancer, with prescribed dose of 79.2 Gy and 10 mm clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. Using angular or isotropic sampling techniques, dosimetric margins were determined for the CTV, bladder and rectum, assuming shift invariance of the dose distribution. For angular sampling, DMDs were sampled at fixed angular intervals {omega} (e.g., {omega}=1 deg., 2 deg., 5 deg., 10 deg., 20 deg.). Isotropic samples were uniformly distributed on the unit sphere resulting in variable angular increments, but were calculated for the same number of sampling directions as angular DMDs, and accordingly characterized by the effective angular increment {omega}{sub eff}. In each direction, the DM was calculated by moving the structure in radial steps of size {delta}(=0.1,0.2,0.5,1 mm) until the specified isodose was crossed. Coverage estimation accuracy {Delta}Q was quantified as a function of the sampling parameters {omega} or

  5. Distributed Soil Moisture Estimation in a Mountainous Semiarid Basin: Constraining Soil Parameter Uncertainty through Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatheendradas, S.; Vivoni, E.

    2007-12-01

    A common practice in distributed hydrological modeling is to assign soil hydraulic properties based on coarse textural datasets. For semiarid regions with poor soil information, the performance of a model can be severely constrained due to the high model sensitivity to near-surface soil characteristics. Neglecting the uncertainty in soil hydraulic properties, their spatial variation and their naturally-occurring horizonation can potentially affect the modeled hydrological response. In this study, we investigate such effects using the TIN-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) applied to the mid-sized (100 km2) Sierra Los Locos watershed in northern Sonora, Mexico. The Sierra Los Locos basin is characterized by complex mountainous terrain leading to topographic organization of soil characteristics and ecosystem distributions. We focus on simulations during the 2004 North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) when intensive soil moisture measurements and aircraft- based soil moisture retrievals are available in the basin. Our experiments focus on soil moisture comparisons at the point, topographic transect and basin scales using a range of different soil characterizations. We compare the distributed soil moisture estimates obtained using (1) a deterministic simulation based on soil texture from coarse soil maps, (2) a set of ensemble simulations that capture soil parameter uncertainty and their spatial distribution, and (3) a set of simulations that conditions the ensemble on recent soil profile measurements. Uncertainties considered in near-surface soil characterization provide insights into their influence on the modeled uncertainty, into the value of soil profile observations, and into effective use of on-going field observations for constraining the soil moisture response uncertainty.

  6. On the distribution of scaling hydraulic parameters in a spatially anisotropic banana field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalado, Carlos M.

    2005-06-01

    When modeling soil hydraulic properties at field scale it is desirable to approximate the variability in a given area by means of some scaling transformations which relate spatially variable local hydraulic properties to global reference characteristics. Seventy soil cores were sampled within a drip irrigated banana plantation greenhouse on a 14×5 array of 2.5 m×5 m rectangles at 15 cm depth, to represent the field scale variability of flow related properties. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and water retention characteristics were measured in these 70 soil cores. van Genuchten water retention curves (WRC) with optimized m ( m≠1-1/ n) were fitted to the WR data and a general Mualem-van Genuchten model was used to predict hydraulic conductivity functions for each soil core. A scaling law, of the form ν=ανi*, was fitted to soil hydraulic data, such that the original hydraulic parameters νi were scaled down to a reference curve with parameters νi*. An analytical expression, in terms of Beta functions, for the average suction value, hc, necessary to apply the above scaling method, was obtained. A robust optimization procedure with fast convergence to the global minimum is used to find the optimum hc, such that dispersion is minimized in the scaled data set. Via the Box-Cox transformation P(τ)=(αiτ-1)/τ, Box-Cox normality plots showed that scaling factors for the suction ( αh) and hydraulic conductivity ( αk) were approximately log-normally distributed (i.e. τ=0), as it would be expected for such dynamic properties involving flow. By contrast static soil related properties as αθ were found closely Gaussian, although a power τ=3/4 was best for approaching normality. Application of four different normality tests (Anderson-Darling, Shapiro-Wilk, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and χ2 goodness-of-fit tests) rendered some contradictory results among them, thus suggesting that this widely extended practice is not recommended for providing a suitable probability

  7. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [adaptive control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control is investigated. A comprehensive examination of real-time centralized adaptive control options for flexible spacecraft is provided.

  8. Finite-dimensional approximation for optimal fixed-order compensation of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Dennis S.; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    In controlling distributed parameter systems it is often desirable to obtain low-order, finite-dimensional controllers in order to minimize real-time computational requirements. Standard approaches to this problem employ model/controller reduction techniques in conjunction with LQG theory. In this paper we consider the finite-dimensional approximation of the infinite-dimensional Bernstein/Hyland optimal projection theory. This approach yields fixed-finite-order controllers which are optimal with respect to high-order, approximating, finite-dimensional plant models. The technique is illustrated by computing a sequence of first-order controllers for one-dimensional, single-input/single-output, parabolic (heat/diffusion) and hereditary systems using spline-based, Ritz-Galerkin, finite element approximation. Numerical studies indicate convergence of the feedback gains with less than 2 percent performance degradation over full-order LQG controllers for the parabolic system and 10 percent degradation for the hereditary system.

  9. Model Predictive Optimal Control of a Time-Delay Distributed-Parameter Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal control method for a class of distributed-parameter systems governed by first order, quasilinear hyperbolic partial differential equations that arise in many physical systems. Such systems are characterized by time delays since information is transported from one state to another by wave propagation. A general closed-loop hyperbolic transport model is controlled by a boundary control embedded in a periodic boundary condition. The boundary control is subject to a nonlinear differential equation constraint that models actuator dynamics of the system. The hyperbolic equation is thus coupled with the ordinary differential equation via the boundary condition. Optimality of this coupled system is investigated using variational principles to seek an adjoint formulation of the optimal control problem. The results are then applied to implement a model predictive control design for a wind tunnel to eliminate a transport delay effect that causes a poor Mach number regulation.

  10. Optimal switching policy for performance enhancement of distributed parameter systems based on event-driven control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wen-Ying; Cui, Bao-Tong; Lou, Xu-Yang; Li, Wen

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to improve the performance of a class of distributed parameter systems for the optimal switching of actuators and controllers based on event-driven control. It is assumed that in the available multiple actuators, only one actuator can receive the control signal and be activated over an unfixed time interval, and the other actuators keep dormant. After incorporating a state observer into the event generator, the event-driven control loop and the minimum inter-event time are ultimately bounded. Based on the event-driven state feedback control, the time intervals of unfixed length can be obtained. The optimal switching policy is based on finite horizon linear quadratic optimal control at the beginning of each time subinterval. A simulation example demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed policy.

  11. Study on spatial distribution of plasma parameters in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, Hee-Woon; Lee, Woohyun; Kim, Ji-Won; Whang, Ki-Woong; Kim, Hyuk; Park, Wanjae

    2015-07-15

    Spatial distributions of various plasma parameters such as plasma density, electron temperature, and radical density in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (M-ICP) were investigated and compared. Electron temperature in between the rf window and the substrate holder of M-ICP was higher than that of ICP, whereas the one just above the substrate holder of M-ICP was similar to that of ICP when a weak (<8 G) magnetic field was employed. As a result, radical densities in M-ICP were higher than those in ICP and the etch rate of oxide in M-ICP was faster than that in ICP without severe electron charging in 90 nm high aspect ratio contact hole etch.

  12. Distributed Parameter Analysis of Pressure and Flow Disturbances in Rocket Propellant Feed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Wood, Don J.; Lightner, Charlene

    1966-01-01

    A digital distributed parameter model for computing the dynamic response of propellant feed systems is formulated. The analytical approach used is an application of the wave-plan method of analyzing unsteady flow. Nonlinear effects are included. The model takes into account locally high compliances at the pump inlet and at the injector dome region. Examples of the calculated transient and steady-state periodic responses of a simple hypothetical propellant feed system to several types of disturbances are presented. Included are flow disturbances originating from longitudinal structural motion, gimbaling, throttling, and combustion-chamber coupling. The analytical method can be employed for analyzing developmental hardware and offers a flexible tool for the calculation of unsteady flow in these systems.

  13. Distributed Parameter Control of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for Diesel-Powered Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakravesh, Hallas

    The main scope of this work is to design a distributed parameter control for SCR, which is modelled by using coupled hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs). This is a boundary control problem where the control objectives are to reduce the amount of NOx emissions and ammonia slip as far as possible. Two strategies are used to control SCR. The first strategy includes using the direct transcription (DT) as the open-loop control technique. The second strategy includes the design of a closed-loop control technique that uses a new numerical method developed in this work, which combines the method of characteristics and spectral decomposition, and the characteristic-based nonlinear model predictive control (CBNMPC) as the control algorithm. The results show that the designed advanced controllers are able to achieve very high control performance in terms of NOx and ammonia slip reduction.

  14. Peculiarities of distributions of the cosmic-ray exposure ages of H chondrite falls and finds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexeev, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    Well known peak in the distribution of the cosmic-ray exposure ages of H chondrites at 6-7 My can be employed as mark in comparison of different populations of H chondrites. It is found the age corresponding to maximum of peak for non-Antarctic falls is higher by (15+/-5) percent of this for non-Antarctic finds. Antarctic H chondrites occupy intermediate position. This effect is probably due to process of weathering.

  15. Spatial distribution of Ar-40/Ar-39 ages in lunar breccia 14301.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megrue, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    The distribution of stable and radioactive argon isotopes in a lunar breccia has been measured in situ by laser probe mass spectrometry. This new technique determines the spatial distribution of Ar-40/Ar-39 ages on less than .1 milligram of material. Calculated Ar-40/Ar-39 ages of clasts within this breccia are 3.7 and 2.9 b.y. Parentless radiogenic Ar-40 exists within the fine-grained matrix and appears to have been trapped simultaneously with solar argon. This 'atmosphere' of ambient gas appears to have been incorporated into the rock by an impact event not more than 3 b.y. ago.

  16. Genetic variation in sex hormone genes influences heel ultrasound parameters in middle-aged and elderly men: results from the European Male Aging Study (EMAS).

    PubMed

    Limer, Kate L; Pye, Stephen R; Thomson, Wendy; Boonen, Steven; Borghs, Herman; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Adams, Judith E; Ward, Kate A; Platt, Hazel; Payne, Debbie; John, Sally L; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Casanueva, Felipe; Finn, Joseph D; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Silman, Alan J; Wu, Frederick C; O'Neill, Terence W

    2009-02-01

    Genes involved in sex hormone pathways are candidates for influencing bone strength. Polymorphisms in these genes were tested for association with heel quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters in middle-aged and elderly European men. Men 40-79 yr of age were recruited from population registers in eight European centers for the European Male Aging Study (EMAS). Polymorphisms were genotyped in AR, ESR1, ESR2, CYP19A1, CYP17A1, SHBG, SRD5A2, LHB, and LHCGR. QUS parameters broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS) were measured in the heel and used to derive BMD. The relationships between QUS parameters and polymorphisms were assessed using linear regression adjusting for age and center. A total of 2693 men, with a mean age of 60.1 +/- 11.1 (SD) yr were included in the analysis. Their mean BUA was 80.0 +/- 18.9 dB/Mhz, SOS was 1550.2 +/- 34.1 m/s, and BMD was 0.542 +/- 0.141 g/cm(2). Significant associations were observed between multiple SNPs in a linkage disequilibrium (LD) block within CYP19A1, peaking at the TCT indel with the deletion allele associating with reduced ultrasound BMD in heterozygotes (beta =-0.016, p = -0.005) and homozygotes (beta = -0.029, p = 0.001). The results for BUA and SOS were similar. Significant associations with QUS parameters were also observed for the CAG repeat in AR and SNPs in CYP17A1, LHCGR, and ESR1. Our data confirm evidence of association between bone QUS parameters and polymorphisms in CYP19A1, as well as modest associations with polymorphisms in CYP17A1, ESR1, LHCGR, and AR in a population sample of European men; this supports a role for genetically determined sex hormone actions in influencing male bone health.

  17. A distributed parameter electromechanical and statistical model for energy harvesting from turbulence-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobeck, J. D.; Inman, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    Extensive research has been done on the topics of both turbulence-induced vibration and vibration based energy harvesting; however, little effort has been put into bringing these two topics together. Preliminary experimental studies have shown that piezoelectric structures excited by turbulent flow can produce significant amounts of useful power. This research could serve to benefit applications such as powering remote, self-sustained sensors in small rivers or air ventilation systems where turbulent fluid flow is a primary source of ambient energy. A novel solution for harvesting energy in these unpredictable fluid flow environments was explored by the authors in previous work, and a harvester prototype was developed. This prototype, called piezoelectric grass, has been the focus of many experimental studies. In this paper the authors present a theoretical analysis of the piezoelectric grass harvester modeled as a single unimorph cantilever beam exposed to turbulent cross-flow. This distributed parameter model was developed using a combination of both analytical and statistical techniques. The analytical portion uses a Rayleigh-Ritz approximation method to describe the beam dynamics, and utilizes piezoelectric constitutive relationships to define the electromechanical coupling effects. The statistical portion of the model defines the turbulence-induced forcing function distributed across the beam surface. The model presented in this paper was validated using results from several experimental case studies. Preliminary results show that the model agrees quite well with experimental data. A parameter optimization study was performed with the proposed model. This study demonstrated how a new harvester could be designed to achieve maximum power output in a given turbulent fluid flow environment.

  18. Parameter identification of a distributed runoff model by the optimization software Colleo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Mamoru; Yamakage, Yuzuru; Tsuda, Morimasa; Anai, Hirokazu; Iwami, Yoichi

    2015-04-01

    The introduction of Colleo (Collection of Optimization software) is presented and case studies of parameter identification for a distributed runoff model are illustrated. In order to calculate discharge of rivers accurately, a distributed runoff model becomes widely used to take into account various land usage, soil-type and rainfall distribution. Feasibility study of parameter optimization is desired to be done in two steps. The first step is to survey which optimization algorithms are suitable for the problems of interests. The second step is to investigate the performance of the specific optimization algorithm. Most of the previous studies seem to focus on the second step. This study will focus on the first step and complement the previous studies. Many optimization algorithms have been proposed in the computational science field and a large number of optimization software have been developed and opened to the public with practically applicable performance and quality. It is well known that it is important to use suitable algorithms for the problems to obtain good optimization results efficiently. In order to achieve algorithm comparison readily, optimization software is needed with which performance of many algorithms can be compared and can be connected to various simulation software. Colleo is developed to satisfy such needs. Colleo provides a unified user interface to several optimization software such as pyOpt, NLopt, inspyred and R and helps investigate the suitability of optimization algorithms. 74 different implementations of optimization algorithms, Nelder-Mead, Particle Swarm Optimization and Genetic Algorithm, are available with Colleo. The effectiveness of Colleo was demonstrated with the cases of flood events of the Gokase River basin in Japan (1820km2). From 2002 to 2010, there were 15 flood events, in which the discharge exceeded 1000m3/s. The discharge was calculated with the PWRI distributed hydrological model developed by ICHARM. The target

  19. A new study of shower age distribution in near vertical showers by EAS air shower array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, N.; Basak, D. K.; Goswami, G. C.; Ghosh, B.

    1984-01-01

    The air shower array has been developed since it started operation in 1931. The array covering an area of 900 sq m now incorporates 21 particle density sampling detectors around two muon magnetic spectrographs. The air showers are detected in the size range 10 to the 4th power to 10 to the 6th power particles. A total of 11000 showers has so far been detected. Average values of shower age have been obtained in various shower size ranges to study the dependence of shower age on shower size. The core distance dependence of shower age parameter has also been analyzed for presentation.

  20. Inverse planning in the age of digital LINACs: station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-03-01

    The last few years have seen a number of technical and clinical advances which give rise to a need for innovations in dose optimization and delivery strategies. Technically, a new generation of digital linac has become available which offers features such as programmable motion between station parameters and high dose-rate Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams. Current inverse planning methods are designed for traditional machines and cannot accommodate these features of new generation linacs without compromising either dose conformality and/or delivery efficiency. Furthermore, SBRT is becoming increasingly important, which elevates the need for more efficient delivery, improved dose distribution. Here we will give an overview of our recent work in SPORT designed to harness the digital linacs and highlight the essential components of SPORT. We will summarize the pros and cons of traditional beamlet-based optimization (BBO) and direct aperture optimization (DAO) and introduce a new type of algorithm, compressed sensing (CS)-based inverse planning, that is capable of automatically removing the redundant segments during optimization and providing a plan with high deliverability in the presence of a large number of station control points (potentially non-coplanar, non-isocentric, and even multi-isocenters). We show that CS-approach takes the interplay between planning and delivery into account and allows us to balance the dose optimality and delivery efficiency in a controlled way and, providing a viable framework to address various unmet demands of the new generation linacs. A few specific implementation strategies of SPORT in the forms of fixed-gantry and rotational arc delivery are also presented.

  1. Solar cycle variation of the statistical distribution of the solar wind ɛ parameter and its constituent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindale, E.; Chapman, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    We use 20 years of Wind solar wind observations to investigate the solar cycle variation of the solar wind driving of the magnetosphere. For the first time, we use generalized quantile-quantile plots to compare the statistical distribution of four commonly used solar wind coupling parameters, Poynting flux, B2, the ɛ parameter, and vB, between the maxima and minima of solar cycles 23 and 24. We find the distribution is multicomponent and has the same functional form at all solar cycle phases; the change in distribution is captured by a simple transformation of variables for each component. The ɛ parameter is less sensitive than its constituent variables to changes in the distribution of extreme values between successive solar maxima. The quiet minimum of cycle 23 manifests only in lower extreme values, while cycle 24 was less active across the full distribution range.

  2. A distributed fault-detection and diagnosis system using on-line parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, T.-H.; Merrill, W.; Duyar, A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a model-based fault-detection and diagnosis system (FDD) is reviewed. The system can be used as an integral part of an intelligent control system. It determines the faults of a system from comparison of the measurements of the system with a priori information represented by the model of the system. The method of modeling a complex system is described and a description of diagnosis models which include process faults is presented. There are three distinct classes of fault modes covered by the system performance model equation: actuator faults, sensor faults, and performance degradation. A system equation for a complete model that describes all three classes of faults is given. The strategy for detecting the fault and estimating the fault parameters using a distributed on-line parameter identification scheme is presented. A two-step approach is proposed. The first step is composed of a group of hypothesis testing modules, (HTM) in parallel processing to test each class of faults. The second step is the fault diagnosis module which checks all the information obtained from the HTM level, isolates the fault, and determines its magnitude. The proposed FDD system was demonstrated by applying it to detect actuator and sensor faults added to a simulation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The simulation results show that the proposed FDD system can adequately detect the faults and estimate their magnitudes.

  3. Optimal control of distributed parameter systems using adaptive critic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padhi, Radhakant

    In this dissertation, two systematic optimal control synthesis techniques are presented for distributed parameter systems based on the adaptive critic neural networks. Following the philosophy of dynamic programming, this adaptive critic optimal control synthesis approach has many desirable features, viz. having a feedback form of the control, ability for on-line implementation, no need for approximating the nonlinear system dynamics, etc. More important, unlike the dynamic programming, it can accomplish these objectives without getting overwhelmed by the computational and storage requirements. First, an approximate dynamic programming based adaptive critic control synthesis formulation was carried out assuming an approximation of the system dynamics in a discrete form. A variety of example problems were solved using this proposed general approach. Next a different formulation is presented, which is capable of directly addressing the continuous form of system dynamics for control design. This was obtained following the methodology of Galerkin projection based weighted residual approximation using a set of orthogonal basis functions. The basis functions were designed by with the help of proper orthogonal decomposition, which leads to a very low-dimensional lumped parameter representation. The regulator problems of linear and nonlinear heat equations were revisited. Optimal controllers were synthesized first assuming a continuous controller and then a set of discrete controllers in the spatial domain. Another contribution of this study is the formulation of simplified adaptive critics for a large class of problems, which can be interpreted as a significant improvement of the existing adaptive critic technique.

  4. Radial Distribution of Plasma Parameters in an Asymmetric Coaxial Capacitive Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshl, Jeremy; Nikolic, Milka; Upadhyay, Janardan; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Lepsha

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown that plasma processing is a promising technique for material removal from the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities used in large particle accelerators. A radiofrequency (rf) Capacitive Coupled Plasma (CCP) is created in a coaxial setup with the powered electrode inside a hollow cylindrical cavity. While a great deal of knowledge has been gathered on effective plasma etching criteria in Ar/Cl2 discharge such as pressure, temperature, rf power, dc bias voltage, and experiment construction, little is known about important plasma specific parameters. The determination of plasma parameters is important due to the unique cylindrical geometry of the plasma defined by the SRF cavity geometry. This configuration leaves many questions regarding the structure and distribution of the discharge as it relates to radial position. Presented here are the diagnostic methods and subsequent results for both electropositive (Ar) and electronegative (Ar/Cl2) discharges in a cylindrical coaxial rf CCP. Optical Emission Spectroscopy in conjunction with a robust kinetic model of Argon produces electron temperatures and metastable populations with respect to radial positions of the discharge. Supported by DE-SC0014397.

  5. Estimation of parameters in a distributed precipitation-runoff model for Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beldring, Stein; Engeland, Kolbjørn; Roald, Lars A.; Roar Sælthun, Nils; Voksø, Astrid

    A distributed version of the HBV-model using 1 km2 grid cells and daily time step was used to simulate runoff from the entire land surface of Norway for the period 1961-1990. The model was sensitive to changes in small scale properties of the land surface and the climatic input data, through explicit representation of differences between model elements, and by implicit consideration of sub-grid variations in moisture status. A geographically transferable set of model parameters was determined by a multi-criteria calibration strategy, which simultaneously minimised the residuals between model simulated and observed runoff from 141 Norwegian catchments located in areas with different runoff regimes and landscape characteristics. Model discretisation units with identical landscape classification were assigned similar parameter values. Model performance was evaluated by simulating discharge from 43 independent catchments. Finally, a river routing procedure using a kinematic wave approximation to open channel flow was introduced in the model, and discharges from three additional catchments were calculated and compared with observations. The model was used to produce a map of average annual runoff for Norway for the period 1961-1990.

  6. Feedback optimal control of distributed parameter systems by using finite-dimensional approximation schemes.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, Angelo; Gaggero, Mauro; Zoppoli, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Optimal control for systems described by partial differential equations is investigated by proposing a methodology to design feedback controllers in approximate form. The approximation stems from constraining the control law to take on a fixed structure, where a finite number of free parameters can be suitably chosen. The original infinite-dimensional optimization problem is then reduced to a mathematical programming one of finite dimension that consists in optimizing the parameters. The solution of such a problem is performed by using sequential quadratic programming. Linear combinations of fixed and parameterized basis functions are used as the structure for the control law, thus giving rise to two different finite-dimensional approximation schemes. The proposed paradigm is general since it allows one to treat problems with distributed and boundary controls within the same approximation framework. It can be applied to systems described by either linear or nonlinear elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations in arbitrary multidimensional domains. Simulation results obtained in two case studies show the potentials of the proposed approach as compared with dynamic programming.

  7. Typical Profiles and Distributions of Plasma and Magnetic Field Parameters in Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.; Démoulin, P.; Zhukov, A. N.; Gulisano, A. M.; Mierla, M.; Kilpua, E.; West, M.; Lacatus, D.; Paraschiv, A.; Janvier, M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). They are important because of their simple internal magnetic field configuration, which resembles a magnetic flux rope, and because they represent one of the most geoeffective types of solar transients. In this study, we analyze their internal structure using a superposed epoch method on 63 events observed at L1 by the Advance Composition Explorer (ACE), between 1998 and 2006. In this way, we obtain an average profile for each plasma and magnetic field parameter at each point of the cloud. Furthermore, we take a fixed time-window upstream and downstream from the MC to also sample the regions preceding the cloud and the wake trailing it. We then perform a detailed analysis of the internal characteristics of the clouds and their surrounding solar wind environments. We find that the parameters studied are compatible with log-normal distribution functions. The plasma β and the level of fluctuations in the magnetic field vector are the best parameters to define the boundaries of MCs. We find that one third of the events shows a peak in plasma density close to the trailing edge of the flux ropes. We provide several possible explanations for this result and investigate if the density peak is of a solar origin ( e.g. erupting prominence material) or formed during the magnetic cloud travel from the Sun to 1 AU. The most plausible explanation is the compression due to a fast overtaking flow, coming from a coronal hole located to the east of the solar source region of the magnetic cloud.

  8. Influence of Age and Dose of African Swine Fever Virus Infections on Clinical Outcome and Blood Parameters in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Post, Jacob; Weesendorp, Eefke; Montoya, Maria; Loeffen, Willie L

    African swine fever (ASF) is a fatal disease for domestic pigs, leading to serious economic losses in countries where ASF is endemic. Despite extensive research, efficient vaccines against ASF are lacking. Since peripheral blood cells are important mediators for vaccines, we study the impact of ASF on blood parameters in pigs with different ages and infected with different doses of ASF virus. Four different groups were studied: (1) 12 weeks of age/low virus dose; (2) 12 weeks of age/high virus dose; (3) 18 weeks of age/low virus dose; and (4) 18 weeks of age/high virus dose. By varying in age and/or ASFV inoculation dose, we monitor blood parameters during different degrees of disease. Thirty percent of the pigs survived the infection with a moderately virulent strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV). Animals that did survive infection were generally older, independent from the inoculation dose used. A firm reduction in many different cell types at 3-5 days postinfection (DPI) was accompanied by an increase in body temperature, followed by clinical signs and mortality from day 6 PI. While blood parameters generally normalized in survivors, γδ T cells and IL-10 levels could be related to mortality. These conclusions should be considered in new approaches for protection against ASF.

  9. [Water color parameter spatial distribution character and influence on hygrophyte photosynthesis in Taihu Lake].

    PubMed

    Le, Cheng-feng; Li, Yun-mei; Zhang, Yun-lin; Sun, De-yong; Wu, Lan

    2007-11-01

    Using 64 stations water quality data collected in Taihu Lake, the spatial distribution of water color parameters and euphotic depth was analyzed, and the potential effect on hygrophyte photosynthesis was discussed. The result showed that the most variation was found for Chl a concentration, the value varies from 1.67 microg x L(-1) to 159.94 microg x L(-1), with the standard deviation of 41.03 mg x L(-1). The high Chl a concentration was recorded in Meiliang Bay, Zhushan Lake, Jiapu port and Xiaomei port with obviously spatial variation and compressive isoclines. The spatial variation of total suspended matter (TSM) concentration was lower than that of Chl a with a standard deviation of 31.63 mg x L(-1), and the concentration varies from 6.47 mg x L(-1) to 143.47 mg x L(-1). The high value was found in the area near Dapu port and Xiaomei port, with obviously spatial variation and compressive isoclines. No markedly spatial variation was found for colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the whole lake. Euphotic depth was influenced by TSM and Chl a concentrations, while the influence by TSM was greater than that by Chl a. Therefore, the characteristics of spatial distribution for euphotic depth are reverse with TSM.

  10. Binomial distribution sample confidence intervals estimation for positive and negative likelihood ratio medical key parameters.

    PubMed

    Bolboacă, Sorana; Jäntschi, Lorentz

    2005-01-01

    Likelihood Ratio medical key parameters calculated on categorical results from diagnostic tests are usually express accompanied with their confidence intervals, computed using the normal distribution approximation of binomial distribution. The approximation creates known anomalies,especially for limit cases. In order to improve the quality of estimation, four new methods (called here RPAC, RPAC0, RPAC1, and RPAC2) were developed and compared with the classical method (called here RPWald), using an exact probability calculation algorithm.Computer implementations of the methods use the PHP language. We defined and implemented the functions of the four new methods and the five criterions of confidence interval assessment. The experiments run for samples sizes which vary in 14 - 34 range, 90 - 100 range (0 < X < m, 0< Y < n), as well as for random numbers for samples sizes (4m, n

  11. Calculation of distribution coefficients in the SAMPL5 challenge from atomic solvation parameters and surface areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Martins, Diogo; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2016-11-01

    In the context of SAMPL5, we submitted blind predictions of the cyclohexane/water distribution coefficient (D) for a series of 53 drug-like molecules. Our method is purely empirical and based on the additive contribution of each solute atom to the free energy of solvation in water and in cyclohexane. The contribution of each atom depends on the atom type and on the exposed surface area. Comparatively to similar methods in the literature, we used a very small set of atomic parameters: only 10 for solvation in water and 1 for solvation in cyclohexane. As a result, the method is protected from overfitting and the error in the blind predictions could be reasonably estimated. Moreover, this approach is fast: it takes only 0.5 s to predict the distribution coefficient for all 53 SAMPL5 compounds, allowing its application in virtual screening campaigns. The performance of our approach (submission 49) is modest but satisfactory in view of its efficiency: the root mean square error (RMSE) was 3.3 log D units for the 53 compounds, while the RMSE of the best performing method (using COSMO-RS) was 2.1 (submission 16). Our method is implemented as a Python script available at https://github.com/diogomart/SAMPL5-DC-surface-empirical.

  12. Distributed parameter heat transfer and thermodynamic model of a scroll pump

    SciTech Connect

    Sunder, S.; Smith, J.L. Jr.

    1997-07-01

    Heat transfer processes between gas and walls of a scroll pump strongly affect its thermodynamic performance. Hence, the authors present a new methodology for simulating gas and wall processes of a scroll pump, using the techniques of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). They capture the spatial and temporal distribution of gas temperature and pressure by solving the energy and continuity equations for moving and deforming gas control volumes represents a column (pocket) of gas as it moves through the pump and gets compressed. The gas models incorporate heat transfer between gas and walls, as well as leakage phenomena, and thermodynamic effects. Simultaneously, they also capture the spatial distribution of wall temperatures in a scroll pump by modeling the heat transfer processes that characterize wall-gas and wall-wall interactions. Modes of heat transfer simulated for the wall side include conduction, convection and kissing heat transfer, which is a novel mechanism of heat transfer through transient contact between the wraps of a scroll pump. Gas and wall side calculations proceed iteratively in order to be consistent with each other. The results of the model were found to be in good agreement with experimentally observed scroll wall temperature data and experimentally measured pump thermodynamic parameters.

  13. Effects of age on left atrial volume and strain parameters using echocardiography in a normal black population

    PubMed Central

    Meel, Ruchika; Peters, Ferande; Libhaber, Elena; Nel, Samantha; Essop, Mohammed R

    2016-01-01

    Objective Normal cut-off values for left atrial (LA) size and function may be altered by aging and ethnic differences. No age-related reference values for LA volumetric measurements or LA strain exist in Africans. We aimed to establish normal age-appropriate values of LA size and function in black Africans. Additionally, we studied the correlation between age, LA strain and volumetric parameters. Methods In this prospective, cross-sectional study of 120 individuals (mean age 38.7 ± 12.8 years, 50% men), subjects were classified into four age groups: 18–29, 30–39, 40–49 and 50–70 years. LA volumes were measured by biplane Simpson’s method, and Philips QLAB 9 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) speckle-tracking software was used to measure LA peak strain in the reservoir (ƐR) and contractile phase (ƐCT). Results No significant differences in the maximum and minimum LAVi were noted among the four age categories (P = 0.1, P = 0.2). LA volumetric function assessment showed no difference in reservoir function between age groups (P > 0.05), conduit function decreased with advancing age (r = −0.3, P < 0.001) and booster function displayed a significant increase with age (LA active emptying volume index, P = 0.001). There was a significant decrease in LA ƐR (P < 0.0001) in the older age groups, whereas ƐCT remained unchanged (P = 0.27). Conclusion Age-related changes in LA reservoir, conduit and contractile function in black Africans are similar to those observed in other populations, as was the trend of declining ƐR with advancing age. The preservation of ƐCT with increasing age requires further analysis. PMID:27884828

  14. 40 CFR Table F-3 to Subpart F of... - Critical Parameters of Idealized Ambient Particle Size Distributions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Critical Parameters of Idealized Ambient Particle Size Distributions F Table F-3 to Subpart F of Part 53 Protection of Environment....5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-3 Table F-3 to Subpart F of Part 53—Critical Parameters of...

  15. 40 CFR Table F-3 to Subpart F of... - Critical Parameters of Idealized Ambient Particle Size Distributions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Critical Parameters of Idealized Ambient Particle Size Distributions F Table F-3 to Subpart F of Part 53 Protection of Environment....5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-3 Table F-3 to Subpart F of Part 53—Critical Parameters of...

  16. Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

    2013-12-31

    This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based

  17. Apparent Transition in the Human Height Distribution Caused by Age-Dependent Variation during Puberty Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Takaki; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Kuninaka, Hiroto

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we examine the validity of the transition of the human height distribution from the log-normal distribution to the normal distribution during puberty, as suggested in an earlier study [Kuninaka et al.: J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 78 (2009) 125001]. Our data analysis reveals that, in late puberty, the variation in height decreases as children grow. Thus, the classification of a height dataset by age at this stage leads us to analyze a mixture of distributions with larger means and smaller variations. This mixture distribution has a negative skewness and is consequently closer to the normal distribution than to the log-normal distribution. The opposite case occurs in early puberty and the mixture distribution is positively skewed, which resembles the log-normal distribution rather than the normal distribution. Thus, this scenario mimics the transition during puberty. Additionally, our scenario is realized through a numerical simulation based on a statistical model. The present study does not support the transition suggested by the earlier study.

  18. Influence of anisotropy on velocity and age distribution at Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwinger, T.; Schäfer, M.; Martín, C.; Moore, J. C.

    2013-06-01

    We use a full-Stokes thermo-mechanically coupled ice-flow model to study the dynamics of the glacier inside Scharffenbergbotnen valley, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. The domain encompasses a high accumulation rate region and, downstream a sublimation-dominated bare ice ablation area. The ablation ice area is notable for having old ice at its surface since the vertical velocity is upwards, and horizontal velocities are almost stagnant there. We compare the model simulation with field observations of velocities and the age distribution of the surface ice. A satisfactory match with simulations using an isotropic flow law was not found because of too high horizontal velocities and too slow vertical ones. However, the existence of a pronounced ice fabric may explain the present day surface velocity distribution in the inner Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area. Near absence of data on the temporal evolution of Scharffenbergbotnen since the Late Glacial Maximum necessitates exploration of the impact of anisotropy using prescribed ice fabrics: isotropic, single maximum, and linear variation with depth, in both two-dimensional and three dimensional flow models. The realistic velocity field simulated with a non-collinear orthotropic flow law, however produced surface ages in significant disagreement with the few reliable age measurements and suggests that the age field is not in a steady state and that the present distribution is a result of a flow reorganization at about 15 000 yr BP. In order to fully understand the surface age distribution a transient simulation starting from the Late Glacial Maximum including the correct initial conditions for geometry, age, fabric and temperature distribution would be needed. It is the first time that the importance of anisotropy has been demonstrated in the ice dynamics of a blue ice area. This is useful to understand ice flow in order to better interpret archives of ancient ice for paleoclimate research.

  19. Influence of anisotropy on velocity and age distribution at Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwinger, T.; Schäfer, M.; Martín, C.; Moore, J. C.

    2014-04-01

    We use a full-Stokes thermo-mechanically coupled ice-flow model to study the dynamics of the glacier inside Scharffenbergbotnen valley, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. The domain encompasses a high accumulation rate region and, downstream, a sublimation-dominated bare ice ablation area. The ablation ice area is notable for having old ice at its surface since the vertical velocity is upwards, and horizontal velocities are almost stagnant there. We compare the model simulation with field observations of velocities and the age distribution of the surface ice. No satisfactory match using an isotropic flow law could be found because of too high vertical velocities and much too high horizontal ones in simulations despite varying enhancement factor, geothermal heat flux and surface temperatures over large ranges. However, the existence of a pronounced ice fabric may explain the observed present-day surface velocity and mass balance distribution in the inner Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area. Near absence of data on the temporal evolution of Scharffenbergbotnen since the Late Glacial Maximum necessitates exploration of the impact of anisotropy using prescribed ice fabrics: isotropic, single maximum, and linear variation with depth, in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow models. The realistic velocity field simulated with a noncollinear orthotropic flow law, however, produced surface ages in significant disagreement with the few reliable age measurements and suggests that the age field is not in a steady state and that the present distribution is a result of a flow reorganization at about 15 000 yr BP. In order to fully understand the surface age distribution, a transient simulation starting from the Late Glacial Maximum including the correct initial conditions for geometry, age, fabric and temperature distribution would be needed. This is the first time that the importance of anisotropy has been demonstrated in the ice dynamics of a blue ice area and

  20. Stability of the age distribution of measles cases over time during outbreaks in Bangladesh, 2004-2006.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Eric; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Goodson, James L; Anand, Abhijeet; Mach, Ondrej; Thapa, Arun; O'Connor, Patrick; Linayage, Jayantha; Diorditsa, Serguei; Hasan, A S M Mainul; Uzzaman, Sharif; Jalil Mondal, M D Abdul

    2011-07-01

    Despite recommendations from WHO to conduct measles outbreak response vaccination campaigns based on the age distribution of cases at the beginning of an outbreak, few data exist to specifically examine whether the age distribution of cases remains constant over time in a measles outbreak. This analysis explores this question with use of measles outbreak surveillance data from Bangladesh from the period 2004-2006. Pearson χ(2) tests were conducted of age distributions over 2 periods during 41 large laboratory-confirmed measles outbreaks. Statistically significant changes in age distribution over time were observed in 24% of the outbreaks. No single pattern was detected in the shifts in age distribution; however, an increase in the proportion of cases occurring among infants <9 months of age was evident in 6 outbreaks. These findings suggest a need to consider the possibility of a shift in the age distribution over time when planning an outbreak response vaccination campaign.

  1. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Power and distribution transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.

    1994-05-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in power and distribution transformers important to license renewal in commercial nuclear power plants. The intent of this AMG to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner which allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  2. The age distribution of self-reported personality disorder traits in a household population.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Simone; Coid, Jeremy

    2009-04-01

    Stability over time is an essential criterion for the diagnosis of a personality disorder (PD) according to DSM-IV and ICD-10. However, both longitudinal and cross-sectional studies have demonstrated considerable changes of personality disorder traits during life-span, an observation which challenges this assumption. We measured self-reported DSM-IV personality disorder traits in a nationally representative community sample using a cross-sectional design. We investigated the association of dimensional PD scores with age. Our analyses confirmed a decreasing prevalence of personality disorder mean scores across age groups in the population, particularly Cluster B, with an increase in self-reported schizoid and obsessive-compulsive scores. Furthermore, specific interactions of demographic characteristics and age were identified. Analyses of transition points in the distribution of personality disorders across different age groups did not demonstrate increasing stability after age 30 as previously observed for normal personality traits. Significant changes occurred primarily after the third decade.

  3. Uncertainty propagation in up-scaling of subsoil parameters, no fixed distributions allowed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourens, Aris; van Geer, Frans C.

    2013-04-01

    When creating numerical groundwater models, the structure and properties of the subsoil is indispensable information. Like all model data, these data are subject to uncertainty. Building a groundwater model, the available geological information, like the geological structure and parameter values, has to be up-scaled and aggregated to layers at model scale. If the uncertainty of the geological data is known, in principle, the uncertainty of the up-scaled model layer can be evaluated. The up-scaling from borehole point data to aquifer scale data can be performed by kriging interpolation. However, using this technique, the possibilities to propagate the uncertainty of the borehole data are limited. The most common way to assess the uncertainty is to use kriging in combination with methods like Monte Carlo simulation. If many parameters are involved this is a time consuming process, which does not always yield a useful result. We propose a method, in combination with kriging interpolation, to perform the uncertainty propagation of the subsoil parameters by taking into account the complete probability density functions (PDF) of all individual parameters. This method does not rely on a specific type of distribution function of the PDFs and can therefore widely be used. In the Netherlands, like in many other countries, a large database is available containing borehole data. Interpretation of these data involves assigning hydraulic conductivity values to all the identified thin geological layers. These conductivity values, derived from all kinds of tests, are not fixed values but are represented by a certain range that can be described by a (log-normal) PDF. Beside the uncertainty of the conductivities also the layer depth and thickness are subject to uncertainty and can be described by PDFs. When performing the interpolation of the borehole point data to the desired groundwater model grid, the PDFs of the conductivities and layer depths are used throughout all

  4. Past and present seafloor age distributions and the temporal evolution of plate tectonic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Conrad, C. P.; Buffett, B.; Muller, D.; Loyd, S.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Corsetti, F.

    2008-12-01

    Variations in the rates of seafloor generation and recycling have potentially far-reaching consequences for sea level, ocean chemistry and climate. A parameterized framework to describe such variations could guide the study of non-uniformitarian plate tectonic activity, but there is little agreement on the appropriate mechanical description of the surface boundary layer. A strong constraint on the statistics of oceanic convection systems comes from the preserved seafloor age distribution, and additional inferences are possible when paleo-seafloor is modeled based on plate motion reconstructions. Based on previously reconstructed seafloor ages, we recently inferred that oceanic heat flow was larger by ~15% at 60~Ma than today. This signal is mainly caused by the smaller plates that existed previously in the Pacific basin with relatively larger ridge-proximal area of young seafloor. The associated decrease in heat flow is larger than any plausible decrease due to cooling, and therefore hint at cyclic behavior in plate tectonics. We also consider area-per-age statistics for the present-day and back to 140~Ma from new paleo-age reconstructions. Using a simplified seafloor age evolution model we explore which physical parameterizations for the average behavior of the oceanic lithosphere are compatible with broad trends in the data. In particular, we show that a subduction probability based on lithospheric buoyancy ("sqrt(age)") leads to results that are comparable to, or better than, that of the probability distribution that is required to obtain the "triangular" age distribution with age-independent destruction of ocean floor. The current, near triangular distribution of ages and the relative lull in heat flow are likely only snapshots of a transient state during the Wilson cycle. Current seafloor ages still contain hints of a ≤sssim 60~Myr period, cyclic variation of seafloor production, and using paleo-ages for 140~Ma, we find a ~ 400~Myr best-fitting variation

  5. Age Dating Fluvial Sediment Storage Reservoirs to Construct Sediment Waiting Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalak, K.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Benthem, A.; Karwan, D. L.; Mahan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Suspended sediment transport is an important geomorphic process that can often control the transport of nutrients and contaminants. The time a particle spends in storage remains a critical knowledge gap in understanding particle trajectories through landscapes. We dated floodplain deposits in South River, VA, using fallout radionuclides (Pb-210, Cs-137), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and radiocarbon dating to determine sediment ages and construct sediment waiting time distributions. We have a total of 14 age dates in two eroding banks. We combine these age dates with a well-constrained history of mercury concentrations on suspended sediment in the river from an industrial release. Ages from fallout radionuclides document sedimentation from the early 1900s to the present, and agree with the history of mercury contamination. OSL dates span approximately 200 to 17,000 years old. We performed a standard Weibull analysis of nonexceedance to construct a waiting time distribution of floodplain sediment for the South River. The mean waiting time for floodplain sediment is 2930 years, while the median is approximately 710 years. When the floodplain waiting time distribution is combined with the waiting time distribution for in-channel sediment storage (available from previous studies), the mean waiting time shifts to approximately 680 years, suggesting that quantifying sediment waiting times for both channel and floodplain storage is critical in advancing knowledge of particle trajectories through watersheds.

  6. Cobalt Distribution and Speciation: Effect of Aging, Intermittent Submergence, In situ Rice Roots

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciation and distribution of cobalt (Co) in soils is poorly understood. This study was conducted using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques to examine the influence of soluble Co(II) aging, submergence-dried cycling, and the presence of in vivo rice roots on the...

  7. Aging and Faculty Distribution of Their Work Effort. ASHE 1986 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Janet H.; Blackburn, Robert T.

    The relative impact of the aging process, pervasive changes in higher education, and career socialization experiences on college faculty members' distributions of work effort was studied. Secondary analyses were completed on the following surveys: the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education Survey (1969) and the Survey of the American…

  8. Exercise induces age-dependent changes on epigenetic parameters in rat hippocampus: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Lovatel, Gisele Agustini; Moysés, Felipe; Bertoldi, Karine; Spindler, Christiano; Cechinel, Laura Reck; Muotri, Alysson Renato; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2013-02-01

    Regular exercise improves learning and memory, including during aging process. Interestingly, the imbalance of epigenetic mechanisms has been linked to age-related cognitive deficits. However, studies about epigenetic alterations after exercise during the aging process are rare. In this preliminary study we investigated the effect of aging and exercise on DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) and H3-K9 methylation levels in hippocampus from 3 and 20-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two exercise protocols: single session or chronic treadmill protocol. DNMT1 and H3-K9 methylation levels were decreased in hippocampus from aged rats. The single exercise session decreased both DNMT3b and DNMT1 levels in young adult rats, without any effect in the aged group. Both exercise protocols reduced H3-K9 methylation levels in young adult rats, while the single session reversed the changes on H3-K9 methylation levels induced by aging. Together, these results suggest that an imbalance on DNMTs and H3-K9 methylation levels might be linked to the brain aging process and that the outcome to exercise seems to vary through lifespan.

  9. Correlation between male age, WHO sperm parameters, DNA fragmentation, chromatin packaging and outcome in assisted reproduction technology.

    PubMed

    Nijs, M; De Jonge, C; Cox, A; Janssen, M; Bosmans, E; Ombelet, W

    2011-06-01

    In the human, male ageing results in reproductive hormonal and cellular changes that can influence semen quality (volume, motility, concentration and morphology) and ultimately result in a reduced fertilising capacity and a longer 'time to pregnancy' for ageing men as well as an increased risk for miscarriage. This prospective cohort study of 278 patients undergoing a first in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment was undertaken to examine whether patient's age was reflected in sperm motility, concentration, morphology as well as in DNA fragmentation (DFI) and immature chromatin (unprocessed nuclear proteins and/or poorly condensed chromatin) as measured by the sperm chromatin structure assay. This study also investigated the possible influence of male age (after correcting for female age) on their fertilising capacity, on obtaining a pregnancy and a healthy baby at home. Logistic regression analysis did not reveal any male age-related influences on sperm parameters like concentration, motility or morphology. No significant male age-related increase in DFI or immature chromatin was demonstrable for these patients. Elevated male age, after correcting for female age, was not related to lower fertilisation rates or significant decreases in the chance for a healthy baby at home.

  10. EFFECTS OF TOLUENE ON BRAIN OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging-related susceptibility to environmental chemicals is poorly understood. Oxidative stress (OS) appears to play an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to test whether OS is a potential toxicity pathway for tol...

  11. Working Memory Deficits in ADHD: The Contribution of Age, Learning/Language Difficulties, and Task Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowerby, Paula; Seal, Simon; Tripp, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To further define the nature of working memory (WM) impairments in children with combined-type ADHD. Method: A total of 40 Children with ADHD and an age and gender-matched control group (n = 40) completed two measures of visuo-spatial WM and two measures of verbal WM. The effects of age and learning/language difficulties on performance…

  12. Determination of chronological aging parameters in epidermal keratinocytes by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Chen, Szu-Yu; Chou, Sin-Yo; Wang, Pei-Hsun; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is an important issue in geriatric and cosmetic dermatology. To quantitatively analyze changes in keratinocytes related to intrinsic aging, we exploited a 1230 nm-based in vivo harmonic generation microscopy, combining second- and third-harmonic generation modalities. 52 individuals (21 men and 31 women, age range 19–79) were examined on the sun-protected volar forearm. Through quantitative analysis by the standard algorithm provided, we found that the cellular and nuclear size of basal keratinocytes, but not that of granular cells, was significantly increased with advancing age. The cellular and nuclear areas, which have an increase of 0.51 μm2 and 0.15 μm2 per year, respectively, can serve as scoring indices for intrinsic skin aging. PMID:23304649

  13. Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Centile Curves and Distributions by Age of Hospitalized Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Danny; Goodwin, Andrew J.; Greer, Robert; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Laussen, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) form the basis for monitoring the physiological state of patients. Although norms have been published for healthy and hospitalized children, little is known about their distributions in critically ill children. The objective of this study was to report the distributions of these basic physiological variables in hospitalized critically ill children. Continuous data from bedside monitors were collected and stored at 5-s intervals from 3,677 subjects aged 0–18 years admitted over a period of 30 months to the pediatric and cardiac intensive care units at a large quaternary children’s hospital. Approximately 1.13 billion values served to estimate age-specific distributions for these two basic physiological variables: HR and intra-arterial BP. Centile curves were derived from the sample distributions and compared to common reference ranges. Properties such as kurtosis and skewness of these distributions are described. In comparison to previously published reference ranges, we show that children in these settings exhibit markedly higher HRs than their healthy counterparts or children hospitalized on in-patient wards. We also compared commonly used published estimates of hypotension in children (e.g., the PALS guidelines) to the values we derived from critically ill children. This is a first study reporting the distributions of basic physiological variables in children in the pediatric intensive care settings, and the percentiles derived may serve as useful references for bedside clinicians and clinical trials. PMID:28367430

  14. Stratification based on reproductive state reveals contrasting patterns of age-related variation in demographic parameters in the kittiwake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cam, E.; Monnat, J.-Y.

    2000-01-01

    Heterogeneity in individual quality can be a major obstacle when interpreting age-specific variation in life-history traits. Heterogeneity is likely to lead to within-generation selection, and patterns observed at the population level may result from the combination of hidden patterns specific to subpopulations. Population-level patterns are not relevant to hypotheses concerning the evolution of age-specific reproductive strategies if they differ from patterns at the individual level. We addressed the influence of age and a variable used as a surrogate of quality (yearly reproductive state) on survival and breeding probability in the kittiwake. We found evidence of an effect of age and quality on both demographic parameters. Patterns observed in breeders are consistent with the selection hypothesis, which predicts age-related increases in survival and traits positively correlated with survival. Our results also reveal unexpected age effects specific to subgroups: the influence of age on survival and future breeding probability is not the same in nonbreeders and breeders. These patterns are observed in higher-quality breeding habitats, where the influence of extrinsic factors on breeding state is the weakest. Moreover, there is slight evidence of an influence of sex on breeding probability (not on survival), but the same overall pattern is observed in both sexes. Our results support the hypothesis that age-related variation in demographic parameters observed at the population level is partly shaped by heterogeneity among individuals. They also suggest processes specific to subpopulations. Recent theoreticaI developments lay emphasis on integration of sources of heterogeneity in optimization models to account for apparently 'sub-optimal' empirical patterns. Incorporation of sources of heterogeneity is also the key to investigation of age-related reproductive strategies in heterogeneous populations. Thwarting 'heterogeneity's ruses' has become a major challenge: for

  15. Vibration suppression of distributed parameter flexible structures by Integral Consensus Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Ehsan; Mahmoodi, S. Nima

    2016-03-01

    Integral Consensus Control (ICC) is proposed and implemented in this paper for the first time, as a novel approach for vibration control in distributed parameter flexible structures. The ICC consists of multiple parallel first-order lossy integrators, with the goal of targeting all major participating resonant modes in the oscillation of the structure. The vibration control design is taken to a different level, by integrating the concept of consensus control design into the new dynamics. Each control patch on the flexible structure is considered as a node of a network, and a communication topology with consensus control terms are augmented in the controller design dynamics. The result is an effective vibration controller, which is also robust to failures and inconsistencies in the control system. A cantilever is used as a sample flexible structure to investigate the control method. Multi-agent representation of the system, state estimator dynamics and the ICC model are designed for the structure. Extensive numerical simulations have been conducted to show the suppression performance of the ICC under different input disturbances. A comparative study is presented to show the advantage of the decentralized design over the conventional centralized approach. The new consensus control design provides new possibilities to vibration control problems, where an effective, robust and synchronized suppression is needed.

  16. A continuum breakdown parameter based on the characteristic function of the molecular velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamatsaz, Arghavan; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2014-11-01

    Rarefied flows characterized by Knudsen numbers (Kn) greater than 0.1 are frequently encountered in several applications including low-pressure, high speed and microscale flows and require computationally expensive molecular approaches such as direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to accurately capture the physical phenomena unique to these flows. However, most of these flows also contain regions where traditional inexpensive continuum techniques such as the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are sufficiently accurate making a hybrid NS-DSMC approach attractive and optimal. Such a hybrid method typically requires a robust continuum breakdown parameter (CBP) to determine regions where each method should be applied. Historically, hybrid methods have used CBPs based on the macroscopic properties which are lower order moments of the molecular velocity distribution function (VDF) and their gradients which can have significant inaccuracies. In this work, we propose a novel CBP that utilizes all moments of the VDF by computing the characteristic function with limited computational overhead. We also compare the performance of this CBP using standard benchmark problems including structure of a normal shock wave and Fourier-Couette flow for various Kn from continuum to free-molecular.

  17. Modeling and control for heave dynamics of a flexible wing micro aerial vehicle distributed parameter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Lisa M.

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, much research has been motivated by the idea of biologically-inspired flight. It is a conjecture of the United States Air Force that incorporating characteristics of biological flight into air vehicles will significantly improve the maneuverability and performance of modern aircraft. Although there are studies which involve the aerodynamics, structural dynamics, modeling, and control of flexible wing micro aerial vehicles (MAVs), issues of control and vehicular modeling as a whole are largely unexplored. Modeling with such dynamics lends itself to systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) with nonlinearities, and limited control theory is available for such systems. In this work, a multiple component structure consisting of two Euler-Bernoulli beams connected to a rigid mass is used to model the heave dynamics of an aeroelastic wing MAV, which is acted upon by a nonlinear aerodynamic lift force. We seek to employ tools from distributed parameter modeling and linear control theory in an effort to achieve agile flight potential of flexible, morphable wing MAV airframes. Theoretical analysis of the model is conducted, which includes generating solutions to the eigenvalue problem for the system and determining well-posedness and the attainment of a C 0-semigroup for the linearly approximated model. In order to test the model's ability to track to a desired state and to gain insight into optimal morphing trajectories, two control objectives are employed on the model: target state tracking and morphing trajectory over time.

  18. Distributions and averages of electron density parameters: Explaining the effects of gradient corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupan, Ales; Burke, Kieron; Ernzerhof, Matthias; Perdew, John P.

    1997-06-01

    We analyze the electron densities n(r) of atoms, molecules, solids, and surfaces. The distributions of values of the Seitz radius rs=(3/4πn)1/3 and the reduced density gradient s=|∇n|/(2(3π2)1/3n4/3) in an electron density indicate which ranges of these variables are significant for physical processes. We also define energy-weighted averages of these variables, and , from which local spin density (LSD) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation energies may be estimated. The changes in these averages upon rearrangement of the nuclei (atomization of molecules or solids, stretching of bond lengths or lattice parameters, change of crystal structure, etc.) are used to explain why GGA corrects LSD in the way it does. A thermodynamic-like inequality (essentially d/>d/2) determines whether the gradient corrections drive a process forward. We use this analysis to explain why gradient corrections usually stretch bonds (but not for example H-H bonds), reduce atomization and surface energies, and raise energy barriers to formation at transition states.

  19. Transmission integral analysis of Mössbauer spectra displaying hyperfine parameter distributions with arbitrary profile

    SciTech Connect

    Klencsár, Zoltán

    2014-10-27

    Accurate quantitative analysis of Mössbauer spectra displaying thickness effects requires the consideration of the so-called transmission integral when modeling the spectral shape. Whereas this is straightforward when the correct model for the decomposition of the absorber's nuclear resonance absorption cross-section into individual components is a priori known, in the absence of such knowledge and notably in the presence of hyperfine parameter distributions with an unknown profile, the so-called model-independent evaluation methods could be used to fit the spectra. However, the methods available for this purpose were developed for the analysis of spectra for which the thin absorber approximation is valid, and thus they do not take the sample thickness and related effects into account. Consequently, in order to use them for spectra displaying thickness effects, their usage needs to be generalized by combining them with transmission integral fitting. A new algorithm realizing such a generalized version of the Hesse-Rübartsch model-independent evaluation method was developed recently as an integral part of the MossWinn program. In the present work, the working principle of the newly developed algorithm is described in details along with examples illustrating the capabilities of the method for the case of {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  20. Transmission integral analysis of Mössbauer spectra displaying hyperfine parameter distributions with arbitrary profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klencsár, Zoltán

    2014-10-01

    Accurate quantitative analysis of Mössbauer spectra displaying thickness effects requires the consideration of the so-called transmission integral when modeling the spectral shape. Whereas this is straightforward when the correct model for the decomposition of the absorber's nuclear resonance absorption cross-section into individual components is a priori known, in the absence of such knowledge and notably in the presence of hyperfine parameter distributions with an unknown profile, the so-called model-independent evaluation methods could be used to fit the spectra. However, the methods available for this purpose were developed for the analysis of spectra for which the thin absorber approximation is valid, and thus they do not take the sample thickness and related effects into account. Consequently, in order to use them for spectra displaying thickness effects, their usage needs to be generalized by combining them with transmission integral fitting. A new algorithm realizing such a generalized version of the Hesse-Rübartsch model-independent evaluation method was developed recently as an integral part of the MossWinn program. In the present work, the working principle of the newly developed algorithm is described in details along with examples illustrating the capabilities of the method for the case of 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  1. Phylogeographic Analysis Elucidates the Influence of the Ice Ages on the Disjunct Distribution of Relict Dragonflies in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Büsse, Sebastian; von Grumbkow, Philipp; Hummel, Susanne; Shah, Deep Narayan; Tachamo Shah, Ram Devi; Li, Jingke; Zhang, Xueping; Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Wedmann, Sonja; Hörnschemeyer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Unusual biogeographic patterns of closely related groups reflect events in the past, and molecular analyses can help to elucidate these events. While ample research on the origin of disjunct distributions of different organism groups in the Western Paleartic has been conducted, such studies are rare for Eastern Palearctic organisms. In this paper we present a phylogeographic analysis of the disjunct distribution pattern of the extant species of the strongly cool-adapted Epiophlebia dragonflies from Asia. We investigated sequences of the usually more conserved 18 S rDNA and 28 S rDNA genes and the more variable sequences of ITS1, ITS2 and CO2 of all three currently recognised Epiophlebia species and of a sample of other odonatan species. In all genes investigated the degrees of similarity between species of Epiophlebia are very high and resemble those otherwise found between different populations of the same species in Odonata. This indicates that substantial gene transfer between these populations occurred in the comparatively recent past. Our analyses imply a wide distribution of the ancestor of extant Epiophlebia in Southeast Asia during the last ice age, when suitable habitats were more common. During the following warming phase, its range contracted, resulting in the current disjunct distribution. Given the strong sensitivity of these species to climatic parameters, the current trend to increasing global temperatures will further reduce acceptable habitats and seriously threaten the existences of these last representatives of an ancient group of Odonata. PMID:22666462

  2. Phylogeographic analysis elucidates the influence of the ice ages on the disjunct distribution of relict dragonflies in Asia.

    PubMed

    Büsse, Sebastian; von Grumbkow, Philipp; Hummel, Susanne; Shah, Deep Narayan; Tachamo Shah, Ram Devi; Li, Jingke; Zhang, Xueping; Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Wedmann, Sonja; Hörnschemeyer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Unusual biogeographic patterns of closely related groups reflect events in the past, and molecular analyses can help to elucidate these events. While ample research on the origin of disjunct distributions of different organism groups in the Western Paleartic has been conducted, such studies are rare for Eastern Palearctic organisms. In this paper we present a phylogeographic analysis of the disjunct distribution pattern of the extant species of the strongly cool-adapted Epiophlebia dragonflies from Asia. We investigated sequences of the usually more conserved 18 S rDNA and 28 S rDNA genes and the more variable sequences of ITS1, ITS2 and CO2 of all three currently recognised Epiophlebia species and of a sample of other odonatan species. In all genes investigated the degrees of similarity between species of Epiophlebia are very high and resemble those otherwise found between different populations of the same species in Odonata. This indicates that substantial gene transfer between these populations occurred in the comparatively recent past. Our analyses imply a wide distribution of the ancestor of extant Epiophlebia in Southeast Asia during the last ice age, when suitable habitats were more common. During the following warming phase, its range contracted, resulting in the current disjunct distribution. Given the strong sensitivity of these species to climatic parameters, the current trend to increasing global temperatures will further reduce acceptable habitats and seriously threaten the existences of these last representatives of an ancient group of Odonata.

  3. Relative measurement of acoustic nonlinear parameters and comparison of sensitivity to thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hogeon; Ren, Gang; Kim, Jongbeom; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic nonlinearity measurement of ultrasonic waves are being extensively researched as a promising nondestructive evaluation element. In the condition of constant propagation distance and wave number, many researchers have measured the second-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter, β', that can be simply defined as the ratio of the amplitude of the second harmonic frequency component to the amplitude squared of the fundamental frequency component and compared them in order to identify the acoustic nonlinearity variation according to material degradation. In this study, we extended this concept to the third-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter, γ', by defining it as the ratio of the amplitude of the third harmonic frequency component to the amplitude cubed of the fundamental frequency component. To investigate its effectiveness as a nondestructive evaluation element for the material property degradation, both the second-order acoustic relative nonlinear parameter and the third-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter were measured for the aluminum specimens processed by heat treatment for the different times and then contrasted each other. From the experimental results, the third-order acoustic relative nonlinear parameter was more sensitive than the second-order relative acoustic nonlinear parameter that has been widely used although the amplitude of the third harmonic frequency component was lower than the amplitude of the second harmonic frequency component.

  4. Reconstructing merger timelines using star cluster age distributions: the case of MCG+08-11-002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Medling, Anne M.; U, Vivian; Max, Claire E.; Sanders, David; Kewley, Lisa J.

    2016-05-01

    We present near-infrared imaging and integral field spectroscopy of the centre of the dusty luminous infrared galaxy merger MCG+08-11-002, taken using the Near InfraRed Camera 2 (NIRC2) and the OH-Suppressing InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (OSIRIS) on Keck II. We achieve a spatial resolution of ˜25 pc in the K band, allowing us to resolve 41 star clusters in the NIRC2 images. We calculate the ages of 22/25 star clusters within the OSIRIS field using the equivalent widths of the CO 2.3 μm absorption feature and the Br γ nebular emission line. The star cluster age distribution has a clear peak at ages ≲ 20 Myr, indicative of current starburst activity associated with the final coalescence of the progenitor galaxies. There is a possible second peak at ˜65 Myr which may be a product of the previous close passage of the galaxy nuclei. We fit single and double starburst models to the star cluster age distribution and use Monte Carlo sampling combined with two-sided Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests to calculate the probability that the observed data are drawn from each of the best-fitting distributions. There is a >90 per cent chance that the data are drawn from either a single or double starburst star formation history, but stochastic sampling prevents us from distinguishing between the two scenarios. Our analysis of MCG+08-11-002 indicates that star cluster age distributions provide valuable insights into the timelines of galaxy interactions and may therefore play an important role in the future development of precise merger stage classification systems.

  5. Tree Age Distributions Reveal Large-Scale Disturbance-Recovery Cycles in Three Tropical Forests.

    PubMed

    Vlam, Mart; van der Sleen, Peter; Groenendijk, Peter; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades there has been a growing realization that a large share of apparently 'virgin' or 'old-growth' tropical forests carries a legacy of past natural or anthropogenic disturbances that have a substantial effect on present-day forest composition, structure and dynamics. Yet, direct evidence of such disturbances is scarce and comparisons of disturbance dynamics across regions even more so. Here we present a tree-ring based reconstruction of disturbance histories from three tropical forest sites in Bolivia, Cameroon, and Thailand. We studied temporal patterns in tree regeneration of shade-intolerant tree species, because establishment of these trees is indicative for canopy disturbance. In three large areas (140-300 ha), stem disks and increment cores were collected for a total of 1154 trees (>5 cm diameter) from 12 tree species to estimate the age of every tree. Using these age estimates we produced population age distributions, which were analyzed for evidence of past disturbance. Our approach allowed us to reconstruct patterns of tree establishment over a period of around 250 years. In Bolivia, we found continuous regeneration rates of three species and a peaked age distribution of a long-lived pioneer species. In both Cameroon and Thailand we found irregular age distributions, indicating strongly reduced regeneration rates over a period of 10-60 years. Past fires, windthrow events or anthropogenic disturbances all provide plausible explanations for the reported variation in tree age across the three sites. Our results support the recent idea that the long-term dynamics of tropical forests are impacted by large-scale disturbance-recovery cycles, similar to those driving temperate forest dynamics.

  6. Tree Age Distributions Reveal Large-Scale Disturbance-Recovery Cycles in Three Tropical Forests

    PubMed Central

    Vlam, Mart; van der Sleen, Peter; Groenendijk, Peter; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few decades there has been a growing realization that a large share of apparently ‘virgin’ or ‘old-growth’ tropical forests carries a legacy of past natural or anthropogenic disturbances that have a substantial effect on present-day forest composition, structure and dynamics. Yet, direct evidence of such disturbances is scarce and comparisons of disturbance dynamics across regions even more so. Here we present a tree-ring based reconstruction of disturbance histories from three tropical forest sites in Bolivia, Cameroon, and Thailand. We studied temporal patterns in tree regeneration of shade-intolerant tree species, because establishment of these trees is indicative for canopy disturbance. In three large areas (140–300 ha), stem disks and increment cores were collected for a total of 1154 trees (>5 cm diameter) from 12 tree species to estimate the age of every tree. Using these age estimates we produced population age distributions, which were analyzed for evidence of past disturbance. Our approach allowed us to reconstruct patterns of tree establishment over a period of around 250 years. In Bolivia, we found continuous regeneration rates of three species and a peaked age distribution of a long-lived pioneer species. In both Cameroon and Thailand we found irregular age distributions, indicating strongly reduced regeneration rates over a period of 10–60 years. Past fires, windthrow events or anthropogenic disturbances all provide plausible explanations for the reported variation in tree age across the three sites. Our results support the recent idea that the long-term dynamics of tropical forests are impacted by large-scale disturbance-recovery cycles, similar to those driving temperate forest dynamics. PMID:28105034

  7. Aged boreal biomass-burning aerosol size distributions from BORTAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K. M.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J. W.; Duck, T. J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number-size distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellite) measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ~ 1-2 days) from boreal wildfires in northwestern Ontario. The composite median size distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 230 nm (number-median diameter) and σ = 1.5, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA / ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.09-0.17 μg m-3 ppbv-1 (parts per billion by volume) with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA (organic aerosol) production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period (plume age: 1-2 days), though it does not preclude OA production/loss at earlier stages. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA / ΔCO enhancement ratios. We

  8. Relation of thromboelastography parameters to conventional coagulation tests used to evaluate the hypercoagulable state of aged fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Guan, Zhao; Xu, Qinzhu; Zhao, Lei; Song, Ying; Wang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Fractures are common among aged people, and rapid assessment of the coagulation status is important. The thromboelastography (TEG) test can give a series of coagulation parameters and has been widely used in clinics. In this research, we looked at fracture patients over 60 and compared their TEG results with those of healthy controls. Since there is a paucity of studies comparing TEG assessments with conventional coagulation tests, we aim to clarify the relationship between TEG values and the values given by conventional coagulation tests.Forty fracture patients (27 femur and 13 humerus) over 60 years old were included in the study. The change in their coagulation status was evaluated by TEG before surgery within 4 hours after the fracture. Changes in TEG parameters were analyzed compared with controls. Conventional coagulation test results for the patients, including activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), international normalized ratio (INR), fibrinogen, and platelets, were also acquired, and correlation analysis was done with TEG parameters, measuring similar aspects of the coagulation cascade. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of TEG parameters for detecting raised fibrinogen levels were also analyzed.The K (time to 20 mm clot amplitude) and R (reaction time) values of aged fracture patients were lower than controls. The values for angle, maximal amplitude (MA), and coagulation index (CI) were raised compared with controls, indicating a hypercoagulable state. Correlation analysis showed that there were significant positive correlations between fibrinogen and MA/angle, between platelets and MA, and between APTT and R as well. There was significant negative correlation between fibrinogen and K. In addition, K values have better sensitivity and specificity for detecting elevated fibrinogen concentration than angle and MA values.Aged fracture patients tend to be in a hypercoagulable state, and this could be effectively reflected by a TEG test

  9. Relation of thromboelastography parameters to conventional coagulation tests used to evaluate the hypercoagulable state of aged fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Guan, Zhao; Xu, Qinzhu; Zhao, Lei; Song, Ying; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fractures are common among aged people, and rapid assessment of the coagulation status is important. The thromboelastography (TEG) test can give a series of coagulation parameters and has been widely used in clinics. In this research, we looked at fracture patients over 60 and compared their TEG results with those of healthy controls. Since there is a paucity of studies comparing TEG assessments with conventional coagulation tests, we aim to clarify the relationship between TEG values and the values given by conventional coagulation tests. Forty fracture patients (27 femur and 13 humerus) over 60 years old were included in the study. The change in their coagulation status was evaluated by TEG before surgery within 4 hours after the fracture. Changes in TEG parameters were analyzed compared with controls. Conventional coagulation test results for the patients, including activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), international normalized ratio (INR), fibrinogen, and platelets, were also acquired, and correlation analysis was done with TEG parameters, measuring similar aspects of the coagulation cascade. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of TEG parameters for detecting raised fibrinogen levels were also analyzed. The K (time to 20 mm clot amplitude) and R (reaction time) values of aged fracture patients were lower than controls. The values for angle, maximal amplitude (MA), and coagulation index (CI) were raised compared with controls, indicating a hypercoagulable state. Correlation analysis showed that there were significant positive correlations between fibrinogen and MA/angle, between platelets and MA, and between APTT and R as well. There was significant negative correlation between fibrinogen and K. In addition, K values have better sensitivity and specificity for detecting elevated fibrinogen concentration than angle and MA values. Aged fracture patients tend to be in a hypercoagulable state, and this could be effectively reflected by

  10. Reference values of blood parameters in beef cattle of different ages and stages of lactation.

    PubMed Central

    Doornenbal, H; Tong, A K; Murray, N L

    1988-01-01

    Reference (normal) values for 12 blood serum components were determined for 48 Shorthorn cows (2-10 years old) and their 48 calves, 357 crossbred cows (12-14 years old), 36 feedlot bulls and 36 feedlot steers. In addition, hemoglobin, hematocrit, triiodothyronine, thyroxine and cortisol levels were determined for the crossbred cows, and feedlot bulls and steers. Reference values were tabulated according to sex, age and stage of lactation. Serum concentrations of urea, total protein and bilirubin, and serum activity of aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase increased with age (P less than 0.05), while calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase decreased with age (P less than 0.05) from birth to the age of ten years. The Shorthorn cows had the highest levels of glucose at parturition (P less than 0.05) with decreasing levels during lactation. Creatinine concentration decreased during lactation and increased during postweaning. Both lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase levels increased (P less than 0.05) during lactation. Urea and uric acid were present at higher concentrations in lactating than nonlactating cows (P less than 0.05). The values reported, based on a wide age range and large number of cattle, could serve as clinical guides and a basis for further research. PMID:3349406

  11. Age-Associated Changes in the Spectral and Statistical Parameters of Surface Electromyogram of Tibialis Anterior

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Age-related neuromuscular change of Tibialis Anterior (TA) is a leading cause of muscle strength decline among the elderly. This study has established the baseline for age-associated changes in sEMG of TA at different levels of voluntary contraction. We have investigated the use of Gaussianity and maximal power of the power spectral density (PSD) as suitable features to identify age-associated changes in the surface electromyogram (sEMG). Eighteen younger (20–30 years) and 18 older (60–85 years) cohorts completed two trials of isometric dorsiflexion at four different force levels between 10% and 50% of the maximal voluntary contraction. Gaussianity and maximal power of the PSD of sEMG were determined. Results show a significant increase in sEMG's maximal power of the PSD and Gaussianity with increase in force for both cohorts. It was also observed that older cohorts had higher maximal power of the PSD and lower Gaussianity. These age-related differences observed in the PSD and Gaussianity could be due to motor unit remodelling. This can be useful for noninvasive tracking of age-associated neuromuscular changes. PMID:27610379

  12. Effect of data length and bin numbers on distribution entropy (DistEn) measurement in analyzing healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Udhayakumar, Radhagayathri K; Karmakar, Chandan; Peng Li; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2015-01-01

    Complexity analysis of a given time series is executed using various measures of irregularity, the most commonly used being Approximate entropy (ApEn), Sample entropy (SampEn) and Fuzzy entropy (FuzzyEn). However, the dependence of these measures on the critical parameter of tolerance `r' leads to precarious results, owing to random selections of r. Attempts to eliminate the use of r in entropy calculations introduced a new measure of entropy namely distribution entropy (DistEn) based on the empirical probability distribution function (ePDF). DistEn completely avoids the use of a variance dependent parameter like r and replaces it by a parameter M, which corresponds to the number of bins used in the histogram to calculate it. When tested for synthetic data, M has been observed to produce a minimal effect on DistEn as compared to the effect of r on other entropy measures. Also, DistEn is said to be relatively stable with data length (N) variations, as far as synthetic data is concerned. However, these claims have not been analyzed for physiological data. Our study evaluates the effect of data length N and bin number M on the performance of DistEn using both synthetic and physiologic time series data. Synthetic logistic data of `Periodic' and `Chaotic' levels of complexity and 40 RR interval time series belonging to two groups of healthy aging population (young and elderly) have been used for the analysis. The stability and consistency of DistEn as a complexity measure as well as a classifier have been studied. Experiments prove that the parameters N and M are more influential in deciding the efficacy of DistEn performance in the case of physiologic data than synthetic data. Therefore, a generalized random selection of M for a given data length N may not always be an appropriate combination to yield good performance of DistEn for physiologic data.

  13. Behavioral responses to and brain distribution of morphine in mature adult and aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, C.K.; Ho, I.K.; Hoskins, B.

    1986-03-01

    Mature adult (3-6 mo old) and aged (2 yr old) male ICR mice were injected with 10 to 100 mg/kg morphine, s.c. The ED50 values for running behavior (as measured using Stoelting activity monitors and having each mouse serve as its own control) representing 5 times control activity was approximately 7.5 mg/kg for aged mice and approximately 17.5 mg/kg for the mature adults. The ED50 values for analgesia 1 hr after morphine administration using the tail-flick method (max. response time = 8 sec) were approx. 70 mg/kg for the aged mice and 15 mg/kg for the mature adults. One hour after injecting /sup 3/H-morphine at doses of 30 and 100 mg/kg, 0.13 and 0.14% of the doses appeared in brains of aged and mature adult mice, respectively. Regional distribution of the morphine was the same for both age groups. Expressed as percent of total brain morphine, it was as follows: cortex, 30%; midbrain, 18%; cerebellum, 17%; medulla, 12%; pons, 9%; striatum, 8% and periaqueductal gray, 6%. Expressed as g morphine/g tissue for the 2 doses, the distribution was; periaqueductal gray, 30 and 80; striatum, 9 and 34; medulla, 6 and 20 pons; 5 and 19; cerebellum, 4 and 13; midbrain 2.5 and 8.5 and cortex, 2 and 8. These results suggest that the differences in response to morphine by the two age groups were due to age-related differences in opioid receptor populations and/or affinities.

  14. How old is this bird? The age distribution under some phase sampling schemes.

    PubMed

    Hautphenne, Sophie; Massaro, Melanie; Taylor, Peter

    2017-04-03

    In this paper, we use a finite-state continuous-time Markov chain with one absorbing state to model an individual's lifetime. Under this model, the time of death follows a phase-type distribution, and the transient states of the Markov chain are known as phases. We then attempt to provide an answer to the simple question "What is the conditional age distribution of the individual, given its current phase"? We show that the answer depends on how we interpret the question, and in particular, on the phase observation scheme under consideration. We then apply our results to the computation of the age pyramid for the endangered Chatham Island black robin Petroica traversi during the monitoring period 2007-2014.

  15. The distribution of blood rheological parameters in the microvasculature of cat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Lipowsky, H H; Kovalcheck, S; Zweifach, B W

    1978-11-01

    In vivo studies of the rheological behavior of blood in the microcirculation were conducted by direct in situ measurements in cat mesentery. Upstream to downstream pressure drops were measured in unbranched arterioles, capillaries, and venules, with diameters from 7 to 58 micrometer. Simultaneous measurements of red cell velocity and vessel geometry facilitated computation of bulk velocity, pressure gradient, apparent viscosity, wall shear stress, and resistance. Arteriovenous distributions of these parameters revealed the following. Maximum pressure gradient (0.015 cm H20/micrometer) occurs in the true capillaries (7 micrometer in diameter); intravascular wall shear stress averaged 47.1 dynes/cm2 in arterioles and 29.0 dynes/cm2 in venules. Extreme values as great as 200 dynes/cm2 were observed in a few shunting arterioles. Apparent viscosity averaged 3.59 cP in arterioles, 5.15 cP in venules, and 4.22 cP overall. Intravascular resistance per unit length of microvessel varied with luminal diameter as a power law function with exponents of -4.04 for arterioles, -3.94 for venules, and -3.99 for all vessels combined. This apparent maintenance of Poiseuille's law is attributed to the opposing processes of hematocrit reduction and decreasing shear rate as blood is dispersed in successive arteriolar segments, and the converse action of these processes in the venous confluences which lessen the extent of network variations in apparent viscosity. Reductions in bulk velocity from the normal flow state to below 0.5 mm/sec resulted in increases in apparent viscosity by a factor of 2 to 10, which are attributed primarily to obstruction of the lumen by leukocyte-endothelium adhesion.

  16. Analyzing nutrient distribution in different particle-size municipal aged refuse.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangke; Hou, Fen; Guo, Zhen; Yao, Gaoyi; Sang, Nan

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using aged municipal solid waste as farmland soil, it is essential to study its nutritive compositions for plant growth. Previous studies have demonstrated that the properties of different particle-size aged refuse are very different, therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate the adequacy of three elements (N, P, K) and the fractionation of inorganic P in the aged refuse with a particle-size distribution of 900 to 300, 300 to 150, 150 to 105, 105 to 90 and 90 to 0 μm. The results indicate that (1) total quantities of N, P, K were much larger than that in the general soil and the quantities of available N, P and K were also adequate; (2) total content of P was sufficient, but the ratio of available-P to total P was not high enough; (3) with the decrease of particle size, the contents of these elements presented different trends. The results implicate that total contents of N, P and K were enough for the aged refuse being exploited as cultivated soil, and different gradation of aged refuse could be added to improve poor soils. It provides scientific evidence for utilizing different particle-size aged refuse comprehensively.

  17. Characteristic age distribution of Plasmodium vivax infections after malaria elimination on Aneityum Island, Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Akira; Chaves, Luis F; Taleo, George; Kalkoa, Morris; Isozumi, Rie; Wickremasinghe, Renu; Perlmann, Hedvig; Takeo, Satoru; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Tachibana, Shin-ichiro; Kimura, Masatsugu; Björkman, Anders; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Drakeley, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Resurgence is a major concern after malaria elimination. After the initiation of the elimination program on Aneityum Island in 1991, microscopy showed that Plasmodium falciparum disappeared immediately, whereas P. vivax disappeared from 1996 onward, until P. vivax cases were reported in January 2002. By conducting malariometric surveys of the entire population of Aneityum, we investigated the age distribution of individuals with parasites during this epidemic in the context of antimalarial antibody levels and parasite antigen diversity. In July 2002, P. vivax infections were detected by microscopy in 22/759 individuals: 20/298 born after the beginning of the elimination program in 1991, 2/126 born between 1982 and 1991, and none of 335 born before 1982. PCR increased the number of infections detected to 77, distributed among all age groups. Prevalences were 12.1%, 16.7%, and 6.0%, respectively (P < 0.001). In November, a similar age pattern was found, but with fewer infections: 6/746 and 39/741 individuals were found to be infected by microscopy and PCR, respectively. The frequencies of antibody responses to P. vivax were significantly higher in individuals born before 1991 than in younger age groups and were similar to those on Malakula Island, an area of endemicity. Remarkably low antigen diversity (h, 0.15) of P. vivax infections was observed on Aneityum compared with the other islands (h, 0.89 to 1.0). A P. vivax resurgence was observed among children and teenagers on Aneityum, an age distribution similar to those before elimination and on islands where P. vivax is endemic, suggesting that in the absence of significant exposure, immunity may persist, limiting infection levels in adults. The limited parasite gene pool on islands may contribute to this protection.

  18. Sex and age differences in mercury distribution and excretion in methylmercury-administered mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hirayama, K.; Yasutake, A.

    1986-01-01

    Sex differences in mercury distribution and excretion after single administration of methylmercury chloride (MMC, 5 mg/kg were studied in mice. A sex difference in urinary mercury excretion was found in sexually mature mice (age of 7 wk) of C57BL/6N and BALB/cA strains. Males showed higher mercury levels in urine than females, though no significant difference was found in fecal mercury levels 24 h post exposure to MMC. The higher urinary excretion rates in males accounted for significant lowering of mercury levels in the brain, liver, and blood, but not in the kidney, which showed higher values. At 5 min, however, the sex difference was found only in the kidney, showing higher levels in males. Changes in mercury distribution with time were studied in C57BL/6N mice. The brain mercury increased in both sexes up to 3 d, and decreased only in males on d 5. Liver and blood mercury decreased with time in both sexes, and these were constantly higher in females than in males. Renal mercury in males decreased to similar levels to females on d 3. The sex differences at various ages were studied with C57BL/6N mice 24 h after dosing. Two-week-old mice did not show significant sex differences in the mercury distribution and excretion, and their urinary mercury levels were much lower as compared to the older mice. Urinary mercury excretion in both sexes increased at 4 wk of age and then decreased at 45 wk of age. At 4, 7, 10, and 45 wk of age, males showed higher urinary mercury levels than females. From these findings, it has been suggested that urinary mercury excretion may be related to sex hormones, especially androgens.

  19. Aging of evaporated MgF2 described by a various number of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasikov, Aarne; Kuznetsov, Anatoli S.

    1997-02-01

    The MgF2 layers were vacuum evaporated on fused silica substrates using a crystalline and a pressed sintered evaporation materials. The transition spectra of the specimens were recorded in the wavelength range 240 - 830 nm and changes in it monitored during storage of the specimens in atmosphere. The results were analyzed using an envelope method and a fitting of Lorentzian dispersion model with various number of parameters. A rise of the computed indices of refraction and absorption during storing in the air was seen. A heating in vacuum resulted in the temporal descending of refraction and rise of absorption indices. Fitting of the dispersion equation showed a drop of the absorption index moving from 4 to 7 fitting parameters in the red side of the spectra. On the blue side (UV) both indices rose moving from 4 to 5 parameters and descended again at 7 parameters. This shows a need of proper selection of the dispersion model for describing the real coatings. The negative values for the indices of absorption obtained by envelope method displayed the inhomogeneity of the refractive index in the fresh coatings.

  20. Locus of Control and Other Psycho-Social Parameters in Successful American Age-Group Swimmers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Edmund J., Jr.; Straub, William F.

    Psycho-social factors in successful age-group swimmers were explored in this study. The subjects were 50 female and 39 male participants in the 1975 Amateur Athletic Union National Junior Olympics who were asked to answer a set of questions from an open-ended questionnaire. The results support a picture of young persons who invest a great deal of…

  1. Optimal-control theoretic methods for optimization and regulation of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Jennifer Dawn

    Optimal control and optimization of distributed parameter systems are discussed in the context of a common control framework. The adjoint method of optimization and the traditional linear quadratic regulator implementation of optimal control both employ adjoint or costate variables in the determination of control variable progression. As well both theories benefit from a reduced order model approximation in their execution. This research aims to draw clear parallels between optimization and optimal control utilizing these similarities. Several applications are presented showing the use of adjoint/costate variables and reduced order models in optimization and optimal control problems. The adjoint method for shape optimization is derived and implemented for the quasi-one-dimensional duct and two variations of a two-dimensional double ramp inlet. All applications are governed by the Euler equations. The quasi-one-dimensional duct is solved first to test the adjoint method and to verify the results against an analytical solution. The method is then adapted to solve the shape optimization of the double ramp inlet. A finite volume solver is tested on the flow equations and then implemented for the corresponding adjoint equations. The gradient of the cost function with respect to the shape parameters is derived based on the computed adjoint variables. The same inlet shape optimization problem is then solved using a reduced order model. The basis functions in the reduced order model are computed using the method of snapshots form of proper orthogonal decomposition. The corresponding weights are derived using an optimization in the design parameter space to match the reduced order model to the original snapshots. A continuous map of these weights in terms of the design variables is obtained via a response surface approximations and artificial neural networks. This map is then utilized in an optimization problem to determine the optimal inlet shape. As in the adjoint method

  2. MRI-derived body segment parameters of children differ from age-based estimates derived using photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jeremy J; Pavol, Michael J; Snow, Christine M; Hayes, Wilson C

    2007-01-01

    Body segment parameters are required when researching joint kinetics using inverse dynamics models. However, the only regression equations for estimating pediatric body segment parameters across a wide age range were developed, using photogrammetry, based on 12 boys and have not been validated to date (Jensen, R.K., 1986. Body segment mass, radius and radius of gyration proportions of children. Journal of Biomechanics 19, 359-368). To assess whether these equations could validly be applied to girls, we asked whether body segment parameters estimated by the equations differ from parameters measured using a validated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method. If so, do the differences cause significant differences in joint kinetics during normal gait? Body segment parameters were estimated from axial MRIs of the left thigh and shank of 10 healthy girls (9.6 +/- 0.9 years) and compared to those from Jensen's equations. Kinematics and kinetics were collected for 10 walking trials. Extrema in hip and knee moments and powers were compared between the two sets of body segment parameters. With the exception of the shank mass center and radius of gyration, body segment parameters measured using MRI were significantly different from those estimated using regression equations. These systematic differences in body segment parameters resulted in significant differences in sagittal-plane joint moments and powers during gait. Nevertheless, it is doubtful that even the greatest differences in kinetics are practically meaningful (0.3% BW x HT and 0.7% BW x HT/s for moments and power at the hip, respectively). Therefore, body segment parameters estimated using Jensen's regression equations are a suitable substitute for more detailed anatomical imaging of 8-10-year-old girls when quantifying joint kinetics during gait.

  3. Ages and metallicities for quiescent galaxies in the Shapley supercluster: driving parameters of the stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Russell J.; Lucey, John R.; Hudson, Michael J.

    2009-12-01

    We use high signal-to-noise spectroscopy for a sample of 232 quiescent galaxies in the Shapley supercluster, to investigate how their stellar populations depend on velocity dispersion (σ), luminosity and stellar mass. The sample spans a large range in velocity dispersion (30-300kms-1) and in luminosity (MR from -18.7 to -23.2). Estimates of age, total metallicity (Z/H) and α-element abundance ratio (α/Fe) were derived from absorption-line analysis, using single-burst models of Thomas and collaborators. Using the Rose CaII index, we conclude that recent star formation (frosting) events are not responsible for the intermediate ages observed in some of the galaxies. Age, Z/H and α/Fe are correlated positively with velocity dispersion, but we also find significant residual trends with luminosity: at given σ, the brighter galaxies are younger, less α-enriched and have higher Z/H. At face value, these results might suggest that the stellar populations depend on stellar mass as well as on velocity dispersion. However, we show that the observed trends can be reproduced by models in which the stellar populations depend systematically only on σ, and are independent of stellar mass M*. For age, the observed luminosity correlation arises because young galaxies are brighter, at fixed M*. For metallicity, the observed luminosity dependence arises because metal-rich galaxies, at fixed mass, tend also to be younger, and hence brighter. We find a good match to the observed luminosity correlations with age ~σ+0.40, Z/H~σ+0.35,α/Fe ~σ+0.20, where the slopes are close to those found when fitting traditional scaling relations. We conclude that the star formation and enrichment histories of galaxies are determined primarily by the depth of their gravitational potential wells. The observed residual correlations with luminosity do not imply a corresponding dependence on stellar mass.

  4. Competition and Habitat Quality Influence Age and Sex Distribution in Wintering Rusty Blackbirds

    PubMed Central

    Mettke-Hofmann, Claudia; Hamel, Paul B.; Hofmann, Gerhard; Zenzal Jr., Theodore J.; Pellegrini, Anne; Malpass, Jennifer; Garfinkel, Megan; Schiff, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Bird habitat quality is often inferred from species abundance measures during the breeding and non-breeding season and used for conservation management decisions. However, during the non-breeding season age and sex classes often occupy different habitats which suggest a need for more habitat-specific data. Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) is a forested wetland specialist wintering in bottomland hardwood forests in the south-eastern U. S. and belongs to the most steeply declining songbirds in the U.S. Little information is available to support priority birds such as the Rusty Blackbird wintering in this threatened habitat. We assessed age and sex distribution and body condition of Rusty Blackbirds among the three major habitats used by this species in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and also measured food availability. Overall, pecan groves had the highest biomass mainly driven by the amount of nuts. Invertebrate biomass was highest in forests but contributed only a small percentage to overall biomass. Age and sex classes were unevenly distributed among habitats with adult males primarily occupying pecan groves containing the highest nut biomass, females being found in forests which had the lowest nut biomass and young males primarily staying in forest fragments along creeks which had intermediate nut biomass. Males were in better body condition than females and were in slightly better condition in pecan groves. The results suggest that adult males occupy the highest quality habitat and may competitively exclude the other age and sex classes. PMID:25946335

  5. Competition and habitat quality influence age and sex distribution in wintering rusty blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Mettke-Hofmann, Claudia; Hamel, Paul B; Hofmann, Gerhard; Zenzal, Theodore J; Pellegrini, Anne; Malpass, Jennifer; Garfinkel, Megan; Schiff, Nathan; Greenberg, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Bird habitat quality is often inferred from species abundance measures during the breeding and non-breeding season and used for conservation management decisions. However, during the non-breeding season age and sex classes often occupy different habitats which suggest a need for more habitat-specific data. Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) is a forested wetland specialist wintering in bottomland hardwood forests in the south-eastern U. S. and belongs to the most steeply declining songbirds in the U.S. Little information is available to support priority birds such as the Rusty Blackbird wintering in this threatened habitat. We assessed age and sex distribution and body condition of Rusty Blackbirds among the three major habitats used by this species in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and also measured food availability. Overall, pecan groves had the highest biomass mainly driven by the amount of nuts. Invertebrate biomass was highest in forests but contributed only a small percentage to overall biomass. Age and sex classes were unevenly distributed among habitats with adult males primarily occupying pecan groves containing the highest nut biomass, females being found in forests which had the lowest nut biomass and young males primarily staying in forest fragments along creeks which had intermediate nut biomass. Males were in better body condition than females and were in slightly better condition in pecan groves. The results suggest that adult males occupy the highest quality habitat and may competitively exclude the other age and sex classes.

  6. Effect of age and chemical treatments on characteristic parameters for active and porous sublayers of polymeric composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Benavente, J; Vázquez, M I

    2004-05-15

    Changes in the transport parameters and the chemical nature of the surface of composite polyamide/polysulfone membranes due to both aging and treatment with chemical products (HCl, H(3)NO, and NaOH) have been considered. Hydraulic and salt permeability were obtained from water flow and salt diffusion measurements, respectively, and their values seem to indicate a modification in the structural parameters (porosity/thickness) of aging samples, while HCl and HNO(3) treatments will act in the opposite way. Chemical modifications in the membrane surfaces were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which mainly show the effect of H(3)NO and HCl on the polyamide active layer of the membranes (polyamide oxidation), but no chemical damage for that sublayer. Electrical characterization of both sublayers of the composite membranes were determined from impedance spectroscopy (IS) measurements using equivalent circuits as models, and these results indicate: (i) a strong increase of the membrane electrical resistance as a consequence of aging, mainly that associated with the active sublayer (30 times higher for an old sample than for a fresh one) and treatment with NaOH; (ii) the reduction of this effect when the samples were treated with HCl and HNO(3) solutions. Changes in the values of the electrical resistance of the composite membranes are in agreement with those obtained for permeabilities, but the electrical parameter also allows the determination of the contribution of each sublayer.

  7. [Parameters of controlled mechanical lung ventilation and external respiratory function during thoracoscopic surgeries in children of different age groups].

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, N M; Tsypin, L E; Geodakian, O S; Demakhin, A A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to estimate the parameters of mechanical ventilation and respiratory function during videotorachoscopic surgeries in children. 73 anesthesias were conducted in children aged 5 to 16 years of age. During the study, a detailed monitoring of respiratory function and parameters of mechanical ventilation was carried out. Indicators reflecting the lung function remained stable in all phases of the study. Parameters of mechanical ventilation during the study varied. Changes in PIP and MAP were similar in all age groups. The maximum changes of compliance were in the third group. One-lung ventilation is safe under certain conditions: increasing FiO2 from 0.5 to 1, the reduction of tidal volume up to 5-5.3 ml/kg, the use of a size or a half size smaller cuffed endotracheal tubes for intubation of the right and left main bronchus compared to those for tracheal intubation. For the intubation of the right main bronchus the endotracheal tube with the Murphy eye should be used, for the means ventilation of the upper lobe of the right lung. If the minute volume of breathing is adequate and there is no preoperative hypercapnia, the elimination of CO2 for one-lung ventilation is not disrupted and the tension of CO2 in arterial blood increases.

  8. Atlas of Relations Between Climatic Parameters and Distributions of Important Trees and Shrubs in North America - Alaska Species and Ecoregions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Robert S.; Anderson, Katherine H.; Strickland, Laura E.; Shafer, Sarah L.; Pelltier, Richard T.; Bartlein, Patrick J.

    2006-01-01

    Climate is the primary factor in controlling the continental-scale distribution of plant species, although the relations between climatic parameters and species' ranges is only now beginning to be quantified. Preceding volumes of this atlas explored the continental-scale relations between climatic parameters and the distributions of woody plant species across all of the continent of North America. This volume presents similar information for important woody species, groups of species, and ecoregions in more detail for the State of Alaska. For these analyses, we constructed a 25-kilometer equal-area grid of modern climatic and bioclimatic parameters for North America from instrumental weather records. We obtained a digital representation of the geographic distribution of each species or ecoregion, either from a published source or by digitizing the published distributions ourselves. The presence or absence of each species or ecoregion was then determined for each point on the 25-kilometer grid, thus providing a basis for comparison of the climatic data with the geographic distribution of each species or ecoregion. The relations between climate and these distributions are presented in graphical and tabular form.

  9. Age-related change of technetium-99m-HMDP distribution in the skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Kigami, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Ohnishi, Hideo

    1996-05-01

    To understand age-related changes of whole-body and regional skeletal metabolism, it is important to investigate the mechanisms of age-related bone loss and to develop suitable treatments for it. Bone biopsies show metabolism of the particular site examined while biochemical markers for bone metabolism reflect total skeletal metabolis. Bone scintigraphy is a convenient and simple way to analyze whole-body and regional skeletal metabolism. We attempted to study and understand age-related changes in bone metabolism by quantifying the bone scan and correlating it with biochemical bone metabolic markers. The whole-body skeletal uptake (WBSU) and whole-body skeletal tracer distribution pattern were studied in men and women by bone scintigraphy using {sup 99m}Tc-hydroxy-methane-diphosphonate (HMDP). Bone scans were performed using a standard protocol and quantified by setting regions of interest (ROIs) on selected regions. WBSU and the skeletal distribution pattern were compared with simultaneously obtained serum biochemical markers. WBSU showed an increase with age in both sexes, but in women, uptake in the head and legs increased more relatively than in the thoracic region, while in men no such tendency was observed. Increase of WBSU and relative increase of uptakes in the head demonstrated a weak correlation with the serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and type 1 collagen metabolites. These results show an age-related increase of skeletal turnover and sex-dependent regional skeletal metabolism. The age-related changes seen in bone scintigrams might be a sign of progressive bone loss, reflecting changes in local bone matabolism. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Random regression models on Legendre polynomials to estimate genetic parameters for weights from birth to adult age in Canchim cattle.

    PubMed

    Baldi, F; Albuquerque, L G; Alencar, M M

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this work was to estimate covariance functions for direct and maternal genetic effects, animal and maternal permanent environmental effects, and subsequently, to derive relevant genetic parameters for growth traits in Canchim cattle. Data comprised 49,011 weight records on 2435 females from birth to adult age. The model of analysis included fixed effects of contemporary groups (year and month of birth and at weighing) and age of dam as quadratic covariable. Mean trends were taken into account by a cubic regression on orthogonal polynomials of animal age. Residual variances were allowed to vary and were modelled by a step function with 1, 4 or 11 classes based on animal's age. The model fitting four classes of residual variances was the best. A total of 12 random regression models from second to seventh order were used to model direct and maternal genetic effects, animal and maternal permanent environmental effects. The model with direct and maternal genetic effects, animal and maternal permanent environmental effects fitted by quadric, cubic, quintic and linear Legendre polynomials, respectively, was the most adequate to describe the covariance structure of the data. Estimates of direct and maternal heritability obtained by multi-trait (seven traits) and random regression models were very similar. Selection for higher weight at any age, especially after weaning, will produce an increase in mature cow weight. The possibility to modify the growth curve in Canchim cattle to obtain animals with rapid growth at early ages and moderate to low mature cow weight is limited.

  11. Predictive parameters of Legionella pneumophila occurrence in hospital water: HPCs and plumbing system installation age.

    PubMed

    Ghanizadeh, Ghader; Mirmohamadlou, Ali; Esmaeli, Davoud

    2016-09-01

    Occurrence of Legionella pneumophila can be relevant to the installation age and the presence of heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs). This research illustrates L. pneumophila contamination of hospital water in accordance with the installation age and the presence of HPCs. One hundred and fifty samples were collected from hot and cold water systems and cultured on R2A and BCYE agar. L. pneumophila identification was done via specific biochemical tests. HPCs and L. pneumophila were detected in 96 and 37.3 % of the samples, respectively. The mean of HPCs density was 947 ± 998 CFU/ml; therefore, 52 % of the samples had higher densities than 500 CFU/ml. High densities of HPCs (>500 CFU/ml) led to colonization of L. pneumophila (≥1000 CFU/ml), mainly observed in cooling systems, gynecological, sonography, and NICU wards. Chi(2) test demonstrated that higher densities (>500 CFU/ml) of HPCs and L. pneumophila contamination in cold water were more frequent than warm water (OR: 2.3 and 1.49, respectively). Univariate regressions implied a significant difference between HPCs density and installation age in positive and negative tests of L. pneumophila (OR = 1.1, p < 0.001, OR = 1.2, p < 0.001). Mann-Whitney U test implied the significant effects of HPCs and installation age on L. pneumophila occurrences (p < 0.001). Spearman correlation and multivariate linear regression revealed significant differences between L. pneumophila and HPCs densities (r s  = 0.33, p < 0.001 and ß = 0.11, p = 0.02), but nonsignificant difference with installation age (r s  = 0.33, p < 0.001 and ß = 0.0, p = 0.91). The occurrence of L. pneumophila, HPCs, and installation age are relevant; so, plumbing system renovation with appropriate materials and promotion of the effective efforts for hospital's water quality assurance is highly recommended.

  12. Prediction uncertainty assessment of a systems biology model requires a sample of the full probability distribution of its parameters.

    PubMed

    van Mourik, Simon; Ter Braak, Cajo; Stigter, Hans; Molenaar, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    Multi-parameter models in systems biology are typically 'sloppy': some parameters or combinations of parameters may be hard to estimate from data, whereas others are not. One might expect that parameter uncertainty automatically leads to uncertain predictions, but this is not the case. We illustrate this by showing that the prediction uncertainty of each of six sloppy models varies enormously among different predictions. Statistical approximations of parameter uncertainty may lead to dramatic errors in prediction uncertainty estimation. We argue that prediction uncertainty assessment must therefore be performed on a per-prediction basis using a full computational uncertainty analysis. In practice this is feasible by providing a model with a sample or ensemble representing the distribution of its parameters. Within a Bayesian framework, such a sample may be generated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm that infers the parameter distribution based on experimental data. Matlab code for generating the sample (with the Differential Evolution Markov Chain sampler) and the subsequent uncertainty analysis using such a sample, is supplied as Supplemental Information.

  13. Liver Function Parameters in Hip Fracture Patients: Relations to Age, Adipokines, Comorbidities and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Leon; Srikusalanukul, Wichat; Fisher, Alexander; Smith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To asses liver markers in older patients with hip fracture (HF) in relation to age, comorbidities, metabolic characteristics and short-term outcomes. Methods: In 294 patients with HF (mean age 82.0±7.9 years, 72.1% women) serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gammaglutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, bilirubin, 25(OH)vitaminD, PTH, calcium, phosphate, magnesium, adiponectin, leptin, resistin, thyroid function and cardiac troponin I were measured. Results: Elevated ALT, GGT, ALP or bilirubin levels on admission were observed in 1.7% - 9.9% of patients. With age GGT, ALT and leptin decrease, while PTH and adiponectin concentrations increase. Higher GGT (>30U/L, median level) was associated with coronary artery disease (CAD), diabetes mellitus (DM), and alcohol overuse; lower ALT (≤20U/L, median level) with dementia; total bilirubin >20μmol/L with CAD and alcohol overuse; and albumin >33g/L with CAD. Multivariate adjusted regression analyses revealed ALT, ALP, adiponectin, alcohol overuse and DM as independent and significant determinants of GGT (as continuous or categorical variable); GGT for each other liver marker; and PTH for adiponectin. The risk of prolonged hospital stay (>20 days) was about two times higher in patients with GGT>30U/L or adiponectin >17.14 ng/L (median level) and 4.7 times higher if both conditions coexisted. The risk of in-hospital death was 3 times higher if albumin was <33g/L. Conclusions: In older HF patients liver markers even within the normal range are associated with age-related disorders and outcomes. Adiponectin (but not 25(OH)vitaminD, PTH, leptin or resistin) is an independent contributor to higher GGT. Serum GGT and albumin predict prolonged hospital stay and in-hospital death, respectively. A unifying hypothesis of the findings presented. PMID:25589886

  14. Effects of manual task complexity on gait parameters in school-aged children and adults.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzese, Laurel D; Rao, Ashwini K; Bellows, Rachel; Figueroa, Kristina; Levy, Jennifer; Lim, Esther; Puccio, Lauren

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the dual-task interference effects of complexity (simple vs. complex), type of task (carrying a pitcher vs. tray), and age (young adults vs. 7-10 year old children) on temporal-spatial and variability measures of gait. All participants first walked on the GAITRite walkway without any concurrent task, followed by four dual-task gait conditions. The group of children had a more variable step length and step time than adults across all walking conditions. They also slowed down, took fewer, smaller steps and spent more time in double limb support than adults in the complex dual task conditions. Gait in healthy young adults and school aged children was relatively unaffected by concurrent performance of simple versions of the manual tasks. Our overall analysis suggests that dual-task gait in school aged children is still developing and has not yet reached adult capacity. This study also highlights the critical role of task demand and complexity in dual-task interference.

  15. Injection of Contaminants into a Simulated Water Distribution System Equipped with Continuous Multi-Parameter Water Monitors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA’s Technology Testing and Evaluation Program has been charged by EPA to evaluate the performance of commercially available water security-related technologies. Multi-parameter water monitors for distributions systems have been evaluated as such a water security techn...

  16. Age- and sex-related differences of morphometric, densitometric and geometric parameters of tibiotarsal bone in Ross broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Charuta, Anna; Dzierzecka, Małgorzata; Komosa, Marcin; Kalinowski, Łukasz; Pierzchała, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    For the first time computed tomography has been used to analyze densitometric and geometric parameters in proximal metaphyses and the mid-diaphyses of tibiotarsal bones in broiler chickens in posthatching development as influenced by age and sex. The research was conducted on 60 tibial bones of 2-, 4- and 6-week-old broiler chickens (Ross 308) (10 males and 10 females in each age group). Statistical analysis has been conducted with the use of one-way ANOVA and Fisher's exact test. Calculations have been performed separately for each sex, with age as a differentiation variable and separately for each of the developmental stages, with sex as a differentiation factor. Pearson's correlation coefficient have been calculated. Also, relative bone density has been determined. It was observed that volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) in the diaphyses was two times higher (app. 550 cm3) than in the proximal metaphyses (app. 230 cm ) of the tibiae in broiler chickens. In the proximal metaphyses of the tibiotarsal bones, densitometric and geometrical parameters increased with age of the birds. Densitometric parameters (vBMD, BMC) in 6-week-old males displayed (slightly) higher values than in females. It is worth emphasising that in both sexes bone mineral content (BMC) was higher in the tibial proximal metaphyses than in the diaphyses. At the mid-diaphysis, most of the densitometric and geometrical parameters, i.e. bone mineral content (BMC), Strength-Strain Index (SSI), periosteal circumference (PERI_C), endosteal circumference (ENDO_C), cortical area(CRT_A), trabecular area (TRAB_A) and bone area (TOT_A), tended to grow with the birds' age. vBMD (volumetric bone mineral density in situ) is the only parameter that did not grow with age. It was also observed that in males in 4 wk, vBMD in the proximal metaphyses displayed the lowest values during posthatching development (217.47 cm3). Also between 2 and 4 wk of the development, vBMD in the diaphyses decreased from 637.64 cm3

  17. DISTRIBUTION OF CARIOUS AND NON-CARIOUS CERVICAL LESIONS AND GINGIVAL RECESSION AT AGE RELATED ASPECTS.

    PubMed

    Mamaladze, M; Khutsishvili, L; Zarkua, E

    2016-07-01

    The current study aims at differentiating carious and/or non-carious diseases developed in Class 5 region and detecting the distribution rate at the age aspects. The study was conducted at the Dental Clinicand Educational-Research Center "Unident" LTD and Dental Clinic "Dens". 256 patients were involved in the study. All patients underwent a routine dental examination, while rentgenovisiography and CT were performed in case of need. For gathering the detailed medical history and integrated study of Class 5 defects, a special questionnaire/survey, providing detailed information on each patient, was developed. The conducted study revealed the following: The patients were divided into 3 age groups: 16-30 of ages (77 patients, I study group), 30-50 of ages (97 patients, II study group) and 50-70 of ages (82, III study group), respectively. In total 5802 teeth were examined. The subject of our interest was identification of intact and damaged teeth (affected with caries and non-carious diseases) in the above-mentioned contingent. It was found that carious disease of cervical zone of tooth (Class 5) most often was revealed in 30-50 age group (202 cases), which is 1.8-fold higher than the same index in the I study group (144) and 1.4-fold higher in the III study group (183), respectively; The highest rate of non-carious lesions (erosion, abrasion, abfraction) of dental neck was recorded in examined 50-70 age group (294 cases), which was 4.6 -fold higher than in the I study group (64) and 2.1 -fold higher in II study group (140), respectively; The lowest incidence of gingival recession was in the I study group (65 cases), which is 6.3 -fold lower than in the II study group (412) and 7.5-fold lower than - the III group (493).

  18. Weighted recalibration of the Rosetta pedotransfer model with improved estimates of hydraulic parameter distributions and summary statistics (Rosetta3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yonggen; Schaap, Marcel G.

    2017-04-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been widely used to predict soil hydraulic parameters in favor of expensive laboratory or field measurements. Rosetta (Schaap et al., 2001, denoted as Rosetta1) is one of many PTFs and is based on artificial neural network (ANN) analysis coupled with the bootstrap re-sampling method which allows the estimation of van Genuchten water retention parameters (van Genuchten, 1980, abbreviated here as VG), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), and their uncertainties. In this study, we present an improved set of hierarchical pedotransfer functions (Rosetta3) that unify the water retention and Ks submodels into one. Parameter uncertainty of the fit of the VG curve to the original retention data is used in the ANN calibration procedure to reduce bias of parameters predicted by the new PTF. One thousand bootstrap replicas were used to calibrate the new models compared to 60 or 100 in Rosetta1, thus allowing the uni-variate and bi-variate probability distributions of predicted parameters to be quantified in greater detail. We determined the optimal weights for VG parameters and Ks, the optimal number of hidden nodes in ANN, and the number of bootstrap replicas required for statistically stable estimates. Results show that matric potential-dependent bias was reduced significantly while root mean square error (RMSE) for water content were reduced modestly; RMSE for Ks was increased by 0.9% (H3w) to 3.3% (H5w) in the new models on log scale of Ks compared with the Rosetta1 model. It was found that estimated distributions of parameters were mildly non-Gaussian and could instead be described rather well with heavy-tailed α-stable distributions. On the other hand, arithmetic means had only a small estimation bias for most textures when compared with the mean-like ;shift; parameter of the α-stable distributions. Arithmetic means and (co-)variances are therefore still recommended as summary statistics of the estimated distributions. However, it

  19. Effect of age and season on semen quality parameters in Sahiwal bulls.

    PubMed

    Bhakat, Mukesh; Mohanty, T K; Raina, V S; Gupta, A K; Khan, H M; Mahapatra, R K; Sarkar, M

    2011-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of season, period, age, bull, and ejaculate on semen quality in Sahiwal bulls. Semen production records from 1996 to 2006 of 5,483 ejaculates from 46 Sahiwal bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Complex, NDRI, Karnal, India were analyzed using least square analysis of variance by LSML software package. The overall least squares means of ejaculate volume (VOL), total volume per day (VOLD), mass activity (MA), initial motility (IM), sperm concentration per ml (SPC), and sperm concentration per ejaculate (SPCE) were 3.79 ± 0.02 ml, 5.81 ± 0.06 ml, 2.32 ± 0.01, 55.47 ± 0.001%, 766.69 ± 5.50 × 10(6)/ml and 3023.25 ± 30.15 × 10(6), respectively. All semen traits (VOL, VOLD, MA, IM and SPCE) were significantly (P < 0.01) affected by age groups, season and period, whereas season had significant effect on VOL at 5% level. During hot-humid season, highest value of VOL, VOLD, MA, IM, SPC, and SPCE were observed followed by summer and cold season. Highest value of VOL, VOLD, IM, and SPCE were observed during period-3 (2004-2006), whereas highest value of MA and SPC were observed during period-1 (1996-1999). However, lowest magnitude of MA, IM, SPC, and SPCE during period-2 (2000-2003) was observed. Ejaculate characteristics like VOL, VOLD, and SPCE increased with the increasing age of bull up to 5 years and then decreased. Significant (P < 0.01) bull to bull variation was found in VOL, VOLD, MA, IM, SPC, and SPCE traits. First ejaculate had significantly (P < 0.01) higher MA, IM, SPC, and SPCE. Hence, it could be concluded that during rainy season and period-1 and period-3 the quality of semen is quantitatively and qualitatively good. Better quality semen was obtained up to 5 years of age in Sahiwal bulls.

  20. A General Approach for Specifying Informative Prior Distributions for PBPK Model Parameters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characterization of uncertainty in model predictions is receiving more interest as more models are being used in applications that are critical to human health. For models in which parameters reflect biological characteristics, it is often possible to provide estimates of paramet...

  1. Approximation techniques for parameter estimation and feedback control for distributed models of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    Approximation ideas are discussed that can be used in parameter estimation and feedback control for Euler-Bernoulli models of elastic systems. Focusing on parameter estimation problems, ways by which one can obtain convergence results for cubic spline based schemes for hybrid models involving an elastic cantilevered beam with tip mass and base acceleration are outlined. Sample numerical findings are also presented.

  2. Parameters of Density Distribution of Exotic Nuclei Extracted from a Data on Reaction Cross-section in the Glauber Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Ivan; Rueter, Keiti

    2016-09-01

    Parameters of density distribution of exotic nuclei with halo structure were extracted from the experimental data on the interaction cross-section using exact expressions obtained in the Glauber theory. Generally, to do so measured interaction cross-section is compared with a reaction cross-section calculated in optical approximation or using exact expressions of the Glauber theory. It was shown before that the parameters of nuclear density distribution depends on chosen density model (Gaussian, harmonic oscillator or Woods-Saxon) and on the used approximation of the Glauber theory (i.e. optical or rigid target). In the presented paper, we discuss the difference between reaction and interaction cross-sections calculated in various approximations, and how this difference affects the accuracy of the nuclear density parameters determination. As an example, we provide results of the analyzes of experimental data on interaction cross-section of 11Li, 16C and 31Ne nuclei on 12C target.

  3. A method for measuring precipitation parameters and raindrop size distributions using radar reflectivity and optical extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, C. W.; Atlas, D.

    1977-01-01

    A method of determining precipitation parameters from two remotely measurable quantities, the radar reflectivity factor and the optical extinction, is described. The raindrop size spectrum is approximated by a two-parameter exponential form; when these parameters are evaluated in terms of the radar reflectivity factor and the optical extinction, an exponential spectrum is obtained that is generally in very good agreement with the observed size spectrum. Other calculated precipitation parameters, such as rainfall rate and liquid water content, which are derived from the exponential approximation, also agree with experimental data. It is indicated that other combinations of two remote measurables can also be used to obtain more accurate estimates of precipitation parameters than can be obtained by the use of an empirical relationship.

  4. Atlas of Relations Between Climatic Parameters and Distributions of Important Trees and Shrubs in North America - Ecoregions of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Robert S.; Anderson, Katherine H.; Pelltier, Richard T.; Shafer, Sarah L.; Bartlein, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    Climate is the primary factor controlling the continental-scale distribution of plant species, although the relations between climatic parameters and species' ranges are only now beginning to be quantified. This volume examines the relations between climate and the distributions of (1) Kuchler's 'potential natural vegetation' categories for the 48 contiguous States of the United States of America, (2) Bailey's ecoregions of North America, and (3) World Wildlife Fund's ecoregions of North America. For these analyses, we employed a 25-kilometer equal-area grid of modern climatic and bioclimatic parameters for North America, coupled with presence-absence data for the occurrence of each ecoregion under the three classification systems under consideration. The resulting relations between climate and ecoregion distributions are presented in graphical and tabular form. Presentation of ecoregion-climate relations here is intended to be useful for a greater understanding of ecosystem evolution, ecosystem dynamics, and potential effects of future climate change on ecoregions.

  5. [Changes in the biological and immunologic parameters in the oral cavity of the aged. Review].

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, A; Tripi, T R

    1998-01-01

    Senescence is the effect of the immune system incapacity to see "self" and "non-self"; timo-involution induced down-regulation of immunoregulatory -T and B-lymphocytes. Immunosenescence mutations in oral cavity are examined. Even the oral ecosystem presents disorders in quality and quantity of the bacterial plaque and a different immune response. Age senescence is particularly evident in the masticatory apparatus, in fact the dental tissues have remarkable morpho-structural physiological changes; the epithelial, connective and osseous tissues of the periodontium have structural age changes related to the collagen synthesis and physical properties, with an increase of the stroma and a decrease of cell population. The osseous tissue presents cellular atrophy, sclerosis, osteoporosis and is undergoing a continuous structural remodelling; the oral mucous membranes show a thinning of epithelium and an increase of the stroma related to the parenchyma. Specific individual changes could be appraised in the involution of stomatognathic apparatus, more than an indefinite reduction of the performances.

  6. Age discrimination among eruptives of Menengai Caldera, Kenya, using vegetation parameters from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blodget, Herbert W.; Heirtzler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation to determine the degree to which digitally processed Landsat TM imagery can be used to discriminate among vegetated lava flows of different ages in the Menengai Caldera, Kenya. A selective series of five images, consisting of a color-coded Landsat 5 classification and four color composites, are compared with geologic maps. The most recent of more than 70 postcaldera flows within the caldera are trachytes, which are variably covered by shrubs and subsidiary grasses. Soil development evolves as a function of time, and as such supports a changing plant community. Progressively older flows exhibit the increasing dominance of grasses over bushes. The Landsat images correlated well with geologic maps, but the two mapped age classes could be further subdivided on the basis of different vegetation communities. It is concluded that field maps can be modified, and in some cases corrected by use of such imagery, and that digitally enhanced Landsat imagery can be a useful aid to field mapping in similar terrains.

  7. Energy-related parameters and their association with age, gender, and morphometric measurements in healthy donkeys.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, F J; Estepa, J C; Gonzalez-De Cara, C A; Aguilera-Aguilera, R; Toribio, R E; Perez-Ecija, A

    2015-05-01

    Donkeys are commonly afflicted by endocrine and metabolic disturbances but few studies have investigated endocrine variables involved in energy regulation and their association with morphometric indices, age or gender in this species. Hemostatic and clinical differences have been demonstrated between horses and donkeys, so to consider both species as metabolically and endocrinologically similar could lead to misdiagnosis. In this study, plasma concentrations of glucose, triglycerides and endocrine factors involved in energy homeostasis (insulin, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, ghrelin and insulin-like growth factor [IGF]-1) were measured and their association with morphometric variables (body condition score, neck scoring and body mass index), gender and age was determined in 62 healthy donkeys. In addition, a neck scoring system specific for donkeys was developed. Insulin, glucagon, leptin and IGF-1 concentrations were found to be similar between donkeys and other species, but adiponectin and active ghrelin were lower in donkeys than horses. Donkeys with larger neck scores and body mass indices had higher triglyceride, leptin and IGF-1 concentrations. A sexual dimorphism was observed on all morphometric measurements and plasma glucose concentrations independent of adiposity. Younger animals had lower morphometric measurements and triglyceride and leptin concentrations.

  8. Differential Protein Distribution between the Nucleus and Mitochondria: Implications in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lionaki, Eirini; Gkikas, Ilias; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes plays a pivotal role in maintenance of mitochondrial biogenesis and functionality during stress and aging. Environmental and cellular inputs signal to nucleus and/or mitochondria to trigger interorganellar compensatory responses. Loss of this tightly orchestrated coordination results in loss of cellular homeostasis and underlies various pathologies and age-related diseases. Several signaling cascades that govern interorganellar communication have been revealed up to now, and have been classified as part of the anterograde (nucleus to mitochondria) or retrograde (mitochondrial to nucleus) response. Many of these molecular pathways rely on the dual distribution of nuclear or mitochondrial components under basal or stress conditions. These dually localized components usually engage in specific tasks in their primary organelle of function, whilst upon cellular stimuli, they appear in the other organelle where they engage in the same or a different task, triggering a compensatory stress response. In this review, we focus on protein factors distributed between the nucleus and mitochondria and activated to exert their functions upon basal or stress conditions. We further discuss implications of bi-organellar targeting in the context of aging. PMID:27695477

  9. Do predators influence the distribution of age-0 kokanee in a Colorado Reservoir?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardiman, J.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Martinez, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal changes in reservoir conditions such as productivity, light, and temperature create spatiotemporal variation in habitat that may segregate or aggregate predators and prey, producing implications for the distribution, growth, and survival of fishes. We used hydroacoustics to document the diel vertical distribution of age-0 kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka relative to environmental gradients at Blue Mesa Reservoir, Colorado, during May-August of 2002. Temperature, light, and zooplankton density profiles were examined relative to foraging conditions for kokanee and their primary predator, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. Age-0 kokanee displayed large diel vertical migrations in May despite the lack of an energetic advantage before reservoir stratification. Age-0 kokanee minimized near-surface foraging at this time, perhaps to avoid predation by visual predators, such as lake trout, in the well-lit surface waters. Strong reservoir stratification in midsummer appeared to provide a thermal refuge from lake trout that the kokanee exploited. By August vertical migrations were shallow and most kokanee remained in the epilimnion throughout the day. Although the energetic implications of the late-summer strategy are unclear, it appears that kokanee were responding to changes in their predator environment. A robust model for kokanee diel vertical migration across a range of systems should include a predator avoidance component.

  10. Asteroid age distributions determined by space weathering and collisional evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willman, Mark; Jedicke, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We provide evidence of consistency between the dynamical evolution of main belt asteroids and their color evolution due to space weathering. The dynamical age of an asteroid's surface (Bottke, W.F., Durda, D.D., Nesvorný, D., Jedicke, R., Morbidelli, A., Vokrouhlický, D., Levison, H. [2005]. Icarus 175 (1), 111-140; Nesvorný, D., Jedicke, R., Whiteley, R.J., Ivezić, Ž. [2005]. Icarus 173, 132-152) is the time since its last catastrophic disruption event which is a function of the object's diameter. The age of an S-complex asteroid's surface may also be determined from its color using a space weathering model (e.g. Willman, M., Jedicke, R., Moskovitz, N., Nesvorný, D., Vokrouhlický, D., Mothé-Diniz, T. [2010]. Icarus 208, 758-772; Jedicke, R., Nesvorný, D., Whiteley, R.J., Ivezić, Ž., Jurić, M. [2004]. Nature 429, 275-277; Willman, M., Jedicke, R., Nesvorny, D., Moskovitz, N., Ivezić, Ž., Fevig, R. [2008]. Icarus 195, 663-673. We used a sample of 95 S-complex asteroids from SMASS and obtained their absolute magnitudes and u, g, r, i, z filter magnitudes from SDSS. The absolute magnitudes yield a size-derived age distribution. The u, g, r, i, z filter magnitudes lead to the principal component color which yields a color-derived age distribution by inverting our color-age relationship, an enhanced version of the 'dual τ' space weathering model of Willman et al. (2010). We fit the size-age distribution to the enhanced dual τ model and found characteristic weathering and gardening times of τw = 2050 ± 80 Myr and τg=4400-500+700Myr respectively. The fit also suggests an initial principal component color of -0.05 ± 0.01 for fresh asteroid surface with a maximum possible change of the probable color due to weathering of Δ PC = 1.34 ± 0.04. Our predicted color of fresh asteroid surface matches the color of fresh ordinary chondritic surface of PC1 = 0.17 ± 0.39.

  11. Simulating the grain-size distribution of Wisconsinan age glaciofluvial sediments: Applications to fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, E.K.; Anderson, M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    A sedimentary deposition model, SEDSIM, was used to simulate the deposition of glaciofluvial sediments in south-central Wisconsin. These types of deposits are present at or near the surface over much of the northern United States and have a high contamination potential. They also represent relatively recent analogs for ancient braided stream systems. Sixty sediment samples were used to determine the average sediment properties for a facies assemblage located 8-10 km from the ice margin. A regional depositional system was simulated, using SEDSIM, to determine the range of input values that reproduced the observed average sediment characteristics. Progressively smaller scale models were constructed to produce more detailed estimates of the grain-size distribution. the grain-size estimates from the finest scale model were translated into relative hydraulic conductivity values using the method of Hazen. The resulting conductivities were incorporated into a fluid flow model to illustrate the control that heterogeneity of petrologic properties has on the direction and rate of fluid movement. This work indicates that a wide range of input parameters will reproduce the bulk sediment properties. Furthermore, small-scale features may not be reproduced under the assumptions incorporated in the current SEDSIM code. Thus, for sedimentary depositional models to be used to predict permeability and porosity distributions, or to interpret paleo-flow conditions, one must determine calibration targets that are more sensitive to flow parameters than bulk grain-size distributions.

  12. Estimates of genetic parameters for total milk yield over multiple ages in Brazilian Murrah buffaloes using different models.

    PubMed

    Sesana, R C; Baldi, F; Borquis, R R A; Bignardi, A B; Hurtado-Lugo, N A; El Faro, L; Albuquerque, L G; Tonhati, H

    2014-04-14

    The objective of this study was to estimate variance components and genetic parameters for accumulated 305-day milk yield (MY305) over multiple ages, from 24 to 120 months of age, applying random regression (RRM), repeatability (REP) and multi-trait (MT) models. A total of 4472 lactation records from 1882 buffaloes of the Murrah breed were utilized. The contemporary group (herd-year-calving season) and number of milkings (two levels) were considered as fixed effects in all models. For REP and RRM, additive genetic, permanent environmental and residual effects were included as random effects. MT considered the same random effects as did REP and RRM with the exception of permanent environmental effect. Residual variances were modeled by a step function with 1, 4, and 6 classes. The heritabilities estimated with RRM increased with age, ranging from 0.19 to 0.34, and were slightly higher than that obtained with the REP model. For the MT model, heritability estimates ranged from 0.20 (37 months of age) to 0.32 (94 months of age). The genetic correlation estimates for MY305 obtained by RRM (L23.res4) and MT models were very similar, and varied from 0.77 to 0.99 and from 0.77 to 0.99, respectively. The rank correlation between breeding values for MY305 at different ages predicted by REP, MT, and RRM were high. It seems that a linear and quadratic Legendre polynomial to model the additive genetic and animal permanent environmental effects, respectively, may be sufficient to explain more parsimoniously the changes in MY305 genetic variation with age.

  13. Higher body mass, older age and higher monounsaturated fatty acids intake reflect better quantitative ultrasound parameters in Inuit preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Jessy El; Egeland, Grace; Weiler, Hope

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Investigate the effects of selected factors associated with quantitative ultrasound parameters among Inuit preschoolers living in Arctic communities (56° 32′–72° 40′N). Materials and methods Children were selected randomly in summer and early fall (n=296). Dietary intake was assessed through the administration of a 24-h dietary recall (24-h recall) and a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Anthropometry was measured using standardized procedures. Plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were measured using a chemiluminescent assay (Liaison, Diasorin). Quantitative ultrasound parameters were measured using Sahara Sonometer, (Hologic Inc.). Results Children divided by speed of sound (SoS) and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) quartiles were not different for age (years), sex (M/F), calcium (mg/d) and vitamin D intake (µg/d) and plasma 25(OH)D concentration (nmol/L). However, children in the highest BUA and SoS quartile had higher body mass index (BMI) compared to those in quartile 1. Using multivariate linear regression, higher BMI, older age and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) intake were predictors of BUA while only BMI was a predictor of SoS. Conclusions Further investigation assessing intakes of traditional foods (TF) and nutrients affecting bone parameters along with assessment of vitamin D status of Inuit children across seasons is required. PMID:22789515

  14. Effects of age and its interaction with task parameters on lifting biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiahong; Qu, Xingda

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the age-related differences in lifting biomechanics. Eleven younger and 12 older participants were instructed to perform symmetric lifting tasks defined by different combinations of destination heights and load magnitudes. Lifting biomechanics was assessed. It was found that the trunk flexion in the starting posture was 32% lower and the peak trunk extension velocity was 46% lower in older participants compared with those in younger ones, indicating that older adults tended to use safer lifting strategies than did younger adults. Based on these findings, we recommend that physical exercise programmes may be a more effective ergonomic intervention for reducing the risks of low back pain (LBP) in lifting among older workers, compared with instructions of safe lifting strategies. As for younger workers, instructions of safe lifting strategies would be effective in LBP risk reduction.

  15. Numerical Study of the Gas Distribution in an Oxygen Blast Furnace. Part 2: Effects of the Design and Operating Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-09-01

    Gas distribution plays a significant role in an oxygen blast furnace. The uneven distribution of recycling gas from the shaft tuyere has been shown to affect the heat distribution and energy utilization in an oxygen blast furnace. Therefore, the optimal design and operating parameters beneficial to the gas distribution in an oxygen blast furnace should be determined. In total, three parameters and 22 different conditions in an oxygen blast furnace multifluid model were considered. The gas and heat distributions in an oxygen blast furnace under different conditions were simulated and compared. The study revealed that when the height of shaft tuyere decreased from 7.8 m to 3.8 m, the difference in top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 11.6%. When the recycling gas temperature increased from 1123 K to 1473 K, the difference in the top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 3.9%. As the allocation ratio increased from 0.90 to 1.94, the difference in the top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 3.0%. Considering both gas and heat distributions, a shaft tuyere height of 3.8 m to 4.8 m, a recycling gas temperature of 1473 K and an allocation ratio of 1.94 are recommended in practice under the conditions of this study.

  16. Size frequency distributions of key epibenthic organisms in the eastern Chukchi Sea and their correlations with environmental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, B.; Ravelo, A.; Grebmeier, J.; Trefry, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    Epibenthic communities play a key role in ecosystem functioning in Arctic shelf Seas, such as in the Chukchi Sea in the Pacific Arctic. These communities, however, are patchily distributed and are influenced by various environmental parameters. Along with taxonomic composition, another community aspect that may vary spatially and be influenced by the environment is the distribution of organism sizes. This study presents the first size frequency distributions of nine epifaunal taxa that were determined to be dominant in the eastern Chukchi Sea in July/August 2009 and 2010, including male, female and gravid Chionoecetes opilio and Hyas coarctatus crabs, the gastropods Neptunea spp., Plicifusus spp., Colus spp., and Cryptonatica spp., and the echinoderms Gorgonocephalus spp., Leptasterias spp., and Echinarachnius parma. Some abundant taxa exhibited a wide range of sizes (i.e. C. opilio, Neptunea spp., and Leptasterias spp.), while others had a much smaller size range (i.e. Cryptonatica spp. and E. parma). We also found that size distributions of these taxa correlated with various combinations of the environmental parameters that have been shown to be important in structuring the general distribution patterns for the epibenthic invertebrate communities in the study area, including percent total sediment organic carbon, sediment chlorophyll a, temperature, latitude, sediment grain size 2 and 4 phi, pH, and dissolved oxygen. Our findings present benchmark information that is needed to detect future alterations in body-size frequency distributions that are likely to happen in response to the predicted climate and environmental changes in the Chukchi Sea region.

  17. Haematology and some blood chemical parameters of young carp till the age of three years.

    PubMed

    Svetina, A; Matasin, Zeljka; Tofant, Alenka; Vucemilo, Marija; Fijan, N

    2002-01-01

    Haematological and biochemical analyses of blood were performed in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) kept in small ponds. Caught and anaesthetised carp were clinically examined and blood samples were taken at regular intervals during the three years. In the first year of examinations, the haemoglobin and haematocrit values of carp fry significantly increased (P < 0.01) from June to September. The intensive growth of carp in the summer period in the second year was accompanied by adequate erythropoiesis. During hibernation haematocrit and haemoglobin significantly decreased (P < 0.05) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) increased (P < 0.01) in both scaly and mirror carp. MCHC increased also with the age and increasing body weight of the fish. Mirror carp had lower haematocrit and haemoglobin values than scaly carp (P < 0.01). Comparative haematological analyses between carp of normal and poor body condition showed that moderate anaemia appeared in those with poor body condition. The results indicate that there is marked seasonal and age-dependent variation in the values of haematocrit and haemoglobin. Pond water quality investigations indicated good environmental conditions. A 50% increase (P < 0.05) of glucose concentration was found from June to September in the blood plasma of carp in the third year, accompanied by an even more increased (80%; P < 0.01) concentration of total lipids. At the same time, considerable changes of cholesterol and total protein concentrations were not observed. The results suggest that the investigated haematological and biochemical variables could be successfully utilised in monitoring the metabolic balance and health status of fish in intensive culture.

  18. Age distribution, polyps and rectal cancer in the Egyptian population-based cancer registry

    PubMed Central

    Veruttipong, Darlene; Soliman, Amr S; Gilbert, Samuel F; Blachley, Taylor S; Hablas, Ahmed; Ramadan, Mohamed; Rozek, Laura S; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To describe the clinical and epidemiologic profiles of the disease and to compare the findings with those generated from the previous hospital-based studies. METHODS: The Gharbiah cancer registry is the only population-based cancer registry in Egypt since 1998. We analyzed the data of all colorectal cancer patients included in the registry for the period of 1999-2007. All medical records of the 1364 patients diagnosed in Gharbiah during the study period were retrieved and the following information abstracted: age, residence, diagnosis date, grade, stage, topology, clinical characteristics, and histology variables. Egyptian census data for 1996 and 2006 were used to provide the general population’s statistics on age, sex, residence and other related demographic factors. In addition to age- and sex-specific incidence rate analyses, we analyze the data to explore the incidence distribution by rural-urban differences among the 8 districts of the province. We also compared the incidence rates of Gharbiah to the rates of the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data of the United States. RESULTS: Over the 9 year-period, 1364 colorectal cancer cases were included. The disease incidence under age 40 years was relatively high (1.3/105) while the incidence in the age groups 40 and over was very low (12.0/105, 19.4/105 and 21.2/105 in the age groups 40-59 years, 60-69 years and > 70 years, respectively). The vast majority of tumors (97.2%) had no polyps and 37.2% of the patients presented with primary lesions in the rectum. Colorectal cancer was more common in patients from urban (55%) than rural (45%) areas. Regional differences in colon and rectal cancer incidence in the 8 districts of the study province may reflect different etiologic patterns in this population. The registry data of Egypt shows a slightly higher incidence of colorectal cancer than the United States in subjects under age 40 years. The results also shows significantly lower incidence of

  19. The Old Imbrium Hypothesis. [revision for KREEP materials formation age and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, E.; Meyer, C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    It is proposed that the order of lunar events was such that the Imbrium event predates the formation of the lunar rock type called KREEP. This hypothesis is used to explain the distribution of KREEP in the regions of Imbrium ejecta and the location of KREEP within the Imbrium and Procellarum mare regions. Model ages of KREEP materials have been previously interpreted to mean that their 'formation' age (time of initial extrusion) is about 4.3 to 4.4 AE. Consequently it is suggested that the Imbrium impact was before 4.3 to 4.4 AE rather than at about 3.9 AE, as is currently believed. This Old Imbrium Hypothesis is not yet proven, but seems to be consistent with a large variety of basic lunar observations.

  20. Gender- and Age-Specific REE and REE/FFM Distributions in Healthy Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu; Yang, Xue; Na, Li-Xin; Li, Ying; Sun, Chang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Basic data on the resting energy expenditure (REE) of healthy populations are currently rare, especially for developing countries. The aims of the present study were to describe gender- and age-specific REE distributions and to evaluate the relationships among glycolipid metabolism, eating behaviors, and REE in healthy Chinese adults. This cross-sectional survey included 540 subjects (343 women and 197 men, 20–79 years old). REE was measured by indirect calorimetry and expressed as kcal/day/kg total body weight. The data were presented as the means and percentiles for REE and the REE to fat-free mass (FFM) ratio; differences were described by gender and age. Partial correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlations between REE, tertiles of REE/FFM, and glycolipid metabolism and eating behaviors. In this study, we confirmed a decline in REE with age in women (p = 0.000) and men (p = 0.000), and we found that men have a higher REE (p = 0.000) and lower REE/FFM (p = 0.021) than women. Furthermore, we observed no associations among glycolipid metabolism, eating behaviors, and REE in healthy Chinese adults. In conclusion, the results presented here may be useful to clinicians and nutritionists for comparing healthy and ill subjects and identifying changes in REE that are related to aging, malnutrition, and chronic diseases. PMID:27598192

  1. The galactic habitable zone and the age distribution of complex life in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lineweaver, Charles H; Fenner, Yeshe; Gibson, Brad K

    2004-01-02

    We modeled the evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy to trace the distribution in space and time of four prerequisites for complex life: the presence of a host star, enough heavy elements to form terrestrial planets, sufficient time for biological evolution, and an environment free of life-extinguishing supernovae. We identified the Galactic habitable zone (GHZ) as an annular region between 7 and 9 kiloparsecs from the Galactic center that widens with time and is composed of stars that formed between 8 and 4 billion years ago. This GHZ yields an age distribution for the complex life that may inhabit our Galaxy. We found that 75% of the stars in the GHZ are older than the Sun.

  2. Lipid and lipoprotein profile in menopausal transition. Effects of hormones, age and fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Berg, G; Mesch, V; Boero, L; Sayegh, F; Prada, M; Royer, M; Muzzio, M L; Schreier, L; Siseles, N; Benencia, H

    2004-04-01

    The behavior of lipoproteins during the menopausal transition and their relationship with sex hormones and body fat distribution is still unclear. Our aim was to evaluate atherogenic IDL, LDL, Lp(a) and antiatherogenic HDL lipoproteins in four groups of women: premenopausal (n = 20), menopausal transition women with menstrual bleeding (n = 31), menopausal transition women with 3 to 6 months amenorrhea (n = 36), and postmenopausal women (n = 30). We also measured their FSH, LH and estradiol levels along with BMI and waist circumference. Menopausal transition and postmenopausal women showed higher values of waist circumference (p < 0.0032), LDL-cholesterol (p < 0.002), IDL-cholesterol (p < 0.002) and apoprotein B (p < 0.0001) than premenopausal women. Total-cholesterol (p < 0.0001), triglycerides (p < 0.004), IDL-cholesterol and Lp(a) were higher in menopausal transition women with amenorrhea and in postmenopausal women in comparison with premenopausal women. After adjustment according to age and waist circumference, multiple regression analysis showed the increase in total-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol to be linearly associated to menopausal status and estradiol concentration, whereas Lp(a) was only related to menopausal status. Age was found to be an independent variable in relation to apoprotein B concentration changes. The effect of menopausal status on TG levels did not remain in the model when age, waist and BMI were included (beta = 0.05, p = 0.356). HDL-cholesterol levels were the same in all the groups. Menopause, age and the increase in abdominal fat distribution were three independent and significant factors impairing lipoprotein profiles from the beginning of the menopausal transition.

  3. Methods and evaluation of frequency aging in distributed-feedback laser diodes for rubidium atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthey, Renaud; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2011-09-01

    Distributed-feedback laser diodes emitting at 780nm have been evaluated, with respect to the aging of the injection current required for reaching the rubidium D2 resonance line. Results obtained for lasers operating in air and in vacuum for 9 months are reported. When operated at constant temperature, the laser current required for emission at the wavelength of the desired atomic resonance is found to decrease by 50 to 80μA per month. The impact of this result on the lifetime and long-term performances of laser-pumped rubidium atomic clocks is discussed.

  4. Methods and evaluation of frequency aging in distributed-feedback laser diodes for rubidium atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Matthey, Renaud; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2011-09-01

    Distributed-feedback laser diodes emitting at 780 nm have been evaluated, with respect to the aging of the injection current required for reaching the rubidium D2 resonance line. Results obtained for lasers operating in air and in vacuum for 9 months are reported. When operated at constant temperature, the laser current required for emission at the wavelength of the desired atomic resonance is found to decrease by 50 to 80 μA per month. The impact of this result on the lifetime and long-term performances of laser-pumped rubidium atomic clocks is discussed.

  5. Mapping for maternal and newborn health: the distributions of women of childbearing age, pregnancies and births

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The health and survival of women and their new-born babies in low income countries has been a key priority in public health since the 1990s. However, basic planning data, such as numbers of pregnancies and births, remain difficult to obtain and information is also lacking on geographic access to key services, such as facilities with skilled health workers. For maternal and newborn health and survival, planning for safer births and healthier newborns could be improved by more accurate estimations of the distributions of women of childbearing age. Moreover, subnational estimates of projected future numbers of pregnancies are needed for more effective strategies on human resources and infrastructure, while there is a need to link information on pregnancies to better information on health facilities in districts and regions so that coverage of services can be assessed. Methods This paper outlines demographic mapping methods based on freely available data for the production of high resolution datasets depicting estimates of numbers of people, women of childbearing age, live births and pregnancies, and distribution of comprehensive EmONC facilities in four large high burden countries: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Tanzania. Satellite derived maps of settlements and land cover were constructed and used to redistribute areal census counts to produce detailed maps of the distributions of women of childbearing age. Household survey data, UN statistics and other sources on growth rates, age specific fertility rates, live births, stillbirths and abortions were then integrated to convert the population distribution datasets to gridded estimates of births and pregnancies. Results and conclusions These estimates, which can be produced for current, past or future years based on standard demographic projections, can provide the basis for strategic intelligence, planning services, and provide denominators for subnational indicators to track progress. The datasets

  6. Statistical Properties of the Stokes V-Parameter Spatial Distribution of Some Spectral Lines Across the Solar DisK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshcherov, V. S.; Demidov, M. L.; Zhigalov, V. V.; Grigoryev, V. M.

    The measurements of the Stokes parameters distribution in spectral lines (the more number of lines, the better) is the most powerful and promising tool of magnetic fields and termodynamical conditions diagnostics in solar plasma. Sometimes [1] it is very important to know such mean values of V-parameter distribution over the line profile as amplitude and area asymmetries, and what is espicially valuable, - on the different positions on the solar disc. At the present paper, using the CCD stokesmeter of the Sayan observatory [2], we study the properties of these parameters as a function of center-to-limb distance and the strength of magnetic fields. A great number of data (dozens of stokesgrames of the whole solar disc) with low-spatial resolution observation (two arc minutes) are used in the investigation. Some questions of theoretical interpretation of the founded properties are discussed. References 1. O.Steiner. Flux Tube Dynamic. - 3rd Advances in Solar Physics Euroconference: Magnetic Fields and Oscillations. (Eds. B.Schmieder, A.Hofmann, J,Staude). ASP Confernce Series. Vol.184, 1999, p.38-54. 2. V.S.Peshcherov, V.V.Zhigalov, M.L.Demidov, V.M. Grigoryev. Large -Scale Solar Magnetic Fields: the Stokes V-Parameter Distribution in the Line FeI 525.0 nm. - JOSO Annual Report, 1998, p.87-88.

  7. Visual deprivation leads to gait adaptations that are age- and context-specific: II. Kinematic parameters.

    PubMed

    Hallemans, Ann; Beccu, Sofie; Van Loock, Kelly; Ortibus, Els; Truijen, Steven; Aerts, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Significant differences exist between eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions in postural sway, self-selected dimensionless walking speed and duration of double support in both children and adults. The decrease in speed could be attributed to a decrease in dimensionless stride length. The question remains whether the slower gait is a reflection of fundamental changes in movement control in the absence of vision or it results from uncertainty or fear of falling. Studying the differences in foot and ankle kinematics between the two conditions may provide further information. In this study we compare the impact of visual deprivation on joint kinematics during locomotion in adults and children. Visual deprivation had a significant effect on the gait pattern of healthy children and adults. Differences included a more backward leaning position of the trunk, limited movement in the pelvis, reduced hip adduction during stance, increased flexion of the knee related to flat foot contact and reduced ankle plantar flexion at push-off. These differences indicate a more cautious walking strategy in the absence of vision, probably resulting from postural control problems. Although age also had a significant effect on gait in both EO and EC conditions, adults and children show little differences in their kinematic response to blindfolding.

  8. Allometric Growth of Testes in Relation to Age, Body Weight and Selected Blood Parameters in Male Japanese Quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Vatsalya, Vatsalya; Arora, Kashmiri L

    2012-01-01

    The Japanese quail is a very valuable animal model for research in a variety of biological disciplines. The purpose of this study was to characterize and interrelate age-dependent testicular parameters with various blood constituents: blood glucose, plasma proteins and packed cell volume that are developing concurrently in the growing bird. Another objective of the study was to identify selective physioanatomical markers for predicting the testicular growth and the onset of sexual maturity. Male Japanese quail hatchlings were raised in temperature controlled brooders for up to 3 weeks of age under a constant light and then shifted to hanging cages in an air conditioned room set at ~73° F under a 14L: 10D lighting system and ad libitum access to feed and water. Starting d8, a group of 8-10 birds of uniform size and weight were selected randomly at 4-day intervals up to d52 of age for the project. The birds were weighed and blood sampled using the brachial vein and Blood Glucose (BGL), Total Plasma Proteins (PP) and Packed Cell Volume (PCV) levels were measured prior to euthanization. The testes were removed and measured for weight, length, width and Volume (VOL). All the testicular measurements were then correlated with age and body weight. The left testes were larger than the right testes and their differences were evident at d36 of age. Testicular measurements also reflected two distinct growth surges at d28, d32 and d36 of age. Combined Testes Weight (CTW) and Combined Testes Volume (CTV) revealed a strong positive correlation with PCV and PP and a negative correlation with Blood Glucose Level (BGL). Accordingly, these measurements could serve as reliable markers of growth rate and sexual maturation in male Japanese quail.

  9. A pilot study on the effect of Lactobacillus casei Zhang on intestinal microbiota parameters in Chinese subjects of different age.

    PubMed

    Kwok, L Y; Wang, L; Zhang, J; Guo, Z; Zhang, H

    2014-09-01

    Ageing of the population is an imminent global problem. Lactobacillus casei Zhang (LcZ) was isolated from Inner Mongolian fermented milk, koumiss. LcZ possesses numerous probiotic properties in in vitro tests and in animal models. However, it has never been tested in any human trial. In the current study, the impact of oral consumption of LcZ on different age groups was tested. Chinese subjects, including 10 young, 7 middle-aged and 7 elderly volunteers (with mean age of 24.3, 47.6 and 64.7, respectively), were recruited. Each subject took 10.6 log10 cfu LcZ daily for a continuous period of 28 days. Several parameters, including the amounts of LcZ and four selected groups of bacteria, change of bacterial diversity, short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and total bile acids (TBA), were monitored in faecal samples collected from the subjects before starting, during and after stopping oral LcZ consumption. The consumption of LcZ exhibited beneficial effects to the subjects by modulating faecal microbiota in a temporal manner with a prolonged elevation of SCFA and reduction of TBA. The potentially harmful Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter genera were suppressed by the probiotic administration. Furthermore, a moderately divergent response was observed in the indigenous gut populations of Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides fragilis group in different age subjects. Taken together, the current study has provided proof on the positive effect of probiotic consumption and crucial insights into the design and application of probiotic-based products to users of different age segments.

  10. Determine the Dose Distribution Using Ultrasound Parameters in MAGIC-f Polymer Gels.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Hossein; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Arbabi, Azim; Bakhshandeh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, using methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper (MAGIC-f) polymer gel after megavoltage energy exposure, the sensitivity of the ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient dose-dependent parameters was evaluated. The MAGIC-f polymer gel was irradiated under 1.25 MeV cobalt-60, ranging from 0 to 60 Gy in 2-Gy steps, and received dose uniformity and accuracy of ±2%. After calibration of the ultrasonic systems with a frequency of 500 kHz, the parameters of ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient of the irradiated gel samples were measured. According to the dose-response curve, the ability of ultrasonic parameters was evaluated in dose rate readings. Based on a 4-order polynomial curve, fitted on the dose-response parameters of ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient and observed at 24 hours after irradiation, ultrasonic parameters had more sensitivity. The sensitivity of the dose-velocity and dose-attenuation coefficient curves was observed as 50 m/s/Gy and 0.06 dB/MHz/Gy over the linear range of 4 to 44 Gy, respectively. The ultrasonic parameters at 5°C, 15°C, and 25°C on the gel dosimeter after 0 to 60 Gy irradiation showed that readings at 25°C have higher sensitivity compared to 15°C and 5°C. Maximum sensitivity time and temperature readings of the MAGIC-f ultrasonic parameters were concluded 24 hours after irradiation and at a temperature of 25°C.

  11. On-site removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes from leachate by aged refuse bioreactor: Effects of microbial community and operational parameters.

    PubMed

    Su, Yinglong; Wang, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhiting; Xie, Bing

    2017-07-01

    The abuse of antibiotics has raised the prevalence of antibiotic resistance, which will pose potential risk to human health. Leachate, generated during the landfill treatment of municipal solid waste, is the important hotspot of the antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), and no effective on-site treatment has been put forward for preventing ARGs dissemination. Herein, the aged refuse bioreactor was employed to remove antibiotics and ARGs from leachate, and the great removal performance was observed. For the detected antibiotics, the total removal efficiency was about 76.75%, and sulfanilamide and macrolide were removed with high efficiencies (>80%). Among the target ARGs, tetracycline and macrolide resistance genes (tetM, tetQ and ermB) were eliminated with 1.2-2.0 orders of magnitude. The occurrences of ARGs did not correlated with water quality parameters such as COD, total nitrogen, ammonia, nitrate and nitrite, but closely linked to the variations of the bacterial community structure. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated the significant correlations between four genera and the distribution of ARGs, which implied that these key genera (including potential pathogens) drove the ARGs removal. Furthermore, the hydraulic loading test confirmed that the aged refuse bioreactor was capable of achieving high removal efficiencies even under shock loading for the higher loading was negative for the proliferations of potential ARGs hosts. This study suggested that aged refuse bioreactor could be a promising way for antibiotics and ARGs on-site removal from leachate.

  12. Vertical distribution of organochlorine pesticides in humus along Alpine altitudinal profiles in relation to ambiental parameters.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, M; Faus-Kessler, T; Jakobi, G; Levy, W; Henkelmann, B; Bernhöft, S; Kotalik, J; Zsolnay, A; Bassan, R; Belis, C; Kräuchi, N; Moche, W; Simoncic, P; Uhl, M; Weiss, P; Schramm, K-W

    2009-12-01

    In forest soils along vertical profiles located in different parts of the Alps, concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), namely organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCH), heptachlor, aldrin, dieldrin and mirex, were measured. Though local characteristics of the sites are influenced by numerous factors like orographic and meteorological parameters, forest stand characteristics and humus parameters, we ascertained a marked vertical increase of concentrations of some organochlorine compounds in the soil. On the basis of climatological values of each site, we found that the contamination increase with altitude can be ascribed to a certain 'cold condensation effect'. In addition, the perennial atmospheric deposition of POPs is controlled by precipitation. Other key parameters explaining the accumulation of POPs are the soil organic carbon stocks, the turnover times, the re-volatilisation and degradation processes, which vary with altitude.

  13. Temperature, age and crust thickness distributions of Loki Patera on Io: implications for resurfacing mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    A high-spatial-resolution, multi-wavelength observation by the Galileo NIMS instrument has been analysed to determine the temperature and area distribution of a large portion of the ionian volcano Loki Patera. The temperatures of the cooler components from a two-temperature fit to the data can be used to determine ages of the surface. The age of the floor along a profile across the floor of the caldera ranges from 10 to 80 days. This puts the start of the resurfacing in July/early August 2001, yielding a resurfacing rate of approximately 1 km/day, with the new lava spreading from the SW corner of the caldera in a NE direction. This rate is consistent with resurfacing by foundering of the crust on a lava lake. However,the temperature distribution may also result from the emplacement of flows. Implied crust thicknesses (derived using a lava cooling model) range from 2.6 to 0.9 m.

  14. Model-independent constraints on the shape parameters of dilepton angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccioli, Pietro; Lourenço, Carlos; Seixas, João; Wöhri, Hermine K.

    2011-03-01

    The coefficients determining the dilepton decay angular distribution of vector particles obey certain positivity constraints and a rotation-invariant identity. These relations are a direct consequence of the covariance properties of angular momentum eigenstates and are independent of the production mechanism. The Lam-Tung relation can be derived as a particular case, simply recognizing that the Drell-Yan dilepton is always produced transversely polarized with respect to one or more quantization axes. The dilepton angular distribution continues to be characterized by a frame-independent identity also when the Lam-Tung relation is violated. Moreover, the violation can be easily characterized by measuring a one-dimensional distribution depending on one shape coefficient.

  15. On-Line Water Quality Parameters as Indicators of Distribution System Contamination

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a time when the safety and security of services we have typically taken for granted are under question, a real-time or near real-time method of monitoring changes in water quality parameters could provide a critical line of defense in protecting public health. This study was u...

  16. The Identification of a Distributed Parameter Model for a Flexible Structure,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    Computer Applications in Science and Engineering, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, 1984, Mat, Aplicada e Computacional , to appear. (3] H. T...Parameter estimation for the Euler- Bernoulli beam, Mat. Aplioada e Computacional , A, (1985), pp.95-124. (9] J. L. Lions, Optimal Control of Systems

  17. Effect of process parameters on temperature distribution in twin-electrode TIG coupling arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Xiong, Jun; Gao, Hongming; Wu, Lin

    2012-10-01

    The twin-electrode TIG coupling arc is a new type of welding heat source, which is generated in a single welding torch that has two tungsten electrodes insulated from each other. This paper aims at determining the distribution of temperature for the coupling arc using the Fowler-Milne method under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The influences of welding current, arc length, and distance between both electrode tips on temperature distribution of the coupling arc were analyzed. Based on the results, a better understanding of the twin-electrode TIG welding process was obtained.

  18. Relations between demographic parameters.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1979-05-01

    The mean life-expectancy e describes the average prospective life-time of an individual aged zero. This parameter can be explicitly described in terms of the survivorship distribution of the population. The Malthusian parameter r represents the asymptotic growth rate of a population. This parameter can be implicitly expressed in terms of the net-maternity distribution. The parameters e and r incompletely incorporate the age-specific fertility and mortality pattern of a population; distinct populations may have the same growth rate but different net-maternity functions; distinct populations may be characterized by the same mean life expectation but may have different survivorship distributions. This article analyzes a class of parameters called the entropy of a population (Demetrius, 1974a) which distinguishes between net-maternity functions with the same growth rate and also mortality distributions with the same mean life expectation. This class of parameters measures the convexity of the fertility and mortality distributions. This paper analyzes the relations between the entropy parameter and the standard demographic parameters.

  19. Foaming properties of various Champagne wines depending on several parameters: grape variety, aging, protein and CO2 content.

    PubMed

    Cilindre, Clara; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Villaume, Sandra; Jeandet, Philippe; Marchal, Richard

    2010-02-15

    A comparison of the foaming parameters of various Champagne wines was undergone with two well distinct methods: (i) a classical gas-sparging method providing standardized but artificial effervescence conditions (the so-called Mosalux), and (ii) a computer assisted viewing equipment (CAVE), much closer to the real champagne tasting conditions. The latter one is the only apparatus which enables a thorough descriptive analysis of foam behavior, during the pouring process of a sparkling wine, and from the end of its pouring. Various Champagne wines elaborated from two grape varieties (Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier) and having experienced different aging-periods (15 months and 5 years) were analyzed and compared to a model sparkling wine, elaborated from a model base wine (devoid of grape colloids). The CO(2) and protein content was also investigated to discuss the foaming behavior of these wines. A significant loss of the CO(2) content during aging was observed and might be the reason for the worse foaming properties of the old champagnes, as determined with CAVE. It is worth noting that contradictory foaming parameters were obtained through the Mosalux method, which is indeed more intrusive than the CAVE, and finally far from the real champagne tasting conditions, since it requires filtration and champagne degassing prior experiment.

  20. Distribution pattern and the risks of OPCs, PHAs and PCBs in aged refuses from landfill.

    PubMed

    Lou, Ziyang; Li, Anding; Tai, Jun; Yuan, Wenxiang; Zhu, Nanwen; Zhao, Youcai

    2016-09-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are the urgent risk for landfill, and should be considered before the landfill reclamation and resource. In this work, the distribution pattern of selected POPs in landfill and their ecological risks were investigated and assessed. The Σ20OCPs, Σ16PAHs and Σ19PCBs were around 157.4-329.2, 4103-19,190, and 79.1-340.3μgkg(-1) in aged refuses, with the mean value of 206.6, 8645.4, and 155.1μgkg(-1). While those in soil covers were only 6.3-75.4, 125.5-515.3 and 2.6-43.4μgkg(-1), with the mean value of 33.7, 257.7, and 24.0μgkg(-1), respectively. The maximum OPCs, PHAs and PCBs were in aged refuse with 13, 7, 10 disposal years. Whereas, the corresponding top content in soil covers were in 10, 13 and 16years, meaning that aged refuses were not the direct source for soil covers. Among 20 OCPs measured, α-HCH, δ-HCH, Dieldrin, and Endrin were presented in all aged refuses, with the mean concentration of 93.6, 52.1, 3.9 and 4.7μgkg(-1), respectively. For PAHs, PHE, FLU and PYR were the main composition, and reached to 1535, 1224, 1187μgkg(-1). The Σ7CarPAHs occupied around 33.3-49.9% of total Σ16PAHs tested, and could be used as the indictor for PAHs pollutant in landfill. PCB-5 content was around 40.7-263.3μgkg(-1) in aged refuses, and occupied around 51.5-81.8% of Σ19PCBs measured. The HCHs and DDTs in aged refuses were below the national standard GB15618-1995, and the corresponding Σ19PCBs concentrations met the standard of GB 13015-91, suggesting that aged refuse are accepted for the further utilization process.

  1. A mitochondrial location for haemoglobins--dynamic distribution in ageing and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Freya; Greville-Heygate, Oliver; Marsh, Oliver; Anderson, Susan; Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Haemoglobins are iron-containing proteins that transport oxygen in the blood of most vertebrates. The mitochondrion is the cellular organelle which consumes oxygen in order to synthesise ATP. Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in neurodegeneration and ageing. We find that α and β haemoglobin (Hba and Hbb) proteins are altered in their distribution in mitochondrial fractions from degenerating brain. We demonstrate that both Hba and Hbb are co-localised with the mitochondrion in mammalian brain. The precise localisation of the Hbs is within the inner membrane space and associated with inner mitochondrial membrane. Relative mitochondrial to cytoplasmic ratios of Hba and Hbb show changing distributions of these proteins during the process of neurodegeneration in the pcd(5j) mouse brain. A significant difference in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb content in the mitochondrial fraction is seen at 31 days after birth, this corresponds to a stage when dynamic neuronal loss is measured to be greatest in the Purkinje Cell Degeneration mouse. We also report changes in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb levels in ageing brain and muscle. Significant differences in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb can be seen when comparing aged brain to muscle, suggesting tissue specific functions of these proteins in the mitochondrion. In muscle there are significant differences between Hba levels in old and young mitochondria. To understand whether the changes detected in mitochondrial Hbs are of clinical significance, we examined Parkinson's disease brain, immunohistochemistry studies suggest that cell bodies in the substantia nigra accumulate mitochondrial Hb. However, western blotting of mitochondrial fractions from PD and control brains indicates significantly less Hb in PD brain mitochondria. One explanation could be a specific loss of cells containing mitochondria loaded with Hb proteins. Our study opens the door to an examination of the role of Hb function, within the context of the mitochondrion

  2. Ages, distributions, and origins of upland coastal dune sheets in Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, C.D.; Stock, E.; Price, D.M.; Hart, R.; Reckendorf, F.; Erlandson, J.M.; Hostetler, S.W.

    2007-01-01

    A total of ten upland dune sheets, totaling 245??km in combined length, have been investigated for their origin(s) along the Oregon coast (500??km in length). The ages of dune emplacement range from 0.1 to 103??ka based on radiocarbon (36 samples) and luminescence (46 samples) dating techniques. The majority of the emplacement dates fall into two periods of late-Pleistocene age (11-103??ka) and mid-late-Holocene age (0.1-8??ka) that correspond to marine low-stand and marine high-stand conditions, respectively. The distribution of both the late-Pleistocene dune sheets (516??km2 total surface area) and the late-Holocene dune sheets (184??km2) are concentrated (90% of total surface area) along a 100??km coastal reach of the south-central Oregon coast. This coastal reach lies directly landward of a major bight (Heceta-Perpetua-Stonewall Banks) on the continental shelf, at depths of 30-200??m below present mean sea level (MSL). The banks served to trap northward littoral drift during most of the late-Pleistocene conditions of lowered sea level (- 50 ?? 20??m MSL). The emerged inner-shelf permitted cross-shelf, eolian sand transport (10-50??km distance) by onshore winds. The depocenter sand deposits were reworked by the Holocene marine transgression and carried landward by asymmetric wave transport during early- to mid-Holocene time. The earliest dated onset of Holocene dune accretion occurred at 8??ka in the central Oregon coast. A northward migration of Northeast Pacific storm tracks to the latitude of the shelf depocenter (Stonewall, Perpetua, Heceta Banks) in Holocene time resulted in eastward wave transport from the offshore depocenter. The complex interplay of coastal morphology, paleosea-level, and paleoclimate yielded the observed peak distribution of beach and dune sand observed along the south-central Oregon coast. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rare-earth distribution behaviour and lattice parameter changes on rare-earth substituted garnet single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, H.; Numazawa, T.; Sato, M.

    1994-08-01

    The selection of rare-earth substituted Ga and Al garnets in solid solution and their growth to single crystals using the conventional Czochralski technique is described. The crystals grown were investigated for their distribution behavior and lattice parameter changes in order to understand their characteristics in the solid solution. Investigation was by means of an ICP chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis with powdered samples ground from wafers taken from both the tops and tails of the crystals grown.

  4. The Finite-Size Scaling Relation for the Order-Parameter Probability Distribution of the Six-Dimensional Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdan, Ziya; Karakuş, Özlem

    2016-11-01

    The six dimensional Ising model with nearest-neighbor pair interactions has been simulated and verified numerically on the Creutz Cellular Automaton by using five bit demons near the infinite-lattice critical temperature with the linear dimensions L=4,6,8,10. The order parameter probability distribution for six dimensional Ising model has been calculated at the critical temperature. The constants of the analytical function have been estimated by fitting to probability function obtained numerically at the finite size critical point.

  5. Aging affects spatial distribution of leg muscle oxygen saturation during ramp cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Murase, Norio; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Osada, Takuya; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2013-01-01

    We compared muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) responses in several leg muscles and within a single muscle during ramp cycling exercise between elderly men (n = 8; age, 65 ± 3 years; ELD) and young men (n = 10; age, 23 ± 3 years; YNG). SmO2 was monitored at the distal site of the vastus lateralis (VLd), proximal site of the vastus lateralis (VLp), rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VM), biceps femoris (BF), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and tibialis anterior (TA) by near-infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy. During submaximal exercise, significantly lower SmO2 at a given absolute work rate was observed in VLd, RF, BF, GL, and TA but not in VLp, VM, and GM in ELD than in YNG. In contrast, at all measurement sites, SmO2 at peak exercise was not significantly different between groups. These results indicate that the effects of aging on SmO2 responses are heterogeneous between leg muscles and also within a single muscle. The lower SmO2 in older men may have been caused by reduced muscle blood flow or altered blood flow distribution.

  6. Genotype-phenotype relationship for localization and age distribution of telangiectases in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Letteboer, Tom G W; Mager, Hans-Jurgen; Snijder, Repke J; Lindhout, Dick; Ploos van Amstel, Hans-Kristian; Zanen, Pieter; Westermann, Kees J J

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) ranging from telangiectases to larger AVMs. Mutations in two genes cause HHT; ENG (HHT1) and ACVRL1 (HHT2). Although the hallmark for clinical diagnosis is the presence of telangiectases, there are few publications reporting the relative distribution and frequency of these features between HHT1 and HHT2. Here, the results of such analysis of telangiectases in 268 patients with HHT1 and 130 patients with HHT2 are described. Localization of the telangiectases is reported, and patients were clustered by age to estimate the site prevalence for different age categories. We show that telangiectases of the nasal mucosa are present at a higher prevalence and start to appear earlier in life than those of the oral mucosa or dermal sites in patients with either HHT1 or HHT2. Oral and nasal mucosal telangiectases are present earlier in life in patients with HHT1 compared to patients with HHT2, whereas dermal lesions are more frequent and appear earlier in life in patients with HHT2. In patients with either HHT1 or HHT2, the number of sites affected increases with age. In patients with HHT1, more women than men had skin telangiectases, particularly on the face. These results confirm that the frequency of AVMs differ between patients with HHT1 and HHT2, and that these differences can be detected on physical examination.

  7. Propagated but Topologically Distributed Forebrain Neurons Expressing Alpha-Synuclein in Aged Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Katsuo; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Takada, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), alpha-synuclein (α-syn) accumulates to induce cell death and/or form a cytoplasmic inclusion called Lewy body (LB). This α-syn-related pathology is termed synucleinopathy. It remains unclear how α-syn accumulation expands during the progress of synucleinopathy in the human brain. In our study, we investigated the patterns of distribution and propagation of forebrain neurons expressing α-syn in aged macaques. It was found that the occurrence of α-syn-positive neurons proceeded topologically based on the midbrain dopamine pathways arising from the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area where they were primarily observed. In the nigrostriatal or mesolimbic dopamine pathway, the age-dependent increase in α-syn-positive neurons was evident in the striatum or the nucleus accumbens, respectively. Concerning the nigrostriatal pathway, a mediolateral or rostrocaudal gradient was seen in the substantia nigra or the striatum, respectively, and a compensatory increase in dopamine transporter occurred in the striatum regardless of the decreased dopamine level. In the mesocortical dopamine pathway, α-syn-positive neurons appeared in the prefrontal and then motor areas of the frontal lobe. Given that neither LB formation nor clinical phenotype manifestation was detected in any of the monkeys examined in the present study, aged macaques may be useful as a potential presymptomatic model for PD and LB-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27861638

  8. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LEVELS OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA AND WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS IN A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional plating methods were used to quantify heterotrophic bacteria from a drinking water distribution system. Three media, plate count agar (PCA), R2A agar and sheep blood agar (TSA-SB) were used to determine heterotrophic plate count (HPC) levels. Grab samples were collec...

  9. Parameter Estimation under Constraints for Multivariate Normal Distributions with Incomplete Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoppe, Alice; Buu, Yuh-Pey Anne; Flury, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    Presents an application of the EM-algorithm to two problems of estimation and testing in a multivariate normal distribution with missing data. The two models are tested applying the log-likelihood ratio test. Solves the problem of different and nonmonotone patterns of missing data by introducing suitable transformations and partitions of the data…

  10. Age-dependent chromosomal distribution of male-biased genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong E; Vibranovski, Maria D; Krinsky, Benjamin H; Long, Manyuan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the correlation between the chromosomal location and age distribution of new male-biased genes formed by duplications via DNA intermediates (DNA-level) or by de novo origination in Drosophila. Our genome-wide analysis revealed an excess of young X-linked male-biased genes. The proportion of X-linked male-biased genes then diminishes through time, leading to an autosomal excess of male-biased genes. The switch between X-linked and autosomal enrichment of male-biased genes was also present in the distribution of both protein-coding genes on the D. pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome and microRNA genes of D. melanogaster. These observations revealed that the evolution of male-biased genes is more complicated than the previously detected one-step X→A gene traffic and the enrichment of the male-biased genes on autosomes. The pattern we detected suggests that the interaction of various evolutionary forces such as the meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), faster-X effect, and sexual antagonism in the male germline might have shaped the chromosomal distribution of male-biased genes on different evolutionary time scales.

  11. Age-dependent chromosomal distribution of male-biased genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong E.; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Krinsky, Benjamin H.; Long, Manyuan

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the chromosomal location and age distribution of new male-biased genes formed by duplications via DNA intermediates (DNA-level) or by de novo origination in Drosophila. Our genome-wide analysis revealed an excess of young X-linked male-biased genes. The proportion of X-linked male-biased genes then diminishes through time, leading to an autosomal excess of male-biased genes. The switch between X-linked and autosomal enrichment of male-biased genes was also present in the distribution of both protein-coding genes on the D. pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome and microRNA genes of D. melanogaster. These observations revealed that the evolution of male-biased genes is more complicated than the previously detected one-step X→A gene traffic and the enrichment of the male-biased genes on autosomes. The pattern we detected suggests that the interaction of various evolutionary forces such as the meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), faster-X effect, and sexual antagonism in the male germline might have shaped the chromosomal distribution of male-biased genes on different evolutionary time scales. PMID:20798392

  12. ANALYSIS OF AGED IN-HOME CARPETING TO DETERMINE THE DISTRIBUTION OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES BETWEEN DUST, CARPET, AND PAD COMPARTMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents results of a study to determine the distribution of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) between dust and carpet components in aged carpeting. Carpeting in eight homes in the Research Triangle Area, which...

  13. Limiting extensibility constitutive model with distributed fibre orientations and ageing of abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Horný, Lukáš; Netušil, Marek; Daniel, Matěj

    2014-10-01

    The abdominal aorta is susceptible to age-related pathological changes (arteriosclerosis, atherosclerosis, aneurysm, and tortuosity). Computational biomechanics and mechanobiology provide models capable of predicting mutual interactions between a changing mechanical environment and patho-physiological processes in ageing. However, a key factor is a constitutive equation which should reflect the internal tissue architecture. Our study investigates three microstructurally-motivated invariant-based hyperelastic anisotropic models suitable for description of the passive mechanical behaviour of the human abdominal aorta at a multiaxial state of stress known from recent literature. The three adopted models have also been supplemented with a newly proposed constitutive model (limiting extensibility with fibre dispersion). All models additively decouple the mechanical response of the isotropic (elastin and smooth muscle cells represented by the neo-Hookean term) and the anisotropic (collagen) parts. Two models use exponential functions to capture large strain stiffening ascribed to the engagement of collagen fibres into the load-bearing process. The other two models are based on the concept of limiting extensibility. Perfect alignment of reinforcing fibres with two preferred directions as well as fibre dispersion are considered. Constitutive models are calibrated to the inflation-extension response adopted from the literature based on the computational model of the residually-stressed thick-walled tube. A correlation analysis of determined material parameters was performed to reveal dependence on the age. The results of the nonlinear regression suggest that limiting fibre extensibility is the concept which is suitable to be used for the constitutive description of the aorta at multiaxial stress states and is highly sensitive to ageing-induced changes in mechanical response.

  14. Maximum likelihood estimation of the parameters and quantiles of the general extreme-value distribution from censored samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phien, Huynh Ngoc; Fang, Tsu-Shang Emma

    1989-01-01

    The General Extreme Value (GEV) distribution has become increasingly popular, as has the use of historic information, in flood frequency analysis during recent years. Both call for a systematic investigation of the properties of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimators obtained from censored samples. In this study, such an investigation was made for the type-1 censoring believed to be more frequently encountered in practical situations. All the mathematical equations needed for obtaining the ML estimators of the parameters and the quantiles (represented by the T- year event) were derived and Monte Carlo experiments were carried out to determine their sampling properties. It was found that censoring may reduce the bias of the parameter estimators but does not necessarily increase the variances. It was also found that the variances-covariances of the parameter estimators, and hence the variance of the T- year event, are better approximated by using the observed rather than the Fisher information matrix.

  15. Inversion and uncertainty of highly parameterized models in a Bayesian framework by sampling the maximal conditional posterior distribution of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mara, Thierry A.; Fajraoui, Noura; Younes, Anis; Delay, Frederick

    2015-02-01

    We introduce the concept of maximal conditional posterior distribution (MCPD) to assess the uncertainty of model parameters in a Bayesian framework. Although, Markov Chains Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are particularly suited for this task, they become challenging with highly parameterized nonlinear models. The MCPD represents the conditional probability distribution function of a given parameter knowing that the other parameters maximize the conditional posterior density function. Unlike MCMC which accepts or rejects solutions sampled in the parameter space, MCPD is calculated through several optimization processes. Model inversion using MCPD algorithm is particularly useful for highly parameterized problems because calculations are independent. Consequently, they can be evaluated simultaneously with a multi-core computer. In the present work, the MCPD approach is applied to invert a 2D stochastic groundwater flow problem where the log-transmissivity field of the medium is inferred from scarce and noisy data. For this purpose, the stochastic field is expanded onto a set of orthogonal functions using a Karhunen-Loève (KL) transformation. Though the prior guess on the stochastic structure (covariance) of the transmissivity field is erroneous, the MCPD inference of the KL coefficients is able to extract relevant inverse solutions.

  16. Age distribution of passive margins through earth history and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. C.

    2007-05-01

    The ages and lifespans of all existing passive (Atlantic-type) margins plus 59 ancient ones were compiled. Passive margins have existed on Earth almost continually since at least 2685 Ma. Their abundance has fluctuated dramatically, and most of the fluctuations have clear tectonic causes. For the past 2200 Ma, the compiled age distribution of passive margins appears to be robust and not an artifact of an incomplete rock record or flaws in the compilation. It closely tracks all the first-order highs and lows of the seawater 87Sr/86Sr curve, which has been derived from utterly independent data. The main features of the age distribution are as follows: (1) A present-day maximum in number and aggregate length of passive margins corresponds to a time of continental dispersal following breakup of Pangea. (2) A 250- 350-Ma minimum corresponds to Pangea's greatest extent. (3) A 500-600-Ma maximum represents a time of continental dispersal following staged breakup from 600 to 1000 Ma of one or more larger continents (Rodinia in most models). (4) Passive margins are rare between 1000 and 1650 Ma, and none are known at all between 1650 and 1750 Ma. This 750-m.y. low in the passive margin record coincides with the heyday of massif anorthosites. Whereas the Mesoproterozoic may have seen few modern-style Wilson Cycles involving the opening and closing of Atlantic-type oceans, it nonetheless was a time of plate tectonics involving subduction and collision (e.g., Grenville orogeny). (5) Passive margins were abundant between 1750 to 2250 Ma. The close of this interval at 1750-1800 Ma was marked by the collisional assembly of Laurentia, Baltica, and other cratons, which may have been part of a supercontinent (Columbia in some models). A maximum at 1850-2050 Ma corresponds to a time of dispersed small continents. (6) The record of passive margins before 2250 Ma is patchy. It definitely extends back to 2685 Ma (Kaapvaal craton, W margin), and possibly to about 3000 Ma. For all but a

  17. Computational Models to Determine Transport and Hydrolysis Rate Parameters of Contaminants in a Water Distribution System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    is derived from quantum-mechanics calculations and is further refined to reproduce physical properties of the simulated system. For our test ...parameters were tested by repeating simulations using a method reported in Vishnya- kov and Neimark (2004). As a model of typical surfaces found in a...difference, ∆P = NF/A, where ‘A’ is the cross-section of the channel. To test if the character of the silica surface can influ- ence the uptake of the

  18. Extended moment series and the parameters of the negative binomial distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.O.

    1984-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that, for finite sample sizes, moment estimators may be superior to maximum likelihood estimators in some regions of parameter space. In this paper a statistic based on the central moment of the sample is expanded in a Taylor series using 24 derivatives and many more terms than previous expansions. A summary algorithm is required to find meaningful approximants using the higher-order coefficients. A example is presented and a comparison between theoretical assessment and simulation results is made.

  19. Submarine Landslides along the U.S. Atlantic Margin: Their Distribution, Failure Processes, and Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaytor, J. D.; ten Brink, U. S.; Twichell, D. C.; Baxter, C. D.; Hallam, T. D.; Brothers, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the size, distribution, failure mode, and age of submarine landslides on the seafloor along the U.S. Atlantic continental slope and rise, using near-complete multibeam bathymetry coverage, together with new and existing seismic reflection, core, and photographic data sets. These data show that open-slope and canyon-related landslides are ubiquitous features of the continental margin and in places have been a dominant mechanism of downslope sediment transport and slope-rise modification. Retrogressive and translational mechanisms are prevailing modes of failure, although earth-flows, rare in the marine realm, are present along seafloor gradients of less than 1o on the upper rise. Individual and composite open-slope landslides with scar dimensions that exceed 900 km2 in area and 100 km3 in volume and deposit run-out distances greater than 200 km are present off Georges Bank (Munson-Nygren-Retriever complex), southern New England, Cape Hatteras (Currituck and Cape Lookout landslides), and the Blake Plateau (Cape Fear landslide). While dating of several landslides along the margin suggests a link to mechanisms driven by environmental changes at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum, the ages of the majority of the observed landslides are still unknown. In an effort to address the scarcity of age information required to investigate failure process and geohazards, we are utilizing both absolute (radiocarbon and oxygen isotope) and relative dating techniques. Radiocarbon dating of shallow water mollusks from recently collected piston cores in landslide scars and debris deposits offshore of southern New England record multiple landslide events over the last 50,000 years originating from both the continental slope and upper rise. Relative ages of landslide features are obtained from cross-cutting relationships between canyons and landslide scars and related mass-transport deposits.

  20. Effects of coolant parameters on steady state temperature distribution in phospheric-acid fuel cell electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Abdul-Aziz, A.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of thermophysical properties and flow rate on the steady-state temperature distribution in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell electrode plate was experimentally investigated. An experimental setup that simulates the operating conditions prevailing in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell stack was used. The fuel cell cooling system utilized three types of coolants to remove excess heat generated in the cell electrode and to maintain a reasonably uniform temperature distribution in the electrode plate. The coolants used were water, engine oil, and air. These coolants were circulated at Reynolds number ranging from 1165 to 6165 for water; 3070 to 6864 for air; and 15 to 79 for oil. Experimental results are presented.

  1. A modular approach to addressing model design, scale, and parameter estimation issues in distributed hydrological modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leavesley, G.H.; Markstrom, S.L.; Restrepo, P.J.; Viger, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A modular approach to model design and construction provides a flexible framework in which to focus the multidisciplinary research and operational efforts needed to facilitate the development, selection, and application of the most robust distributed modelling methods. A variety of modular approaches have been developed, but with little consideration for compatibility among systems and concepts. Several systems are proprietary, limiting any user interaction. The US Geological Survey modular modelling system (MMS) is a modular modelling framework that uses an open source software approach to enable all members of the scientific community to address collaboratively the many complex issues associated with the design, development, and application of distributed hydrological and environmental models. Implementation of a common modular concept is not a trivial task. However, it brings the resources of a larger community to bear on the problems of distributed modelling, provides a framework in which to compare alternative modelling approaches objectively, and provides a means of sharing the latest modelling advances. The concepts and components of the MMS are described and an example application of the MMS, in a decision-support system context, is presented to demonstrate current system capabilities. Copyright ?? 2002 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  2. Site and age class variation of hematologic parameters for female Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) of Northern Nevada.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Kathryn J; Perryman, Barry L; Holcombe, Dale W

    2010-01-01

    Decreases in Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) numbers throughout the western United States have been attributed to declining habitat quantity and quality. Improving our understanding of how interannual ecologic site variability affects nutritional status and fitness of different bird age classes will lead to improved land management and conservation strategies. Greater Sage Grouse were sampled from two Population Management Units located in northern Nevada, United States: Tuscarora (TU) and Lone Willow (LW) during 15 March-11 April 2004 and 14-20 March 2005. Twenty (16 yearlings, four adults) and 17 (7 yearlings, 10 adults) female Sage Grouse were captured and bled during 2004, and 12 (four yearlings, eight adults) and 14 (10 yearlings, four adults) were sampled during 2005 in TU and LW, respectively. Samples were evaluated to examine the effect of site, age, and year on specific hematologic and serum chemistry parameters. Several differences between age classes, sites, and years were detected for a number of fitness indicators; however, actual values fell within normal ranges of variation for Sage Grouse or other avian species. Differences were also detected for several parameters more closely related to reproductive fitness, including total plasma and serum proteins, and serum calcium and phosphorus. Yearlings had lower plasma protein (P<0.0001) and lower serum protein than did adults (P=0.0003). In 2004, TU yearlings had lower serum calcium levels than the adults, and in 2005, LW yearlings had lower levels than adults (P=0.008). Females on the TU site had lower serum phosphorus than the LW females (P<0.0001). Overall, adult females weighed more than yearlings (P=0.0004). Lower values found in yearlings, and on the TU management unit, indicate a lower production potential, particularly in unfavorable years. A lower intrinsic ability of yearlings to reproduce, combined with lower nutrition potentials and associated annual variations on certain types

  3. Age distribution and seasonal dynamics of abomasal helminths in wild red deer from central Spain.

    PubMed

    Santín-Durán, Mónica; Alunda, José M; Hoberg, Eric P; de la Fuente, Concepción

    2008-10-01

    A study on age distribution and seasonal dynamics of abomasal helminths in wild red deer was conducted in central Spain, by monthly samplings of fawns (<1 yr), subadult (1-2 yr), and adult (>2 yr) animals. Both intensity and prevalence of abomasal parasitism were higher in older animals, particularly in males. A bimodal pattern for intensity of infection by gastrointestinal parasites was observed. Maximum values attained in winter and summer may be related to variation in climate and the shifting availability of forage resources. The pattern was largely due to the contribution of Spiculopteragia asymmetrica/Spiculopteragia quadrispiculata, whereas the other species found (Ostertagia leptospicularis/Ostertagia kolchida and Ostertagia drozdzi/Ostertagia ryjikovi) occurred with lower prevalence and intensity of infection. Among these ostertagiines, the ratio for major and minor morphotypes of males of respective species and the relative abundance of males and females were stable through the annual cycle.

  4. A validation of the first genome-wide association study of calcaneus ultrasound parameters in the European Male Ageing Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS) as measured by quantitative ultrasound (QUS) at the calcaneus in the Framingham 100K genome-wide association study (GWAS) but have not been validated in independent studies. The aim of this analysis was to determine if these SNPs are associated with QUS measurements assessed in a large independent population of European middle-aged and elderly men. The association between these SNPs and bone mineral density (BMD) measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was also tested. Methods Men aged 40-79 years (N = 2960) were recruited from population registers in seven European centres for participation in an observational study of male ageing, the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). QUS at the calcaneus was measured in all subjects and blood was taken for genetic analysis. Lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN) and total hip (TH) BMD were measured by DXA in a subsample of 620 men in two centres. SNPs associated with BUA or SOS in the Framingham study with p < 10-4 were selected and genotyped using SEQUENOM technology. Linear regression was used to test for the association between SNPs and standardised (SD) bone outcomes under an additive genetic model adjusting for centre. The same direction of effect and p < 0.05 indicated replication. Results Thirty-four of 38 selected SNPs were successfully genotyped in 2377 men. Suggestive evidence of replication was observed for a single SNP, rs3754032, which was associated with a higher SOS (β(SD) = 0.07, p = 0.032) but not BUA (β(SD) = 0.02, p = 0.505) and is located in the 3'UTR of WDR77 (WD repeat domain 77) also known as androgen receptor cofactor p44. A single SNP, rs238358, was associated with BMD at the LS (β(SD) = -0.22, p = 0.014), FN (β(SD) = -0.31,p = 0.001) and TH (β(SD) = -0.36, p = 0.002) in a locus previously associated with LS BMD in large-scale GWAS

  5. Parameters inversing of polarized bidirectional reflectance distribution function model for target rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Zhan, Yong-hong; Yang, Di; Zeng, Chang-e.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we try to find a model that can apply to predict the polarization characteristics of the targets on the ground correctly. In the first place, we give an introduction to several kinds of existing models which are divided into three categories: Empirical models are precise but occupy too much source of computer; Physical-based models can predict the phenomenon of reflection exactly but hardly get the final results; Semi-empirical models have both advantages mentioned above and avoid their disadvantages effectively. Then we make an analysis of the Priest-Germer (PG) pBRDF model, one of semi-empirical models, which is suitable for our study. The methods of parameters inversing and testing are proposed based on this model and the test system from which we can get enough data to verify the accuracy of the model is designed independently. At last, we make a simulation of the whole process of the parameters inversing based on PG pBRDF model. From the analysis of the simulation curves, we briefly know the direction we go in the following work to make an amendment.

  6. The statistical analysis of the color—orbit parameters and color—inclination distributions of TNOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiyev, Shaig; Simonia, Irakli

    2016-10-01

    The research of the surface properties of the trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) is the key factor to obtain information about past and current status of our Solar System. Because of the far distance from the Sun the photometric investigations remain the most popular approaching way to study of physical conditions of TNOs. For this reason, we examine the correlation between 294 known B-R and 259 V-R color indexes and the orbital parameters of the trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) with by classification is giving in the literature: Cubewanos (Classical KBOs), Plutinos, Sentaurs, SDOs, Other TNOs, and Resonants, and subgroups by diameters greater than 80 km. Almost all inclinations of subgroups by classifications and diameters are strongly correlated with B-R and V-R indexes. Simultaneously, the remarkable and moderate correlations with high significance levels were found in 8 cases for B-R and other orbit parameters: semi-major axis, eccentricity, perihelion and diameters by diameter subgroups and 9 cases by classifications. Moreover, only 4 of 11 moderate correlation coefficients with high significance levels for V-R were calculated by classifications and 6 cases by diameters.

  7. Application of Hansen solubility parameters for understanding and prediction of drug distribution in microspheres.

    PubMed

    Vay, Kerstin; Scheler, Stefan; Friess, Wolfgang

    2011-09-15

    In an emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation process for the preparation of microspheres the employed solvents have a tremendous influence on the characteristics of the resulting particles. Nevertheless the solvent selection is often based on empirical data rather than on calculated values. The purpose of this investigation was to use the concept of solubility parameters for interpretation and improved understanding of solvent effects in the process of microparticle preparation. Partial solubility parameters of 3-{2-[4-(6-Fluor-1,2-benzisoxazol-3-yl)piperidino]ethyl}-2-methyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-4H-pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-on, which was used as a model drug, were determined experimentally using an extended Hansen regression model. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles were prepared with an emulsion solvent removal process employing methylene chloride and its mixtures with benzyl alcohol and n-butanol. It could be shown, that the encapsulation efficiency was influenced by the change of the solvent composition during the extraction process. Furthermore the solvent selection had an essential influence on the morphological state of the drug and it could be shown and explained, that by a decrease of the dissolving power a completely amorphous product was obtained.

  8. Parameter Estimation in Astronomy with Poisson-Distributed Data. 1; The (CHI)2(gamma) Statistic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    1999-01-01

    Applying the standard weighted mean formula, [Sigma (sub i)n(sub i)ssigma(sub i, sup -2)], to determine the weighted mean of data, n(sub i), drawn from a Poisson distribution, will, on average, underestimate the true mean by approx. 1 for all true mean values larger than approx.3 when the common assumption is made that the error of the i th observation is sigma(sub i) = max square root of n(sub i), 1).This small, but statistically significant offset, explains the long-known observation that chi-square minimization techniques which use the modified Neyman'chi(sub 2) statistic, chi(sup 2, sub N) equivalent Sigma(sub i)((n(sub i) - y(sub i)(exp 2)) / max(n(sub i), 1), to compare Poisson - distributed data with model values, y(sub i), will typically predict a total number of counts that underestimates the true total by about 1 count per bin. Based on my finding that weighted mean of data drawn from a Poisson distribution can be determined using the formula [Sigma(sub i)[n(sub i) + min(n(sub i), 1)](n(sub i) + 1)(exp -1)] / [Sigma(sub i)(n(sub i) + 1)(exp -1))], I propose that a new chi(sub 2) statistic, chi(sup 2, sub gamma) equivalent, should always be used to analyze Poisson- distributed data in preference to the modified Neyman's chi(exp 2) statistic. I demonstrated the power and usefulness of,chi(sub gamma, sup 2) minimization by using two statistical fitting techniques and five chi(exp 2) statistics to analyze simulated X-ray power - low 15 - channel spectra with large and small counts per bin. I show that chi(sub gamma, sup 2) minimization with the Levenberg - Marquardt or Powell's method can produce excellent results (mean slope errors approx. less than 3%) with spectra having as few as 25 total counts.

  9. Estimation of demographic measures for India, 1881-1961, based on census age distributions.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, P

    1971-11-01

    Abstract India is one of the very few developing countries which have a relatively long history of population censuses. The first census was taken in 1872, the second in 1881 and since then there has been a census every ten years, the latest in 1971. Yet the registration of births and deaths in India, even at the present time, is too inadequate to be of much help in estimating fertility and mortality conditions in the country. From time to time Indian census actuaries have indirectly constructed life tables by comparing one census age distribution with the preceding one. Official life tables are available for all the decades from 1872-1881 to 1951-1961, except for 1911-1921 and 1931-1941. Kingsley Davis(1) filled in the gap by constructing life tables for the latter two decades. He also estimated the birth and death rates ofIndia for the decades from 1881-1891 to 1931-1941. Estimates of these rates for the following two decades, 1941-1951 and 1951-1961, were made by Indian census actuaries. The birth rates of Davis and the Indian actuaries were obtained basically by the reverse survival method from the age distribution and the computed life table of the population. Coale and Hoover(2), however, estimated the birth and death rates and the life table of the Indian population in 1951 by applying stable population theory. The most recent estimates of the birth rate and death rate for 1963-1964 are based on the results of the National Sample Survey. All these estimates are presented in summary form in Table 1.

  10. Retrieval of phase history parameters from distributed scatterers in urban areas using very high resolution SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Bamler, Richard

    2012-09-01

    In a recent contribution Ferretti and co-workers (Ferretti, A., Fumagalli, A., Novali, F., Prati, C., Rocca, F., Rucci, A., 2011. A new algorithm for processing interferometric data-stacks: SqueeSAR IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 49(9), pp. 3460-3470) have proposed the SqueeSAR method, a way to exploit temporally coherent distributed scatterers in coherent SAR data stacks. Elevation and deformation or subsidence estimates are obtained with accuracy similar as in the well known persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI). In this paper we propose an alternative approach and provide a first demonstration of the optimal estimation of distributed scatterers' phase histories in urban areas. Different to SqueeSAR, we derive phase histories for each distributed scatterer pixel rather than for groups of pixels. We use the Anderson-Darling statistical test to identify neighboring samples of the same distribution. Prior to covariance matrix estimation required for maximum likelihood estimation we apply a multi-resolution defringe technique. By using TerraSAR-X high resolution spotlight data, it is demonstrated that we are able to retrieve reliable phase histories and motion parameter estimates from distributed scatterers with signal-to-noise-ratio far below the common range.

  11. Cost-effective age structure and geographical distribution of boreal forest reserves.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Johanna; Ohman, Karin; Perhans, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena; Bugman, Harald

    2011-02-01

    1. Forest reserves are established to preserve biodiversity, and to maintain natural functions and processes. Today there is heightened focus on old-growth stages, with less attention given to early successional stages. The biodiversity potential of younger forests has been overlooked, and the cost-effectiveness of incorporating different age classes in reserve networks has not yet been studied.2. We performed a reserve selection analysis in boreal Sweden using the Swedish National Forest Inventory plots. Seventeen structural variables were used as biodiversity indicators, and the cost of protecting each plot as a reserve was assessed using the Heureka system. A goal programming approach was applied, which allowed inclusion of several objectives and avoided a situation in which common indicators affected the result more than rare ones. The model was limited either by budget or area.3. All biodiversity indicators were found in all age classes, with more than half having the highest values in ages ≥ 100 years. Several large-tree indicators and all deadwood indicators had higher values in forests 0-14 years than in forests 15-69 years.4. It was most cost-effective to protect a large proportion of young forests since they generally have a lower net present value compared to older forests, but still contain structures of importance for biodiversity. However, it was more area-effective to protect a large proportion of old forests since they have a higher biodiversity potential per area.5. The geographical distribution of reserves selected with the budget-constrained model was strongly biassed towards the north-western section of boreal Sweden, with a large proportion of young forest, whereas the area-constrained model focussed on the south-eastern section, with dominance by the oldest age class.6.Synthesis and applications. We show that young forests with large amounts of structures important to biodiversity such as dead wood and remnant trees are cheap and cost

  12. Cost-effective age structure and geographical distribution of boreal forest reserves

    PubMed Central

    Lundström, Johanna; Öhman, Karin; Perhans, Karin; Rönnqvist, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lena; Bugman, Harald

    2011-01-01

    1. Forest reserves are established to preserve biodiversity, and to maintain natural functions and processes. Today there is heightened focus on old-growth stages, with less attention given to early successional stages. The biodiversity potential of younger forests has been overlooked, and the cost-effectiveness of incorporating different age classes in reserve networks has not yet been studied. 2. We performed a reserve selection analysis in boreal Sweden using the Swedish National Forest Inventory plots. Seventeen structural variables were used as biodiversity indicators, and the cost of protecting each plot as a reserve was assessed using the Heureka system. A goal programming approach was applied, which allowed inclusion of several objectives and avoided a situation in which common indicators affected the result more than rare ones. The model was limited either by budget or area. 3. All biodiversity indicators were found in all age classes, with more than half having the highest values in ages ≥ 100 years. Several large-tree indicators and all deadwood indicators had higher values in forests 0–14 years than in forests 15–69 years. 4. It was most cost-effective to protect a large proportion of young forests since they generally have a lower net present value compared to older forests, but still contain structures of importance for biodiversity. However, it was more area-effective to protect a large proportion of old forests since they have a higher biodiversity potential per area. 5. The geographical distribution of reserves selected with the budget-constrained model was strongly biassed towards the north-western section of boreal Sweden, with a large proportion of young forest, whereas the area-constrained model focussed on the south-eastern section, with dominance by the oldest age class. 6. Synthesis and applications. We show that young forests with large amounts of structures important to biodiversity such as dead wood and remnant trees are cheap and

  13. The YNP Metagenome Project: Environmental Parameters Responsible for Microbial Distribution in the Yellowstone Geothermal Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Inskeep, William P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Herrgård, Markus J.; Rusch, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex contains over 10,000 diverse geothermal features that host numerous phylogenetically deeply rooted and poorly understood archaea, bacteria, and viruses. Microbial communities in high-temperature environments are generally less diverse than soil, marine, sediment, or lake habitats and therefore offer a tremendous opportunity for studying the structure and function of different model microbial communities using environmental metagenomics. One of the broader goals of this study was to establish linkages among microbial distribution, metabolic potential, and environmental variables. Twenty geochemically distinct geothermal ecosystems representing a broad spectrum of Yellowstone hot-spring environments were used for metagenomic and geochemical analysis and included approximately equal numbers of: (1) phototrophic mats, (2) “filamentous streamer” communities, and (3) archaeal-dominated sediments. The metagenomes were analyzed using a suite of complementary and integrative bioinformatic tools, including phylogenetic and functional analysis of both individual sequence reads and assemblies of predominant phylotypes. This volume identifies major environmental determinants of a large number of thermophilic microbial lineages, many of which have not been fully described in the literature nor previously cultivated to enable functional and genomic analyses. Moreover, protein family abundance comparisons and in-depth analyses of specific genes and metabolic pathways relevant to these hot-spring environments reveal hallmark signatures of metabolic capabilities that parallel the distribution of phylotypes across specific types of geochemical environments. PMID:23653623

  14. One shot methods for optimal control of distributed parameter systems 1: Finite dimensional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, Shlomo

    1991-01-01

    The efficient numerical treatment of optimal control problems governed by elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) and systems of elliptic PDEs, where the control is finite dimensional is discussed. Distributed control as well as boundary control cases are discussed. The main characteristic of the new methods is that they are designed to solve the full optimization problem directly, rather than accelerating a descent method by an efficient multigrid solver for the equations involved. The methods use the adjoint state in order to achieve efficient smoother and a robust coarsening strategy. The main idea is the treatment of the control variables on appropriate scales, i.e., control variables that correspond to smooth functions are solved for on coarse grids depending on the smoothness of these functions. Solution of the control problems is achieved with the cost of solving the constraint equations about two to three times (by a multigrid solver). Numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the method proposed in distributed control case, pointwise control and boundary control problems.

  15. The YNP Metagenome Project: Environmental Parameters Responsible for Microbial Distribution in the Yellowstone Geothermal Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Inskeep, William P; Jay, Zackary J; Tringe, Susannah G; Herrgård, Markus J; Rusch, Douglas B

    2013-01-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex contains over 10,000 diverse geothermal features that host numerous phylogenetically deeply rooted and poorly understood archaea, bacteria, and viruses. Microbial communities in high-temperature environments are generally less diverse than soil, marine, sediment, or lake habitats and therefore offer a tremendous opportunity for studying the structure and function of different model microbial communities using environmental metagenomics. One of the broader goals of this study was to establish linkages among microbial distribution, metabolic potential, and environmental variables. Twenty geochemically distinct geothermal ecosystems representing a broad spectrum of Yellowstone hot-spring environments were used for metagenomic and geochemical analysis and included approximately equal numbers of: (1) phototrophic mats, (2) "filamentous streamer" communities, and (3) archaeal-dominated sediments. The metagenomes were analyzed using a suite of complementary and integrative bioinformatic tools, including phylogenetic and functional analysis of both individual sequence reads and assemblies of predominant phylotypes. This volume identifies major environmental determinants of a large number of thermophilic microbial lineages, many of which have not been fully described in the literature nor previously cultivated to enable functional and genomic analyses. Moreover, protein family abundance comparisons and in-depth analyses of specific genes and metabolic pathways relevant to these hot-spring environments reveal hallmark signatures of metabolic capabilities that parallel the distribution of phylotypes across specific types of geochemical environments.

  16. Relationship between the fractal dimension anisotropy of the spatial faults distribution and the paleostress fields on a Variscan granitic massif (Central Spain): the F-parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, R.; Paredes, C.; Muñoz-Martín, A.

    2005-04-01

    The spatial distribution of faults is usually described as a fractal set characterised by the fractal dimension. In this work, we have filtered fault patterns interpreted from digital elevation models, aerial photographs and field maps, by using structural geological parameters of the stress ellipsoid (stress tensor direction and stress ratio R') and age of deformation. From these filtered structural maps, we have obtained the fractal dimension associated with the fracture patterns developed during Permo-Triassic and Alpine tectonic events on a Variscan granitic massif located in the Spanish Central System. Oriented fractal dimensions were calculated on several transects crossing the fault-filtered maps. The fractal dimension ( D), calculated by 1-D box-counting, describes an ellipse on a polar plot with the short axis as the minimum value ( DHmin) and the long axis as the maximum value ( DHmax) of the fractal dimensions measured. From these analyses, we have defined the F-parameter as a function of the maximum value, minimum value and vertical value of fractal dimension ( Dz), F=( Dz- DHmin)/( DHmax- DHmin). Finally we have established, from a local scale analysis, a perpendicular relationship between the principal axes of the ellipse of the fractal spatial anisotropy of fractures and the principal axes of the stress tensor ( σHmax, σHmin and σz) that generates this dynamic pattern of fractures. Furthermore, the F-parameter and the stress ratio R' are equivalents and, applied in this area, both show a triaxial extension.

  17. Red Cell Distribution Width and the Risk of Death in Middle-aged and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kushang V.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ershler, William B.; Longo, Dan L.; Guralnik, Jack M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Red cell distribution width (RDW), a component of an electronic complete blood count, is a measure of heterogeneity in the size of circulating erythrocytes. In patients with symptomatic cardiovascular disease (CVD), RDW is associated with mortality. However, it has not been demonstrated that RDW is a predictor of mortality independent of nutritional deficiencies or in the general population. Methods RDW was measured in a national sample of 8175 community-dwelling adults aged 45 and older who participated in the 1988–1994 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey; mortality follow-up occurred through December 31, 2000. Deaths from all causes, CVD, cancer, and other causes were examined as a function of RDW. Results Higher RDW values were strongly associated with an increased risk of death. Compared to the lowest quintile of RDW, the following were adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause mortality (and 95 percent confidence intervals): second quintile, 1.1 (0.9–1.3); third quintile, 1.2 (1.0–1.4); fourth quintile, 1.4 (1.2–1.8); fifth quintile, 2.1 (1.7–2.6). For every 1 percent increment in RDW, all-cause mortality risk increased by 22% [HR = 1.22 (1.15–1.30); p<0.001]. Even when analyses were restricted to non-anemic participants or to those in the normal range of RDW (11–15%) without iron, folate, or vitamin B12 deficiency, RDW remained strongly associated with mortality. The prognostic effect of RDW was observed in both middle-aged and older adults for multiple causes of death. Conclusions RDW is a widely-available test that is a strong predictor of mortality in the general population of adults aged 45 and older. PMID:19273783

  18. Sex and age distribution in transport-related injuries in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Bahman Sayyar; Sharzei, Kaveh; Zargar, Moosa

    2004-05-01

    Intercountry or regional differences in patterns of injury by the road user type have significant implication for prevention policies. In order to have an estimate from the existing conditions of transport-related injuries (TRIs) and especially to evaluate sex and age distribution of traffic accident victims, we analyzed information of 8426 hospitalized trauma patients during 13 months of data gathering process. Forty-five percent of the injuries were related to car accidents and men/women ratio in these patients was 4.2/1. The highest men/women ratio was (16/1) for motorcyclists, while the lowest ratio (1/1), was for rear seat car passengers. Mean (+/-S.D.) age of the patients was 31 (+/-18), and men were nearly 2 years younger than women (33 versus 31). Sixty-seven percent of the females' and 44% of the males' injuries were related to pedestrian crashes. Motorcycle-related injuries in men and car passenger related injuries in women were the second most common type of crash (42 and 22%, respectively). The use of protective devices in our population was worrisome. In only 6% of the male motorcyclists helmet use was reported, and 3% of the male car occupants had used seatbelts at the time of the accident. The condition in the female population was much worse and no use of the protective devices was reported in this group of the patients. Crude mortality rate in men was nearly two times that of women (6.2% versus 3.8%). After adjustment for age, injury severity score (ISS) and category of the road users, men and women had similar mortality rate.

  19. ADNP: A major autism mutated gene is differentially distributed (age and gender) in the songbird brain.

    PubMed

    Hacohen Kleiman, Gal; Barnea, Anat; Gozes, Illana

    2015-10-01

    ADNP is a protein necessary for brain development, important for brain plasticity, cognitive and social functioning, characteristics that are all impaired in autism and in the Adnp(+/-) mouse model, in a sex-dependent manner. ADNP was originally discovered as a protein that is secreted from glial cells in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP is a major neuroprotective peptide in the CNS and PNS and was also associated with social recognition in rodents and aggression, pair-bonding and parental behaviors in birds. Comparative sequence alignment revealed high evolutionary conservation of ADNP in Chordata. Despite its importance in brain function, ADNP has never been studied in birds. Zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) are highly social songbirds that have a sexually dichotomous anatomical brain structure, with males demonstrating a developed song system, presenting a model to study behavior and potential sexually dependent fundamental differences. Here, using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we discovered sexually dichotomous and age related differences in ADNP mRNA expression in three different regions of the song bird brain-cerebellum, cerebrum, and brain stem. Higher levels of ADNP mRNA were specifically found in young male compared to the female cerebrum, while aging caused a significant 2 and 3-fold decrease in the female and male cerebrum, respectively. Furthermore, a comparison between the three tested brain regions revealed unique sex-dependent ADNP mRNA distribution patterns, affected by aging. Future studies are aimed at deciphering the function of ADNP in birds, toward a better molecular understanding of sexual dichotomy in singing behavior in birds.

  20. Age- and sex-dependent distribution of persistent organochlorine pollutants in urban foxes.

    PubMed

    Dip, Ramiro; Hegglin, Daniel; Deplazes, Peter; Dafflon, Oscar; Koch, Herbert; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2003-10-01

    The colonization of urban and suburban habitats by red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) provides a novel sentinel species to monitor the spread of anthropogenic pollutants in densely populated human settlements. Here, red foxes were collected in the municipal territory of Zürich, Switzerland, and their perirenal adipose tissue was examined for persistent organochlorine residues. This pilot study revealed an unexpected pattern of contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), with significantly higher levels of the predominant congeners PCB-138, PCB-153, and PCB-180 in juvenile foxes relative to adult animals. Further data analysis demonstrated that the observed difference was attributable to an age-dependent reduction of PCB concentrations in females, whereas male foxes retained approximately the same PCB burden throughout their life span. A similar sex-related bias between population members has been observed, primarily in marine mammals. Interestingly, the reduction of organochlorine contents with progressive age is reminiscent of human studies, where an extensive maternal transfer of xenobiotics to the offspring has been shown to result in increased exposure levels of infants relative to adults. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an urban wildlife species that faithfully reflects the dynamic distribution of toxic contaminants in the corresponding human population. Suburban and urban foxes occupy habitats in close proximity to humans, depend on anthropogenic food supplies, are relatively long-lived and readily available for sampling, can be easily aged and sexed, have a limited home range, and, therefore, meet several important requirements to serve as a surrogate species for the assessment of toxic health hazards.

  1. Comparison of deconvolution techniques using a distribution mixture parameter estimation: application in single photon emission computed tomography imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignotte, Max; Meunier, Jean; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Janicki, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Thanks to its ability to yield functionally rather than anatomically-based information, the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imagery technique has become a great help in the diagnostic of cerebrovascular diseases which are the third most common cause of death in the USA and Europe. Nevertheless, SPECT images are very blurred and consequently their interpretation is difficult. In order to improve the spatial resolution of these images and then to facilitate their interpretation by the clinician, we propose to implement and to compare the effectiveness of different existing 'blind' or 'supervised' deconvolution methods. To this end, we present an accurate distribution mixture parameter estimation procedure which takes into account the diversity of the laws in the distribution mixture of a SPECT image. In our application, parameters of this distribution mixture are efficiently exploited in order to prevent overfitting of the noisy data for the iterative deconvolution techniques without regularization term, or to determine the exact support of the object to be restored when this one is needed. Recent blind deconvolution techniques such as the NAS--RIF algorithm, combined with this estimation procedure, can be efficiently applied in SPECT imagery and yield promising results.

  2. Measurements of induced voltages and currents in a distribution power line and associated atmospheric parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago-Perez, Julio

    1988-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of thunderstorms around the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has affected scheduled launch, landing, and other ground operations for many years. In order to protect against and provide safe working facilities, KSC has performed and hosted several studies on lightning phenomena. For the reasons mentioned above, KSC has established the Atmospheric Science Field Laboratory (ASFL). At these facilities KSC launches wire-towing rockets into thunderstorms to trigger natural lightning to the launch site. A program named Rocket Triggered Lightning Program (RTLP) is being conducted at the ASFL. This report calls for two of the experiments conducted in the summer 1988 Rocket Triggered Lightning Program. One experiment suspended an electric field mill over the launching areas from a balloon about 500 meters high to measure the space charges over the launching area. The other was to connect a waveform recorder to a nearby distribution power line to record currents and voltages wave forms induced by natural and triggered lightning.

  3. Distribution of crack density parameter in Central Betic Cordillera (Southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Inmaculada; Torcal, Federico; Morales, José

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have used high-resolution P- and S-wave velocity results to estimate crack density (ɛ, epsilon) and saturation ratio (ξ, xi) at a depth of 2 km in an intramountain basin and surrounding regions. Detailed observations of gravity, seismic profile and geological data reveal high ɛ consistent with large sedimentary thickness and minimum ɛ coinciding with elevations arising from the basement of the basin. From the distribution of seismic measurements of ξ it is possible to identify the presence of aquifers in detrital sediments, sandstone and dolostone. However, ξ does not show significant changes for the aquifers in geological formations made up also of schists and marbles. A low ξ anomaly in the western part could be associated with Triassic evaporite and clay rocks, and high values of ξ in the southwestern part near thermal springs may be imaging the intricate system of fractures which connect at depth with aquifer rocks.

  4. Utilization of temperature distribution in expiratory speaking flow as a new parameter for speech production analysis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, G F; Vargas, J V C; Filho, E D M

    2004-01-01

    A new instrument with potential use for speech production analysis is utilized in this study to measure the temperature and velocity of the expiratory speaking flow outside the oral cavity. From a physical point of view, the temperature patterns of individuals with healthy voices are expected to be different from individuals with breathy voices, since their air flow patterns are different: during breathy speech production, the glottis does not close completely, and the leakage of warm air through the glottis increases the extent of the hotter-than-ambient temperature field outside the oral cavity. The instrument is a pipe through which the tested individual breathes out while producing a sustained vowel. A tap water heat exchanger keeps the pipe wall at a temperature level considerably lower than the body temperature. The temperature gradient along the pipe centreline is measured and related to the average air velocity at the oral cavity. The measurements were performed in 30 male and 30 female subjects without vocal complaints. The objective of this initial investigation was to evaluate the possibility of establishing patterns of normality for the temperature distribution outside the oral cavity in expiratory speaking flow. In the experiments, all the temperature measurements increased as the expiratory air flow of the individual increased during speech production, therefore the instrument results agree with the physical behavior predicted by fluid mechanics and heat transfer principles. The collected data allowed for the construction of charts with two distinct normalized temperature distributions outside the oral cavity, for male and female individuals, respectively. These charts have the potential for future utilization in a follow-up study for comparison with similar measurements obtained with individuals with vocal fold pathologies, aiming to eventually produce a reliable new instrument for early detection of vocal problems through a non-invasive procedure.

  5. Slip-Related Changes in Plantar Pressure Distribution, and Parameters for Early Detection of Slip Events

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seungyoung; Cho, Hyungpil; Kang, Boram; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Mi Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate differences in plantar pressure distribution between a normal gait and unpredictable slip events to predict the initiation of the slipping process. Methods Eleven male participants were enrolled. Subjects walked onto a wooden tile, and two layers of oily vinyl sheet were placed on the expected spot of the 4th step to induce a slip. An insole pressure-measuring system was used to monitor plantar pressure distribution. This system measured plantar pressure in four regions (the toes, metatarsal head, arch, and heel) for three events: the step during normal gait; the recovered step, when the subject recovered from a slip; and the uncorrected, harmful slipped step. Four variables were analyzed: peak pressure (PP), contact time (CT), the pressure-time integral (PTI), and the instant of peak pressure (IPP). Results The plantar pressure pattern in the heel was unique, as compared with other parts of the sole. In the heel, PP, CT, and PTI values were high in slipped and recovered steps compared with normal steps. The IPP differed markedly among the three steps. The IPPs in the heel for the three events were, in descending order (from latest to earliest), slipped, recovered, and normal steps, whereas in the other regions the order was normal, recovered, and slipped steps. Finally, the metatarsal head-to-heel IPP ratios for the normal, recovered, and slipped steps were 6.1±2.9, 3.1±3.0, and 2.2±2.5, respectively. Conclusion A distinctive plantar pressure pattern in the heel might be useful for early detection of a slip event to prevent slip-related injuries. PMID:26798603

  6. Estimation of genetic parameters for body weights, scrotal circumference, and testicular volume measured at different ages in Nellore cattle.

    PubMed

    Boligon, A A; Silva, J A V; Sesana, R C; Sesana, J C; Junqueira, J B; Albuquerque, L G

    2010-04-01

    Data from 129,575 Nellore cattle born between 1993 and 2006, belonging to the Jacarezinho cattle-raising farm, were used to estimate genetic parameters for scrotal circumference measured at 9 (SC9), 12 (SC12), and 18 (SC18) mo of age and testicular volume measured at the same ages (TV9, TV12, and TV18) and to determine their correlation with weaning weight (WW) and yearling weight (YW), to provide information for the definition of selection criteria in beef cattle. Estimates of (co)variance components were calculated by the REML method applying an animal model in single- and multiple-trait analysis. The following heritability estimates and their respective SE were obtained for WW, YW, SC9, SC12, SC18, TV9, TV12, and TV18: 0.33 +/- 0.02, 0.37 +/- 0.03, 0.29 +/- 0.03, 0.39 +/- 0.04, 0.42 +/- 0.03, 0.19 +/- 0.04, 0.26 +/- 0.05, and 0.39 +/- 0.04, respectively. The genetic correlation between WW and YW was positive and high (0.80 +/- 0.04), indicating that these traits are mainly determined by the same genes. Genetic correlations between the growth traits and scrotal circumference measures were positive and of low to moderate magnitude, ranging from 0.23 +/- 0.04 to 0.38 +/- 0.04. On the other hand, increased genetic associations were estimated between scrotal circumference and testicular volume at different ages (0.61 +/- 0.04 to 0.86 +/- 0.04). Selection for greater scrotal circumference in males should result in greater WW, YW, and testicular volume. In conclusion, in view of the difficulty in measuring testicular volume, there is no need to change the selection criterion from scrotal circumference to testicular volume in genetic breeding programs of Zebu breeds.

  7. Genetic parameters and relationships between growth traits and scrotal circumference measured at different ages in Nellore cattle

    PubMed Central

    Boligon, Arione Augusti; Baldi, Fernando; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão

    2011-01-01

    Records from 106,212 Nellore animals, born between 1998 and 2006, were used to estimate (co)variance components and genetic parameters for birth weight (BW), average weight gains from birth to weaning (GBW), average weight gains from weaning to after yearling (GWAY), weaning hip height (WHH), postweaning hip height (PHH) and scrotal circumferences at 9 (SC9), 12 (SC12) and 15 (SC15) months of age. (Co)variance components were estimated by an animal model using multi-trait analysis. Heritability estimates for BW, GBW, GWAY, WHH, PHH, SC9, SC12 and SC15 were 0.31 ± 0.01; 0.25 ± 0.02; 0.30 ± 0.04; 0.51 ± 0.04; 0.54 ± 0.04; 0.39 ± 0.01; 0.41 ± 0.01 and 0.44 ± 0.02, respectively. Genetic correlations between growth traits ranged from 0.09 ± 0.01 to 0.88 ± 0.01, thereby implying that, at any age, selection to increase average weight gains will also increase stature. Genetic correlations between BW and average weight gains with scrotal circumferences were all positive and moderate (0.15 ± 0.03 to 0.38 ± 0.01). On the other hand, positive and low genetic associations were estimated between hip height and scrotal circumference at different ages (0.09 ± 0.01 to 0.17 ± 0.02). The results of this study pointed out that selection to larger scrotal circumferences in males will promote changes in average weight gains. In order to obtain Nellore cattle with the stature and size suitable for the production system, both weight gain and hip height should be included in a selection index. PMID:21734821

  8. Genetic parameters and relationships between growth traits and scrotal circumference measured at different ages in Nellore cattle.

    PubMed

    Boligon, Arione Augusti; Baldi, Fernando; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão

    2011-04-01

    Records from 106,212 Nellore animals, born between 1998 and 2006, were used to estimate (co)variance components and genetic parameters for birth weight (BW), average weight gains from birth to weaning (GBW), average weight gains from weaning to after yearling (GWAY), weaning hip height (WHH), postweaning hip height (PHH) and scrotal circumferences at 9 (SC9), 12 (SC12) and 15 (SC15) months of age. (Co)variance components were estimated by an animal model using multi-trait analysis. Heritability estimates for BW, GBW, GWAY, WHH, PHH, SC9, SC12 and SC15 were 0.31 ± 0.01; 0.25 ± 0.02; 0.30 ± 0.04; 0.51 ± 0.04; 0.54 ± 0.04; 0.39 ± 0.01; 0.41 ± 0.01 and 0.44 ± 0.02, respectively. Genetic correlations between growth traits ranged from 0.09 ± 0.01 to 0.88 ± 0.01, thereby implying that, at any age, selection to increase average weight gains will also increase stature. Genetic correlations between BW and average weight gains with scrotal circumferences were all positive and moderate (0.15 ± 0.03 to 0.38 ± 0.01). On the other hand, positive and low genetic associations were estimated between hip height and scrotal circumference at different ages (0.09 ± 0.01 to 0.17 ± 0.02). The results of this study pointed out that selection to larger scrotal circumferences in males will promote changes in average weight gains. In order to obtain Nellore cattle with the stature and size suitable for the production system, both weight gain and hip height should be included in a selection index.

  9. Comparison of gating dynamics of different IP3R channels with immune algorithm searching for channel parameter distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiuhong; Li, Xiang; Qi, Hong; Wei, Fang; Chen, Jianyong; Shuai, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    The gating properties of the inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) are determined by the binding and unbinding capability of Ca2+ ions and IP3 messengers. With the patch clamp experiments, the stationary properties have been discussed for Xenopus oocyte type-1 IP3R (Oo-IP3R1), type-3 IP3R (Oo-IP3R3) and Spodoptera frugiperda IP3R (Sf-IP3R). In this paper, in order to provide insights about the relation between the observed gating characteristics and the gating parameters in different IP3Rs, we apply the immune algorithm to fit the parameters of a modified DeYoung-Keizer model. By comparing the fitting parameter distributions of three IP3Rs, we suggest that the three types of IP3Rs have the similar open sensitivity in responding to IP3. The Oo-IP3R3 channel is easy to open in responding to low Ca2+ concentration, while Sf-IP3R channel is easily inhibited in responding to high Ca2+ concentration. We also show that the IP3 binding rate is not a sensitive parameter for stationary gating dynamics for three IP3Rs, but the inhibitory Ca2+ binding/unbinding rates are sensitive parameters for gating dynamics for both Oo-IP3R1 and Oo-IP3R3 channels. Such differences may be important in generating the spatially and temporally complex Ca2+ oscillations in cells. Our study also demonstrates that the immune algorithm can be applied for model parameter searching in biological systems.

  10. Ground water age and nitrate distribution within a glacial aquifer beneath a thick unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, C.T.; Cook, P.G.; Frape, S.K.; Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.; Blackport, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The impact on ground water quality from increasing fertilizer application rates over the past 40 years is evaluated within a glacial aquifer system beneath a thick unsaturated zone. Ground water ages within the aquifer could not be accurately determined from the measured distribution of 3H and as a result, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and 3H/3He dating techniques were applied. Beneath a 25 m thick unsaturated zone, ground water ages based on CFC-11 concentrations were greater than 3H/3He ground water ages by 6 to 10 years, due to the time lag associated with the diffusion of CFCs through the unsaturated zone. Using the corrected CFC-11 and 3H/3He ground water ages and the estimated travel time of 3H within the unsaturated zone, the approximate position of ground water recharged since the mid-1960s was determined. Nitrate concentrations within post mid-1960s recharge were generally elevated and near or above the drinking water limit of 10 mg-N/L. In comparison, pre mid-1960s recharge had nitrate concentrations <2.5 mg-N/L. The elevated NO3- concentrations in post mid-1960s recharge are attributed mainly to increasing fertilizer application rates between 1970 and the mid- to late 1980s. Anaerobic conditions suitable for denitrification are present within pre mid-1960s recharge indicating that removal of DO is a slow process taking tens of years. Over the next 10 to 20 years, nitrate concentrations at municipal well fields that are currently capturing aerobic ground water recharged near the mid-1960s are expected to increase because of the higher fertilizer application rates beginning in the 1970s and 1980s.The impact on ground water quality from increasing fertilizer application rates over the past 40 years is evaluated within a glacial aquifer system beneath a thick unsaturated zone. Beneath a 25 m thick unsaturated zone, ground water ages based on CFC-11 concentrations were greater than 3H/3He ground water ages by 6 to 10 years, due to the time lag associated with the

  11. Age and sex distribution of some retinal macular diseases: senile and presenile macular degeneration and central serous retinitis.

    PubMed

    Knave, B; Tengroth, B; Voss, M

    1984-01-01

    The age and sex distribution of senile macular degeneration (SMD) was investigated at the Low Vision Clinic in Stockholm. SMD increased with age and was found to be more common among women than men. This difference was not due to the fact that women live longer than men or related to women consulting ophthalmologists more often than men because of visual handicap. The age and sex distribution of presenile macular degeneration ( PSMD ) and central serous retinitis (CSR) was investigated at the Department of Ophthalmology of Falun Hospital. Also PSMD increased with age and was found to be more common among women than men, even if the sex difference was not as clear as for SMD. CSR was found to be more frequent at younger ages and, contrary to SMD and PSMD , more common among men. The reasons for these sex differences in frequencies of SMD, PSMD and CSR are not known.

  12. Decoupled ARX and RBF Neural Network Modeling Using PCA and GA Optimization for Nonlinear Distributed Parameter Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ridong; Tao, Jili; Lu, Renquan; Jin, Qibing

    2016-12-08

    Modeling of distributed parameter systems is difficult because of their nonlinearity and infinite-dimensional characteristics. Based on principal component analysis (PCA), a hybrid modeling strategy that consists of a decoupled linear autoregressive exogenous (ARX) model and a nonlinear radial basis function (RBF) neural network model are proposed. The spatial-temporal output is first divided into a few dominant spatial basis functions and finite-dimensional temporal series by PCA. Then, a decoupled ARX model is designed to model the linear dynamics of the dominant modes of the time series. The nonlinear residual part is subsequently parameterized by RBFs, where genetic algorithm is utilized to optimize their hidden layer structure and the parameters. Finally, the nonlinear spatial-temporal dynamic system is obtained after the time/space reconstruction. Simulation results of a catalytic rod and a heat conduction equation demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy compared to several other methods.

  13. Batch Tests To Determine Activity Distribution and Kinetic Parameters for Acetate Utilization in Expanded-Bed Anaerobic Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Peter; Suidan, Makram T.

    1990-01-01

    Batch tests to measure maximum acetate utilization rates were used to determine the distribution of acetate utilizers in expanded-bed sand and expanded-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) reactors. The reactors were fed a mixture of acetate and 3-ethylphenol, and they contained the same predominant aceticlastic methanogen, Methanothrix sp. Batch tests were performed both on the entire reactor contents and with media removed from the reactors. Results indicated that activity was evenly distributed within the GAC reactors, whereas in the sand reactor a sludge blanket on top of the sand bed contained approximately 50% of the activity. The Monod half-velocity constant (Ks) for the acetate-utilizing methanogens in two expanded-bed GAC reactors was searched for by combining steady-state results with batch test data. All parameters necessary to develop a model with Monod kinetics were experimentally determined except for Ks. However, Ks was a function of the effluent 3-ethylphenol concentration, and batch test results demonstrated that maximum acetate utilization rates were not a function of the effluent 3-ethylphenol concentration. Addition of a competitive inhibition term into the Monod expression predicted the dependence of Ks on the effluent 3-ethylphenol concentration. A two-parameter search determined a Ks of 8.99 mg of acetate per liter and a Ki of 2.41 mg of 3-ethylphenol per liter. Model predictions were in agreement with experimental observations for all effluent 3-ethylphenol concentrations. Batch tests measured the activity for a specific substrate and determined the distribution of activity in the reactor. The use of steady-state data in conjunction with batch test results reduced the number of unknown kinetic parameters and thereby reduced the uncertainty in the results and the assumptions made. PMID:16348175

  14. A Coupled Lumped-Parameter and Distributed Network Model for Cerebral Pulse-Wave Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jaiyoung; Hu, Xiao; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral circulation is unique in its ability to maintain blood flow to the brain under widely varying physiologic conditions. Incorporating this autoregulatory response is necessary for cerebral blood flow (CBF) modeling, as well as investigations into pathological conditions. We discuss a one-dimensional (1D) nonlinear model of blood flow in the cerebral arteries coupled to autoregulatory lumped-parameter (LP) networks. The LP networks incorporate intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and cortical collateral blood flow models. The overall model is used to evaluate changes in CBF due to occlusions in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and common carotid artery (CCA). Velocity waveforms at the CCA and internal carotid artery (ICA) were examined prior and post MCA occlusion. Evident waveform changes due to the occlusion were observed, providing insight into cerebral vasospasm monitoring by morphological changes of the velocity or pressure waveforms. The role of modeling of collateral blood flows through cortical pathways and communicating arteries was also studied. When the MCA was occluded, the cortical collateral flow had an important compensatory role, whereas the communicating arteries in the circle of Willis (CoW) became more important when the CCA was occluded. To validate the model, simulations were conducted to reproduce a clinical test to assess dynamic autoregulatory function, and results demonstrated agreement with published measurements. PMID:26287937

  15. Toward the Distribution of Orbital Parameters of Nearby Major Galaxy Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi Karvani, Seyed Alireza

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis project our goal is to measure the initial conditions of a sample of ~20 local disk-disk major galaxy mergers. Measuring the orbital parameters is possible by findingthe most similar galaxy merger simulation to the morphology and kinematics of the data.We have developed an automated modeling method based on the Identikit software package,which also estimates the uncertainty of the measured initial conditions. We tested our modeling method using an independent set of GADGET simulations, and we acquired reliable results onprograde merger systems. We observed the Hα kinematics of our sample using SparsePak IFU on the WIYN telescope at KPNO, and DIS on the 3.5m telescope at APO. For the few merger systems in our sample with archival HI data available, we compare the use of HI vs Hα as the kinematic tracer. This work lays the ground-work for the analysis of larger statistical samples of mergers from on-going IFU galaxy survey such as MaNGA.

  16. Distributed and Lumped Parameter Models for the Characterization of High Throughput Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Iannetti, Laura; D'Urso, Giovanna; Conoscenti, Gioacchino; Cutrì, Elena; Tuan, Rocky S; Raimondi, Manuela T; Gottardi, Riccardo; Zunino, Paolo

    Next generation bioreactors are being developed to generate multiple human cell-based tissue analogs within the same fluidic system, to better recapitulate the complexity and interconnection of human physiology [1, 2]. The effective development of these devices requires a solid understanding of their interconnected fluidics, to predict the transport of nutrients and waste through the constructs and improve the design accordingly. In this work, we focus on a specific model of bioreactor, with multiple input/outputs, aimed at generating osteochondral constructs, i.e., a biphasic construct in which one side is cartilaginous in nature, while the other is osseous. We next develop a general computational approach to model the microfluidics of a multi-chamber, interconnected system that may be applied to human-on-chip devices. This objective requires overcoming several challenges at the level of computational modeling. The main one consists of addressing the multi-physics nature of the problem that combines free flow in channels with hindered flow in porous media. Fluid dynamics is also coupled with advection-diffusion-reaction equations that model the transport of biomolecules throughout the system and their interaction with living tissues and C constructs. Ultimately, we aim at providing a predictive approach useful for the general organ-on-chip community. To this end, we have developed a lumped parameter approach that allows us to analyze the behavior of multi-unit bioreactor systems with modest computational effort, provided that the behavior of a single unit can be fully characterized.

  17. Distributed and Lumped Parameter Models for the Characterization of High Throughput Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Conoscenti, Gioacchino; Cutrì, Elena; Tuan, Rocky S.; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Gottardi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Next generation bioreactors are being developed to generate multiple human cell-based tissue analogs within the same fluidic system, to better recapitulate the complexity and interconnection of human physiology [1, 2]. The effective development of these devices requires a solid understanding of their interconnected fluidics, to predict the transport of nutrients and waste through the constructs and improve the design accordingly. In this work, we focus on a specific model of bioreactor, with multiple input/outputs, aimed at generating osteochondral constructs, i.e., a biphasic construct in which one side is cartilaginous in nature, while the other is osseous. We next develop a general computational approach to model the microfluidics of a multi-chamber, interconnected system that may be applied to human-on-chip devices. This objective requires overcoming several challenges at the level of computational modeling. The main one consists of addressing the multi-physics nature of the problem that combines free flow in channels with hindered flow in porous media. Fluid dynamics is also coupled with advection-diffusion-reaction equations that model the transport of biomolecules throughout the system and their interaction with living tissues and C constructs. Ultimately, we aim at providing a predictive approach useful for the general organ-on-chip community. To this end, we have developed a lumped parameter approach that allows us to analyze the behavior of multi-unit bioreactor systems with modest computational effort, provided that the behavior of a single unit can be fully characterized. PMID:27669413

  18. Numerical analysis of seismic events distributions on the planetary scale and celestial bodies astrometrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatova, Dr.

    2012-04-01

    Modern research in the domains of Earth sciences is developing from the descriptions of each individual natural phenomena to the systematic complex research in interdisciplinary areas. For studies of its kind in the form numerical analysis of three-dimensional (3D) systems, the author proposes space-time Technology (STT), based on a Ptolemaic geocentric system, consist of two modules, each with its own coordinate system: (1) - 3D model of a Earth, the coordinates of which provides databases of the Earth's events (here seismic), and (2) - a compact model of the relative motion of celestial bodies in space - time on Earth known as the "Method of a moving source" (MDS), which was developed in MDS (Bulatova, 1998-2000) for the 3D space. Module (2) was developed as a continuation of the geocentric Ptolemaic system of the world, built on the astronomical parameters heavenly bodies. Based on the aggregation data of Space and Earth Sciences, systematization, and cooperative analysis, this is an attempt to establish a cause-effect relationship between the position of celestial bodies (Moon, Sun) and Earth's seismic events.

  19. A Three-Parameter Inversion of the Drop Size Distribution Using NASA/TRMM Microwave Link Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Lang, Roger H.; Meneghini, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Attenuation measurements at 25 and 38 GHz performed with the NASA/TRMM Microwave Link provide information about the drop size distribution (DSD) along the propagation path. Additional path-average measurements along the Link path, such as a third attenuation measurement or the rain rate from well-calibrated raingauges, can provide further DSD information. This paper explores an inversion procedure for determining simultaneously three parameters of a gamma DSD by using three measurements. Also, some preliminary results obtained using Link data are presented.

  20. Joint min-max distribution and Edwards-Anderson's order parameter of the circular 1/f-noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiangyu; Le Doussal, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the joint min-max distribution and the Edwards-Anderson's order parameter for the circular model of 1/f-noise. Both quantities, as well as generalisations, are obtained exactly by combining the freezing-duality conjecture and Jack-polynomial techniques. Numerical checks come with significantly improved control of finite-size effects in the glassy phase, and the results convincingly validate the freezing-duality conjecture. Application to diffusive dynamics is discussed. We also provide a formula for the pre-factor ratio of the joint/marginal Carpentier-Le Doussal tail for minimum/maximum which applies to any logarithmic random energy model.

  1. Krill distribution in relation to environmental parameters in mesoscale structures in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonori, Iole; De Felice, Andrea; Canduci, Giovanni; Costantini, Ilaria; Biagiotti, Ilaria; Giuliani, Giordano; Budillon, Giorgio

    2017-02-01

    Krill, a key pelagic resource of the Antarctic food web, provides an important link between primary and secondary plankton production and top predators. Since krill abundance is a crucial factor in Antarctic ecosystem functioning, its monitoring supplies vital data. Acoustic surveys are an effective approach to estimating krill abundance. An acoustic survey was conducted in the western Ross Sea in January 2014-10 years after a similar survey by our team - to estimate krill abundance and biomass and monitor oceanographic conditions. Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) was detected in the northern part of the western Ross Sea and dense swarms of ice krill (Euphausia crystallorophias) were found in its central coastal area. Data analysis revealed an inverse correlation between E. superba density and salinity in the water column, whereas a positive correlation was found between E. crystallorophias abundance and fluorescence; the latter relationship was confirmed in thematic maps of E. crystallorophias spatial distribution and fluorescence. Comparison of 2004 and 2014 biomass data showed a much greater abundance of both species in the more recent survey.

  2. Stereophotogrammetrie Mass Distribution Parameter Determination Of The Lower Body Segments For Use In Gait Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffer, Daniel B.; Schaer, Alex R.; Baumann, Juerg U.

    1989-04-01

    Inclusion of mass distribution information in biomechanical analysis of motion is a requirement for the accurate calculation of external moments and forces acting on the segmental joints during locomotion. Regression equations produced from a variety of photogrammetric, anthropometric and cadaeveric studies have been developed and espoused in literature. Because of limitations in the accuracy of predicted inertial properties based on the application of regression equation developed on one population and then applied on a different study population, the employment of a measurement technique that accurately defines the shape of each individual subject measured is desirable. This individual data acquisition method is especially needed when analyzing the gait of subjects with large differences in their extremity geo-metry from those considered "normal", or who may possess gross asymmetries in shape in their own contralateral limbs. This study presents the photogrammetric acquisition and data analysis methodology used to assess the inertial tensors of two groups of subjects, one with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy and the other considered normal.

  3. Geographical distribution of organochlorine contaminants and reproductive parameters in Herring Gulls on Lake Superior in 1983.

    PubMed

    Chip Weseloh, D V; Ewins, P J; Struger, J; Mineau, P; Norstrom, R J

    1994-02-01

    As part of the Great Lakes International Surveillance Plan, 1978-83, egg contaminant levels and reproductive output were determined for Herring Gull colonies on Lake Superior in 1983. Since 1974, the Herring Gull has been widely used in the Great Lakes as a spatial and temporal monitor of organochlorine (OC) contaminant levels and associated biological effects. Most eggs contained a wide range of OCs, the main compounds being DDE, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane, hexachlorobenzene and mirex. Levels of an additional ten OCs and five polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) congeners were also determined for some sites. Overall, levels varied significantly among colonies, but there was no obvious relationship to spatial distribution of contaminants in sediments or fish species. OC levels in eggs had declined by up to 84% since 1974. Eggshells were only 8% thinner than before the introduction of DDT, and shell thinning was not a cause of breeding failure. Average reproductive output varied from 0.15 to 1.57 young per apparently occupied nest in 1983: at 56% of colonies the value was below that thought necessary to maintain stable populations. The main causes of failure were egg disappearence and cannibalism of chicks. Despite this, the population appeared to have been increasing at about 4% per annum. Reduced availability of forage fish during the early 1980s was the most likely reason for the poor reproductive output in 1983.

  4. An analytical description of the evolution of binary orbital-parameter distributions in N-body computations of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Michael; Kroupa, Pavel; Oh, Seungkyung

    2011-11-01

    A new method is presented to describe the evolution of the orbital-parameter distributions for an initially universal binary population in star clusters by means of the currently largest existing library of N-body models. It is demonstrated that a stellar-dynamical operator, ΩMecl, rhdyn(t), exists, which uniquely transforms an initial (t= 0) orbital-parameter distribution function for binaries, ?, into a new distribution, ?, depending on the initial cluster mass, Mecl, and half-mass radius, rh, after some time t of dynamical evolution. For ? distribution functions derived are used, which are consistent with constraints for pre-main-sequence and Class I binary populations. Binaries with a lower energy and a higher reduced mass are dissolved preferentially. The Ω operator can be used to efficiently calculate and predict binary properties in clusters and whole galaxies without the need for further N-body computations. For the present set of N-body models, it is found that the binary populations change their properties on a crossing time-scale such that ΩMecl, rhdyn(t) can be well parametrized as a function of the cluster density, ρecl. Furthermore, it is shown that the binary fraction in clusters with similar initial velocity dispersions follows the same evolutionary tracks as a function of the passed number of relaxation times. Present-day observed binary populations in star clusters put constraints on their initial stellar densities, ρecl, which are found to be in the range of 102≲ρecl(≤rh)/ M⊙ pc-3≲ 2 × 105 for open clusters and a few ×103≲ρecl(≤rh)/ M⊙ pc-3≲ 108 for globular clusters.

  5. Age distribution patterns of human gene families: divergent for Gene Ontology categories and concordant between different subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangbiao; Zou, Yangyun; Cheng, Qiqun; Zeng, Yanwu; Gu, Xun; Su, Zhixi

    2014-04-01

    The age distribution of gene duplication events within the human genome exhibits two waves of duplications along with an ancient component. However, because of functional constraint differences, genes in different functional categories might show dissimilar retention patterns after duplication. It is known that genes in some functional categories are highly duplicated in the early stage of vertebrate evolution. However, the correlations of the age distribution pattern of gene duplication between the different functional categories are still unknown. To investigate this issue, we developed a robust pipeline to date the gene duplication events in the human genome. We successfully estimated about three-quarters of the duplication events within the human genome, along with the age distribution pattern in each Gene Ontology (GO) slim category. We found that some GO slim categories show different distribution patterns when compared to the whole genome. Further hierarchical clustering of the GO slim functional categories enabled grouping into two main clusters. We found that human genes located in the duplicated copy number variant regions, whose duplicate genes have not been fixed in the human population, were mainly enriched in the groups with a high proportion of recently duplicated genes. Moreover, we used a phylogenetic tree-based method to date the age of duplications in three signaling-related gene superfamilies: transcription factors, protein kinases and G-protein coupled receptors. These superfamilies were expressed in different subcellular localizations. They showed a similar age distribution as the signaling-related GO slim categories. We also compared the differences between the age distributions of gene duplications in multiple subcellular localizations. We found that the distribution patterns of the major subcellular localizations were similar to that of the whole genome. This study revealed the whole picture of the evolution patterns of gene functional

  6. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  7. Analysis of luminosity distributions and the shape parameters of strong gravitational lensing elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernaux, J.; Magain, P.; Sluse, D.; Chantry, V.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The luminosity profiles of galaxies acting as strong gravitational lenses can be tricky to study. Indeed, strong gravitational lensing images display several lensed components, both point-like and diffuse, around the lensing galaxy. Those objects limit the study of the galaxy luminosity to its inner parts. Therefore, the usual fitting methods perform rather badly on such images. Previous studies of strong lenses luminosity profiles using software such as GALFIT or IMFITFITS and various PSF-determining methods have resulted in somewhat discrepant results. Aims: The present work aims at investigating the causes of those discrepancies, as well as at designing more robust techniques for studying the morphology of early-type lensing galaxies with the ability to subtract a lensed signal from their luminosity profiles. Methods: We design a new method to independently measure each shape parameter, namely, the position angle, ellipticity, and half-light radius of the galaxy. Our half-light radius measurement method is based on an innovative scheme for computing isophotes that is well suited to measuring the morphological properties of gravititational lensing galaxies. Its robustness regarding various specific aspects of gravitational lensing image processing is analysed and tested against GALFIT. It is then applied to a sample of systems from the CASTLES database. Results: Simulations show that, when restricted to small, inner parts of the lensing galaxy, the technique presented here is more trustworthy than GALFIT. It gives more robust results than GALFIT, which shows instabilities regarding the fitting region, the value of the Sérsic index, and the signal-to-noise ratio. It is therefore better suited than GALFIT for gravitational lensing galaxies. It is also able to study lensing galaxies that are not much larger than the PSF. New values for the half-light radius of the objects in our sample are presented and compared to previous works. Table 6 is only available

  8. Age-specific absolute and relative organ weight distributions for Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Marino, Dale J

    2012-01-01

    The Fischer 344 (F344) rat has been the standard rat strain used in toxicology studies conducted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP). However, the numerous reports published to date on growth, survival, and tumor incidence have not included an overall compilation of organ weight data. Notably, dose-related organ weight effects are endpoints used by regulatory agencies to develop toxicity reference values (TRVs) for use in human health risk assessments. In addition, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, which utilize relative organ weights, are increasingly being used to develop TRVs. Because a compilation of organ weights for F344 rats could prove beneficial for TRV development and PBPK modeling, all available absolute and relative organ weight data for untreated control F344 rats were collected from NCI/NTP feed, drinking-water, and inhalation studies in order to develop age-specific distributions. Results showed that organ weights were collected more frequently at 2-wk (59 studies), 3-mo (148 studies), and 15-mo (38 studies) intervals than at other intervals and more frequently from feeding and inhalation than from drinking-water studies. Liver, right kidney, lung, heart, thymus, and brain weights were most frequently collected. From the collected data, the mean and standard deviation for absolute and relative organ weights were calculated. Findings showed age-related increases in absolute weights and decreases in relative weights for brain, liver, right kidney, lung, heart, thyroid, and right testis. The results suggest a general variability trend in absolute organ weights of brain < right testis < heart < right kidney < liver < lung < thymus < thyroid.

  9. Patterns and age distribution of ground-water flow to streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modica, E.; Reilly, T.E.; Pollock, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Simulations of ground-water flow in a generic aquifer system were made to characterize the topology of ground-water flow in the stream subsystem and to evaluate its relation to deeper ground-water flow. The flow models are patterned after hydraulic characteristics of aquifers of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and are based on numerical solutions to three-dimensional, steady-state, unconfined flow. The models were used to evaluate the effects of aquifer horizontal-to-vertical hydraulic conductivity ratios, aquifer thickness, and areal recharge rates on flow in the stream subsystem. A particle tracker was used to determine flow paths in a stream subsystem, to establish the relation between ground-water seepage to points along a simulated stream and its source area of flow, and to determine ground-water residence time in stream subsystems. In a geometrically simple aquifer system with accretion, the source area of flow to streams resembles an elongated ellipse that tapers in the downgradient direction. Increased recharge causes an expansion of the stream subsystem. The source area of flow to the stream expands predominantly toward the stream headwaters. Baseflow gain is also increased along the reach of the stream. A thin aquifer restricts ground-water flow and causes the source area of flow to expand near stream headwaters and also shifts the start-of-flow to the drainage basin divide. Increased aquifer anisotropy causes a lateral expansion of the source area of flow to streams. Ground-water seepage to the stream channel originates both from near- and far-recharge locations. The range in the lengths of flow paths that terminate at a point on a stream increase in the downstream direction. Consequently, the age distribution of ground water that seeps into the stream is skewed progressively older with distance downstream. Base flow ia an integration of ground water with varying age and potentially different water quality, depending on the source within the drainage basin

  10. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: II. Control of the H II Region Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A; Leitherer, C

    2006-03-01

    We examine from a theoretical viewpoint how the physical parameters of H II regions are controlled both in normal galaxies and in starburst environments. These parameters are the H II region luminosity function, the time-dependent size, the covering fraction of molecular clouds, the pressure in the ionized gas and the ionization parameter. The factors which control them are the initial mass function of the exciting stars, the cluster mass function, the metallicity and the mean pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. We investigate the sensitivity of the H{alpha} luminosity to the IMF, and find that this can translate to about 30% variation in derived star formation rates. The molecular cloud dissipation timescale is estimated from a case study of M17 to be {approx} 1 Myr. Based upon H II luminosity function fitting for nearby galaxies, we propose that the cluster mass function has a log-normal form peaking at {approx} 185M{sub {circle_dot}}. This suggests that the cluster mass function is the continuation of the stellar IMF to higher mass. The pressure in the H II regions is controlled by the mechanical luminosity flux from the central cluster. Since this is closely related to the ionizing photon flux, we show that the ionization parameter is not a free variable, and that the diffuse ionized medium may be composed of many large, faint and old H II regions. Finally, we derive theoretical probability distributions for the ionization parameter as a function of metallicity and compare these to those derived for SDSS galaxies.

  11. An analysis of sensitivity of CLIMEX parameters in mapping species potential distribution and the broad-scale changes observed with minor variations in parameters values: an investigation using open-field Solanum lycopersicum and Neoleucinodes elegantalis as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Ricardo Siqueira; Kumar, Lalit; Shabani, Farzin; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho

    2017-02-01

    A sensitivity analysis can categorize levels of parameter influence on a model's output. Identifying parameters having the most influence facilitates establishing the best values for parameters of models, providing useful implications in species modelling of crops and associated insect pests. The aim of this study was to quantify the response of species models through a CLIMEX sensitivity analysis. Using open-field Solanum lycopersicum and Neoleucinodes elegantalis distribution records, and 17 fitting parameters, including growth and stress parameters, comparisons were made in model performance by altering one parameter value at a time, in comparison to the best-fit parameter values. Parameters that were found to have a greater effect on the model results are termed "sensitive". Through the use of two species, we show that even when the Ecoclimatic Index has a major change through upward or downward parameter value alterations, the ef