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Sample records for age hardening response

  1. Effects of Ce additions on the age hardening response of Mg–Zn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Langelier, Brian Esmaeili, Shahrzad

    2015-03-15

    The effects of Ce additions on the precipitation hardening behaviour of Mg–Zn are examined for a series of alloys, with Ce additions at both alloying and microalloying levels. The alloys are artificially aged, and studied using hardness measurement and X-ray diffraction, as well as optical and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that the age-hardening effect is driven by the formation of fine precipitates, the number density of which is related to the Zn content of the alloy. Conversely, the Ce content is found to slightly reduce hardening. When the alloy content of Ce is high, large secondary phase particles containing both Ce and Zn are present, and remain stable during solutionizing. These particles effectively reduce the amount of Zn available as solute for precipitation, and thereby reduce hardening. Combining hardness results with thermodynamic analysis of alloy solute levels also suggests that Ce can have a negative effect on hardening when present as solutes at the onset of ageing. This effect is confirmed by designing a pre-ageing heat treatment to preferentially remove Ce solutes, which is found to restore the hardening capability of an Mg–Zn–Ce alloy to the level of the Ce-free alloy. - Highlights: • The effects of Ce additions on precipitation in Mg–Zn alloys are examined. • Additions of Ce to Mg–Zn slightly reduce the age-hardening response. • Ce-rich secondary phase particles deplete the matrix of Zn solute. • Hardening is also decreased when Ce is present in solution. • Pre-ageing to preferentially precipitate out Ce restores hardening capabilities.

  2. Unraveling the Age Hardening Response in U-Nb Alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Hackenberg, Robert Errol; Hemphill, Geralyn M. Sewald; Forsyth, Robert Thomas; ...

    2016-11-15

    Complicating factors that have stymied understanding of uranium-niobium’s aging response are briefly reviewed, including (1) niobium inhomogeneity, (2) machining damage effects on tensile properties, (3) early-time transients of ductility increase, and (4) the variety of phase transformations. A simple Logistic-Arrhenius model was applied to predict yield and ultimate tensile strengths and tensile elongation of U-4Nb as a function of thermal age. Lastly, fits to each model yielded an apparent activation energy that was compared with phase transformation mechanisms.

  3. Modifications of the Response of Materials to Shock Loading by Age Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, Jeremy C. F.

    2015-10-01

    The shock response of two age-hardened alloys, aluminum 6061 and copper-2 wt pct beryllium (CuBe), has been investigated in terms of their microstructual state; either solution treated or age hardened. While age hardening induces large increases in strength at quasi-static strain rates, age hardening does not produce the same magnitude of strength increase during shock loading. Examination of the shocked microstructures (of 6061) indicates that the presence of a fine distribution of precipitates throughout the microstructure hinders the motion and generation of dislocations and hence reduces the strain-rate sensitivity of the aged material, thus allowing the properties of the solution-treated state to approach those of the aged. It has also been observed that the shear strength of solution-treated CuBe is near identical to that of pure copper. It is suggested that this is the result of two competing processes; large lattice strains as beryllium substitutes onto the copper lattice inducing a high degree of solution strengthening acting against a reduction in shear strength caused by twinning in the alloy.

  4. Precipitation, strength and work hardening of age hardened aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryen, Ø.; Holmedal, B.; Marthinsen, K.; Furu, T.

    2015-08-01

    The strength and work hardening of age hardened AA6063 and AA6082 alloys have been investigated in terms of a detailed characterization of precipitate and dislocation structures obtained by TEM and SEM. Tensile and compression tests were performed at as quenched, peak aged and severely aged conditions. A strong work hardening in the as quenched condition was found, similar to AlMg alloys with twice as much alloying elements in solid solution. It was found that the initial work hardening rate and the critical failure strain are both smallest at the peak aged condition. During large deformations the needle-shaped precipitates are sheared uniformly by dislocations altering their <001> orientations, which indicates extensive cross slip. In the overaged condition the early initial work hardening is larger than at the peak aged condition, but followed by a weak linear work hardening, apparently directly entering stage IV at a low strain. Cracked, needle-shaped precipitates were seen at larger strains.

  5. Evaluation of Solute Clusters Associated with Bake-Hardening Response in Isothermal Aged Al-Mg-Si Alloys Using a Three-Dimensional Atom Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruga, Yasuhiro; Kozuka, Masaya; Takaki, Yasuo; Sato, Tatsuo

    2014-12-01

    Temporal changes in the number density, size distribution, and chemical composition of clusters formed during natural aging at room temperature and pre-aging at 363 K (90 °C) in an Al-0.62Mg-0.93Si (mass pct) alloy were evaluated using atom probe tomography. More than 10 million atoms were examined in the cluster analysis, in which about 1000 clusters were obtained for each material after various aging treatments. The statistically proven records show that both number density and the average radius of clusters in pre-aged materials are larger than in naturally aged materials. It was revealed that the fraction of clusters with a low Mg/Si ratio after natural aging for a short time is higher than with other aging treatments, regardless of cluster size. This indicates that Si-rich clusters form more easily after short-period natural aging, and that Mg atoms can diffuse into the clusters or possibly form another type of Mg-Si cluster after prolonged natural aging. The formation of large clusters with a uniform Mg/Si ratio is encouraged by pre-aging. It can be concluded that an increase of small clusters with various Mg/Si ratios does not promote the bake-hardening (BH) response, whereas large clusters with a uniform Mg/Si ratio play an important role in hardening during the BH treatment at 443 K (170 °C).

  6. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  7. Computer modelling of age hardening for cast aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linda; Ferguson, W. George

    2009-08-01

    Age hardening, or precipitation hardening, is one of the most widely adopted techniques for strengthening of aluminium alloys. Although various age hardening models have been developed for aluminium alloys, from the large volume of literature reviewed, it appears that the bulk of the research has been concentrated on wrought aluminium alloys, only a few of the established precipitation models have been applied to the casting aluminium alloys. In the present work, there are two modelling methods that have been developed and applied to the casting aluminium alloys A356 and A357. One is based on the Shercliff-Ashby methodology to produce a process model, by which we mean a mathematical relationship between process variables (alloy composition, ageing temperature and time) and material properties (yield strength or hardness) through microstructure evolution (precipitate radius, volume fraction). The other method is based on the Kampmann and Wagner Numerical (KWN) model which deals with concomitant nucleation, growth and coarsening and is thus capable of predicting the full evolution of the particle size distribution and then a strength model is used to evaluate the resulting change in hardness or yield strength at room temperature by taking into account contributions from lattice resistance, solid solution hardening and precipitation hardening.

  8. Continuous Hardening During Isothermal Aging at 723 K (450 °C) of a Precipitation Hardening Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celada-Casero, Carola; Chao, Jesús; Urones-Garrote, Esteban; San Martin, David

    2016-11-01

    The isothermal aging behavior of a cold-rolled precipitation hardening stainless steel has been studied at 723 K (450 °C) for holding times up to 72 hours. The precipitation hardening has been investigated using microhardness Vickers (Hv), thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements, and tensile testing. Microhardness compared to TEP measurements is more sensitive to detect the initial stages of aging. Two precipitation regimes have been observed: the first one related to the formation of Cu-clusters for aging times below 1 hour and a second one associated with formation of Ni-rich precipitates. The results show that the material exhibits an outstanding continuous age strengthening response over the aging time investigated, reaching a hardness of 710 ± 4 HV1 and an ultimate tensile strength ( σ UTS) of 2.65 ± 0.02 GPa after 72 hours. Engineering stress-plastic strain curves reveal that the strength increases and the ductility decreases as the aging time increases. However, after prolonged holding times (24-72 hours) and, although small, a rise in both the strength and the total elongation is observed. The precipitation kinetics can be well predicted over the entire range of aging times by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation. Finally, a reliable linear hardness-yield strength correlation has been found, which enables a rapid evaluation of the strength from bulk hardness measurements.

  9. Group precipitation and age hardening of nanostructured Fe-based alloys with ultra-high strengths

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Miller, M. K.; Yu, C. Y.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    The precipitation of nanoparticles plays a key role in determining the properties of many structural materials, and the understanding of their formation and stabilization mechanisms has been a long standing interest in the material field. However, the critical issues involving the group precipitation of various nanoparticles and their cooperative hardening mechanism remain elusive in the newly discovered Fe-based alloys with nanostructures. Here we quantitatively elucidate the nucleation mechanism, evolution kinetics and hardening effects of the group-precipitated nanoparticles in the Fe-Cu-Ni-Al-based alloys by atom probe tomography together with both first-principles and thermodynamic calculations. Our results provide the compelling evidence for two interesting but complex group precipitation pathways of nanoparticles, i.e., the Cu-rich and NiAl-based precipitations. The co-existence of the two precipitation pathways plays a key role in age hardening kinetics and ultimately enhances the hardening response, as compared to the single particle type of strengthening, therefore providing an effective new approach for strengthening materials for structural applications. PMID:26892834

  10. Group precipitation and age hardening of nanostructured Fe-based alloys with ultra-high strengths.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Z B; Luan, J H; Miller, M K; Yu, C Y; Liu, C T

    2016-02-19

    The precipitation of nanoparticles plays a key role in determining the properties of many structural materials, and the understanding of their formation and stabilization mechanisms has been a long standing interest in the material field. However, the critical issues involving the group precipitation of various nanoparticles and their cooperative hardening mechanism remain elusive in the newly discovered Fe-based alloys with nanostructures. Here we quantitatively elucidate the nucleation mechanism, evolution kinetics and hardening effects of the group-precipitated nanoparticles in the Fe-Cu-Ni-Al-based alloys by atom probe tomography together with both first-principles and thermodynamic calculations. Our results provide the compelling evidence for two interesting but complex group precipitation pathways of nanoparticles, i.e., the Cu-rich and NiAl-based precipitations. The co-existence of the two precipitation pathways plays a key role in age hardening kinetics and ultimately enhances the hardening response, as compared to the single particle type of strengthening, therefore providing an effective new approach for strengthening materials for structural applications.

  11. Group precipitation and age hardening of nanostructured Fe-based alloys with ultra-high strengths

    DOE PAGES

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Miller, M. K.; ...

    2016-02-19

    The precipitation of nanoparticles plays a key role in determining the properties of many structural materials, and the understanding of their formation and stabilization mechanisms has been a long standing interest in the material field. However, the critical issues involving the group precipitation of various nanoparticles and their cooperative hardening mechanism remain elusive in the newly discovered Fe-based alloys with nanostructures. Here we quantitatively elucidate the nucleation mechanism, evolution kinetics and hardening effects of the group-precipitated nanoparticles in the Fe-Cu-Ni-Al-based alloys by atom probe tomography together with both first-principles and thermodynamic calculations. Our results provide the compelling evidence for twomore » interesting but complex group precipitation pathways of nanoparticles, i.e., the Cu-rich and NiAl-based precipitations. Lastly, the co-existence of the two precipitation pathways plays a key role in age hardening kinetics and ultimately enhances the hardening response, as compared to the single particle type of strengthening, therefore providing an effective new approach for strengthening materials for structural applications.« less

  12. Group precipitation and age hardening of nanostructured Fe-based alloys with ultra-high strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Z. B.; Luan, J. H.; Miller, M. K.; Yu, C. Y.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-02-19

    The precipitation of nanoparticles plays a key role in determining the properties of many structural materials, and the understanding of their formation and stabilization mechanisms has been a long standing interest in the material field. However, the critical issues involving the group precipitation of various nanoparticles and their cooperative hardening mechanism remain elusive in the newly discovered Fe-based alloys with nanostructures. Here we quantitatively elucidate the nucleation mechanism, evolution kinetics and hardening effects of the group-precipitated nanoparticles in the Fe-Cu-Ni-Al-based alloys by atom probe tomography together with both first-principles and thermodynamic calculations. Our results provide the compelling evidence for two interesting but complex group precipitation pathways of nanoparticles, i.e., the Cu-rich and NiAl-based precipitations. Lastly, the co-existence of the two precipitation pathways plays a key role in age hardening kinetics and ultimately enhances the hardening response, as compared to the single particle type of strengthening, therefore providing an effective new approach for strengthening materials for structural applications.

  13. Hydrogen effects on the age hardening behavior of 2024 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. A.; Louthan, M. R., Jr.; Sisson, R. D., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    It has been found that the fatigue crack growth rate in aluminum alloys increases significantly in the presence of moisture. This phenomenon along with a moisture effect observed in another context has been attributed to 'embrittlement' of the aluminum by absorbed hydrogen generated by the reaction of moisture with freshly exposed aluminum. A description is given of a number of age hardening experiments involving 2024 aluminum. These experiments show that a mechanism related to the segregation of absorbed hydrogen to the coherent theta-double-prime interfaces may account for the observed reduction in fatigue life. It is pointed out that this segregation promotes a loss of coherency in the hydrogen rich region at a fatigue crack tip. Subsequently, the loss of coherency causes local softening and reduces fatigue life.

  14. Extracting material response from simple mechanical tests on hardening-softening-hardening viscoplastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Nisha

    Compliant foams are usually characterized by a wide range of desirable mechanical properties. These properties include viscoelasticity at different temperatures, energy absorption, recoverability under cyclic loading, impact resistance, and thermal, electrical, acoustic and radiation-resistance. Some foams contain nano-sized features and are used in small-scale devices. This implies that the characteristic dimensions of foams span multiple length scales, rendering modeling their mechanical properties difficult. Continuum mechanics-based models capture some salient experimental features like the linear elastic regime, followed by non-linear plateau stress regime. However, they lack mesostructural physical details. This makes them incapable of accurately predicting local peaks in stress and strain distributions, which significantly affect the deformation paths. Atomistic methods are capable of capturing the physical origins of deformation at smaller scales, but suffer from impractical computational intensity. Capturing deformation at the so-called meso-scale, which is capable of describing the phenomenon at a continuum level, but with some physical insights, requires developing new theoretical approaches. A fundamental question that motivates the modeling of foams is `how to extract the intrinsic material response from simple mechanical test data, such as stress vs. strain response?' A 3D model was developed to simulate the mechanical response of foam-type materials. The novelty of this model includes unique features such as the hardening-softening-hardening material response, strain rate-dependence, and plastically compressible solids with plastic non-normality. Suggestive links from atomistic simulations of foams were borrowed to formulate a physically informed hardening material input function. Motivated by a model that qualitatively captured the response of foam-type vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) pillars under uniaxial compression [2011,"Analysis of

  15. Age-hardening of grid alloys and its effect on battery manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillian, Warren F.; Rice, David M.

    The age-hardening behaviour of three generic classes of lead—antimony grid alloys commonly used in the lead/acid battery manufacturing industry were studied. The effects on age-hardening behaviour of several heat treatments devised to simulate downstream processing of battery grids in the manufacturing process were investigated together with the effect of varying cooling rate following casting. Rapid cooling (water quenching) resulted in a general acceleration and enhancement of the age-hardening behaviour of all alloys, whilst heat treatment following casting generally gave rise to a reduction in peak hardness.

  16. Effect of heterogeneous precipitation on age-hardening of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle dispersion Al-4mass% Cu composite produced by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, S.; Hatayama, T.; Matsugi, K.; Yanagisawa, O.

    2000-04-14

    The acceleration of aging kinetics has been frequently observed in aluminum matrix composites produced by ingot or powder metallurgy. Recently, in the mechanically alloyed (MA) Al-4mass%Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites, the authors have found that the age-hardening response significantly decreases, and that considerable stable {theta} phases are formed at a very short aging time. The purposes of this study are to investigate the local precipitation behaviors, and attempt to clarify the dominant microstructural factors of the decrease in the age-harden ability and the acceleration of the age-hardening kinetics in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle dispersion Al-4mass%Cu composites produced by mechanical alloying. In order to build a basis for comparison, the age-hardening behaviors of the unreinforced matrix alloy (IM alloy), which is produced by ingot metallurgy technique, are also investigated.

  17. Phase decomposition in an Fe-40 at.% Cr alloy after isothermal aging and its effect on hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Hirata, Victor M. Soriano-Vargas, Orlando; Rosales-Dorantes, Hector J.; Saucedo Munoz, Maribel L.

    2011-08-15

    The phase decomposition process of an Fe-40 at.% Cr alloy was studied after isothermal aging at 475 and 500 deg. C using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, as well as hardness measurements. High-resolution transmission electron microscope observations showed that the hardening behavior is associated with the formation of the nanometric coherent decomposed Cr-rich and Fe-rich phases with irregular shape and interconnected as expected for a spinodally-decomposed alloy. As the aging progressed, coherent rounded Cr-rich phase precipitates were observed in the Fe-rich phase matrix. The coarsening process of the Cr-rich phase was observed for aging times up to 750 h. Nevertheless, no decrease in hardness with time was observed because of the nanometric size of the Cr-rich phase, less than 10 nm. Aging hardening was higher at 500 deg. C because of the higher decomposition kinetics. - Research Highlights: {yields} Spinodally-decomposed phases showed an interconnected and irregular shape in aged Fe-Cr alloy. {yields} Further aging promoted the formation of nanometric coherent rounded Cr-rich precipitates. {yields} Nanometric Cr-rich phases are responsible for the age hardening. {yields} Coarsening process of these nanometric Cr-rich precipitates caused no decrease in hardness.

  18. Precipitation Reactions in Age-Hardenable Alloys During Laser Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jägle, Eric A.; Sheng, Zhendong; Wu, Liang; Lu, Lin; Risse, Jeroen; Weisheit, Andreas; Raabe, Dierk

    2016-03-01

    We describe and study the thermal profiles experienced by various age-hardenable alloys during laser additive manufacturing (LAM), employing two different manufacturing techniques: selective laser melting and laser metal deposition. Using scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography, we reveal at which stages during the manufacturing process desired and undesired precipitation reactions can occur in age-hardenable alloys. Using examples from a maraging steel, a nickel-base superalloy and a scandium-containing aluminium alloy, we demonstrate that precipitation can already occur during the production of the powders used as starting material, during the deposition of material (i.e. during solidification and subsequent cooling), during the intrinsic heat treatment effected by LAM (i.e. in the heat affected zones) and, naturally, during an ageing post-heat treatment. These examples demonstrate the importance of understanding and controlling the thermal profile during the entire additive manufacturing cycle of age-hardenable materials including powder synthesis.

  19. Age Hardening Kinetics in 7xxx Type (Al-Mg-Zn) Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vevecka-Priftaj, A.; Lamani, E.; Fjerdingen, J.; Langsrud, Y.; Gjoennes, J.; Hansen, V.

    2007-04-23

    Age hardening in industrial 7xxx alloys at the temperature 100 deg. and 150 deg. C up to 144 hrs, after solid solution treatments at 450 deg. and 550 deg. C, has been followed by measurements of Vickers hardness, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The influence of silicon on phase and kinetic of age hardening zones and precipitates has been studied. High iron and silicon content increase the number of primary particle in the alloy. Size distribution of {eta}'-precipitates has been determined.

  20. Microstructural evolution and the variation of tensile behavior after aging heat treatment of precipitation hardened martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jong-Ho; Jeong, JaeSuk; Lee, Jong-Wook

    2015-01-15

    The effects of aging temperature on the microstructural evolution and the tensile behavior of precipitation hardened martensitic steel were investigated. Microscopic analysis using transmission electron microscope (TEM) was combined with the microstructural analysis using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to characterize the microstructural evolution with aging temperature. Peak hardness was obtained by precipitation of the Ni{sub 3}Al ordered phase. After aging at temperature range from 420 to 590 °C, spherical Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates and ellipsoidal M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were observed within laths and at lath boundaries, respectively. Strain hardening behavior was analyzed with Ludwik equation. It is observed that the plastic strain regimes can be divided into two different stages by a rapid increase in strain hardening followed by a comparatively lower increase. At the first strain hardening stage, the aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen, and the exponent in the aged specimen was not changed considerably with increasing aging temperature. It is revealed that the strain hardening exponents at the first and the second stages were associated with the Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates and the domain size representing the coherent scattering area, respectively. - Highlights: • All of aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen at the first stage. • The value of strain hardening exponent in the aged specimen was nearly constant with aging temperature. • Ni{sub 3}Al precipitation dominantly influenced to the increase of strain hardening exponent at the first strain hardening stage. • Domain size was associated with strain hardening exponent at the second strain hardening stage.

  1. YIELD STRENGTH PREDICTION FOR RAPID AGE-HARDENING HEAT TREATMENT OF ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Hebi; Sabau, Adrian S; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Skszek, Timothy; Niu, X

    2013-01-01

    A constitutive model has been developed to predict the yield strength aging curves for aluminum casting alloys during non-isothermal age-hardening processes. The model provides the specific relationship between the process variables and yield strength. Several aging heat treatment scenarios have been investigated using the proposed model, including two-step aging recipes. Two-step aging heat treatments involve a low temperature regime to promote nucleation of secondary phases and a second step at higher temperature for the growth of the secondary phases. The predicted results show that yield strength of approximately 300MPa might be obtained in shorter aging time, of approximately 30 minutes. Thus, better mechanical properties can be obtained by optimizing the time-temperature schedules for the precipitation hardening process of heat treatable aluminum alloys.

  2. Age hardening characteristics and mechanical behavior of Al-Cu-Li-Zr-In alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the age-hardening response and cryogenic mechanical properties of superplastic Al-Cu-Li-Zr-In alloys. Two alloys with compositions Al-2.65Cu-2.17Li-O.13Zr (baseline) and Al-2.60Cu-2.34Li-0.16Zr-0.17In were scaled-up from 30 lb permanent mold ingots to 350 lb DC (direct chill) ingots and thermomechanically processed to 3.2 mm thick sheet. The microstructure of material which contained the indium addition was partially recrystallized compared to the baseline suggesting that indium may influence recrystallization behavior. The indium-modified alloy exhibited superior hardness and strength compared to the baseline alloy when solution-heat-treated at 555 C and aged at 160 C or 190 C. For each alloy, strength increased and toughness was unchanged or decreased when tested at - 185 C compared to ambient temperature. By using optimized heat treatments, the indium-modified alloy exhibited strength levels approaching those of the baseline alloy without deformation prior to aging. The increase in strength of these alloys in the T6 condition make them particularly attractive for superplastic forming applications where post-SPF parts cannot be cold deformed to increase strength.

  3. Predictive Modeling of the Constitutive Response of Precipitation Hardened Ni-Rich NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A.; Franco, B.; Wang, S.; Baxevanis, T.; Karaman, I.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2017-03-01

    The effective thermomechanical response of precipitation hardened near-equiatomic Ni-rich NiTi alloys is predicted on the basis of composition and heat treatment using a microscale-informed model. The model takes into account the structural effects of the precipitates (precipitate volume fraction, elastic properties, elastic mismatch between the precipitates and the matrix, and coherency stresses due to the lattice mismatch between the precipitates and the matrix) on the reversible martensitic transformation under load as well as the chemical effects resulting from the Ni-depletion of the matrix during precipitate growth. The post-aging thermomechanical response is predicted based on finite element simulations on representative microstructures, using the response of the solutionized material and time-temperature-martensitic transformation temperature maps. The predictions are compared with experiments for materials of different initial compositions and heat treatments and reasonably good agreement is demonstrated for relatively low precipitate volume fractions.

  4. Predictive Modeling of the Constitutive Response of Precipitation Hardened Ni-Rich NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A.; Franco, B.; Wang, S.; Baxevanis, T.; Karaman, I.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2017-01-01

    The effective thermomechanical response of precipitation hardened near-equiatomic Ni-rich NiTi alloys is predicted on the basis of composition and heat treatment using a microscale-informed model. The model takes into account the structural effects of the precipitates (precipitate volume fraction, elastic properties, elastic mismatch between the precipitates and the matrix, and coherency stresses due to the lattice mismatch between the precipitates and the matrix) on the reversible martensitic transformation under load as well as the chemical effects resulting from the Ni-depletion of the matrix during precipitate growth. The post-aging thermomechanical response is predicted based on finite element simulations on representative microstructures, using the response of the solutionized material and time-temperature-martensitic transformation temperature maps. The predictions are compared with experiments for materials of different initial compositions and heat treatments and reasonably good agreement is demonstrated for relatively low precipitate volume fractions.

  5. Identification of potential oviductal factors responsible for zona pellucida hardening and monospermy during fertilization in mammals.

    PubMed

    Mondéjar, Irene; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Avilés, Manuel; Coy, Pilar

    2013-09-01

    Oviduct fluid increases the time required for digestion of the zona pellucida (ZP) by proteolytic enzymes (ZP hardening). This effect has been associated with levels of monospermy after in vitro fertilization (IVF) in the pig and cow, but the possible existence of a directly proportional relationship between hardening and monospermy remains unknown. To investigate whether variations in hardening of different oviductal fluids (OFs) are correlated with variations in levels of monospermy after IVF, porcine oocytes were incubated with three batches of OFs known to produce different ZP hardening effects (3, 7, and 25 min); after IVF, monospermy levels were 0%, 14.58% ± 5.14%, and 35.14% ± 7.95%, respectively. These results could partially explain the lack of polyspermy found during in vivo fertilization in pigs (with a hardened oviductal ZP) compared with levels found during IVF (with no hardened ZP). Using the bovine model, OF was fractionated by heparin affinity chromatography, and the hardening effect on the ZP was tested for each fraction obtained from a linear gradient of sodium chloride concentration. The highest effect was obtained with the fraction eluted with 0.4 M sodium chloride. Fractions with high-level or low-level effects were processed by on-chip electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A list of potential proteins responsible for this effect includes OVGP1 and members of the HSP and PDI families.

  6. Blast response of a hardened Army ISO shelter

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, R.W.; Lush, A.; Crenshaw, W.L.

    1982-09-01

    A prototype shelter was designed to withstand a blast loading corresponding to a 10.0 psi (68.9 kPa) incident overpressure. The hardened shelter was then constructed, instrumented and subjected to a simulated nuclear blast loading. Test results demonstrated that a design featuring shear stiffened sandwich panels with aluminum face materials could withstand a nominal 10.0 psi incident shock loading.

  7. Influence of rotary swaging and subsequent age hardening on properties of EN AW 6082 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleček, L.; Palán, J.; Nacházel, J.; Dlouhý, J.

    2017-02-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructure of EN AW 6082 were investigated. The aluminium alloy was processed by combining the solution annealing, plastic deformation and artificial age hardening, respectively. The initial state of the investigated material was provided in the form of extruded rods with the diameter of 12 mm. For the solution annealing the temperature 530 °C was chosen. The plastic deformation was realized by rotary swaging at ambient temperature and the investigated material was rotary swaged from 12 to 10 mm in diameter. The effect of the age hardening temperature and time was studied at temperatures of 120 and 160 °C and times 1 - 12 hours. The impact of processing parameters on mechanical properties was assessed by tensile testing and hardness measurement. Metallographic examination was carried out by light optical microscopy (LOM) and scanning electron microscopy using electron backscatter diffraction (SEM-EBSD).

  8. Effects of alloying on aging and hardening processes of steel with 20% nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogachev, I. N.; Zvigintsev, N. V.; Maslakova, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of hardness, thermal emf, and electrical resistance were used to study the effects of Co, Mo, Ti and Al contents on aging and hardening processes in Fe 20%Ni steel. It is shown that the effects of these alloying elements differ substantially. Anomalies which arise in the temperature dependence of physical properties due to the presence of cobalt and molybdenum are reduced by the inclusion of titanium and aluminum (and vice versa).

  9. Approximating the dynamic response of strain-hardening structures

    SciTech Connect

    Youngdahl, C.K.

    1991-01-01

    A mode approximation method is being developed to predict the dynamic plastic deformation of strain-hardening structures. A mode shape having time-dependent coefficients is based on quasi-static deformation profiles. Two stress fields are associated with the modal shape, one satisfying the dynamic relations and the other satisfying the constitutive equations. The application of suitable matching conditions results in a set of simultaneous differential and algebraic equations for the amplitude coefficients and plastic region size. Using the example of a simply supported beam, the effect of varying the number of matching conditions on the accuracy of the solution is presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Age-hardening mechanisms in a commercial dental gold alloy containing platinum and palladium.

    PubMed

    Tani, T; Udoh, K; Yasuda, K; Van Tendeloo, G; Van Landuyt, J

    1991-10-01

    The age-hardening mechanism of a commercial dental gold alloy containing platinum and palladium (in wt.%, 15 Cu, 6 Ag, 5 Pt, 3 Pd, 3 Zn, with the balance as gold) was elucidated by means of electrical resistivity, hardness tests, x-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy, as well as high-resolution electron microscopy. The sequence of phase transformations during isothermal aging below the critical temperature, Tc = 825 K, was described as follows: disordered solid solution alpha 0 (FCC)----metastable AuCu I' ordered phase (FCT)----metastable alpha 2 disordered phase (FCC) equilibrium AuCu I ordered phase (FCT) + equilibrium alpha 2 disordered phase (FCC). The hardening was due to the introduction of coherency strain at the interface between the AuCu I' platelet and the matrix. These ordered platelets had mutually perpendicular c-axes to compensate for the strain introduced by their tetragonality. A loss of coherency at the interface brought about softening of the alloy, i.e., over-aging.

  11. Effects of composition and age hardening on precious metal electrical contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, L.E.; Peebles, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Precious metal alloys are commonly used for wiper electrical contacts in electromechanical devices which operate in dry and inert atmospheres. A pin-on-plate experimental configuration has been used to evaluate two different palladium alloy pins (ASTM B540 and ASTM B563) sliding on a gold alloy plate (ASTM B541) age hardened at two temperatures. For all combinations of test conditions except the higher palladium content alloy (ASTM B563), two stages of wear were observed: (1) a prow of Au alloy was formed on the palladium alloy pin and (2) work hardening and roughening of the wear track occurred with transfer and backtransfer of Au alloy material. With the higher palladium alloy pin (ASTM B563) a friction polymer was formed for laboratory air testing. The prow formed on the pin was a mechanical mixture of gold alloy plate and palladium alloy pin materials; palladium was found in the wear track for this experimental condition, while no palladium was found in wear tracks for the other test conditions. Segregation of zinc, silver and copper in wear tracks occurred for all test conditions, but the extent of segregation was dependent on contact couple combination and heat treatment of the gold alloy plate. The least amount of segregation was observed when the gold alloy plate was age hardened at 426 /degree/C. More segregation occurred for testing in helium than for testing in vacuum with a low partial pressure of oxygen. The largest segregation of metallic elements occurred for laboratory air testing, but the total metallic content of wear tracks was low; the wear tracks consisted primarily of carbon. Segregation was slightly larger with the higher palladium alloy (ASTM B563) pin.

  12. Microstructural evolution and age hardening in aluminium alloys: Atom probe field-ion microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ringer, S.P.; Hono, K.

    2000-02-01

    This paper examines the microstructural evolution in selected aluminum alloys based on commercial age hardenable 2000, 6000, and 7000 series alloys. Atom probe field-ion microscopy and transmission electron microscopy have been used to examine the effects of microalloying and the origins of hardening. The combined application of these techniques is particularly important in the study of nanoscale precipitation processes. It is shown that the nature and kinetics of the precipitation process depend on the solute-solute interactions that produce solute clusters. The solute clusters precede the formation of GP zones or precipitation, and have a defining role on the nature and kinetics of the subsequent precipitation processes. Moreover, interactions between solute clustering and dislocations can have a significant hardening effect, the origins of which seem to be distinctly different from the conventional notion of precipitation hardening.

  13. Investigation of Clusters in Medium Carbon Secondary Hardening Ultra-high-strength Steel After Hardening and Aging Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerababu, R.; Balamuralikrishnan, R.; Muraleedharan, K.; Srinivas, M.

    2015-06-01

    Clusters, containing between 10 and 1000 atoms, have been investigated in a martensitic secondary hardening ultra-high-strength steel austenitized at 1173 K (900 °C) for 1 hour and tempered at either 768 K or 783 K (495 °C or 510 °C) for 4 or 8 hours using 3D atom probe. The presence of clusters was unambiguously established by comparing the observed spatial distribution of the different alloying elements against the corresponding distribution expected for a random solid solution. Maximum separation envelope method has been used for delineating the clusters from the surrounding "matrix." Statistical analysis was used extensively for size and composition analyses of the clusters. The clusters were found to constitute a significant fraction accounting for between 1.14 and 2.53 vol pct of the microstructure. On the average, the clusters in the 783 K (510 °C) tempered sample were coarser by ~65 pct, with an average diameter of 2.26 nm, relative to the other samples. In all samples, about 85 to 90 pct of the clusters have size less than 2 nm. The percentage frequency histograms for carbon content of the clusters in 768 K and 783 K (495 °C and 510 °C) tempered samples revealed that the distribution shifts toward higher carbon content when the tempering temperature is higher. It is likely that the presence of these clusters exerts considerable influence on the strength and fracture toughness of the steel.

  14. Age-hardening behaviour and microstructure of a silver alloy with high Cu content for dental application.

    PubMed

    Seol, Hyo-Joung; Park, Young-Gu; Hoon Kwon, Yong; Takada, Yukyo; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2005-11-01

    Age-hardening behaviour and the related microstructural changes of a silver alloy with relatively high Cu content were elucidated by means of hardness test, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The microstructure of the solution-treated specimen was composed of the Ag-rich matrix, the Cu-rich particle-like structures containing Pd, and the lamellar structure of both phases. By the age-hardening heat-treatment, the Cu element began to precipitate from the Ag-rich matrix by the solubility limit, and the very fine Cu-rich precipitates became coarsened by further aging. The silver alloy with relatively high Cu content showed apparent age-hardenability. The hardness of the solution-treated specimen began to increase and reached a maximum value with increasing aging time, and then the hardness decreased gradually after maintaining the maximum value for short periods of time. The early stage of precipitation of the Cu-rich phase from the Ag-rich matrix seemed to have caused the increase in hardness. The decrease in hardness was attributed to the coarsening of the Cu-rich precipitates in the later stage of the age-hardening process.

  15. Fatigue Crack Growth of Age-Hardened Al Alloy Under Ultrasonic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Kawagoishi, N.; Kariya, K.; Nu, Y.; Goto, M.

    An age-hardened and extruded Al alloy 7075-T6 was fatigued under both ultrasonic loading (20kHz) and rotating bending (50Hz) in the environments of controlled humidity, distilled water and oxygen gas respectively, to investigate the availability of ultrasonic fatigue test as a time-saving tool for the reliability evaluation of materials subjected to conventional frequency loading. Although fatigue strength decreased slightly at relative humidity below 60-70%, it degraded significantly when the humidity was increased beyond that level, irrespective of the loading frequency. However, the mechanisms of strength degradation involved in high humidity are quite different. Under rotating bending, fatigue strength decreased because crack growth was accelerated due to brittle fracture, whileas the decrease in fatigue strength under ultrasonic loading was caused by crack propagation transition from tensile mode to shear mode cracking.

  16. Characterization of prior cold worked and age hardened Cu-3Ti-1Cd alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Markandeya, R. . E-mail: marksravvala@yahoo.co.in; Nagarjuna, S.; Sarma, D.S.

    2005-05-15

    The influence of cold deformation by 50%, 75% and 90% on the age-hardening behavior of a Cu-3Ti-1Cd alloy has been investigated by hardness, tensile tests and light optical as well as transmission electron microscopy. The hardness of Cu-3Ti-1Cd alloy increased from 111 Hv in the solution-treated condition to 355 Hv in 90% cold worked and peak aged condition. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths of Cu-3Ti-1Cd alloy reached maxima of 922 MPa and 1035 MPa, respectively, on 90% deformation and peak aging. The microstructure of the deformed alloy exhibited elongated grains and deformation bands. The maximum strength on peak aging was brought about by the precipitation of ordered, metastable, coherent {beta}' Cu{sub 4}Ti phase, in addition to high dislocation density and deformation twins. Both the hardness and the strength of the alloy decreased on overaging due to the development of the incoherent equilibrium phase {beta} Cu{sub 3}Ti in a cellular structure form. However, the morphology of the discontinuous precipitation was changed to globular form at high deformation levels.

  17. Hardening mechanisms in a dynamic strain aging alloy, Hastelloy X, during isothermal and thermomechanical cyclic deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Castelli, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    The relative contributions of the hardening mechanisms in Hastelloy X during cyclic deformation were investigated by conducting isothermal cyclic deformation tests within a total strain range of +/-0.3 pct and at several temperatures and strain rates, and thermomechanical tests within several different temperature limits. The results of the TEM examinations and special constant structure tests showed that the precipitation on dislocations of Cr23C6 contributed to hardening, but only after sufficient time above 500 C. Solute drag alone produced very considerable cyclic hardening. Heat dislocation densities, peaking around 10 exp 11 per sq cm, were found to develop at temperatures producing the greatest cyclic hardening.

  18. Elastic limit and microplastic response of hardened steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zaccone, M.A. ); Krauss, G. . Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Tempered martensite-retained austenite microstructures were produced by direct quenching a series of 41XX medium carbon steels, direct quenching and reheating a series of five 0.8C-Cr-Ni-Mo steels and intercritically austenitizing at various temperatures, and quenching a SAE 52100 steel. All specimens were tempered either at 150 C or at 200 C. Specimens were subjected to compression and tension testing in the microstrain regime to determine the elastic limits and microplastic response of the microstructures. The retained austenite and matrix carbon content of the intercritically austenized specimens were measured by X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy. The elastic limit of the microstructures decreases with increasing amounts of retained austenite. Refining of the austenite distribution increases the elastic limit. Low elastic limits are mainly due to low flow stresses in the austenite and not internal stresses. The elastic limit correlates with the largest austenite free-mean path by a Hall-Petch type equation. The elastic limit increases with decreasing intercritical austenitizing temperature in the SAE 52100 due to a lower carbon content in the matrix reducing the retained austenite levels and retained carbides that refine grain size and, therefore, the austenite distribution in quenched specimens. In the microplastic region, the strain is accommodated by successively smaller austenite regions until the flow strength matches that of the martensite. Reheating and quenching refines the microstructure and renders the austenite unstable in the microplastic regime, causing transformation of the austenite to martensite by a strain-induced mechanism. The transformation of austenite to martensite occurs by a stress-assisted mechanism in medium carbon steels. The low elastic limits in medium carbon steels were due to the inability of the strain from the stress-assisted transformation to balance the plastic strain accumulated in the austenite.

  19. Computer Modelling of Age Hardening for Isothermally Aged Al-Mg-Si Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linda; Ferguson, W. George

    Computer modelling, due to it saving time and money, has been widely used in industrial simulation. The present model, which is based on the Shercliff-Ashby methodology for the ageing of aluminum alloys, can be used to predict the yield strength (or hardness) of Al-Mg-Si alloys for the artificial ageing temperature below the solvus temperature as a function of time. With suitable input data, this model can be applied to most Al-Mg-Si alloys, wrought or cast. In the present model, input data for aluminium alloys of A356, A357 and 6061 is taken from the open literature, and then the unknown constants are calibrated from these data. After calibration, the ageing curves are constructed for different isothermal ageing temperatures. Finally, experimentally ageing heat treatments at different temperatures for casting alloys of A356 were done to validate the model.

  20. Age hardening and creep resistance of cast Al–Cu alloy modified by praseodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Zhihao; Qiu, Feng; Wu, Xiaoxue; Liu, Yingying; Jiang, Qichuan

    2013-12-15

    The effects of praseodymium on age hardening behavior and creep resistance of cast Al–Cu alloy were investigated. The results indicated that praseodymium facilitated the formation of the θ′ precipitates during the age process and improved the hardness of the Al–Cu alloy. Besides, praseodymium resulted in the formation of the Al{sub 11}Pr{sub 3} phase in the grain boundaries and among the dendrites of the modified alloy. Because of the good thermal stability of Al{sub 11}Pr{sub 3} phase, it inhibits grain boundary migration and dislocation movement during the creep process, which contributes to the improvement in the creep resistance of the modified alloy at elevated temperatures. - Highlights: • Pr addition enhances the hardness and creep resistance of the Al–Cu alloy. • Pr addition facilitates the formation of the θ′ precipitates. • Pr addition results in the formation of the Al11Pr3 phase in the Al–Cu alloy.

  1. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Radiation response of pseudo-MOS transistors fabricated in hardened fully-depleted SIMOX SOI wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Da-Wei; Zhang, Zheng-Xuan; Zhang, Shuai; Chen, Ming; Yu, Wen-Jie; Wang, Ru; Tian, Hao; Liu, Zhang-Li

    2009-10-01

    The total dose radiation response of pseudo-MOS transistors fabricated in hardened and unhardened FD (fully-depleted) SIMOX (Separation by Implanted Oxygen) SOI (Silicon-on-insulator) wafers is presented. At 1 Mrad(Si) radiation dose, the threshold voltage shift of the pseudo-MOS transistor is reduced from -115.5 to -1.9 V by the hardening procedure. The centroid location of the net positive charge trapped in BOX, the hole-trap density and the hole capture fraction of BOX are also shown. The results suggest that hardened FD SIMOX SOI wafers can perform well in a radiation environment.

  2. Influence of cold rolling degree and ageing treatments on the precipitation hardening of 2024 and 7075 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimi, A.; Yousfi, H.; Trari, M.

    2013-08-01

    In the present work, the precipitation hardening of 2024 and 7075 aluminum alloys is investigated as a function of cold rolling degree, ageing time and temperature using Vickers microhardness measurements and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It is found that a variation in such parameters can improve the hardness and plays an important role in the precipitation hardening process. At specific ageing temperature, the large cold rolled 7075 alloy exhibits two peaks of hardness. Moreover, for both alloys, the increment of hardness during ageing decreases with increasing the cold rolling degree. While in some cases microhardness measurements give impression that the precipitation reaction is slowed down by deformation, DSC analysis indicates that the precipitation is much accelerated since only a slight deformation decreases strongly the temperatures of reactions. However, the degree of cold rolling does not play a crucial role.

  3. Friction Stir Welding of Age-Hardenable Aluminum Alloys: A Parametric Approach Using RSM Based GRA Coupled With PCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, D.; Rao, V. S.

    2014-04-01

    Age-hardenable aluminum alloys, primarily used in the aerospace, automobile and marine industries (2×××, 6××× and 7×××), can be welded using solid-state welding techniques. Friction stir welding is an emerging solid-state welding technique used to join both similar and dissimilar materials. The strength of a friction stir welded joint depends on the joining process parameters. Therefore, a combination of the statistical techniques of a response surface methodology based on a grey relational analysis coupled to a principal component analysis was proposed to select the process parameters suitable for joining AA 2024 and AA 6061 aluminum alloys via friction stir welding. The significant process parameters, such as rotational speed, welding speed, axial load and pin shapes (PS) were considered during the statistical experiment. The results indicate that the square PS plays a vital role and yields an ultimate tensile strength of 141 MPa for an elongation of 12 % versus cylinder and taper pin profiles. The root cause for joint strength loss and fracture mode was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Severe material flow during macro defects, such as pin holes and porosity, degrades the joint strength by approximately 44 % for AA 2024 and 51 % for AA 6061 fabricated FS-welded aluminum alloys relative to the base material. The results of this approach are useful for accurately controlling the response and optimize the process parameters.

  4. Inhibition of environmental fatigue crack propagation in age-hardenable aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Jenifer S.

    Age-hardenable aluminum alloys, such as C47A-T86 (Al-Cu-Li) and 7075-T651 (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu), used in aerospace structures are susceptible to environment assisted fatigue crack propagation (EFCP) by hydrogen environment embrittlement. This research demonstrates effective inhibition of EFCP in C47A-T86 and 7075-T651 under both full immersion in aqueous chloride solution and atmospheric exposure which more accurately describes aircraft service conditions. Inhibition is attributed to the presence of a crack tip passive film reducing H production and uptake, as explained by the film rupture-hydrogen embrittlement mechanism, and can be accomplished through both addition of a passivating ion (ion-assisted inhibition) and localized-alloy corrosion creating passivating conditions (self inhibition). Addition of molybdate to both bulk chloride solution and surface chloride droplets eliminates the effect of environment on fatigue crack propagation in C47A-T86 and 7075-1651 at sufficiently low loading frequencies and high stress ratio by yielding crack growth rates equivalent to those for fatigue in ultra high vacuum. The preeminent corrosion inhibitor, chromate, has not been reported to produce such complete inhibition. Inhibition is promoted by reduced loading frequency, increased crack tip molybdate concentration, and potential at or anodic to free corrosion; each of which favors passivity. The inhibiting effect of molybdate parallels chromate, establishing molybdate as a viable chromate replacement inhibitor. The ability of molybdate to inhibit EFCP is enhanced by atmospheric exposures producing surface electrolyte droplets; crack growth rates are reduced by an order of magnitude under loading frequencies as high as 30 Hz, a frequency at which inhibition was not possible under full immersion. Al-Cu-Mg/Li alloys, including 2024-T351, are capable of self inhibition of EFCP. This behavior is attributed to localized corrosion through dealloying of anodic Al2CuMg or Al2Cu

  5. The role of twinning deformation on the hardening response of polycrystalline magnesium from discrete dislocation dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Haidong; Aubry, Sylvie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; ...

    2015-04-13

    The mechanical response of micro-twinned polycrystalline magnesium was studied through three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). A systematic interaction model between dislocations and (1012) tension twin boundaries (TBs) was proposed and introduced into the DDD framework. In addition, a nominal grain boundary (GB) model agreeing with experimental results was also introduced to mimic the GB’s barrier effect. The current simulation results show that TBs act as a strong obstacle to gliding dislocations, which contributes significantly to the hardening behavior of magnesium. On the other hand, the deformation accommodated by twinning plays a softening role. Therefore, the concave shape of the Mgmore » stress-strain curve results from the competition between dislocation-TB induced hardening and twinning deformation induced softening. At low strain levels, twinning deformation induced softening dominates and a decreasing hardening rate is observed in Stage-I. In Stage-II, both the hardening and softening effects decline, but twinning deformation induced softening declines faster, which leads to an increasing hardening rate.« less

  6. The role of twinning deformation on the hardening response of polycrystalline magnesium from discrete dislocation dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Haidong; Aubry, Sylvie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; El-Awady, Jaafar A.

    2015-04-13

    The mechanical response of micro-twinned polycrystalline magnesium was studied through three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). A systematic interaction model between dislocations and (1012) tension twin boundaries (TBs) was proposed and introduced into the DDD framework. In addition, a nominal grain boundary (GB) model agreeing with experimental results was also introduced to mimic the GB’s barrier effect. The current simulation results show that TBs act as a strong obstacle to gliding dislocations, which contributes significantly to the hardening behavior of magnesium. On the other hand, the deformation accommodated by twinning plays a softening role. Therefore, the concave shape of the Mg stress-strain curve results from the competition between dislocation-TB induced hardening and twinning deformation induced softening. At low strain levels, twinning deformation induced softening dominates and a decreasing hardening rate is observed in Stage-I. In Stage-II, both the hardening and softening effects decline, but twinning deformation induced softening declines faster, which leads to an increasing hardening rate.

  7. Influence of Thermal Aging on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Dual Phase Precipitation Hardened Powder Metallurgy Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Increasing demand for high strength powder metallurgy (PM) steels has resulted in the development of dual phase PM steels. In this work, the effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels of varying ferrite-martensite content were examined. Quantitative analyses of the inherent porosity and phase fractions were conducted on the steels and no significant differences were noted with respect to aging temperature. Tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation to fracture all increased with increasing aging temperature reaching maxima at 538°C in most cases. Increased strength and decreased ductility were observed in steels of higher martensite content. Nanoindentation of the individual microconstituents was employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the strengthening contributions. Both the ferrite and martensite hardness values increased with aging temperature and exhibited similar maxima to the bulk tensile properties. Due to the complex non-uniform stresses and strains associated with conventional nanoindentation, micropillar compression has become an attractive method to probe local mechanical behavior while limiting strain gradients and contributions from surrounding features. In this study, micropillars of ferrite and martensite were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels. Compression testing was conducted using a nanoindenter equipped with a flat punch indenter. The stress-strain curves of the individual microconstituents were calculated from the load-displacement curves less the extraneous displacements of the system. Using a rule of mixtures approach in conjunction with porosity corrections, the mechanical properties of ferrite and martensite were combined for comparison to tensile tests of the bulk material, and reasonable agreement was found for the ultimate tensile

  8. Age hardening and the potential for superplasticity in a fine-grained Al-Mg-Li-Zr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Minoru; Berbon, P.B.; Langdon, T.G.; Horita, Zenji; Nemoto, Minoru; Tsenev, N.K.; Valiev, R.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the age-hardening characteristics and the mechanical properties of an Al-5.5 pct Mg-2.2 pct Li-0.12 pct Zr alloy processed by equal-channel angular (ECA) pressing to give a very fine grain size of {approximately} 1.2 {micro}m. The results show that peak aging occurs more rapidly when the grain size is very fine, and this effect is interpreted in terms of the higher volume of precipitate-free zones in the fine-grained material. Mechanical testing demonstrates that the ECA-pressed material exhibits high strength and good ductility at room temperature compared to conventional Al alloys containing Li. Elongations of up to {approximately} 550 pct may be achieved at an elevated temperature of 603 K in the ECA-pressed condition, thereby confirming that, in this condition, the alloy may be a suitable candidate material for use in superplastic forming operations.

  9. Thermal plasticity is related to the hardening response of heat shock protein expression in two Bactrocera fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun-tao; Chen, Bing; Li, Zhi-hong

    2014-08-01

    It is generally believed that widely distributed species differ in their thermal plasticity from narrowly distributed species, but how differences in thermal plasticity are regulated at the molecular level remains largely unknown. Here, we conducted a comparative study of two closely related invasive fruit fly species, Bactrocera correcta and Bactroceradorsalis, in China. The two species had overlapping distributions, but B. dorsalis had a much wider range throughout the country and a longer invasive history than B. correcta. We first examined the effects of thermal acclimation on the ability of the two fruit flies to survive heat stress. The heat shock tolerance of B. dorsalis was significantly enhanced by heat hardening at 35, 37, 39 and 41°C, but that of B. correcta was only enhanced by heat hardening at 39°C and 41°C. Thus, the more widespread species has a higher thermal plasticity than the narrowly distributed species. We then determined the expression of Hsp70 and Hsp90 during different developmental stages and their responses to thermal hardening. The expression of both Hsp70 and Hsp90 in larvae was upregulated in response to heat hardening, starting at 35°C for B. dorsalis and at 39°C for B. correcta. The two species exhibited a highly consistent pattern of thermal response in terms of their heat shock survival rates and levels of Hsp gene expression. The results suggest that the difference in thermal plasticity may be responsible for the different distributions of the two species and that Hsp expression may be involved in the regulation of thermal plasticity. Our findings have important implications for the prediction of the thermal limits and ecological responses of related species in nature.

  10. The Effect of Artificial Aging on Tensile Work Hardening Characteristics of a Cast Al-7 Pct Si-0.55 Pct Mg (A357) Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiryakioğlu, M.; Alexopoulos, N. D.

    2008-11-01

    Al-7 pct Si-0.55 pct Mg (A357) alloy specimens excised from continuously cast bars were solution treated at 540 °C for 22 hours, quenched, and finally aged artificially at 155 °C, 175 °C, and 205 °C for various times. Tensile work hardening characteristics were investigated using Kocks Mecking (KM) plots for every specimen out of the 90 totally investigated. Each specimen followed the stage III KM work hardening model. The effect of artificial aging, i.e., matrix strength on the KM work hardening model parameters, was investigated. The results of the current analysis indicated that (1) unlike previously found for wrought Al-Mg-Si alloys, the shearing-bypassing transition in β″ precipitates takes place at peak strength, (2) the transition from stage II to III work hardening is affected by yield strength and temper, (3) the KM parameters are strongly affected by artificial aging, and (4) the elongation to fracture is determined by stage III work hardening, especially by parameter K of the KM model.

  11. Effect of Aged Microstructure on the Strength and Work Hardening Behavior of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Rajdeep; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Ghosal, P.; Nandy, T. K.; Ray, K. K.

    2015-08-01

    This investigation is aimed at revealing the deformation behavior of a β-Ti alloy, namely Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al, under various aged conditions with an emphasis on correlating the work hardening characteristics of the alloy with its corresponding microstructure. The alloy was cast, forged, hot rolled, solution treated, and aged differently to generate microstructures with varying amounts and morphologies of α- and β-phases. While microstructural characterization was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), tensile tests were conducted to study the work hardening behavior of the alloy. One may infer from the results that the strength of the alloy deteriorates, while the elongation to failure improves with an increase in the aging temperature. The strength of the alloy depends strongly on the amount of α- and the inter-α-spacing. The work hardening behavior of the alloy aged at temperatures below 808 K (535 °C) is markedly different than those aged at higher temperatures. This characteristic behavior has been explained using the deformation signatures in the α-phase revealed by TEM examinations. A stress gradient-based model and a dislocation evolution-type model are found to satisfactorily describe the strength and the work hardening behavior of the alloy aged under different conditions.

  12. Microstructure, properties, and age hardening behavior of a thermomechanically processed ultralow-carbon Cu-bearing high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Mishra, B.; Das, S.; Chatterjee, S.

    2005-03-01

    An ultralow-carbon steel alloyed with Ni, Mn, Mo, and Cu and microalloyed with Nb and Ti was subjected to a three-stage controlled rolling operation followed by water quenching. The effect of thermomechanical processing on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and age-hardening behavior of the steel was evaluated. The precipitation behavior of Cu at different aging temperatures was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The high strength values obtained in the present steel are due to the fine-lath martensite structure along with tiny precipitates of microalloying carbide and carbonitride of Ti and Nb at all finish rolling temperatures (FRTs). The increased strength value at the lower FRT is due to the finer lath width and packet size of martensite. The large TiN particles and the coarse martensite-austenite (MA) constituents impaired the impact-toughness value of the steel at subambient temperature. On aging at different temperatures, a wide variation in structure and properties has been obtained. At low aging temperatures, coherent Cu particles form and a peak strength is obtained due to the formation of fine ɛ-Cu precipitates. On increasing aging temperatures, the Cu particle size increases, with a simultaneous decrease in dislocation density in the matrix resulting in a continuous decrease in strength.

  13. Effect of strain rate on bake hardening response of BH220 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anindya; Tarafder, Soumitro; Sivaprasad, S.; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2015-09-01

    This study aims at understanding the bake hardening ability of ultra low carbon BH220 steel at different strain rates. The as-received material has been pre-strained to four different levels and then deformed in tension under (a) as pre-strained state and (b) after baking at 170 ∘C for 20 minutes, at three different strain rates of 0.001, 0.1 and 100/s. In both the conditions, yield stress increased with pre-strain and strain rate, but bake hardening ability was found to decrease when strain rate was increased. The strain rate sensitivity of the material was also found to decrease with bake hardening. Generation of dislocation forests and their subsequent immobility during baking treatment enables them to act as long range obstacles during further deformation. At higher strain rates, less amount of dislocations are produced which can interact with themselves and produce hardening, because of which bake hardening ability and the strain rate drops. A dislocation based strengthening model, as proposed by Larour et al. 2011 [7], was used to predict the yield stress values obtained at different conditions. The equation produced excellent co-relation with the experimental data.

  14. SEU response of design- and resistor-hardened D-latches in the SA3300 microprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, F.W.; Corbett, W.T.; Axness, C.L.; Wunsch, T.F.; Hughes, K.L.; Treece, R.K.; Hass, K.J.; Hash, G.L.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of hardening the SA3300 against SEU using design and design-plus-resistor approaches is presented. The full performance and SEU tolerance requirements are met using R{sub fb} {le} 160 k{Omega}. Lumped-parameter circuit simulations are used to analyze results. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  15. The effects of solution treatment on the mechanical properties of age-hardened A-286 bar stock at elevated and cryogenic temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties are presented of solution treated and age hardened A-286 corrosion resistant steel bar stock. Material solution treated at 899 C or 982 C, each followed by an age hardening treatment of 718 C, was evaluated. Test specimens manufactured from 1.50 inch (3.81 cm) diameter bar stock were tested at temperatures from +649 C to -253 C. The test data indicated excellent tensile, yield, elongation and reduction-in-area properties at all testing temperatures for both solution treated and aged materials. Cryogenic temperature notched tensile, impact, and shear tests indicated excellent notch strength, ductility, and shear values. There was very little difference in the mechanical properties of the two solution treated and aged materials. The only exception was that the 962 C solution treated and aged material had superior stress rupture properties at 649 C.

  16. Case hardenability at high carbon levels

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, H.W.

    1995-02-01

    Loss of hardenability in the case was thought to be responsible for a lower than specified hardness found on a large carburized bushing. Pseudo Jominy testing on several high hardenability carburizing grades confirmed that hardenability fade was present at carbon levels above 0.65% and particularly for those steels containing molybdenum. Analysis of previous work provided a formula for calculating Jominy hardenability at various carbon levels. Again the results confirmed that the loss of hardenability was more severe in steels containing molybdenum.

  17. Precipitation of β' phase and hardening in dental-casting Ag-20Pd-12Au-14.5Cu alloys subjected to aging treatments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghwan; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Hieda, Junko; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Fukui, Hisao

    2014-03-01

    The age-hardening behavior of the dental-casting Ag-20Pd-12Au-14.5Cu alloy subjected to aging treatment at around 673K is well known, and this hardening has been widely employed in various applications. To date, the age-hardening of this alloy has been explained to attribute to the precipitation of a β phase, which is a B2-type ordered CuPd phase or PdCuxZn1-x phase. In this study, results obtained from microstructural observations using a transmission electron microscopy and a scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed that a fine L10-type ordered β' phase precipitated in the matrix and a coarse-structure region (consisting of Ag- and Cu-rich regions) appeared after aging treatment at 673K and contributed to increase in hardness. The microstructure of the coarse β phase, which existed before aging treatment, did not change by aging treatment. Thus, it is concluded that the fine β' phase precipitated by aging treatment contributed more to increase in hardness than the coarse-structure region and coarse β phase.

  18. [Responses of Arma chinensis cold tolerance to rapid cold hardening and underlying physiological mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Peng; Song, Li-Wen; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Chen, Yue-Qu; Zuo, Tong-Tong; Wang, Jun; Sun, Wei

    2012-03-01

    Rapid cold hardening can enhance the cold tolerance of some insects. To explore the effects of different cold hardening induction temperature on the cold tolerance of Arma chinensis and related physiological mechanisms, the 3rd generation A. chinensis adults reared indoor were treated with cooling at 15, 10, and 4 degrees C for 4 h, respectively, or with gradual cooling from 15 degrees C for 4 h to 10 degrees C for 4 h, and finally to 4 degrees C for 4 h. The super-cooling point, water content, and the contents of low molecular carbohydrates, glycerol, and amino acids of the adults after cooling and the adults cold tolerance at 0, -5, and -10 degrees C were measured by thermocouple, high performance liquid chromatography, and other analytical techniques. When exposed at -10 degrees C after cooling, the survival rate of the adults treated with gradual cooling or treated with cooling at 4 degrees C for 4 h was averagely 58.3%, while that of the adults reared at room temperature (25 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C) or treated with cooling at 15 degrees C or 10 degrees C for 4 h decreased significantly, with an average of 8.9%. The super-cooling point of the adults treated with gradual cooling or with cooling at 4 degrees C for 4 h was -15.6 degrees C, which was averagely 1.3 degrees C lower than that of the other treatments. The water content of the adults had no significant difference among all treatments, with an average of 61.8%, but the glucose, sorbitolum, glycerol, Ala, and Glu contents in treatments gradual cooling and cooling at 4 degrees C for 4 h increased by 2.82-fold, 2.65-fold, 3.49-fold, 51.3%, and 80.2%, while the fucose, mannose, and Pro contents decreased by 68.4%, 52.2%, and 30.2%, respectively, as compared with the other treatments. The fructose content showed no significant difference among all treatments. It was suggested that rapid cool hardening had a critical temperature to induce the physiological metabolism process of adult A. chinensis, and

  19. Strengthening in rapidly solidified age hardened Cu-Cr and Cu-Cr-Zr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Correia, J.B.; Davies, H.A.; Sellars, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Cu-Cr and Cu-Cr-Zr alloy powders were produced by water atomization and consolidated by warm extrusion. Coherent Cr precipitation is associated with the peak hardness condition in these alloys. The mechanical properties obtained after aging treatments, namely the peak hardness, and the corresponding proof stress are related to the concentration of the alloying element initially in solid solution in the powders. The strengthening observed is interpreted in terms of theories of precipitation and dispersion strengthening and compared with similar analyses reported previously in the literature for these alloy systems.

  20. Ordering Transformation and Age Hardening in a Ni-Cr-W Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangyu; Hu, Rui; Li, Xiaolin; Luo, Gongliao; Li, Jinshan; Fu, Hengzhi

    2016-12-01

    The microstructural changes occurring in a Ni-Cr-W superalloy during prolonged exposure to proper temperature have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that nanometer-sized C11b (Pt2Mo-type) and DO22 superlattices can precipitate in the Ni-Cr-W alloy by means of a simple aging treatment at temperatures varying in the range of 773 K to 973 K (500 °C to 700 °C). The mechanism of transformation to long-range order has been revealed to accord with continuous mode based on transmission electron microscopy results and variation trend in Vickers microhardness. No signs of overaging and coarsening of C11b and DO22 phases with further aging have been found, which indicates that both of them have a high-thermal stability. The orientation relationships and interfaces between C11b/DO22 precipitates and Ni-based matrix have been investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and the results reveal that the interfaces between C11b/DO22 precipitates and surrounding matrix are coherent at the atomic scale. Because of the high-density nanometer-sized C11b/DO22 precipitates, the microhardness of the alloy is improved remarkably.

  1. Modifications on A-F hardening rule to assess ratcheting response of materials and its interaction with fatigue damage under uniaxial stress cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadzadehrishehri, Gholamreza

    Ratcheting deformation is accumulated progressively over three distinct stages in materials undergoing asymmetrical cyclic stresses. The present thesis evaluates the triphasic ratcheting response of materials from two stand points: (i) Mechanistic approach at which stages of ratcheting progress over stress cycles was related to mechanistic parameters such as stress level, lifespan, mechanical properties and the softening/hardening response of materials. Mechanistic approach formulated in this thesis was employed to assess ratcheting strain over triphasic stages in various steel and copper alloys under uniaxial stress cycles. Good agreements were achieved between the predicted ratcheting strain values based on the proposed formulation and those of experimentally reported. (ii) Kinematic hardening rule approach at which the hardening rule was characterized by the yield surface translation mechanism and the corresponding plastic modulus calculated based on the consistency condition. Various cyclic plasticity models were employed to assess ratcheting response of materials under different loading conditions. The Armstrong-Frederick (A-F) hardening rule was taken as the backbone of ratcheting analysis developed in this thesis mainly due to less complexity and number of coefficients in the hardening rule as compared with other earlier developed hardening rules in the literature. To predict triphasic ratcheting strain over stress cycles, the A-F hardening rule has been further developed by means of new strain rate coefficients gamma 2 and delta. These coefficients improved the hardening rule capability to calibrate and control the rate of ratcheting over its progressive stages. The modified hardening formulation holds the coefficients of the hardening rule to control stress-strain hysteresis loops generated over stress cycles during ratcheting process plus the ratcheting rates over stages I, II, and III. These coefficients were calibrated and defined based on the applied

  2. Initial precipitation and hardening mechanism during non-isothermal aging in an Al–Mg–Si–Cu 6005A alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wenchao; Ji, Shouxun; Huang, Lanping; Sheng, Xiaofei; Li, Zhou; Wang, Mingpu

    2014-08-15

    The characterization of precipitation and hardening mechanism during non-isothermal aging had been investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy for an Al–Mg–Si–Cu 6005A alloy. It was proposed that the needle-shaped β″ precipitates with a three-dimension coherency strain-field and an increased number density in the Al matrix provided the maximum strengthening effect for the Al–Mg–Si–Cu 6005A alloy. Simultaneously, it was also found that the formation and evolution of clusters in the early precipitation were associated with the vacancy binding energy, during which Si atoms played an important role in controlling the numbers density of Mg/Si co-clusters, and the excess Si atoms provided the increased number of nucleation sites for the subsequent precipitates to strengthen and improve the precipitation rate. Finally, based on the experimental observation and theoretical analysis, the precipitation sequence during the early precipitation in the Al–Mg–Si–Cu 6005A alloy was proposed as: supersaturated solid solution → Si-vacancy pairs, Mg-vacancy pairs and Mg clusters → Si clusters, and dissolution of Mg clusters → Mg atoms diffusion into the existing Si clusters → Mg/Si co-clusters → GP zone. - Highlights: • β″ precipitates provide the maximum strengthening effect for the 6005A alloy. • Si atoms play an important role in controlling the numbers of Mg/Si co-clusters. • The early aging sequence is deduced based on the solute-vacancy binding energy.

  3. Proposed radiation hardened mobile vehicle for Chernobyl dismantlement and nuclear accident response

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, M.S.; Holliday, M.A.; Karpachov, J.A.; Ivanov, A.

    1995-01-01

    Researchers are developing a radiation hardened, Telerobotic Dismantling System (TDS) to remediate the Chernobyl facility. To withstand the severe radiation fields, the robotic system, will rely on electrical motors, actuators, and relays proven in the Chernobyl power station. Due to its dust suppression characteristics and ability to cut arbitrary materials the authors propose using a water knife as the principle tool to slice up the large fuel containing masses. The front end of the robot will use a minimum number of moving parts by locating most of the susceptible and bulky components outside the work area. Hardened and shielded video cameras will be designed for remote control and viewing of the robotic functions. Operators will supervise and control robot movements based on feedback from a suite of sensory systems that would include vision systems, radiation detection and measurement systems and force reflection systems. A gripper will be instrumented with a variety of sensors (e.g. force, torque, or tactile), allowing varying debris surface properties to be grasped. The gripper will allow the operator to manipulate and segregate debris items without entering the radiologically and physically dangerous dismantlement operations area. The robots will initially size reduce the FCM`s to reduce the primary sources of the airborne radionuclides. The robot will then remove the high level waste for packaging or decontamination, and storage nearby.

  4. Precipitation hardening in aluminum alloy 6022

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, W.F.; Laughlin, D.E.

    1999-03-05

    Although the precipitation process in Al-Mg-Si alloys has been extensively studied, the understanding of the hardening process is still incomplete, since any change in composition, processing and aging practices, etc., could affect the precipitation hardening behavior. In this paper, hardness measurements, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy have been utilized to study the precipitation hardening behavior in aluminum alloy 6022.

  5. Apoplastic Sugars, Fructans, Fructan Exohydrolase, and Invertase in Winter Oat: Responses to Second-Phase Cold Hardening

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, David P.; Henson, Cynthia A.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in apoplastic carbohydrate concentrations and activities of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes were determined in crown tissues of oat (Avena sativa L., cv Wintok) during cold hardening. During second-phase hardening (−3°C for 3 d) levels of fructan, sucrose, glucose, and fructose in the apoplast increased significantly above that in nonhardened and first-phase-hardened plants. The extent of the increase in apoplastic fructan during second-phase hardening varied with the degree of fructan polymerization (DP) (e.g. DP3 and DP4 increased to a greater extent than DP7 and DP > 7). Activities of invertase and fructan exohydrolase in the crown apoplast increased approximately 4-fold over nonhardened and first-phase-hardened plants. Apoplastic fluid extracted from nonhardened, first-phase-hardened, and second-phase-hardened crown tissues had low levels, of symplastic contamination, as determined by malate dehydrogenase activity. The significance of these results in relation to increases in freezing tolerance from second-phase hardening is discussed.

  6. Ageing behaviour of an Fe-20Ni-1.8Mn-1.6Ti-0.59Al (wt%) maraging alloy: clustering, precipitation and hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Pereloma, E.V. . E-mail: elena.pereloma@spme.monash.edu.au; Shekhter, A.; Miller, M.K.; Ringer, S.P.

    2004-11-08

    Changes in the solute distribution as well as the evolution of precipitation, microstructure and mechanical properties have been studied in an experimental maraging Fe-20Ni-1.8Mn-1.5Ti-0.59Al (wt%) alloy during ageing at 550 deg C. An initial hardening reaction within 5 s is reported, which is remarkable in terms of extent and rapidity. This strengthening was caused by the formation of complex multi-component atomic co-clusters containing primarily Ni-Ti-Al as well as some Mn. This cluster strengthened condition produced the optimum toughness observed throughout the ageing sequence. After 60 s ageing, the appearance of discrete precipitation of needle-shaped {eta}-Ni{sub 3}Ti particles was associated with a second rise in hardness towards an eventual peak at 600 s. This precipitation hardening was accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in ductility. A reverse transformation of martensite to austenite occurs progressively during ageing and this contributes to the initial and secondary softening.

  7. Hydraulic Signals from the Roots and Rapid Cell-Wall Hardening in Growing Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves Are Primary Responses to Polyethylene Glycol-Induced Water Deficits.

    PubMed

    Chazen, O.; Neumann, P. M.

    1994-04-01

    We investigated mechanisms involved in inhibition of maize (Zea mays L.) leaf-elongation growth following addition of non-penetrating osmolyte to the root medium. The elongation rate of the first true leaf remained inhibited for 4 h after addition of polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG; -0.5 MPa water potential), despite progressive osmotic adjustment in the growing leaf tissues. Thus, inhibition of leaf growth did not appear to be directly related to loss of leaf capacity to maintain osmotic potential gradients. Comparative cell-wall-extension capacities of immature (still expanding) leaf tissues were measured by creep extensiometry using whole plants. Reductions in irreversible (plastic) extension capacity (i.e. wall hardening) were detected minutes and hours after addition of PEG to the roots, by both in vivo and in vitro assay. The onset of the wall-hardening response could be detected by in vitro assay only 2 min after addition of PEG. Thus, initiation of wall hardening appeared to precede transcription-regulated responses. The inhibition of both leaf growth and wall-extension capacity was reversed by removal of PEG after 4 h. Moreover, wall hardening could be induced by other osmolytes (mannitol, NaCl). Thus, the leaf responses did not appear to be related to any specific (toxic) effect of PEG. We conclude that hardening of leaf cell walls is a primary event in the chain of growth regulatory responses to PEG-induced water deficits in maize. The signaling processes by which PEG, which is not expected to penetrate root cell walls or membranes, might cause cell-wall hardening in relatively distant leaves was also investigated. Plants with live or killed roots were exposed to PEG. The killed roots were presumed to be unable to produce hormonal or electrical signals in response to addition of PEG; however, inhibition of leaf elongation and hardening of leaf cell walls were detected with both live and killed roots. Thus, neither hormonal signaling nor signaling via

  8. Influence of Thermal Aging on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Dual-Phase, Precipitation-Hardened, Powder Metallurgy Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J. L.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual-phase, precipitation-hardened, powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels of varying ferrite-martensite content were examined. Quantitative analyses of the inherent porosity and phase fractions were conducted on the steels, and no significant differences were noted with respect to aging temperature. Tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation to fracture all increased with increasing aging temperature reaching maxima at 811 K (538 °C) in most cases. Increased strength and decreased ductility were observed in steels of higher martensite content. Nanoindentation of the individual microconstituents was employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the strengthening contributions. Both the ferrite and martensite nanohardness values increased with aging temperature and exhibited similar maxima to the bulk tensile properties.

  9. Desiccation enhances rapid cold-hardening in the flesh fly Sarcophaga bullata: evidence for cross tolerance between rapid physiological responses.

    PubMed

    Yi, Shu-Xia; Gantz, J D; Lee, Richard E

    2017-01-01

    Many insects use rapid cold-hardening (RCH), a physiological response to sub-lethal exposure to stressors, such as chilling and desiccation, to enhance their cold tolerance within minutes. Recently, drought-induced RCH, triggered by brief, mild desiccation, was described in larvae of the freeze-tolerant gall fly (Eurosta solidaginis). However, its prevalence and ecological significance in other insects is not known. Consequently, we used a freeze-intolerant model, the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata, to investigate the effects and mechanisms of drought-induced RCH. In addition, we investigated how drought- and cold-induced RCH interact by exposing flies to both desiccation and chilling. Desiccation for 3 h increased larval pupariation after cold shock from 28 to 40 %-the first example of drought-induced RCH in both a freeze-intolerant insect and in a non-overwintering life stage. We also found that desiccation and chilling together enhanced the cold hardiness of larvae and adults more than either did separately, suggesting that drought and cold trigger distinct physiological mechanisms that interact to afford greater cold tolerance. These results suggest that drought-induced RCH is a highly conserved response used by insects with diverse life history strategies. Furthermore, the protective interaction between drought- and cold-induced RCH suggests that, in nature, insects use multiple cues and physiological mechanisms to fine-tune their response to changing ambient conditions.

  10. Comparative study of structure formation and mechanical behavior of age-hardened Ti–Nb–Zr and Ti–Nb–Ta shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Inaekyan, K.; Brailovski, V.; Prokoshkin, S.; Pushin, V.; Dubinskiy, S.; Sheremetyev, V.

    2015-05-15

    This work sets out to study the peculiar effects of aging treatment on the structure and mechanical behavior of cold-rolled and annealed biomedical Ti–21.8Nb–6.0Zr (TNZ) and Ti–19.7Nb–5.8Ta (TNT) (at.%) shape memory alloys by means of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, functional fatigue and thermomechanical testing techniques. Dissimilar effects of aging treatment on the mechanical behavior of Zr- and Ta-doped alloys are explained by the differences in the ω-phase formation rate, precipitate size, fraction and distribution, and by their effect on the alloys' critical stresses and transformation temperatures. Even short-time aging of the TNZ alloy leads to its drastic embrittlement caused by “overaging”. On the contrary, during aging of the TNT alloy, formation of finely dispersed ω-phase precipitates is gradual and controllable, which makes it possible to finely adjust the TNT alloy functional properties using precipitation hardening mechanisms. To create in this alloy nanosubgrained dislocation substructure containing highly-dispersed coherent nanosized ω-phase precipitates, the following optimum thermomechanical treatment is recommended: cold rolling (true strain 0.37), followed by post-deformation annealing (600 °C, 15–30 min) and age-hardening (300 °C, 30 min) thermal treatments. It is shown that in TNT alloy, pre-transition diffraction effects (diffuse reflections) can “mask” the β-phase substructure and morphology of secondary phases. - Highlights: • TNZ alloy is characterized by much higher ω-phase precipitation rate than TNT alloy. • Difference in precipitation rates is linked to the difference in Zr and Ta diffusion mobility. • Aging of nanosubgrained TNZ alloy worsens its properties irrespective of the aging time. • Aging time of nanosubgrained TNT alloy can be optimized to improve its properties.

  11. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D.

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  12. Use of intraspecific variation in thermal responses for estimating an elevational cline in the timing of cold hardening in a sub-boreal conifer.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, W; Ono, K; Hara, T; Goto, S

    2015-01-01

    To avoid winter frost damage, evergreen coniferous species develop cold hardiness with suitable phenology for the local climate regime. Along the elevational gradient, a genetic cline in autumn phenology is often recognised among coniferous populations, but further quantification of evolutionary adaptation related to the local environment and its responsible signals generating the phenological variation are poorly understood. We evaluated the timing of cold hardening among populations of Abies sachalinensis, based on time series freezing tests using trees derived from four seed source populations × three planting sites. Furthermore, we constructed a model to estimate the development of hardening from field temperatures and the intraspecific variations occurring during this process. An elevational cline was detected such that high-elevation populations developed cold hardiness earlier than low-elevation populations, representing significant genetic control. Because development occurred earlier at high-elevation planting sites, the genetic trend across elevation overlapped with the environmental trend. Based on the trade-off between later hardening to lengthen the active growth period and earlier hardening to avoid frost damage, this genetic cline would be adaptive to the local climate. Our modelling approach estimated intraspecific variation in two model components: the threshold temperature, which was the criterion for determining whether the trees accumulated the thermal value, and the chilling requirement for trees to achieve adequate cold hardiness. A higher threshold temperature and a lower chilling requirement could be responsible for the earlier phenology of the high-elevation population. These thermal responses may be one of the important factors driving the elevation-dependent adaptation of A. sachalinensis.

  13. Meat Feeding Restricts Rapid Cold Hardening Response and Increases Thermal Activity Thresholds of Adult Blow Flies, Calliphora vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Coleman, Paul C; Bale, Jeffrey S; Hayward, Scott A L

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all temperate insects survive the winter by entering a physiological state of reduced metabolic activity termed diapause. However, there is increasing evidence that climate change is disrupting the diapause response resulting in non-diapause life stages encountering periods of winter cold. This is a significant problem for adult life stages in particular, as they must remain mobile, periodically feed, and potentially initiate reproductive development at a time when resources should be diverted to enhance stress tolerance. Here we present the first evidence of protein/meat feeding restricting rapid cold hardening (RCH) ability and increasing low temperature activity thresholds. No RCH response was noted in adult female blow flies (Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy) fed a sugar, water and liver (SWL) diet, while a strong RCH response was seen in females fed a diet of sugar and water (SW) only. The RCH response in SW flies was induced at temperatures as high as 10°C, but was strongest following 3h at 0°C. The CTmin (loss of coordinated movement) and chill coma (final appendage twitch) temperature of SWL females (-0.3 ± 0.5°C and -4.9 ± 0.5°C, respectively) was significantly higher than for SW females (-3.2 ± 0.8°C and -8.5 ± 0.6°C). We confirmed this was not directly the result of altered extracellular K+, as activity thresholds of alanine-fed adults were not significantly different from SW flies. Instead we suggest the loss of cold tolerance is more likely the result of diverting resource allocation to egg development. Between 2009 and 2013 winter air temperatures in Birmingham, UK, fell below the CTmin of SW and SWL flies on 63 and 195 days, respectively, suggesting differential exposure to chill injury depending on whether adults had access to meat or not. We conclude that disruption of diapause could significantly impact on winter survival through loss of synchrony in the timing of active feeding and reproductive development with favourable

  14. Meat Feeding Restricts Rapid Cold Hardening Response and Increases Thermal Activity Thresholds of Adult Blow Flies, Calliphora vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all temperate insects survive the winter by entering a physiological state of reduced metabolic activity termed diapause. However, there is increasing evidence that climate change is disrupting the diapause response resulting in non-diapause life stages encountering periods of winter cold. This is a significant problem for adult life stages in particular, as they must remain mobile, periodically feed, and potentially initiate reproductive development at a time when resources should be diverted to enhance stress tolerance. Here we present the first evidence of protein/meat feeding restricting rapid cold hardening (RCH) ability and increasing low temperature activity thresholds. No RCH response was noted in adult female blow flies (Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy) fed a sugar, water and liver (SWL) diet, while a strong RCH response was seen in females fed a diet of sugar and water (SW) only. The RCH response in SW flies was induced at temperatures as high as 10°C, but was strongest following 3h at 0°C. The CTmin (loss of coordinated movement) and chill coma (final appendage twitch) temperature of SWL females (-0.3 ± 0.5°C and -4.9 ± 0.5°C, respectively) was significantly higher than for SW females (-3.2 ± 0.8°C and -8.5 ± 0.6°C). We confirmed this was not directly the result of altered extracellular K+, as activity thresholds of alanine-fed adults were not significantly different from SW flies. Instead we suggest the loss of cold tolerance is more likely the result of diverting resource allocation to egg development. Between 2009 and 2013 winter air temperatures in Birmingham, UK, fell below the CTmin of SW and SWL flies on 63 and 195 days, respectively, suggesting differential exposure to chill injury depending on whether adults had access to meat or not. We conclude that disruption of diapause could significantly impact on winter survival through loss of synchrony in the timing of active feeding and reproductive development with favourable

  15. An Educational Response to Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLain, Rosemary

    1978-01-01

    The emphasis of this article is on aging and the needs of the elderly as a basis for developing educational content in the curriculum. It includes a description of a theoretical framework developed by Abraham Maslow for a holistic approach to needs of the aged. (Editor/RK)

  16. Age and male erectile responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Solnick, R L; Birren, J E

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine (1) the difference in the rate of penile circumference increase per unit time between a group of young and a group of old normal males when exposed to the same erotic movie and (2) the correlation coefficient between penile shaft temperature increase and penile circumference increase. Ten males aged 19-30 years and ten males aged 48-65 years served as subjects. Each subject placed a thermistor and strain gauge on his penis and both outputs were recorded simultaneously on a two-channel recorder. The younger group responded at an erection rate 5.8 times faster than that of the older group. The correlation coefficient, based on the percent approach to oral temperature (98.6 degrees F) and the percent increase in penile circumference, was 0.75.

  17. A mathematical model to predict the strength of aluminum alloys subjected to precipitation hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, F.S.; Sheikh, A.K.; Rashid, M.

    1999-06-01

    A number of alloys, notably most of the aluminum alloys, can be heat treated by aging. This aging due to time-dependent precipitation hardening increases the strength and hardness as well as modifying other mechanical properties. Precipitation hardening has been a popular strengthening mechanism for many decades; therefore, extensive information is available in literature about the precipitation-hardening response of various series of aluminum alloys. The age-hardening response of these alloys is usually represented in graphical form as plotted between property changes and aging time for different temperatures. In designing a suitable precipitation-hardening strategy, one can refer to these graphs. However, for automatic control of aging furnaces, as well as for decision making regarding optimal selection of aging conditions (time/temperature combination), it is desirable to express these relationships in a formal mathematical structure. A mathematical model is developed in this article for widely used heat treatable aluminum alloys used in the extrusion industry. This model is a condensed representation of all {sigma} = f(T,t) curves in different series of aluminum alloys, and the parameters of this model characterize the various compositions of the alloys in the series.

  18. The Role of Twinning Deformation on the Hardening Response of Polycrystalline Magnesium from Discrete Dislocation Dynamics Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    to the basal plane leading to predominant basal slip, as shown in Fig. 4(a), since the Schmid factor on these planes is maxi - mum. The low yield...slip is the hardest slip mode. It is also observed from Fig. 3 that regardless of the loading directions, all single crystals results exhibit weak ...In Section 3.1, the dislocation forest hardening effect for single crystals was observed to be weak (see Fig. 3). Furthermore, GBs do produce

  19. Phenomenological modeling of hardening and thermal recovery in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Bodner, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    Modeling of hardening and thermal recovery in metals is considered within the context of unified elastic-viscoplastic theories. Specifically, the choices of internal variables and hardening measures, and the resulting hardening response obtained by incorporating saturation-type evolution equations into two general forms of the flow law are examined. Based on the analytical considerations, a procedure for delineating directional and isotropic hardening from uniaxial hardening data has been developed for the Bodner-Partom model and applied to a nickel-base superalloy, B1900 + Hf. Predictions based on the directional hardening properties deduced from the monotonic loading data are shown to be in good agreement with results of cyclic tests.

  20. Effect of Strain-Induced Age Hardening on Yield Strength Improvement in Ferrite-Austenite Duplex Lightweight Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyejin; Lee, Seok Gyu; Sohn, Seok Su; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-11-01

    Ferrite-austenite lightweight steels showing TRansformation-induced plasticity were developed by varying the aging temperature with or without prestraining, and their effects on tensile properties were investigated in relation with microstructural evolution of carbide formation. The aged steels contained austenite, pearlite, and martensite in the ferrite matrix, and the austenite volume fraction decreased with the increasing aging temperature because some austenite grains decomposed to pearlites. This austenite decomposition to pearlite was favorable for the improvement of yield strength, but negatively influenced overall tensile properties. The prestraining promoted the austenite decomposition by a diffusion-controlled phase transformation, and changed the morphology of the cementite from a long lamellar shape to a densely agglomerated particle shape. In order to obtain the large increase in yield strength as well as excellent combination of strength and ductility, the strain-induced aging treatment, i.e., prestraining followed by aging, is important like in the prestrained and 673 K (400 °C)-aged steel. This large increase in yield strength, in spite of a reduction of elongation (65 to 43 pct), was basically attributed to an appropriate amount of decomposition of austenite to pearlite ( e.g., 4 vol pct), while having sufficient austenite to martensite transformation ( e.g., 14.5 vol pct martensite).

  1. Responses of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius, to temperature extremes and dehydration: levels of tolerance, rapid cold hardening and expression of heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Benoit, J B; Lopez-Martinez, G; Teets, N M; Phillips, S A; Denlinger, D L

    2009-12-01

    This study of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius, examines tolerance of adult females to extremes in temperature and loss of body water. Although the supercooling point (SCP) of the bed bugs was approximately -20 degrees C, all were killed by a direct 1 h exposure to -16 degrees C. Thus, this species cannot tolerate freezing and is killed at temperatures well above its SCP. Neither cold acclimation at 4 degrees C for 2 weeks nor dehydration (15% loss of water content) enhanced cold tolerance. However, bed bugs have the capacity for rapid cold hardening, i.e. a 1-h exposure to 0 degrees C improved their subsequent tolerance of -14 and -16 degrees C. In response to heat stress, fewer than 20% of the bugs survived a 1-h exposure to 46 degrees C, and nearly all were killed at 48 degrees C. Dehydration, heat acclimation at 30 degrees C for 2 weeks and rapid heat hardening at 37 degrees C for 1 h all failed to improve heat tolerance. Expression of the mRNAs encoding two heat shock proteins (Hsps), Hsp70 and Hsp90, was elevated in response to heat stress, cold stress and during dehydration and rehydration. The response of Hsp90 was more pronounced than that of Hsp70 during dehydration and rehydration. Our results define the tolerance limits for bed bugs to these commonly encountered stresses of temperature and low humidity and indicate a role for Hsps in responding to these stresses.

  2. The secondary hardening phenomenon in strain-hardened MP35N alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, S.; El-Danaf, E.; Shaji, E.; Kalidindi, S.R.; Doherty, R.D.

    1998-10-09

    Mechanical testing and microscopy techniques were used to investigate the influence of aging on the structure and strengthening of MP35N alloy. It was confirmed that aging the deformed material at 600 C for 4 h provided additional strengthening, here referred to as secondary hardening, in addition to the primary strain hardening. The secondary hardening phenomenon was shown to be distinctly different from typical age hardening processes in that it only occurred in material deformed beyond a certain cold work level. At moderate strains, aging caused a shift in the entire stress-strain curve of the annealed material to higher stresses while at high strains, it produced shear localization and limited work softening. The secondary hardening increment was also found to be grain size dependent. The magnitude of the secondary hardening appeared to be controlled by the flow stress in the strain hardened material. A model is proposed to explain the observations and is supported by direct experimental evidence. The model is based on formation of h.c.p. nuclei through the Suzuki mechanism, that is segregation of solute atoms to stacking faults, on aging the strain hardened material. The h.c.p. precipitates appear to thicken only in the presence of high dislocation density produced by prior cold work.

  3. Microstructural characteristics and aging response of Zn-containing Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuan-hua; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ji-shan

    2013-07-01

    Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys with and without Zn addition were fabricated by conventional ingot metallurgy method. The microstructures and properties were investigated using optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), tensile test, hardness test, and electrical conductivity measurement. It is found that the as-cast Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Zn alloy is composed of coarse dendritic grains, long needle-like β/δ-AlFeSi white intermetallics, and Chinese script-like α-AlFeSi compounds. During high temperature homogenization treatment, only harmful needle-like β-AlFeSi phase undergoes fragmentation and spheroidizing at its tips, and the destructive needle-like δ-phase does not show any morphological and size changes. Phase transitions from β-AlFeSi to α-AlFeSi and from δ-AlFeSi to β-AlFeSi are also not found. Zn addition improves the aging hardening response during the former aging stage and postpones the peak-aged hardness to a long aging time. In T4 condition, Zn addition does not obviously increase the yield strength and decrease the elongation, but it markedly improves paint-bake hardening response during paint-bake cycle. The addition of 0.5wt% Zn can lead to an increment of 99 MPa in yield strength compared with the value of 69 MPa for the alloy without Zn after paint-bake cycle.

  4. Response to cartoons and attitudes toward aging.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, A

    1981-01-01

    Although it has commonly been asserted that cartoon images of aging convey deep psychological significance, the relationship between attitudes and cartoon appreciation has received little systematic attention. The present study examined the relationship between responses to cartoons and attitudes toward aging among college students. Subjects rated the funniness of 60 cartoons and completed the Attitudes Toward Aging Inventory, Tuckman-Lorge, and Semantic Differential. Factor analysis revealed four categories of cartoons on aging: Disparagement, Ineffectuality, Obsolescence, and Isolation. No significant relationships were found between attitudes and humor appreciation, although age and education were inversely related to several cartoon themes.

  5. Precipitation Hardening and Statistical Modeling of the Aging Parameters and Alloy Compositions in Al-Cu-Mg-Ag Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Obaisi, A. M.; El-Danaf, E. A.; Ragab, A. E.; Soliman, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    The addition of Ag to Al-Cu-Mg systems has been proposed to replace the existing high-strength 2xxx and 7xxx Al alloys. The aged Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloys exhibited promising properties, due to special type of precipitates named Ω, which cooperate with other precipitates to enhance the mechanical properties significantly. In the present investigation, the effect of changing percentages of alloying elements, aging time, and aging temperature on the hardness values was studied based on a factorial design. According to this design of experiments (DOE)—23 factorial design, eight alloys were cast and hot rolled, where (Cu, Mg, and Ag) were added to aluminum with two different levels for each alloying element. These alloys were aged at different temperatures (160, 190, and 220 °C) over a wide range of time intervals from 10 min. to 64 h. The resulting hardness data were used as an input for Minitab software to model and relate the process variables with hardness through a regression analysis. Modifying the alloying elements' weight percentages to the high level enhanced the hardness of the alloy with about 40% as compared to the alloy containing the low level of all alloying elements. Through analysis of variance (ANOVA), it was figured out that altering the fraction of Cu had the greatest effect on the hardness values with a contribution of about 49%. Also, second-level interaction terms had about 21% of impact on the hardness values. Aging time, quadratic terms, and third-level interaction terms had almost the same level of influence on hardness values (about 10% contribution). Furthermore, the results have shown that small addition of Mg and Ag was enough to improve the mechanical properties of the alloy significantly. The statistical model formulated interpreted about 80% of the variation in hardness values.

  6. Cyclic hardening mechanisms in Nimonic 80A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Gerold, V.

    1987-01-01

    A nickel base superalloy was fatigued under constant plastic strain range control. The hardening response was investigated as a function of plastic strain range and particle size of the gamma prime phase. Hardening was found to be a function of the slip band spacing. Numerous measurements of the slip band spacing and other statistical data on the slip band structures were obtained. Interactions between intersecting slip systems were shown to influence hardening. A Petch-Hall model was found to describe best this relationship between the response stress and the slip band spacing.

  7. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... cause of heart attack and stroke. High blood cholesterol levels can cause hardening of the arteries at ...

  8. Steels with controlled hardenability for induction hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelyakovskii, K. Z.

    1980-07-01

    Steels of the CH and LH type developed in the Soviet Union permit the use of a new method of induction hardening — bulk-surface hardening — and efficient utilization of the high-strength conditions (σb = 230-250 kgf/mm2). These steels make it possible to improve the structural strength, operating characteristics, service life, and reliability of critical heavily loaded machine parts. At the same time, CH steels make it possible to reduce by a factor of 2-3 the quantity of alloying elements, reduce the electrical energy for heat treatment, and completely exclude the cost of quenching oil for heat treatment in automatic equipment with high labor productivity, while retaining good working conditions. All this leads to substantial savings in production and operation. For example, when transmission gears (cylindrical and conical) are manufactured from LH steels the annual savings amount to more than 700,000 rubles at two automobile plants. Machine parts of CH steels — half axles and bearings in railway cars —have saved respectively six and four million rubles annually. The introduction of controlled-hardenability steels for induction hardening is a necessary condition for technological progress in machine construction and metallurgy.

  9. The response of mulberry trees after seedling hardening to summer drought in the hydro-fluctuation belt of Three Gorges Reservoir Areas.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohui; Liu, Yun; Li, Jiaxing; Xiong, Xingzheng; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xiaohua; Feng, Dalan

    2013-10-01

    Interest has developed in the potential of mulberry (Morus alba), a woody perennial, for revegetating the hydro-fluctuation belt of the Three Gorges Reservoir due to its resistance to water-logging stress. To be useful, the trees must also be able to withstand dry conditions in summer when temperatures can be very high and droughts become severe quickly. Here, we report a study in which mulberry seedlings were grown in a greenhouse under a variety of simulated soil water conditions reflecting potential summer scenarios in the hydro-fluctuation belt of the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. We compared the responses of two pretreatment groups of mulberry seedlings to different levels of drought stress. The pretreatment groups differed with respect to drought hardening: the daily-managed (DM) group had relative soil moisture held constant in the range 70-80 %, while the drought-hardened (DH) group had relative soil moisture held constant at 40-50 %. Following the month-long pretreatment of seedlings, the two groups of young trees (DM and DH) were then respectively subjected to three levels of drought stress for a month: normal watering, moderate drought stress, and severe drought stress. A series of measurements comparing the physiological status of the plants in the two groups were then made, and the following results were obtained: (1) As drought stress increased, the heights, base diameters, root surface areas, photosynthetic rates (Pn), stomatal conductances (Gs), and transpiration rates (Tr) of the mulberry trees in both groups (DM and DH) decreased significantly, while the specific root area and abscisic acid (ABA) contents had increasing trends. Root activity and instantaneous water use efficiency of mulberry trees in both groups (DM and DH) were all raised under drought stress conditions than under normal watering, but the root/shoot ratio and leaf water potential were lowered. (2) At the same level of soil water content, the heights, base diameters, root

  10. Effect of reinforcing particle type on morphology and age-hardening behavior of Al–4.5 wt.% Cu based nanocomposites synthesized through mechanical milling

    SciTech Connect

    Mostaed, A.; Saghafian, H.; Mostaed, E.; Shokuhfar, A.; Rezaie, H.R.

    2013-02-15

    The effects of reinforcing particle type (SiC and TiC) on morphology and precipitation hardening behavior of Al–4.5%Cu based nanocomposites synthesized via mechanical milling were investigated in the current work. In order to study the microstructure and morphology of mechanically milled powder, X-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were utilized. Results revealed that at the early stages of mechanical milling, when reinforcing particles are polycrystal, the alloying process is enhanced more in the case of using the TiC particles as reinforcement. But, at the final stages of mechanical milling, when reinforcing particles are single crystal, the alloying process is enhanced more in the case of using the SiC ones. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrated that Al–4.5 wt.%Cu based nanocomposite powders were synthesized and confirmed that the mutual diffusion of aluminum and copper occurs through the interfacial plane of (200). The hardness results showed that not only does introducing 4 vol.% of reinforcing particles (SiC or TiC) considerably decrease the porosity of the bulk composite samples, but also it approximately doubles the hardness of Al–4.5 wt.%Cu alloy (53.4 HB). Finally, apart from TEM and scanning electron microscopy observation which are localized, a decline in hardness in the TiC and SiC contained samples, respectively, after 1.5 and 2 h aging time at 473 K proves the fact that the size of SiC particles is smaller than the size of the TiC ones. - Highlights: ► HRTEM results show mutual diffusion of Al and Cu occurs through the (200) planes. ► TiC particles enhance alloying process more than the SiC ones at the early stages of MM. ► SiC particles enhance alloying process more than the TiC ones at the final stages of MM.

  11. Hardening: Australian for Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    ADF towards homeland defense. For further details, see Jeffrey Grey. A Military History of Australia. Melbourne, Australia, Cambridge University...is a simplified explanation of the hardene d force structure proposed by FLW. The hardened concept encompasses other aspects that enhance Army...standardized with three rifle companies. A 196 Leahy “ A Land Force for the Future: The Australian Army in the Early 21st Century.” 2003: 19. 197 See Monk, Paul

  12. The role of aging on the mechanical and microstructural response of aluminum 6061 to one-dimensional shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.; Chu, M. Q.; Jones, I. P.; Gray, G. T.; Appleby-Thomas, G.

    2010-10-01

    The shock response of the aluminum alloy 6061, and its variation according to heat treatment have been monitored via the placement of stress gauges in such orientations so as to be sensitive to the lateral component of stress, and hence the shear strength. To complement these measurements, the postshock microstructure and mechanical response have also been determined via full one-dimensional recovery techniques. Results have shown that the solution treated (T0) state, as a largely single phase material displays a fast rising shock pulse with a significant degree of hardening behind the shock front. This indicates that a high degree of dislocation generation is expected. Postshock analysis of recovered samples has confirmed this hypothesis, with dislocation cells being observed and a notable increase in the yield strength in comparison to the as-received material. In contrast, the aged (T6) experiments showed a much longer rise time with a lower degree of hardening behind the shock front. Microstructural analysis postshock shows a more randomized dislocation distribution, with little or no postshock hardening occurring once the shock induced strain has been accounted for. This has been attributed to the presence of fine Mg2Si precipitates inhibiting the motion and generation of dislocations. These measurements are in agreement with work previously carried out on this material. Comparison of the shear strengths of the two heat treatments also shows that although the T6 condition is a little higher than T0, the differences are somewhat lower than expected.

  13. Quenching and ageing effects on defects and their structures in FeAl alloys, and the influence on hardening and softening

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.A.; Morris, D.G.

    1998-01-06

    It is well known that FeAl has many thermal vacancies at high temperature which lead to significant hardening. During slow quenches from high temperature or on annealing after quenching vacancies annihilate at sinks leading to dislocation creation. The relative importance of hardening by vacancies and by dislocations has not been examined and is one objective of this study. There has been considerable effort devoted to the examination of vacancies in FeAl alloys, because of the large thermal vacancy concentrations and because of the hardening. The concentration of vacancies can be as high as several per cent for alloys close to stoichiometry at high temperatures, corresponding to a very low enthalpy for vacancy formation. The value depends on the Al content, with smaller values and larger vacancy concentrations for alloys near FeAl stoichiometry. Typical values range from 118kJ/mol for Fe-23.7%Al (atomic %), to 34 kJ/mol for stoichiometric FeAl.

  14. High CO2 atmosphere modulating the phenolic response associated with cell adhesion and hardening of Annona cherimola fruit stored at chilling temperature.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Roberto; Molina-Garcia, Antonio D; Sanchez-Ballesta, Maria T; Escribano, Maria I; Merodio, Carmen

    2002-12-18

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5.) activity, tanning ability, and polyphenols levels were measured in cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) fruit treated with 20% CO(2) + 20% O(2) + 60% N(2) for 1, 3, or 6 days during chilling temperature (6 degrees C) storage. The residual effect of CO(2) after transfer to air was also studied. These observations were correlated with texture and cellular characteristics, visualized by cryo-SEM. Tanning ability and the early increase in tannin polyphenols induced by chilling temperature were reduced by CO(2) treatment. Conversely, high CO(2) atmosphere enhanced the nontannin polyphenol fraction as compared with fruit stored in air. Lignin accumulation and PAL activation observed in untreated fruit after prolonged storage at chilling temperature were prevented by high CO(2). Moreover, the restraining effect on lignification was less effective when the CO(2) treatment was prolonged for 6 days. In addition, fruits held at these conditions had greater firmness and the histological characterization of the separation between cells was similar to that in untreated fruits. We conclude that CO(2) treatment modulates the phenolic response that seems to regulate the strength of cell adhesion and so to prevent hardening caused by chilling temperature storage.

  15. Natural ageing responses of duplex structured Mg-Li based alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, C Q; Xu, D K; Wang, B J; Sheng, L Y; Qiao, Y X; Han, E H

    2017-01-05

    Natural ageing responses of duplex structured Mg-6%Li and Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloys have been investigated. Microstructural analyses revealed that the precipitation and coarsening process of α-Mg particles could occur in β-Li phases of both two alloys during ageing process. Since a certain amount of Mg atoms in β-Li phases were consumed for the precipitation of abundant tiny MgLiZn particles, the size of α-Mg precipitates in Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloy was relatively smaller than that in Mg-6%Li alloy. Micro hardness measurements demonstrated that with the ageing time increasing, the α-Mg phases in Mg-6%Li alloy could have a constant hardness value of 41 HV, but the contained β-Li phases exhibited a slight age-softening response. Compared with the Mg-6%Li alloy, the age-softening response of β-Li phases in Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloy was much more profound. Meanwhile, a normal age-hardening response of α-Mg phases was maintained. Tensile results indicated that obvious ageing-softening phenomenon in terms of macro tensile strength occurred in both two alloys. Failure analysis demonstrated that for the Mg-6%Li alloy, cracks were preferentially initiated at α-Mg/β-Li interfaces. For the Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloy, cracks occurred at both α-Mg/β-Li interfaces and slip bands in α-Mg and β-Li phases.

  16. Natural ageing responses of duplex structured Mg-Li based alloys

    PubMed Central

    Li, C. Q.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, B. J.; Sheng, L. Y.; Qiao, Y. X.; Han, E. H.

    2017-01-01

    Natural ageing responses of duplex structured Mg-6%Li and Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloys have been investigated. Microstructural analyses revealed that the precipitation and coarsening process of α-Mg particles could occur in β-Li phases of both two alloys during ageing process. Since a certain amount of Mg atoms in β-Li phases were consumed for the precipitation of abundant tiny MgLiZn particles, the size of α-Mg precipitates in Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloy was relatively smaller than that in Mg-6%Li alloy. Micro hardness measurements demonstrated that with the ageing time increasing, the α-Mg phases in Mg-6%Li alloy could have a constant hardness value of 41 HV, but the contained β-Li phases exhibited a slight age-softening response. Compared with the Mg-6%Li alloy, the age-softening response of β-Li phases in Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloy was much more profound. Meanwhile, a normal age-hardening response of α-Mg phases was maintained. Tensile results indicated that obvious ageing-softening phenomenon in terms of macro tensile strength occurred in both two alloys. Failure analysis demonstrated that for the Mg-6%Li alloy, cracks were preferentially initiated at α-Mg/β-Li interfaces. For the Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloy, cracks occurred at both α-Mg/β-Li interfaces and slip bands in α-Mg and β-Li phases. PMID:28053318

  17. Natural ageing responses of duplex structured Mg-Li based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Q.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, B. J.; Sheng, L. Y.; Qiao, Y. X.; Han, E. H.

    2017-01-01

    Natural ageing responses of duplex structured Mg-6%Li and Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloys have been investigated. Microstructural analyses revealed that the precipitation and coarsening process of α-Mg particles could occur in β-Li phases of both two alloys during ageing process. Since a certain amount of Mg atoms in β-Li phases were consumed for the precipitation of abundant tiny MgLiZn particles, the size of α-Mg precipitates in Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloy was relatively smaller than that in Mg-6%Li alloy. Micro hardness measurements demonstrated that with the ageing time increasing, the α-Mg phases in Mg-6%Li alloy could have a constant hardness value of 41 HV, but the contained β-Li phases exhibited a slight age-softening response. Compared with the Mg-6%Li alloy, the age-softening response of β-Li phases in Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloy was much more profound. Meanwhile, a normal age-hardening response of α-Mg phases was maintained. Tensile results indicated that obvious ageing-softening phenomenon in terms of macro tensile strength occurred in both two alloys. Failure analysis demonstrated that for the Mg-6%Li alloy, cracks were preferentially initiated at α-Mg/β-Li interfaces. For the Mg-6%Li-6%Zn-1.2%Y alloy, cracks occurred at both α-Mg/β-Li interfaces and slip bands in α-Mg and β-Li phases.

  18. 42. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NAIL HARDENER USED TO HARDEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NAIL HARDENER USED TO HARDEN AND TEMPER THE NAILS; WEST TUBES IN FOREGRPUND AND DRAWBACK TUBE IN THE CENTER - LaBelle Iron Works, Thirtieth & Wood Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  19. Experience of high-nitrogenous steel powder application in repairs and surface hardening of responsible parts for power equipment by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, A. S.; Kardonina, N. I.

    2016-02-01

    The questions of the application of novel diffusion-alloying high-nitrogenous steel powders for repair and surface hardening of responsible parts of power equipment by plasma spraying are considered. The appropriateness of the method for operative repair of equipment and increasing its service life is justified. General data on the structure, properties, and manufacture of nitrogen-, aluminum-, and chromium-containing steel powders that are economically alloyed using diffusion are described. It is noted that the nitrogen release during the decomposition of iron nitrides, when heating, protects the powder particles from oxidation in the plasma jet. It is shown that the coating retains 50% of nitrogen that is contained in the powder. Plasma spraying modes for diffusion-alloying high-nitrogenous steel powders are given. The service properties of plasma coatings based on these powders are analyzed. It is shown that the high-nitrogenous steel powders to a nitrogen content of 8.9 wt % provide the necessary wear resistance and hardness of the coating and the strength of its adhesion to the substrate and corrosion resistance to typical aggressive media. It is noted that increasing the coating porosity promotes stress relaxation and increases its thickness being limited with respect to delamination conditions in comparison with dense coatings on retention of the low defectiveness of the interface and high adhesion to the substrate. The examples of the application of high-nitrogenous steel powders in power engineering during equipment repairs by service companies and overhaul subdivisions of heat power plants are given. It is noted that the plasma spraying of diffusion-alloyed high-nitrogenous steel powders is a unique opportunity to restore nitrided steel products.

  20. Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Frazier, Donald O.; Patrick, Marshall C.; Watson, Michael D.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Environmental Modeling is crucial to proper predictive modeling and electronic response to the radiation environment. When compared to on-orbit data, CREME96 has been shown to be inaccurate in predicting the radiation environment. The NEDD bases much of its radiation environment data on CREME96 output. Close coordination and partnership with DoD radiation-hardened efforts will result in leveraged - not duplicated or independently developed - technology capabilities of: a) Radiation-hardened, reconfigurable FPGA-based electronics; and b) High Performance Processors (NOT duplication or independent development).

  1. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  2. Nuclear effects hardened shelters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindke, Paul

    1990-11-01

    The Houston Fearless 76 Government Projects Group has been actively engaged for more than twenty-five years as a sub-contractor and currently as a prime contractor in the design, manufacture, repair and logistics support of custom mobile ground stations and their equipment accommodations. Other associated products include environmental control units (ECU's), mobilizers for shelters and a variety of mobile power generation units (MPU's). Since 1984, Houston Fearless 76 has designed and manufactured four 8' x 8' x 22' nuclear hardened mobile shelters. These shelters were designed to contain electronic data processing/reduction equipment. One shelter is currently being operated by the Air Force as a Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) approved and certified Special Corrpartmented Information Facility (SCIF). During the development and manufacturing process of the shelters, we received continual technical assistance and design concept evaluations from Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Operations Analysis and Logistics Engineering Division and the Nondestructive Inspection Lab at McClellan AFB. SAIC was originally employed by the Air Force to design the nuclear hardening specifications applied to these shelters. The specific levels of hardening to which the shelters were designed are classified and will not be mentioned during this presentation.

  3. Practical aspects of systems hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Applications of hardening technology in a practical system require a balance between the factors governing affordability, producibility, and survivability of the finished design. Without careful consideration of the top-level system operating constraints, a design engineer may find himself with a survivable but overweight, unproductive, expensive design. This paper explores some lessons learned in applying hardening techniques to several laser communications programs and is intended as an introductory guide to novice designers faced with the task of hardening a space system.

  4. Industrial Hardening Demonstration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    less severe conditions than thermal cracking (850’ - 950°F and 10 to 20 psi). Zeolitic or molecular sieve- base catalysts are used. Catalytic reforming...with Potential Industrial Hardening A-1 Participants B Post-Attack Petroleum Refining (and Production) B-1 from Crude Oil V List of Figures Number Page...the Key Worker Shelter 116 viii B-1 Proportions of the Products Obtained by Distillation B-2 of Six Crude Oils B-2 Generalized Flow Chart of the

  5. Stress responses during ageing: molecular pathways regulating protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kyriakakis, Emmanouil; Princz, Andrea; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2015-01-01

    The ageing process is characterized by deterioration of physiological function accompanied by frailty and ageing-associated diseases. The most broadly and well-studied pathways influencing ageing are the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling pathway and the dietary restriction pathway. Recent studies in diverse organisms have also delineated emerging pathways, which collectively or independently contribute to ageing. Among them the proteostatic-stress-response networks, inextricably affect normal ageing by maintaining or restoring protein homeostasis to preserve proper cellular and organismal function. In this chapter, we survey the involvement of heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the regulation of longevity, placing emphasis on the cross talk between different response mechanisms and their systemic effects. We further discuss novel insights relevant to the molecular pathways mediating these stress responses that may facilitate the development of innovative interventions targeting age-related pathologies such as diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. The responsible subject in the global age.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, Elena

    2010-09-01

    The first thesis of this article is that the concept of responsibility takes on an unprecedented meaning in the twentieth century resulting from the emergence of a new dimension of the other: to be responsible comes to mean not just to account for oneself in relation to the other, but also to take the other into account, to take care of the other-what I call responsibility towards (the other). The main reason for this change consists in the emergence of global risks and the necessity, as underlined by Hans Jonas, to be responsible for the destiny of the world and future generations. The problem, as explored in the article's second thesis, is that this implies the existence of a subject who is capable of responsibility. Jonas's insights on this point are insufficient, since he only recognizes duty as the fundament for his ethics of responsibility and thus neglects the problem of motivation. This is a particularly crucial problem today as we are witnessing the presence of a pathological subject, characterized by a split in his faculties (between doing and imagining, knowing and feeling). To underline this fact, this article makes use of Günther Anders's reflections, which provide a psycho-anthropological analysis of the subject, showing his pathologies and the necessity, from a moral perspective, to overcome his scission. Finally, this author suggests, as the article's third thesis, that this overcoming is the necessary fundament for the perception of risk, which in turn reinstates the subject's perception of his own vulnerability. Responsibility thus finds a motivation, which is neither altruistic nor duty-centred, in the awareness of our own vulnerability and the bond with the destiny of humankind as a whole.

  7. Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials

    DOEpatents

    Murray, Jr., Holt; Harris, Ian D.; Ratka, John O.; Spiegelberg, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined.

  8. Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials

    DOEpatents

    Murray, H. Jr.; Harris, I.D.; Ratka, J.O.; Spiegelberg, W.D.

    1994-06-28

    A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined. 5 figures.

  9. The Status of Rapid Response Learning in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Dew, Ilana T. Z.; Giovanello, Kelly S.

    2010-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for an age-related impairment in associative processing under intentional encoding and retrieval conditions, but the status of incidental associative processing has been less clear. Two experiments examined the effects of age on rapid response learning – the incidentally learned stimulus-response association that results in a reduction in priming when a learned response becomes inappropriate for a new task. Specifically, we tested whether priming was equivalently sensitive in both age groups to reversing the task-specific decision cue. Experiment 1 showed that cue inversion reduced priming in both age groups using a speeded inside/outside classification task, and in Experiment 2 cue inversion eliminated priming on an associative version of this task. Thus, the ability to encode an association between a stimulus and its initial task-specific response appears to be preserved in aging. These findings provide an important example of a form of associative processing that is unimpaired in older adults. PMID:20853961

  10. Aging. Aging-induced type I interferon response at the choroid plexus negatively affects brain function.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; David, Eyal; Castellano, Joseph M; Miller, Omer; Kertser, Alexander; Berkutzki, Tamara; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Bezalel, Dana; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2014-10-03

    Aging-associated cognitive decline is affected by factors produced inside and outside the brain. By using multiorgan genome-wide analysis of aged mice, we found that the choroid plexus, an interface between the brain and the circulation, shows a type I interferon (IFN-I)-dependent gene expression profile that was also found in aged human brains. In aged mice, this response was induced by brain-derived signals, present in the cerebrospinal fluid. Blocking IFN-I signaling within the aged brain partially restored cognitive function and hippocampal neurogenesis and reestablished IFN-II-dependent choroid plexus activity, which is lost in aging. Our data identify a chronic aging-induced IFN-I signature, often associated with antiviral response, at the brain's choroid plexus and demonstrate its negative influence on brain function, thereby suggesting a target for ameliorating cognitive decline in aging.

  11. Aging, Tolerance to High Altitude, and Cardiorespiratory Response to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Lhuissier, François J

    2015-06-01

    Richalet, Jean-Paul, and François J. Lhuissier. Aging, tolerance to high altitude, and cardiorespiratory response to hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 16:117-124, 2015.--It is generally accepted that aging is rather protective, at least at moderate altitude. Some anecdotal reports even mention successful ascent of peaks over 8000 m and even Everest by elderly people. However, very few studies have explored the influence of aging on tolerance to high altitude and prevalence of acute high altitude related diseases, taking into account all confounding factors such as speed of ascent, altitude reached, sex, training status, and chemo-responsiveness. Changes in physiological responses to hypoxia with aging were assessed through a cross-sectional 20-year study including 4675 subjects (2789 men, 1886 women; 14-85 yrs old) and a longitudinal study including 30 subjects explored at a mean 10.4-year interval. In men, ventilatory response to hypoxia increased, while desaturation was less pronounced with aging. Cardiac response to hypoxia was blunted with aging in both genders. Similar results were found in the longitudinal study, with a decrease in cardiac and an increase in ventilatory response to hypoxia with aging. These adaptive responses were less pronounced or absent in post-menopausal untrained women. In conclusion, in normal healthy and active subjects, aging has no deleterious effect on cardiac and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, at least up to the eighth decade. Aging is not a contraindication for high altitude, as far as no pathological condition interferes and physical fitness is compatible with the intensity of the expected physical demand of one's individual. Physiological evaluation through hypoxic exercise testing before going to high altitude is helpful to detect risk factors of severe high altitude-related diseases.

  12. Computed tomographic beam-hardening artefacts: mathematical characterization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Chung, Yong Eun; Seo, Jin Keun

    2015-06-13

    This paper presents a mathematical characterization and analysis of beam-hardening artefacts in X-ray computed tomography (CT). In the field of dental and medical radiography, metal artefact reduction in CT is becoming increasingly important as artificial prostheses and metallic implants become more widespread in ageing populations. Metal artefacts are mainly caused by the beam-hardening of polychromatic X-ray photon beams, which causes mismatch between the actual sinogram data and the data model being the Radon transform of the unknown attenuation distribution in the CT reconstruction algorithm. We investigate the beam-hardening factor through a mathematical analysis of the discrepancy between the data and the Radon transform of the attenuation distribution at a fixed energy level. Separation of cupping artefacts from beam-hardening artefacts allows causes and effects of streaking artefacts to be analysed. Various computer simulations and experiments are performed to support our mathematical analysis.

  13. The effect of aging on the hydrogen-assisted fatigue cracking of a precipitation-hardened Al-Li-Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. S.; Duquette, D. J.

    1992-05-01

    The corrosion fatigue behavior of an Al-2.5 pct Li-0.12 pct Zr alloy has been studied as a function of heat treatment by performing smooth specimen fatigue life experiments on differently aged alloys in dry air and humid nitrogen. Results indicated that aging decreased the fatigue life of the Al-Li-Zr alloy in dry air. However, exposure to water vapor reduced the fatigue resistance of the underaged (UA) alloys but increased the fatigue life of the overaged alloys (OA) alloys. Hydrogen precharging experiments (either exposure to moist air or cathodic charging in HC1 solutions) followed by fatigue testing in dry air confirmed that the UA alloys were susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement and that the OA alloys were insensitive to a hydrogen effect. The experimental results suggest that the susceptibility of the Al-Li-Zr alloy to hydrogen-assisted fracture is essentially related to the effectiveness of hydrogen transport to the region ahead of the crack tip, which is controlled by the microstructure of the alloy. Environmental and aging effects which influence the fatigue characteristics of the studied alloy are discussed.

  14. Effects of alloying additions and austenitizing treatments on secondary hardening and fracture behavior for martensitic steels containing both Mo and W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. B.; Kwon, H.; Kwon, H.; Yang, H. R.

    2001-07-01

    The effects of alloying additions and austenitizing treatments on secondary hardening and fracture behavior of martensitic steels containing both Mo and W were investigated. The secondary hardening response and properties of these steels are dependent on the composition and distribution of the carbides formed during aging (tempering) of the martensite, as modified by alloying additions and austenitizing treatments. The precipitates responsible for secondary hardening are M2C carbides formed during the dissolution of the cementite (M3C). The Mo-W steel showed moderately strong secondary hardening and delayed overaging due to the combined effects of Mo and W. The addition of Cr removed secondary hardening by the stabilization of cementite, which inhibited the formation of M2C carbides. The elements Co and Ni, particularly in combination, strongly increased secondary hardening. Additions of Ni promoted the dissolution of cementite and provided carbon for the formation of M2C carbide, while Co increased the nucleation rate of M2C carbide. Fracture behavior is interpreted in terms of the presence of impurities and coarse cementite at the grain boundaries and the variation in matrix strength associated with the formation of M2C carbides. For the Mo-W-Cr-Co-Ni steel, the double-austenitizing at the relatively low temperatures of 899 to 816 °C accelerated the aging kinetics because the ratio of Cr/(Mo + W) increased in the matrix due to the presence of undissolved carbides containing considerably larger concentrations of (Mo + W). The undissolved carbides reduced the impact toughness for aging temperatures up to 510 °C, prior to the large decrease in hardness that occurred on aging at higher temperatures.

  15. A theoretical investigation of mixing thermodynamics, age-hardening potential, and electronic structure of ternary M11–xM2xB2 alloys with AlB2 type structure

    PubMed Central

    Alling, B.; Högberg, H.; Armiento, R.; Rosen, J.; Hultman, L.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal diborides are ceramic materials with potential applications as hard protective thin films and electrical contact materials. We investigate the possibility to obtain age hardening through isostructural clustering, including spinodal decomposition, or ordering-induced precipitation in ternary diboride alloys. By means of first-principles mixing thermodynamics calculations, 45 ternary M11–xM2xB2 alloys comprising MiB2 (Mi = Mg, Al, Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta) with AlB2 type structure are studied. In particular Al1–xTixB2 is found to be of interest for coherent isostructural decomposition with a strong driving force for phase separation, while having almost concentration independent a and c lattice parameters. The results are explained by revealing the nature of the electronic structure in these alloys, and in particular, the origin of the pseudogap at EF in TiB2, ZrB2, and HfB2. PMID:25970763

  16. A theoretical investigation of mixing thermodynamics, age-hardening potential, and electronic structure of ternary M11-xM2xB2 alloys with AlB2 type structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alling, B.; Högberg, H.; Armiento, R.; Rosen, J.; Hultman, L.

    2015-05-01

    Transition metal diborides are ceramic materials with potential applications as hard protective thin films and electrical contact materials. We investigate the possibility to obtain age hardening through isostructural clustering, including spinodal decomposition, or ordering-induced precipitation in ternary diboride alloys. By means of first-principles mixing thermodynamics calculations, 45 ternary M11-xM2xB2 alloys comprising MiB2 (Mi = Mg, Al, Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta) with AlB2 type structure are studied. In particular Al1-xTixB2 is found to be of interest for coherent isostructural decomposition with a strong driving force for phase separation, while having almost concentration independent a and c lattice parameters. The results are explained by revealing the nature of the electronic structure in these alloys, and in particular, the origin of the pseudogap at EF in TiB2, ZrB2, and HfB2.

  17. Cyclic hardening in bundled actin networks.

    PubMed

    Schmoller, K M; Fernández, P; Arevalo, R C; Blair, D L; Bausch, A R

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear deformations can irreversibly alter the mechanical properties of materials. Most soft materials, such as rubber and living tissues, display pronounced softening when cyclically deformed. Here we show that, in contrast, reconstituted networks of crosslinked, bundled actin filaments harden when subject to cyclical shear. As a consequence, they exhibit a mechano-memory where a significant stress barrier is generated at the maximum of the cyclic shear strain. This unique response is crucially determined by the network architecture: at lower crosslinker concentrations networks do not harden, but soften showing the classic Mullins effect known from rubber-like materials. By simultaneously performing macrorheology and confocal microscopy, we show that cyclic shearing results in structural reorganization of the network constituents such that the maximum applied strain is encoded into the network architecture.

  18. Microscopic Origin of Strain Hardening in Methane Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jihui; Liang, Yunfeng; Tsuji, Takeshi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2016-03-24

    It has been reported for a long time that methane hydrate presents strain hardening, whereas the strength of normal ice weakens with increasing strain after an ultimate strength. However, the microscopic origin of these differences is not known. Here, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and normal ice by compressive deformation test using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that methane hydrate exhibits strain hardening only if the hydrate is confined to a certain finite cross-sectional area that is normal to the compression direction. For normal ice, it does not present strain hardening under the same conditions. We show that hydrate guest methane molecules exhibit no long-distance diffusion when confined to a finite-size area. They appear to serve as non-deformable units that prevent hydrate structure failure, and thus are responsible for the strain-hardening phenomenon.

  19. Microscopic Origin of Strain Hardening in Methane Hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jihui; Liang, Yunfeng; Tsuji, Takeshi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported for a long time that methane hydrate presents strain hardening, whereas the strength of normal ice weakens with increasing strain after an ultimate strength. However, the microscopic origin of these differences is not known. Here, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and normal ice by compressive deformation test using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that methane hydrate exhibits strain hardening only if the hydrate is confined to a certain finite cross-sectional area that is normal to the compression direction. For normal ice, it does not present strain hardening under the same conditions. We show that hydrate guest methane molecules exhibit no long-distance diffusion when confined to a finite-size area. They appear to serve as non-deformable units that prevent hydrate structure failure, and thus are responsible for the strain-hardening phenomenon. PMID:27009239

  20. System-Level Radiation Hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Although system-level radiation hardening can enable the use of high-performance components and enhance the capabilities of a spacecraft, hardening techniques can be costly and can compromise the very performance designers sought from the high-performance components. Moreover, such techniques often result in a complicated design, especially if several complex commercial microcircuits are used, each posing its own hardening challenges. The latter risk is particularly acute for Commercial-Off-The-Shelf components since high-performance parts (e.g. double-data-rate synchronous dynamic random access memories - DDR SDRAMs) may require other high-performance commercial parts (e.g. processors) to support their operation. For these reasons, it is essential that system-level radiation hardening be a coordinated effort, from setting requirements through testing up to and including validation.

  1. Cellular stress response pathways and ageing: intricate molecular relationships.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2011-05-17

    Ageing is driven by the inexorable and stochastic accumulation of damage in biomolecules vital for proper cellular function. Although this process is fundamentally haphazard and uncontrollable, senescent decline and ageing is broadly influenced by genetic and extrinsic factors. Numerous gene mutations and treatments have been shown to extend the lifespan of diverse organisms ranging from the unicellular Saccharomyces cerevisiae to primates. It is becoming increasingly apparent that most such interventions ultimately interface with cellular stress response mechanisms, suggesting that longevity is intimately related to the ability of the organism to effectively cope with both intrinsic and extrinsic stress. Here, we survey the molecular mechanisms that link ageing to main stress response pathways, and mediate age-related changes in the effectiveness of the response to stress. We also discuss how each pathway contributes to modulate the ageing process. A better understanding of the dynamics and reciprocal interplay between stress responses and ageing is critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies that exploit endogenous stress combat pathways against age-associated pathologies.

  2. Oxidative stress response and Nrf2 signaling in aging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongqiao; Davies, Kelvin J. A.; Forman, Henry Jay

    2015-01-01

    Increasing oxidative stress, a major characteristic of aging, has been implicated in variety of age-related pathologies. In aging, oxidant production from several sources is increased while antioxidant enzymes, the primary lines of defense, are decreased. Repair systems, including the proteasomal degradation of damaged proteins also declines. Importantly, the adaptive response to oxidative stress declines with aging. Nrf2/EpRE signaling regulates the basal and inducible expression of many antioxidant enzymes and the proteasome. Nrf2/EpRE activity is regulated at several levels including transcription, post-translation, and interaction with other proteins. This review summarizes current studies on age-related impairment of Nrf2/EpRE function and discusses the change of Nrf2 regulatory mechanisms with aging. PMID:26066302

  3. Dislocation Multi-junctions and Strain Hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, V; Hsiung, L; Tang, M; Arsenlis, A; Bartelt, M; Cai, W; Florando, J; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Hommes, G; Pierce, T; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2006-06-20

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects--dislocations. First theorized in 1934 to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed only two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening: a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions tying dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed hereafter multi-junctions. The existence of multi-junctions is first predicted by Dislocation Dynamics (DD) and atomistic simulations and then confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments in single crystal molybdenum. In large-scale Dislocation Dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in BCC crystals.

  4. Dislocation multi-junctions and strain hardening.

    PubMed

    Bulatov, Vasily V; Hsiung, Luke L; Tang, Meijie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; Bartelt, Maria C; Cai, Wei; Florando, Jeff N; Hiratani, Masato; Rhee, Moon; Hommes, Gregg; Pierce, Tim G; de la Rubia, Tomas Diaz

    2006-04-27

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects called dislocations. First proposed theoretically in 1934 (refs 1-3) to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening, a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions that tie the dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed 'multi-junctions'. We first predict the existence of multi-junctions using dislocation dynamics and atomistic simulations and then confirm their existence by transmission electron microscopy experiments in single-crystal molybdenum. In large-scale dislocation dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication, thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in body-centred cubic crystals.

  5. [The effect of daily exposure to low hardening temperature on plant vital activity].

    PubMed

    Markovskaia, E F; Sysoeva, M I; Sherudilo, E G

    2008-01-01

    Phenomenological responses of plants to daily short-term exposure to low hardening temperature was studied under chamber and field conditions. Experiments were carried out on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), marigolds (Tagetes L.), and petunia (Petunia x hybrida) plants. The obtained data demonstrated a similar pattern of response in all studied plant species to different variants of exposure to low hardening temperature. The main features of plant response to daily short-term exposure to low hardening temperature include: a higher rate of increase in cold tolerance (cf. two- or threefold increase relative to constant low hardening temperature) that peaked on day 5 (cf. day 2 at constant low hardening temperature) and was maintained for 2 weeks (cf. 3-4 days at constant low hardening temperature); a simultaneous increase in heat tolerance (cf. twofold relative to constant low hardening temperature) maintained over a long period (cf. only in the beginning of the exposure to constant low hardening temperature); a sharp drop in the subsequent cold tolerance after plant incubation in the dark (cf. a very low decrease in cold tolerance following the exposure to constant low hardening temperature); a combination of high cold tolerance and high photochemical activity of the photosynthetic apparatus (cf. a low non-photochemical quenching at constant low hardening temperature); and the capacity to rapidly increase cold tolerance in response to repeated short-term exposures to low hardening temperature in plants grown outdoors (cf. a gradual increase after repeated exposure to constant low hardening temperature). Possible methods underlying the plant response to daily short-term exposure to low temperature are proposed.

  6. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging

    PubMed Central

    Buechel, Heather M.; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L.; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9–12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors. PMID:24575039

  7. Precipitation hardening in 350 grade maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, U.K. . Radiometallurgy Div.); Dey, G.K. . Metallurgy Division); Asundi, M.K. )

    1993-11-01

    Evolution of microstructure in 350 grade commercial maraging steel has been examined. In the earlier stages of aging, the strengthening phases are formed by the heterogeneous precipitation, and these phases have been identified as intermetallic compounds of the Ni[sub 3] (Ti, Mo) and Fe[sub 2]Mo types. The kinetics of precipitation are studied in terms of the activation energy by carrying out isothermal hardness measurements of aged material. The mechanical properties in the peak-aged and overaged conditions were evaluated and the flow behavior examined. The overaging behavior of the steel has been studied and the formation of austenite of different morphologies identified. The crystallography of the austenite has been examined in detail. From the microstructural examination of peak-aged and deformed samples, it could be inferred that the dislocation-precipitate interaction is by precipitate shearing. Increased work hardening of the material in the overaged condition was suggestive of looping of precipitates by dislocations.

  8. Systemic DNA damage responses in aging and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ribezzo, Flavia; Shiloh, Yosef; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The genome is constantly attacked by a variety of genotoxic insults. The causal role for DNA damage in aging and cancer is exemplified by genetic defects in DNA repair that underlie a broad spectrum of acute and chronic human disorders that are characterized by developmental abnormalities, premature aging, and cancer predisposition. The disease symptoms are typically tissue-specific with uncertain genotype-phenotype correlation. The cellular DNA damage response (DDR) has been extensively investigated ever since yeast geneticists discovered DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms, several decades ago. In recent years, it has become apparent that not only cell-autonomous but also systemic DNA damage responses determine the outcome of genome instability in organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of non-cell-autonomous DNA damage responses will provide important new insights into the role of genome instability in human aging and a host of diseases including cancer and might better explain the complex phenotypes caused by genome instability. PMID:26773346

  9. Age-group differences in inhibiting an oculomotor response.

    PubMed

    Gottlob, Lawrence R; Fillmore, Mark T; Abroms, Ben D

    2007-11-01

    Age-group differences were examined in the delayed oculomotor response task, which requires that observers delay the execution of a saccade (eye movement) toward an abrupt-onset visual cue. This task differs from antisaccade and attentional capture in that inhibition causes saccades to be postponed, not redirected. Older adults executed more premature saccades than young adults, but there were no age-group differences in latency or accuracy of saccades executed at the proper time. The results suggest that older adults are less capable of inhibiting a prepotent saccadic response, but that other aspects of visual working memory related to the task are preserved.

  10. 'Healthy Ageing' policies and anti-ageing ideologies and practices: on the exercise of responsibility.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Beatriz

    2008-12-01

    This paper explores how the exercise of the ethics of 'responsibility' for health care advanced through 'healthy ageing' and 'successful ageing' narratives in Western countries animates an array of 'authorities', including the 'anti-ageing medicine' movement as a strategy to address the anxieties of growing old in Western societies and as a tool to exercise the ethos of 'responsibility'. The choice of this type of authority as a source of guidance for self-constitution and the exercise of the 'responsible self', this paper will argue, enables the enactment of a type of late modernity notion of citizenship for ageing individuals based on principles of agelessness, health, independence and consumption power. Through interviews with anti-ageing consumers, however, it is also possible to argue the existence of tensions and contradictions that such a rigid model of self-constitution in later life produces, and the potential forms of resistance and contestations that may emerge as a result. In this way the current 'war on anti-ageing medicine' (Vincent 2003) becomes also symptomatic of bigger 'wars' taking place not only between institutions competing for control over knowledge and management of ageing, but between those in favour and against the homogenisation of life under the language of universal science, reason and market rationality.

  11. Thermal shifts and intermittent linear response of aging systems.

    PubMed

    Sibani, Paolo; Christiansen, Simon

    2008-04-01

    At time t after an initial quench, an aging system responds to a perturbation turned on at time twresponse on the ratio t/tw . Further insight is obtained imposing small temperature steps, so-called T shifts. The average response as a function of t/tw,eff , where tw,eff is the effective age, is similar to the response of a system aged isothermally at the final temperature. Using an Ising model with plaquette interactions, the applicability of analytic formulas for the average isothermal magnetization is confirmed. The T -shifted aging behavior of the model is approximately described using effective ages. Large positive shifts nearly reset the effective age. Negative T shifts offer a more detailed probe of the dynamics. Assuming the marginal stability of the "current" attractor against thermal noise fluctuations, the scaling form tw,eff=tw x and the dependence of the exponent x on the aging temperatures before and after the shift are theoretically available. The predicted form of x has no adjustable parameters. Both the algebraic scaling of the effective age and the form of the exponent reasonably agree with the data. The present simulations thus confirm the crucial role of marginal stability in glassy relaxation.

  12. Does age matter? The influence of age on response rates in a mixed-mode survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gigliotti, Larry M.; Dietsch, Alia

    2014-01-01

    The appeal of cost savings and faster results has fish and wildlife management agencies considering the use of Internet surveys instead of traditional mail surveys to collect information from their constituents. Internet surveys, however, may suffer from differential age-related response rates, potentially producing biased results if certain age groups respond to Internet surveys differently than they do to mail surveys. We examined this concern using data from a mixed-mode angler survey conducted in South Dakota following the 2011 fishing season. Results indicated that young anglers (16–18) had the lowest return rates and senior anglers (65+) had the highest, regardless of survey mode. Despite this consistency in response rates, we note two concerns: (a) lower Internet response rates and (b) different age groups represented by the Internet and mail survey samples differed dramatically. Findings indicate that constituent groups may be represented differently with the use of various survey modes.

  13. A Critical Assessment of Cyclic Softening and Hardening Behavior in a Near- α Titanium Alloy During Thermomechanical Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Kartik; Sarkar, Rajdeep; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Sundararaman, M.

    2016-10-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue behavior of Ti-alloy Timetal 834 has been studied at two temperature intervals viz. 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) and 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) under mechanical strain-controlled cycling. Among the temperatures studied, the alloy exhibited initial cyclic softening followed by cyclic hardening at 723 K (450 °C) in the temperature interval of 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C). However, continuous cyclic hardening was observed at 723 K (450 °C) in 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C). At 573 K (300 °C) and 873 K (600 °C), cyclic softening was observed in the cyclic stress response curves in both the temperature intervals. The dislocation substructure was observed to be planar in both the modes of TMF loading. Based on TEM microstructures and few unconventional fatigue tests, the observed cyclic hardening is attributed to dynamic strain aging. The reduced fatigue life at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) under OP-TMF loading was attributed to the combined effect of cyclic hardening (leading to early strain localization and crack initiation), oxidation, and development of tensile mean stresses.

  14. Age Differences in Responses to Conflict in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Mark H.; Kraus, Linda A.; Capobianco, Sal

    2009-01-01

    Socioemotional selectivity theory (SST) has been used successfully to explain age differences in interpersonal conflict behavior: older adults are generally less likely to engage in destructive responses, and more likely to employ nonconfrontational ones. However, this research has focused almost exclusively on conflict with intimates (spouses,…

  15. The aging mind: neuroplasticity in response to cognitive training

    PubMed Central

    Park, Denise C.; Bischof, Gérard N.

    2013-01-01

    Is it possible to enhance neural and cognitive function with cognitive training techniques? Can we delay age-related decline in cognitive function with interventions and stave off Alzheimer's disease? Does an aged brain really have the capacity to change in response to stimulation? In the present paper, we consider the neuroplasticity of the aging brain, that is, the brain's ability to increase capacity in response to sustained experience. We argue that, although there is some neural deterioration that occurs with age, the brain has the capacity to increase neural activity and develop neural scaffolding to regulate cognitive function. We suggest that increase in neural volume in response to cognitive training or experience is a clear indicator of change, but that changes in activation in response to cognitive training may be evidence of strategy change rather than indicative of neural plasticity. We note that the effect of cognitive training is surprisingly durable over time, but that the evidence that training effects transfer to other cognitive domains is relatively limited. We review evidence which suggests that engagement in an environment that requires sustained cognitive effort may facilitate cognitive function. PMID:23576894

  16. The aging mind: neuroplasticity in response to cognitive training.

    PubMed

    Park, Denise C; Bischof, Gérard N

    2013-03-01

    Is it possible to enhance neural and cognitive function with cognitive training techniques? Can we delay age-related decline in cognitive function with interventions and stave off Alzheimer's disease? Does an aged brain really have the capacity to change in response to stimulation? In the present paper, we consider the neuroplasticity of the aging brain, that is, the brain's ability to increase capacity in response to sustained experience. We argue that, although there is some neural deterioration that occurs with age, the brain has the capacity to increase neural activity and develop neural scaffolding to regulate cognitive function. We suggest that increase in neural volume in response to cognitive training or experience is a clear indicator of change, but that changes in activation in response to cognitive training may be evidence of strategy change rather than indicative of neural plasticity. We note that the effect of cognitive training is surprisingly durable over time, but that the evidence that training effects transfer to other cognitive domains is relatively limited. We review evidence which suggests that engagement in an environment that requires sustained cognitive effort may facilitate cognitive function.

  17. Oxidative stress, radiation-adaptive responses, and aging.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuri

    2004-09-01

    Organisms living in an aerobic environment were forced to evolve effective cellular strategies to detoxify reactive oxygen species. Besides diverse antioxidant enzymes and compounds, DNA repair enzymes, and disassembly systems, which remove damaged proteins, regulation systems that control transcription, translation, and activation have also been developed. The adaptive responses, especially those to radiation, are defensive regulation mechanisms by which oxidative stress (conditioning irradiation) elicits a response against damage because of subsequent stress (challenging irradiation). Although many researchers have investigated these molecular mechanisms, they remain obscure because of their complex signaling pathways and the involvement of various proteins. This article reviews the factors concerned with radiation-adaptive response, the signaling pathways activated by conditioning irradiation, and the effects of aging on radiation-adaptive response. The proteomics approach is also introduced, which is a useful method for studying stress response in cells.

  18. Empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Meyer, Esther; Prell, Daniel; Kachelriess, Marc

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Due to x-ray beam polychromaticity and scattered radiation, attenuation measurements tend to be underestimated. Cupping and beam hardening artifacts become apparent in the reconstructed CT images. If only one material such as water, for example, is present, these artifacts can be reduced by precorrecting the rawdata. Higher order beam hardening artifacts, as they result when a mixture of materials such as water and bone, or water and bone and iodine is present, require an iterative beam hardening correction where the image is segmented into different materials and those are forward projected to obtain new rawdata. Typically, the forward projection must correctly model the beam polychromaticity and account for all physical effects, including the energy dependence of the assumed materials in the patient, the detector response, and others. We propose a new algorithm that does not require any knowledge about spectra or attenuation coefficients and that does not need to be calibrated. The proposed method corrects beam hardening in single energy CT data. Methods: The only a priori knowledge entering EBHC is the segmentation of the object into different materials. Materials other than water are segmented from the original image, e.g., by using simple thresholding. Then, a (monochromatic) forward projection of these other materials is performed. The measured rawdata and the forward projected material-specific rawdata are monomially combined (e.g., multiplied or squared) and reconstructed to yield a set of correction volumes. These are then linearly combined and added to the original volume. The combination weights are determined to maximize the flatness of the new and corrected volume. EBHC is evaluated using data acquired with a modern cone-beam dual-source spiral CT scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), with a modern dual-source micro-CT scanner (TomoScope Synergy Twin, CT Imaging GmbH, Erlangen, Germany), and with a modern

  19. High-Performance, Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.; Frazier, Donald O.; Adams, James H.; Johnson, Michael A.; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project endeavors to advance the current state-of-the-art in high-performance, radiation-hardened electronics and processors, ensuring successful performance of space systems required to operate within extreme radiation and temperature environments. Because RHESE is a project within the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP), RHESE's primary customers will be the human and robotic missions being developed by NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) in partial fulfillment of the Vision for Space Exploration. Benefits are also anticipated for NASA's science missions to planetary and deep-space destinations. As a technology development effort, RHESE provides a broad-scoped, full spectrum of approaches to environmentally harden space electronics, including new materials, advanced design processes, reconfigurable hardware techniques, and software modeling of the radiation environment. The RHESE sub-project tasks are: SelfReconfigurable Electronics for Extreme Environments, Radiation Effects Predictive Modeling, Radiation Hardened Memory, Single Event Effects (SEE) Immune Reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) (SIRF), Radiation Hardening by Software, Radiation Hardened High Performance Processors (HPP), Reconfigurable Computing, Low Temperature Tolerant MEMS by Design, and Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Integrated Electronics for Extreme Environments. These nine sub-project tasks are managed by technical leads as located across five different NASA field centers, including Ames Research Center, Goddard Space Flight Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. The overall RHESE integrated project management responsibility resides with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Initial technology development emphasis within RHESE focuses on the hardening of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA)s and Field Programmable Analog

  20. Male age mediates reproductive investment and response to paternity assurance.

    PubMed

    Benowitz, Kyle M; Head, Megan L; Williams, Camellia A; Moore, Allen J; Royle, Nick J

    2013-08-07

    Theory predicts that male response to reduced paternity will depend on male state and interactions between the sexes. If there is little chance of reproducing again, then males should invest heavily in current offspring, regardless of their share in paternity. We tested this by manipulating male age and paternity assurance in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. We found older males invested more in both mating effort and parental effort than younger males. Furthermore, male age, a component of male state, mediated male response to perceived paternity. Older males provided more prenatal care, whereas younger males provided less prenatal care, when perceived paternity was low. Adjustments in male care, however, did not influence selection acting indirectly on parents, through offspring performance. This is because females adjusted their care in response to the age of their partner, providing less care when paired with older males than younger males. As a result offspring, performance did not differ between treatments. Our study shows, for the first time, that a male state variable is an important modifier of paternity-parental care trade-offs and highlights the importance of social interactions between males and females during care in determining male response to perceived paternity.

  1. HARDENING FROG POINTS BY EXPLOSIVE ENERGY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Experiments were made to determine the most efficient method of strain hardening railroad frog points in order to increase their fatigue resistance...Mechanical strain hardening with rolls 40 mm in diameter under a load of 8 tons produced in standard frogs cast from G13L high-manganese steel (AISI...Hadfield steel) a work-hardened surface layer 3-5 mm thick with a hardness of 340 HB. In other experiments, the frogs were hardened by exploding a

  2. Age differences in responses to conflict in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mark H; Kraus, Linda A; Capobianco, Sal

    2009-01-01

    Socioemotional selectivity theory (SST) has been used successfully to explain age differences in interpersonal conflict behavior: older adults are generally less likely to engage in destructive responses, and more likely to employ nonconfrontational ones. However, this research has focused almost exclusively on conflict with intimates (spouses, family, friends), and has typically not examined conflict in the workplace. The present investigation uses behavior ratings made by bosses, peers, and subordinates of 2513 working adults to examine the association between age and workplace conflict behavior; more specifically, it tests three hypotheses generated from socioemotional selectivity theory. Consistent with predictions, raters generally agreed that older working adults were more likely to engage in nonconfrontational responses (yielding, delaying responding); also as expected, older and younger respondents did not consistently differ in their efforts to constructively solve conflict. Unexpectedly, little evidence was found that older adults engage in less active destructive behavior.

  3. Consequences of heat hardening on a field fitness component in Drosophila depend on environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Loeschcke, Volker; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2007-02-01

    Heat hardening increases thermal resistance to more extreme temperatures in the laboratory. However, heat hardening also has negative consequences, and the net benefit of hardening has not been evaluated in the field. We tested short-term heat hardening effects on the likelihood of Drosophila melanogaster to be caught at different temperatures at baits in field sites without natural resources. We predicted that hardened flies should be more frequently caught at the baits at high but not low temperatures. Under cool conditions, flies hardened at 36 degrees C, and to a lesser extent at 34 degrees C, were less frequently caught at baits than nonhardened flies a few hours after release, indicating a negative effect of hardening. In later captures, negative effects tended to disappear, particularly in males. Under warm conditions, there was an overall balance of negative and positive effects, though with a different temporal resolution. Under very hot conditions, when capture rates were low, there was a large benefit of hardening at 36 degrees C and 34 degrees C but not 33 degrees C. Finally, based on climatic records, the overall benefit of hardening in D. melanogaster is discussed as an evolved response to high temperatures occasionally experienced by organisms at some locations.

  4. Branching structure and strain hardening of branched metallocene polyethylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Enrique; Li, Si-Wan; Costeux, Stéphane; Dealy, John M.

    2015-09-15

    There have been a number of studies of a series of branched metallocene polyethylenes (BMPs) made in a solution, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) polymerization. The materials studied vary in branching level in a systematic way, and the most highly branched members of the series exhibit mild strain hardening. An outstanding question is which types of branched molecules are responsible for strain hardening in extension. This question is explored here by use of polymerization and rheological models along with new data on the extensional flow behavior of the most highly branched members of the set. After reviewing all that is known about the effects of various branching structures in homogeneous polymers and comparing this with the structures predicted to be present in BMPs, it is concluded that in spite of their very low concentration, treelike molecules with branch-on-branch structure provide a large number of deeply buried inner segments that are essential for strain hardening in these polymers.

  5. Secondary hardening steel having improved combination of hardness and toughness

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.; Bhat, Manjeshwar S.; Garrison, Jr., Warren M.

    1979-01-01

    A secondary hardening alloy steel composition consisting essentially of about 0.25-0.5% carbon, about 0.5-1.0% manganese, about 1.5-3.0% nickel, about 0-1.0% chromium, about 1.75-2.5% molybdenum, about 0-0.4% vanadium, and an additive selected from about 1-3% aluminum and a combination of at least about 1% aluminum and at least about 1% silicon for a combined Al+Si content of about 2-4%, the balance being iron and impurity elements. The present steel composition has the following characteristics: it exhibits a flat tempering response, it is hardenable upon tempering to a Rockwell C hardness of at least 50, and it has an improved combination of hardness vs. toughness properties after tempering in the secondary hardening range. A method of preparation is also described.

  6. Surface Fatigue Resistance with Induction Hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis; Turza, Alan; Chapman, Mike

    1996-01-01

    Induction hardening has been used for some years to harden the surface and improve the strength and service life of gears and other components. Many applications that employ induction hardening require a relatively long time to finish the hardening process and controlling the hardness of the surface layer and its depth often was a problem. Other surface hardening methods, ie., carbonizing, take a very long time and tend to cause deformations of the toothing, whose elimination requires supplementary finishing work. In double-frequency induction hardening, one uses a low frequency for the preheating of the toothed wheel and a much higher frequency for the purpose of rapidly heating the surface by way of surface hardening.

  7. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response in aging and age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Marishka K.; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum(ER) is a multifunctional organelle within which protein folding, lipid biosynthesis, and calcium storage occurs. Perturbations such as energy or nutrient depletion, disturbances in calcium or redox status that disrupt ER homeostasis lead to the misfolding of proteins, ER stress and up-regulation of several signaling pathways coordinately called the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is characterized by the induction of chaperones, degradation of misfolded proteins and attenuation of protein translation. The UPR plays a fundamental role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and thus is central to normal physiology. However, sustained unresolved ER stress leads to apoptosis. Aging linked declines in expression and activity of key ER molecular chaperones and folding enzymes compromise proper protein folding and the adaptive response of the UPR. One mechanism to explain age associated declines in cellular functions and age-related diseases is a progressive failure of chaperoning systems. In many of these diseases, proteins or fragments of proteins convert from their normally soluble forms to insoluble fibrils or plaques that accumulate in a variety of organs including the liver, brain or spleen. This group of diseases, which typically occur late in life includes Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, type II diabetes and a host of less well known but often equally serious conditions such as fatal familial insomnia. The UPR is implicated in many of these neurodegenerative and familial protein folding diseases as well as several cancers and a host of inflammatory diseases including diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis. This review will discuss age-related changes in the ER stress response and the role of the UPR in age-related diseases. PMID:22934019

  8. Differential Responses to Adjuvants of Macrophages from Young Virgin, Aging Virgin and Aging Breeder Mice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Rb-Ai.62 483 DIFFERENTIAL RESPONSES TO ADJUVANTS OF MACROPHAGES FROM i/i YOUNG VIRGIN AGIN (U) MINNESOTA UNIV DULUTH DEPT OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY RN...ADDRESS (City, State. an ZI 0EC 18 198E- Dept. of Medical Microbiology & Immunology 800 N. Quincy Street E1 8 Duluth, MN 55812-2487 Arlington, VA 22217-5...Aging Breeder Mice by Pamela R. Petrequin and Arthur G. Johnson Dept. of Medical Microbiology /Immunology University of Minnesota-Duluth School of

  9. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  10. Macroeconomic implications of population ageing and selected policy responses

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David E; Chatterji, Somnath; Kowal, Paul; Lloyd-Sherlock, Peter; McKee, Martin; Rechel, Bernd; Rosenberg, Larry; Smith, James P

    2015-01-01

    Between now and 2030, every country will experience population ageing—a trend that is both pronounced and historically unprecedented. Over the past six decades, countries of the world had experienced only a slight increase in the share of people aged 60 years and older, from 8% to 10%. But in the next four decades, this group is expected to rise to 22% of the total population—a jump from 800 million to 2 billion people. Evidence suggests that cohorts entering older age now are healthier than previous ones. However, progress has been very uneven, as indicated by the wide gaps in population health (measured by life expectancy) between the worst (Sierra Leone) and best (Japan) performing countries, now standing at a difference of 36 years for life expectancy at birth and 15 years for life expectancy at age 60 years. Population ageing poses challenges for countries’ economies, and the health of older populations is of concern. Older people have greater health and long-term care needs than younger people, leading to increased expenditure. They are also less likely to work if they are unhealthy, and could impose an economic burden on families and society. Like everyone else, older people need both physical and economic security, but the burden of providing these securities will be falling on a smaller portion of the population. Pension systems will be stressed and will need reassessment along with retirement policies. Health systems, which have not in the past been oriented toward the myriad health problems and long-term care needs of older people and have not sufficiently emphasised disease prevention, can respond in different ways to the new demographic reality and the associated changes in population health. Along with behavioural adaptations by individuals and businesses, the nature of such policy responses will establish whether population ageing will lead to major macroeconomic difficulties. PMID:25468167

  11. Gingival wound healing: an essential response disturbed by aging?

    PubMed

    Smith, P C; Cáceres, M; Martínez, C; Oyarzún, A; Martínez, J

    2015-03-01

    Gingival wound healing comprises a series of sequential responses that allow the closure of breaches in the masticatory mucosa. This process is of critical importance to prevent the invasion of microbes or other agents into tissues, avoiding the establishment of a chronic infection. Wound healing may also play an important role during cell and tissue reaction to long-term injury, as it may occur during inflammatory responses and cancer. Recent experimental data have shown that gingival wound healing is severely affected by the aging process. These defects may alter distinct phases of the wound-healing process, including epithelial migration, granulation tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. The cellular and molecular defects that may explain these deficiencies include several biological responses such as an increased inflammatory response, altered integrin signaling, reduced growth factor activity, decreased cell proliferation, diminished angiogenesis, reduced collagen synthesis, augmented collagen remodeling, and deterioration of the proliferative and differentiation potential of stem cells. In this review, we explore the cellular and molecular basis of these defects and their possible clinical implications.

  12. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  13. Impaired alpha1-adrenergic responses in aged rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Olivier; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Guenoun, Thierry; Laplace, Monique; Crozatier, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    To determine age-related changes in the cardiac effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, both cardiomyocyte Ca2+-transient and cardiac protein kinase C (PKC) activity were measured in 3-month- (3MO) and 24-month- (24MO) old Wistar rats. Ca2+ transients obtained under 1 Hz pacing by microfluorimetry of cardiomyocyte loaded with indo-1 (405/480 nm fluorescence ratio) were compared in control conditions (Kreb's solution alone) and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation (phenylephrine or cirazoline, an alpha1-specific agonist). PKC activity and PKC translocation index (particulate/total activity) were also assayed before and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In 3MO, cirazoline induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient for a 10(-9) M concentration which returned to control values for larger concentrations. In contrast, in 24MO, we observed a constant negative effect of cirazoline on the Ca2+ transient with a significant decrease at 10(-6) M compared with both baseline and Kreb's solution. Preliminary experiments showed that, in a dose-response curve to phenylephrine, the response of Ca2+ transient was maximal at 10(-7) M. This concentration induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient in 3MO and a significant decrease in 24MO. The same concentration was chosen to perform PKC activity measurements under alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In the basal state, PKC particulate activity was higher in 24MO than that in 3MO but was not different in cytosolic fractions; so that the translocation index was higher in 24MO (P < 0.01). After phenylephrine, a translocation of PKC toward the particulate fraction was observed in 3MO but not in 24MO. In conclusion, cardiac alpha1-adrenoceptor response was found to be impaired in aged hearts. The negative effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation on Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes obtained from old rats can be related to an absence of alpha1-adrenergic-induced PKC translocation.

  14. Effects of Age on Temperature Responses During Exposure to Hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C.K.; Baer, L. A.; Moran, M. M.; Wang, T. J.; Yuan, F.; Daunton, N. G.; Corcoran, M. L.; Wade, C. E.; Dalfan, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rats subjected to centrifugation show a marked decrease in body temperature relating to gravity level. Several studies have indicated, that an initial response to centrifugation is followed by acclimation. To test for differences between young (Y; 2 months) and mature (M; 8 months) rats in their response in temperature, both groups were exposed to hypergravity induced by centrifugation. Thirty-six male rats were divided into four groups according to age and G-load (control (1.0G-Y and 1.0G-M), 2.0G-Y or 2.0G-M) and were housed in pairs in standard vivarium cages. During the 7-day period of centrifugation, temperature was measured every five minutes by surgically implanted telemeters. Body mass was measured daily. We found that initial body temperature in 2.0G-M was less than that of 2.0G-Y. Both hypergravity groups (2.0G-Y and 2.0G-M) showed a decrease in temperature at the onset of centrifugation, and the change in temperature (Delta = 0.5 C) remained the same between the groups. Significant differences persisted with 2.0G-Y recovering to control values in four days and 2.0G-M recovering in five days. These results indicate that the mature animals have a similar response as the younger animals, but take longer to acclimate.

  15. DISPERSION HARDENING OF URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Arbiter, W.

    1963-01-15

    A method of hardening U metal involves the forming of a fine dispersion of UO/sub 2/. This method consists of first hydriding the U to form a finely divided powder and then exposing the powder to a very dilute O gas in an inert atmosphere under such pressure and temperature conditions as to cause a thin oxide film to coat each particle of the U hydride, The oxide skin prevents agglomeration of the particles as the remaining H is removed, thus preserving the small particle size. The oxide skin coatings remain as an oxide dispersion. The resulting product may be workhardened to improve its physical characteristics. (AEC)

  16. Energy-Efficient Thermomagnetic and Induction Hardening

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will develop and test a hybrid thermomagnetic and induction hardening technology to replace conventional heat treatment processes in forging applications.

  17. Precipitation hardening of an Al-4.2 wt% Mg-0.6 wt% Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratchev, P.; Verlinden, B.; Houtte, P. van; Smet, P. de

    1998-06-12

    The precipitation hardening of an experimental Al-4.2 wt % Mg-0.6 wt % Cu alloy has been studied. After a first initial jump, the yield strength increases almost linearly with the logarithm of the ageing time and a peak of hardness is reached after 11 days at 180 C. Special attention is given to the precipitation hardening during the early stage of ageing. It has been shown that S{double_prime} phase can be formed heterogeneously on dislocation loops and helices and a new mechanism of precipitation hardening due to this S{double_prime} phase precipitation is proposed. The precipitation of S{double_prime} on dislocations is the predominant cause of strengthening during the initial stage of precipitation hardening (up to 30 min at 180 C). Guinier-Preston-Bagaryatsky (GPB) zones (or better, the recently introduced Cu/Mg clusters) also appear in the initial stage, but their contribution to the hardness, which up to now as considered to be predominant, is shown to be smaller than the one of the S{double_prime} precipitates. Since the density of the S{double_prime} nucleation sites is related to the amount of dislocations, this mechanism is important in the case of a bake hardening treatment when ageing is preceded by cold deformation. Uniform S{double_prime} precipitation has also been found at the later ageing stage, which suggests that the contribution of S{double_prime} to the precipitation hardening at that stage is not less important.

  18. Serum Response Factor in Muscle Tissues: From Development to Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Coletti, Dario; Daou, Nissrine; Hassani, Medhi; Li, Zhenlin; Parlakian, Ara

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle cells share various common characteristic features. During development the embryonic mesodermal layer contribute at different proportions to the formation of these tissues. At the functional level, contractility as well as its decline during ageing, are also common features. Cytoskeletal components of these tissues are characterized by various actin isoforms that govern through their status (polymerised versus monomeric) and their interaction with the myosins the contractile properties of these muscles. Finally, at the molecular level, a set of different transcription factors with the notable exception of Serum Response Factor SRF- which is commonly enriched in the 3 types of muscle- drive and maintain the differentiation of these cells (Myf5, MyoD, Myogenin for skeletal muscle; Nkx2.5, GATA4 for cardiomyocytes). In this review, we will focus on the transcription factor SRF and its role in the homeostasis of cardiac, smooth and skeletal muscle tissues as well as its behaviour during the age related remodelling process of these tissues with a specific emphasis on animal models and human data when available. PMID:27478561

  19. How sex and age affect immune responses, susceptibility to infections, and response to vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Giefing-Kröll, Carmen; Berger, Peter; Lepperdinger, Günter; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    Do men die young and sick, or do women live long and healthy? By trying to explain the sexual dimorphism in life expectancy, both biological and environmental aspects are presently being addressed. Besides age-related changes, both the immune and the endocrine system exhibit significant sex-specific differences. This review deals with the aging immune system and its interplay with sex steroid hormones. Together, they impact on the etiopathology of many infectious diseases, which are still the major causes of morbidity and mortality in people at old age. Among men, susceptibilities toward many infectious diseases and the corresponding mortality rates are higher. Responses to various types of vaccination are often higher among women thereby also mounting stronger humoral responses. Women appear immune-privileged. The major sex steroid hormones exhibit opposing effects on cells of both the adaptive and the innate immune system: estradiol being mainly enhancing, testosterone by and large suppressive. However, levels of sex hormones change with age. At menopause transition, dropping estradiol potentially enhances immunosenescence effects posing postmenopausal women at additional, yet specific risks. Conclusively during aging, interventions, which distinctively consider the changing level of individual hormones, shall provide potent options in maintaining optimal immune functions. PMID:25720438

  20. How sex and age affect immune responses, susceptibility to infections, and response to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Giefing-Kröll, Carmen; Berger, Peter; Lepperdinger, Günter; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2015-06-01

    Do men die young and sick, or do women live long and healthy? By trying to explain the sexual dimorphism in life expectancy, both biological and environmental aspects are presently being addressed. Besides age-related changes, both the immune and the endocrine system exhibit significant sex-specific differences. This review deals with the aging immune system and its interplay with sex steroid hormones. Together, they impact on the etiopathology of many infectious diseases, which are still the major causes of morbidity and mortality in people at old age. Among men, susceptibilities toward many infectious diseases and the corresponding mortality rates are higher. Responses to various types of vaccination are often higher among women thereby also mounting stronger humoral responses. Women appear immune-privileged. The major sex steroid hormones exhibit opposing effects on cells of both the adaptive and the innate immune system: estradiol being mainly enhancing, testosterone by and large suppressive. However, levels of sex hormones change with age. At menopause transition, dropping estradiol potentially enhances immunosenescence effects posing postmenopausal women at additional, yet specific risks. Conclusively during aging, interventions, which distinctively consider the changing level of individual hormones, shall provide potent options in maintaining optimal immune functions.

  1. COSMIC-RAY HELIUM HARDENING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Ioka, Kunihito

    2011-03-01

    Recent observations by the CREAM and ATIC-2 experiments suggest that (1) the spectrum of cosmic-ray (CR) helium is harder than that of CR protons below the knee energy, 10{sup 15}eV, and (2) all CR spectra become hard at {approx}>10{sup 11}eV nucleon{sup -1}. We propose a new idea, that higher energy CRs are generated in a more helium-rich region, to explain the hardening without introducing different sources for CR helium. The helium-to-proton ratio at {approx}100 TeV exceeds the Big Bang abundance Y = 0.25 by several times, and the different spectrum is not reproduced within the diffusive shock acceleration theory. We argue that CRs are produced in a chemically enriched region, such as a superbubble, and the outward-decreasing abundance naturally leads to the hard spectrum of CR helium if CRs escape from the supernova remnant shock in an energy-dependent way. We provide a simple analytical spectrum that also fits well the hardening due to the decreasing Mach number in the hot superbubble with {approx}10{sup 6} K. Our model predicts hard and concave spectra for heavier CR elements.

  2. On the Precipitation Hardening of Selective Laser Melted AlSi10Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulkhair, Nesma T.; Tuck, Chris; Ashcroft, Ian; Maskery, Ian; Everitt, Nicola M.

    2015-08-01

    Precipitation hardening of selective laser melted AlSi10Mg was investigated in terms of solution heat treatment and aging duration. The influence on the microstructure and hardness was established, as was the effect on the size and density of Si particles. Although the hardness changes according to the treatment duration, the maximum hardening effect falls short of the hardness of the as-built parts with their characteristic fine microstructure. This is due to the difference in strengthening mechanisms.

  3. Passive biaxial mechanical response of aged human iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Bauer, Christian A J; Mörth, Christian; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2003-06-01

    Inflation and extension tests of arteries are essential for the understanding of arterial wall mechanics. Data for such tests of human arteries are rare. At autopsy we harvested 10 non-diseased external iliac arteries of aged subjects (52-87 yrs). Structural homogeneity was ensured by means of ultrasound imaging, and anamneses of patients were recorded. We measured the axial in situ stretches, load-free geometries and opening angles. Passive biaxial mechanical responses of preconditioned cylindrical specimens were studied in 37 degrees C calcium-free Tyrode solution under quasistatic loading conditions. Specimens were subjected to pressure cycles varying from 0 to 33.3 kPa (250 mmHg) at nine fixed axial loads, varying from 0 to 9.90N. For the description of the load-deformation behavior we employed five "two-dimensional" orthotropic strain-energy functions frequently used in arterial wall mechanics. The associated constitutive models were compared in regard to their ability of representing the experimental data. Histology showed that the arteries were of the muscular type. In contrast to animal arteries they exhibited intimal layers of considerable thickness. The average ratio of wall thickness to outer diameter was 7.7, which is much less than observed for common animal arteries. We found a clear correlation between age and the axial in situ stretch lambda is (r = -0.72, P = 0.03), and between age and distensibility of specimens, i.e. aged specimens are less distensible. Axial in situ stretches were clearly smaller (1.07 +/- 0.09, mean +/- SD) than in animal arteries. For one specimen lambda is was even smaller than 1.0, i.e. the vessel elongated axially upon excision. The nonlinear and anisotropic load-deformation behavior showed small hystereses. For the majority of specimens we observed axial stretches smaller than 1.3 and circumferential stretches smaller than 1.1 for the investigated loading range. Data from in situ inflation tests showed a significant

  4. Improved hardening theory for cyclic plasticity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Armstrong, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A temperature-dependent version of a combined hardening theory, including isotropic and kinematic hardening, is presented within the framework of recent plasticity formulations. This theory has been found to be especially useful in finite-element analysis of aerospace vehicle engines under conditions of large plastic strain and low-cycle fatigue.

  5. HRTEM and HAADF-STEM of precipitates at peak ageing of cast A319 aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Wiengmoon, Amporn; Pearce, John T H; Chairuangsri, Torranin; Isoda, Seiji; Saito, Hikaru; Kurata, Hiroki

    2013-02-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-angle annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) were applied to investigate the precipitates formed during age hardening at 170±5°C for up to 48h of cast A319 aluminium alloy (Al-4.93wt%Si-3.47wt%Cu). The precipitates at the peak-aged condition have been identified as mainly θ" together with a smaller amount of θ'. It is proposed that the θ" is responsible for hardening at peak ageing at 170°C of the cast A319 aluminium alloy.

  6. Nanoscale characterization of the biomechanical hardening of bovine zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Frassanito, Maria Cristina; Lamberti, Luciano; Brunelli, Roberto; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Monaci, Maurizio; Papi, Massimiliano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Parasassi, Tiziana; Sylla, Lakamy; Ursini, Fulvio; De Spirito, Marco

    2012-11-07

    The zona pellucida (ZP) is an extracellular membrane surrounding mammalian oocytes. The so-called zona hardening plays a key role in fertilization process, as it blocks polyspermy, which may also be caused by an increase in the mechanical stiffness of the ZP membrane. However, structural reorganization mechanisms leading to ZP's biomechanical hardening are not fully understood yet. Furthermore, a correct estimate of the elastic properties of the ZP is still lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the biomechanical behaviour of ZP membranes extracted from mature and fertilized bovine oocytes to better understand the mechanisms involved in the structural reorganization of the ZP that may lead to the biomechanical hardening of the ZP. For that purpose, a hybrid procedure is developed by combining atomic force microscopy nanoindentation measurements, nonlinear finite element analysis and nonlinear optimization. The proposed approach allows us to determine the biomechanical properties of the ZP more realistically than the classical analysis based on Hertz's contact theory, as it accounts for the nonlinearity of finite indentation process, hyperelastic behaviour and material heterogeneity. Experimental results show the presence of significant biomechanical hardening induced by the fertilization process. By comparing various hyperelastic constitutive models, it is found that the Arruda-Boyce eight-chain model best describes the biomechanical response of the ZP. Fertilization leads to an increase in the degree of heterogeneity of membrane elastic properties. The Young modulus changes sharply within a superficial layer whose thickness is related to the characteristic distance between cross-links in the ZP filamentous network. These findings support the hypothesis that biomechanical hardening of bovine ZP is caused by an increase in the number of inter-filaments cross-links whose density should be higher in the ZP inner side.

  7. Monitoring of hardening and hygroscopic induced strains in a calcium phosphate bone cement using FBG sensor.

    PubMed

    Bimis, A; Karalekas, D; Bouropoulos, N; Mouzakis, D; Zaoutsos, S

    2016-07-01

    This study initially deals with the investigation of the induced strains during hardening stage of a self-setting calcium phosphate bone cement using fiber-Bragg grating (FBG) optical sensors. A complementary Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) investigation was also conducted at different time intervals of the hardening period and its findings were related to the FBG recordings. From the obtained results, it is demonstrated that the FBG response is affected by the microstructural changes taking place when the bone cement is immersed into the hardening liquid media. Subsequently, the FBG sensor was used to monitor the absorption process and hygroscopic response of the hardened and dried biocement when exposed to a liquid/humid environment. From the FBG-based calculated hygric strains as a function of moisture concentration, the coefficient of moisture expansion (CME) of the examined bone cement was obtained, exhibiting two distinct linear regions.

  8. Age alters the cardiovascular response to direct passive heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minson, C. T.; Wladkowski, S. L.; Cardell, A. F.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Kenney, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    During direct passive heating in young men, a dramatic increase in skin blood flow is achieved by a rise in cardiac output (Qc) and redistribution of flow from the splanchnic and renal vascular beds. To examine the effect of age on these responses, seven young (Y; 23 +/- 1 yr) and seven older (O; 70 +/- 3 yr) men were passively heated with water-perfused suits to their individual limit of thermal tolerance. Measurements included heart rate (HR), Qc (by acetylene rebreathing), central venous pressure (via peripherally inserted central catheter), blood pressures (by brachial auscultation), skin blood flow (from increases in forearm blood flow by venous occlusion plethysmography), splanchnic blood flow (by indocyanine green clearance), renal blood flow (by p-aminohippurate clearance), and esophageal and mean skin temperatures. Qc was significantly lower in the older than in the young men (11.1 +/- 0.7 and 7.4 +/- 0.2 l/min in Y and O, respectively, at the limit of thermal tolerance; P < 0. 05), despite similar increases in esophageal and mean skin temperatures and time to reach the limit of thermal tolerance. A lower stroke volume (99 +/- 7 and 68 +/- 4 ml/beat in Y and O, respectively, P < 0.05), most likely due to an attenuated increase in inotropic function during heating, was the primary factor for the lower Qc observed in the older men. Increases in HR were similar in the young and older men; however, when expressed as a percentage of maximal HR, the older men relied on a greater proportion of their chronotropic reserve to obtain the same HR response (62 +/- 3 and 75 +/- 4% maximal HR in Y and O, respectively, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the older men redistributed less blood flow from the combined splanchnic and renal circulations at the limit of thermal tolerance (960 +/- 80 and 720 +/- 100 ml/min in Y and O, respectively, P < 0. 05). As a result of these combined attenuated responses, the older men had a significantly lower increase in total blood flow directed to

  9. Drought tolerance and transplanting performance of holm oak (Quercus ilex) seedlings after drought hardening in the nursery.

    PubMed

    Villar-Salvador, Pedro; Planelles, Rosa; Oliet, Juan; Peñuelas-Rubira, Juan L; Jacobs, Douglass F; González, Magdalena

    2004-10-01

    Drought stress is the main cause of mortality of holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) seedlings in forest plantations. We therefore assessed if drought hardening, applied in the nursery at the end of the growing season, enhanced the drought tolerance and transplanting performance of holm oak seedlings. Seedlings were subjected to three drought hardening intensities (low, moderate and severe) for 2.5 and 3.5 months, and compared with control seedlings. At the end of the hardening period, water relations, gas exchange and morphological attributes were determined, and survival and growth under mesic and xeric transplanting conditions were assessed. Drought hardening increased drought tolerance primarily by affecting physiological traits, with no effect on shoot/root ratio or specific leaf mass. Drought hardening reduced osmotic potential at saturation and at the turgor loss point, stomatal conductance, residual transpiration (RT) and new root growth capacity (RGC), but enhanced cell membrane stability. Among treated seedlings, the largest response occurred in seedlings subjected to moderate hardening. Severe hardening reduced shoot soluble sugar concentration and increased shoot starch concentration. Increasing the duration of hardening had no effect on water relations but reduced shoot mineral and starch concentrations. Variation in cell membrane stability, RT and RGC were negatively related to osmotic adjustment. Despite differences in drought tolerance, no differences in mortality and relative growth rate were observed between hardening treatments when the seedlings were transplanted under either mesic or xeric conditions.

  10. Precipitation hardening in the first aerospace aluminum alloy: the wright flyer crankcase.

    PubMed

    Gayle, F W; Goodway, M

    1994-11-11

    Aluminum has had an essential part in aerospace history from its very inception: An aluminum copper alloy (with a copper composition of 8 percent by weight) was used in the engine that powered the historic first flight of the Wright brothers in 1903. Examination of this alloy shows that it is precipitation-hardened by Guinier-Preston zones in a bimodal distribution, with larger zones (10 to 22 nanometers) originating in the casting practice and finer ones (3 nanometers) resulting from ambient aging over the last 90 years. The precipitation hardening in the Wright Flyer crankcase occurred earlier than the experiments of Wilm in 1909, when such hardening was first discovered, and predates the accepted first aerospace application of precipitation-hardened aluminum in 1910.

  11. Ageing is not associated with an altered immune response during Trypanosoma cruzi infection: Ageing and Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Colato, Rafaela Pravato; Brazão, Vânia; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; do Vale, Gabriel Tavares; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2017-01-25

    The aims of this work were to evaluate the influence of ageing on the magnitude of the immune response in male Wistar rats infected with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Infected young animals displayed enhanced CD4(+) T cells as compared to uninfected counterparts. Ageing also triggered a significant reduction in CD8(+) T cells compared to young and uninfected groups. The percentage of spleen NKT cells was reduced for all groups, regardless of the infection status. Significant decreased B-cells was noted in aged controls and infected animals as compared to young counterparts. A significant decrease in MHC class II (RT1B) expression in all aged animals was observed, whether infected or not. The highest and significant levels of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) were noted in the aged and infected animals as compared to young-infected ones (16day). Consequently superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was reduced for both control and infected aged animals. Significant elevation of 8-isoprostane levels was found in aged control and infected animals. Plasma glutathione (GSH) concentration was reduced in aged control animals, as well as, in the young infected animals. NO production was increased in both infected and uninfected aged animals compared to young infected and uninfected animals. Corticosterone levels were elevated in aged animals, whether infected or not. Thus, our results are inedited since the immune response is not worsened by the simple fact of animals being older. Ageing by itself triggered a damaged immune response as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species, when compared to young counterparts, but it did not contribute to impair the immune response of T. cruzi infected and aged rats.

  12. The Difference that Age Makes: Cultural Factors that Shape Older Adults' Responses to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogk, Marja

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests that approaching vision loss from age-related macular degeneration from a sociocultural perspective, specifically considering perceptions of aging, blindness, disability, and generational viewpoints and norms, may be critical to understanding older adults' responses to vision loss and visual rehabilitation.

  13. Aging increases the susceptibility of hepatic inflammation, liver fibrosis and aging in response to high-fat diet in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Hee; Xu, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Koyama, Yukinori; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Diggle, Karin; You, Young-Hyun; Schilling, Jan M; Jeste, Dilip; Sharma, Kumar; Brenner, David A; Kisseleva, Tatiana

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to investigate whether aging increases the susceptibility of hepatic and renal inflammation or fibrosis in response to high-fat diet (HFD) and explore the underlying genetic alterations. Middle (10 months old) and old (20 months old) aged, male C57BL/6N mice were fed either a low-fat diet (4 % fat) or HFD (60 % fat) for 4 months. Young (3 months old) aged mice were included as control group. HFD-induced liver and kidney injuries were analyzed by serum and urine assay, histologic staining, immunohistochemistry, and reverse-transcription real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Total RNA sequencing with next-generation technology was done with RNA extracted from liver tissues. With HFD feeding, aged was associated with higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels, marked infiltration of hepatic macrophages, and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines (MCP1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17A). Importantly, aged mice showed more advanced hepatic fibrosis and increased expression of fibrogenic markers (Col-I-α1, αSMA, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGFβRII, PDGF, PDGFRβII, TIMP1) in response to HFD. Aged mice fed on HFD also showed increased oxidative stress and TLR4 expression. In the total RNA seq and gene ontology analysis of liver, old-aged HFD group showed significant up-regulation of genes linked to innate immune response, immune response, defense response, inflammatory response compared to middle-aged HFD group. Meanwhile, aging and HFD feeding showed significant increase in glomerular size and mesangial area, higher urine albumin/creatinine ratio, and advanced renal inflammation or fibrosis. However, the difference of HFD-induced renal injury between old-aged group and middle-aged group was not significant. The susceptibility of hepatic fibrosis as well as hepatic inflammation in response to HFD was significantly increased with aging. In addition, aging was associated with glomerular alterations and increased renal inflammation or

  14. Method of Hardening Glass-Reinforced Plastics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-09

    373 NETHOD OF HARDENING GLASS -REINFORCED PLASTICS (U) 1/i FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV idRIGHT-PATTERSON NFS ON V F DOLGIKH ET AL 89 FEB 88 FTD-ID(RS)T-M49...FTD-ID(RS)T-0049-88 9 February 1988 MICROFICHE NR: FTD-tES-C-00219 METHOD OF HARDENING GLASS -REINFORCED PLASTICS By: V.F. Dolgikh, S.L. Roginskiy, et...translation were extracted from the best quality copy available. If 1 11i METHOD OF HARDENING GLASS -REINFORCED PLASTICS V. F. Dolgikh, S. L. Roginskiy, E. L

  15. Phase composition and hardening of steels of the Fe-Cr-Ni-Co-Mo system with martensite-austenite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, L. V.; Shal'kevich, A. B.

    2007-03-01

    The phase composition and mechanical properties of maraging steels of the Fe-Cr-Ni-Co-Mo system are studied as a function of the alloying and of the temperatures of quenching and aging. The intermetallic phases strengthening martensite in different aging stages are determined. The degree of the hardening and the variation of the impact toughness at cryogenic temperatures are compared for steels with different structures (martensite and martensite-austenite) in the stages of maximum hardening and overaging. The effect of retained and reverted austenite on the resistance to crack propagation under impact loading is determined for steels with martensite of a different nature and amount of hardening phases.

  16. Diminished acute phase response and increased hepatic inflammation of aged rats in response to intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Christian R; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Pérez, Claudio; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Riquelme, Denise M; Ordenes, Gamaliel; Oshima, Kiyoko; Aravena, Mauricio; Pérez, Viviana I; Nishimura, Sumiyo; Sabaj, Valeria; Walter, Robin; Sierra, Felipe

    2008-12-01

    Aging is associated with a deterioration of the acute phase response to inflammatory challenges. However, the nature of these defects remains poorly defined. We analyzed the hepatic inflammatory response after intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) given to Fisher 344 rats aged 6, 15, and 22-23 months. Induction of the acute phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, and T-kininogen was reduced and/or retarded with aging. Initial induction of interleukin-6 in aged rats was normal, but the later response was increased relative to younger counterparts. An exacerbated hepatic injury was observed in aged rats receiving LPS, as evidenced by the presence of multiple microabscesses in portal tracts, confluent necrosis, higher neutrophil accumulation, and elevated serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, relative to younger animals. Our results suggest that aged rats displayed a reduced expression of APPs and increased hepatic injury in response to the inflammatory insult.

  17. Fatigue hardening in niobium single crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doner, M.; Diprimio, J. C.; Salkovitz, E. I.

    1973-01-01

    Nb single crystals of various orientations were cyclically deformed in tension-compression under strain control. At low strain amplitudes all crystals oriented for single slip and some oriented for multiple slip showed a two stage hardening. When present, the first stage was characterized with almost no cyclic work hardening. The rate of hardening in the second stage increased with strain amplitude and the amount of secondary slip. In crystals oriented for single slip kink bands developed on their side faces during rapid hardening stage which resulted in considerable amount of asterism in Laue spots. A cyclic stress-strain curve independent of prior history was found to exist which was also independent of crystal orientation. Furthermore, this curve differed only slightly from that of polycrystalline Nb obtained from data in literature.

  18. Extraordinary strain hardening by gradient structure.

    PubMed

    Wu, XiaoLei; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Liu; Yuan, Fuping; Zhu, Yuntian T

    2014-05-20

    Gradient structures have evolved over millions of years through natural selection and optimization in many biological systems such as bones and plant stems, where the structures change gradually from the surface to interior. The advantage of gradient structures is their maximization of physical and mechanical performance while minimizing material cost. Here we report that the gradient structure in engineering materials such as metals renders a unique extra strain hardening, which leads to high ductility. The grain-size gradient under uniaxial tension induces a macroscopic strain gradient and converts the applied uniaxial stress to multiaxial stresses due to the evolution of incompatible deformation along the gradient depth. Thereby the accumulation and interaction of dislocations are promoted, resulting in an extra strain hardening and an obvious strain hardening rate up-turn. Such extraordinary strain hardening, which is inherent to gradient structures and does not exist in homogeneous materials, provides a hitherto unknown strategy to develop strong and ductile materials by architecting heterogeneous nanostructures.

  19. Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, John W.

    1976-08-24

    Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

  20. Process for hardening the surface of polymers

    DOEpatents

    Mansur, L.K.; Lee, E.H.

    1992-07-14

    Hard surfaced polymers and the method for making them is generally described. Polymers are subjected to simultaneous multiple ion beam bombardment, that results in a hardening of the surface and improved wear resistance. 1 figure.

  1. Process for hardening the surface of polymers

    DOEpatents

    Mansur, Louis K.; Lee, Eal H.

    1992-01-01

    Hard surfaced polymers and the method for making them is generally described. Polymers are subjected to simultaneous multiple ion beam bombardment, that results in a hardening of the surface and improved wear resistance.

  2. 7 CFR 58.641 - Hardening and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hardening and storage. 58.641 Section 58.641... Procedures § 58.641 Hardening and storage. Immediately after the semifrozen product is placed in its intended container it shall be placed in a hardening tunnel or hardening room to continue the freezing process....

  3. 7 CFR 58.641 - Hardening and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hardening and storage. 58.641 Section 58.641... Procedures § 58.641 Hardening and storage. Immediately after the semifrozen product is placed in its intended container it shall be placed in a hardening tunnel or hardening room to continue the freezing process....

  4. 7 CFR 58.641 - Hardening and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hardening and storage. 58.641 Section 58.641... Procedures § 58.641 Hardening and storage. Immediately after the semifrozen product is placed in its intended container it shall be placed in a hardening tunnel or hardening room to continue the freezing process....

  5. 7 CFR 58.641 - Hardening and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hardening and storage. 58.641 Section 58.641... Procedures § 58.641 Hardening and storage. Immediately after the semifrozen product is placed in its intended container it shall be placed in a hardening tunnel or hardening room to continue the freezing process....

  6. 7 CFR 58.641 - Hardening and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hardening and storage. 58.641 Section 58.641... Procedures § 58.641 Hardening and storage. Immediately after the semifrozen product is placed in its intended container it shall be placed in a hardening tunnel or hardening room to continue the freezing process....

  7. Sadness prediction and response: effects of age and agreeableness.

    PubMed

    Pearman, Ann; Andreoletti, Carrie; Isaacowitz, Derek M

    2010-04-01

    Research has suggested that both age and personality play a role in emotional experience and regulation, but these variables have not been considered together to determine the relative contribution of each. This study simultaneously examined age and agreeableness differences in the experience of sad stimuli. Participants were 46 younger adults (age, M = 22.04 years, SD = 5.41 years) and 48 older adults (age, M = 74.23, SD = 7.82 years). Participants were asked to predict how sad stimuli (i.e., sad photos) would make them feel and were then measured on their actual reaction to the stimuli (reactivity) as well as on their emotional recovery. Agreeableness, but not age, was related to predicted levels of sadness, such that the more agreeable, the higher the predicted sadness (beta = 0.37). In contrast to expectations, prediction accuracy was not related to age or agreeableness. For emotional reactivity, agreeableness (beta = 0.16), but not age, was related to reactivity to sad stimuli (i.e., more agreeable, higher reactivity). Finally, age (beta = 0.14) was significantly related to emotional recovery such that the older adults reported lower levels of sadness at posttest than did the younger adults. Similarly, people who were more agreeable also reported better emotional recovery (beta = 0.15). These relationships were not affected by depression or pretest sadness ratings. Overall, these findings suggest distinct roles for age and agreeableness in predicting different components of the emotion regulation process. An individual with advanced age, high levels of agreeableness, or both may be well-positioned for resilience throughout the emotion regulation process.

  8. Transmission and scanning electron microscope study on the secondary cyclic hardening behavior of interstitial-free steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Chia-Chang; Ho, New-Jin; Huang, Hsing-Lu

    2009-11-15

    Strain controlled fatigue experiment was employed to evaluate automotive grade interstitial-free ferrite steel. Hundreds of grains were examined by scanning electron microscope under electron channeling contrast image technique of backscattered electron image mode for comprehensive comparison of micrographs with those taken under transmission electron microscope. The cyclic stress responses clearly revealed that rapid hardening occurs at the early stage of cycling as a result of multiplication of dislocations to develop loop patches, dipolar walls and dislocation cells at various total strain amplitudes. After primary rapid hardening, stress responses varied from being saturated to further hardening according to dislocation structure evolution at various strain amplitudes. The fatigue failure was always accompanied with further hardening including secondary hardening. The corresponding dislocation structures with the three types of hardening behaviors are discussed. Once the secondary hardening starts, dislocation cells began to develop along grain boundaries in the low strain region and then extended into grain interiors as strain amplitudes increased and cycling went on. The secondary hardening rates were found to be directly proportional to their strain amplitudes.

  9. Aging causes decreased resistance to multiple stresses and a failure to activate specific stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bergsma, Alexis L.; Senchuk, Megan M.; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we examine the relationship between stress resistance and aging. We find that resistance to multiple types of stress peaks during early adulthood and then declines with age. To dissect the underlying mechanisms, we use C. elegans transcriptional reporter strains that measure the activation of different stress responses including: the heat shock response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response, endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, hypoxia response, SKN-1-mediated oxidative stress response, and the DAF-16-mediated stress response. We find that the decline in stress resistance with age is at least partially due to a decreased ability to activate protective mechanisms in response to stress. In contrast, we find that any baseline increase in stress caused by the advancing age is too mild to detectably upregulate any of the stress response pathways. Further exploration of how worms respond to stress with increasing age revealed that the ability to mount a hormetic response to heat stress is also lost with increasing age. Overall, this work demonstrates that resistance to all types of stress declines with age. Based on our data, we speculate that the decrease in stress resistance with advancing age results from a genetically-programmed inactivation of stress response pathways, not accumulation of damage. PMID:27053445

  10. Aging causes decreased resistance to multiple stresses and a failure to activate specific stress response pathways.

    PubMed

    Dues, Dylan J; Andrews, Emily K; Schaar, Claire E; Bergsma, Alexis L; Senchuk, Megan M; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we examine the relationship between stress resistance and aging. We find that resistance to multiple types of stress peaks during early adulthood and then declines with age. To dissect the underlying mechanisms, we use C. elegans transcriptional reporter strains that measure the activation of different stress responses including: the heat shock response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response, endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, hypoxia response, SKN-1-mediated oxidative stress response, and the DAF-16-mediated stress response. We find that the decline in stress resistance with age is at least partially due to a decreased ability to activate protective mechanisms in response to stress. In contrast, we find that any baseline increase in stress caused by the advancing age is too mild to detectably upregulate any of the stress response pathways. Further exploration of how worms respond to stress with increasing age revealed that the ability to mount a hormetic response to heat stress is also lost with increasing age. Overall, this work demonstrates that resistance to all types of stress declines with age. Based on our data, we speculate that the decrease in stress resistance with advancing age results from a genetically-programmed inactivation of stress response pathways, not accumulation of damage.

  11. [Beam hardening correction method for X-ray computed tomography based on subsection beam hardening curves].

    PubMed

    Huang, Kui-dong; Zhang, Ding-hua

    2009-09-01

    After researching the forming principle of X-ray beam hardening and analyzing the usual methods of beam hardening correction, a beam hardening correction model was established, in which the independent variable was the projection gray, and so the computing difficulties in beam hardening correction can be reduced. By considering the advantage and disadvantage of fitting beam hardening curve to polynomial, a new expression method of the subsection beam hardening curves based on polynomial was proposed. In the method, the beam hardening data were fitted firstly to a polynomial curve which traverses the coordinate origin, then whether the got polynomial curve surged in the fore-part or back-part of the fitting range was judged based on the polynomial curvature change. If the polynomial fitting curve surged, the power function curve was applied to replace the surging parts of the polynomial curve, and the C1 continuity was ensured at the joints of the segment curves. The experimental results of computed tomography (CT) simulation show that the method is well stable in the beam hardening correction for the ideal CT images and CT images with added noises, and can mostly remove the beam hardening artifact at the same time.

  12. Decline in Radiation Hardened Microcircuit Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Two areas of radiation hardened microcircuit infrastructure will be discussed: 1) The availability and performance of radiation hardened microcircuits, and, and 2) The access to radiation test facilities primarily for proton single event effects (SEE) testing. Other areas not discussed, but are a concern include: The challenge for maintaining radiation effects tool access for assurance purposes, and, the access to radiation test facilities primarily for heavy ion single event effects (SEE) testing. Status and implications will be discussed for each area.

  13. Properties and Commercial Application of Manual Plasma Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    A new method and a device for plasma hardening of various parts are considered. Installation of the new device does not require too much investment (the active mechanical productions are appropriate for its accommodation) and special choice of personnel (welders train to use it without difficulty). Plasma hardening does not deform and worsen the smoothness of the surface, which makes it possible to employ many hardened parts without finishing mechanical treatment required after bulk or induction hardening. The hardened layer (about 1 mm) produced by plasma hardening exhibits better wear resistance than after bulk hardening with tempering, which prolongs the service life of the parts.

  14. On shakedown analysis in hardening plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quoc-Son

    2003-01-01

    The extension of classical shakedown theorems for hardening plasticity is interesting from both theoretical and practical aspects of the theory of plasticity. This problem has been much discussed in the literature. In particular, the model of generalized standard materials gives a convenient framework to derive appropriate results for common models of plasticity with strain-hardening. This paper gives a comprehensive presentation of the subject, in particular, on general results which can be obtained in this framework. The extension of the static shakedown theorem to hardening plasticity is presented at first. It leads by min-max duality to the definition of dual static and kinematic safety coefficients in hardening plasticity. Dual static and kinematic approaches are discussed for common models of isotropic hardening of limited or unlimited kinematic hardening. The kinematic approach also suggests for these models the introduction of a relaxed kinematic coefficient following a method due to Koiter. Some models for soils such as the Cam-clay model are discussed in the same spirit for applications in geomechanics. In particular, new appropriate results concerning the variational expressions of the dual kinematic coefficients are obtained.

  15. Coccidiosis in swine: dose and age response to Isospora suis.

    PubMed

    Stuart, B P; Gosser, H S; Allen, C B; Bedell, D M

    1982-07-01

    Coccidiosis is a disease of the young piglet due to infection with Isospora suis and is characterized by diarrhea which is nonresponsive to antibacterial therapy. There is variable morbidity and mortality. Piglets develop a more severe clinical illness and enteritis when infected with I. suis at one to three days of age than when infected at two weeks of age. Microscopic lesions range from villous atrophy and mild erosion to severe fibrinonecrotic enteritis.

  16. Influence of electrified surface of cementitious materials on structure formation of hardened cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, A.; Gusakov, A.

    2015-01-01

    To provide high strength and durability of concrete it is necessary to study the influence of physical and chemical and mechanical principles of dispersed cementitious systems. The experimental bench was developed to study the influence of electrified surface of cementitious materials on structure formation of hardened cement paste. The test bench allows accelerating the processes of dissolution of cementing materials in water due to influence of electric discharge on their surface. Cement activation with high-voltage corona discharge when AC current is applied allows increasing the ultimate compressive strength of hardened cement paste by 46% at the age of one day and by 20% at the age of 28 days.

  17. Aging response and characterization of precipitates in Zr alloy Excel pressure tube material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattari, M.; Holt, R. A.; Daymond, M. R.

    2014-09-01

    Precipitation hardening in the Zr-based alloy Excel (Zr-3.5 wt.% Sn-0.8 wt.% Mo-0.8 wt.% Nb) was studied using hardness testing and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Solution treatment at 890 °C, in the αZr + βZr region, and 980 °C, in the βZr region, followed by water-quenching and aging resulted in an increase of hardness, of up to 47% compared to the annealed material. The optimum condition for aging heat treatment was found to be 450 °C for 1-2 h. The precipitates were observed only in the transformed βZr martensitic phase. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in TEM showed the precipitate composition to be Zr-30 wt.% Mo-25 wt.% Nb-2 wt.% Fe. The crystal structure of the precipitates was determined to be hexagonal with a = 0.294 nm and c = 0.448 nm, i.e. c/a = 1.526.

  18. Mitochondrial responsibility in ageing process: innocent, suspect or guilty.

    PubMed

    López-Lluch, Guillermo; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel José Moreno; Asencio-Salcedo, Claudio; Rodríguez-Aguilera, Juan Carlos; Navas, Plácido

    2015-10-01

    Ageing is accompanied by the accumulation of damaged molecules in cells due to the injury produced by external and internal stressors. Among them, reactive oxygen species produced by cell metabolism, inflammation or other enzymatic processes are considered key factors. However, later research has demonstrated that a general mitochondrial dysfunction affecting electron transport chain activity, mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover, apoptosis, etc., seems to be in a central position to explain ageing. This key role is based on several effects from mitochondrial-derived ROS production to the essential maintenance of balanced metabolic activities in old organisms. Several studies have demonstrated caloric restriction, exercise or bioactive compounds mainly found in plants, are able to affect the activity and turnover of mitochondria by increasing biogenesis and mitophagy, especially in postmitotic tissues. Then, it seems that mitochondria are in the centre of metabolic procedures to be modified to lengthen life- or health-span. In this review we show the importance of mitochondria to explain the ageing process in different models or organisms (e.g. yeast, worm, fruitfly and mice). We discuss if the cause of aging is dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction of if the mitochondrial changes observed with age are a consequence of events taking place outside the mitochondrial compartment.

  19. Dislocation subgrain structures and modeling the plastic hardening of metallic single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B. L.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Ortiz, M.

    2010-07-01

    A single crystal plasticity theory for insertion into finite element simulation is formulated using sequential laminates to model subgrain dislocation structures. It is known that local models do not adequately account for latent hardening, as latent hardening is not only a material property, but a nonlocal property (e.g. grain size and shape). The addition of the nonlocal energy from the formation of subgrain structure dislocation walls and the boundary layer misfits provide both latent and self-hardening of a crystal slip. Latent hardening occurs as the formation of new dislocation walls limits motion of new mobile dislocations, thus hardening future slip systems. Self-hardening is accomplished by an evolution of the subgrain structure length scale. The substructure length scale is computed by minimizing the nonlocal energy. The minimization of the nonlocal energy is a competition between the dislocation wall energy and the boundary layer energies. The nonlocal terms are also directly minimized within the subgrain model as they affect deformation response. The geometrical relationship between the dislocation walls and slip planes affecting the dislocation mean free path is taken into account, giving a first-order approximation to shape effects. A coplanar slip model is developed due to requirements while modeling the subgrain structure. This subgrain structure plasticity model is noteworthy as all material parameters are experimentally determined rather than fit. The model also has an inherit path dependence due to the formation of the subgrain structures. Validation is accomplished by comparison with single crystal tension test results.

  20. Segmentation-free empirical beam hardening correction for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schüller, Sören; Sawall, Stefan; Stannigel, Kai; Hülsbusch, Markus; Ulrici, Johannes; Hell, Erich; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The polychromatic nature of the x-ray beams and their effects on the reconstructed image are often disregarded during standard image reconstruction. This leads to cupping and beam hardening artifacts inside the reconstructed volume. To correct for a general cupping, methods like water precorrection exist. They correct the hardening of the spectrum during the penetration of the measured object only for the major tissue class. In contrast, more complex artifacts like streaks between dense objects need other techniques of correction. If using only the information of one single energy scan, there are two types of corrections. The first one is a physical approach. Thereby, artifacts can be reproduced and corrected within the original reconstruction by using assumptions in a polychromatic forward projector. These assumptions could be the used spectrum, the detector response, the physical attenuation and scatter properties of the intersected materials. A second method is an empirical approach, which does not rely on much prior knowledge. This so-called empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) and the previously mentioned physical-based technique are both relying on a segmentation of the present tissues inside the patient. The difficulty thereby is that beam hardening by itself, scatter, and other effects, which diminish the image quality also disturb the correct tissue classification and thereby reduce the accuracy of the two known classes of correction techniques. The herein proposed method works similar to the empirical beam hardening correction but does not require a tissue segmentation and therefore shows improvements on image data, which are highly degraded by noise and artifacts. Furthermore, the new algorithm is designed in a way that no additional calibration or parameter fitting is needed. Methods: To overcome the segmentation of tissues, the authors propose a histogram deformation of their primary reconstructed CT image. This step is essential for the

  1. "Life Stage-Specific" Variations in Performance in Response to Age Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hehman, Jessica A.; Bugental, Daphne Blunt

    2013-01-01

    In a test of life stage-specific responses to age-based stigma, older (n = 54, ages 62-92) and younger (n = 81, ages 17-22) adults were told that a task (Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale-III block design) required either (a) speed/contemporary knowledge (YA; "youth advantage") or (b) life experience/wisdom (OA; "age…

  2. On Analytical Solutions to Beam-Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaud, G.

    2017-01-01

    When polychromatic X-rays propagate through a material, for instance in computerized tomography (CT), low energy photons are more attenuated resulting in a "harder" beam. The beam-hardening phenomenon breaks the monochromatic radiation model based on the Radon transform giving rise to artifacts in CT reconstructions to the detriment of visual inspection and automated segmentation algorithms. We propose first a simplified analytic representation for the beam-hardening. Besides providing a general understanding of the phenomenon, this model proposes to invert the beam-hardening effect for homogeneous objects leading to classical monochromatic data. For heterogeneous objects, no analytical reconstruction of the density can be derived without more prior information. However, the beam-hardening is shown to be a smooth operation on the data and thus to preserve the encoding of the singularities of the attenuation map within the data. A microlocal analysis encourages the use of contour extraction methods to solve partially the beam-hardening effect even for heterogeneous objects. The application of both methods, exact analytical solution for homogeneous objects and feature extraction for heterogeneous ones, on real data demonstrates their relevancy and efficiency.

  3. Obesity superimposed on aging magnifies inflammation and delays the resolving response after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Elizabeth F.; Kabarowski, Janusz H.; Ingle, Kevin A.; Kain, Vasundhara; Barnes, Stephen; Crossman, David K.; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake has increased over the last 100 yr, contributing to the current obesogenic environment. Obesity and aging are prominent risk factors for myocardial infarction (MI). How obesity interacts with aging to alter the post-MI response, however, is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that obesity in aging mice would impair the resolution of post-MI inflammation. PUFA diet (PUFA aging group) feeding to 12-mo-old C57BL/6J mice for 5 mo showed higher fat mass compared with standard lab chow (LC)-fed young (LC young group; 3–5 mo old) or aging alone control mice (LC aging group). LC young, LC aging, and PUFA aging mice were subjected to coronary artery ligation to induce MI. Despite similar infarct areas post-MI, plasma proteomic profiling revealed higher VCAM-1 in the PUFA aging group compared with LC young and LC aging groups, leading to increased neutrophil infiltration in the PUFA aging group (P < 0.05). Macrophage inflammatory protein-1γ and CD40 were also increased at day 1, and myeloperoxidase remained elevated at day 5, an observation consistent with delayed wound healing in the PUFA aging group. Lipidomic analysis showed higher levels of arachidonic acid and 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid at day 1 post-MI in the PUFA aging group compared with the LC aging group (all P < 0.05), thereby mediating neutrophil extravasation in the PUFA aging group. The inflammation-resolving enzymes 5-lipoxygenase, cyclooxygenase-2, and heme oxyegnase-1 were altered to delay wound healing post-MI in the PUFA aging group compared with LC young and LC aging groups. PUFA aging magnifies the post-MI inflammatory response and impairs the healing response by stimulating prolonged neutrophil trafficking and proinflammatory lipid mediators. PMID:25485899

  4. Modeling of Irradiation Hardening of Polycrystalline Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Zbib, Hussein M.; Garmestani, Hamid; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-09-14

    High energy particle irradiation of structural polycrystalline materials usually produces irradiation hardening and embrittlement. The development of predict capability for the influence of irradiation on mechanical behavior is very important in materials design for next generation reactors. In this work a multiscale approach was implemented to predict irradiation hardening of body centered cubic (bcc) alpha-iron. The effect of defect density, texture and grain boundary was investigated. In the microscale, dislocation dynamics models were used to predict the critical resolved shear stress from the evolution of local dislocation and defects. In the macroscale, a viscoplastic self-consistent model was applied to predict the irradiation hardening in samples with changes in texture and grain boundary. This multiscale modeling can guide performance evaluation of structural materials used in next generation nuclear reactors.

  5. An Anisotropic Hardening Model for Springback Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Danielle; Xia, Z. Cedric

    2005-08-05

    As more Advanced High-Strength Steels (AHSS) are heavily used for automotive body structures and closures panels, accurate springback prediction for these components becomes more challenging because of their rapid hardening characteristics and ability to sustain even higher stresses. In this paper, a modified Mroz hardening model is proposed to capture realistic Bauschinger effect at reverse loading, such as when material passes through die radii or drawbead during sheet metal forming process. This model accounts for material anisotropic yield surface and nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening behavior. Material tension/compression test data are used to accurately represent Bauschinger effect. The effectiveness of the model is demonstrated by comparison of numerical and experimental springback results for a DP600 straight U-channel test.

  6. Mars north polar deposits: stratigraphy, age, and geodynamical response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, R.J.; Zuber, M.T.; Smrekar, S.E.; Mellon, M.T.; Head, J.W.; Tanaka, K.L.; Putzig, N.E.; Milkovich, S.M.; Campbell, B.A.; Plaut, J.J.; Safaeinili, A.; Seu, R.; Biccari, D.; Carter, L.M.; Picardi, G.; Orosei, R.; Surdas, Mohit P.; Heggy, E.; Zurek, R.W.; Egan, A.F.; Giacomoni, E.; Russo, F.; Cutigni, M.; Pettinelli, E.; Holt, J.W.; Leuschen, C.J.; Marinangeli, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Shallow Radar (SHARAD) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has imaged the internal stratigraphy of the north polar layered deposits of Mars. Radar reflections within the deposits reveal a laterally continuous deposition of layers, which typically consist of four packets of finely spaced reflectors separated by homogeneous interpacket regions of nearly pure ice. The packet/interpacket structure can be explained by approximately million-year periodicities in Mars' obliquity or orbital eccentricity. The observed ???100-meter maximum deflection of the underlying substrate in response to the ice load implies that the present-day thickness of an equilibrium elastic lithosphere is greater than 300 kilometers. Alternatively, the response to the load may be in a transient state controlled by mantle viscosity. Both scenarios probably require that Mars has a subchondritic abundance of heat-producing elements.

  7. The role of Peroxiredoxin 4 in inflammatory response and aging

    PubMed Central

    Klichko, Vladimir I.; Orr, William C.; Radyuk, Svetlana N.

    2015-01-01

    In prior studies, we determined that moderate overexpression of the Drosophila endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized peroxiredoxin (Prx), dPrx4, reduced oxidative damage and conferred beneficial effects on lifespan, while high level expression increased the incidence of tissue-specific apoptosis and dramatically shortened longevity. The detrimental pro-apoptotic and life-shortening effects were attributed to aberrant localization of dPrx4 and the apparent ER stress elicited by dPrx4 overexpression. In addition, activation of both the NF-κB- and JAK/STAT- mediated stress responses was detected, although it wasn’t clear whether these served as functional alarm signals. Here we extend these findings to show that activation of the NF-κB -dependent immunity-related/inflammatory genes, associated with lifespan shortening effects, is dependent on the activity of a Drosophila NF-κB ortholog, Relish. In the absence of Relish, the pro-inflammatory effects typically elicited by dPrx4 overexpression were not detected. The absence of Relish not only prevented hyperactivation of the immunity-related genes but also significantly rescued the severe shortening of lifespan normally observed in dPrx4 over-expressors. Overactivation of the immune/inflammatory responses was also lessened by JAK/STAT signaling. In addition we found that cellular immune/pro-inflammatory responses provoked by the oxidant paraquat but not bacteria are mediated via dPrx4 activity in the ER, as up-regulation of the immune-related genes was eliminated in flies underexpressing dPrx4 whereas immune responses triggered by bacteria were unaffected. Finally, efforts to reveal critical tissues where dPrx4 modulates longevity showed that broad targeting of dPrx4 to neuronal tissue had strong beneficial effects, while targeting expression to the fat body had deleterious effects. PMID:26689888

  8. Age-Related Response Bias in the Decoding of Sad Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Fölster, Mara; Hess, Ursula; Hühnel, Isabell; Werheid, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have found that age is negatively associated with the accuracy of decoding emotional facial expressions; this effect of age was found for actors as well as for raters. Given that motivational differences and stereotypes may bias the attribution of emotion, the aim of the present study was to explore whether these age effects are due to response bias, that is, the unbalanced use of response categories. Thirty younger raters (19–30 years) and thirty older raters (65–81 years) viewed video clips of younger and older actors representing the same age ranges, and decoded their facial expressions. We computed both raw hit rates and bias-corrected hit rates to assess the influence of potential age-related response bias on decoding accuracy. Whereas raw hit rates indicated significant effects of both the actors’ and the raters’ ages on decoding accuracy for sadness, these age effects were no longer significant when response bias was corrected. Our results suggest that age effects on the accuracy of decoding facial expressions may be due, at least in part, to age-related response bias. PMID:26516920

  9. Thermoelastic constitutive equations for chemically hardening materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, B. W.; Levitsky, M.

    1974-01-01

    Thermoelastic constitutive equations are derived for a material undergoing solidification or hardening as the result of a chemical reaction. The derivation is based upon a two component model whose composition is determined by the degree of hardening, and makes use of strain-energy considerations. Constitutive equations take the form of stress rate-strain rate relations, in which the coefficients are time-dependent functions of the composition. Specific results are developed for the case of a material of constant bulk modulus which undergoes a transition from an initial liquidlike state into an isotropic elastic solid. Potential applications are discussed.

  10. 'Work-Hardenable' Ductile Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Eckert, Juergen; Tang Meibo; Wang Weihua; Kim, Ki Buem; Baier, Falko; Theissmann, Ralf

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive 'work hardening' and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The 'work-hardening' capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  11. Complex and differential glial responses in Alzheimer's disease and ageing.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, José J; Butt, Arthur M; Gardenal, Emanuela; Parpura, Vladimir; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells and their association with neurones are fundamental for brain function. The emergence of complex neurone-glial networks assures rapid information transfer, creating a sophisticated circuitry where both types of neural cells work in concert, serving different activities. All glial cells, represented by astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia and NG2-glia, are essential for brain homeostasis and defence. Thus, glia are key not only for normal central nervous system (CNS) function, but also to its dysfunction, being directly associated with all forms of neuropathological processes. Therefore, the progression and outcome of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases depend on glial reactions. In this review, we provide a concise account of recent data obtained from both human material and animal models demonstrating the pathological involvement of glia in neurodegenerative processes, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as physiological ageing.

  12. Effects of age, socioeconomic status, and menstrual cycle on pulmonary response to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, E. Jr.; McDonnell, W.F.; House, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of age, socioeconomic status, and menstrual cycle phase on the pulmonary response to ozone exposure. Three hundred seventy-two healthy white and black young adults, between the ages of 18 and 35 y, were exposed only once to 0.0, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, 0.30, or 0.40 ppm ozone for 2.3 h. Prior to and after exposure, pulmonary function tests were obtained. Prior to exposure, each subject completed a personal and family-history questionnaire. The response to this questionnaire were used to investigate age, socioeconomic status, and menstrual cycle phase effects on pulmonary responsiveness to ozone. We concluded that the ages of subjects, within the age range studied, had an effect on responsiveness (i.e., decrements in forced expiratory volume in 1 s decreased as the subjects` ages decreased). Socioeconomic status, as reflected by education of fathers, also appeared to affect forced expiratory volume in 1-s responsiveness to ozone, with the middle socioeconomic group being the most responsive. The phase of menstrual cycle did not have an impact on individual responsiveness to ozone. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Innovative Structural Materials and Sections with Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Vikram

    The motivation of this work is based on development of new construction products with strain hardening cementitious composites (SHCC) geared towards sustainable residential applications. The proposed research has three main objectives: automation of existing manufacturing systems for SHCC laminates; multi-level characterization of mechanical properties of fiber, matrix, interface and composites phases using servo-hydraulic and digital image correlation techniques. Structural behavior of these systems were predicted using ductility based design procedures using classical laminate theory and structural mechanics. SHCC sections are made up of thin sections of matrix with Portland cement based binder and fine aggregates impregnating continuous one-dimensional fibers in individual or bundle form or two/three dimensional woven, bonded or knitted textiles. Traditional fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) use random dispersed chopped fibers in the matrix at a low volume fractions, typically 1-2% to avoid to avoid fiber agglomeration and balling. In conventional FRC, fracture localization occurs immediately after the first crack, resulting in only minor improvement in toughness and tensile strength. However in SHCC systems, distribution of cracking throughout the specimen is facilitated by the fiber bridging mechanism. Influence of material properties of yarn, composition, geometry and weave patterns of textile in the behavior of laminated SHCC skin composites were investigated. Contribution of the cementitious matrix in the early age and long-term performance of laminated composites was studied with supplementary cementitious materials such as fly ash, silica fume, and wollastonite. A closed form model with classical laminate theory and ply discount method, coupled with a damage evolution model was utilized to simulate the non-linear tensile response of these composite materials. A constitutive material model developed earlier in the group was utilized to characterize and

  14. Strain hardening in bent copper foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ichiro; Sato, Masumi; Kuroda, Mitsutoshi

    2011-09-01

    A series of systematic tensile and microbend tests were conducted on copper foil specimens with different thicknesses. The specimens were made of a copper foil having almost unidirectional crystal orientations that was considered to be nearly single-crystal. In order to investigate the effects of slip system interactions, two different crystal orientations relative to the tensile direction were considered in the tests: one is close to coplanar double-slip orientation, and the other is close to the ideal cube orientation (the tensile direction nearly coincides to [0 0 1]) that yields multi-planar multi-slip deformation. We extended the microbend test method to include the reversal of bending, and we attempted to divide the total amount of strain-hardening into isotropic and kinematic hardening components. In the tensile tests, no systematic tendency of size dependence was observed. In the microbend tests, size-dependent kinematic hardening behavior was observed for both the crystal orientations, while size dependence of isotropic hardening was observed only for the multi-planar multi-slip case. We introduce an extended crystal plasticity model that accounts for the effects of the geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs), which correspond to the spatial gradients of crystallographic slips. Through numerical simulations performed using the model, the origin of the size-dependent behavior observed in the microbend tests is discussed.

  15. SEU hardening of CMOS memory circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, S.; Canaris, J.; Liu, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a design technique to harden CMOS memory circuits against Single Event Upset (SEU) in the space environment. A RAM cell and Flip Flop design are presented to demonstrate the method. The Flip Flop was used in the control circuitry for a Reed Solomon encoder designed for the Space Station.

  16. [Microstructural changes in hardened beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)].

    PubMed

    Mujica, Maria Virginia; Granito, Marisela; Soto, Naudy

    2015-06-01

    (Phaseolus vulgaris). The hardening of Phaseolus vulgaris beans stored at high temperature and high relative humidity is one of the main constraints for consumption. The objective of this research was to evaluate by scanning electron microscopy, structural changes in cotyledons and testa of the hardened beans. The freshly harvested grains were stored for twelve months under two conditions: 5 ° C-34% RH and 37 ° C-75% RH, in order to promote hardening. The stored raw and cooked grains were lyophilized and fractured. The sections of testa and cotyledons were observed in an electron microscope JSM-6390. After twelve months, grains stored at 37 ° C-75% RH increased their hardness by 503%, whereas there were no significant changes in grains stored at 5 ° C-34% RH. At the microstructural level, the cotyledons of the raw grains show clear differences in appearance of the cell wall, into the intercellular space size and texture matrix protein. There were also differences in compaction of palisade and sub-epidermal layer in the testa of raw grains. After cooking, cotyledon cells of the soft grains were well separated while these ofhard grains were seldom separated. In conclusion, the found differences in hard and soft grains showed a significant participation of both structures, cotyledons and testa, in the grains hardening.

  17. Antioxidant response and related gene expression in aged oat seed.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingqi; Huo, Heqiang; Mao, Peisheng

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate deterioration of oat seeds during storage, we analyzed oxygen radicals, antioxidant enzyme activity, proline content, and gene transcript levels in oat seeds with different moisture contents (MCs; 4, 16, and 28% w/w) during storage for 0, 6, and 12 months (CK, LT-6, and LT-12 treatments, respectively) at 4°C. The germination percentage decreased significantly with higher seed MCs and longer storage duration. The concentrations of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide increased with seed MC increasing. The activities of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) may have had a complementary or interacting role to scavenge reactive oxygen species. As the storage duration extended, the proline content decreased in seeds with 4 and 16% MC and increased in 28%. These findings suggest that proline played the main role in adaptation to oxidative stress in seeds with higher MC (28%), while antioxidant enzymes played the main role in seeds with lower MCs (4%, 16%). In the gene transcript analyses, SOD1 transcript levels were not consistent with total SOD activity. The transcript levels of APX1 and CAT1 showed similar trends to those of APX and CAT activity. The transcript levels of P5CS1, which encodes a proline biosynthetic enzyme, increased with seed MC increasing in CK. Compared with changing of proline content in seeds stored 12 months, PDH1 transcript levels showed the opposite trend and maintained the lower levels in seeds of 16 and 28% MCs. The transcript level of P5CS1 was significantly affected by MC, and PDH1 could improve stress resistance for seed aging and maintain seed vigor during long-term storage.

  18. 'Fire hardening' spear wood does slightly harden it, but makes it much weaker and more brittle.

    PubMed

    Ennos, Antony Roland; Chan, Tak Lok

    2016-05-01

    It is usually assumed that 'fire hardening' the tips of spears, as practised by hunter-gatherers and early Homo spp., makes them harder and better suited for hunting. This suggestion was tested by subjecting coppiced poles of hazel to a fire-hardening process and comparing their mechanical properties to those of naturally seasoned poles. A Shore D hardness test showed that fire treatment slightly increased the hardness of the wood, but flexural and impact tests showed that it reduced the strength and work of fracture by 30% and 36%, respectively. These results suggest that though potentially slightly sharper and more durable, fire-hardened tips would actually be more likely to break off when used, as may have been the case with the earliest known wooden tool, the Clacton spear. Fire might first have been used to help sharpen the tips of spears, and fire-hardening would have been a mostly negative side effect, not its primary purpose.

  19. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  20. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  1. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  2. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  3. 7 CFR 58.622 - Hardening and storage rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hardening and storage rooms. 58.622 Section 58.622 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....622 Hardening and storage rooms. Hardening and storage rooms for frozen desserts shall be...

  4. Effect of age on noradrenaline responses in rat tail artery and aorta: role of endothelium.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, A; Vila, E

    1995-10-01

    1. We have analysed the impact of ageing on the contractile responses induced by noradrenaline on endothelium intact and denuded aorta and tail artery rings from Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, the influence of age on noradrenaline stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis was investigated. 2. The sensitivity and the phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis to noradrenaline in aorta and tail artery were not modified by age. Intact tail artery rings showed a greater maximal contraction (Emax) to noradrenaline in old as compared to young animals. However, no Emax modification by age was observed in aorta (intact or denuded) and in denuded tail artery rings. 3. Removal of endothelial cells resulted in an increase of noradrenaline sensitivity but not the Emax in aorta from each age group. 4. In contrast, the absence of endothelium did not modify (young rats) or diminish (aged rats) the alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in tail artery. 5. These results seem to indicate that: (1) there is no influence of age on noradrenaline responses in presence of endothelium; and (2) responses in denuded preparations seem to indicate a differential role of endothelium on noradrenaline responses obtained in different vascular beds.

  5. Computers and Young Children: Software Types, Social Contexts, Gender, Age, and Emotional Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shade, Daniel D.

    1994-01-01

    Videotaped four- to eight-year olds as they interacted with computer software at different levels of developmental appropriateness. Facial expressions and other affective behaviors were analyzed as a function of age, presence of a peer, and appropriateness of software. Found that responses were mediated more by age, gender, and social condition…

  6. Auditory brainstem response in neonates: influence of gender and weight/gestational age ratio

    PubMed Central

    Angrisani, Rosanna M. Giaffredo; Bautzer, Ana Paula D.; Matas, Carla Gentile; de Azevedo, Marisa Frasson

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of gender and weight/gestational age ratio on the Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) in preterm (PT) and term (T) newborns. METHODS: 176 newborns were evaluated by ABR; 88 were preterm infants - 44 females (22 small and 22 appropriate for gestational age) and 44 males (22 small and 22 appropriate for gestational age). The preterm infants were compared to 88 term infants - 44 females (22 small and 22 appropriate for gestational age) and 44 males (22 small and 22 appropriate for gestational age). All newborns had bilateral presence of transient otoacoustic emissions and type A tympanometry. RESULTS: No interaural differences were found. ABR response did not differentiate newborns regarding weight/gestational age in males and females. Term newborn females showed statistically shorter absolute latencies (except on wave I) than males. This finding did not occur in preterm infants, who had longer latencies than term newborns, regardless of gender. CONCLUSIONS: Gender and gestational age influence term infants' ABR, with lower responses in females. The weight/gestational age ratio did not influence ABR response in either groups. PMID:24473955

  7. Pr-Zr-Co precipitation-hardened magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, A. M.; Zhang, Yong; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2000-06-01

    Hard magnetic properties have been found in homogenized and subsequently aged Pr-Zr-Co alloys. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a microstructure consisting of a Pr2(Co, Zr)17 matrix with (Pr, Zr)Co5 precipitates formed after aging the homogenized alloys with the (Pr, Zr)Co5+δ structure. This microstructure is similar to that of the Sm-Co-Cu-Zr precipitation-hardened magnets. However, unlike Sm2Co17, the easy magnetization direction (EMD) of Pr2Co17 lies in a basal plane. The coexistence of the 2:17 matrix phase with EMD∥(001) and the 1:5 cell-boundary phase with EMD∥[001] results in unusual alignment effects. Anisotropic Pr11.5Zr4Co85 powders with coercivity of 4.1 kOe and energy product of 7.2 MGOe were obtained.

  8. IGNITION HARDENING OF CELLULOSIC MATERIALS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Similar ignition response measurements were made with specimens exposed to ionizing radiation. Alpha-cellulose samples containing a mixture of boric acid ... borax , and ammonium di-hydrogen phosphate could not be ignited by irradiances up to 4.0 cal/sq cm/sec. Above this value, transient ignition would

  9. Inflammatory nociception responses do not vary with age, but diminish with the pain history

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Arceo, Karina; Contreras, Bernardo; León-Olea, Martha; Coffeen, Ulises; Jaimes, Orlando; Pellicer, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Some of the relevant factors that must be considered when dealing with old age include its growing numbers in the general population and pain contention in this age group. In this sense, it is important to study whether antinociceptive responses change with age. To elucidate this point, persistent pain in animals is the preferred model. In addition, the response to inflammatory pain in the same individual must be explored along its lifetime. Male Wistar rats were infiltrated with carrageenan (50 μl intraplantar) and tested 3 h and 24 h after injection using thermal (plantar test) and mechanociceptive tests (von Frey). The rats were divided into the following groups: (a) young rats infiltrated for the first time at 12 weeks of age and re-infiltrated at 15 and 17 weeks; (b) adult rats infiltrated for the first time at 28 weeks of age and re-infiltrated at 44 and 56 weeks; and (c) old rats infiltrated for the first time at 56 weeks of age and re-infiltrated at 72 weeks. The rats tested for the first time at 12 and 56 weeks of age showed hyperalgesia due to carrageenan infiltration at 3 h and 24 h after injection. This result showed that old rats maintain the same antialgesic response due to inflammation. However, when the injection was repeated in the three age groups, the latency to the thermal and mechanociceptive responses at 3 h is increased when compared to animals exposed for the first time to inflammation. The response to thermal and mechanociception in old rats is the same as in young animals as long as the nociceptive stimulus is not repeated. The repetition of the stimulus produces changes compatible with desensitization of the response and evidences the significance of algesic stimulus repetition in the same individual rather than the age of the individual. PMID:25120479

  10. Marriage behavior response to prime-age adult mortality: evidence from Malawi.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Mika; Yamauchi, Futoshi

    2009-02-01

    This article examines the effect of AIDS-related mortality of the prime-age adult population on marriage behavior among women in Malawi. A rise in prime-age adult mortality increases risks associated with the search for a marriage partner in the marriage market. A possible behavioral change in the marriage market in response to an increase in prime-age adult mortality is to marry earlier to avoid exposure to HIV/AIDS risks. We test this hypothesis by using micro data from Malawi, where prime-age adult mortality has drastically increased. In the analysis, we estimate the probability of prime-age adult mortality that sample women have observed during their adolescent period by utilizing retrospective information on deaths of their siblings. Empirical analysis shows that excess prime-age adult mortality in the local marriage market lowers the marriage age for females and shortens the interval between the first sex and first marriage.

  11. Effects of age, signal level, and signal rate on the auditory middle latency response.

    PubMed

    Tucker, D A; Ruth, R A

    1996-04-01

    The effects of age, signal rate, and signal level on the maturing auditory middle latency response (AMLR) were evaluated in 50 normal-hearing subjects ranging in age from 2 days to 35 years. Ipsilateral and contralateral AMLR waveforms were recorded in newborns (n = 10), children (n = 10), preteens (n = 10), teens (n = 10), and adults (n = 10). The AMLR Pa waveform was obtained in 70 to 100 percent of all subjects. The variables of age, signal level, and site of recording significantly affected Pa peak amplitude and absolute latency. However, stimulus rate did not significantly affect the response.

  12. Pupillary responses to short-wavelength light are preserved in aging

    PubMed Central

    Rukmini, A. V.; Milea, Dan; Aung, Tin; Gooley, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    With aging, less blue light reaches the retina due to gradual yellowing of the lens. This could result in reduced activation of blue light-sensitive melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells, which mediate non-visual light responses (e.g., the pupillary light reflex, melatonin suppression, and circadian resetting). Herein, we tested the hypothesis that older individuals show greater impairment of pupillary responses to blue light relative to red light. Dose-response curves for pupillary constriction to 469-nm blue light and 631-nm red light were compared between young normal adults aged 21–30 years (n = 60) and older adults aged ≥50 years (normal, n = 54; mild cataract, n = 107; severe cataract, n = 18). Irrespective of wavelength, pupillary responses were reduced in older individuals and further attenuated by severe, but not mild, cataract. The reduction in pupillary responses was comparable in response to blue light and red light, suggesting that lens yellowing did not selectively reduce melanopsin-dependent light responses. Compensatory mechanisms likely occur in aging that ensure relative constancy of pupillary responses to blue light despite changes in lens transmission. PMID:28266650

  13. Attribution of Responsibility by Japanese and Americans as a Function of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Marvin E.; Iwawaki, Saburo

    1972-01-01

    Two age groups of Japanese and Americans were experimentally compared in the attribution of responsibility. The findings of the study were interpreted in terms of cultural differences in values and parental reward patterns, and show great cultural similarities in the attribution of responsibility. (Authors)

  14. A Lifespan Perspective on Terrorism: Age Differences in Trajectories of Response to 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Stacey B.; Poulin, Michael J.; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2013-01-01

    A terrorist attack is an adverse event characterized by both an event-specific stressor and concern about future threats. Little is known about age differences in responses to terrorism. This longitudinal study examined generalized distress, posttraumatic stress responses, and fear of future attacks following the September 11, 2001 (9/11)…

  15. Pupillary responses to short-wavelength light are preserved in aging.

    PubMed

    Rukmini, A V; Milea, Dan; Aung, Tin; Gooley, Joshua J

    2017-03-07

    With aging, less blue light reaches the retina due to gradual yellowing of the lens. This could result in reduced activation of blue light-sensitive melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells, which mediate non-visual light responses (e.g., the pupillary light reflex, melatonin suppression, and circadian resetting). Herein, we tested the hypothesis that older individuals show greater impairment of pupillary responses to blue light relative to red light. Dose-response curves for pupillary constriction to 469-nm blue light and 631-nm red light were compared between young normal adults aged 21-30 years (n = 60) and older adults aged ≥50 years (normal, n = 54; mild cataract, n = 107; severe cataract, n = 18). Irrespective of wavelength, pupillary responses were reduced in older individuals and further attenuated by severe, but not mild, cataract. The reduction in pupillary responses was comparable in response to blue light and red light, suggesting that lens yellowing did not selectively reduce melanopsin-dependent light responses. Compensatory mechanisms likely occur in aging that ensure relative constancy of pupillary responses to blue light despite changes in lens transmission.

  16. Psychopathic Traits and Physiological Responses to Aversive Stimuli in Children Aged 9-11 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Pan; Baker, Laura A.; Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian; Lozano, Dora Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Atypical electrodermal and cardiovascular response patterns in psychopathic individuals are thought to be biological indicators of fearless and disinhibition. This study investigated the relationship between psychopathic traits and these autonomic response patterns using a countdown task in 843 children (aged 9-10 years). Heart rate (HR) and…

  17. Age-dependent female responses to a male ejaculate signal alter demographic opportunities for selection

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, Claudia; Green, Darrell; Mills, Walter E.; Chapman, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    A central tenet of evolutionary explanations for ageing is that the strength of selection wanes with age. However, data on age-specific expression and benefits of sexually selected traits are lacking—particularly for traits subject to sexual conflict. We addressed this by using as a model the responses of Drosophila melanogaster females of different ages to receipt of sex peptide (SP), a seminal fluid protein transferred with sperm during mating. SP can mediate sexual conflict, benefitting males while causing fitness costs in females. Virgin and mated females of all ages showed significantly reduced receptivity in response to SP. However, only young virgin females also showed increased egg laying; hence, there was a narrow demographic window of maximal responses to SP. Males gained significant ‘per mating’ fitness benefits only when mating with young females. The pattern completely reversed in matings with older females, where SP transfer was costly. The overall benefits of SP transfer (hence opportunity for selection) therefore reversed with female age. The data reveal a new example of demographic variation in the strength of selection, with convergence and conflicts of interest between males and ageing females occurring over different facets of responses to a sexually antagonistic trait. PMID:23843383

  18. Association of sex and age with responses to lower-body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe

    1988-01-01

    The effects of age and sex on the human-body responses to -50 torr LBNP were investigated in subjects who have undergone LBNP tests at the Kennedy Space Center. The comparison of results obtained on women and age-matched men indicated that men had larger relative increases in calf circumference and greater increases in peripheral resistance during the exposure to LBNP than the women; on the other hand, women displayed greater increases in thoracic impedance and heart rate. The comparison of the results on men of different ages (between 29 and 56 y) indicated that older subjects had greater increases in peripheral resistance and less heart rate elevation in response to LBNP. It is suggested that the age-related circulatory differences were due to a reduction in vagal response and a switch to predominant sympathetic nervous system influence in older men.

  19. Aged neutrophils contribute to the first line of defense in the acute inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Bernd; Vadlau, Yannick; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Nekolla, Katharina; Sharaf, Kariem; Gaertner, Florian; Massberg, Steffen; Krombach, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Under steady-state conditions, aged neutrophils are removed from the circulation in bone marrow, liver, and spleen, thereby maintaining myeloid cell homeostasis. The fate of these aged immune cells under inflammatory conditions, however, remains largely obscure. Here, we demonstrate that in the acute inflammatory response during endotoxemia, aged neutrophils cease returning to the bone marrow and instead rapidly migrate to the site of inflammation. Having arrived in inflamed tissue, aged neutrophils were found to exhibit a higher phagocytic activity as compared with the subsequently recruited nonaged neutrophils. This distinct behavior of aged neutrophils under inflammatory conditions is dependent on specific age-related changes in their molecular repertoire that enable these “experienced” immune cells to instantly translate inflammatory signals into immune responses. In particular, aged neutrophils engage Toll-like receptor-4- and p38 MAPK-dependent pathways to induce conformational changes in β2 integrins that allow these phagocytes to effectively accomplish their mission in the front line of the inflammatory response. Hence, ageing in the circulation might represent a critical process for neutrophils that enables these immune cells to properly unfold their functional properties for host defense. PMID:27609642

  20. Multi-MGy Radiation Hardened Camera for Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, Sylvain; Boukenter, Aziz; Ouerdane, Youcef; Goiffon, Vincent; Corbiere, Franck; Rolando, Sebastien; Molina, Romain; Estribeau, Magali; Avon, Barbara; Magnan, Pierre; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Raine, Melanie

    2015-07-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing cameras for surveillance systems to monitor nuclear facilities or nuclear waste storages. Particularly, for today's and the next generation of nuclear facilities increasing safety requirements consecutive to Fukushima Daiichi's disaster have to be considered. For some applications, radiation tolerance needs to overcome doses in the MGy(SiO{sub 2}) range whereas the most tolerant commercial or prototypes products based on solid state image sensors withstand doses up to few kGy. The objective of this work is to present the radiation hardening strategy developed by our research groups to enhance the tolerance to ionizing radiations of the various subparts of these imaging systems by working simultaneously at the component and system design levels. Developing radiation-hardened camera implies to combine several radiation-hardening strategies. In our case, we decided not to use the simplest one, the shielding approach. This approach is efficient but limits the camera miniaturization and is not compatible with its future integration in remote-handling or robotic systems. Then, the hardening-by-component strategy appears mandatory to avoid the failure of one of the camera subparts at doses lower than the MGy. Concerning the image sensor itself, the used technology is a CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) designed by ISAE team with custom pixel designs used to mitigate the total ionizing dose (TID) effects that occur well below the MGy range in classical image sensors (e.g. Charge Coupled Devices (CCD), Charge Injection Devices (CID) and classical Active Pixel Sensors (APS)), such as the complete loss of functionality, the dark current increase and the gain drop. We'll present at the conference a comparative study between these radiation-hardened pixel radiation responses with respect to conventional ones, demonstrating the efficiency of the choices made. The targeted strategy to develop the complete radiation hard camera electronics will

  1. Differential response to intrahippocampal interleukin-4/interleukin-13 in aged and exercise mice.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, Alyssa; Kohman, Rachel A

    2017-02-20

    Normal aging is associated with low-grade neuroinflammation that results from age-related priming of microglial cells. Further, aging alters the response to several anti-inflammatory factors, including interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13. One intervention that has been shown to modulate microglia activation in the aged brain, both basally and following an immune challenge, is exercise. However, whether engaging in exercise can improve responsiveness to anti-inflammatory cytokines is presently unknown. The current study evaluated whether prior exercise training increases sensitivity to anti-inflammatory cytokines that promote the M2 (alternative) microglia phenotype in adult (5-month-old) and aged (23-month-old) C57BL/6J mice. After 8weeks of exercise or control housing, mice received bilateral hippocampal injections of an IL-4/IL-13 cocktail or vehicle. Twenty-four hours later hippocampal samples were collected and analyzed for expression of genes associated with the M1 (inflammatory) and M2 microglia phenotypes. Results show that IL-4/IL-13 administration increased expression of the M2-associated genes found in inflammatory zone 1 (Fizz1), chitinase-like 3 (Ym1), Arginase-1 (Arg1), SOCS1, IL-1ra, and CD206. In response to IL-4/IL-13 administration, aged mice showed increased hippocampal expression of the M2-related genes Arg1, SOCS1, Ym1, and CD206 relative to adult mice. Aged mice also showed increased expression of IL-1β relative to adults, which was unaffected by wheel running or IL-4/IL-13. Wheel running was found to have modest effects on expression of Ym1 and Fizz1 in aged and adult mice. Collectively, our findings indicate that aged mice show a differential response to anti-inflammatory cytokines relative to adult mice and that exercise has limited effects on modulating this response.

  2. The confounded effects of age and exposure history in response to influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mosterín Höpping, Ana; McElhaney, Janet; Fonville, Judith M; Powers, Douglas C; Beyer, Walter E P; Smith, Derek J

    2016-01-20

    Numerous studies have explored whether the antibody response to influenza vaccination in elderly adults is as strong as it is in young adults. Results vary, but tend to indicate lower post-vaccination titers (antibody levels) in the elderly, supporting the concept of immunosenescence-the weakening of the immunological response related to age. Because the elderly in such studies typically have been vaccinated against influenza before enrollment, a confounding of effects occurs between age, and previous exposures, as a potential extrinsic reason for immunosenescence. We conducted a four-year study of serial annual immunizations with inactivated trivalent influenza vaccines in 136 young adults (16 to 39 years) and 122 elderly adults (62 to 92 years). Compared to data sets of previously published studies, which were designed to investigate the effect of age, this detailed longitudinal study with multiple vaccinations allowed us to also study the effect of prior vaccination history on the response to a vaccine. In response to the first vaccination, young adults produced higher post-vaccination titers, accounting for pre-vaccination titers, than elderly adults. However, upon subsequent vaccinations the difference in response to vaccination between the young and elderly age groups declined rapidly. Although age is an important factor when modeling the outcome of the first vaccination, this term lost its relevance with successive vaccinations. In fact, when we examined the data with the assumption that the elderly group had received (on average) as few as two vaccinations prior to our study, the difference due to age disappeared. Our analyses therefore show that the initial difference between the two age groups in their response to vaccination may not be uniquely explained by immunosenescence due to ageing of the immune system, but could equally be the result of the different pre-study vaccination and infection histories in the elderly.

  3. Structural heredity influence upon principles of strain wave hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiricheck, A. V.; Barinov, S. V.; Yashin, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    It was established experimentally that by penetration of a strain wave through material hardened not only the technological modes of processing, but also a technological heredity - the direction of the fibers of the original macrostructure have an influence upon the diagram of microhardness. By penetration of the strain wave along fibers, the degree of hardening the material is less, however, a product is hardened throughout its entire section mainly along fibers. In the direction of the strain waves across fibers of the original structure of material, the degree of material hardening is much higher, the depth of the hardened layer with the degree of hardening not less than 50% makes at least 3 mm. It was found that under certain conditions the strain wave can completely change the original structure of the material. Thus, a heterogeneously hardened structure characterized by the interchange of harder and more viscous areas is formed, which is beneficial for assurance of high operational properties of material.

  4. Age-related slowing of response selection and production in a visual choice reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with delayed processing in choice reaction time (CRT) tasks, but the processing stages most impacted by aging have not been clearly identified. Here, we analyzed CRT latencies in a computerized serial visual feature-conjunction task. Participants responded to a target letter (probability 40%) by pressing one mouse button, and responded to distractor letters differing either in color, shape, or both features from the target (probabilities 20% each) by pressing the other mouse button. Stimuli were presented randomly to the left and right visual fields and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were adaptively reduced following correct responses using a staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, we tested 1466 participants who ranged in age from 18 to 65 years. CRT latencies increased significantly with age (r = 0.47, 2.80 ms/year). Central processing time (CPT), isolated by subtracting simple reaction times (SRT) (obtained in a companion experiment performed on the same day) from CRT latencies, accounted for more than 80% of age-related CRT slowing, with most of the remaining increase in latency due to slowed motor responses. Participants were faster and more accurate when the stimulus location was spatially compatible with the mouse button used for responding, and this effect increased slightly with age. Participants took longer to respond to distractors with target color or shape than to distractors with no target features. However, the additional time needed to discriminate the more target-like distractors did not increase with age. In Experiment 2, we replicated the findings of Experiment 1 in a second population of 178 participants (ages 18–82 years). CRT latencies did not differ significantly in the two experiments, and similar effects of age, distractor similarity, and stimulus-response spatial compatibility were found. The results suggest that the age-related slowing in visual CRT latencies is largely due to delays in response selection and

  5. Aging Mesenchymal Stem Cells Fail to Protect Because of Impaired Migration and Antiinflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Martha L.; Huleihel, Luai; Kapetanaki, Maria G.; Lino-Cardenas, Christian L.; Mroz, Lyle; Ellis, Bryon M.; McVerry, Bryan J.; Richards, Thomas J.; Kaminski, Naftali; Cerdenes, Nayra; Mora, Ana L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Aging is characterized by functional impairment and reduced capacity to respond appropriately to environmental stimuli and injury. With age, there is an increase in the incidence and severity of chronic and acute lung diseases. However, the relationship between age and the lung’s reduced ability to repair is far from established and necessitates further research in the field. Objectives: Little is currently known about age-related phenomena in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). On account of their ability to protect the endothelium and the alveolar epithelium through multiple paracrine mechanisms, we looked for adverse effects that aging might cause in MSC biology. Such age-related changes might partly account for the increased susceptibility of the aging lung to injury. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrated that old mice have more inflammation in response to acute lung injury. To investigate the causes, we compared the global gene expression of aged and young bone marrow–derived MSCs (B-MSCs). Our results revealed that the expression levels of inflammatory response genes depended on the age of the B-MSCs. We demonstrated that the age-dependent decrease in expression of several cytokine and chemokine receptors is important for the migration and activation of B-MSCs. Finally, we showed by adoptive transfer of aged B-MSCs to young endotoxemic mice that aged cells lacked the antiinflammatory protective effect of their young counterparts. Conclusions: Taken together, the decreased expression of cytokine and chemokine receptors in aged B-MSCs compromises their protective role by perturbing the potential of B-MSCs to become activated and mobilize to the site of injury. PMID:24559482

  6. Aging of myelinating glial cells predominantly affects lipid metabolism and immune response pathways.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Valérie; Csárdi, Gábor; de Preux-Charles, Anne-Sophie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Smit, August B; Verheijen, Mark H G; Bergmann, Sven; Chrast, Roman

    2012-05-01

    Both the central and the peripheral nervous systems are prone to multiple age-dependent neurological deficits, often attributed to still unknown alterations in the function of myelinating glia. To uncover the biological processes affected in glial cells by aging, we analyzed gene expression of the Schwann cell-rich mouse sciatic nerve at 17 time points throughout life, from day of birth until senescence. By combining these data with the gene expression data of myelin mouse mutants carrying deletions of either Pmp22, SCAP, or Lpin1, we found that the majority of age-related transcripts were also affected in myelin mutants (54.4%) and were regulated during PNS development (59.5%), indicating a high level of overlap in implicated molecular pathways. The expression profiles in aging copied the direction of transcriptional changes observed in neuropathy models; however, they had the opposite direction when compared with PNS development. The most significantly altered biological processes in aging involved the inflammatory/immune response and lipid metabolism. Interestingly, both these pathways were comparably changed in the aging optic nerve, suggesting that similar biological processes are affected in aging of glia-rich parts of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Our comprehensive comparison of gene expression in three distinct biological conditions including development, aging, and myelin disease thus revealed a previously unanticipated relationship among themselves and identified lipid metabolism and inflammatory/immune response pathways as potential therapeutical targets to prevent or delay so far incurable age-related and inherited forms of neuropathies.

  7. Between 21 and 34 years of age, aging alters the catecholamine responses to supramaximal exercise in endurance trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Zouhal, H; Gratas-Delamarche, A; Rannou, F; Granier, P; Bentue-Ferrer, D; Delamarche, P

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aging and training on the adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA) responses during the Wingate-test in three age groups of subjects: 21 year old untrained subjects (21U), 21 year old endurance trained (21T) (national elite runners), 34 year old endurance trained (34T) (national elite runners). Performances during the test were judged using the usual parameters of peak power (Wmax) and mean power (W) expressed in absolute or relative values. A and NA responses were measured at rest (A0 and NA0) immediately at the end of the exercise (Amax and NAmax) and after 5 minutes recovery (A5 and NA5). Plasma maximal lactate (La(max)) was determined 3 minutes after the end of the exercise. Wmax, W and La(max) were always significantly lower in 34T compared to 21T and 21U. The catecholamine responses were similar in 21T and 21U. Inversely, a significantly lower value of Amax was observed in 34T (2.01 +/- 0.5 nmol x l(-1)) compared to 21U (3.62 +/- 0.3 nmol x l(-1)) associated with a significantly higher value of NA(max) in 34T versus 21T and 21U. Thus, the Amax/NA(max) ratio was found to be significantly lower in the older subjects versus both 21T and 21U. All these findings indicated that endurance training did not affect the sympathoadrenergic responses to a supramaximal exercise and suggested that only one decade may reduce the capacity of the medulla to secrete adrenaline and therefore the adrenal medulla responsiveness to the sympathetic nervous activity.

  8. HIV-1 transgenic rats display alterations in immunophenotype and cellular responses associated with aging.

    PubMed

    Abbondanzo, Susan J; Chang, Sulie L

    2014-01-01

    Advances in anti-retroviral therapy over the last two decades have allowed life expectancy in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus to approach that of the general population. The process of aging in mammalian species, including rats, results in immune response changes, alterations in immunological phenotypes, and ultimately increased susceptibility to many infectious diseases. In order to investigate the immunological pathologies associated with chronic HIV-1 disease, particularly in aging individuals, the HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat model was utilized. HIV-1Tg rats were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to determine immunological alterations during the aging process. LPS is known to cause an imbalance in cytokine and chemokine release, and provides a method to identify changes in immune responses to bacterial infection in an HIV animal model. An immune profile and accompanying cellular consequences as well as changes in inflammatory cytokine and chemokine release related to age and genotype were assessed in HIV-1Tg rats. The percentage of T cells decreased with age, particularly T cytotoxic cells, whereas T helper cells increased with age. Neutrophils and monocytes increased in HIV-1Tg rats during maturation compared to age-matched F344 control rats. Aging HIV-1Tg rats displayed a significant increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α, along with an increase in the chemokine, KC/GRO, in comparison to age-matched controls. Our data indicate that immunophenotype and immune responses can change during aging in HIV-positive individuals. This information could be important in determining the most beneficial age-dependent therapeutic treatment for HIV patients.

  9. Vasodilator responses to dopamine in rat perfused mesentery are age-dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Wanstall, J. C.; O'Donnell, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    1. Dose-dependent vasodilator responses to dopamine, isoprenaline, noradrenaline, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and sodium nitroprusside were obtained in isolated perfused mesentery preparations, taken from reserpine-treated rats of different ages. The preparations were pretreated with phenoxybenzamine (1 microM) and perfused with physiological salt solution containing cocaine (10 microM), additional KCl (20 mM) and vasopressin (0.1 microM). 2. Vasodilator responses to dopamine were abolished by the dopamine1 (DA1)-selective antagonist SCH 23390 (10 nM) and those to isoprenaline by propranolol (1 microM), but the vasodilator responses to noradrenaline were abolished only when SCH 23390 and propranolol were used together. This indicated that dopamine was acting via DA1-receptors, isoprenaline via beta-adrenoceptors and that noradrenaline could act via DA1-receptors and beta-adrenoceptors in this preparation. 3. Responses to all the vasodilator drugs decreased in magnitude between the ages of 1 and 2 months. Responses to dopamine declined further in 4 month-old rats and were negligible at 6 or 22-24 months of age. Responses to isoprenaline were well maintained up to 6 months of age, but were negligible at 22-24 months. 4. It is concluded that, in the rat mesenteric vasculature, there is a non-specific decline in responses to vasodilator drugs during development (1 to 2 months). Subsequently there is a specific decline in DA1-receptor-mediated and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated responses; the former are lost at an earlier age than the latter. This different time course suggests that age influences receptor numbers, or their coupling to adenylate cyclase, rather than a post-receptor event in the adenylate cyclase/cyclic AMP pathway. PMID:2804550

  10. Do Aging and Tactile Noise Stimulation Affect Responses to Support Surface Translations in Healthy Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate neuromuscular responses to support surface perturbations are crucial to prevent falls, but aging-related anatomical and physiological changes affect the appropriateness and efficiency of such responses. Low-level noise application to sensory receptors has shown to be effective for postural improvement in a variety of different balance tasks, but it is unknown whether this intervention may have value for improvement of corrective postural responses. Ten healthy younger and ten healthy older adults were exposed to sudden backward translations of the support surface. Low-level noise (mechanical vibration) to the foot soles was added during random trials and temporal (response latency) and spatial characteristics (maximum center-of-pressure excursion and anterior-posterior path length) of postural responses were assessed. Mixed-model ANOVA was applied for analysis of postural response differences based on age and vibration condition. Age affected postural response characteristics, but older adults were well able to maintain balance when exposed to a postural perturbation. Low-level noise application did not affect any postural outcomes. Healthy aging affects some specific measures of postural stability, and in high-functioning older individuals, a low-level noise intervention may not be valuable. More research is needed to investigate if recurring fallers and neuropathy patients could benefit from the intervention in postural perturbation tasks. PMID:27195007

  11. Plasma hardening of railway wheel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakaev, E. Kh.; Ivanov, P. P.; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Paristyi, I. L.; Troitsky, A. A.; Yablonsky, A. E.; Filippov, G. A.

    1998-10-01

    A computer-controlled plasma technology was developed for the treatment of rolling stock wheels, providing the thermal hardening of tread and flange working surfaces. As a result of the plasma treatment the surface hardness of the wheel grows from 255 up to 420-450 HB. Herewith, the wear capability of the wheel metal grows 2-3 times and its resistance to the weariness-driven destruction grows 1.5 times due to the pecularities of the structural state of the steel, arising out of the thermal impact and of the alloying of the steel with nitrogen during the plasma treatment. Installation of several plants based on this technology in engine houses allowed to carry out a full scale experiment in order to assess the running characteristics of treated wheel sets in comparison with plain ones. Wheel life between mounting and truing or dismounting doubles due to plasma hardening.

  12. Radiation-hardened transistor and integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ma, Kwok K.

    2007-11-20

    A composite transistor is disclosed for use in radiation hardening a CMOS IC formed on an SOI or bulk semiconductor substrate. The composite transistor has a circuit transistor and a blocking transistor connected in series with a common gate connection. A body terminal of the blocking transistor is connected only to a source terminal thereof, and to no other connection point. The blocking transistor acts to prevent a single-event transient (SET) occurring in the circuit transistor from being coupled outside the composite transistor. Similarly, when a SET occurs in the blocking transistor, the circuit transistor prevents the SET from being coupled outside the composite transistor. N-type and P-type composite transistors can be used for each and every transistor in the CMOS IC to radiation harden the IC, and can be used to form inverters and transmission gates which are the building blocks of CMOS ICs.

  13. Hologram formation in hardened dichromated gelatin films.

    PubMed

    Lin, L H

    1969-05-01

    Hardened gelatin films sensitized with ammonium dichromate can be utilized to record high quality holograms. The maximum diffraction efficiency of the hologram approaches 90%. The light scattering from the hologram is so low that under ordinary light the hologram plate appears almost indistinguishable from a clear glass plate. Either a transmission or a reflection hologram can be recorded. Linear recording range of light amplitude is large. A practical method of preparing and processing the film is described, and the exposure characteristics are presented.

  14. Circadian deep sequencing reveals stress-response genes that adopt robust rhythmic expression during aging

    PubMed Central

    Kuintzle, Rachael C.; Chow, Eileen S.; Westby, Tara N.; Gvakharia, Barbara O.; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.; Hendrix, David A

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of the circadian clock, which directs rhythmic expression of numerous output genes, accelerates aging. To enquire how the circadian system protects aging organisms, here we compare circadian transcriptomes in heads of young and old Drosophila melanogaster. The core clock and most output genes remained robustly rhythmic in old flies, while others lost rhythmicity with age, resulting in constitutive over- or under-expression. Unexpectedly, we identify a subset of genes that adopted increased or de novo rhythmicity during aging, enriched for stress-response functions. These genes, termed late-life cyclers, were also rhythmically induced in young flies by constant exposure to exogenous oxidative stress, and this upregulation is CLOCK-dependent. We also identify age-onset rhythmicity in several putative primary piRNA transcripts overlapping antisense transposons. Our results suggest that, as organisms age, the circadian system shifts greater regulatory priority to the mitigation of accumulating cellular stress. PMID:28221375

  15. Folding and faulting of strain-hardening sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The question of whether single- or multi-layers of sedimentary rocks will fault or fold when subjected to layer-parallel shortening is investigated by means of the theory of elastic-plastic, strain-hardening materials, which should closely describe the properties of sedimentary rocks at high levels in the Earth's crust. The most attractive feature of the theory is that folding and faulting, intimately related in nature, are different responses of the same idealized material to different conditions. When single-layers of sedimentary rock behave much as strain-hardening materials they are unlikely to fold, rather they tend to fault, because contrasts in elasticity and strength properties of sedimentary rocks are low. Amplifications of folds in such materials are negligible whether contacts between layer and media are bonded or free to slip for single layers of dolomite, limestone, sandstone, or siltstone in media of shale. Multilayers of these same rocks fault rather than fold if contacts are bonded, but they fold readily if contacts between layers are frictionless, or have low yield strengths, for example due to high pore-water pressure. Faults may accompany the folds, occurring where compression is increased in cores of folds. Where there is predominant reverse faulting in sedimentary sequences, there probably were few structural units. ?? 1980.

  16. Visual ageing: unspecific decline of the responses to luminance and colour.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, A; Porciatti, V; Morrone, M C; Burr, D C

    1996-11-01

    We have investigated whether ageing affects selectively the responses to equiluminant patterns of pure colour contrast. In two groups of subjects (mean ages 29 and 72 yr) contrast thresholds were measured psychophysically for the detection and for the discrimination of the direction of motion of drifting gratings. The gratings were modulated either in pure luminance contrast (and uniform colour), or pure chromatic contrast (red-green equiluminant gratings). In subjects of the same age groups, visual evoked potentials (VEP) were recorded in response to gratings with either pure luminance contrast or pure colour contrast sinusoidally reversed in contrast at various temporal frequencies. It was shown that psychophysical contrast sensitivity for equiluminant patterns deteriorates significantly with age, and VEP latency increases. However, these effects of ageing on the responses to patterns of pure colour contrast are substantially the same as those observed in the same subjects for stimuli with pure luminance contrast. The results suggest that ageing causes a small and unspecific decline of the response of the visual system to luminance and colour contrast.

  17. Cardiovascular responses to postural changes: differences with age for women and men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, M. A.; Tomaselli, C. M.; Hoffler, W. G.

    1994-01-01

    The cardiovascular responses to postural change, and how they are affected by aging, are inadequately described in women. Therefore, the authors examined the influence of age and sex on the responses of blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, and other variables to change in posture. Measurements were made after 10 minutes each in the supine, seated, and standing positions in 22 men and 25 women who ranged in age from 21 to 59 years. Several variables differed, both by sex and by age, when subjects were supine. On rising, subjects' diastolic and mean arterial pressures, heart rate, total peripheral resistance (TPR), and thoracic impedance increased; cardiac output, stroke volume, and mean stroke ejection rate decreased; and changes in all variables, except heart rate, were greater from supine to sitting than sitting to standing. The increase in heart rate was greater in the younger subjects, and increases in TPR and thoracic impedance were greater in the older subjects. Stroke volume decreased less, and TPR and thoracic impedance increased more, in the women than in the men. The increase in TPR was particularly pronounced in the older women. These studies show that the cardiovascular responses to standing differ, in some respects, between the sexes and with age. The authors suggest that the sex differences are, in part, related to greater decrease of thoracic blood volume with standing in women than in men, and that the age differences result, in part, from decreased responsiveness of the high-pressure baroreceptor system.

  18. A Generalized Anisotropic Hardening Rule Based on the Mroz Multi-Yield-Surface Model for Pressure Insensitive and Sensitive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Pan, Jwo

    2009-07-27

    In this paper, a generalized anisotropic hardening rule based on the Mroz multi-yield-surface model is derived. The evolution equation for the active yield surface is obtained by considering the continuous expansion of the active yield surface during the unloading/reloading process. The incremental constitutive relation based on the associated flow rule is then derived for a general yield function. As a special case, detailed incremental constitutive relations are derived for the Mises yield function. The closed-form solutions for one-dimensional stress-plastic strain curves are also derived and plotted for the Mises materials under cyclic loading conditions. The stress-plastic strain curves show closed hysteresis loops under uniaxial cyclic loading conditions and the Masing hypothesis is applicable. A user material subroutine based on the Mises yield function, the anisotropic hardening rule and the constitutive relations was then written and implemented into ABAQUS. Computations were conducted for a simple plane strain finite element model under uniaxial monotonic and cyclic loading conditions based on the anisotropic hardening rule and the isotropic and nonlinear kinematic hardening rules of ABAQUS. The results indicate that the plastic response of the material follows the intended input stress-strain data for the anisotropic hardening rule whereas the plastic response depends upon the input strain ranges of the stress-strain data for the nonlinear kinematic hardening rule.

  19. Pulsed laser surface hardening of ferrous alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Reed, C. B.; Leong, K. H.; Hunter, B. V.

    1999-09-30

    A high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser and special optics were used to produce surface hardening on 1045 steel and gray cast iron by varying the process parameters. Unlike CO{sub 2} lasers, where absorptive coatings are required, the higher absorptivity of ferrous alloys at the Nd:YAG laser wavelength eliminates the necessity of applying a coating before processing. Metallurgical analysis of the treated tracks showed that very fine and hard martensitic microstructure (1045 steel) or inhomogeneous martensite (gray cast iron) were obtained without surface melting, giving maximum hardness of HRC 61 and HRC 40 for 1045 steel and gray cast iron respectively. The corresponding maximum case depths for both alloys at the above hardness are 0.6 mm. Gray cast iron was more difficult to harden without surface melting because of its lower melting temperature and a significantly longer time-at-temperature required to diffuse carbon atoms from the graphite flakes into the austenite matrix during laser heating. The thermal distortion was characterized in term of flatness changes after surface hardening.

  20. Strain Hardening in Bidisperse Polymer Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark O.; Hoy, Robert S.

    2009-03-01

    The connections between glassy and rubbery strain hardening have been a matter of great controversy in recent years. Recent experiments and our earlier simulations have suggested that the hardening modulus GR is proportional to the entanglement density in glasses, as it is to the crosslink density in rubbers. In this work we present more extensive studies of strain hardening in bidisperse glasses and its relation to microscopic conformational changes. The mixtures contain chains of very different lengths but equivalent chemistry. GR does not scale simply with the entanglement density. Instead it obeys a simple mixing rule, with GR equal to the volume fraction weighted average of the moduli of the two pure components. As in recent studies of monodisperse systems (R. S. Hoy and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 117801 (2007)), the stress is directly correlated to the degree of chain orientation. Chains of a given length undergo almost the same degree of alignment in pure systems and mixtures, explaining why the simple mixing rule applies. The connection to recent analytic theories by K. Chen and K. S. Schweizer (PRL, in press) will be discussed.

  1. Stage IV work hardening in cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Rollett, A.D.; Kocks, U.F.; Doherty, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The work hardening of fcc metals at large strains is discussed with reference to the linear stress-strain behavior often observed at large strains and known as Stage IV. The experimental evidence shows that Stage IV is a work hardening phenomenon that is found quite generally, even in pure fcc metals subjected to homogeneous deformation. A simple model for Stage IV in pure metals is presented, based on the accumulation of dislocation debris. Experiments are described for large strain torsion tests on four aluminum alloys. The level and extent of Stage IV scaled with the saturation stress that would represent the end of Stage III in the absence of a Stage IV. Reversing the torsion after large prestrains produced transient reductions in the work hardening. The strain rate sensitivity was also measured before and during the transient and found not to vary significantly. The microstructure observed at large strains in an Mg alloy suggest that Stage IV can occur in the absence of microband formation. Previous proposals for the cause of Stage IV are reviewed and found to be not supported by recent experimental data.

  2. Antibody responses to avian influenza viruses in wild birds broaden with age

    PubMed Central

    Manvell, Ruth J.; Schulenburg, Bodo; Shell, Wendy; Wikramaratna, Paul S.; Perrins, Christopher; Sheldon, Ben C.; Brown, Ian H.; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    For viruses such as avian influenza, immunity within a host population can drive the emergence of new strains by selecting for viruses with novel antigens that avoid immune recognition. The accumulation of acquired immunity with age is hypothesized to affect how influenza viruses emerge and spread in species of different lifespans. Despite its importance for understanding the behaviour of avian influenza viruses, little is known about age-related accumulation of immunity in the virus's primary reservoir, wild birds. To address this, we studied the age structure of immune responses to avian influenza virus in a wild swan population (Cygnus olor), before and after the population experienced an outbreak of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in 2008. We performed haemagglutination inhibition assays on sampled sera for five avian influenza strains and show that breadth of response accumulates with age. The observed age-related distribution of antibody responses to avian influenza strains may explain the age-dependent mortality observed during the highly pathogenic H5N1 outbreak. Age structures and species lifespan are probably important determinants of viral epidemiology and virulence in birds. PMID:28003449

  3. Taurine enhances the sexual response and mating ability in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiancheng; Lin, Shumei; Feng, Ying; Wu, Gaofeng; Hu, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that taurine is abundant in male reproductive organs, and can be biosynthesized by testis, but the taurine concentration will reduce with aging. The levels of serum LH, T, NOS, and NO were found to be obviously increased by taurine supplementation in aged rats in our previous study. In addition, aging will result in a significant decline in sexual response and function, which may be attributed to the androgen deficiency. Furthermore, NO has been proposed as a crucial mediator of penile erection. That makes us hypothesize that there is potential relationship between taurine decline and erection dysfunction in aged males. So the primary aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of taurine on male sexuality in rats. Taurine was offered in water to male aged (20 months old) rats for 110 days. The effects of taurine on the sexual response, mating ability, levels of serum reproductive hormones, and penile NOS and NO levels were investigated. The results showed that taurine can significantly reduce the EL and ML; obviously increase the ERF, MF, IF, and EJF; stimulate the secretion of GnRH, LH, and T; and elevate penis NOS and NO level in aged rats. The results indicated that taurine can enhance the sexual response and mating ability in aged male rats by increasing the level of testosterone and NO, but the exact mechanism of which needs to be further investigated.

  4. Ageing and exercise training alter adrenergic vasomotor responses of rat skeletal muscle arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Anthony J; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Delp, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    Ageing is associated with increased leg vascular resistance and reductions in leg blood flow during rest and exercise, potentially predisposing older adults to a host of functional and cardiovascular complications. The purpose of these studies was to examine the effects and possible mechanisms of ageing and exercise training on arteriolar adrenergic vasoreactivity. Young and old male Fischer 344 rats were divided into young sedentary (YS), old sedentary (OS), young exercise-trained (YT) or old exercise-trained (OT) groups, where training consisted of chronic treadmill exercise. Isolated soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscle arterioles were studied in vitro. Responses to noradrenaline in endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded arterioles, as well as during nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition were determined. Vasodilator responses to isoproterenol and forskolin were also determined. Results: Noradrenaline-mediated vasoconstriction was increased in SOL arterioles with ageing, and exercise training in old rats attenuated α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in arterioles from both muscle types. Removal of the endothelium and NOS inhibition eliminated these ageing and training effects. Isoproterenol-mediated vasodilatation was impaired with ageing in SOL and GAS arterioles, and exercise training had little effect on this response. Forskolin-induced vasodilatation was not affected by age. The data demonstrate that ageing augments α-adrenergic vasoconstriction while exercise training attenuates this response, and both of these alterations are mediated through an endothelial α-receptor-NOS-signalling pathway. In contrast, ageing diminishes β-receptor-mediated vasodilatation, but this impairment is specific to the smooth muscle. These studies indicate that α- and β-adrenergic mechanisms may serve to increase systemic vascular resistance with ageing, and that the effects of exercise training on adrenergic vasomotor properties could contribute to the beneficial

  5. Brain Insulin Administration Triggers Distinct Cognitive and Neurotrophic Responses in Young and Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Haas, Clarissa B; Kalinine, Eduardo; Zimmer, Eduardo R; Hansel, Gisele; Brochier, Andressa W; Oses, Jean P; Portela, Luis V; Muller, Alexandre P

    2016-11-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for cognitive deficits and neurodegenerative disorders, and impaired brain insulin receptor (IR) signaling is mechanistically linked to these abnormalities. The main goal of this study was to investigate whether brain insulin infusions improve spatial memory in aged and young rats. Aged (24 months) and young (4 months) male Wistar rats were intracerebroventricularly injected with insulin (20 mU) or vehicle for five consecutive days. The animals were then assessed for spatial memory using a Morris water maze. Insulin increased memory performance in young rats, but not in aged rats. Thus, we searched for cellular and molecular mechanisms that might account for this distinct memory response. In contrast with our expectation, insulin treatment increased the proliferative activity in aged rats, but not in young rats, implying that neurogenesis-related effects do not explain the lack of insulin effects on memory in aged rats. Furthermore, the expression levels of the IR and downstream signaling proteins such as GSK3-β, mTOR, and presynaptic protein synaptophysin were increased in aged rats in response to insulin. Interestingly, insulin treatment increased the expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) receptors in the hippocampus of young rats, but not of aged rats. Our data therefore indicate that aged rats can have normal IR downstream protein expression but failed to mount a BDNF response after challenge in a spatial memory test. In contrast, young rats showed insulin-mediated TrkB/BDNF response, which paralleled with improved memory performance.

  6. Age-Related Maturation of Wave V Latency of Auditory Brainstem Response in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bist, Sampan Singh; Kumar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Auditory brainstem response (ABR) is a noninvasive measurement of a stimulus-locked, synchronous electrical event. ABR provides information concerning the functional integrity of brainstem nuclei. Age is a key factor in the interpretation of ABR peak latency among different age groups. Progressively with time it follows a "maturation pattern" during which latencies decrease. Wave V is very prominent and reliable for detection of threshold in children. The present study was performed to see the effect of age related auditory maturation on ABR wave V latency in children. Subjects and Methods The study involved 80 subjects ranging in age from birth to 12 years. The subjects were divided equally into eight age groups. ABR were elicited by an acoustic click stimuli, brainstem responses collected through electrode and recorded at the same time. Latency of wave V was acknowledged. Results Wave V latency decreased rapidly in early childhood, became slower after 3 years of age and completely matured by 12 years of age. There was no significant difference in latency of wave V between the ears with age. Conclusions There is a distinct maturation pattern of wave V latency in ABR for both ears. ABR is a reliable test to assess the functional maturation of wave V in children. PMID:27626083

  7. Age-associated Epstein–Barr virus-specific T cell responses in seropositive healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas Sierra, D; Vélez Colmenares, G; Orfao de Matos, A; Fiorentino Gómez, S; Quijano Gómez, S M

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is present in 95% of the world's adult population. The immune response participates in immune vigilance and persistent infection control, and this condition is maintained by both a good quality (functionality) and quantity of specific T cells throughout life. In the present study, we evaluated EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte responses in seropositive healthy individuals younger and older than 50 years of age. The assessment comprised the frequency, phenotype, functionality and clonotypic distribution of T lymphocytes. We found that in both age groups a similar EBV-specific T cell response was found, with overlapping numbers of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α+ T lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+) within the memory and effector cell compartments, in addition to monofunctional and multi-functional T cells producing interleukin (IL)-2 and/or interferon (IFN)-γ. However, individuals aged more than 50 years showed significantly higher frequencies of IL-2-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes in association with greater production of soluble IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 than subjects younger than 50 years. A polyclonal T cell receptor (TCR)-variable beta region (Vβ) repertoire exists in both age groups under basal conditions and in response to EBV; the major TCR families found in TNF-α+/CD4+ T lymphocytes were Vβ1, Vβ2, Vβ17 and Vβ22 in both age groups, and the major TCR family in TNF-α+/CD8+ T cells was Vβ13·1 for individuals younger than 50 years and Vβ9 for individuals aged more than 50 years. Our findings suggest that the EBV-specific T cell response (using a polyclonal stimulation model) is distributed throughout several T cell differentiation compartments in an age-independent manner and includes both monofunctional and multi-functional T lymphocytes. PMID:24666437

  8. Age-dependent preference in human antibody responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae polypeptide antigens.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, S; Dagan, R; Shani-Sekler, M; Grossman, N; Fleminger, G; Friger, M; Nebenzahl, Y Mizrachi

    2002-02-01

    Vulnerability to Streptococcus pneumoniae is most pronounced in children. The microbial virulence factors and the features of the host immune response contributing to this phenomenon are not completely understood. In the current study, the humoral immune response to separated Strep. pneumoniae surface proteins and the ability to interfere with Strep. pneumoniae adhesion to cultured epithelial cells were analysed in adults and in children. Sera collected from healthy adults recognized Strep. pneumoniae separated lectin and nonlectin surface proteins in Western blot analysis and inhibited on average 80% of Strep. pneumoniae adhesion to epithelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. However, sera longitudinally collected from healthy children attending day care centres from 18 months of age and over the course of the following 2 years revealed: (a) development of antibodies to previously unrecognized Strep. pneumoniae surface proteins with age; (b) a quantitative increase in antibody responses, measured by densitometry, towards separated Strep. pneumoniae surface proteins with age; and (c) inhibition of Strep. pneumoniae adhesion to epithelial cells, which was 50% on average at 18 months of age, increased significantly to an average level of 80% inhibition at 42 months of age equalling adult sera inhibitory values. The results obtained in the current study, from the longitudinally collected sera from healthy children with documented repeated Strep. pneumoniae colonization, show that repeated exposures are insufficient to elicit an immune response to Strep. pneumoniae proteins at 18 months of age. This inability to recognize Strep. pneumoniae surface proteins may stem from the inefficiency of T-cell-dependent B-cell responses at this age and/or from the low immunogenicity of the proteins.

  9. Age-dependent preference in human antibody responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae polypeptide antigens

    PubMed Central

    LIFSHITZ, S; DAGAN, R; SHANI-SEKLER, M; GROSSMAN, N; FLEMINGER, G; FRIGER, M; NEBENZAHL, Y MIZRACHI

    2002-01-01

    Vulnerability to Streptococcus pneumoniae is most pronounced in children. The microbial virulence factors and the features of the host immune response contributing to this phenomenon are not completely understood. In the current study, the humoral immune response to separated Strep. pneumoniae surface proteins and the ability to interfere with Strep. pneumoniae adhesion to cultured epithelial cells were analysed in adults and in children. Sera collected from healthy adults recognized Strep. pneumoniae separated lectin and nonlectin surface proteins in Western blot analysis and inhibited on average 80% of Strep. pneumoniae adhesion to epithelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. However, sera longitudinally collected from healthy children attending day care centres from 18 months of age and over the course of the following 2 years revealed: (a) development of antibodies to previously unrecognized Strep. pneumoniae surface proteins with age; (b) a quantitative increase in antibody responses, measured by densitometry, towards separated Strep. pneumoniae surface proteins with age; and (c) inhibition of Strep. pneumoniae adhesion to epithelial cells, which was 50% on average at 18 months of age, increased significantly to an average level of 80% inhibition at 42 months of age equalling adult sera inhibitory values. The results obtained in the current study, from the longitudinally collected sera from healthy children with documented repeated Strep. pneumoniae colonization, show that repeated exposures are insufficient to elicit an immune response to Strep. pneumoniae proteins at 18 months of age. This inability to recognize Strep. pneumoniae surface proteins may stem from the inefficiency of T-cell-dependent B-cell responses at this age and/or from the low immunogenicity of the proteins. PMID:11876760

  10. Aging, age-related macular degeneration, and the response-to-retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, Christine A.; Johnson, Mark; Huang, Jiahn-Dar; Rudolf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The largest risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is advanced age. A prominent age-related change in the human retina is the accumulation of histochemically detectable neutral lipid in normal Bruch’s membrane (BrM) throughout adulthood. This change has the potential to have a major impact on physiology of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). It occurs in the same compartment as drusen and basal linear deposit, the pathognomonic extracellular, lipid-containing lesions of ARMD. Here we present evidence from light microscopic histochemistry, ultrastructure, lipid profiling of tissues and isolated lipoproteins, and gene expression analysis that this deposition can be accounted for by esterified cholesterol-rich, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particles constitutively produced by the RPE. This work collectively allows ARMD lesion formation and its aftermath to be conceptualized as a response to the retention of a sub-endothelial apolipoprotein B lipoprotein, similar to a widely accepted model of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) (Tabas et al., 2007). This approach provides a wide knowledge base and sophisticated clinical armamentarium that can be readily exploited for the development of new model systems and the future benefit of ARMD patients. PMID:19698799

  11. Heart rate responses of women aged 23–67 years during competitive orienteering

    PubMed Central

    Bird, S; George, M; Balmer, J; Davison, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the heart rate responses of women orienteers of different standards and to assess any relation between heart rate responses and age. Methods: Eighteen competitive women orienteers completed the study. They were divided into two groups: eight national standard orienteers (ages 23–67 years); 10 club standard orienteers (ages 24–67 years). Each participant had her heart rate monitored during a race recognised by the British Orienteering Federation. Peak heart rate (HRPEAK), mean heart rate (HRMEAN), standard deviation of her heart rate during each orienteering race (HRSD), and mean change in heart rate at each control point (ΔHRCONTROL) were identified. The data were analysed using analysis of covariance with age as a covariate. Results: National standard orienteers displayed a lower within orienteering race standard deviation in heart rate (6 (2) v 12 (2) beats/min, p<0.001) and a lower ΔHRCONTROL (5 (1) v 17 (4) beats/min, p<0.001). The mean heart rate during competition was higher in the national standard group (170 (11) v 158 (11) beats/min, p = 0.025). The HRMEAN for the national and club standard groups were 99 (8)% and 88 (9)% of their age predicted maximum heart rate (220-age) respectively. All orienteers aged >55 years (n = 4) recorded HRMEAN greater than their age predicted maximum. Conclusions: The heart rate responses indicate that national and club standard women orienteers of all ages participate in the sport at a vigorous intensity. The higher ΔHRCONTROL of club standard orienteers is probably due to failing to plan ahead before arriving at the controls and this, coupled with slowing down to navigate or relocate when lost, produced a higher HRSD. PMID:12782552

  12. A lifespan perspective on terrorism: age differences in trajectories of response to 9/11.

    PubMed

    Scott, Stacey B; Poulin, Michael J; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2013-05-01

    A terrorist attack is an adverse event characterized by both an event-specific stressor and concern about future threats. Little is known about age differences in responses to terrorism. This longitudinal study examined generalized distress, posttraumatic stress responses, and fear of future attacks following the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks among a large U.S. national sample of adults (N = 2,240) aged 18-101 years. Individuals completed Web-based surveys up to 6 times over 3 years post 9/11. Multilevel models revealed different age-related patterns for distress, posttraumatic stress, and ongoing fear of future attacks. Specifically, older age was associated with lower overall levels of general distress, a steeper decline in posttraumatic stress over time, and less change in fear of future terrorist attacks over the 3 years. Understanding age differences in response to the stress of terrorism adds to the growing body of work on age differences in reactions to adversity.

  13. Aging-Dependent Changes in the Radiation Response of the Adult Rat Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Matthew K. Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Robbins, Mike E.; Riddle, David R.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of aging on the radiation response in the adult rat brain. Methods and Materials: Male rats 8, 18, or 28 months of age received a single 10-Gy dose of whole-brain irradiation (WBI). The hippocampal dentate gyrus was analyzed 1 and 10 weeks later for sensitive neurobiologic markers associated with radiation-induced damage: changes in density of proliferating cells, immature neurons, total microglia, and activated microglia. Results: A significant decrease in basal levels of proliferating cells and immature neurons and increased microglial activation occurred with normal aging. The WBI induced a transient increase in proliferation that was greater in older animals. This proliferation response did not increase the number of immature neurons, which decreased after WBI in young rats, but not in old rats. Total microglial numbers decreased after WBI at all ages, but microglial activation increased markedly, particularly in older animals. Conclusions: Age is an important factor to consider when investigating the radiation response of the brain. In contrast to young adults, older rats show no sustained decrease in number of immature neurons after WBI, but have a greater inflammatory response. The latter may have an enhanced role in the development of radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction in older individuals.

  14. Impact of age-related neuroglial cell responses on hippocampal deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Joseph O.; Rezaie, Payam; Gabbott, Paul L.; Stewart, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is one of the greatest risk factors for the development of sporadic age-related neurodegenerative diseases and neuroinflammation is a common feature of this disease phenotype. In the immunoprivileged brain, neuroglial cells, which mediate neuroinflammatory responses, are influenced by the physiological factors in the microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS). These physiological factors include but are not limited to cell-to-cell communication involving cell adhesion molecules, neuronal electrical activity and neurotransmitter and neuromodulator action. However, despite this dynamic control of neuroglial activity, in the healthy aged brain there is an alteration in the underlying neuroinflammatory response notably seen in the hippocampus, typified by astrocyte/microglia activation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production and signaling. These changes may occur without any overt concurrent pathology, however, they typically correlate with deteriorations in hippocamapal or cognitive function. In this review we examine two important phenomenons, firstly the relationship between age-related brain deterioration (focusing on hippocampal function) and underlying neuroglial response(s), and secondly how the latter affects molecular and cellular processes within the hippocampus that makes it vulnerable to age-related cognitive decline. PMID:25972808

  15. Age-specific variation in immune response in Drosophila melanogaster has a genetic basis.

    PubMed

    Felix, Tashauna M; Hughes, Kimberly A; Stone, Eric A; Drnevich, Jenny M; Leips, Jeff

    2012-07-01

    Immunosenescence, the age-related decline in immune system function, is a general hallmark of aging. While much is known about the cellular and physiological changes that accompany immunosenescence, we know little about the genetic influences on this phenomenon. In this study we combined age-specific measurements of bacterial clearance ability following infection with whole-genome measurements of the transcriptional response to infection and wounding to identify genes that contribute to the natural variation in immunosenescence, using Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Twenty inbred lines derived from nature were measured for their ability to clear an Escherichia coli infection at 1 and 4 weeks of age. We used microarrays to simultaneously determine genome-wide expression profiles in infected and wounded flies at each age for 12 of these lines. Lines exhibited significant genetically based variation in bacterial clearance at both ages; however, the genetic basis of this variation changed dramatically with age. Variation in gene expression was significantly correlated with bacterial clearance ability only in the older age group. At 4 weeks of age variation in the expression of 247 genes following infection was associated with genetic variation in bacterial clearance. Functional annotation analyses implicate genes involved in energy metabolism including those in the insulin signaling/TOR pathway as having significant associations with bacterial clearance in older individuals. Given the evolutionary conservation of the genes involved in energy metabolism, our results could have important implications for understanding immunosenescence in other organisms, including humans.

  16. Activation of the immune response is a key feature of aging in mice.

    PubMed

    Brink, Thore C; Regenbrecht, Christian; Demetrius, Lloyd; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James

    2009-12-01

    The process of aging is complex involving numerous factors centered on transcriptional changes with advanced age. This study was aimed at elucidating mechanisms involved in mouse aging by conducting both gene expression and biochemical analyses on isolated mouse brain, heart and kidney. The gene expression analysis was not aimed at solely highlighting age-related transcriptional changes but also revealing regulated biological processes, cellular compartments, signaling and metabolic pathways. We have uncovered a conserved increase in the expression of genes mediating immune responses in all the tissues analyzed. In addition, elevated levels of lipid hydroperoxides (LPO)—an indicator of increased levels of radical oxygen species, implicate an oxidative stress-mediated activity of NF-kB signaling. In summary, these results suggest that transcriptional changes are most probably the downstream effect of environmental and endogenous factors constantly affecting the organism during its lifetime. In addition, we propose LPO as a potential biomarker of aging.

  17. How T follicular helper cells and the germinal centre response change with age.

    PubMed

    Linterman, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Normal ageing is accompanied by a decline in the function of the immune system that causes an increased susceptibility to infections and an impaired response to vaccination in older individuals. This results in an increased disease burden in the aged population, even with good immunisation programmes in place. The decreased response to vaccination is partly due to the diminution of the germinal centre response with age, caused by impaired T-cell help to B cells. Within the germinal centre, T-cell help is provided by a specialised subset of CD4(+) T cells; T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Tfh cells provide survival and selection signals to germinal centre B cells, allowing them to egress from the germinal centre and become long-live plasma cells or memory B cells, and provide life-long protection against subsequent infection. This review will discuss the cellular and molecular changes in both Tfh cells and germinal centre B cells that occur with advancing age, which result in a smaller germinal centre response and a less effective response to immunisation.

  18. Different modes of hippocampal plasticity in response to estrogen in young and aged female rats

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michelle M.; Shah, Ravi A.; Janssen, William G. M.; Morrison, John H.

    2001-01-01

    Estrogen regulates hippocampal dendritic spine density and synapse number in an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent manner, and these effects may be of particular importance in the context of age-related changes in endocrine status. We investigated estrogen's effects on axospinous synapse density and the synaptic distribution of the NMDA receptor subunit, NR1, within the context of aging. Although estrogen induced an increase in axospinous synapse density in young animals, it did not alter the synaptic representation of NR1, in that the amount of NR1 per synapse was equivalent across groups. Estrogen replacement in aged female rats failed to increase axospinous synapse density; however, estrogen up-regulated synaptic NR1 compared with aged animals with no estrogen. Therefore, the young and aged hippocampi react differently to estrogen replacement, with the aged animals unable to mount a plasticity response generating additional synapses, yet responsive to estrogen with respect to additional NMDA receptor content per synapse. These findings have important implications for estrogen replacement therapy in the context of aging. PMID:11427724

  19. Zinc–gene interaction related to inflammatory/immune response in ageing

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The pivotal role played by zinc–gene interaction in affecting some relevant cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) and heat shock proteins (HSP70-2) in ageing, successful ageing (nonagenarians) and the most common age-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis and infections, is now recognized. The polymorphisms of genes codifying proteins related to the inflammation are predictive on one hand in longevity, on the other hand they are associated with atherosclerosis or severe infections. Since the health life-span has a strong genetic component, which in turn also affected by nutritional factors like zinc, the association of these polymorphisms with innate immune response, zinc ion bioavailability and Metallothioneins (MT) homeostasis is an useful tool to unravel the role played by zinc–gene interactions in longevity, especially due to the inability of MT in zinc release in ageing and chronic inflammation. In ageing, this last fact leads to depressed innate immune response for host defence. In contrast, in very old age the inflammation is lower with subsequent more zinc ion bioavailability, less MT gene expression and satisfactory innate immunity. Therefore, the zinc–gene (IL-6, TNF-α, Hsp70-2) interactions, via MT homeostasis, are crucial to achieve successful ageing. PMID:18850188

  20. Constitutive modelling of evolving flow anisotropy including distortional hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Pietryga, Michael P.; Vladimirov, Ivaylo N.; Reese, Stefanie

    2011-05-04

    The paper presents a new constitutive model for anisotropic metal plasticity that takes into account the expansion or contraction (isotropic hardening), translation (kinematic hardening) and change of shape (distortional hardening) of the yield surface. The experimentally observed region of high curvature ('nose') on the yield surface in the loading direction and flattened shape in the reverse loading direction are modelled here by means of the concept of directional distortional hardening. The modelling of directional distortional hardening is accomplished by means of an evolving fourth-order tensor. The applicability of the model is illustrated by fitting experimental subsequent yield surfaces at finite plastic deformation. Comparisons with test data for aluminium low and high work hardening alloys display a good agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data.

  1. Age Hardening of Binary Iron-Nickel Martensites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    thinner than the critical thickness are said to satisfy a " thin - film criterion", several of which have been proposed in the literature (91-93). Romig...94) used a thin - film criterion that allows for a 10% error due to absorption in IA/IB to calculate the critical thickness for a number of Fe-Ni...be avoided only by analyzing crushed grains, extracted * particles, or uniformly thin films . Romig (90) reported that these effects can be minimized

  2. Decrease of the lymphoproliferative response to varicella-zoster virus antigen in the aged.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, R; Florent, G; Just, M

    1981-01-01

    Humoral antibodies and specific cellular immune reactions (proliferative immune response in the lymphocyte transformation test) to varicella-zoster virus antigen were measured in children, young adults, and elderly people. In children and young adults, the humoral varicella-zoster-specific antibodies and the virus-specific cellular immune response generally coincided. In the over-60 age group, however, a discrepancy was often observed between these parameters. Ninety percent of the elderly subjects showed humoral antibodies, but only 64% still had a measurable varicella-zoster-specific immune response. There was no correlation between the magnitude of the virus antigen-specific immune response and the mitogen-induced lymphoproliferative response (phytohemagglutinin stimulation). One in three elderly people, therefore, showed no cellular immune response to the varicella-zoster virus antigen, and this person could probably be regarded as a potential herpes zoster patient. PMID:6163722

  3. The effect of age on inhibition of return is independent of non-ocular response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Poliakoff, Ellen; Coward, Rachel S; Lowe, Christine; O'Boyle, Donald J

    2007-01-28

    Inhibition of return (IOR) refers to the slowing of a response to a target stimulus presented in the same location as a previous stimulus. Increased IOR has been observed in older adults, despite a reduction in other 'inhibitory' processes. However, cue-target tasks have been used in all previous studies and because of this, IOR may have been overestimated due to non-ocular response inhibition associated with withholding a response from the cue. Could increased levels of response inhibition account for the observations of increased IOR in older adults? This confound can be circumvented by using a target-target paradigm, in which a response is made to all stimuli. We tested three groups of 24 subjects: young (mean 22.5 years), young-old (mean 61.9 years) and old-old (mean 74.8 years). Subjects completed both visual cue-target and target-target tasks with identical inter-stimulus intervals of 1400 and 1800ms. IOR magnitude increased with age in both the cue-target task and the target-target task. Furthermore, the magnitude of visual IOR was found to increase with age even when individual differences in baseline response speed were taken into account. Thus, there appears to be a genuine increase in IOR magnitude with age.

  4. Metal Artifact Reduction for Polychromatic X-ray CT Based on a Beam-Hardening Corrector.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Hwang, Dosik; Seo, Jin Keun

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a new method to correct beam hardening artifacts caused by the presence of metal in polychromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT) without degrading the intact anatomical images. Metal artifacts due to beam-hardening, which are a consequence of X-ray beam polychromaticity, are becoming an increasingly important issue affecting CT scanning as medical implants become more common in a generally aging population. The associated higher-order beam-hardening factors can be corrected via analysis of the mismatch between measured sinogram data and the ideal forward projectors in CT reconstruction by considering the known geometry of high-attenuation objects. Without prior knowledge of the spectrum parameters or energy-dependent attenuation coefficients, the proposed correction allows the background CT image (i.e., the image before its corruption by metal artifacts) to be extracted from the uncorrected CT image. Computer simulations and phantom experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method to alleviate beam hardening artifacts.

  5. Protection performance evaluation regarding imaging sensors hardened against laser dazzling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, Gunnar; Koerber, Michael; Forster, Daniel; Eberle, Bernd

    2015-05-01

    Electro-optical imaging sensors are widely distributed and used for many different purposes, including civil security and military operations. However, laser irradiation can easily disturb their operational capability. Thus, an adequate protection mechanism for electro-optical sensors against dazzling and damaging is highly desirable. Different protection technologies exist now, but none of them satisfies the operational requirements without any constraints. In order to evaluate the performance of various laser protection measures, we present two different approaches based on triangle orientation discrimination on the one hand and structural similarity on the other hand. For both approaches, image analysis algorithms are applied to images taken of a standard test scene with triangular test patterns which is superimposed by dazzling laser light of various irradiance levels. The evaluation methods are applied to three different sensors: a standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera, a high dynamic range camera with a nonlinear response curve, and a sensor hardened against laser dazzling.

  6. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  7. Age-dependent responses of glial cells and leptomeninges during systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhou; Tokuda, Yukie; Zhang, Xin-Wen; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Systemic inflammation causes the age-dependent differential glial responses, but little is known about how age influences the barrier function of leptomeninges during systemic inflammation. This study was conducted to elucidate the relationship between the glial responses and the levels of tight junction proteins, occludin and ZO-1, in adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats. In young AA rats, microglia and astrocytes localized to the proximity of the leptomeninges expressed interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. The level of occludin significantly increased. In middle-aged AA rats, however, glial cells expressed IL-1beta and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-synthesizing enzymes. Furthermore, occludin and ZO-1 significantly decreased, resulting in the increased permeability of leptomeninges. In the cultured leptomeningeal cells, IL-1beta and PGE(2) caused a marked loss of occludin and ZO-1, respectively. Pretreatment with IL-10 and TGF-beta1 significantly antagonized their effects. These findings establish that age strongly influences the barrier functions of the leptomeninges through the age-dependent differential glial responses during systemic inflammation.

  8. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Restore Impaired Mucosal Immune Responses in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aso, Kazuyoshi; Tsuruhara, Akitoshi; Takagaki, Kentaro; Oki, Katsuyuki; Ota, Megumi; Nose, Yasuhiro; Tanemura, Hideki; Urushihata, Naoki; Sasanuma, Jinichi; Sano, Masayuki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Aso, Rio; McGhee, Jerry R.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) can differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Several clinical trials have shown the ability of AMSCs to regenerate these differentiated cell types. Age-associated dysregulation of the gastrointestinal (GI) immune system has been well documented. Our previous studies showed that impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract occurs earlier during agingthan is seen in the systemic compartment. In this study, we examined the potential of AMSCs to restore the GI mucosal immune system in aged mice. Aged (>18 mo old) mice were adoptively transferred with AMSCs. Two weeks later, mice were orally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) plus cholera toxin (CT) three times at weekly intervals. Seven days after the final immunization, when fecal extract samples and plasma were subjected to OVA- and CT-B-specific ELISA, elevated levels of mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) and plasma IgG antibody (Ab) responses were noted in aged mouse recipients. Similar results were also seen aged mice which received AMSCs at one year of age. When cytokine production was examined, OVA-stimulated Peyer’s patch CD4+ T cells produced increased levels of IL-4. Further, CD4+ T cells from the lamina propria revealed elevated levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ production. In contrast, aged mice without AMSC transfer showed essentially no OVA- or CT-B-specific mucosal SIgA or plasma IgG Ab or cytokine responses. Of importance, fecal extracts from AMSC transferred aged mice showed neutralization activity to CT intoxication. These results suggest that AMSCs can restore impaired mucosal immunity in the GI tract of aged mice. PMID:26840058

  9. Auditory Middle Latency Responses in Chronic Smokers Compared to Nonsmokers: Differential Effects of Stimulus and Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramkissoon, Ishara; Beverly, Brenda L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Effects of clicks and tonebursts on early and late auditory middle latency response (AMLR) components were evaluated in young and older cigarette smokers and nonsmokers. Method: Participants ( n = 49) were categorized by smoking and age into 4 groups: (a) older smokers, (b) older nonsmokers, (c) young smokers, and (d) young nonsmokers.…

  10. Early advancing age alters plasma glucose and glucoregulatory hormones in response to supramaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Zouhal, Hassane; Vincent, Sophie; Moussa, Elie; Botcazou, Maïtel; Delamarche, Paul; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette

    2009-11-01

    After the age of 60, the decrease in physical activity and the increase in fat mass (FM) are two essential factors contributing to the alteration of glucose, insulin, and catecholamines responses induced by exercise. To discard these two factors, we compared the glucoregulatory responses in three different groups of men between the ages 21 and 34, and matched pairs: trained groups (T34 and T21) were matched for training level; T21 and U21 (U for untrained) were matched for age; T34 and U21 were matched for FM. The glucoregulatory responses were determined by venous plasma concentrations of glucose ([GLU]), insulin ([INS]), and catecholamines (adrenaline: [A], noradrenaline: [NA]) before and after a Wingate test. [GLU], [INS], and [A] did not differ between T21 and U21, indicating that high-level training had no effects on these parameters. On the other hand, T34 compared to T21 and U21, had higher GLU associated with lower INS post-exercise concentrations. Moreover, [A(max)] was significantly lower in this group. Consequently, T34 only exhibited a significant alteration in glucose and glucoregulatory responses after a Wingate test, which could not be explained by the usual decrease in physical activity and/or the increase in FM. Therefore, aging alone seems to be one main factor of this deterioration.

  11. Are There Age-Related Differences in the Ability to Learn Configural Responses?

    PubMed

    Clark, Rachel; Freedberg, Michael; Hazeltine, Eliot; Voss, Michelle W

    2015-01-01

    Age is often associated with a decline in cognitive abilities that are important for maintaining functional independence, such as learning new skills. Many forms of motor learning appear to be relatively well preserved with age, while learning tasks that involve associative binding tend to be negatively affected. The current study aimed to determine whether age differences exist on a configural response learning task, which includes aspects of motor learning and associative binding. Young (M = 24 years) and older adults (M = 66.5 years) completed a modified version of a configural learning task. Given the requirement of associative binding in the configural relationships between responses, we predicted older adults would show significantly less learning than young adults. Older adults demonstrated lower performance (slower reaction time and lower accuracy). However, contrary to our prediction, older adults showed similar rates of learning as indexed by a configural learning score compared to young adults. These results suggest that the ability to acquire knowledge incidentally about configural response relationships is largely unaffected by cognitive aging. The configural response learning task provides insight into the task demands that constrain learning abilities in older adults.

  12. Response of the Elderly to Disaster: An Age-Stratified Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, Robert; Klenow, Daniel J.

    1982-01-01

    Analyzed the effect of age on elderly tornado victims' (N=62) responses to stress effects. Compared to younger victims (N=240), the elderly did not suffer disproportionate material losses, but were more likely to be injured and have a death in the household. Elderly victims had a lower incidene of emotional and family problems. (Author/JAC)

  13. A Twin Study of Spatial and Non-Spatial Delayed Response Performance in Middle Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremen, William S.; Mai, Tuan; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Franz, Carol E.; Blankfeld, Howard M.; Xian, Hong; Eisen, Seth A.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Lyons, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed alternation and object alternation are classic spatial and non-spatial delayed response tasks. We tested 632 middle-aged male veteran twins on variants of these tasks in order to compare test difficulty, measure their inter-correlation, test order effects, and estimate heritabilities (proportion of observed variance due to genetic…

  14. Body Composition and Physiological Responses of Masters Female Swimmers 20 to 70 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccaro, Paul; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Female masters swimmers ranging in age from 20 to 69 were chosen for a study of their body composition and physiological responses at rest and during exercise. Two training groups were formed that differed on the basis of frequency, duration, and intensity of swimming workouts. Results are discussed. (Author/DF)

  15. Radiation-hardened nonvolatile MNOS RAM

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, T.F.; Dodson, W.H.; Hash, G.L.; Jones, R.V.; Nasby, R.D.; Olson, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation hardened nonvolatile MNOS RAM is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The memory organization is 128 x 8 bits and utilizes two p-channel MNOS transistors per memory cell. The peripheral circuitry is constructed with CMOS metal gate and is processed with standard Sandia rad-hard processing techniques. The devices have memory retention after a dose-rate exposure of 1E12 rad(Si)/s, are functional after total dose exposure of 1E6 rad(Si), and are dose-rate upset resistant to levels of 7E8 rad(Si)/s.

  16. A radiation hardened nonvolatile MNOS RAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, T. F.; Dodson, W. H.; Hash, G. L.; Jones, R. V.; Nasby, R. D.; Olson, R. J.

    1983-12-01

    A radiation hardened nonvolatile MNOS RAM (SA2998) is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The memory organization is 128 x 8 bits and utilizes two p-channel MNOS transistors per memory cell. The peripheral circuitry is constructed with CMOS metal gate and is processed with standard Sandia rad-hard processing techniques. The device requires +10 V and +25 V for operation. The devices have memory retention after a dose-rate exposure of 1E12 rad(Si)/s, are functional after total dose exposure of 1E6 rad(Si), and are dose-rate upset resistant to levels of 7E8 rad(Si)/s.

  17. Strain hardening of steel EP836

    SciTech Connect

    Lyadskaya, A.A.; Lappa, R.M.; Spuskanyuk, V.Z.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigate the effect of different combinations of cold hydraulic pressing and heat treatment on the physical and mechanical properties of steel EP836 (03N17K10V10MT), containing 0.03% C, 16-17% Ni, 10-11.5% Co, 9.5-11.5% W, 1% Ti, 1% Mo, and 0.15% A1. Deformation of the unaged steel resulted in insignificant hardening without a decrease in plasticity; this agrees with the results of investigations of other steels of this class.

  18. Enabling Strain Hardening Simulations with Dislocation Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenlis, A; Cai, W

    2006-12-20

    Numerical algorithms for discrete dislocation dynamics simulations are investigated for the purpose of enabling strain hardening simulations of single crystals on massively parallel computers. The algorithms investigated include the /(N) calculation of forces, the equations of motion, time integration, adaptive mesh refinement, the treatment of dislocation core reactions, and the dynamic distribution of work on parallel computers. A simulation integrating all of these algorithmic elements using the Parallel Dislocation Simulator (ParaDiS) code is performed to understand their behavior in concert, and evaluate the overall numerical performance of dislocation dynamics simulations and their ability to accumulate percents of plastic strain.

  19. Expecting the Unexpected: Radiation Hardened Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penix, John; Mehlitz, Peter C.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation induced Single Event Effects (SEEs) are a serious problem for spacecraft flight software, potentially leading to a complete loss of mission. Conventional risk mitigation has been focused on hardware, leading to slow, expensive and outdated on-board computing devices, increased power consumption and launch mass. Our approach is to look at SEEs from a software perspective, and to explicitly design flight software so that it can detect and correct the majority of SEES. Radiation hardened flight software will reduce the significant residual residual risk for critical missions and flight phases, and enable more use of inexpensive and fast COTS hardware.

  20. Technology Developments in Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Howell, Joe T.

    2008-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project consists of a series of tasks designed to develop and mature a broad spectrum of radiation hardened and low temperature electronics technologies. Three approaches are being taken to address radiation hardening: improved material hardness, design techniques to improve radiation tolerance, and software methods to improve radiation tolerance. Within these approaches various technology products are being addressed including Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAA), MEMS, Serial Processors, Reconfigurable Processors, and Parallel Processors. In addition to radiation hardening, low temperature extremes are addressed with a focus on material and design approaches. System level applications for the RHESE technology products are discussed.

  1. Erythropoiesis in the aged mouse. I. Response to stimulation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Udupa, K.B.; Lipschitz, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    Changes in erythropoiesis with age were studied by examining the hematocrit increase in response to hypoxia in aged mice and by assessing the change in erythropoiesis following the injection of erythropoietin in young and old polycythemic mice. The increase in hematocrit after exposure to hypoxia was more variable and generally lower in old mice than in young mice. When erythropoietin was injected into polycythemic animals, the increase in differentiated erythroid cells and /sup 59/Fe incorporation into erythroid marrow and peripheral blood cells was significantly lower in old mice than in young mice. In contrast to differentiated erythroid cells, there was less evidence of a reduced response to simulation of the more primitive erythroid progenitor cells of aged animals. The early undifferentiated erythroid progenitor, burst-forming units, did not decrease when either young or aged mice were made polycythemic, and no change following erythropoietin injection was noted. Polycythemia suppressed the late-differentiated erythroid progenitor, erythroid colony-forming units, to a greater extent in aged animals, but when erythropoietin was injected, the percent increase over the subsequent 24 hours was identical to that in young mice. These observations indicate a reduced erythropoietic capacity with age, the abnormality being most obvious in the more mature erythroid precursors.

  2. Sex and age mortality responses in zinc acetate-treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, G.R.; Cole, B.S.; Lovelace, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    In regard to trace metal treatment or exposure, a number of variables are known to affect the expression of toxicity concerning its time course and degree. For example, known variables are route of administration, anionic component of the test substance, and sex and age of the recipient animal. Concerning the latter, little, if any, data have been reported dealing with sex- and age-related responses to excess zinc in mammalian systems. The primary purpose of the short communication presented here focuses on the determination of median lethal dose in sexually immature, i.e., juvenile, and adult female and male mice following a single zinc acetate insult. In addition, variation of lethality responses was examined with the age and sex groups to a divided treatment of a lethal dosage of zinc acetate, the injections of which were separated by various intervals.

  3. The effects of road transportation on physiological responses and meat quality in sheep differing in age.

    PubMed

    Zhong, R Z; Liu, H W; Zhou, D W; Sun, H X; Zhao, C S

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 8 h of road transportation on physiological responses and meat quality traits of sheep at 6, 12, and 24 mo of age. Seventy-two male sheep were equally divided into transported (TRANS) and nontransported (CON) treatments (n = 36), and each treatment was subdivided into 3 groups by age (n = 12). Sheep in CON groups were weighed, blood sampled, and slaughtered, whereas sheep in TRANS groups were weighed, transported, blood sampled, and slaughtered to collect meat samples. The BW of sheep in TRANS groups was reduced significantly (P < 0.001) compared with CON sheep, and older sheep lost more BW than younger animals. However, dressing percentages of TRANS sheep were significantly (P < 0.001) greater than those of CON sheep. Some meat quality variables were affected by transportation, and responses of different ages of sheep varied. Total pigment content and lipid oxidation of LM and gluteus medius of TRANS sheep increased significantly (P < 0.001) compared with CON sheep. Cooking loss of LM and gluteus medius was influenced significantly (P < 0.01) by interaction effect between transportation and age, and the values for 6-mo-old TRANS sheep were less than those of CON sheep. Serum total protein (P = 0.036), globulin (P = 0.026), triglyceride (P < 0.001), and total cholesterol concentrations (P = 0.028) of TRANS sheep decreased compared with CON sheep. Serum NEFA concentration of TRANS sheep increased in relation to CON sheep with a significant interaction (P < 0.001) between transportation and age effect. Numbers of white blood cells were influenced (P = 0.002) by an interaction effect between transportation and age, and values for 6-mo-old sheep were not influenced by transportation. Numbers of platelets were influenced (P = 0.014) by age; they decreased more in 6-mo-old sheep than in older sheep. Transportation and age had no significant effects (P > 0.05) on packed cell volume and lymphocyte number. Serum creatine

  4. Aging of the rat adrenocortical cell: response to ACTH and cyclic AMP in vitro.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S; Carsia, R V

    1983-03-01

    To study intrinsic age-related changes in adrenocortical steroid production, cells isolated from rats of different ages (3 to 24 months) were used. Acute (2 hour) corticosterone production in response to stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) was measured by radioimmunoassay. With age, adrenocortical cells lose much of their ability to produce corticosterone in the absence or presence of ACTH or cAMP. The loss is progressive from 6 to 24 months of age. Analysis of the data suggests that from 6 to 12 months, an intracellular steroidogenic lesion develops; in addition there may be a loss in ACTH receptors on the plasma membrane. After 12 months these defects increase and are accompanied by a decrease in receptor sensitivity to ACTH.

  5. Age-related memory impairments due to reduced blood glucose responses to epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ken A; Chang, Qing; Mohler, Eric G; Gold, Paul E

    2010-12-01

    Increases in blood glucose levels are an important component of the mechanisms by which epinephrine enhances memory formation. The present experiments addressed the hypothesis that a dysfunction in the blood glucose response to circulating epinephrine contributes to age-related memory impairments. Doses of epinephrine and glucagon that significantly increased blood glucose levels in young adult rats were far less effective at doing so in 2-year-old rats. In young rats, epinephrine and glucose were about equally effective in enhancing memory and in prolonging post-training release of acetylcholine in the hippocampus. However, glucose was more effective than epinephrine in enhancing both memory and acetylcholine release in aged rats. These results suggest that an uncoupling between circulating epinephrine and glucose levels in old rats may lead to an age-related reduction in the provision of glucose to the brain during training. This in turn may contribute to age-related changes in memory and neural plasticity.

  6. Loneliness accentuates age differences in cardiovascular responses to social evaluative threat.

    PubMed

    Ong, Anthony D; Rothstein, Jeremy D; Uchino, Bert N

    2012-03-01

    The effects of aging and loneliness on cardiovascular stress responses were examined in 91 young (18-30 years) and 91 older (65-80 years) normotensive adults. Participants completed the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test. Piece-wise linear growth-curve analysis was used to model group differences in resting, reactivity, and recovery levels of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Replicating and extending prior research, analyses revealed age-related increases in resting SBP and DBP. Adjusting for demographics and health covariates, interactions were found for SBP in which age differences in stress reactivity and recovery were greater among lonely than nonlonely participants. Findings provide further evidence that loneliness interacts with age to augment cardiovascular risk to social evaluative threat.

  7. Organizational Responsibility for Age-Friendly Social Participation: Views of Australian Rural Community Stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Winterton, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study critically explores the barriers experienced by diverse rural community stakeholders in facilitating environments that enable age-friendly social participation. Twenty-six semi-structured interviews were conducted across two rural Australian communities with stakeholders from local government, health, social care, and community organizations. Findings identify that rural community stakeholders face significant difficulties in securing resources for groups and activities catering to older adults, which subsequently impacts their capacity to undertake outreach to older adults. However, in discussing these issues, questions were raised in relation to whose responsibility it is to provide resources for community groups and organizations providing social initiatives and whose responsibility it is to engage isolated seniors. These findings provide a much-needed critical perspective on current age-friendly research by acknowledging the responsibilities of various macro-level social structures-different community-level organizations, local government, and policy in fostering environments to enable participation of diverse rural older adults.

  8. Beam hardening and partial beam hardening of the bowtie filter: Effects on dosimetric applications in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Rendon, X.; Zhang, G.; Bosmans, H.; Oyen, R.; Zanca, F.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate the consequences on dosimetric applications when a CT bowtie filter is modeled by means of full beam hardening versus partial beam hardening. Method: A model of source and filtration for a CT scanner as developed by Turner et. al. [1] was implemented. Specific exposures were measured with the stationary CT X-ray tube in order to assess the equivalent thickness of Al of the bowtie filter as a function of the fan angle. Using these thicknesses, the primary beam attenuation factors were calculated from the energy dependent photon mass attenuation coefficients and used to include beam hardening in the spectrum. This was compared to a potentially less computationally intensive approach, which accounts only partially for beam hardening, by giving the photon spectrum a global (energy independent) fan angle specific weighting factor. Percentage differences between the two methods were quantified by calculating the dose in air after passing several water equivalent thicknesses representative for patients having different BMI. Specifically, the maximum water equivalent thickness of the lateral and anterior-posterior dimension and of the corresponding (half) effective diameter were assessed. Results: The largest percentage differences were found for the thickest part of the bowtie filter and they increased with patient size. For a normal size patient they ranged from 5.5% at half effective diameter to 16.1% for the lateral dimension; for the most obese patient they ranged from 7.7% to 19.3%, respectively. For a complete simulation of one rotation of the x-ray tube, the proposed method was 12% faster than the complete simulation of the bowtie filter. Conclusion: The need for simulating the beam hardening of the bow tie filter in Monte Carlo platforms for CT dosimetry will depend on the required accuracy.

  9. Aged mice display an altered pulmonary host response to Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) infections

    PubMed Central

    CA, Mares; SS, Ojeda; Q, Li; EG, Morris; JJ, Coalson; JM, Teale

    2012-01-01

    Aging is a complex phenomenon that has been shown to affect many organ systems including the innate and adaptive immune systems. The current study was designed to examine the potential effect of immunosenescence on the pulmonary immune response using a Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) inhalation infection model. F. tularensis is a gram-negative intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia.In this study both young (8-12 week old) and aged (20-24 month old) mice were infected intranasally with LVS. Lung tissues from young and aged mice were used to assess pathology, recruitment of immune cell types and cytokine expression levels at various times post infection. Bacterial burdens were also assessed. Interestingly, the lungs of aged animals harbored fewer organisms at early time points of infection (day 1, day 3) compared with their younger counterparts. In addition, only aged animals displayed small perivascular aggregates at these early time points that appeared mostly mononuclear in nature. However, the kinetics of infiltrating polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and increased cytokine levels measured in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were delayed in infected aged animals relative to young infected animals with neutrophils appearing at day 5 post infection (PI) in the aged animals as opposed to day 3 PI in the young infected animals. Also evident were alterations in the ratios of mononuclear to PMNs at distinct post infection times. The above evidence indicates that aged mice elicit an altered immune response in the lung to respiratory Francisella tularensis LVS infections compared to their younger counterparts. PMID:19825409

  10. Metformin activation of AMPK suppresses AGE-induced inflammatory response in hNSCs.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ming-Min; Nicol, Christopher J; Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Chen, Yen-Lin; Pei, Dee; Lin, Chien-Hung; Shih, Yi-Nuo; Yen, Chia-Hui; Chen, Shiang-Jiuun; Huang, Rong-Nan; Chiang, Ming-Chang

    2017-03-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the precise mechanisms remain unclear, T2DM may exacerbate neurodegenerative processes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling is an evolutionary preserved pathway that is important during homeostatic energy biogenesis responses at both the cellular and whole-body levels. Metformin, a ubiquitously prescribed anti-diabetic drug, exerts its effects by AMPK activation. However, while the roles of AMPK as a metabolic mediator are generally well understood, its performance in neuroprotection and neurodegeneration are not yet well defined. Given hyperglycemia is accompanied by an accelerated rate of advanced glycosylation end product (AGE) formation, which is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic neuronal impairment and, inflammatory response, clarification of the role of AMPK signaling in these processes is needed. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that metformin, an AMPK activator, protects against diabetic AGE induced neuronal impairment in human neural stem cells (hNSCs). In the present study, hNSCs exposed to AGE had significantly reduced cell viability, which correlated with elevated inflammatory cytokine expression, such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α. Co-treatment with metformin significantly abrogated the AGE-mediated effects in hNSCs. In addition, metformin rescued the transcript and protein expression levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and inhibitory kappa B kinase (IKK) in AGE-treated hNSCs. NF-κB is a transcription factor with a key role in the expression of a variety of genes involved in inflammatory responses, and metformin did prevent the AGE-mediated increase in NF-κB mRNA and protein levels in the hNSCs exposed to AGE. Indeed, co-treatment with metformin significantly restored inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels in AGE-treated h

  11. CID25: radiation hardened color video camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiko, D. A.; Bhaskaran, S. K.; Czebiniak, S. W.

    2006-02-01

    The charge injection device, CID25, is presented. The CID25 is a color video imager. The imager is compliant with the NTSC interlaced TV standard. It has 484 by 710 displayable pixels and is capable of producing 30 frames-per-second color video. The CID25 is equipped with the preamplifier-per-pixel technology combined with parallel row processing to achieve high conversion gain and low noise bandwidth. The on-chip correlated double sampling circuitry serves to reduce the low frequency noise components. The CID25 is operated by a camera system consisting of two parts, the head assembly and the camera control unit (CCU). The head assembly and the CCU can be separated by up to 150 meter long cable. The CID25 imager and the head portion of the camera are radiation hardened. They can produce color video with insignificant SNR degradation out to at least 2.85 Mrad of total dose of Co 60 γ-radiation. This represents the first in industry radiation hardened color video system, based on a semiconductor photo-detector that has an adequate sensitivity for room light operation.

  12. Hardened Client Platforms for Secure Internet Banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchi, C.; Zakhidov, S.

    We review the security of e-banking platforms with particular attention to the exploitable attack vectors of three main attack categories: Man-in-the-Middle, Man-in-the-PC and Man-in-the-Browser. It will be shown that the most serious threats come from combination attacks capable of hacking any transaction without the need to control the authentication process. Using this approach, the security of any authentication system can be bypassed, including those using SecureID Tokens, OTP Tokens, Biometric Sensors and Smart Cards. We will describe and compare two recently proposed e-banking platforms, the ZTIC and the USPD, both of which are based on the use of dedicated client devices, but with diverging approaches with respect to the need of hardening the Web client application. It will be shown that the use of a Hardened Browser (or H-Browser) component is critical to force attackers to employ complex and expensive techniques and to reduce the strength and variety of social engineering attacks down to physiological fraud levels.

  13. The HPA axis response to stress in women: effects of aging and fitness.

    PubMed

    Traustadóttir, Tinna; Bosch, Pamela R; Matt, Kathleen S

    2005-05-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that aging is associated with greater hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity to psychological stress, and whether aerobic fitness is associated with a lower HPA axis response to psychological stress. Three groups, consisting of young-unfit women (27.9+/-2.5 yr, n=10), older-unfit women (66.3+/-1.4 yr, n=14), and older-fit women (66.6+/-2.0 yr, n=12), underwent the Matt Stress Reactivity Protocol (MSRP). The MSRP is a stress test battery that combines mental challenges, a physical challenge, and a psychosocial stressor. Definition of fitness was based on maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)) where unfit was defined as having VO(2max)age group and fit was defined as VO(2max)>average for the respective age group. The MSRP elicited increases in heart rate, blood pressure, ACTH, and cortisol (P<0.001). The older-unfit women had significantly greater cortisol responses to the challenge than both the young-unfit and the older-fit women (P<0.05), who did not differ from each other. ACTH levels were significantly higher in the older-unfit women at baseline and throughout the trial, compared to both young-unfit and the older-fit (P<0.01). The ACTH response was not different between any of the groups. The young-unfit women had greater heart rate responses than the older-unfit (P<0.01), while the latter had greater systolic blood pressure responses (P<0.01). There were no significant differences between the older-unfit and older-fit in terms of heart rate or blood pressure responses. Our result shows that among unfit women, aging is associated with greater HPA axis reactivity to psychological stress, and that higher aerobic fitness among older women can attenuate these age-related changes as indicated by a blunted cortisol response to psychological stress. These findings suggest that exercise training may be an effective way of modifying some of the neuroendocrine changes associated with aging.

  14. Factors Related to Emotional Responses in School-aged Children Who Have Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Veronica García

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was performed to answer the following questions (a) What factors contribute to the emotional responses of school-age children who have asthma? (b) What are the potential gaps in the literature regarding the emotional responses of school-age children (ages 6–12) who have asthma? (c) Are children with a lower socioeconomic status (SES) and those who are minorities represented in the literature proportionate to their prevalence? Two main focus areas regarding emotional responses were identified: (a) factors related to children who have asthma and (b) factors related to caregivers of children who have asthma. Internalizing disorders were reported consistently for children and caregivers of children who have asthma. Negative consequences of asthma for children included panic and asthma attacks, missed school days, and behavioral problems. Issues for caregivers included higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms, asthma management deficits, and lower caregiver warmth and involvement. Gaps in the literature included separated studies for children ages 6–12, a lack of a standardized method to define SES, studies that were of a more experimental nature, and studies of minority children and caregivers commensurate with their asthma prevalence. PMID:22757594

  15. In vitro age dependent response of macrophages to micro and nano titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Marcos E; Sittner, Maximiliano; Cabrini, Rómulo L; Guglielmotti, María B; Olmedo, Daniel G; Tasat, Deborah R

    2015-02-01

    As a result of corrosion, microparticles (MP) and/or nanoparticles (NP) can be released from the metallic implants surface into the bioenvironment. The biological response to these particles depends not only on the physico-chemical properties of the particles but also on host factors, such as age. Macrophages have attracted wide concern in biomedicine. The aim of this investigation was to study the age related biological response of macrophages to TiO2 -MP and NP in vitro. Alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained from young and senescent rats were cultured and exposed to TiO2 -MP and NP. Cell metabolism, superoxide anion (O2 (-) ) and nitric oxide (NO) generation, and cytokine release (IL-6, TNFα, IL-10) were measured. Cell metabolism was not affected by particle exposure. O2 (-) and NO generation increased in a dose dependent manner. A marked increase on IL-6 release was found in the young-AM subpopulation exposed to TiO2 -MP. Conversely, both particle sizes induced a dose dependent release of TNFα in senescent-AM. Only the highest concentration of TiO2 -particles caused a significant increase in IL-10 release in AM-cultures. These observations lend strong support to the suggestion that cellular response of macrophages to TiO2 -particles is age dependent. The biological effect of the particles would seem to be more deleterious in the senescent age-group.

  16. Aging and the Skeletal Muscle Angiogenic Response to Exercise in Women.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Timothy P; Kraus, Raymond M; Carrithers, John A; Garry, Joseph P; Hickner, Robert C

    2015-10-01

    Whether aging lowers skeletal muscle basal capillarization and angiogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the effects of aging on skeletal muscle capillarization, eight young (YW) and eight aged (AW) women completed 8 weeks of exercise training. The response and relationships of muscle capillarization, interstitial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and microvascular blood flow to aerobic exercise training were investigated. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained before and after exercise training for the measurement of capillarization. Muscle interstitial VEGF protein and microvascular blood flow were measured at rest and during submaximal exercise at PRE, 1-WK, and 8-WKS by microdialysis. Exercise training increased (20%-25%) capillary contacts of type I, IIA, and IIB fibers in YW and AW. Interstitial VEGF protein was higher in AW than YW at rest and was higher in YW than AW during exercise independent of training status. Differences in muscle capillarization were not explained by secreted VEGF nor were differences in VEGF explained by microvascular blood flow. These results confirm that aging (57-76 years age range) does not impair the muscle angiogenic response to exercise training, although sex differences may exist in similarly trained women and men.

  17. Aging and sleep deprivation induce the unfolded protein response in the pancreas: implications for metabolism.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Nirinjini; Davis, James G; Zhu, Jingxu; Yabumoto, Maya; Singletary, Kristan; Brown, Marishka; Galante, Raymond; Agarwal, Beamon; Baur, Joseph A

    2014-02-01

    Sleep disruption has detrimental effects on glucose metabolism through pathways that remain poorly defined. Although numerous studies have examined the consequences of sleep deprivation (SD) in the brain, few have directly tested its effects on peripheral organs. We examined several tissues in mice for induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR) following acute SD. In young animals, we found a robust induction of BiP in the pancreas, indicating an active UPR. At baseline, pancreata from aged animals exhibited a marked increase in a pro-apoptotic transcription factor, CHOP, that was amplified by SD, whereas BiP induction was not observed, suggesting a maladaptive response to cellular stress with age. Acute SD increased plasma glucose levels in both young and old animals. However, this change was not overtly related to stress in the pancreatic beta cells, as plasma insulin levels were not lower following acute SD. Accordingly, animals subjected to acute SD remained tolerant to a glucose challenge. In a chronic SD experiment, young mice were found to be sensitized to insulin and have improved glycemic control, whereas aged animals became hyperglycemic and failed to maintain appropriate plasma insulin concentrations. Our results show that both age and SD cooperate to induce the UPR in pancreatic tissue. While changes in insulin secretion are unlikely to play a major role in the acute effects of SD, CHOP induction in pancreatic tissues suggests that chronic SD may contribute to the loss or dysfunction of endocrine cells and that these effects may be exacerbated by normal aging.

  18. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs attenuate the vascular responses in aging metabolic syndrome rats

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Diaz-Diaz, Eulises; Pavón, Natalia; Guarner-Lans, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging are low-grade systemic inflammatory conditions, and inflammation is a key component of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) upon the vascular reactivity in aging MS rats. Methods: MS was induced in young male rats by adding 30% sucrose in drinking water over 6, 12, and 18 months. When the treatment was finished, the blood samples were collected, and aortas were dissected out. The expression of COX isoenzymes and PLA2 in the aortas was analyzed using Western blot analysis. The contractile responses of aortic rings to norepinephrine (1 μmol/L) were measured in the presence or absence of different NSAIDs (10 μmol/L for each). Results: Serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β) in control rats were remained stable during the aging process, whereas serum IL-6 in MS rats were significantly increased at 12 and 18 months. The levels of COX isoenzyme and PLA2 in aortas from control rats increased with the aging, whereas those in aortas from MS rats were irregularly increased with the highest levels at 6 months. Pretreatment with acetylsalicylic acid (a COX-1 preferential inhibitor), indomethacin (a non-selective COX inhibitor) or meloxicam (a COX-2 preferential inhibitor) decreased NE-induced contractions of aortic rings from MS rats at all the ages, with meloxicam being the most potent. Acetylsalicylic acid also significantly reduced the maximum responses of ACh-induced vasorelaxation of aortic rings from MS rats, but indomethacin and meloxicam had no effect. Conclusion: NSAIDs can directly affect vascular responses in aging MS rats. Understanding the effects of NSAIDs on blood vessels may improve the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and MS in the elders. PMID:25263337

  19. Are vocabulary tests measurement invariant between age groups? An item response analysis of three popular tests.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mark C; Berry, Jane M; Freeman, Sara P

    2014-12-01

    Relatively high vocabulary scores of older adults are generally interpreted as evidence that older adults possess more of a common ability than younger adults. Yet, this interpretation rests on empirical assumptions about the uniformity of item-response functions between groups. In this article, we test item response models of differential responding against datasets containing younger-, middle-aged-, and older-adult responses to three popular vocabulary tests (the Shipley, Ekstrom, and WAIS-R) to determine whether members of different age groups who achieve the same scores have the same probability of responding in the same categories (e.g., correct vs. incorrect) under the same conditions. Contrary to the null hypothesis of measurement invariance, datasets for all three tests exhibit substantial differential responding. Members of different age groups who achieve the same overall scores exhibit differing response probabilities in relation to the same items (differential item functioning) and appear to approach the tests in qualitatively different ways that generalize across items. Specifically, younger adults are more likely than older adults to leave items unanswered for partial credit on the Ekstrom, and to produce 2-point definitions on the WAIS-R. Yet, older adults score higher than younger adults, consistent with most reports of vocabulary outcomes in the cognitive aging literature. In light of these findings, the most generalizable conclusion to be drawn from the cognitive aging literature on vocabulary tests is simply that older adults tend to score higher than younger adults, and not that older adults possess more of a common ability.

  20. Shifts in the carbohydrate, polyol, and amino acid pools during rapid cold-hardening and diapause-associated cold-hardening in flesh flies (Sarcophaga crassipalpis): a metabolomic comparison.

    PubMed

    Michaud, M Robert; Denlinger, David L

    2007-10-01

    Flesh flies can enhance their cold hardiness by entering a photoperiod-induced pupal diapause or by a temperature-induced rapid cold-hardening process. To determine whether the same or different metabolites are involved in these two responses, derivatized polar extracts from flesh flies subjected to these treatments were examined using gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (GC-MS). This metabolomic approach demonstrated that levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis (glycerol, glucose, alanine, pyruvate) were elevated by both treatments. Metabolites elevated uniquely in response to rapid cold-hardening include glutamine, cystathionine, sorbitol, and urea while levels of beta-alanine, ornithine, trehalose, and mannose levels were reduced. Rapid cold-hardening also uniquely perturbed the urea cycle. In addition to the elevated metabolites shared with rapid cold-hardening, leucine concentrations were uniquely elevated during diapause while levels of a number of other amino acids were reduced. Pools of two aerobic metabolic intermediates, fumarate and citrate, were reduced during diapause, indicating a reduction of Krebs cycle activity. Principal component analysis demonstrated that rapid cold-hardening and diapause are metabolically distinct from their untreated, non-diapausing counterparts. We discuss the possible contribution of each altered metabolite in enhancing the overall cold hardiness of the organism, as well as the efficacy of GC-MS metabolomics for investigating insect physiological systems.

  1. Effects of aging on switching the response direction of pro- and antisaccades.

    PubMed

    Olk, Bettina; Jin, Yu

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated effects of task switching between pro- and antisaccades and switching the direction of these saccades (response switching) on performance of younger and older adults. Participants performed single-task blocks, in which only pro- or only antisaccades had to be made as well as mixed-task blocks, in which pro- and antisaccades were required. Analysis of specific task switch effects in the mixed-task blocks showed switch costs for error rates for prosaccades for both groups, suggesting that antisaccade task rules persisted and affected the following prosaccade. The comparison between single- and mixed-task blocks showed that mixing costs were either equal or smaller for older than younger participants, indicating that the older participants were well able to keep task sets in working memory. The most prominent age difference that was observed for response switching was that for the older but not younger group task switching and response switching interacted, resulting in less errors when two consecutive antisaccades were made in the same direction. This finding is best explained with a facilitation of these consecutive antisaccades. The present study clearly demonstrated the impact of response switching and a difference between age groups, underlining the importance of considering this factor when investigating pro- and antisaccades, especially antisaccades, and when investigating task switching and aging.

  2. Contrasting neural effects of aging on proactive and reactive response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bloemendaal, Mirjam; Zandbelt, Bram; Wegman, Joost; van de Rest, Ondine; Cools, Roshan; Aarts, Esther

    2016-10-01

    Two distinct forms of response inhibition may underlie observed deficits in response inhibition in aging. We assessed whether age-related neurocognitive impairments in response inhibition reflect deficient reactive inhibition (outright stopping) or also deficient proactive inhibition (anticipatory response slowing), which might be particularly evident with high information load. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging in young (n = 25, age range 18-32) and older adults (n = 23, 61-74) with a stop-signal task. Relative to young adults, older adults exhibited impaired reactive inhibition (i.e., longer stop-signal reaction time) and increased blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal for successful versus unsuccessful inhibition in the left frontal cortex and cerebellum. Furthermore, older adults also exhibited impaired proactive slowing, but only as a function of information load. This load-dependent behavioral deficit was accompanied by a failure to increase blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal under high information load in lateral frontal cortex, presupplementary motor area and striatum. Our findings suggest that inhibitory deficits in older adults are caused both by reduced stopping abilities and by diminished preparation capacity during information overload.

  3. The effects of age, sex, and hormones on emotional conflict-related brain response during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Cservenka, Anita; Stroup, Madison L; Etkin, Amit; Nagel, Bonnie J

    2015-10-01

    While cognitive and emotional systems both undergo development during adolescence, few studies have explored top-down inhibitory control brain activity in the context of affective processing, critical to informing adolescent psychopathology. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain response during an Emotional Conflict (EmC) Task across 10-15-year-old youth. During the EmC Task, participants indicated the emotion of facial expressions, while disregarding emotion-congruent and incongruent words printed across the faces. We examined the relationships of age, sex, and gonadal hormones with brain activity on Incongruent vs. Congruent trials. Age was negatively associated with middle frontal gyrus activity, controlling for performance and movement confounds. Sex differences were present in occipital and parietal cortices, and were driven by activation in females, and deactivation in males to Congruent trials. Testosterone was negatively related with frontal and striatal brain response in males, and cerebellar and precuneus response in females. Estradiol was negatively related with fronto-cerebellar, cingulate, and precuneus brain activity in males, and positively related with occipital response in females. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the effects of age, sex, and sex steroids during an emotion-cognition task in adolescents. Further research is needed to examine longitudinal development of emotion-cognition interactions and deviations in psychiatric disorders in adolescence.

  4. Altered S-nitrosylation of p53 is responsible for impaired antioxidant response in skeletal muscle during aging

    PubMed Central

    Baldelli, Sara; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    p53 transcriptional activity has been proposed to regulate both homeostasis and sarcopenia of skeletal muscle during aging. However, the exact molecular function of p53 remains to be clearly defined. We demonstrated a requirement of nuclear p53 S-nitrosylation in inducing a nitric oxide/PGC-1α-mediated antioxidant pathway in skeletal muscle. Importantly, mutant form of p53-DNA binding domain (C124S) did not undergo nuclear S-nitrosylation and failed in inducing the expression of antioxidant genes (i.e. SOD2 and GCLC). Moreover, we found that during aging the nuclear S-nitrosylation of p53 significantly declines in gastrocnemius/soleus leading to an impairment of redox homeostasis of skeletal muscle. We suggested that decreased level of nuclear neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/Syntrophin complex, which we observed during aging, could be responsible for impaired nuclear S-nitrosylation. Taken together, our data indicate that altered S-nitrosylation of p53 during aging could be a contributing factor of sarcopenia condition and of other skeletal muscle pathologies associated with oxidative/nitrosative stress. PMID:28025407

  5. Behavioral responses to and brain distribution of morphine in mature adult and aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, C.K.; Ho, I.K.; Hoskins, B.

    1986-03-01

    Mature adult (3-6 mo old) and aged (2 yr old) male ICR mice were injected with 10 to 100 mg/kg morphine, s.c. The ED50 values for running behavior (as measured using Stoelting activity monitors and having each mouse serve as its own control) representing 5 times control activity was approximately 7.5 mg/kg for aged mice and approximately 17.5 mg/kg for the mature adults. The ED50 values for analgesia 1 hr after morphine administration using the tail-flick method (max. response time = 8 sec) were approx. 70 mg/kg for the aged mice and 15 mg/kg for the mature adults. One hour after injecting /sup 3/H-morphine at doses of 30 and 100 mg/kg, 0.13 and 0.14% of the doses appeared in brains of aged and mature adult mice, respectively. Regional distribution of the morphine was the same for both age groups. Expressed as percent of total brain morphine, it was as follows: cortex, 30%; midbrain, 18%; cerebellum, 17%; medulla, 12%; pons, 9%; striatum, 8% and periaqueductal gray, 6%. Expressed as g morphine/g tissue for the 2 doses, the distribution was; periaqueductal gray, 30 and 80; striatum, 9 and 34; medulla, 6 and 20 pons; 5 and 19; cerebellum, 4 and 13; midbrain 2.5 and 8.5 and cortex, 2 and 8. These results suggest that the differences in response to morphine by the two age groups were due to age-related differences in opioid receptor populations and/or affinities.

  6. Vascular heat shock protein expression in response to stress. Endocrine and autonomic regulation of this age-dependent response.

    PubMed Central

    Udelsman, R; Blake, M J; Stagg, C A; Li, D G; Putney, D J; Holbrook, N J

    1993-01-01

    Adaptation to stress requires coordinated interactions between the vascular and endocrine systems. Previously we demonstrated that restraint stress induces the expression of the major heat shock protein, HSP70, in the adrenal cortex of the rat. Here we demonstrate that restraint also induces expression of HSP70 in the vasculature. We further demonstrate that the adrenal and vascular responses are differentially regulated: the adrenal response is adrenocorticotropin dependent, whereas the vascular response is under adrenergic control. In addition, the adrenal response is restricted to members of the HSP70 gene family, whereas in vascular tissue the low molecular weight HSP, HSP27, is also induced by restraint. Further characterization of the vascular response revealed that HSP70 induction occurred in both the thoracic and abdominal aortas as well as in the vena cava. However, no HSP70 induction was apparent in the heart or in a wide variety of other tissues examined. In situ hybridization showed that the vascular expression was localized to the aortic smooth muscle cells with minimal expression in the endothelium. Induction of HSP70 mRNA in both the adrenal cortex and aorta was followed by an elevation in HSP70 protein. Maximum HSP70 protein levels were seen within 3-12 h after restraint, but declined thereafter. Stress induced HSP70 expression was dramatically reduced with age, which may explain, in part, the diminished tolerance to stress seen in elderly individuals. Images PMID:8094399

  7. Low-temperature tolerance and cold hardening of cacti

    SciTech Connect

    Nobel, P.S.

    1982-12-01

    Reduced uptake by the chlorenchyma cells of cacti of a stain (neutral red) was used as an indicator of low-temperature damage resulting from cooling stems in the laboratory. Necrosis set in a few degrees below the temperature at which the fraction of cells accumulating stain was reduced by 50%. Coryphantha vivipara, Opuntia polyacantha, and Pediocactus simpsonii, which range to over 300 m altitude in southern Wyoming, were quite cold tolerant. Relationships among tissue cold sensitivity, morphological features which protect the stems from low temperatures, and the occurrence of species in progressively colder regions were investigated. Differences in tissue cold sensitivity accounted for the approx. = 600 m higher elevational limit of Coryphantha vivipara var. rosea compared to the morphologically similar var. deserti in southern Nevada. In contrast, morphological differences alone could adequately explain the relative northern limits of the columnar cacti Carnegiea gigantea vs Stenocereus gummosus and the barrel cacti Ferocactus acanthodes vs. F. wislizenii in the southwestern United States, as previously indicated using a computer model. Cold hardening in response to decreasing day/night air temperatures was observed for 10 species. A decrease from 50/sup 0//40/sup 0/ to 10/sup 0//0/sup 0/ lowered by 4/sup 0/ the temperature at which the fraction of the chlorenchyma cells taking up stain was reduced 50% for both D. rhodacantha and T. candicans, with a half-time for the shift of approx. = 3 d. The tolerance of subzero temperatures and the ability to cold harden allow cacti to range into regions with considerable wintertime freezing.

  8. Radiation-hardened 16K-bit MNOS EAROM

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, M.G.; Dellin, T.A.; Jones, R.V.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation-hardened silicon-gate CMOS/NMNOS 16K-bit EAROM has been designed, fabricated, and evaluated. This memory has been designed to be used as a ROM replacement in radiation-hardened microprocessor-based systems.

  9. Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Patrick, Marshall C.; Johnson, Michael; Cressler, John D.

    2008-01-01

    This conference poster explores NASA's Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments project. This project aims to advance the state of the art in high performance, radiation-hardened electronics that enable the long-term, reliable operation of a spacecraft in extreme radiation and temperature of space and the lunar surface.

  10. Certification of hardened surface layers by magnetic and electromagnetic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitropol'skaya, S. Yu.

    2013-07-01

    The possibilities of certification of hardened surface layers by measurement of coercive force, eddy current inspection and analysis of the field dependence of differential magnetic permeability μ d ( H) are considered. The advantages of analysis of the pattern of peaks on the μ d ( H) dependence for estimating the state of surface-hardened steels subjected to subsequent force loading are shown.

  11. Radiation-Hardened Electronics for the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Watson, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    RHESE covers a broad range of technology areas and products. - Radiation Hardened Electronics - High Performance Processing - Reconfigurable Computing - Radiation Environmental Effects Modeling - Low Temperature Radiation Hardened Electronics. RHESE has aligned with currently defined customer needs. RHESE is leveraging/advancing SOA space electronics, not duplicating. - Awareness of radiation-related activities through out government and industry allow advancement rather than duplication of capabilities.

  12. Evaluation of human antibody responses to diphtheria toxin subunits A and B in various age groups.

    PubMed

    Karakus, R; Caglar, K; Aybay, C

    2007-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate human antibody responses to diphtheria toxin subunits in various age groups. Antibodies against the intact diphtheria toxin and the diphtheria toxin subunits A and B were evaluated in 1319 individuals using a double-antigen ELISA. Although high levels of protection (83.6%, 95% CI 79.2-87.4) were found in children and adolescents, the middle-aged adult population was less protected (28.8%, 95% CI 24.3-33.6). An increase in age was associated with a decrease in the frequency of protected individuals in the 0-39-year age group (p <0.001). Anti-subunit B levels correlated well (p <0.01) with levels of antibodies against the intact toxin. In children aged < or =16 years, the intervals at which the peaks in geometric mean titres of anti-subunit B antibodies were observed were found to correlate with the ages at which booster doses are administered. Overall, males appeared to be more protected than females (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.34-2.08, p <0.001). A small group of individuals had antibody levels of > or =0.1 IU/mL against the intact toxin, but did not have protective antibody against subunit B. Determination of anti-subunit B antibody levels should help in evaluating the effectiveness of diphtheria boosters and other aspects of diphtheria immunity.

  13. A Computational Model of Inferior Colliculus Responses to Amplitude Modulated Sounds in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rabang, Cal F.; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Venkataraman, Yamini; Fisher, Zachery L.; Gardner, Stephanie M.; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) receives ascending excitatory and inhibitory inputs from multiple sources, but how these auditory inputs converge to generate IC spike patterns is poorly understood. Simulating patterns of in vivo spike train data from cellular and synaptic models creates a powerful framework to identify factors that contribute to changes in IC responses, such as those resulting in age-related loss of temporal processing. A conductance-based single neuron IC model was constructed, and its responses were compared to those observed during in vivo IC recordings in rats. IC spike patterns were evoked using amplitude-modulated tone or noise carriers at 20–40 dB above threshold and were classified as low-pass, band-pass, band-reject, all-pass, or complex based on their rate modulation transfer function tuning shape. Their temporal modulation transfer functions were also measured. These spike patterns provided experimental measures of rate, vector strength, and firing pattern for comparison with model outputs. Patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic convergence to IC neurons were based on anatomical studies and generalized input tuning for modulation frequency. Responses of modeled ascending inputs were derived from experimental data from previous studies. Adapting and sustained IC intrinsic models were created, with adaptation created via calcium-activated potassium currents. Short-term synaptic plasticity was incorporated into the model in the form of synaptic depression, which was shown to have a substantial effect on the magnitude and time course of the IC response. The most commonly observed IC response sub-types were recreated and enabled dissociation of inherited response properties from those that were generated in IC. Furthermore, the model was used to make predictions about the consequences of reduction in inhibition for age-related loss of temporal processing due to a reduction in GABA seen anatomically with age. PMID:23129994

  14. Role of aortic input impedance in the decreased cardiovascular response to exercise with aging in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, F C; Weisfeldt, M L; Milnor, W R

    1981-01-01

    The diminished cardiac output response to exercise with advancing age may be attributable to intrinsic inability of the old ventricle to respond appropriately and/or to an additional loading imposed upon the ventricle by the aged vascular system. The steady (resistance) and pulsatile (characteristic impedance) load components together comprise the vascular load faced by the ejecting ventricle. To study the effect of exercise on both vascular components of load, the aortic input impedance was measured in chronically instrumented young and old beagle dogs during graded treadmill exercise before and after beta blockade. Ascending aortic flow was measured by a cuff electromagnetic flow probe, and pressure was measured by a high-fidelity semiconductor transducer. At low levels of exercise the old animals demonstrated a striking 20% increase in characteristic impedance and a 28% decrease in peripheral resistance with no increase in stroke volume. This vascular loading and limitation in stroke volume persisted across the higher exercise levels. In contrast, the young group demonstrated no increase in characteristic impedence, a progressive decrease in peripheral resistance, and a progressive increase in stroke volume across the same exercise levels. These age differences in vascular response and ventricular output were abolished by beta blockade. The groups did not demonstrate a difference in heart rate response, but the young had a greater increase in external left ventricular power than the old across exercise. These data demonstrated a profound difference in the response of young and old vasculature to exercise. At low and intermediate exercise levels the pulsatile vascular load appeared to be a major factor in the limitation of stroke volume in old dogs. At high levels of exercise, the limited exercise response in the old dog may be caused in part by a diminished inotropic responsiveness as well as by the vascular loading. PMID:7251864

  15. The hardening phenomenon in irritant contact dermatitis: an interpretative update.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Shannon A; Maibach, Howard I

    2009-03-01

    Irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) is common and poses a significant problem in high-risk populations. In most cases, ICD resolves despite continued exposure in a process known as 'hardening', allowing individuals to continue with their work. Those who cannot clear ICD develop chronic ICD, which is a significant source of emotional, physical, and financial distress for affected individuals. While hardening is well known among labourers and clinicians, its mechanism remains to be elucidated. Much can be learned from the study of self-healing processes like the hardening phenomenon. This overview briefly documents the pathogenesis of ICD, focuses on the latest advances pertaining to the hardening phenomenon in ICD, and then highlights potential avenues of productive research. A better understanding of the 'hardening' process in the skin will hopefully lead to advances for the treatment of ICD.

  16. New analytical approach for neutron beam-hardening correction.

    PubMed

    Hachouf, N; Kharfi, F; Hachouf, M; Boucenna, A

    2016-01-01

    In neutron imaging, the beam-hardening effect has a significant effect on quantitative and qualitative image interpretation. This study aims to propose a linearization method for beam-hardening correction. The proposed method is based on a new analytical approach establishing the attenuation coefficient as a function of neutron energy. Spectrum energy shift due to beam hardening is studied on the basis of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulated data and the analytical data. Good agreement between MCNP and analytical values has been found. Indeed, the beam-hardening effect is well supported in the proposed method. A correction procedure is developed to correct the errors of beam-hardening effect in neutron transmission, and therefore for projection data correction. The effectiveness of this procedure is determined by its application in correcting reconstructed images.

  17. Effects of age, gender, and immunosuppressive agents on in vivo toll-like receptor pathway responses.

    PubMed

    Khan, Niamat; Summers, Colin W; Helbert, Matthew R; Arkwright, Peter D

    2010-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important in the initiation of immune responses in both health and disease. How TLR activity alters with age, gender, and also with immunosuppressive agents is still largely unexplored. We studied TLR activity in 49 healthy individuals as well as in 26 patients receiving immunosuppressive drugs. TLR activity did not alter significantly between the ages of 2 and 67 years. However, females had twice the TLR7 ligand-induced interferon-I response of males (OR [95% CI] 2.7 [1.4-5.1]), whereas TLR3 and four activities were not significantly different between the sexes. The T-cell immunosuppressant agents cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and azathioprine, as well as low dose glucocorticosteroids did not significantly alter TLR pathway responses. In contrast, high dose glucocorticosteroids reduced in vivo TLR responses by 70%-90%. We suggest that gender differences in TLR responses may help to explain the female preponderance of some autoimmune disorders. Furthermore, an understanding the effects of immunosuppressive agents on TLR-pathway activity should allow more focused therapy for autoimmune disorders.

  18. Impaired NK cell antiviral cytokine response against influenza virus in small-for-gestational-age neonates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinrong; Li, Hong; Mao, Huawei; Yu, Meixing; Yang, Fan; Feng, Ting; Fan, Yingying; Lu, Qiao; Shen, Chongyang; Yin, Zhongwei; Mao, Meng; Tu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    The neonates, particularly small-for-gestational-age (SGA) ones, are susceptible to various microbial infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of host innate immunity system and the main source of the inflammatory cytokines, which provide critical protection during the early phase of viral infections before the development of an appropriate adaptive immune response. However, little is known about the antiviral effects of NK cells in neonates especially the SGA population. Herein, a prospective descriptive study was performed to determine the differences of NK cell immunity among adults, appropriate-for gestational-age (AGA) and SGA neonates. Adults have much higher NK cell number in peripheral blood than that in cord blood from neonates. In response to influenza virus stimulation, neonatal NK cells, especially SGA baby cells, expressed significantly lower antiviral cytokines including perforin, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-α responses than adult NK cells. In addition, the antiviral cytokine responses of NK cells were positively correlated with neonatal birth weight. Our data suggested that the depressed antiviral activity and less frequency of NK cells are likely to be responsible for the high susceptibility to microbial infection in neonates, at least in part. Improving the function of innate immunity may provide a new way to defend virus infection. PMID:23872919

  19. Effects of age, gender and holding on pain response during infant immunization.

    PubMed

    Ipp, Moshe; Taddio, Anna; Goldbach, Morton; Ben David, Shlomit; Stevens, Bonnie; Koren, Gideon

    2004-01-01

    Determinants of infant pain responses are important when assessing the efficacy of analgesics. In a randomized controlled trial, 106 infants aged 2 to 6 months were positioned either supine (SUP) on the examination table or held (HLD) by a parent during routine immunization in a community pediatric office. There was no difference between the SUP and HLD infants in duration of crying, facial grimacing or visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores. Similarly gender did not affect pain response. In contrast, 2-month-old infants displayed more pain during immunization than did 4 or 6-month-old infants.

  20. Age-related changes of auditory brainstem responses in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chi-Wing; Navarro, Xochi; Engle, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates, compared with humans and rodents, have historically been far less used for studies of age-related hearing loss, primarily because of their long life span and high cost of maintenance. Strong similarities in genetics, anatomy, and neurophysiology of the auditory nervous system between humans and monkeys, however, could provide fruitful opportunities to enhance our understanding of hearing loss. The present study used a common, noninvasive technique for testing hearing sensitivity in humans, the auditory brainstem response (ABR), to assess the hearing of 48 rhesus macaques from 6 to 35 yr of age to clicks and tone stimuli between 0.5 and 16.0 kHz. Old monkeys, particularly those above 21.5 yr of age, had missing ABR waveforms at high frequencies. Regression analyses revealed that ABR threshold increased as a function of age at peaks II and IV simultaneously. In the suprathreshold hearing condition (70 dB peak sound pressure level), ABR-based audiograms similarly varied as a function of age such that old monkeys had smaller peak amplitudes and delayed latencies at low, middle, and high frequencies. Peripheral hearing differences remained a major influence associated with age-related changes in audiometric functions of old monkeys at a comparable sensation level across animals. The present findings suggest that hearing loss occurs in old monkeys across a wide range of frequencies and that these deficits increase in severity with age. Parallel to prior studies in monkeys, we found weak effects of sex on hearing, and future investigations are necessary to clarify its role in age-related hearing loss. PMID:25972589

  1. Compensatory responses to age-related decline in odor quality acuity: cholinergic neuromodulation and olfactory enrichment.

    PubMed

    Mandairon, Nathalie; Peace, Shane T; Boudadi, Karim; Boxhorn, Christine E; Narla, Venkata Anupama; Suffis, Sara D; Cleland, Thomas A

    2011-12-01

    The perceptual differentiation of odors can be measured behaviorally using generalization gradients. The steepness of these gradients defines a form of olfactory acuity for odor quality that depends on neural circuitry within the olfactory bulb and is regulated by cholinergic activity therein as well as by associative learning. Using this system as a reduced model for age-related cognitive decline, we show that aged mice, while maintaining almost the same baseline behavioral performance as younger mice, are insensitive to the effects of acutely elevated acetylcholine, which sharpens generalization gradients in young adult mice. Moreover, older mice exhibit evidence of chronically elevated acetylcholine levels in the olfactory bulb, suggesting that their insensitivity to further elevated levels of acetylcholine may arise because the maximum capacity of the system to respond to acetylcholine has already been reached. We propose a model in which an underlying, age-related, progressive deficit is mitigated by a compensatory cholinergic feedback loop that acts to retard the behavioral effects of what would otherwise be a substantial age-related decline in olfactory plasticity. We also treated mice with 10-day regimens of olfactory environmental enrichment and/or repeated systemic injections of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine. Each treatment alone sharpened odor quality acuity, but administering both treatments together had no greater effect than either alone. Age was not a significant main effect in this study, suggesting that some capacity for acetylcholine-dependent plasticity is still present in aged mice despite their sharply reduced ability to respond to acute increases in acetylcholine levels. These results suggest a dynamical framework for understanding age-related decline in neural circuit processing in which the direct effects of aging can be mitigated, at least temporarily, by systemic compensatory responses. In particular, a decline in

  2. The genomic response of the ipsilateral and contralateral cortex to stroke in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Buga, A-M; Sascau, M; Pisoschi, C; Herndon, J G; Kessler, C; Popa-Wagner, A

    2008-01-01

    Aged rats recover poorly after unilateral stroke, whereas young rats recover readily possibly with the help from the contralateral, healthy hemisphere. In this study we asked whether anomalous, age-related changes in the transcriptional activity in the brains of aged rats could be one underlying factor contributing to reduced functional recovery. We analysed gene expression in the periinfarct and contralateral areas of 3-month- and 18-month-old Sprague Dawley rats. Our experimental end-points were cDNA arrays containing genes related to hypoxia signalling, DNA damage and apoptosis, cellular response to injury, axonal damage and re-growth, cell lineage differentiation, dendritogenesis and neurogenesis. The major transcriptional events observed were: (i) Early up-regulation of DNA damage and down-regulation of anti-apoptosis-related genes in the periinfarct region of aged rats after stroke; (ii) Impaired neurogenesis in the periinfarct area, especially in aged rats; (iii) Impaired neurogenesis in the contralateral (unlesioned) hemisphere of both young and aged rats at all times after stroke and (iv) Marked up-regulation, in aged rats, of genes associated with inflammation and scar formation. These results were confirmed with quantitative real-time PCR. We conclude that reduced transcriptional activity in the healthy, contralateral hemisphere of aged rats in conjunction with an early up-regulation of DNA damage-related genes and pro-apoptotic genes and down-regulation of axono- and neurogenesis in the periinfarct area are likely to account for poor neurorehabilitation after stroke in old rats. PMID:18266980

  3. Inkbottle Pore-Method: Prediction of hygroscopic water content in hardened cement paste at variable climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, Rosa Maria . E-mail: espinosa@tuhh.de; Franke, Lutz

    2006-10-15

    The aim of this work is the development of a practicable method for the reliable prediction of the equilibrium hygroscopic water content in hardened cement paste and cement mortars at changing climatic conditions. Sorption thermodynamics and multi-scale pore structure of hardened cement paste build the basis of the new computation procedure. Drying and chemical aging lead to a formation of inkbottle pores. Their influence on sorption behaviour will be considered in particular by including them into the pore model. Experimental data of adsorption, desorption and scanning-isotherms verify the new computation method, which has been called 'IBP-Method' (inkbottle pores)

  4. Hemodynamic responses to laboratory stressors in children and adolescents: the influences of age, race, and gender.

    PubMed

    Allen, M T; Matthews, K A

    1997-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were threefold: (a) to compare the patterns of hemodynamic responding of children and adolescents during behavioral challenges, (b) to examine whether previously reported cardiovascular reactivity differences between Black and White children are dependent on pubertal status, and (c) to assess whether gender differences in hemodynamic response reported for adults is similar in children. One hundred fifty-nine children (ages 8-10 years) and adolescents (ages 15-17 years), equally divided along gender and racial lines, participated in a laboratory protocol consisting of a reaction time task, a mirror tracing task, a cold forehead challenge, and a stress interview. Results indicated that adolescents responded with greater beta-adrenergic activation than did children and that gender differences in reactivity often reported for adults emerged more clearly in the adolescents than in the children. This study failed to replicate prior findings of greater vasoconstrictive responses in Black children as compared with White children.

  5. Metabolites and hormones are involved in the intraspecific variability of drought hardening in radiata pine.

    PubMed

    De Diego, N; Saiz-Fernández, I; Rodríguez, J L; Pérez-Alfocea, P; Sampedro, M C; Barrio, R J; Lacuesta, M; Moncaleán, P

    2015-09-01

    Studies of metabolic and physiological bases of plant tolerance and hardening against drought are essential to improve genetic breeding programs, especially in productive species such as Pinus radiata. The exposure to different drought cycles is a highly effective tool that improves plant conditioning, but limited information is available about the mechanisms that modulate this process. To clarify this issue, six P. radiata breeds with well-known differences in drought tolerance were analyzed after two consecutive drought cycles. Survival rate, concentration of several metabolites such as free soluble amino acids and polyamines, and main plant hormones varied between them after drought hardening, while relative growth ratio and water potential at both predawn and dawn did not. Hardening induced a strong increase in total soluble amino acids in all breeds, accumulating mainly those implicated in the glutamate metabolism (GM), especially L-proline, in the most tolerant breeds. Other amino acids from GM such as γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-arginine (Arg) were also strongly increased. GABA pathway could improve the response against drought, whereas Arg acts as precursor for the synthesis of spermidine. This polyamine showed a positive relationship with the survival capacity, probably due to its role as antioxidant under stress conditions. Finally, drought hardening also induced changes in phytohormone content, showing each breed a different profile. Although all of them accumulated indole-3-acetic acid and jasmonic acid and reduced zeatin content in needles, significant differences were observed regarding abscisic acid, salicylic acid and mainly zeatin riboside. These results confirm that hardening is not only species-dependent but also an intraspecific processes controlled through metabolite changes.

  6. Effect of Prior Warm Rolling on the Retained Austenite Content and Hardening Response of VIM-VAR (Vacuum-Induction Melted, Vacuum-Arc Remelted) AISI M-50 Steel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    THE P-tTAiNED AJSTENITE’ CCNT𔃻NT AN[, -RDENiNG RESPONSE OF(V.I!,-VAR) NISI M-50 STEEL , by Nestor H. Camerino, Jr. March 1985 Thesis Advisor: T. 1...March 1995 Response of (VIM-VAR) AISI Y-50 Steel G. ’PERFORMINGORO. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(.) 111. CON-RACT OR GRANT NUMBER(*) Nestor H. Camerino, Jr. S...Austenite "M 2A. ATRACT (Corttinue an r"W#0e side it nwet.oomv anto 140.Mfy by W$"R ae ;-.ýThe objective of warm rolling M-50 bearing steel is

  7. The Moderating Role of Age in Responses to Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising.

    PubMed

    Ball, Jennifer G; Manika, Danae; Stout, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Age is an important factor that can influence processing of and response to health messages. Many studies examining evaluations of and responses to direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DTCA) have incorporated age as a predictor variable, moderating variable, or sample criterion. However, findings have been inconsistent. This study attempts to add clarity to this body of research by assessing age differences in the antecedent factors of various DTCA outcomes. A multigroup structural equation modeling analysis revealed several significant differences in variable relationships between older (50+) and younger (<50) adults. Overall, older adults exhibited greater complexity in their consideration of DTCA than younger adults in terms of the sheer number of significant relationships within the model. In particular, trust in mediated health information sources and trust in one's physician appeared to be more relevant predictors for older adults. Trust in DTCA was also distinguished as having an inverse relationship with behavioral intentions among older adults while showing a straightforward positive association with attention among younger adults. Further analysis indicated that health status accounted for some but not all of the age differences. It is suggested that younger adults are more open to seeking additional information following DTCA exposure, whereas older adults remain ambivalent.

  8. Pathological gambling and age: differences in personality, psychopathology, and response to treatment variables.

    PubMed

    González-Ibáñez, A; Mora, M; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, J; Ariza, A; Lourido-Ferreira, M R

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the possible differences in personality, psychopathology, and response to treatment in pathological gambling according to age. The sample, comprising 67 participants, was divided into three groups: 32.6% with ages ranging between 17 and 26 years, 31.3% between 27 and 43 years, and 35.8% over 44 years of age. The participants were administered the following tests, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory [MMPI; Hathaway, S.R. & McKinley, J.C. (1943, 1961). Cuestionario de personalidad MMPI. Madrid Seccion de Estudios de TEA ed. 1970, 1975], sensation-seeking questionnaire [SSS; Zuckerman, M. (1979). Sensation seeking; beyond the optimal level of arousal. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates], and the Symptom Check List Revised [SCL-90-R; Derogatis, L.R. (1977). Symptom check list-90 revised. Administration scoring and procedures manual. Baltimore]. All underwent a group treatment programme that was carried out in the Pathological Gambling Unit at Ciutat Sanitaria i Universitaria de Bellvitge (CSUB), Teaching hospital, Barcelona, Spain. The findings show differences depending on age in the participants' personality and in psychopathology and in their response to treatment.

  9. Decreased response to acetylcholine during aging of aplysia neuron R15.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Komolitdin; Rizzo, Valerio; Kadakkuzha, Beena M; Carter, Christopher J; Magoski, Neil S; Capo, Thomas R; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V

    2013-01-01

    How aging affects the communication between neurons is poorly understood. To address this question, we have studied the electrophysiological properties of identified neuron R15 of the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. R15 is a bursting neuron in the abdominal ganglia of the central nervous system and is implicated in reproduction, water balance, and heart function. Exposure to acetylcholine (ACh) causes an increase in R15 burst firing. Whole-cell recordings of R15 in the intact ganglia dissected from mature and old Aplysia showed specific changes in burst firing and properties of action potentials induced by ACh. We found that while there were no significant changes in resting membrane potential and latency in response to ACh, the burst number and burst duration is altered during aging. The action potential waveform analysis showed that unlike mature neurons, the duration of depolarization and the repolarization amplitude and duration did not change in old neurons in response to ACh. Furthermore, single neuron quantitative analysis of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) suggested alteration of expression of specific AChRs in R15 neurons during aging. These results suggest a defect in cholinergic transmission during aging of the R15 neuron.

  10. Aging does not affect the sleep endocrine response to total sleep deprivation in humans.

    PubMed

    Murck, H; Antonijevic, I A; Schier, T; Frieboes, R M; Barthelmes, J; Steiger, A

    1999-01-01

    Aging is associated with decreased sleep continuity, slow wave sleep (SWS), growth hormone (GH) release and an increased hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system activity. Total sleep deprivation (TSD) is a strong stimulus for sleep. To determine if aging affects the response to TSD, for the first time the combined effects of TSD on conventional and spectral sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) parameters and GH, cortisol and prolactin secretion were compared in elderly (60-80 years; n = 7) vs. younger subjects (20-30 years; n = 7). MANOVA revealed a reduction of SWS in the elderly. TSD led to an increase in SWS, a decrease in sleep onset latency, rapid eye movement (REM) density and by trend REM-latency without a global group difference. GH was reduced, whereas prolactin was enhanced in the elderly. After TSD GH was unchanged and prolactin secretion was enhanced without group difference. Thus, the plasticity of the sleep-endocrine system in response to TSD is sustained during aging. The possible involvement of the GABAergic system, that seems not to be severely impaired with age, is proposed.

  11. Keystroke Dynamics-Based Credential Hardening Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlow, Nick; Cukic, Bojan

    abstract Keystroke dynamics are becoming a well-known method for strengthening username- and password-based credential sets. The familiarity and ease of use of these traditional authentication schemes combined with the increased trustworthiness associated with biometrics makes them prime candidates for application in many web-based scenarios. Our keystroke dynamics system uses Breiman’s random forests algorithm to classify keystroke input sequences as genuine or imposter. The system is capable of operating at various points on a traditional ROC curve depending on application-specific security needs. As a username/password authentication scheme, our approach decreases the system penetration rate associated with compromised passwords up to 99.15%. Beyond presenting results demonstrating the credential hardening effect of our scheme, we look into the notion that a user’s familiarity to components of a credential set can non-trivially impact error rates.

  12. Jerky loads on surface-hardened gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rettig, H.; Wirth, X.

    1978-01-01

    Damage occurs again and again in practice in the form of transmissions with surface hardened gears which break after a very long operating time (explained by seldom occurring jerky loads). Gear drives are frequently exposed to jerky stresses which are greater than their fatigue limit. These stresses are considered in gear calculations, first, by shock factors when the transmission is to be designed as high endurance with regard to overloads and, second, in the form of operating ratios when the design is to be time enduring with regard to overloads. The size of the operating ratio depends not only on torque characteristics, drive and processing machine, but also on the material and heat treatment.

  13. Pupillary Response as an Age-Specific Measure of Sexual Interest.

    PubMed

    Attard-Johnson, Janice; Bindemann, Markus; Ó Ciardha, Caoilte

    2016-05-01

    In the visual processing of sexual content, pupil dilation is an indicator of arousal that has been linked to observers' sexual orientation. This study investigated whether this measure can be extended to determine age-specific sexual interest. In two experiments, the pupillary responses of heterosexual adults to images of males and females of different ages were related to self-reported sexual interest, sexual appeal to the stimuli, and a child molestation proclivity scale. In both experiments, the pupils of male observers dilated to photographs of women but not men, children, or neutral stimuli. These pupillary responses corresponded with observer's self-reported sexual interests and their sexual appeal ratings of the stimuli. Female observers showed pupil dilation to photographs of men and women but not children. In women, pupillary responses also correlated poorly with sexual appeal ratings of the stimuli. These experiments provide initial evidence that eye-tracking could be used as a measure of sex-specific interest in male observers, and as an age-specific index in male and female observers.

  14. Age and sex differences in immune response following LPS treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kyle Chiman; van Mil, Spencer; Murray, Emma; Mallet, Jean-François; Matar, Chantal; Ismail, Nafissa

    2016-11-01

    Puberty is an important developmental event that is marked by the reorganizing and remodeling of the brain. Exposure to stress during this critical period of development can have enduring effects on both reproductive and non-reproductive behaviors. The purpose of this study was to investigate age and sex differences in immune response by examining sickness behavior, body temperature changes, and serum cytokine levels following an immune challenge. The effects of circulating gonadal hormones on age and sex differences in immune response were also examined. Results showed that male mice display more sickness behavior and greater fluctuations in body temperature following LPS treatment than female mice. Moreover, adult male mice display more sickness behavior and a greater drop in body temperature following LPS treatment compared to pubertal male mice. Following gonadectomy, pubertal and adult males displayed steeper and prolonged drops in body temperature compared to sham-operated counterparts. Gonadectomy did not eliminate sex differences in LPS-induced body temperature changes, suggesting that additional factors contribute to the observed differences. LPS treatment increased cytokine levels in all mice. However, the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines was higher in adult compared to pubertal mice, while the increase in anti-inflammatory cytokines was greater in pubertal than in adult mice. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of age and sex differences in acute immune response following LPS treatment and possible mechanisms involved in the enduring alterations in behavior and brain function following pubertal exposure to LPS.

  15. Cardiovascular responses to railway noise during sleep in young and middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Patricia; Saremi, Mahnaz; Schimchowitsch, Sarah; Eschenlauer, Arnaud; Rohmer, Odile; Muzet, Alain

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of nocturnal railway noise on cardiovascular reactivity in young (25.8 +/- 2.6 years) and middle-aged (52.2 +/- 2.5 years) adults during sleep. Thirty-eight subjects slept three nights in the laboratory at 1-week interval. They were exposed to 48 randomized pass-bys of Freight, Passenger and Automotive trains either at an 8-h equivalent sound level of 40 dBA (Moderate) and 50 dBA (High) or at a silent Control night. Heart rate response (HRR), heart response amplitude (HRA), heart response latency (HRL) and finger pulse response (FPR), finger pulse amplitude (FPA) and finger pulse latency (FPL) were recorded to measure cardiovascular reactivity after each noise onset and for time-matched pseudo-noises in the control condition. Results show that Freight trains produced the highest cardiac response (increased HRR, HRA and HRL) compared to Passenger and Automotive. But the vascular response was similar whatever the type of train. Juniors exhibited an increased HRR and HRA as compared to seniors, but there was no age difference on vasoconstriction, except a shorter FPL in seniors. Noise level produced dose-dependent effects on all the cardiovascular indices. Sleep stage at noise occurrence was ineffective for cardiac response, but FPA was reduced when noise occurred during REM sleep. In conclusion, our study is in favor of an important impact of nocturnal railway noise on the cardiovascular system of sleeping subjects. In the limit of the samples studied, Freight trains are the most harmful, probably more because of their special length (duration) than because of their speed (rise time).

  16. Cell design modifications to harden a N-channel power IGBT against single event latchup

    SciTech Connect

    Lorfevre, E.; Sagnes, B.; Bruguier, G.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J.; Calvet, M.C.; Ecoffet, R.

    1999-12-01

    Device simulator is used to analyze the heavy ion induced failure mechanism in Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) and to investigate hardening solutions. Single Event Latchup was already identified as the failure mechanism. Lateral and vertical modifications of the P{sup +} plug are proposed to reduce the efficiency of the parasitic thyristor, responsible for the latchup, and validated by 2D-simulations on a N-channel IGBT cell structure.

  17. Finite deformation analysis of crack tip fields in plastically compressible hardening-softening-hardening solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, D.; Singh, S.; Needleman, A.

    2016-11-01

    Crack tip fields are calculated under plane strain small scale yielding conditions. The material is characterized by a finite strain elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation with various hardening-softening-hardening hardness functions. Both plastically compressible and plastically incompressible solids are considered. Displacements corresponding to the isotropic linear elastic mode I crack field are prescribed on a remote boundary. The initial crack is taken to be a semi-circular notch and symmetry about the crack plane is imposed. Plastic compressibility is found to give an increased crack opening displacement for a given value of the applied loading. The plastic zone size and shape are found to depend on the plastic compressibility, but not much on whether material softening occurs near the crack tip. On the other hand, the near crack tip stress and deformation fields depend sensitively on whether or not material softening occurs. The combination of plastic compressibility and softening (or softening-hardening) has a particularly strong effect on the near crack tip stress and deformation fields.

  18. Finite deformation analysis of crack tip fields in plastically compressible hardening-softening-hardening solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, D.; Singh, S.; Needleman, A.

    2017-02-01

    Crack tip fields are calculated under plane strain small scale yielding conditions. The material is characterized by a finite strain elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation with various hardening-softening-hardening hardness functions. Both plastically compressible and plastically incompressible solids are considered. Displacements corresponding to the isotropic linear elastic mode I crack field are prescribed on a remote boundary. The initial crack is taken to be a semi-circular notch and symmetry about the crack plane is imposed. Plastic compressibility is found to give an increased crack opening displacement for a given value of the applied loading. The plastic zone size and shape are found to depend on the plastic compressibility, but not much on whether material softening occurs near the crack tip. On the other hand, the near crack tip stress and deformation fields depend sensitively on whether or not material softening occurs. The combination of plastic compressibility and softening (or softening-hardening) has a particularly strong effect on the near crack tip stress and deformation fields.

  19. Estradiol impairs response inhibition in young and middle-aged, but not old rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Victor C.; Neese, Steven L.; Korol, Donna L.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens have been shown to have a strong influence on such cognitive domains as spatial memory, response learning, and several tasks of executive function, including both working memory and attention. However, the effects of estrogens on inhibitory control and timing behavior, both important aspects of executive function, have received relatively little attention. We examined the effects of estradiol on inhibitory control and timing using a differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL) task. Ovariectomized young (3 month), middle-aged (12 month), and old (18 month) Long-Evans rats received 5% or 10% 17β-estradiol in cholesterol vehicle or cholesterol vehicle alone via Silastic implants and were tested on a DRL task requiring them to wait 15 seconds between lever presses to receive a food reinforcer. The ratio of reinforced to non-reinforced lever presses did not differ across age in the cholesterol vehicle group. Conversely, 17β-estradiol impaired learning of the DRL task in young and middle-aged rats, but the learning of old rats was not impaired relative to vehicle controls following either 5% or 10% 17β-estradiol treatment. Overall, old rats also made fewer lever presses than both the young and middle-aged rats. These results provide new evidence that estrogens impair inhibitory control, an important aspect of self regulation, and add to existing evidence that estrogens differentially affect cognition at different ages. PMID:21281713

  20. Association between Age at Diagnosis of Graves' Disease and Variants in Genes Involved in Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Ploski, Rafal; Kula, Dorota; Krol, Aleksandra; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kolosza, Zofia; Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Stanjek-Cichoracka, Anita; Polanska, Joanna; Jarzab, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background Graves' disease (GD) is a complex disease in which genetic predisposition is modified by environmental factors. The aim of the study was to examine the association between genetic variants in genes encoding proteins involved in immune response and the age at diagnosis of GD. Methods 735 GD patients and 1216 healthy controls from Poland were included into the study. Eight genetic variants in the HLA-DRB1, TNF, CTLA4, CD40, NFKb, PTPN22, IL4 and IL10 genes were genotyped. Patients were stratified by the age at diagnosis of GD and the association with genotype was analysed. Results Polymorphism in the HLA-DRB1, TNF and CTLA4 genes were associated with GD. The carriers of the HLA DRB1*03 allele were more frequent in patients with age at GD diagnosis ≤30 years than in patients with older age at GD diagnosis. Conclusions HLADRB1*03 allele is associated with young age at diagnosis of Graves' disease in polish population. PMID:23544060

  1. Age-related difference in perceptual responses and interface pressure requirements for driver seat design.

    PubMed

    Kyung, Gyouhyung; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2013-01-01

    Due to typical physiological changes with age, older individuals are likely to have different perceptual responses to and different needs for driver-seat interface design. To assess this, a study was conducted in which a total of 22 younger and older participants completed six short-term driving sessions. Three subjective ratings (comfort, discomfort and overall) were obtained, along with 36 driver-seat interface pressure measures, and were used to assess differences and similarities between the two age groups. For both age groups, localised comfort ratings were more effective at distinguishing between driver seats and workspaces. Older individuals appeared to be less sensitive to discomfort than younger individuals. Across age groups, two distinct processes were used in determining whole-body comfort and discomfort perceptions based on localised comfort/discomfort perceptions. Whole-body discomfort levels were largely affected by lower back discomfort in the younger group versus upper back discomfort in the older group. Four specific pressure measures at several body regions differed between the age groups, suggesting distinct contract pressure requirements and loading patterns among these groups.

  2. Effect of cell donor age on the cellular response to nanoparticle exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Rafailovich, Miriam; Mironava, Tatsiana

    As human age there are many significant changes that occur in the skin. Here we investigate how the age-dependent changes in dermal fibroblast mechanics affect cell response to the AuNPs nanoparticles. To analyze these processes we exposed cells from donors of different age groups to AuNPs of two different sizes. Our results indicate that there are significant changes in cell rigidity with age, which in turn lead to different penetration rates of AuNPs through cell membrane and overall nanoparticle toxicity. Cell proliferation results revealed that all cell groups exposed to the same concentration of AuNPs had a very similar decrease in cell proliferation and similar impact on cell morphology. However, recovery data demonstrated that the rate of recovery from the damage is much faster for neonatal cells as compared to 30- and 80-years old cell group. Therefore, we conclude that nanoparticle uptake depends on cell membrane mechanics that in turn is a function of cell donor age.

  3. Immune Responses to Influenza Virus and Its Correlation to Age and Inherited Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bahadoran, Azadeh; Lee, Sau H.; Wang, Seok M.; Manikam, Rishya; Rajarajeswaran, Jayakumar; Raju, Chandramathi S.; Sekaran, Shamala D.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses belong to the family Orthomyxoviridae of enveloped viruses and are an important cause of respiratory infections worldwide. The influenza virus is able to infect a wide variety species as diverse as poultry, marine, pigs, horses, and humans. Upon infection with influenza virus the innate immunity plays a critical role in efficient and rapid control of viral infections as well as in adaptive immunity initiation. The humoral immune system produces antibodies against different influenza antigens, of which the HA-specific antibody is the most important for neutralization of the virus and thus prevention of illness. Cell mediated immunity including CD4+ helper T cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells are the other arms of adaptive immunity induced upon influenza virus infection. The complex inherited factors and age related changes are associated with the host immune responses. Here, we review the different components of immune responses against influenza virus. Additionally, the correlation of the immune response to age and inherited factors has been discussed. These determinations lead to a better understanding of the limitations of immune responses for developing improved vaccines to control influenza virus infection. PMID:27920759

  4. Age and response bias: evidence from the strength-based mirror effect.

    PubMed

    Criss, Amy H; Aue, William; Kılıç, Aslı

    2014-10-01

    Performance in episodic memory is determined both by accurate retrieval from memory and by decision processes. A substantial body of literature suggests slightly poorer episodic memory accuracy for older than younger adults; however, age-related changes in the decision mechanisms in memory have received much less attention. Response bias, the willingness to endorse an item as remembered, is an important decision factor that contributes to episodic memory performance, and therefore understanding age-related changes in response bias is critical to theoretical development. We manipulate list strength in order to investigate two aspects of response bias. First, we evaluate whether criterion placement in episodic memory differs for older and younger adults. Second, we ask whether older adults have the same degree of flexibility to adjust the criterion in response to task demands as younger adults. Participants were tested on weakly and strongly encoded lists where word frequency (Experiment 1) or similarity between targets and foils (Experiment 2) was manipulated. Both older and younger adults had higher hit rates and lower false-alarm rates for strong lists than for weak lists (i.e., a strength-based mirror effect). Older adults were more conservative (less likely to endorse an item as studied) than younger adults, and we found no evidence that older and younger adults differ in their ability to flexibly adjust their criterion based on the demands of the task.

  5. Immune response in virus model structured by cell infection-age.

    PubMed

    Browne, Cameron

    2016-10-01

    This paper concerns modeling the coupled within-host population dynamics of virus and CTL (Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte) immune response. There is substantial evidence that the CTL immune response plays a crucial role in controlling HIV in infected patients. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that certain CTL variants can recognize HIV infected cells early in the infected cell lifecycle before viral production, while other CTLs only detect viral proteins (epitopes) presented on the surface of infected cells after viral production. The kinetics of epitope presentation and immune recognition can impact the efficacy of the immune response. We extend previous virus models to include cell infection-age structure in the infected cell compartment and immune response killing/activation rates of a PDE-ODE system. We characterize solutions to our system utilizing semigroup theory, determine equilibria and reproduction numbers, and prove stability and persistence results. Numerical simulations show that ' early immune recognition' precipitates both enhanced viral control and sustained oscillations via a Hopf bifurcation. In addition to inducing oscillatory dynamics, considering immune process rates to be functions of cell infection-age can also lead to coexistence of multiple distinct immune effector populations.

  6. Conservation Research and Development/ New Ultra-Low Carbon High Strength Steels with Improved Bake Hardenability for Enhanced Stretch Formability and Dent Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony J. DeArdo; C. Isaac Garcia

    2003-12-15

    Conservation Research and Development/New Ultra-Low Carbon High Strength Steels with Improved Bake Hardenability for Enhanced Stretch Formability and Dent Resistance. The experimental work can be divided into four phases. In each phase, the materials were received or designed, processed and tested, to evaluate the BH increment or response, as a function of compositions and processing conditions. Microstructural characterization by various techniques was performed in order to gain insights into the mechanisms of flow stress increment by bake hardening.

  7. Heart rate responses of male orienteers aged 21-67 years during competition.

    PubMed

    Bird, S; George, M; Theakston, S; Balmer, J; Davison, R C R

    2003-03-01

    Orienteering is a sport in which it is common for most participants to be aged over 40 years, but research into the demands of the sport has focused almost exclusively on elite participants aged 21-35 years. The aim of the present study was to examine the heart rate responses of older male orienteers. Thirty-nine competitive male orienteers were divided into three groups: group 1 (international competitive standard, n = 11, age 21-67 years), group 2 (national competitive standard, n = 15, age 24-66 years) and group 3 (club competitive standard, n = 13, age 23-60 years). Each participant had his heart rate monitored during two orienteering races of contrasting technical difficulty. The results were analysed using analysis of covariance, with age as a covariate, and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients to determine whether age was related to the observed heart rate responses. The groups did not differ in their peak (175 +/- 12 beats x min(-1), P = 0.643) or mean (159 +/- 13 beats x min(-1), P = 0.171) heart rates during the races. There was a decline of 6 beats x min(-1) x decade(-1) (P = 0.001) for peak heart rate and 5 beats x min(-1) x decade(-1) (P < 0.001) for mean heart rate. Mean heart rates were 86 +/- 6% of the participants' maximal heart rates and were not associated with age. The orienteers in group 1 displayed a lower (P < 0.005) within-race standard deviation in heart rate (6 +/- 2 beats x min(-1)) than those in groups 2 and 3 (10 +/- 3 and 10 +/- 4 beats x min(-1), respectively). In conclusion, the mean heart rates indicated that all three groups of orienteers ran at a relative high intensity and the international competitive standard orienteers displayed a less variable heart rate, which may have been related to fewer instances of slowing down to relocate and being able to navigate while running at relatively high speeds.

  8. Adaptive responses of cardiac function to fetal postural change as gestational age increases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jin; Choi, Hye Jin; Yang, Sun Young; Koo, Boo Hae; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Hong, Soon Cheol; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The cardiovascular system maintains homeostasis through a series of adaptive responses to physiological requirements. However, little is known about the adaptation of fetal cardiac function to gravity, according to gestational age. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the adaptive responses of cardiac function to postural changes, using Tei index measurements. Methods Fetal echocardiography and Doppler examination were performed on 114 women with vertex singleton pregnancies at 19 to 40 weeks' gestation. Participants were placed in an upright seated position, and the Tei index for fetal left ventricular cardiac function was measured. The women were then moved into a supine position and the Tei index was re-measured. Results The mean Tei index when measured in an upright seated position was significantly lower than that measured in a supine positioning for all fetuses (0.528±0.103 vs. 0.555±0.106, P=0.014, respectively). This difference was also noted in fetuses with a gestational age of 28–40 weeks (0.539±0.107 vs. 0.574±0.102, P=0.011, respectively). However, there was no difference in the Tei index between an upright seated and a supine position among fetuses with a gestational age of <28 weeks (0.505±0.091 vs. 0.516±0.103, P=0.571, respectively). Conclusion Postural changes from an upright seated to a supine position result in an increased Tei index after a gestational age of 28 weeks. This appears to reflect maturation in the adaptive responses of the fetal cardiovascular system to postural changes. PMID:27896244

  9. Neural and vascular variability and the fMRI-BOLD response in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Kannurpatti, Sridhar S; Motes, Michael A; Rypma, Bart; Biswal, Bharat B

    2010-05-01

    Neural, vascular and structural variables contributing to the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal response variability were investigated in younger and older humans. Twelve younger healthy human subjects (six male and six female; mean age: 24 years; range: 19-27 years) and 12 older healthy subjects (five male and seven female; mean age: 58 years; range: 55-71 years) with no history of head trauma and neurological disease were scanned. Functional magnetic resonance imaging measurements using the BOLD contrast were made when participants performed a motor, cognitive or a breath hold (BH) task. Activation volume and the BOLD response amplitude were estimated for the younger and older at both group and subject levels. Mean activation volume was reduced by 45%, 40% and 38% in the elderly group during the motor, cognitive and BH tasks, respectively, compared to the younger. Reduction in activation volume was substantially higher compared to the reduction in the gray matter volume of 14% in the older compared to the younger. A significantly larger variability in the intersubject BOLD signal change occurred during the motor task, compared to the cognitive task. BH-induced BOLD signal change between subjects was significantly less-variable in the motor task-activated areas in the younger compared to older whereas such a difference between age groups was not observed during the cognitive task. Hemodynamic scaling using the BH signal substantially reduced the BOLD signal variability during the motor task compared to the cognitive task. The results indicate that the origin of the BOLD signal variability between subjects was predominantly vascular during the motor task while being principally a consequence of neural variability during the cognitive task. Thus, in addition to gray matter differences, the type of task performed can have different vascular variability weighting that can influence age-related differences in brain functional response.

  10. Differential peptidomics assessment of strain and age differences in mice in response to acute cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Romanova, Elena V; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Ossyra, John R; Zombeck, Jonathan A; Nosek, Michael R; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rhodes, Justin S

    2015-12-01

    Neurochemical differences in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis between individuals and between ages may contribute to differential susceptibility to cocaine abuse. This study measured peptide levels in the pituitary gland (Pit) and lateral hypothalamus (LH) in adolescent (age 30 days) and adult (age 65 days) mice from four standard inbred strains, FVB/NJ, DBA/2J, C57BL/6J, and BALB/cByJ, which have previously been characterized for acute locomotor responses to cocaine. Individual peptide profiles were analyzed using mass spectrometric profiling and principal component analysis. Sequences of assigned peptides were verified by tandem mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis classified all strains according to their distinct peptide profiles in Pit samples from adolescent mice, but not adults. Select pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides were significantly higher in adolescent BALB/cByJ and DBA/2J mice than in FVB/NJ or C57BL/6J mice. A subset of peptides in the LH, but not in the Pit, was altered by cocaine in adolescents. A 15 mg/kg dose of cocaine induced greater peptide alterations than a 30 mg/kg dose, particularly in FVB/NJ animals, with larger differences in adolescents than adults. Neuropeptides in the LH affected by acute cocaine administration included pro-opiomelanocortin-, myelin basic protein-, and glutamate transporter-derived peptides. The observed peptide differences could contribute to differential behavioral sensitivity to cocaine among strains and ages. Peptides were measured using mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) in individual lateral hypothalamus and pituitary samples from four strains and two ages of inbred mice in response to acute cocaine administration. Principal component analyses (PCA) classified the strains according to their peptide profiles from adolescent mice, and a subset of peptides in the lateral hypothalamus was altered by cocaine in adolescents.

  11. The Effect of Aging on the Dynamics of Reactive and Proactive Cognitive Control of Response Interference

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ling; Zhang, Baoqiang; Wang, Baoxi; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Fenghua; Hu, Zhujing

    2016-01-01

    A prime-target interference task was used to investigate the effects of cognitive aging on reactive and proactive control after eliminating frequency confounds and feature repetitions from the cognitive control measures. We used distributional analyses to explore the dynamics of the two control functions by distinguishing the strength of incorrect response capture and the efficiency of suppression control. For reactive control, within-trial conflict control and between-trial conflict adaption were analyzed. The statistical analysis showed that there were no reliable between-trial conflict adaption effects for either young or older adults. For within-trial conflict control, the results revealed that older adults showed larger interference effects on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that the decline mainly stemmed from inefficient suppression rather than from stronger incorrect responses. For proactive control, older adults showed comparable proactive conflict resolution to young adults on mean RT and mean accuracy. Distributional analyses showed that older adults were as effective as younger adults in adjusting their responses based on congruency proportion information to minimize automatic response capture and actively suppress the direct response activation. The results suggest that older adults were less proficient at suppressing interference after conflict was detected but can anticipate and prevent inference in response to congruency proportion manipulation. These results challenge earlier views that older adults have selective deficits in proactive control but intact reactive control. PMID:27847482

  12. Porosity and mechanically optimized PLGA based in situ hardening systems.

    PubMed

    Schloegl, W; Marschall, V; Witting, M Y; Volkmer, E; Drosse, I; Leicht, U; Schieker, M; Wiggenhorn, M; Schaubhut, F; Zahler, S; Friess, W

    2012-11-01

    Goal of the present study was to develop and to characterize in situ-hardening, porous PLGA-based systems for their future application as bone grafting materials. Therefore, we investigated the precipitation behavior of formulations containing PLGA and a water-miscible solvent, DMSO, PEG 400, and NMP. To increase porosity, a pore forming agent (NaCMC) was added and to enhance mechanical properties of the system, an inorganic filler (α-TCP) was incorporated. The behavior upon contact with water and the influence of the prior addition of aqueous media on the morphology of the corresponding hardened implants were investigated. We proved cell-compatibility by live/dead assays for the hardened porous polymer/ceramic-composite scaffolds. The IsHS formulations can therefore be used to manufacture hardened scaffolds ex vivo by using molds with the desired shape and size. Cells were further successfully incorporated into the IsHS by precultivating the cells on the α-TCP-powder prior to their admixing to the formulation. However, cell viability could not be maintained due to toxicity of the tested solvents. But, the results demonstrate that in vivo cells should well penetrate, adhere, and proliferate in the hardened scaffolds. Consequently, we consider the in situ hardening system being an excellent candidate as a filling material for non-weight-bearing orthopedic indications, as the resulting properties of the hardened implant fulfill indication-specific needs like mechanical stability, elasticity, and porosity.

  13. An extended crystal plasticity model for latent hardening in polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargmann, Swantje; Svendsen, Bob; Ekh, Magnus

    2011-12-01

    In this contribution, a computational approach to modeling size-dependent self- and latent hardening in polycrystals is presented. Latent hardening is the hardening of inactive slip systems due to active slip systems. We focus attention on the investigation of glide system interaction, latent hardening and excess dislocation development. In particular, latent hardening results in a transition to patchy slip as a first indication and expression of the development of dislocation microstructures. To this end, following Nye (Acta Metall 1:153-162, 1953), Kondo (in Proceedings of the second Japan national congress for applied mechanics. Science Council of Japan, Tokyo, pp. 41-47, 1953), and many others, local deformation incompatibility in the material is adopted as a measure of the density of geometrically necessary dislocations. Their development results in additional energy being stored in the material, leading to additional kinematic-like hardening effects. A large-deformation model for latent hardening is introduced. This approach is based on direct exploitation of the dissipation principle to derive all field relations and (sufficient) forms of the constitutive relations as based on the free energy density and dissipation potential. The numerical implementation is done via a dual-mixed finite element method. A numerical example for polycrystals is presented.

  14. Radiation effects in power converters: Design of a radiation hardened integrated switching DC/DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adell, Philippe

    When electronic devices are used in space and military systems, they may be exposed to various types of radiation, including photons, electrons, protons, neutrons, and heavy ions. The effects of radiation on the semiconductor devices within the systems range from gradual degradation to catastrophic failure. In order to design and produce reliable systems for space or military applications, it is necessary to understand the device-level effects of radiation and develop appropriate strategies for reducing system susceptibility. This research focuses on understanding radiation effects in power converters for space and military applications. We show that power converters are very sensitive to radiation (total-dose, single event effects and displacement damage) and that their radiation response is dependent on input bias conditions and load conditions. We compared the radiation hardness of various power converter topologies using experiments and simulations. Evaluation of these designs under different modes of operation is demonstrated to be critical for determining radiation hardness. We emphasize the correlation between radiation effects and the role of the dynamic response of these topologies. For instance, total dose exposure has been found to degrade loop gain and affect regulation in some converters. We propose several radiation-hardening solutions to improve the radiation response of these designs. For instance, we demonstrate the design of a digitally controlled boost converter suitable for space applications based on an SRAM FPGA. A design hardening solution has been developed and successfully applied through VHDL simulations and experiments to assure the continuous operation of the converter in the presence of SEES (more precisely SEFIs). This research led to the design of a digitally controlled radiation hardened integrated switching buck converter. The proposed design is suitable for micro-satellite applications and is based on a high-voltage/CMOS process

  15. Aging Is Accompanied by a Blunted Muscle Protein Synthetic Response to Protein Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Benjamin Toby; Gorissen, Stefan H.; Pennings, Bart; Koopman, René; Groen, Bart B. L.; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass with aging (sarcopenia) forms a global health concern. It has been suggested that an impaired capacity to increase muscle protein synthesis rates in response to protein intake is a key contributor to sarcopenia. We assessed whether differences in post-absorptive and/or post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates exist between large cohorts of healthy young and older men. Procedures We performed a cross-sectional, retrospective study comparing in vivo post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis rates determined with stable isotope methodologies between 34 healthy young (22±1 y) and 72 older (75±1 y) men, and post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates between 35 healthy young (22±1 y) and 40 older (74±1 y) men. Findings Post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis rates did not differ significantly between the young and older group. Post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates were 16% lower in the older subjects when compared with the young. Muscle protein synthesis rates were >3 fold more responsive to dietary protein ingestion in the young. Irrespective of age, there was a strong negative correlation between post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis rates and the increase in muscle protein synthesis rate following protein ingestion. Conclusions Aging is associated with the development of muscle anabolic inflexibility which represents a key physiological mechanism underpinning sarcopenia. PMID:26536130

  16. Acacetin promotes healthy aging by altering stress response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Asthana, Jyotsna; Mishra, B N; Pandey, Rakesh

    2016-08-01

    The progression in lifespan has been associated with elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress level which contributes to development of age related disorders. The discovery of lifespan modulating phytomolecules may promote development of natural therapies against age related afflictions. Acacetin (5,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxyflavone), is a naturally occurring flavonoid known to possess therapeutic properties. To this end, the present study evaluates effect of acacetin (AC) on lifespan, stress and neurotoxicity for the first time by using well-established free living, multicellular Caenorhabditis elegans model system. The 25 μM dose of AC significantly prolonged the mean lifespan of worms by 27.31% in comparison to untreated control and other tested doses of AC. Additionally, AC enhanced stress resistance against oxidative and thermal stress in worms. Furthermore, AC attenuated age related intracellular ROS level, aggregation of age pigment lipofuscin and increased the mean survival in stress hypersensitive mev-1 mutant by 40.5%. AC supplementation also reduced the alpha synuclein aggregation in transgenic worm model of Parkinson's disease. The enhanced stress resistance, lifespan and alleviation of age related pathology can be attributed to increment in stress modulatory enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) level. Altogether the results suggest AC exposure maintains stress level, health span and extends mean lifespan of C. elegans. The longevity promoting and neuromodulatory effects of AC are mediated by up regulation of the stress response genes sod-3 and gst-4. The present finding gives new insights of natural remedies and their future prospects in developing therapeutic interventions for managing age related diseases.

  17. Age-Stratified Treatment Response Rates in Hospitalized Patients with Clostridium difficile Infection Treated with Metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Pham, Vy P; Luce, Andrea M; Ruppelt, Sara C; Wei, Wenjing; Aitken, Samuel L; Musick, William L; Roux, Ryan K; Garey, Kevin W

    2015-10-01

    Consensus on the optimal treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is rapidly changing. Treatment with metronidazole has been associated with increased clinical failure rates; however, the reasons for this are unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess age-related treatment response rates in hospitalized patients with CDI treated with metronidazole. This was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of hospitalized patients with CDI. Patients were assessed for refractory CDI, defined as persistent diarrhea after 7 days of metronidazole therapy, and stratified by age and clinical characteristics. A total of 242 individuals, aged 60 ± 18 years (Charlson comorbidity index, 3.8 ± 2.4; Horn's index, 1.7 ± 1.0) were included. One hundred twenty-eight patients (53%) had severe CDI. Seventy patients (29%) had refractory CDI, a percentage that increased from 22% to 28% and to 37% for patients aged less than 50 years, for patients from 50 to 70 years, and for patients aged >70 years, respectively (P = 0.05). In multivariate analysis, Horn's index (odds ratio [OR], 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50 to 2.77; P < 0.001), severe CDI (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.15 to 4.41; P = 0.018), and continued use of antibiotics (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.30 to 5.39; P = 0.0072) were identified as significant predictors of refractory CDI. Age was not identified as an independent risk factor for refractory CDI. Therefore, hospitalized elderly patients with CDI treated with metronidazole had increased refractory CDI rates likely due to increased underlying severity of illness, severity of CDI, and concomitant antibiotic use. These results may help identify patients that may benefit from alternative C. difficile treatments other than metronidazole.

  18. Aging of whiskey increases the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor response.

    PubMed

    Koda, Hirofumi; Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Aoshima, Hitoshi

    2003-08-27

    It is known that the target of most mood-defining compounds such as ethanol is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activities in the human brain. Because both extracts of whiskey by pentane and fragrant components in whiskey potentiate the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting cRNAs prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors in order to study the effects of whiskey itself on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. Whiskey itself also potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors generally more than ethanol at the same concentration as that of the whiskey. The potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response increased with the aging period of the whiskey. Inhalation of whiskey to mice increased the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital more than that of the same concentration of ethanol as the whiskey. These results suggest that not only ethanol but also minor components in whiskey play an important role in the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor-mediated response and possibly the sedative effect of whiskey. Although the minor components are present in extremely small quantities compared with ethanol in alcoholic beverages, they may modulate the mood or consciousness of humans through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic compounds are easily absorbed into the brain across the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response.

  19. A B-cell subset uniquely responsive to innate stimuli accumulates in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yi; O'Neill, Patrick; Naradikian, Martin S.; Scholz, Jean L.

    2011-01-01

    We have discovered a distinct mature B-cell subset that accumulates with age, which we have termed age-associated B cells. These cells comprise up to 30% of mature B cells by 22 months. Despite sharing some features with other mature B-cell subsets, they are refractory to BCR and CD40 stimulation. Instead, they respond to TLR9 or TLR7 stimulation and divide maximally on combined BCR and TLR ligation, leading to Ig production and preferential secretion of IL-10 and IL-4. Although similar to follicular B cells in both B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) receptor expression and BLyS binding capacity, these cells do not rely on BLyS for survival. They are neither cycling nor the result of intrinsically altered B lymphopoiesis in aged BM, but instead appear to be generated from mature B cells that exhaustively expand during the individual's lifetime. Finally, they present Ag effectively and favor polarization to a TH17 profile. Together, these findings reveal that while the magnitude of the mature primary B-cell niche is maintained with age, it is increasingly occupied by cells refractory to BCR-driven activation yet responsive to innate receptor stimulation. PMID:21562046

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W.; Weaver, Eric A.; May, Shannon M.; Croatt, Anthony J.; Foreman, Oded; Kennedy, Richard B.; Poland, Gregory A.; Barry, Michael A.; Nath, Karl A.; Badley, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms of individual variation in severity of influenza infection and response to vaccination are poorly understood. We investigated the effect of reduced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression on vaccine response and outcome of influenza infection. HO-1-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice (kingdom, Animalia; phylum, Chordata; genus/species, Mus musculus) were infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 with or without prior vaccination with an adenoviral-based influenza vaccine. A genome-wide association study evaluated the expression of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HO-1 gene and the response to influenza vaccination in healthy humans. HO-1-deficient mice had decreased survival after influenza infection compared to WT mice (median survival 5.5 vs. 6.5 d, P=0.016). HO-1-deficient mice had impaired production of antibody following influenza vaccination compared to WT mice (mean antibody titer 869 vs. 1698, P=0.02). One SNP in HO-1 and one SNP in the constitutively expressed isoform HO-2 were independently associated with decreased antibody production after influenza vaccination in healthy human volunteers (P=0.017 and 0.014, respectively). HO-1 deficient mice were paired with sex- and age-matched WT controls. HO-1 affects the immune response to both influenza infection and vaccination, suggesting that therapeutic induction of HO-1 expression may represent a novel adjuvant to enhance influenza vaccine effectiveness.—Cummins, N. W., Weaver, E. A., May, S. M., Croatt, A. J., Foreman, O., Kennedy, R. B., Poland, G. A., Barry, M. A., Nath, K. A., Badley, A. D. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice. PMID:22490782

  1. Tissue-specific autophagy responses to aging and stress in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, Hannah C.; Okada, Megan; Merz, Alexey J.; Miller, Dana L.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular function relies on a balance between protein synthesis and breakdown. Macromolecular breakdown through autophagy is broadly required for cellular and tissue development, function, and recovery from stress. While Caenorhabditis elegans is frequently used to explore cellular responses to development and stress, the most common assays for autophagy in this system lack tissue-level resolution. Different tissues within an organism have unique functional characteristics and likely vary in their reliance on autophagy under different conditions. To generate a tissue-specific map of autophagy in C. elegans we used a dual fluorescent protein (dFP) tag that releases monomeric fluorescent protein (mFP) upon arrival at the lysosome. Tissue-specific expression of dFP::LGG-1 revealed autophagic flux in all tissues, but mFP accumulation was most dramatic in the intestine. We also observed variable responses to stress: starvation increased autophagic mFP release in all tissues, whereas anoxia primarily increased intestinal autophagic flux. We observed autophagic flux with tagged LGG-1, LGG-2, and two autophagic cargo reporters: a soluble cytoplasmic protein, and mitochondrial TOMM-7. Finally, an increase in mFP in older worms was consistent with an age-dependent shift in proteostasis. These novel measures of autophagic flux in C. elegans reveal heterogeneity in autophagic response across tissues during stress and aging. PMID:26142908

  2. Tissue-specific autophagy responses to aging and stress in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Hannah C; Okada, Megan; Merz, Alexey J; Miller, Dana L

    2015-06-01

    Cellular function relies on a balance between protein synthesis and breakdown. Macromolecular breakdown through autophagy is broadly required for cellular and tissue development, function, and recovery from stress. While Caenorhabditis elegans is frequently used to explore cellular responses to development and stress, the most common assays for autophagy in this system lack tissue-level resolution. Different tissues within an organism have unique functional characteristics and likely vary in their reliance on autophagy under different conditions. To generate a tissue-specific map of autophagy in C. elegans we used a dual fluorescent protein (dFP) tag that releases monomeric fluorescent protein (mFP) upon arrival at the lysosome. Tissue-specific expression of dFP::LGG-1 revealed autophagic flux in all tissues, but mFP accumulation was most dramatic in the intestine. We also observed variable responses to stress: starvation increased autophagic mFP release in all tissues, whereas anoxia primarily increased intestinal autophagic flux. We observed autophagic flux with tagged LGG-1, LGG-2, and two autophagic cargo reporters: a soluble cytoplasmic protein, and mitochondrial TOMM-7. Finally, an increase in mFP in older worms was consistent with an age-dependent shift in proteostasis. These novel measures of autophagic flux in C. elegans reveal heterogeneity in autophagic response across tissues during stress and aging.

  3. Age-related responses to influenza vaccination in the Newcastle region during 1983 and 1984.

    PubMed

    Howarth, D M; Chaston, T M; Lickiss, K; Weekes, J R; O'Doherty, C; Foster, R E; Tannock, G A; Gillett, R S; Hensley, M J; Bryce, D A

    1987-05-18

    A study was carried out in Newcastle to assess responses to influenza vaccines in elderly nursing home patients and in younger adults during 1983 and 1984. The decision to vaccinate the elderly subjects was made by their general practitioners. A concurrent randomized placebo-controlled trial of the same vaccine was performed in young adult volunteers. Elderly subjects generally possessed higher levels of pre-existing antibody to the influenzal haemagglutinins that were present in the vaccines than did younger subjects. The highest levels were observed in the 52-63 years' age group. Younger subjects showed significantly greater responses to vaccines compared with elderly subjects (P less than 0.05). Peak responses were noted in the 16-24 years' age group. Of a total of 326 elderly subjects (70% of whom had been vaccinated), six participants, two of whom had been vaccinated, contracted laboratory-proven influenza during 1983. Only one unvaccinated subject of a total of 365 subjects (50% of whom had been vaccinated) contracted influenza during 1984. In both years illness was produced by strain A/Philippines/2/82.

  4. Homeodomain-Interacting Protein Kinase (HPK-1) regulates stress responses and ageing in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Slavica; Wood, Mallory; Llamosas, Estelle; Thaivalappil, Priya; Lee, Karen; Liao, Bing Mana; Chew, Yee Lian; Rhodes, Aaron; Yucel, Duygu; Crossley, Merlin; Nicholas, Hannah R

    2016-01-01

    Proteins of the Homeodomain-Interacting Protein Kinase (HIPK) family regulate an array of processes in mammalian systems, such as the DNA damage response, cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a single HIPK homologue called HPK-1. Previous studies have implicated HPK-1 in longevity control and suggested that this protein may be regulated in a stress-dependent manner. Here we set out to expand these observations by investigating the role of HPK-1 in longevity and in the response to heat and oxidative stress. We find that levels of HPK-1 are regulated by heat stress, and that HPK-1 contributes to survival following heat or oxidative stress. Additionally, we show that HPK-1 is required for normal longevity, with loss of HPK-1 function leading to a faster decline of physiological processes that reflect premature ageing. Through microarray analysis, we have found that HPK-1-regulated genes include those encoding proteins that serve important functions in stress responses such as Phase I and Phase II detoxification enzymes. Consistent with a role in longevity assurance, HPK-1 also regulates the expression of age-regulated genes. Lastly, we show that HPK-1 functions in the same pathway as DAF-16 to regulate longevity and reveal a new role for HPK-1 in development. PMID:26791749

  5. Response to stress in Drosophila is mediated by gender, age and stress paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Neckameyer, Wendi S.; Nieto, Andres

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms must maintain equilibrium in response to internal and external challenges within their environment. Changes in neural plasticity (alterations in neuronal populations, dendritic remodeling, and synaptic turnover) are critical components of the homeostatic response to stress, which has been strongly implicated in the onset of affective disorders. However, stress is differentially perceived depending on the type of stress and its context, as well as genetic background, age and sex; therefore, an individual’s maintenance of neuronal homeostasis must differ depending upon these variables. We established Drosophila as a model to analyze homeostatic responses to stress. Sexually immature and mature females and males from an isogenic wild-type strain raised under controlled environmental conditions were exposed to four reproducible and high-throughput translatable stressors to facilitate the analysis of a large number of animals for direct comparisons. These animals were assessed in an open-field arena, in a Light-Dark Box, and in a Forced Swim Test, as well as for sensitivity to the sedative effects of ethanol. These studies establish that immature and mature females and males represent behaviorally distinct populations under control conditions as well as after exposure to different stressors. Therefore, the neural substrates mediating the stress response must be differentially expressed depending upon the hormonal status of the brain. In addition, an adaptive response to a given stressor in one paradigm was not predictive for outcomes in other paradigms. PMID:25783197

  6. Response to stress in Drosophila is mediated by gender, age and stress paradigm.

    PubMed

    Neckameyer, Wendi S; Nieto-Romero, Andres R

    2015-01-01

    All living organisms must maintain equilibrium in response to internal and external challenges within their environment. Changes in neural plasticity (alterations in neuronal populations, dendritic remodeling, and synaptic turnover) are critical components of the homeostatic response to stress, which has been strongly implicated in the onset of affective disorders. However, stress is differentially perceived depending on the type of stress and its context, as well as genetic background, age and sex; therefore, an individual's maintenance of neuronal homeostasis must differ depending upon these variables. We established Drosophila as a model to analyze homeostatic responses to stress. Sexually immature and mature females and males from an isogenic wild-type strain raised under controlled environmental conditions were exposed to four reproducible and high-throughput translatable stressors to facilitate the analysis of a large number of animals for direct comparisons. These animals were assessed in an open-field arena, in a light-dark box, and in a forced swim test, as well as for sensitivity to the sedative effects of ethanol. These studies establish that immature and mature females and males represent behaviorally distinct populations under control conditions as well as after exposure to different stressors. Therefore, the neural substrates mediating the stress response must be differentially expressed depending upon the hormonal status of the brain. In addition, an adaptive response to a given stressor in one paradigm was not predictive for outcomes in other paradigms.

  7. Gerontology and youth-focused service learning: the relation between service recipient age and student responses.

    PubMed

    Kimbler, Kristopher J; Ehman, Anandi C

    2015-01-01

    Service learning is a pedagogical technique that integrates traditional coursework with activities outside the classroom that meet the needs of the community. Gerontology-focused service learning has been incorporated into many courses that cover aging content and is believed to be beneficial to the learning process. Other research has demonstrated that service learning in general has benefits, regardless of the age of the service recipient. It is unclear whether benefits associated with gerontology-focused service learning are unique to experiences with older adults or are a product of the general benefits associated with this pedagogy. This study examined student responses to gerontology-focused service learning compared to youth-focused service learning. The results revealed that students working with older adults reported more negative expectations related to the assignment, more positive experiences interacting with the service recipients, and more reports of learning benefits attributed to service learning.

  8. Growth response of weanling rats to heated, aged, fractionated, and chemically treated yogurts.

    PubMed

    Hargrove, R E; Alford, J A

    1980-07-01

    Significance of viable cultures in yogurt at time of ingestion on rate of growth of weaning rats was determined. Fresh yogurts were compared with those in which cultures were treated with heat, hydrogen peroxide, and ethylene oxide. They also were aged and freeze-dried. Fractions of yogurt prepared by ultrafiltration were recombined to determine which fraction gave the highest rate of gain in weight. Cultures were inactivated and growth in rats was depressed when yogurt was heated at 60 C and above for 2 min. Hydrogen peroxide reduced the viable yogurt count and rate of gain but not feed consumption. Yogurts treated with ethylene oxide were toxic. Aging did not effect culture viability or feed efficiency, but growth response was reduced. Fractionation of yogurt into components of high and low molecular weight and recombinations with control milk fractions indicated that the growth stimulant remained in the component of high molecular weight.

  9. Satiety responsiveness in toddlerhood predicts energy intake and weight status at four years of age.

    PubMed

    Mallan, Kimberley M; Nambiar, Smita; Magarey, Anthea M; Daniels, Lynne A

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether maternal-report of child eating behaviour at two years predicted self-regulation of energy intake and weight status at four years. Using an 'eating in the absence of hunger' paradigm, children's energy intake (kJ) from a semi-standardized lunch meal and a standardized selection of snacks were measured. Participants were 37 mother-child dyads (16 boys, Median child age=4.4years, Inter-quartile range=3.7-4.5years) recruited from an existing longitudinal study (NOURISH randomised controlled trial). All participants were tested in their own home. Details of maternal characteristics, child eating behaviours (at age two years) reported by mothers on a validated questionnaire, and measured child height and weight (at age 3.5-4years) were sourced from existing NOURISH trial data. Correlation and partial correlation analyses were used to examine longitudinal relationships. Satiety responsiveness and Slowness in eating were inversely associated with energy intake of the lunch meal (partial r=-.40, p=.023, and partial r=-.40, p=.023) and the former was also negatively associated with BMI-for-age Z score (partial r=-.42, p=.015). Food responsiveness and Enjoyment of food were not related to energy intake or BMI Z score. None of the eating behaviours were significantly associated with energy intake of the snacks (i.e., eating in the absence of hunger). The small and predominantly 'healthy weight' sample of children may have limited the ability to detect some hypothesized effects. Nevertheless, the study provides evidence for the predictive validity of two eating behaviours and future research with a larger and more diverse sample should be able to better evaluate the predictive validity of other children's early eating behaviour styles.

  10. The strain path dependence of plastic deformation response of AA5754: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Minh-Son; Hu, Lin; Iadicola, Mark; Creuziger, Adam; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2013-12-16

    This work presents modeling of experiments on a balanced biaxial (BB) pre-strained AA5754 alloy, subsequently reloaded uniaxially along the rolling direction and transverse direction. The material exhibits a complex plastic deformation response during the change in strain path due to 1) crystallographic texture, 2) aging (interactions between dislocations and Mg atoms) and 3) recovery (annihilation and re-arrangement of dislocations). With a BB prestrain of about 5 %, the aging process is dominant, and the yield strength for uniaxially deformed samples is observed to be higher than the flow stress during BB straining. The strain hardening rate after changing path is, however, lower than that for pre-straining. Higher degrees of pre-straining make the dynamic recovery more active. The dynamic recovery at higher strain levels compensates for the aging effect, and results in: 1) a reduction of the yield strength, and 2) an increase in the hardening rate of re-strained specimens along other directions. The yield strength of deformed samples is further reduced if these samples are left at room temperature to let static recovery occur. The synergistic influences of texture condition, aging and recovery processes on the material response make the modeling of strain path dependence of mechanical behavior of AA5754 challenging. In this study, the influence of crystallographic texture is taken into account by incorporating the latent hardening into a visco-plastic self-consistent model. Different strengths of dislocation glide interaction models in 24 slip systems are used to represent the latent hardening. Moreover, the aging and recovery effects are also included into the latent hardening model by considering strong interactions between dislocations and dissolved atom Mg and the microstructural evolution. These microstructural considerations provide a powerful capability to successfully describe the strain path dependence of plastic deformation behavior of AA5754.

  11. Gene expression changes in response to aging compared to heat stress, oxidative stress and ionizing radiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Landis, Gary; Shen, Jie; Tower, John

    2012-11-01

    Gene expression changes in response to aging, heat stress, hyperoxia, hydrogen peroxide, and ionizing radiation were compared using microarrays. A set of 18 genes were up-regulated across all conditions, indicating a general stress response shared with aging, including the heat shock protein (Hsp) genes Hsp70, Hsp83 and l(2)efl, the glutathione-S-transferase gene GstD2, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mUPR) gene ref(2)P. Selected gene expression changes were confirmed using quantitative PCR, Northern analysis and GstD-GFP reporter constructs. Certain genes were altered in only a subset of the conditions, for example, up-regulation of numerous developmental pathway and signaling genes in response to hydrogen peroxide. While aging shared features with each stress, aging was more similar to the stresses most associated with oxidative stress (hyperoxia, hydrogen peroxide, ionizing radiation) than to heat stress. Aging is associated with down-regulation of numerous mitochondrial genes, including electron-transport-chain (ETC) genes and mitochondrial metabolism genes, and a sub-set of these changes was also observed upon hydrogen peroxide stress and ionizing radiation stress. Aging shared the largest number of gene expression changes with hyperoxia. The extensive down-regulation of mitochondrial and ETC genes during aging is consistent with an aging-associated failure in mitochondrial maintenance, which may underlie the oxidative stress-like and proteotoxic stress-like responses observed during aging.

  12. Effects of age, available response time and gender on ability to stop suddenly when walking.

    PubMed

    Cao; A Ashton-Miller J; Schultz; Alexander

    1998-10-01

    Background: Injuries may occur during walking when a sudden stop to avoid a gait path obstacle is called for unexpectedly, but cannot be completed in the time available. Little is known about abilities, particularly those of older adults, to stop suddenly. Methods: Twenty young (mean age 23.4 years) and 20 older (72.6 years) healthy and physically active adults with equal numbers of females and males in each age group were studied. While walking straight ahead at approximately 1.3 m/s, they were cued by a light at one of five possible locations to stop as quickly as possible. Subjects were given available response times (ART), the times between the visual cue to stop and potential passage through a virtual wall that was outlined by the array of lights used to cue the subjects, ranging from 375 to 825 ms in 75-ms increments. The rate of success (RS) in completing the stops as prescribed was determined and the effects on RS of age, available response time and gender were examined. Regression analyses were used to interpolate the RS data. Results: At all ART, older female (OF) subjects had a significantly lower rate of success (RS) than either older male (OM) or young adult (YA) subjects. At an ART of 525 ms, for example, RS was 58% for YA and 51% for OM, but only 23% for OF. The regression analyses suggested that OM in the mean would have needed 10 ms longer and OF 70 ms longer than YA to achieve a 50% RS. No significant gender difference in RS were found among YA. Conclusions: The healthy and physically active older female subjects in this study needed longer available response times, and thus longer available stopping distances, than did the young adults or the older males to succeed as well in stopping suddenly while walking at their comfortable gait speed. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Sex and age differences in heavy binge drinking and its effects on alcohol responsivity following abstinence.

    PubMed

    Melón, Laverne C; Wray, Kevin N; Moore, Eileen M; Boehm, Stephen L

    2013-03-01

    Binge drinking during adolescence may perturb the maturing neuroenvironment and increase susceptibility of developing an alcohol use disorder later in life. In the present series of experiments, we utilized a modified version of the drinking in the dark-multiple scheduled access (DID-MSA) procedure to study how heavy binge drinking during adolescence alters responsivity to ethanol later in adulthood. Adult and adolescent C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) males and females were given access to a 20% ethanol solution for 3 hourly periods, each separated by 2h of free water access. B6 adults and adolescents consumed 2 to 3.5 g/kg ethanol an hour and displayed significant intoxication and binge-like blood ethanol concentrations. There was an interaction of sex and age, however, driven by high intakes in adult B6 females, who peaked at 11.01 g/kg. Adolescents of both sexes and adult males never consumed more than 9.3 g/kg. D2 mice consumed negligible amounts of alcohol and showed no evidence of intoxication. B6 mice were abstinent for one month and were retested on the balance beam 10 min following 1.75 g/kg ethanol challenge (20%v/v; i.p). They were also tested for changes in home cage locomotion immediately following the 1.75 g/kg dose (for 10 min prior to balance beam). Although there was no effect of age of exposure, all mice with a binge drinking history demonstrated a significantly dampened ataxic response to an ethanol challenge. Female mice that binge drank during adulthood showed a significantly augmented locomotor response to ethanol when compared to their water drinking controls. This alteration was not noted for males or for females that binge drank during adolescence. These results highlight the importance of biological sex, and its interaction with age, in the development of behavioral adaptation following binge drinking.

  14. Accepting "total and complete responsibility": new age neo-feminist violence against women.

    PubMed

    Sethna, C

    1992-02-01

    Barry Konikov, a hypnotherapist, of Potentials Unlimited Inc., a Michigan-based company which produces approximately 160 Subliminal Persuasion/Self Hypnosis tapes, promises his listeners miracles. The tapes on premenstrual syndrome, abortion, and sexual abuse were analyzed. The self-hypnosis message by Konikov is dangerous for women, because his antifeminism, misogyny, and patriarchism are couched insidiously within New Age neofeminism. Under therapeutic guidance the woman listener can direct her own transformation to complete mental, physical, and spiritual well-being, and her new and improved self is so empowered as to accept total and complete responsibility to overcome the hurt about menstruation, abortion, or sexual abuse. Growth therapies such as Gestalt, guided fantasies, and bioenergetics undermine women with false promises of power. If women are so powerful, then it is their fault if they got raped, or battered, or if they have not received love, money, and inner peace. While seemingly empowering women to develop a strong sense of personal agency, Konikov ignores the patriarchal structures which intersect his women listeners' experience of menstrual discomfort, abortion, and sexual abuse. Konikov's New Age, neofeminist stance contains 4 stages of healing: responsibility, absolution, forgiveness, and resolution. Accepting responsibility for the wound next leads to absolution, and particularly absolution for men. As an example of absolution, Konikov's woman client-ex-plantation slave accepted her past-life relationship to her husband, absolved him of guild, and decided upon a divorce. The issue of absolution widens into forgiveness in the healing process, whereby Konikov wants women to hypnotize themselves therapy should be to help a woman see how her own power as an individual is inextricably bound to the collective power of women as a group. There is no doubt that the New Age neofeminist stance taken by Konikov on the tapes leaves women profoundly

  15. The effect of ageing and fitness on thermoregulatory response to high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Best, S; Caillaud, C; Thompson, M

    2012-08-01

    There are conflicting reports as to whether ageing causes a decreased thermoregulatory response, or if observed differences in previous studies are related to maximal aerobic capacity or training status. This study hypothesized that thermoregulatory response to severe exercise-heat stress is maintained with ageing when both young and older subjects are well trained. Seven older highly trained (OHT = 51-63 years) cyclists were matched with two groups of young cyclists (19-35 years); one group matched for training status [young highly trained (YHT) participants, n = 7] and another for V ˙ O 2 max [young moderately trained (YMT), n = 7]. Each participant exercised at 70% V ˙ O 2 max in hot (35°C, 40% relative humidity) and thermoneutral (20°C, 40% relative humidity) conditions for 60 min. Final rectal temperature in the thermoneutral and heat (YHT = 39.13 ± 0.33°C, YMT = 39.11 ± 0.38°C, OHT = 39.11 ± 0.51°C) tests were similar between all three groups. %HR(max) (heat test: YHT = 92.5 ± 6.0%, YMT = 91.6 ± 4.4%, OHT = 88.6 ± 5.1%), skin temperature, and cutaneous vascular conductance during cycling in both environments were similar between groups. Lower sweat loss and evaporative heat loss in the heat test in the OHT and YMT groups when compared with the YHT group reflected lower metabolic heat production. The findings of the present study suggest that thermoregulatory response is maintained with age among highly trained subjects.

  16. Age matters: Developmental stage of Danio rerio larvae influences photomotor response thresholds to diazinion or diphenhydramine

    PubMed Central

    Kristofco, Lauren A.; Cruz, Luis Colon; Haddad, Samuel P.; Behra, Martine L; Chambliss, C. Kevin; Brooks, Bryan W.

    2016-01-01

    Because basic toxicological data is unavailable for the majority of industrial compounds, High Throughput Screening (HTS) assays using the embryonic and larval zebrafish provide promising approaches to define bioactivity profiles and identify potential adverse outcome pathways for previously understudied chemicals. Unfortunately, standardized approaches, including HTS experimental designs, for examining fish behavioral responses to contaminants are rarely available. In the present study, we examined movement behavior of larval zebrafish over 7 days (4–10 days post fertilization or dpf) during typical daylight workday hours to determine whether intrinsic activity differed with age and time of day. We then employed an early life stage approach using the Fish Embryo Test (FET) at multiple developmental ages to evaluate whether photomotor response (PMR) behavior differed with zebrafish age following exposure to diazinon (DZN), a well-studied orthophosphate insecticide, and diphenhydramine (DPH), an antihistamine that also targets serotonin reuptake transporters and the acetylcholine receptor. 72 h studies were conducted at 1–4, 4–7 and 7–10 dpf, followed by behavioral observations using a ViewPoint system at 4, 7 and 10 dpf. Distance traveled and swimming speeds were quantified; nominal treatment levels were analytically verified by isotope-dilution LC-MSMS. Larval zebrafish locomotion displayed significantly different (p < 0.05) activity profiles over the course of typical daylight and workday hours, and these time of day PMR activity profiles were similar across ages examined (4–10 dpf). 10 dpf zebrafish larvae were consistently more sensitive to DPH than either the 4 or 7 dpf larvae with an environmentally realistic lowest observed effect concentration of 200 ng/L. Though ELS and FET studies with zebrafish typically focus on mortality or teratogenicity in 0–4 dpf organisms, behavioral responses of slightly older fish were several orders of magnitude more

  17. Age matters: Developmental stage of Danio rerio larvae influences photomotor response thresholds to diazinion or diphenhydramine.

    PubMed

    Kristofco, Lauren A; Cruz, Luis Colon; Haddad, Samuel P; Behra, Martine L; Chambliss, C Kevin; Brooks, Bryan W

    2016-01-01

    Because basic toxicological data is unavailable for the majority of industrial compounds, High Throughput Screening (HTS) assays using the embryonic and larval zebrafish provide promising approaches to define bioactivity profiles and identify potential adverse outcome pathways for previously understudied chemicals. Unfortunately, standardized approaches, including HTS experimental designs, for examining fish behavioral responses to contaminants are rarely available. In the present study, we examined movement behavior of larval zebrafish over 7 days (4-10 days post fertilization or dpf) during typical daylight workday hours to determine whether intrinsic activity differed with age and time of day. We then employed an early life stage approach using the Fish Embryo Test (FET) at multiple developmental ages to evaluate whether photomotor response (PMR) behavior differed with zebrafish age following exposure to diazinon (DZN), a well-studied orthophosphate insecticide, and diphenhydramine (DPH), an antihistamine that also targets serotonin reuptake transporters and the acetylcholine receptor. 72h studies were conducted at 1-4, 4-7 and 7-10dpf, followed by behavioral observations using a ViewPoint system at 4, 7 and 10dpf. Distance traveled and swimming speeds were quantified; nominal treatment levels were analytically verified by isotope-dilution LC-MSMS. Larval zebrafish locomotion displayed significantly different (p<0.05) activity profiles over the course of typical daylight and workday hours, and these time of day PMR activity profiles were similar across ages examined (4-10dpf). 10dpf zebrafish larvae were consistently more sensitive to DPH than either the 4 or 7dpf larvae with an environmentally realistic lowest observed effect concentration of 200ng/L. Though ELS and FET studies with zebrafish typically focus on mortality or teratogenicity in 0-4dpf organisms, behavioral responses of slightly older fish were several orders of magnitude more sensitive to DPH. Our

  18. The Effect of Age in the Alteration in Fluid Balance of Rats in Response to Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    With an increase in gravity load induced by centrifugation or upon return to Earth following spaceflight, there is a period of adjustment in fluid balance in rats. With centrifugation there is a reduced fluid intake with maintenance of the rate of urine excretion. Following spaceflight there is an increase in urine output and maintenance of fluid intake. The initial period of acclimation to hypergravity is associated with a net loss of fluids. In the present study in response to centrifugation at 2.0 G this period of acclimation is present in mature rats for a longer period of time, about 24 hours. Following this initial response a period of over compensation has previously been reported. In the present study this was not observed. The net effect of these alterations in water intake and output in response to centrifugation for 14 days was slight increase in the percent total body water, with effective compensation seen in both young and mature rats. Older rats have been shown to have a reduced relative thirst and compensatory renal function in response to hypohydration, hyperosmolality and pharmacological stimuli. Responsiveness to these stimuli are delayed and/or attenuated in older animals. Similar findings were noted in the present study in the initial response to centrifugation. The older animal had a delayed return of fluid intake to control levels. The delay of one day did not appear to effect long-term fluid homeostasis, as there was difference in the response of percent total body water at the end of 14 days of centrifugation with both age groups having a slight but significant increase. This increase has been attributed to the increase in lean body mass induced by centrifugation.

  19. Effect of age and gender on sudomotor and cardiovagal function and blood pressure response to tilt in normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Denq, J. C.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Dyck, P. J.; O'Brien, P. C.; Slezak, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Normative data are limited on autonomic function tests, especially beyond age 60 years. We therefore evaluated these tests in a total of 557 normal subjects evenly distributed by age and gender from 10 to 83 years. Heart rate (HR) response to deep breathing fell with increasing age. Valsalva ratio varied with both age and gender. QSART (quantitative sudomotor axon-reflex test) volume was consistently greater in men (approximately double) and progressively declined with age for all three lower extremity sites but not the forearm site. Orthostatic blood pressure reduction was greater with increasing age. HR at rest was significantly higher in women, and the increment with head-up tilt fell with increasing age. For no tests did we find a regression to zero, and some tests seem to level off with increasing age, indicating that diagnosis of autonomic failure was possible to over 80 years of age.

  20. Age-Related Differences in Response to Music-Evoked Emotion among Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, K. G.; Quintin, E. M.; South, M.

    2016-01-01

    While research regarding emotion recognition in ASD has focused primarily on social cues, musical stimuli also elicit strong emotional responses. This study extends and expands the few previous studies of response to music in ASD, measuring both psychophysiological and behavioral responses in younger children (ages 8-11) as well as older…

  1. α-Tocotrienol quinone modulates oxidative stress response and the biochemistry of aging.

    PubMed

    Shrader, William D; Amagata, Akiko; Barnes, Adam; Enns, Gregory M; Hinman, Andrew; Jankowski, Orion; Kheifets, Viktoria; Komatsuzaki, Ryo; Lee, Edgar; Mollard, Paul; Murase, Katsuyuki; Sadun, Alfredo A; Thoolen, Martin; Wesson, Kieron; Miller, Guy

    2011-06-15

    We report that α-tocotrienol quinone (ATQ3) is a metabolite of α-tocotrienol, and that ATQ3 is a potent cellular protectant against oxidative stress and aging. ATQ3 is orally bioavailable, crosses the blood-brain barrier, and has demonstrated clinical response in inherited mitochondrial disease in open label studies. ATQ3 activity is dependent upon reversible 2e-redox-cycling. ATQ3 may represent a broader class of unappreciated dietary-derived phytomolecular redox motifs that digitally encode biochemical data using redox state as a means to sense and transfer information essential for cellular function.

  2. Cylindrical shell buckling through strain hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Xu, J.; Shteyngart, S.; Gupta, D.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the authors published results of plastic buckling analysis of cylindrical shells. Ideal elastic-plastic material behavior was used for the analysis. Subsequently, the buckling analysis program was continued with the realistic stress-strain relationship of a stainless steel alloy which does not exhibit a clear yield point. The plastic buckling analysis was carried out through the initial stages of strain hardening for various internal pressure values. The computer program BOSOR5 was used for this purpose. Results were compared with those obtained from the idealized elastic-plastic relationship using the offset stress level at 0.2% strain as the yield stress. For moderate hoop stress values, the realistic stress-grain case shows a slight reduction of the buckling strength. But, a substantial gain in the buckling strength is observed as the hoop stress approaches the yield strength. Most importantly, the shell retains a residual strength to carry a small amount of axial compressive load even when the hoop stress has exceeded the offset yield strength.

  3. Cyber situational awareness and differential hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Anurag; Tebben, Dan

    2012-06-01

    The advent of cyber threats has created a need for a new network planning, design, architecture, operations, control, situational awareness, management, and maintenance paradigms. Primary considerations include the ability to assess cyber attack resiliency of the network, and rapidly detect, isolate, and operate during deliberate simultaneous attacks against the network nodes and links. Legacy network planning relied on automatic protection of a network in the event of a single fault or a very few simultaneous faults in mesh networks, but in the future it must be augmented to include improved network resiliency and vulnerability awareness to cyber attacks. Ability to design a resilient network requires the development of methods to define, and quantify the network resiliency to attacks, and to be able to develop new optimization strategies for maintaining operations in the midst of these newly emerging cyber threats. Ways to quantify resiliency, and its use in visualizing cyber vulnerability awareness and in identifying node or link criticality, are presented in the current work, as well as a methodology of differential network hardening based on the criticality profile of cyber network components.

  4. Design concepts for hardened communications structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flathau, William J.; Smith, William G.

    1990-03-01

    An important component of any hardened command and control structure is the antenna system that provides communication with the outside world. Two types of antennae were considered; i.e., the whip type and the directional. The whip type is for short range communication and the directional is for use primarily with satellites. In the super high frequency range, the use of directional antennae having parabolic dishes greater than 8 feet in diameter are common. In the very extra high frequency range, dishes that are 2 to 3 feet in diameter are used. The whip type antenna should extend up to, say, 60 feet in the air. Based on this background, a family of structures was designed that can protect whip and directional antennae from the blast and shock effects from a 1-MT device for ground surface overpressure ranging from 15,000 to 500 psi. As the antennae, transmitters, receivers, power supplies, and lifting mechanisms will be located within such structures, appropriate shock spectra plots were developed to determine if the fragility level of pertinent equipment will be exceeded and for use in designing shock isolation systems. Button up periods of 1 and 4 weeks were considered.

  5. Open Source Radiation Hardened by Design Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The proposed technology allows use of the latest microcircuit technology with lowest power and fastest speed, with minimal delay and engineering costs, through new Radiation Hardened by Design (RHBD) techniques that do not require extensive process characterization, technique evaluation and re-design at each Moore's Law generation. The separation of critical node groups is explicitly parameterized so it can be increased as microcircuit technologies shrink. The technology will be open access to radiation tolerant circuit vendors. INNOVATION: This technology would enhance computation intensive applications such as autonomy, robotics, advanced sensor and tracking processes, as well as low power applications such as wireless sensor networks. OUTCOME / RESULTS: 1) Simulation analysis indicates feasibility. 2)Compact voting latch 65 nanometer test chip designed and submitted for fabrication -7/2016. INFUSION FOR SPACE / EARTH: This technology may be used in any digital integrated circuit in which a high level of resistance to Single Event Upsets is desired, and has the greatest benefit outside low earth orbit where cosmic rays are numerous.

  6. Radiation-induced segregation, hardening, and IASCC

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, E.D.; Nelson, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    Intergranular cracking has been discovered after extended radiation exposure in several boiling water reactor (BWR) internal components made of austenitic stainless steel and nickel-based alloys. There are fewer field observations of intergranular cracking in pressurized water reactors (PWR), but failures have occurred in bolts, springs, and fuel cladding. There is concern for other PWR components, some of which will receive greater radiation doses than BWR components during the plant lifetime. This paper presents the results of an investigation on the connection between radiation induced segregation, hardening and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). A data base was developed containing the available data on austenitic stainless steel where the grain boundary composition was measured by Field Emission Gun-Scanning Transmission Election Microscopy (FEG-STEM), the stress corrosion susceptibility was measured by constant extension rate tests (CERT) in light water reactor environments, some estimate of irradiated strength was available and the irradiation was conducted in a power reactor. The data base was analyzed using advanced data analysis techniques, including tree-structured pattern recognition and transformation analysis codes. The most sensitive variables and optimal modeling forms were identified using these techniques, then preliminary models were calibrated using nonlinear least squares. The results suggest that more than one mechanism causes IASCC.

  7. Radiation-hardened microwave communications system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.F.; Crutcher, R.I.; Vandermolen, R.I. )

    1990-01-01

    The consolidated fuel reprocessing program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing signal transmission techniques and equipment to improve the efficiency of remote handling operations for nuclear applications. These efforts have been largely directed toward the goals of (a) remotely controlling bilateral force-reflecting servomanipulators for dexterous manipulation-based operations in remote maintenance tasks and (b) providing television viewing of the work site. In September 1987, developmental microwave transceiving hardware operating with dish antennas was demonstrated in the advanced integrated maintenance system (AIMS) facility at ORNL, successfully implementing both high-quality one-way television transmissions and simultaneous bidirectional digital control data transmissions with very low error rates. Initial test results based on digital transmission at a 1.0-Mbaud data rate indicated that the error rates of the microwave system were comparable to those of a hardwired system. During these test intervals, complex manipulator operations were performed, and the AIMS transporter was moved repeatedly without adverse effects on data integrity. Results of these tests have been factored into subsequent phases of the development program, with an ultimate goal of designing a fully radiation-hardened microwave signal transmission system for use in nuclear facilities.

  8. Work hardening and work conditioning interventions: do they affect disability?

    PubMed

    Lechner, D E

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the research on the effectiveness of work hardening and work conditioning programs. Twelve studies of work hardening and work conditioning programs in the United States and abroad were reviewed. One study produced convincing evidence in a randomized study that a work conditioning program was useful in producing a higher percentage of return to work and an earlier return to work in a group of patients off work for at least 2 months. Another study demonstrated that a work hardening program increased the rate of return to work by 52% in patients off work for greater than 4 months. Most of the other studies reviewed suggested positive results, but more carefully documented, randomized, and controlled studies are needed to support the efficacy of these programs and to determine the optimum and most cost-effective work hardening and work conditioning interventions.

  9. Possible correlation between work-hardening and fatigue-failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kettunen, P. O.; Kocks, U. F.

    1969-01-01

    Conceptual theory proposes that cyclic hardening due to non-uniform strain and stress amplitudes during testing, especially during the initial application of stress to a specimen, may correlate positively with the ultimate strength of the specimen under test.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  11. Dermal Aged and Fetal Fibroblasts Realign in Response to Mechanical Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Christine; Grymes, Rose; Alvarez, Teresa (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Integrins specifically recognize and bind extracellular matrix components, providing physical anchor points and functional setpoints. Focal adhesion complexes, containing integrin and cytoskeletal proteins, are potential mechanoreceptors, poised to distribute applied forces through the cytoskeleton. Pursuing the hypothesis that cells both perceive and respond to external force, we applied a stretch/relaxation regimen to normal human fetal and aged dermal fibroblast monolayers cultured on flexible membranes. The frequency and magnitude of the applied force is precisely controlled by the Flexercell Unit(Trademark). A protocol of stretch (20% elongation of the monolayer) at a frequency of 6 cycles/min caused a progressive change from a randomly distributed pattern of cells to a symmetric, radial distribution with cells aligned parallel to the applied force. We have coined the term 'orienteering' as the process of active alignment of cells in response to applied force. Cytochalasin D was added in graded doses to investigate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in force perception and transmission. A clear dose response was found; at high concentrations orienteering was abolished; and the drug's impact was reversible. The two cell strains used were similar in their alignment behavior and in their responses to cytochalasin D. Orienteering was influenced by cell density, and the cell strains studied differed in this respect. Fetal cells, unlike their aged counterparts, failed to orient at high cell density. In both cell strains, mid-density cultures aligned rapidly and sparse cultures lagged. These results indicate that both cell-cell adhesion and cytoskeleton integrity are critical in mediating the orienteering response. Differences between these two cell strains may relate to their expression of extracellular matrix molecules (fibronectin, collagen type 1) integrins and their relative binding affinities.

  12. Cortisol responses to a group public speaking task for adolescents: variations by age, gender, and race.

    PubMed

    Hostinar, Camelia E; McQuillan, Mollie T; Mirous, Heather J; Grant, Kathryn E; Adam, Emma K

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory social stress tests involving public speaking challenges are widely used for eliciting an acute stress response in older children, adolescents, and adults. Recently, a group protocol for a social stress test (the Trier Social Stress Test for Groups, TSST-G) was shown to be effective in adults and is dramatically less time-consuming and resource-intensive compared to the single-subject version of the task. The present study sought to test the feasibility and effectiveness of an adapted group public speaking task conducted with a racially diverse, urban sample of U.S. adolescents (N=191; 52.4% female) between the ages of 11 and 18 (M=14.4 years, SD=1.93). Analyses revealed that this Group Public Speaking Task for Adolescents (GPST-A) provoked a significant increase in cortisol production (on average, approximately 60% above baseline) and in self-reported negative affect, while at the same time avoiding excessive stress responses that would raise ethical concerns or provoke substantial participant attrition. Approximately 63.4% of participants exhibited an increase in cortisol levels in response to the task, with 59.2% of the total sample showing a 10% or greater increase from baseline. Results also suggested that groups of five adolescents might be ideal for achieving more uniform cortisol responses across various serial positions for speech delivery. Basal cortisol levels increased with age and participants belonging to U.S. national minorities tended to have either lower basal cortisol or diminished cortisol reactivity compared to non-Hispanic Whites. This protocol facilitates the recruitment of larger sample sizes compared to prior research and may show great utility in answering new questions about adolescent stress reactivity and development.

  13. The combination of precipitation and dispersion hardening in powder metallurgy produced Cu-Ti-Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozic, D.; Dimcic, O.; Dimcic, B. Cvijovic, I.; Rajkovic, V.

    2008-08-15

    Microstructure and microhardness properties of precipitation hardened Cu-Ti and precipitation/dispersion hardened Cu-Ti-Si alloys have been analyzed. Cu-1.2Ti and Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} (wt.%) atomized powders were characterized before and after consolidation by HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing). Rapidly solidified powders and HIP-ed compacts were subsequently subjected to thermal treatment in hydrogen at temperatures between 300 and 600 deg. C. Compared to Cu-Ti powder particles and compacts, obtained by the same procedure, the strengthening effect in Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} powder particles and compacts was much greater. The binary and ternary powders both reveal properties superior to those of Cu-1.2Ti and Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} compacts. Microhardness analysis as a function of the aging temperature of Cu-1.2Ti-3TiSi{sub 2} alloy shows an interaction between precipitation and dispersion hardening which offers possibilities for an application at elevated temperatures.

  14. Feasibility of Underwater Friction Stir Welding of Hardenable Alloy Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    bead-on-plate FSW traverses, approximately 64 inches (1.6 m) in total length, on 0.25 inch (6.4 mm) thick plates of a hardenable alloy steel . The...base plate. Based on preliminary findings, FSW of hardenable alloy steel is a feasible process and should be further researched and refined. 15...v ABSTRACT The objective of this thesis is to determine whether friction stir welding ( FSW ) is a feasible welding process for steels in an

  15. Response bias in "remembering" emotional stimuli: a new perspective on age differences.

    PubMed

    Kapucu, Aycan; Rotello, Caren M; Ready, Rebecca E; Seidl, Katharina N

    2008-05-01

    Older adults sometimes show a recall advantage for emotionally positive, rather than neutral or negative, stimuli (S. T. Charles, M. Mather, & L. L. Carstensen, 2003). In contrast, younger adults respond "old" and "remember" more often to negative materials in recognition tests. For younger adults, both effects are due to response bias changes rather than to enhanced memory accuracy (S. Dougal & C. M. Rotello, 2007). We presented older and younger adults with emotional and neutral stimuli in a remember-know paradigm. Signal-detection and model-based analyses showed that memory accuracy did not differ for the neutral, negative, and positive stimuli, and that "remember" responses did not reflect the use of recollection. However, both age groups showed large and significant response bias effects of emotion: Younger adults tended to say "old" and "remember" more often in response to negative words than to positive and neutral words, whereas older adults responded "old" and "remember" more often to both positive and negative words than to neutral stimuli.

  16. Interleukin-15 responses to aging and unloading-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Siu, Parco M; Alway, Stephen E

    2007-04-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) mRNA is constitutively expressed in skeletal muscle. Although IL-15 has proposed hypertrophic and anti-apoptotic roles in vitro, its role in skeletal muscle cells in vivo is less clear. The purpose of this study was to determine if skeletal muscle aging and unloading, two conditions known to promote muscle atrophy, would alter basal IL-15 expression in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that IL-15 mRNA expression would increase as a result of both aging and muscle unloading and that muscle would express the mRNA for a functional trimeric IL-15 receptor (IL-15R). Two models of unloading were used in this study: hindlimb suspension (HS) in rats and wing unloading in quail. The absolute muscle wet weight of plantaris and soleus muscles from aged rats was significantly less when compared with muscles from young adult rats. Although 14 days of HS resulted in reduced muscle mass of plantaris and soleus muscles from young adult animals, this effect was not observed in muscles from aged animals. A significant aging times unloading interaction was observed for IL-15 mRNA in both rat soleus and plantaris muscles. Patagialis (PAT) muscles from aged quail retained a significant 12 and 6% of stretch-induced hypertrophy after 7 and 14 days of unloading, respectively. PAT muscles from young quail retained 15% hypertrophy at 7 days of unloading but regressed to control levels following 14 days of unloading. A main effect of age was observed on IL-15 mRNA expression in PAT muscles at 14 days of overload, 7 days of unloading, and 14 days of unloading. Skeletal muscle also expressed the mRNAs for a functional IL-15R composed of IL-15Ralpha, IL-2/15R-beta, and -gammac. Based on these data, we speculate that increases in IL-15 mRNA in response to atrophic stimuli may be an attempt to counteract muscle mass loss in skeletal muscles of old animals. Additional research is warranted to determine the importance of the IL-15/IL-15R system to counter muscle wasting.

  17. Evaluation of age-dependent response to NMDA receptor antagonism in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2015-04-01

    Imbalances in glutamatergic signaling have been proposed as the cause of several neurological disturbances. The use of MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, to mimic features of these neurological disorders is effective both in mammals and in fish. However, the variability of the subunits comprising the NMDA receptor during development alters the pharmacokinetic properties of the receptor and leads to different responses to this drug. Here, we evaluated the locomotor response of zebrafish to MK-801 (1, 5, and 20 μM) through the development (30 days postfertilization [dpf] to 2 years postfertilization [ypf]). The NMDA receptor subunit gene expression was also analyzed through the development (7 dpf to 2 ypf). Zebrafish displayed an age-related response to MK-801 with a higher response at 60 and 120 dpf. The magnitude of hyperlocomotion promoted by MK-801 seems to be less powerful for zebrafish in relation to rodents. The verification of expression levels in zebrafish NMDA receptor subunits shows that NR1.1 had a slight reduction throughout the development, while the NR2 subunits, especially NR2A.2 and NR2C.1, vary their expression levels according to the stage of development. The time-specific locomotor response to MK-801 through the development could be a consequence of differential NMDA receptor subunit expression. This result of developmental response to MK-801 is a crucial component in the consolidation of zebrafish as a suitable model to study glutamatergic neurotransmission in early phases.

  18. Age-related declines in immune response in a wild mammal are unrelated to immune cell telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Laura; McDonald, Robbie A.; Delahay, Richard; Young, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Senescence has been hypothesized to arise in part from age-related declines in immune performance, but the patterns and drivers of within-individual age-related changes in immunity remain virtually unexplored in natural populations. Here, using a long-term epidemiological study of wild European badgers (Meles meles), we (i) present evidence of a within-individual age-related decline in the response of a key immune-signalling cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNγ), to ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation, and (ii) investigate three putative drivers of individual variation in the rate of this decline (sex, disease and immune cell telomere length; ICTL). That the within-individual rate of age-related decline markedly exceeded that at the population level suggests that individuals with weaker IFNγ responses are selectively lost from this population. IFNγ responses appeared to decrease with the progression of bovine tuberculosis infection (independent of age) and were weaker among males than females. However, neither sex nor disease influenced the rate of age-related decline in IFNγ response. Similarly, while ICTL also declines with age, variation in ICTL predicted neither among- nor within-individual variation in IFNγ response. Our findings provide evidence of within-individual age-related declines in immune performance in a wild mammal and highlight the likely complexity of the mechanisms that generate them. PMID:26888036

  19. Age-related declines in immune response in a wild mammal are unrelated to immune cell telomere length.

    PubMed

    Beirne, Christopher; Waring, Laura; McDonald, Robbie A; Delahay, Richard; Young, Andrew

    2016-02-24

    Senescence has been hypothesized to arise in part from age-related declines in immune performance, but the patterns and drivers of within-individual age-related changes in immunity remain virtually unexplored in natural populations. Here, using a long-term epidemiological study of wild European badgers (Meles meles), we (i) present evidence of a within-individual age-related decline in the response of a key immune-signalling cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNγ), to ex vivo lymphocyte stimulation, and (ii) investigate three putative drivers of individual variation in the rate of this decline (sex, disease and immune cell telomere length; ICTL). That the within-individual rate of age-related decline markedly exceeded that at the population level suggests that individuals with weaker IFNγ responses are selectively lost from this population. IFNγ responses appeared to decrease with the progression of bovine tuberculosis infection (independent of age) and were weaker among males than females. However, neither sex nor disease influenced the rate of age-related decline in IFNγ response. Similarly, while ICTL also declines with age, variation in ICTL predicted neither among- nor within-individual variation in IFNγ response. Our findings provide evidence of within-individual age-related declines in immune performance in a wild mammal and highlight the likely complexity of the mechanisms that generate them.

  20. Aging-dependent changes in the effect of daily melatonin supplementation on rat metabolic and behavioral responses.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, D D; Mitton, D R; Larsen, S A; Yellon, S M

    2001-08-01

    Pineal melatonin secretion has been reported to commonly decrease with aging, whereas intra-abdominal adiposity, plasma insulin and plasma leptin levels tend to increase. We recently demonstrated that daily melatonin administration starting at middle age suppressed male rat intra-abdominal fat, plasma leptin and plasma insulin to youthful levels, suggesting that aging-related changes in pineal melatonin secretion and in energy regulation may be functionally related. Accordingly, we have now investigated the effects of daily melatonin treatment on energy regulation in young versus middle-aged male Sprague Dawley rats. Addition of melatonin to the drinking water (0.2 microg/mL) produced nocturnal and diurnal plasma melatonin concentrations in middle-aged rats (12 months) equivalent to those of young adult (5 months) rats. Administration of this melatonin dosage every day for 10 wk starting at 10 months of age suppressed (P < 0.01) relative intra-abdominal fat, non-fasted plasma insulin and plasma leptin by 27, 39, and 51%, respectively (vs. vehicle-treated controls). In contrast, administration of melatonin for 10 wk starting at 3 months of age did not significantly alter (P> 0.10) any of these parameters. The melatonin administration stimulated (102%, P < 0.001) behavioral responsiveness of the middle-aged rats in a test of response to novelty, restoring youthful levels, but did not significantly alter behavioral responsiveness of the young rats. These results suggest that suppression of intra-abdominal adiposity and plasma leptin and insulin levels and stimulation of behavioral responsiveness in response to daily exogenous melatonin begins at middle age, coincident with and likely dependent upon the aging-associated decline in endogenous pineal melatonin secretion. These results further suggest that appropriate melatonin supplementation may potentially provide therapy or prophylaxis not only for the insulin resistance, increased intra-abdominal fat and resulting

  1. Analytical considerations of beam hardening in medical accelerator photon spectra.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, C

    1999-09-01

    Beam hardening is a well-known phenomenon for therapeutic accelerator beams passing through matter in narrow beam geometry. This study assesses quantitatively the magnitude of beam hardening of therapeutic beams in water. A formal concept of beam hardening is proposed which is based on the decrease of the mean attenuation coefficient with depth. On the basis of this concept calculations of beam hardening effects are easily performed by means of a commercial spreadsheet program. Published accelerator spectra and the tabulated values of attenuation coefficients serve as input for these calculations. It is shown that the mean attenuation coefficient starts at depth zero with an almost linear decrease and then slowly levels off to a limit value. A similar behavior is found for the beam hardening coefficient. A physically reasonable, semianalytical model is given which fits the data better than previously published functions. The energy dependence of the initial attenuation coefficient is evaluated and shown. It fits well to published experimental data. The initial beam hardening coefficient, however, shows no energy dependence. Its mean value (eta0) approximately 0.006 cm(-1)) is also in close agreement to the measured data.

  2. A study of latent hardening behavior in aluminum single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Mingzhang; Lin Shi; Li Chenghua; Xiao Jimei; Wang Zhongguang

    1996-11-15

    In order to obtain a better understanding or a complete description of plastic properties of polycrystals, especially in polycrystal modelling viewpoint, investigations on latent hardening behavior of single crystals have been performed in a great number. Recently, however, Wu et al. have pointed out that the definition of the yield stress of latent system using the conventional back extrapolation is ambiguous in terms of determining the latent hardening moduli because the initial rapid work-hardening of the transient zone is neglected. They proposed a more precise measure of the yield stress of latent system based on the decrease of the tangent modulus from the linear elastic modulus, and showed that the latent hardening, which would not plus the initial work-hardening of the transient zone, is actually lower than that obtained from the backward extrapolation. Thus, in their opinion, it is considered that the hardening behavior of latent system (such as the directionality, the effects of relative orientation and prestrain) need be newly or further studied in detail. Single crystals of aluminum have been grown with high purity to investigate this behavior.

  3. Low temperature catalytic oxidative aging of LDPE films in response to heat excitation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xuegang; Zhang, Sizhao; Ding, Feng; Lin, Xiaoyan

    2015-09-14

    The waste treatment of polymer materials is often conducted using the photocatalytic technique; however, complete decomposition is frequently inhibited owing to several shortcomings such as low quantum yield and the requirement of ultraviolet irradiation. Herein, we report a strategy to implement moderate management of polymeric films via thermocatalytic oxidative route, which is responsive to heat stimulus. Diverse LDPE-matrix films together with as-prepared thermal catalysts (TCs) or initiators were synthesized to further investigate heat-dependent-catalytic degradation effects. After artificial ageing, structural textures of the as-synthesized films could be chemically deteriorated, followed by a huge increase in surface roughness values, and appreciable loss was also found in the average molecular weights and mechanical parameters. We found an emergent phenomenon in which crystallization closely resembled two-dimensional (2D) growth, which displayed rod-like or disc-type crystal shapes. New chemical groups generated on film surfaces were monitored, and led to a higher limiting oxygen index because of strong catalytic oxidation, thus demonstrating the success of catalytic oxidative ageing by heat actuation. The underlying mechanism responsible for thermocatalytic oxidative pattern is also discussed. Accordingly, these findings may have important implications for better understanding the development of polymeric-matrix waste disposal.

  4. Macrophage Response to UHMWPE Submitted to Accelerated Ageing in Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Magda F G; Mansur, Alexandra A P; Martins, Camila P S; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel F; Mansur, Herman S

    2010-06-10

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been the most commonly used bearing material in total joint arthroplasty. Wear and oxidation fatigue resistance of UHMWPE are regarded as two important properties to extend the longevity of knee prostheses. The present study investigated the accelerated ageing of UHMWPE in hydrogen peroxide highly oxidative chemical environment. The sliced samples of UHMWPE were oxidized in a hydrogen peroxide solution for 120 days with their total level of oxidation (Iox) characterized by Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The potential inflammatory response, cell viability and biocompatibility of such oxidized UHMWPE systems were assessed by a novel biological in vitro assay based on the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) by activated murine macrophages with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) cytokine and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Furthermore, macrophage morphologies in contact with UHMWPE oxidized surfaces were analyzed by cell spreading-adhesion procedure using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results have given significant evidence that the longer the period of accelerated aging of UHMWPE the higher was the macrophage inflammatory equivalent response based on NO secretion analysis.

  5. Effects of negative ageing on deformation and strength response of geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, M.; Towhata, I.; Yamada, S.; Qureshi, M. U.; Kawano, K.

    2009-04-01

    Negative ageing or decay of grains with time is often ignored in conventional geotechnical investigations. Geology is always vital in such a scenario but the micro-scale geotechnical point of concern is the time-dependent loss of strength and deformation characteristics. This paper presents unique data from torsional shear tests on crushed soft rocks from Yokosuka, Japan and 2005-Kashmir earthquake hit areas of Pakistan. Material being sensitive to disintegrate by water-action allowed to simulate the long-term stress-strain and volume change response under saturated conditions whereas dry tests on similar soil represent initial intact response of the material. Negative ageing is manipulated by an enormous decrease in shear strength parameters, changes in grain size curve and increase in volumetric compression. It is concluded that for long-term hazard evaluation of various geotechnical structures, the effects of loss of strength due to decay of grains with time should be incorporated in conventional analysis and design models.

  6. Aging enhances liver fibrotic response in mice through hampering extracellular matrix remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Delire, Bénédicte; Lebrun, Valérie; Selvais, Charlotte; Henriet, Patrick; Bertrand, Amélie; Horsmans, Yves; Leclercq, Isabelle A.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical data identify age as a factor for severe liver fibrosis. We evaluate whether and how aging modulates the fibrotic response in a mouse model. Liver fibrosis was induced by CCl4 injections (thrice weekly for 2 weeks) in 7 weeks- and 15 months-old mice (young and old, respectively). Livers were analyzed for fibrosis, inflammation and remodeling 48 and 96 hours after the last injection. Old mice developed more severe fibrosis compared to young ones as evaluated by sirius red morphometry. Expression of pro-fibrogenic genes was equally induced in the two age-groups but enhanced fibrolysis in young mice was demonstrated by a significantly higher Mmp13 induction and collagenase activity. While fibrosis resolution occurred in young mice within 96 hours, no significant fibrosis attenuation was observed in old mice. Although recruitment of monocytes-derived macrophages was similar in young and old livers, young macrophages had globally a remodeling phenotype while old ones, a pro-fibrogenic phenotype. Moreover, we observed a higher proportion of thick fibers and enhanced expression of enzymes involved in collagen maturation in old mice. Conclusion Impaired fibrolysis of a matrix less prone to remodeling associated with a pro-inflammatory phenotype of infiltrated macrophages contribute to a more severe fibrosis in old mice. PMID:27941216

  7. Effects of age and sex on hormonal responses to weightlessness simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larochelle, F.; Leach, C.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of horizontal bedrest on the excretion of catecholamines, aldosterone, and cortisol by human subjects grouped by age and sex are examined. The responses are assessed by assays of 24-hr urine samples collected throughout the studies. In 36-45-yr-olds, the excretion of epinephrine increases, whereas it decreases in the 46-55- and 56-65-yr-old groups. Norepinephrine excretion decreases (5-27%) in all groups during bedrest. Aldosterone excretion increases in the younger two groups of both males (19 and 6%) and females (47 and 9%). A slight decrease is observed in 56-65-yr-old males (6%), whereas excretion in females is unchanged. Cortisol excretion increases in the youngest groups of both men (12%) and women (13%) but decreases in the 56-65-yr-old groups (6 and 5%). For the two groups of intermediate age (46-55 yr), excretion in females decreases (15%), whereas in males it increases (19%). It is believed that hormone measurements may be of value in explaining variation in stress tolerance due to age and/or sex during space flight.

  8. Age-related decline in the responsiveness of motor cortex to plastic forces reverses with levodopa or cerebellar stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Asha; Popa, Traian; James, Praveen; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Backer, Febina; Varughese Chacko, Lijo; Govind, Preetha; Pradeep, Salini; Meunier, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    The plasticity of motor cortex is integral for motor memory and skills acquisition but it declines with aging. Forty healthy volunteers, across 6 decades, were tested to examine the (a) age-dependency of motor cortex responsiveness to plasticity induction, as measured from the response to paired associative stimulation (PAS) and the (b) effect of aging on the cerebellar modulation of motor cortex response to PAS. We examined if reduced dopaminergic transmission was involved in the age-related decline of response to PAS by retesting 10 of the older subjects after a single dose of levodopa. There was a substantial decline in the motor cortex response to PAS with aging, which was restored by levodopa in the older subjects. The cerebellar modulation of motor cortex response to PAS was less vulnerable to aging and a single session of cerebellar inhibition reinstated the cortical responsiveness in older subjects. Both levodopa and cerebellar inhibition can be tested for their ability to enhance motor skills acquisition and motor performance in the elderly individuals.

  9. Aging alters muscle reflex control of autonomic cardiovascular responses to rhythmic contractions in humans.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Venturelli, Massimo; Rossman, Matthew J; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bledsoe, Amber D; Richardson, Russell S; Amann, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the influence of aging on the group III/IV muscle afferents in the exercise pressor reflex-mediated cardiovascular response to rhythmic exercise. Nine old (OLD; 68 ± 2 yr) and nine young (YNG; 24 ± 2 yr) males performed single-leg knee extensor exercise (15 W, 30 W, 80% max) under control conditions and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing feedback from group III/IV leg muscle afferents. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output, leg blood flow (QL), systemic (SVC) and leg vascular conductance (LVC) were continuously determined. With no hemodynamic effect at rest, fentanyl blockade during exercise attenuated both cardiac output and QL ∼17% in YNG, while the decrease in cardiac output in OLD (∼5%) was significantly smaller with no impact on QL (P = 0.8). Therefore, in the face of similar significant ∼7% reduction in MAP during exercise with fentanyl blockade in both groups, LVC significantly increased ∼11% in OLD, but decreased ∼8% in YNG. The opposing direction of change was reflected in SVC with a significant ∼5% increase in OLD and a ∼12% decrease in YNG. Thus while cardiac output seems to account for the majority of group III/IV-mediated MAP responses in YNG, the impact of neural feedback on the heart may decrease with age and alterations in SVC become more prominent in mediating the similar exercise pressor reflex in OLD. Interestingly, in terms of peripheral hemodynamics, while group III/IV-mediated feedback plays a clear role in increasing LVC during exercise in the YNG, these afferents seem to actually reduce LVC in OLD. These peripheral findings may help explain the limited exercise-induced peripheral vasodilation often associated with aging.

  10. The metabolic response to postnatal leptin in rats varies with age and may be litter dependent.

    PubMed

    Granado, M; Diaz, F; Fuente-Martín, E; García-Cáceres, C; Argente, J; Chowen, J A

    2014-06-01

    Hyperleptinemia during postnatal life induces long-term effects on metabolism. However, these effects are controversial as both increased and decreased propensity towards obesity has been reported. To further analyze the effects of chronic neonatal hyperleptinemia on the subsequent metabolic profile, male Wistar rats proceeding from 18 different litters (8 pups/litter) received a daily subcutaneous injection of either saline (10 ml/kg, n=36) or leptin (3 μg/g, n=36) from postnatal day (PND) 2 to PND9. Rats were sacrificed at 10, 40, or 150 days of age. At 10 days of age, leptin treated rats had decreased body weight (p<0.001) and body fat (p<0.05). Leptin levels and glycemia were increased (p<0.01), whereas insulin, total lipids, triglycerides and glycerol levels were decreased (p<0.05). At PND40 rats receiving leptin had increased glycemia (p<0.01) and plasma HDL and LDL levels, but decreased total lipids (p<0.05). At PND150 neonatal leptin treatment induced different effects in rats raised in different litters. Rats from litter 1 had increased body weight (p<0.05), body fat (p<0.01), and plasma leptin (p<0.001), cholesterol (p<0.001), triglyceride (p<0.001), total lipid (p<0.001), LDL (p<0.05), and glycerol (p<0.001) levels. In rats from litter 2 these parameters did not differ from controls. Rats from litter 3 had decreased body weight (p<0.05), visceral fat (p<0.01) and plasma leptin (p<0.001), cholesterol (p<0.001), triglyceride (p<0.001), glycerol (p<0.001), and HDL (p<0.001) levels. In conclusion, the metabolic response to postnatal leptin varies with age, with the response in adulthood being variable and most likely influenced by other factors, including the genetic make-up.

  11. Topical Estrogen Accelerates Cutaneous Wound Healing in Aged Humans Associated with an Altered Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, Gillian S.; Greenwell-Wild, Teresa; Horan, Michael A.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Ferguson, Mark W. J.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of intrinsic aging on the cutaneous wound healing process are profound, and the resulting acute and chronic wound morbidity imposes a substantial burden on health services. We have investigated the effects of topical estrogen on cutaneous wound healing in healthy elderly men and women, and related these effects to the inflammatory response and local elastase levels, an enzyme known to be up-regulated in impaired wound healing states. Eighteen health status-defined females (mean age, 74.4 years) and eighteen males (mean age, 70.7 years) were randomized in a double-blind study to either active estrogen patch or identical placebo patch attached for 24 hours to the upper inner arm, through which two 4-mm punch biopsies were made. The wounds were excised at either day 7 or day 80 post-wounding. Compared to placebo, estrogen treatment increased the extent of wound healing in both males and females with a decrease in wound size at day 7, increased collagen levels at both days 7 and 80, and increased day 7 fibronectin levels. In addition, estrogen enhanced the strength of day 80 wounds. Estrogen treatment was associated with a decrease in wound elastase levels secondary to reduced neutrophil numbers, and decreased fibronectin degradation. In vitro studies using isolated human neutrophils indicate that one mechanism underlying the altered inflammatory response involves both a direct inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis by estrogen and an altered expression of neutrophil adhesion molecules. These data demonstrate that delays in wound healing in the elderly can be significantly diminished by topical estrogen in both male and female subjects. PMID:10514397

  12. Contribution of β' and β precipitates to hardening in as-solutionized Ag-20Pd-12Au-14.5Cu alloys for dental prosthesis applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghwan; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Hieda, Junko; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Fukui, Hisao

    2014-04-01

    Dental Ag-20Pd-12Au-14.5Cu alloys exhibit a unique hardening behavior, which the mechanical strengths enhance significantly which enhances the mechanical strength significantly after high-temperature (1123K) solution treatment without aging treatment. The mechanism of the unique hardening is not clear. The contribution of two precipitates (β' and β phases) to the unique hardening behavior in the as-solutionized Ag-20Pd-12Au-14.5Cu alloys was investigated. In addition, the chemical composition of the β' phase was investigated. The fine β' phase densely precipitates in a matrix. The β' phase (semi-coherent precipitate), which causes lattice strain, contributes greatly to the unique hardening behavior. On the other hand, the coarse β phase sparsely precipitates in the matrix. The contribution of the β phase (incoherent precipitate), which does not cause lattice strain, is small. The chemical composition of the β' phase was determined. This study reveals that the fine β' phase precipitated by high-temperature solution treatment leads to the unique hardening behavior in dental Ag-20Pd-12Au-14.5Cu alloys in the viewpoints of the lattice strain contrast and interface coherency. It is expected to make the heat treatment process more practical for hardening. The determined chemical composition of β' phase would be helpful to study an unknown formation process of β' phase.

  13. Cyclic Hardening Behaviors and Reduction in Fatigue Life of Type 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel in 310 deg. C Low Oxygen-Containing Water

    SciTech Connect

    Hyunchul Cho; Byoung Koo Kim; Changheuil Jang; In Sup Kim; Seung Mo Hong

    2006-07-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests were conducted to investigate the cyclic behavior and the fatigue life of type 316LN stainless steel (SS) at various strain rates in 310 deg. C low oxygen-containing water. The strain rates were 0.008, 0.04, and 0.4%/s, and the applied strain amplitude was varied from 0.4 to 1.0%. The dissolved oxygen concentration of the test water was maintained below 1 ppb. The test material in 310 deg. C low oxygen-containing water experienced a primary hardening, followed by a softening. From our data, we confirm the occurrence of the dynamic strain aging (DSA), and finally it can be considered that the primary hardening was brought about by the DSA. The secondary hardening was observed distinctly for 0.4%/s and 0.4%. The improvement of fatigue resistance and the secondary hardening occurred under the same loading condition. Therefore, the improvement of fatigue resistance may be related to the occurrence of the secondary hardening. When the secondary hardening occurs, intense slip bands are replaced by the corduroy structure. The corduroy structure can induce retardation of crack initiation, and ultimately the fatigue resistance is improved. Comparative study between the fatigue life generated in the current study and some prediction models was performed to evaluate the reliability of our data. (authors)

  14. Sea-level responses to sediment transport over the last ice age cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, K.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2013-12-01

    Sea-level changes over the last ice age cycle were instrumental in steering Earth's topographic evolution. These sea-level variations were driven by changes in surface mass loads, including not only ice and ocean mass variations but also the transfer of rock from eroding mountains to sedimentary deposits. Here we use an extended numerical model of ice age sea level (Dalca et al., 2013) to explore how sediment erosion and deposition affected global sea-level variations over the last ice age cycle. The model takes histories of ice and sediment loads as inputs, and it computes gravitationally self-consistent sea level responses by accounting for the deformational, gravitational, and rotational perturbations in the Earth's viscoelastic form. In these model simulations, we use published estimates of erosion rates, sedimentation rates, and ice sheet variations to constrain sediment and ice loading since the Last Interglacial. We explore sea-level responses to several erosional and depositional scenarios, and in each we quantify the relative contributions of crustal deformation and gravitational perturbation to the computed sea-level change. We also present a case study to illustrate the effects that sediment transfer can have on sea level at the regional scale. In particular, we focus on the region surrounding the Indus River, where fluvial sediment fluxes are among the highest on Earth. Preliminary model results suggest that sediment fluxes from Asia to the ocean are large enough to produce a significant response in sea level along the northeastern coast of the Arabian Sea. Moreover, they suggest that modeled sea-level histories are sensitive to the timing and spatial distribution of sediment erosion and deposition. For instance, sediment deposition along the continental shelf - which may have been the primary site of Indus River sediment deposition during the Holocene - produces a different sea-level response than sediment deposition on the deep-sea Indus Fan, where

  15. Hardening by bubbles in He-implanted Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J. A.; Follstaedt, D. M.; Myers, S. M.

    2008-01-01

    Detailed finite-element modeling of nanoindentation data is used to obtain the mechanical properties of Ni implanted with 1-10 at. % He. The mechanical properties of this material elucidate the fundamental materials science of dislocation pinning by nanometer-size gas bubbles and also have implications for radiation damage of materials. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy showed that implantation of 1-5 at. % He at room temperature or at 200 deg. C produced a highly damaged layer extending to a depth of 700-800 nm and containing a fine dispersion of He bubbles with diameters of 1.1{+-}0.2 nm. Implantation at 500 deg. C enlarged the bubble sizes. By fitting the nanoindentation data with a finite-element model that includes the responses of both the implanted layer and the unimplanted substrate in the deformation, the Ni(He) layers are shown to have hardnesses as much as approximately seven times that of untreated Ni, up to 8.3{+-}0.6 GPa. Examination of the dependence of yield strength on He concentration, bubble size, and bubble density reveals that an Orowan hardening mechanism is likely to be in operation, indicating that the bubbles pin dislocation motion as strongly as hard second-phase precipitates do. This strong pinning of dislocations by bubbles is also supported by our numerical simulations, which show that substantial applied shear stress is required to move a dislocation through an empty cavity.

  16. Predictors of anti-VEGF treatment response in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Finger, Robert P; Wickremasinghe, Sanjeewa S; Baird, Paul N; Guymer, Robyn H

    2014-01-01

    Currently available evidence on predictors of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment response in neovascular age-related macular degeneration was reviewed. No meta-analysis of results is possible because of a lack of controlled and randomized trials, varying treatment regimes and outcome measures used, as well as suboptimal reporting. For genetic factors, most evidence to date has been generated for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the complement factor H (CFH), and VEGF-A genes. Just under half of the SNPs assessed in the CFH gene and 15% of the SNPs assessed in the VEGF gene were found to be associated with visual outcomes or the number of injections required during follow-up. Some evidence suggests association of worse treatment outcomes as well as a younger age at treatment onset with an increasing number of risk alleles in known risk genes (CFH and ARMS2/HTRA1) and polymorphisms in the VEGF-A gene. Clinical factors such as higher age, a better visual acuity (VA), a larger choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesion at baseline, and a delay between symptom onset and initiation of treatment of more than 3 weeks also impact outcomes. Conversely, a worse acuity at baseline predicted more gain in vision. Overall, patients presenting with good acuity at baseline were more likely to have good VA at follow up, but the gain afforded by treatment was impacted by a ceiling effect. Most available evidence suggests a strong association of clinical factors such as age, baseline VA, and CNV lesion size with anti-VEGF treatment outcomes. No behavioral factors such as smoking influence treatment outcomes. Based on the studies conducted so far, the evidence suggests that underlying genotype of known AMD risk associated genes or of the VEGF-A gene have a limited effect, whereas presenting clinical factors appear to be more important in determining treatment outcomes.

  17. Rapid cold hardening and expression of heat shock protein genes in the B-biotype Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihong; Lei, Zhongren; Li, Xue; Oetting, Ronald D

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes the rapid cold hardening processes of the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). It was found that all developmental stages of B. tabaci have the capacity of rapid cold hardening and the length of time required to induce maximal cold hardiness at 0 °C varies with stage. There was only 18.3% survival when adult whiteflies were transferred directly from 26 °C to -8.5 °C for 2 h. However, exposure to 0 °C for 1 h before transfer to -8.5 °C increased the survival to 81.2%. The whiteflies show "prefreeze" mortality when they were exposed to temperatures above the supercooling point (SCP), although the range of SCP of whiteflies is -26 °C to -29 °C. The rapid cold hardening had no effect on SCP and reduced the lower lethal temperature of adults from -9 °C to -11 °C. Rapid cold-hardened adults had a similar lifespan as the control group but deposited fewer eggs than nonhardened individuals. The expression profiles during cold hardening and recovery from this process revealed that HSP90 did not respond to cold stress. However, HSP70 and HSP20 were significantly induced by cold with different temporal expression patterns. These results suggest that the rapid cold hardening response is possibly advantageous to whiteflies that are often exposed to drastic temperature fluctuations in spring or autumn in northern China, and the expression of HSP70 and HSP20 may be associated with the cold tolerance of B. tabaci.

  18. Attenuated cerebral vasodilatory capacity in response to hypercapnia in college-aged African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hurr, Chansol; Kim, Kiyoung; Harrison, Michelle L; Brothers, R Matthew

    2015-01-01

    African Americans (AAs) have increased risk for cardiovascular, cerebral vascular and metabolic disease, including hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes, relative to Caucasian Americans (CAs). While it is accepted that endothelial function is impaired in AAs, less is known regarding their cerebral vasodilatory capacity in response to hypercapnia. We hypothesized that AAs have a reduction in the total range of change in cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) measured in the middle cerebral artery and an index of cerebral vascular conductance (CVCI) in response to changes in the partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide () during rebreathing-induced hypercapnia when compared with CAs. Twenty-one healthy, college-aged AA (10 male) and 21 age- and sex-matched CA (10 male) subjects participated in this study. A four-parameter logistic regression was used for curve fitting the responses of CBFV and CVCI relative to changes in . The total ranges of change in CBFV (101 ± 18 versus 69 ± 23%; P < 0.001) and CVCI (83 ± 21 versus 58 ± 21%; P < 0.001) as well as the maximal increase in CBFV (205 ± 24 versus 169 ± 24%; P < 0.001) and CVCI (188 ± 30 versus 154 ± 19%; P < 0.001) were reduced during hypercapnia in AAs relative to CAs despite a similar increase in (change, 15 ± 3 versus 15 ± 3 mmHg; P = 0.65). In conclusion, these data indicate that AAs have attenuated cerebral vascular capacity to respond to hypercapnia when compared with CAs. PMID:25557729

  19. Is Animal Age a Factor In the Response of Bone to Spaceflight?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, E. R.; Garetto, L. P.; Doty, S. B.; Halloran, B. P.; Turner, R. T.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The rodent bone response to spaceflight may be influenced by a multitude of actors including flight duration, strain, and housing. Review of bone formation rates during spaceflight suggests that age may also play a role in the response. Weanling rats show fewer bone changes than older rats. To determine if the long bones of weanling rats were insensitive to weight-bearing, a hindlimb unloading experiment was conducted simultaneously with a 9d shuttle flight in 34d old group-housed male rats. All animals were injected with bone markers 7d and 1d before flight and euthanized at landing, 24hr, and 72hr following recovery. If no differences in body weight, bone length, or bone formation at the tibiofibular junction were noted at the different time points, data were combined for each group. No significant differences in body weight were found at any time period among the groups. The humerus, tibia, and femur elongated significantly during the flight period with no difference in lengths between groups at the end of the flight period. The group-housed flight rats showed no change in cortical bone formation rate compared to preflight values, flight controls, or vivarium controls. However, the hindlimb unloading group showed a significant 30% decrease in bone formation rate compared to all other groups. Individually-housed 38d old animals flown for 14d showed approx. 10% suppression of cortical growth. We speculate that the mechanical threshold required for cross-sectional bone growth is reached in group-house weanling rats during spaceflight, perhaps, through physical interactions, and that the weanling animals are sensitive to loading. However, the threshold is not fully reached in either singly-housed flight or hindlimb unloaded weanling rats. Older singly-housed flight animals appear to show equal or greater bone changes compared to hindlimb unloaded rats. We conclude that age, flight duration, strain, and housing have important roles in rodent skeletal responses to

  20. Zinc coated sheet steel for press hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Zahra N.

    Galvanized steels are of interest to enhance corrosion resistance of press-hardened steels, but concerns related to liquid metal embrittlement have been raised. The objective of this study was to assess the soak time and temperature conditions relevant to the hot-stamping process during which Zn penetration did or did not occur in galvanized 22MnB5 press-hardening steel. A GleebleRTM 3500 was used to heat treat samples using hold times and temperatures similar to those used in industrial hot-stamping. Deformation at both elevated temperature and room temperature were conducted to assess the coating and substrate behavior related to forming (at high temperature) and service (at room temperature). The extent of alloying between the coating and substrate was assessed on undeformed samples heat treated under similar conditions to the deformed samples. The coating transitioned from an α + Gamma1 composition to an α (bcc Fe-Zn) phase with increased soak time. This transition likely corresponded to a decrease in availability of Zn-rich liquid in the coating during elevated temperature deformation. Penetration of Zn into the substrate sheet in the undeformed condition was not observed for any of the processing conditions examined. The number and depth of cracks in the coating and substrate steel was also measured in the hot-ductility samples. The number of cracks appeared to increase, while the depth of cracks appeared to decrease, with increasing soak time and increasing soak temperature. The crack depth appeared to be minimized in the sample soaked at the highest soak temperature (900 °C) for intermediate and extended soak times (300 s or 600 s). Zn penetration into the substrate steel was observed in the hot-ductility samples soaked at each hold temperature for the shortest soak time (10 s) before being deformed at elevated temperature. Reduction of area and elongation measurements showed that the coated sample soaked at the highest temperature and longest soak time

  1. Impact of mild temperature hardening on thermotolerance, fecundity, and Hsp gene expression in Liriomyza huidobrensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Hua; Chen, Bing; Kang, Le

    2007-12-01

    The pea leafminer, Liriomyza huidobrensis, is one of the most important economic insect pests around the world. Its population fluctuates greatly with seasonal change in China, and temperature was thought to be one of the important reasons. In attempt to further explore the impact of disadvantageous temperature on L. huidobrensis, 1-day-old adults were shocked at various temperatures (10, 25, 32, and 35 degrees C, respectively) for 4h, and the effects on thermotolerance, feeding, and fecundity were studied. Meanwhile the expression of five heat shock genes (hsp90, 70, 60, 40, and 20) was examined by real-time quantitative PCR. Our results showed that both 32 and 35 degrees C hardenings remarkably increased adult heat resistance, whereas cold tolerance was not improved accordingly. No cross resistance in response to cold and heat stresses was observed. Both adult feeding and fecundity were dramatically reduced, but no effect was observed on egg hatching, larval survival, pupal eclosion, or sex ratio. The results indicate that the deleterious effect on fecundity is the result of direct cessation of oviposition during the period of stress. Simultaneously, the mRNA levels of hsp70 and hsp20 significantly increased upon thermal hardening. Taken together, our results suggest that mild heat hardening improves thermotolerance of L. huidobrensis at the cost of impairment on fecundity, and the induced expression of hsp70 and hsp20 may play an important role in balancing the functional tradeoff.

  2. Age-Related Effects on Memory for Social Stimuli: The Role of Valence, Arousal, and Emotional Responses.

    PubMed

    Hess, Thomas M; Popham, Lauren E; Growney, Claire M

    2017-01-01

    Background/Study Context: Previous research (Hess et al., 2013, Psychology and Aging, 28, 853-863) suggested that age-based positivity effects in memory were attenuated with social stimuli. This research examined the degree to which this generalized across arousal levels associated with social images. Variations in approach and avoidance responses to individual images were also examined, along with age differences in their relationship to memory performance.

  3. Strain Hardening and Strain Softening of Reversibly Cross-linked Supramolecular Polymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Donghua; Craig, Stephen L

    2011-09-27

    The large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior of metallo-supramolecular polymer networks formed by adding bis-Pd(II) cross-linkers to poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution is reported. The influence of scanning frequency, dissociation rate of cross-linkers, concentration of cross-linkers, and concentration of PVP solution on the large amplitude oscillatory shear behavior is explored. In semidilute unentangled PVP solutions, above a critical scanning frequency, strain hardening of both storage moduli and loss moduli is observed. In the semidilute entangled regime of PVP solution, however, strain softening is observed for samples with faster cross-linkers (k(d) ∼ 1450 s(-1)), whereas strain hardening is observed for samples with slower cross-linkers (k(d) ∼ 17 s(-1)). The mechanism of strain hardening is attributed primarily to a strain-induced increase in the number of elastically active chains, with possible contributions from non-Gaussian stretching of polymer chains at strains approaching network fracture. The divergent strain softening of samples with faster cross-linkers in semidilute entangled PVP solutions, relative to the strain hardening of samples with slower cross-linkers, is consistent with observed shear thinning/shear thickening behavior reported previously and is attributed to the fact that the average time that a cross-linker remains detached is too short to permit the local relaxation of polymer chain segments that is necessary for a net conversion of elastically inactive to elastically active cross-linkers. These and other observations paint a picture in which strain softening and shear thinning arise from the same set of molecular mechanisms, conceptually uniting the two nonlinear responses for this system.

  4. Sensitivity of polycrystal [local] plasticity to slip system kinematic hardening laws for Al 7075-T6

    DOE PAGES

    Hennessey, Conor; Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2017-01-22

    The prediction of formation and early growth of microstructurally small fatigue cracks requires use of constitutive models that accurately estimate local states of stress, strain, and cyclic plastic strain. However, few research efforts have attempted to systematically consider the sensitivity of overall cyclic stress-strain hysteresis and higher order mean stress relaxation and plastic strain ratcheting responses introduced by the slip system back-stress formulation in crystal plasticity, even for face centered cubic (FCC) crystal systems. This paper explores the performance of two slip system level kinematic hardening models using a finite element crystal plasticity implementation as a User Material Subroutine (UMAT)more » within ABAQUS, with fully implicit numerical integration. The two kinematic hardening formulations aim to reproduce the cyclic deformation of polycrystalline Al 7075-T6 in terms of both macroscopic cyclic stress-strain hysteresis loop shape, as well as ratcheting and mean stress relaxation under strain- or stress-controlled loading with mean strain or stress, respectively. The first formulation is an Armstrong-Frederick type hardening-dynamic recovery law for evolution of the back stress. This approach is capable of reproducing observed deformation under completely reversed uniaxial loading conditions, but overpredicts the rate of cyclic ratcheting and associated mean stress relaxation. The second formulation corresponds to a multiple back stress Ohno-Wang type hardening law with nonlinear dynamic recovery. The adoption of this back stress evolution law greatly improves the capability to model experimental results for polycrystalline specimens subjected to cycling with mean stress or strain. As a result, the relation of such nonlinear dynamic recovery effects are related to slip system interactions with dislocation substructures.« less

  5. Sensitivity of polycrystal plasticity to slip system kinematic hardening laws for Al 7075-T6

    DOE PAGES

    Hennessey, Conor; Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2017-02-01

    The prediction of formation and early growth of microstructurally small fatigue cracks requires use of constitutive models that accurately estimate local states of stress, strain, and cyclic plastic strain. However, few research efforts have attempted to systematically consider the sensitivity of overall cyclic stress-strain hysteresis and higher order mean stress relaxation and plastic strain ratcheting responses introduced by the slip system back-stress formulation in crystal plasticity, even for face centered cubic (FCC) crystal systems. This paper explores the performance of two slip system level kinematic hardening models using a finite element crystal plasticity implementation as a User Material Subroutine (UMAT)more » within ABAQUS, with fully implicit numerical integration. The two kinematic hardening formulations aim to reproduce the cyclic deformation of polycrystalline Al 7075-T6 in terms of both macroscopic cyclic stress-strain hysteresis loop shape, as well as ratcheting and mean stress relaxation under strain- or stress-controlled loading with mean strain or stress, respectively. The first formulation is an Armstrong-Frederick type hardening-dynamic recovery law for evolution of the back stress. This approach is capable of reproducing observed deformation under completely reversed uniaxial loading conditions, but overpredicts the rate of cyclic ratcheting and associated mean stress relaxation. The second formulation corresponds to a multiple back stress Ohno-Wang type hardening law with nonlinear dynamic recovery. The adoption of this back stress evolution law greatly improves the capability to model experimental results for polycrystalline specimens subjected to cycling with mean stress or strain. As a result, the relation of such nonlinear dynamic recovery effects are related to slip system interactions with dislocation substructures.« less

  6. Susceptibility of the aging Brown Norway rat to carbaryl, an anti-cholinesterase-based insecticide: Thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proportion of aged in the United States is projected to expand markedly for the next several decades. Hence, the U.S.EPA is assessing if the aged are more susceptible to environmental toxicants. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses of young adult, mature adult, a...

  7. Assessing Defense Structure in School-Age Children Using the Response Evaluation Measure-71-Youth Version (REM-Y-71)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Katy B.; Medic, Sanja; Yasnovsky, Jessica; Steiner, Hans

    2006-01-01

    This study used the Response Evaluation Measure-Youth (REM-Y-71), a self-report measure of 21 defense reactions, among school-age children. Participants were elementary and middle school students (n=290; grades 3-8; age range: 8-15; mean=11.73). Factor analysis revealed a 2-factor defense structure consistent with structure among high school and…

  8. Psychopathic traits and physiological responses to aversive stimuli in children aged 9-11 years.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Baker, Laura A; Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian; Lozano, Dora Isabel

    2012-07-01

    Atypical eletrodermal and cardiovascular response patterns in psychopathic individuals are thought to be biological indicators of fearless and disinhibition. This study investigated the relationship between psychopathic traits and these autonomic response patterns using a countdown task in 843 children (aged 9-10 years). Heart rate (HR) and non-specific skin conductance responses (NS-SCRs) were recorded while participants anticipated and reacted to 105 dB signaled or un-signaled white-noise bursts. Using multilevel regression models, both larger HR acceleration and fewer NS-SCR were found to be significantly associated with psychopathic traits during anticipation of signaled white-noise bursts. However, two divergent patterns appeared for HR and SCR: (1) larger HR acceleration was specific to the callousness-disinhibition factor of psychopathic traits while reduced NS-SCR was only associated with the manipulative-deceitfulness factor; (2) the negative association between the manipulative-deceitfulness factor and NS-SCR was only found in boys but not in girls. These findings replicated what has been found in psychopathic adults, suggesting that autonomic deficits present in children at risk may predispose them to later psychopathy. The divergent findings across psychopathic facets and sexes raised the possibility of different etiologies underlying psychopathy, which may in turn suggest multiple treatment strategies for boys and girls.

  9. Heterogeneous Depression Responses to Chronic Pain Onset among Middle-Aged Adults: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhuoying; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R.; Bonanno, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies on depression response to chronic pain are limited by lack of clarification of different forms of response patterns and cross-sectional measures. The current study examined heterogeneous long-term patterns of depression response to chronic pain onset using the mixture modeling technique. Depression symptoms prior to and following pain onset over a course of six years were charted in a nationally representative middle-aged sample. Four distinct depression symptom trajectories emerged. The resilience (72.0%) trajectory describes a pattern of no/minimal depression symptoms prior to and following pain onset. The post-pain depression trajectory (11.4%) describes a pattern of low depression at baseline and increasing symptoms following pain onset. The chronic depression (6.8%) trajectory is characterized by persistently high depression symptoms irrespective of pain onset. The prior depression improved (9.8%) trajectory describes a pattern of high depression at baseline and gradually declining symptoms following pain onset. Self-rated health at both baseline and following pain onset predicted the resilience trajectory. Baseline self-rated health distinguished the post-pain depression and chronic depression trajectories. Individuals in the prior depression improved trajectory were older and had more chronic illnesses at baseline but fewer illnesses following pain onset, compared to those in the resilience or post-pain depression trajectory. PMID:24679514

  10. Psychopathic Traits and Physiological Responses to Aversive Stimuli in Children Aged 9–11 Years

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Laura A.; Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian; Lozano, Dora Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Atypical eletrodermal and cardiovascular response patterns in psychopathic individuals are thought to be biological indicators of fearless and disinhibition. This study investigated the relationship between psychopathic traits and these autonomic response patterns using a count-down task in 843 children (aged 9–10 years). Heart rate (HR) and non-specific skin conductance responses (NS-SCRs) were recorded while participants anticipated and reacted to 105 dB signaled or unsignaled white-noise bursts. Using multilevel regression models, both larger HR acceleration and fewer NS-SCR were found to be significantly associated with psychopathic traits during anticipation of signaled white-noise bursts. However, two divergent patterns appeared for HR and SCR: (1) larger HR acceleration was specific to the callousness-disinhibition factor of psychopathic traits while reduced NS-SCR was only associated with the manipulative-deceitfulness factor; (2) the negative association between the manipulative-deceitfulness factor and NS-SCR was only found in boys but not in girls. These findings replicated what has been found in psychopathic adults, suggesting that autonomic deficits present in children at risk may predispose them to later psychopathy. The divergent findings across psychopathic facets and sexes raised the possibility of different etiologies underlying psychopathy, which may in turn suggest multiple treatment strategies for boys and girls. PMID:22228313

  11. Reduced responsiveness of kisspeptin neurons to estrogenic positive feedback associated with age-related disappearance of LH surge in middle-age female rats.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Misawa Niki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Matsui, Hisanori; Seki, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Kaori; Chatani, Fumio; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Age-related disappearance of the LH surge is one of major biomarkers of reproductive aging in female rats. Kisspeptin neurons in the hypothalamic anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) are proposed as the critical regulator of the preovulatory LH surge in response to estrogenic positive feedback. Here we investigated the possible involvement of the AVPV kisspeptin neurons in the disappearance of the LH surge in middle-age rats. Middle-age rats exhibiting persistent estrus (M-PE) did not show an LH surge although neither Kiss1 mRNA nor peptide in the AVPV was differentially expressed when compared to young rats exhibiting normal estrous cycles (YN). M-PE released LH in response to exogenous kisspeptin in a similar dose-dependent manner as YN, suggesting that their GnRH neurons still maintained responsiveness to kisspeptin. To investigate the estrogenic positive feedback effect on kisspeptin neurons in the AVPV, rats were ovariectomized and supplemented with estradiol (OVX+E2). We performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for Kiss1 mRNA and cFos, respectively, and found that M-PE exhibited a significantly lower percentage of Kiss1 mRNA positive neurons with cFos immunoreactivity, although the total number of kisspeptin neurons was not different from that in cyclic rats. Furthermore, OVX+E2 M-PE did not show the surge-like LH release under high estradiol administration while YN did. Thus our current study suggests that the reduced responsiveness of the AVPV kisspeptin neurons to estrogenic positive feedback presumably results in the decrease in kisspeptin secretion from neurons and eventually causes the age-related disappearance of the LH surge in middle age female rats.

  12. Does increased heat resistance result in higher susceptibility to predation? A test using Drosophila melanogaster selection and hardening.

    PubMed

    Hangartner, Sandra; Dworkin, Ian; DeNieu, Michael; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2017-04-07

    Heat resistance of ectotherms can be increased both by plasticity and evolution, but these effects may have trade-offs resulting from biotic interactions. Here we test for predation costs in Drosophila melanogaster populations with altered heat resistance produced by adult hardening and directional selection for increased heat resistance. In addition, we also tested for genetic trade-offs by testing heat resistance in lines that have evolved under increased predation risk. We show that while 35/37°C hardening increases heat resistance as expected, it does not increase predation risk from jumping spiders or mantids; in fact there was an indication that survival may have increased under predation following a triple 37°C compared to a single 35°C hardening treatment. Flies that survived a 39°C selection cycle showed lower survival under predation, suggesting a predation cost of exposure to a more severe heat stress. There was however no correlated response to selection because survival did not differ between control and selected lines after selection was relaxed for one or two generations. In addition, lines selected for increased predation risk did not differ in heat resistance. Our findings suggest independent evolutionary responses to predation and heat as measured in laboratory assays, and no costs of heat hardening on susceptibility to predation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Process design of press hardening with gradient material property influence

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, R.; Schieck, F.; Rautenstrauch, A.

    2011-05-04

    Press hardening is currently used in the production of automotive structures that require very high strength and controlled deformation during crash tests. Press hardening can achieve significant reductions of sheet thickness at constant strength and is therefore a promising technology for the production of lightweight and energy-efficient automobiles. The manganese-boron steel 22MnB5 have been implemented in sheet press hardening owing to their excellent hot formability, high hardenability, and good temperability even at low cooling rates. However, press-hardened components have shown poor ductility and cracking at relatively small strains. A possible solution to this problem is a selective increase of steel sheet ductility by press hardening process design in areas where the component is required to deform plastically during crash tests. To this end, process designers require information about microstructure and mechanical properties as a function of the wide spectrum of cooling rates and sequences and austenitizing treatment conditions that can be encountered in production environments. In the present work, a Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT) diagram with corresponding material properties of sheet steel 22MnB5 was determined for a wide spectrum of cooling rates. Heating and cooling programs were conducted in a quenching dilatometer. Motivated by the importance of residual elasticity in crash test performance, this property was measured using a micro-bending test and the results were integrated into the CCT diagrams to complement the hardness testing results. This information is essential for the process design of press hardening of sheet components with gradient material properties.

  14. Residual stress relaxation and fatigue behavior of an induction hardened microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Ana Luisa Rivas De

    The thermal and mechanical relaxation of compressive residual stresses during tempering and cyclic loading of an induction hardened vanadium microalloyed steel has been evaluated. A microstructural analysis was also carried out on the microalloyed steel to correlate the residual stress relaxation behavior with microstructural characteristics of the material. Vanadium carbide particle size and distribution were analyzed as well as how these characteristics are affected by the application of normalizing and induction hardening heat treatments. To determine the effect of vanadium carbide particles on the residual stress relaxation response of the microalloyed steel a parallel study was conducted on a 1530 steel which is similar in chemistry to the microalloyed steel, but without the vanadium. The thermal relaxation of compressive residual stresses due to tempering for 2 hours after induction hardening was evaluated for a range of tempering temperatures from 177sp° C\\ (350sp° F) to 579sp° C\\ (1075sp° F). Mechanical residual stress relaxation was evaluated by subjecting specimens to cyclic loading conditions. For this part of the work a special type of specimen was designed. The specimen had an overall C-shape with a T-shaped cross section. This specimen geometry generates higher levels of stresses in the induction hardened outer layer than in the soft core material along the inner layer of the C-shaped geometry. The compressive residual stresses were generated by the phase transformation that occurs during hardening heat treatments and also by mechanical means. Additional compressive stresses were put into the outer surface region of the hardened C-shaped specimens by pre-straining them plastically through the application of compressive loads. Fine vanadium carbide precipitates were observed in the microalloyed steel in the as-forged condition. The application of a normalizing and induction hardening heat treatments caused coarsening of the vanadium carbide

  15. A Microfluidic System for Studying Ageing and Dynamic Single-Cell Responses in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Elco; Smith, Stewart; Swain, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of the importance of cell-to-cell variability in cellular decision-making and a growing interest in stochastic modeling of cellular processes has led to an increased demand for high density, reproducible, single-cell measurements in time-varying surroundings. We present ALCATRAS (A Long-term Culturing And TRApping System), a microfluidic device that can quantitatively monitor up to 1000 cells of budding yeast in a well-defined and controlled environment. Daughter cells are removed by fluid flow to avoid crowding allowing experiments to run for over 60 hours, and the extracellular media may be changed repeatedly and in seconds. We illustrate use of the device by measuring ageing through replicative life span curves, following the dynamics of the cell cycle, and examining history-dependent behaviour in the general stress response. PMID:24950344

  16. [From the right to health to the responsibility for healthy aging: a new foundation for anti-aging medicine in Germany].

    PubMed

    Spindler, M

    2010-03-01

    This paper explores the problem of dealing with normalisation in public health concepts, using the example of the relaunching of anti-aging-medicine in Germany. The analysis mainly draws upon qualitative analyses of publications of different anti-aging-medicine organisations. The German branch of anti-aging-medicine's new concepts of the nature, the morality and the self-design of aging are delineated. These are the concepts of aging as a medically controllable health risk (nature), the emphasis of the moral duty to responsible personal risk control (morality) and the self-design through individual risk profiles and prevention programmes. The analysis shows that the proposed bio-political programme cannot only be induced from biologically, societally or medically given facts, but that it is - as all public health concepts - a normative concept. It is argued that the normative aspects of public health concepts cannot be avoided but should be explicated and negotiated. This paper therefore concludes with an exploration of what there is to negotiate concerning the German anti-aging-physicians' surprisingly uncontroversial plea for a shift of emphasis from the collective right to health to a new individual duty for health maintenance in old age.

  17. Reverse-Martensitic Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel upon Up-quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kiminori; Guo, Defeng; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyi

    2016-08-01

    Reverse-martensitic transformation utilizing up-quenching was demonstrated for austenitic stainless steel. Up-quenching was done following the stress-induced phase modification to martensite and then enrichment of the body-centered-cubic ferrite. Transmission-electron-microscopy observation and Vickers hardness test revealed that the reverse-martensitic transformation yields quench hardening owing to an introduction of highly-concentrated dislocation. It is furthermore found that Cr precipitation on grain boundaries caused by isothermal aging is largely suppressed in the present approach.

  18. Migrational changes of mesenchymal stem cells in response to cytokines, growth factors, hypoxia, and aging.

    PubMed

    Naaldijk, Yahaira; Johnson, Adiv A; Ishak, Stefan; Meisel, Hans Jörg; Hohaus, Christian; Stolzing, Alexandra

    2015-10-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-immunogenic, multipotent cells with at least trilineage differentiation potential. They promote wound healing, improve regeneration of injured tissue, and mediate numerous other health effects. MSCs migrate to sites of injury and stimulate repair either through direct differentiation or indirectly through the stimulation of endogenous repair mechanisms. Using the in vitro scratch assay, we show that the inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors TNF-α, SDF-1, PDGF, and bFGF enhance migration of rat MSCs under normoxic conditions, while TNF-α, IFN-γ, PDGF, and bFGF promote MSC migration under hypoxic conditions. This indicates that the oxygen concentration affects how MSCs will migrate in response to specific factors and, consistent with this, differential expression of cytokines was observed under hypoxic versus normoxic conditions. Using the transwell migration assay, we find that TNF-α, IFN-γ, bFGF, IGF-1, PDGF, and SDF-1 significantly increase transmigration of rat MSCs compared to unstimulated medium. MSCs derived from aged rats exhibited comparable migration to MSCs derived from young rats under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, even after application with specific factors. Similarly, migration in MSCs from aged, human donors did not statistically differ compared to migration in MSCs derived from human umbilical cord tissue or younger donors.

  19. Growth of short children born small for gestational age and their response to growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Hemchand Krishna; Khadilkar, Vaman V; Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Khadilkar, Anuradha V

    2013-05-08

    Growth hormone [GH] is licensed for use in children born small for gestational age (SGA) who fail to catch-up. We retrospectively compared the response of twenty children born SGA (who satisfied the auxological criteria) to growth hormone (Group I) versus randomly selected age and sex matched controls from a group of SGA children with growth related complaints, not treated with GH (Group II). After 2 years of GH therapy the HAZ increased from -2.8 to -1.6 in Group I, compared 2.2 to -1.7 in group II (P-value < 0.05). The percentage of pubertal children rose from 55% to 65% in cases versus 60% to 75% in the controls (P>0.05). GH resulted in increase in growth velocity Z-score during the first year and (4.3±0.5 in Group-I versus - 0.5±0.6 in Group-II, P<0.05) second year of treatment (1.7±0.4 in cases versus -0.6±0.7 in controls, P<0.05).Thus, GH improves height of short SGA children without accelerating pubertal progression.

  20. Understanding less than nothing: children's neural response to negative numbers shifts across age and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Wolford, George

    2013-01-01

    We examined the brain activity underlying the development of our understanding of negative numbers, which are amounts lacking direct physical counterparts. Children performed a paired comparison task with positive and negative numbers during an fMRI session. As previously shown in adults, both pre-instruction fifth-graders and post-instruction seventh-graders demonstrated typical behavioral and neural distance effects to negative numbers, where response times and parietal and frontal activity increased as comparison distance decreased. We then determined the factors impacting the distance effect in each age group. Behaviorally, the fifth-grader distance effect for negatives was significantly predicted only by positive comparison accuracy, indicating that children who were generally better at working with numbers were better at comparing negatives. In seventh-graders, negative number comparison accuracy significantly predicted their negative number distance effect, indicating that children who were better at working with negative numbers demonstrated a more typical distance effect. Across children, as age increased, the negative number distance effect increased in the bilateral IPS and decreased frontally, indicating a frontoparietal shift consistent with previous numerical development literature. In contrast, as negative comparison task accuracy increased, the parietal distance effect increased in the left IPS and decreased in the right, possibly indicating a change from an approximate understanding of negatives' values to a more exact, precise representation (particularly supported by the left IPS) with increasing expertise. These shifts separately indicate the effects of increasing maturity generally in numeric processing and specifically in negative number understanding.

  1. ERP Responses of Elementary-Age Children to Video Game Simulations of Two Stimuli Types: Study 1 and 2 Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Doris; Schroer, Joseph E.; Thomas, Robin; Zhang, Xinge; Chou, Michael; Chou, Tricia

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis that brain activity may differ during varied types of video game play was investigated in two studies of event-related potentials exhibited by children age 7 to 12 when processing game-based stimuli requiring correct/incorrect responses or choices between two imaginative alternative responses. The first study had 22 children of…

  2. Youth are more Vulnerable to False Memories than Middle-Aged Adults due to Liberal Response Bias

    PubMed Central

    Meusel, Liesel-Ann C.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Jaswal, Gurpreet; McKinnon, Margaret C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Numerous studies show changes in vulnerability to false memory formation across development and into senescence. No study, however, has compared false memory formation in the critical transition period spanning late adolescence to middle adulthood. Method: Using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, we explored the effects of age and of emotion on false memory formation in youth (16 to 23 years of age) and in middle-aged adults (29 to 58 years of age). Results: We found that youth endorsed more false lure items than middle-aged adults. This increased vulnerability to false memory formation stemmed from a more liberal response bias in the younger group. Conclusions: Youth have a more liberal response criterion than middle-aged adults that contributes to an increased vulnerability to false memory formation. Subsequent age-related changes in response bias may reflect the maturation of frontal and temporal regions. In youth, a more liberal response bias may contribute to the heightened propensity for poor decision-making seen in this population. PMID:23133463

  3. Age-specific response of a migratory bird to an experimental alteration of its habitat.

    PubMed

    Haché, Samuel; Villard, Marc-André

    2010-07-01

    -specific. Three years post-harvest, recruitment rate was sufficient to fill most territory vacancies in treated plots, due mainly to first-time breeders. 5. To our knowledge, this is the first study documenting the effects of experimental habitat alteration on recruitment rate in a songbird species using a BACI design. The response of this male subpopulation highlights the influence of recruitment on the density of open populations of solitary-nesting birds and age-specific patterns in the response of individuals to habitat alterations.

  4. Aging- and task-related resilience decline is linked to food responsiveness in highly social honey bees.

    PubMed

    Speth, Martin T; Kreibich, Claus D; Amdam, Gro V; Münch, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Conventional invertebrate models of aging have provided striking examples for the influence of food- and nutrient-sensing on lifespan and stress resilience. On the other hand, studies in highly social insects, such as honey bees, have revealed how social context can shape very plastic life-history traits, for example flexible aging dynamics in the helper caste (workers). It is, however, not understood how food perception and stress resilience are connected in honey bee workers with different social task behaviors and aging dynamics. To explore this linkage, we tested if starvation resilience, which normally declines with age, depends on food responsiveness in honey bees. We studied two typically non-senesced groups of worker bees with different social task behaviors: mature nurses (caregivers) and mature foragers (food collectors). In addition, we included a group of old foragers for which functional senescence is well-established. Bees were individually scored for their food perception by measuring the gustatory response to different sucrose concentrations. Subsequently, individuals were tested for survival under starvation stress. We found that starvation stress resilience, but not gustatory responsiveness differed between workers with different social task behaviors (mature nurses vs. mature foragers). In addition starvation stress resilience differed between foragers with different aging progressions (mature foragers vs. old foragers). Control experiments confirmed that differences in starvation resilience between mature nurses and mature foragers were robust against changing experimental conditions, such as water provision and activity. For all worker groups we established that individuals with low gustatory responsiveness were more resilient to starvation stress. Finally, for the group of rapidly aging foragers we found that low food responsiveness was linked to a delayed age-related decline in starvation resilience. Our study highlights associations between

  5. Solute hardening and softening effects in B2 nickel aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, L.M.; Liu, C.T.; Anderson, I.M.; Chang, Y.A.

    1998-11-01

    The effect of substitutional solute additions including Fe, Mn, and Pd on the hardness of B2-ordered NiAl alloys was investigated. The solid solution hardening behavior of intermetallics is more complex than that of typical metallic solid solutions because of complications arising from the site preference of the solute as well as the effects of the solute on the concentrations of other point defects, e.g., vacancies and anti-site defects. For this reason, care was taken to experimentally establish solute site preferences and point defect concentrations in the NiAl alloys before analyzing the hardness data. By taking these factors into account it was possible to rationalize the observed unusual hardening effects. Three distinct categories of solid solution hardening behavior were encountered. The first was hardening by the solute addition itself. This was observed in the case of Pd additions to Al-poor NiAl. However, when fe or Mn is added to Al-poor NiAl a second category is observed; these elements are seen to soften the material. The third category of behavior is observed when Fe is added to NiAl with a constant Al concentration of 50 at. %. In this case it is vacancies, rather than solute atoms, which harden the material.

  6. Pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II in female mice is enhanced with age: role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pressor response to angiotensin II (AngII) is attenuated in adult females as compared to males via an angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R)-dependent pathway. We hypothesized that adult female mice are protected against AngII-induced hypertension via an enhanced AT2R-mediated pathway and that in reproductively senescent females this pathway is no longer operative. Methods Mean arterial pressure was measured via telemetry in 4-month-old (adult) and 16-month-old (aged) and aged ovariectomized (aged-OVX) wild-type and AT2R knockout (AT2R-KO) female mice during baseline and 14-day infusion of vehicle (saline) or AngII (600 ng/kg/min s.c.). Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine renal gene expression of angiotensin receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in response to 14-day treatment with vehicle or AngII. Results Basal mean arterial pressure was similar between the groups. The pressor response to AngII was augmented in adult AT2R-KO compared to adult wild-type mice (29 ± 3 mmHg versus 10 ± 4 mmHg, respectively, on day 14 as compared to basal mean arterial pressure, P = 0.002). In wild-type mice, pressor responsiveness to AngII was augmented with age, such that the pressor response to AngII was similar between aged AT2R-KO and wild-type female mice (31 ± 4 mmHg versus 34 ± 3 mmHg, respectively, on day 14, P = 0.9). There were no significant differences in pressor responsiveness to AngII between aged and aged-OVX mice. Vehicle-treated aged wild-type mice had a lower renal AT2R/AT1R balance as compared to adult counterparts. In response to AngII, the renal AT2R/AT1R balance in aged wild-type females was greater than that observed in vehicle-treated aged wild-type females and adult wild-type females, yet the protective effects of AT2R activation were not restored. Conclusions The protective role of the AT2R depressor pathway is lost with age in female mice. Therefore

  7. Righteous realists: Perceptions of American power and responsibility in the nuclear age

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    This is a study of the moral and ethical dimensions of political realism in post-World War II America, especially in relation to realist thought on nuclear weapons issues. Emphasis is placed on evolving notions of power and responsibility as they form the basis for a realist philosophy of power in the nuclear age. It is argued that the realists developed a concept of responsible power which was a hybrid of traditional American ideals and European Realpolitik. Included are chapters on the personal and intellectual background of five noteworthy realists, the realist position on some basic dilemmas in political ethics, the problem of usable and unusable force, the realists' view on deterrence and arms control, the question of democracy versus guardianship, and the realists as cultural critics. This study highlights the coherence of realist thought while pointing out the paradoxes upon which it is based. It situates realism in its historical context and reveals realism's relationship to explicit political and cultural values. It concludes that at their core, the realists were moralists; and realism was the entity through which they reconciled morality and power.

  8. Teen responses when a younger school-age sibling has been bullied

    PubMed Central

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Zdunowski-Sjoblom, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of bullying among children, and the sometimes tragic consequences as a result, has become a major concern in schools. The larger research for this study reported on in-depth interviews with 28 elementary and middle school-age boys and girls (7–12 years) who had experienced various forms of bullying and relational aggression by their peers, mostly on school grounds, and the responses of their parents and teachers. Responses of the children's teen siblings to the younger child's revelations of being bullied are the focus of this report. In-depth interviews with each teen sibling (n = 28) and with each bullied child revealed how the children viewed the teen siblings' supportive strategies. Almost all the children (89%) reported that their older siblings talked with them and offered advice. The teen siblings shared with the younger ones that they too (71%) had been bullied, or they knew someone who had been bullied (18%). Teens gave the advice to ‘bully back’ to 11% and advice to ‘tell someone’ to 32% of the younger children. The children felt quite positive about their older siblings' advice (89%), which did differ depending on the bullied child's gender. Teen siblings gave advice to ‘avoid bullies’ to 77% of female and to 27% of male younger children. PMID:25931644

  9. Application of Low Dose Radiation Adaptive Response to Control Aging-Related Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, Mohan

    2013-11-01

    Oxidative damage has been implicated in the pathogenesis of most aging-related diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. Antioxidant supplementation has been found to be ineffective in reducing such diseases, but increased endogenous production of antioxidants from the adaptive response due to physical and cognitive exercises (which increase oxidative metabolism and oxidative stress) has been effective in reducing some of the diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR), which increases oxidative stress and results in adaptive response of increased antioxidants, may provide an alternative method of controlling the aging-related diseases. We have studied the effect of LDR on the induction of adaptive response in rat brains and the effectiveness of the LDR in reducing the oxidative damage caused by subsequent high dose radiation. We have also investigated the effect of LDR on apomorphine-induced rotations in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) unilaterally-lesioned rat model of Parkinson?s disease (PD). LDR was observed to initiate an adaptive response in the brain, and reduce the oxidative damage from subsequent high dose radiation exposure, confirming the effectiveness of LDR adaptive response in reducing the oxidative damage from the free radicals due to high dose radiation. LDR resulted in a slight improvement in Tyrosine hydroxylase expression on the lesioned side of substantia nigra (indicative of its protective effect on the dopaminergic neurons), and reduced the behavioral symptoms in the 6-OHDA rat model of PD. Translation of this concept to humans, if found to be applicable, may be a possible approach for controlling the progression of PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Since any translation of the concept to humans would be hindered by the currently prevalent carcinogenic concerns regarding LDR based on the linear no-threshold (LNT) model, we have also studied the justifications for the use of the LNT model. One of the shortcomings of the LNT model is that it

  10. Age-Related Differences in Response to Music-Evoked Emotion Among Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, K G; Quintin, E M; South, M

    2016-04-01

    While research regarding emotion recognition in ASD has focused primarily on social cues, musical stimuli also elicit strong emotional responses. This study extends and expands the few previous studies of response to music in ASD, measuring both psychophysiological and behavioral responses in younger children (ages 8-11) as well as older adolescents (ages 16-18). Compared to controls, the ASD group demonstrated reduced skin conductance response to music-evoked emotion. Younger groups, regardless of diagnosis, showed greater physiological reactivity to scary stimuli than to other emotions. There was a significant interaction of age group and diagnostic group in identifying scary music stimuli, possibly evidencing disrupted developmental trajectories in ASD for integrating physiological and cognitive cues that may underlie symptoms of anxiety.

  11. Gross efficiency responses to exercise conditioning in adult males of various ages.

    PubMed

    Gissane, C; Corrigan, D L; White, J A

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated gross efficiency changes in a group of 60 adult males (mean age 39.2 +/- 1.2 years) resulting from endurance training and age-related responses to such training in sub-groups (each n = 20) of younger (30.7 +/- 0.7 years), intermediate (38.3 +/- 0.5 years) and older (48.6 +/- 1.1 years) subjects. Gross efficiency (%) was calculated from work output, oxygen consumption and RER energy equivalents following 10 min standard cycle ergometry exercise at 100 W and 50 rev min-1. Measurements were made at pre-, mid- and post-8 months of training, which involved progressive walking/jogging activities designed to enhance endurance capacity. In the total group, VO2 decreased pre- to post-training from 2.15 +/- 0.02 to 1.93 +/- 0.01 1 min-1 (P less than 0.01). In the sub-groups, both the younger and older subjects showed a significantly reduced VO2, from 2.17 +/- 0.01 to 1.98 +/- 0.04 1 min-1 and 2.05 +/- 0.08 to 1.86 +/- 0.03 1 min-1 respectively (P less than 0.05), but no significant changes were noted at mid-training. In the intermediate age subjects, while there were trends towards a reduced VO2, none was significant. The ANOVA revealed increased mean gross efficiency in the total group from pre- (14.3 +/- 0.1%) to post- (15.5 +/- 0.2%) (P less than 0.05) but not at mid-training (14.8 +/- 0.2%). While similar trends were observed in the sub-groups, gross efficiency increases were not significant, although changes in gross efficiency were reflected in VO2. The findings suggest that during standardized exercise, oxygen cost may be reduced and gross efficiency increased in adult males following endurance training and that such changes may take place over a variety of age ranges.

  12. Age-related differences in the response of the brain to dietary melatonin.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Arezoo; Sharman, Edward; Bondy, Stephen C

    2014-02-01

    The aged brain is prone to excessive levels of immune activity, not initiated by an acute response to an extrinsic agent. While dietary melatonin is reported to attenuate the extent of expression of proinflammatory genes, little is known about the extent to which these changes can be translated into altered levels of corresponding proteins. The baseline levels of the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 alpha, were greater in older (~29 months old) compared to younger (~7 months old) mouse brains. Acute (3 h) exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), but not inflammatory cytokines in the brain. The serum level of TNF-α was increased after LPS injection, indicating a systemic immune response to the bacterial cell wall component. Dietary melatonin (40 ppm for 9.3 weeks) did not prevent LPS-induced changes in younger animals but caused an increased systemic TNF-α response in older mice. Melatonin did reduce markers of carbonyl formation in brain proteins of young animals and nitrosylative damage to peptide-bound amino acid residues, in the brains of older animals. Acute LPS challenge did not significantly affect these oxidative markers. Thus, despite lack of clear evidence of attenuation of the NF-κB-cytokine inflammatory trajectory within the CNS by melatonin, this agent did show a protective effect against free radical-initiated injury to amino acid residues within proteins. The results illustrate that previously reported changes in gene expression following melatonin treatment need not be closely paralleled by corresponding changes in protein content.

  13. Ion-irradiation-induced hardening in Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunn, J. D.; Lee, E. H.; Byun, T. S.; Mansur, L. K.

    2001-07-01

    Inconel 718 is a material under consideration for areas in the target region of the spallation neutron source (SNS), now under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. In these positions, displacement damage from protons and neutrons will affect the mechanical properties. In addition, significant amounts of helium and hydrogen will build up in the material due to transmutation reactions. Nanoindentation measurements of solution-annealed (SA) Inconel 718 specimens, implanted with Fe-, He-, and H-ions to simulate SNS target radiation conditions, have shown that hardening occurs due to ion-induced displacement damage as well as due to the build-up of helium bubbles in the irradiated layer. Precipitation-hardened (PH) Inconel 718 also exhibited hardening by helium build-up but showed softening as a function of displacement damage due to dissolution of the γ ' and γ″ precipitates.

  14. Characterization of an age-response relationship to GSK's recombinant hepatitis B vaccine in healthy adults: An integrated analysis

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Meeren, Olivier; Crasta, Priya; Cheuvart, Brigitte; De Ridder, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The immune system becomes less effective with age, and older age is associated with an increased susceptibility to diseases and reduced responses to vaccination. Furthermore, some adult populations, such as those with diabetes mellitus, are at increased risk of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Decreasing responses to vaccination with advanced age have been described, but it is not known at what age immunogenicity starts to reduce, or until what age immunogenicity remains acceptable (for example ≥80 % seroprotection post-vaccination). We characterized the relationship between age and seroprotection rate induced by recombinant HBV vaccination by conducting a pooled analysis of clinical trial data. Healthy adults aged ≥20 y who had been vaccinated with 20μg HBV vaccine (Engerix™ B, GSK Vaccines, Belgium) in a 0, 1, 6 months schedule in 11 studies since 1996 were included. The observed seroprotection rate, defined as an anti-HBV surface antigen antibody concentration ≥10 mIU/ml was 94.5% in the whole population (N = 2,620, Total vaccinated cohort), ranging from 98.6% in adults vaccinated at age 20–24 years, to 64.8% in those vaccinated at age ≥65 y A model on seroprotection rates showed a statistically significant decrease with age, and predicted that the anti-HBs seroprotection rate remains ≥90% up to 49 y of age and ≥80% up to 60 y of age. Individuals at risk of HBV infection should be vaccinated as early in life as possible to improve the likelihood of achieving seroprotection. Additional studies are needed to identify whether unvaccinated individuals older than 60 y would benefit from regimens that include additional or higher vaccine doses. PMID:25996260

  15. Effects of age and caloric restriction in the vascular response of renal arteries to endothelin-1 in rats.

    PubMed

    Amor, Sara; García-Villalón, Angel Luis; Rubio, Carmen; Carrascosa, Jose Ma; Monge, Luis; Fernández, Nuria; Martín-Carro, Beatriz; Granado, Miriam

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular alterations are the most prevalent cause of impaired physiological function in aged individuals with kidney being one the most affected organs. Aging-induced alterations in renal circulation are associated with a decrease in endothelium-derived relaxing factors such as nitric oxide (NO) and with an increase in contracting factors such as endothelin-1(ET-1). As caloric restriction (CR) exerts beneficial effects preventing some of the aging-induced alterations in cardiovascular system, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of age and caloric restriction in the vascular response of renal arteries to ET-1 in aged rats. Vascular function was studied in renal arteries from 3-month-old Wistar rats fed ad libitum (3m) and in renal arteries from 8-and 24-month-old Wistar rats fed ad libitum (8m and 24m), or subjected to 20% caloric restriction during their three last months of life (8m-CR and 24m-CR). The contractile response to ET-1 was increased in renal arteries from 8m and 24m compared to 3m rats. ET-1-induced contraction was mediated by ET-A receptors in all experimental groups and also by ET-B receptors in 24m rats. Caloric restriction attenuated the increased contraction to ET-1 in renal arteries from 8m but not from 24m rats possibly through NO release proceeding from ET-B endothelial receptors. In 24m rats, CR did not attenuate the aging-increased response of renal arteries to ET-1, but it prevented the aging-induced increase in iNOS mRNA levels and the aging-induced decrease in eNOS mRNA levels in arterial tissue. In conclusion, aging is associated with an increased response to ET-1 in renal arteries that is prevented by CR in 8m but not in 24m rats.

  16. Adults' age-related differences in strategy perseveration are modulated by response-stimulus intervals and problem features.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Patrick; Brun, Fleur

    2014-10-01

    Ageing results in the tendency of older adults to repeat the same strategy across consecutive problems more often than young adults, even when such strategy perseveration is not appropriate. Here, we examined how these age-related differences in strategy perseveration are modulated by response-stimulus intervals and problem characteristics. We asked participants to select the best strategy while accomplishing a computational estimation task (i.e., provide approximate sums to two-digit addition problems like 38 + 74). We found that participants repeated the same strategy across consecutive problems more often when the duration between their response and next problem display was short (300 ms) than when it was long (1300 ms). We also found more strategy perseverations in older than in young adults under short Response-Stimulus Intervals, but not under long Response-Stimulus Intervals. Finally, age-related differences in strategy perseveration decreased when problem features helped participants to select the best strategy. These modulations of age-related differences in strategy perseveration by response-stimulus intervals and characteristics of target problems are important for furthering our understanding of mechanisms underlying strategy perseveration and, more generally, ageing effects on strategy selection.

  17. Kinematic Hardening: Characterization, Modeling and Impact on Springback Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, J. L.; Bouvier, S.; Jomaa, M.; Billardon, R.

    2007-05-17

    The constitutive modeling of the materials' mechanical behavior, usually carried out using a phenomenological constitutive model, i.e., a yield criterion associated to the isotropic and kinematic hardening laws, is of paramount importance in the FEM simulation of the sheet metal forming processes, as well as in the springback prediction. Among others, the kinematic behavior of the yield surface plays an essential role, since it is indispensable to describe the Bauschinger effect, i.e., the materials' answer to the multiple tension-compression cycles to which material points are submitted during the forming process. Several laws are usually used to model and describe the kinematic hardening, namely: a) the Prager's law, which describes a linear evolution of the kinematic hardening with the plastic strain rate tensor b) the Frederick-Armstrong non-linear kinematic hardening, basically a non-linear law with saturation; and c) a more advanced physically-based law, similar to the previous one but sensitive to the strain path changes. In the present paper a mixed kinematic hardening law (linear + non-linear behavior) is proposed and its implementation into a static fully-implicit FE code is described. The material parameters identification for sheet metals using different strategies, and the classical Bauschinger loading tests (i.e. in-plane forward and reverse monotonic loading), are addressed, and their impact on springback prediction evaluated. Some numerical results concerning the springback prediction of the Numisheet'05 Benchmark no. 3 are briefly presented to emphasize the importance of a correct modeling and identification of the kinematic hardening behavior.

  18. Determination of Anisotropic Hardening of Sheet Metals by Shear Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schikorra, Marco; Brosius, Alexander; Kleiner, Matthias

    2005-08-05

    With regard to the increasing necessity of accurate material data determination for the prediction of springback, a material testing equipment has been developed and set up for the measurement of material hardening within cyclic loading. One reason for inaccurate springback predictions can be seen in a missing consideration of load reversal effects in a realistic material model description. Due to bending and unbending while the material is drawn from the flange over a radius of a deep drawing tool, a hardening takes place which leads to an expanding or shifting of the elastic area and yield locus known as isotropic, kinematic, or combined hardening. Since springback is mainly influenced by the actual stress state and a correct distinction between elastic and elastic-plastic regions, an accurate prediction of these stress and strain components is basically required to simulate springback accurately, too. The presented testing method deals with shearing of sheet metal specimens in one or more load cycles to analyze the change of yield point and yield curve. The experimental set up is presented and discussed and the results are shown for different materials such as aluminum A199.5, stainless steel X5CrNi18.10, dual phase steel DP600, and copper Cu99.99. To guarantee a wide experimental range, different sheet thicknesses were used additionally. Simulations using the finite element method were carried out to compare the measured results with calculated results from different yield criterions and different hardening laws mentioned above. It was possible to show that commonly used standard material hardening laws like isotropic and kinematic hardening laws often do not lead to accurate stress state predictions when load reversals occur. The work shows the range of occurring differences and strategies to obtain to a more reliable prediction.

  19. Differential responsiveness to contractile agents of isolated smooth muscle cells from human colons as a function of age and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J C; Guitton, C; Pignodel, C; Cuq, P; Moussu, P; Pouderoux, P; Christen, M O; Balmes, J L; Bali, J P

    1997-11-01

    To study the involvement of age and inflammation in motor colonic activity in man, contractile responses to CCK, carbachol, and KCl of isolated colonic smooth muscle cells (SMC) from normal and inflamed human colons were evaluated; the incidence of sex and smoking on contraction was also analyzed. Contractile responses to the three agonists were significantly lower in tissues with a low degree of inflammation than in tissues with high level of inflammation or normal tissues. This reduction in cell responsiveness appears to be nonspecific and nonreceptor mediated. A positive correlation of the contractile responses to the three stimulants with the age of patients was observed. In contrast, no association was found between sex, smoking, and cell contraction. In conclusion, contractions of SMC due to CCK, carbachol, and KCl were significantly modified during life; inflammation of the colon led to a loss of SMC responsiveness.

  20. Predictions for weak mechanical ignition of strain hardened granular explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Keith A.

    2004-04-01

    Predictions are given for the coupled bulk and grain scale response of initially unstressed, strain hardened granular HMX (C4H8N8O8) due to mild piston impact (impact speeds <100 m/s). Importantly, this response depends on the material's strain history as the stress necessary for bulk inelastic compaction (crush up) increases with the solid volume fraction. Although the quasistatic compaction behavior of HMX is well characterized, the influence of strain history on the bulk and grain scale dynamic loading response has largely been unexplored. In this study, the initial solid volume fraction of the unstressed material is varied over the range of φf⩽φ0⩽1, where φf=0.655 is its free pour value. A Hugoniot analysis for the bulk material identifies three dispersed compaction wave structures that depend on the impact speed and initial solid volume fraction, and are analogous to elastic-plastic waves in dynamically loaded solids. For increasing impact speed, these structures consist of (1) a single viscoelastic wave; (2) a leading viscoelastic wave and a trailing viscoplastic wave; and (3) a single viscoplastic wave. It is shown that the resulting localized heating near intergranular contact surfaces can trigger sustained combustion of the material. Predictions for the grain scale thermochemical response indicate that significant bulk viscoplastic heating is required for ignition of materials with φf⩽φ0⩽0.88, whereas bulk viscoelastic heating leads to the ignition of denser materials (φ0>0.91). Both viscoelastic and viscoplastic heating are predicted to be important for ignition of materials having 0.88⩽φ0⩽0.91. Within this transition range there is predicted a sharp increase in impact sensitivity as the power input needed for ignition rapidly decreases to a value close to that for the free pour density (0.40 MW/cm2) before increasing again. This result is important for assessing the impact sensitivity and deflagration-to-detonation transition of

  1. Age associated low mitochondrial biogenesis may be explained by lack of response of PGC-1α to exercise training.

    PubMed

    Derbré, Frederic; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Nascimento, Ana Lucia; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Martinez-Bello, Vladimir Essau; Tresguerres, Jesus A F; Fuentes, Teresa; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette; Monsalve, Maria; Viña, Jose

    2012-06-01

    Low mitochondriogenesis is critical to explain loss of muscle function in aging and in the development of frailty. The aim of this work was to explain the mechanism by which mitochondriogenesis is decreased in aging and to determine to which extent it may be prevented by exercise training. We used aged rats and compared them with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α deleted mice (PGC-1α KO). PGC-1α KO mice showed a significant decrease in the mitochondriogenic pathway in muscle. In aged rats, we found a loss of exercise-induced expression of PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), and of cytochrome C. Thus muscle mitochondriogenesis, which is activated by exercise training in young animals, is not in aged or PGC-1α KO ones. Other stimuli to increase PGC-1α synthesis apart from exercise training, namely cold induction or thyroid hormone treatment, were effective in young rats but not in aged ones. To sum up, the low mitochondrial biogenesis associated with aging may be due to the lack of response of PGC-1α to different stimuli. Aged rats behave as PGC-1α KO mice. Results reported here highlight the role of PGC-1α in the loss of mitochondriogenesis associated with aging and point to this important transcriptional coactivator as a target for pharmacological interventions to prevent age-associated sarcopenia.

  2. Why semiconductors must be hardened when used in space

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, P. S.

    2000-01-04

    The natural space radiation environment presents a great challenge to present and future satellite systems with significant assets in space. Defining requirements for such systems demands knowledge about the space radiation environment and its effects on electronics and optoelectronics technologies, as well as suitable risk assessment of the uncertainties involved. For mission of high radiation levels, radiation-hardened integrated circuits will be required to preform critical mission functions. The most successful systems in space will be those that are best able to blend standard commercial electronics with custom radiation-hardened electronics in a mix that is suitable for the system of interest.

  3. Atomistic mechanisms of cyclic hardening in metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chuang; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2012-06-01

    Molecular dynamics with an embedded-atom method potential is used to simulate the nanoindentation of Cu63.5Zr36.5 metallic glasses. In particular, the effects of cyclic loading within the nominal elastic range on the overall strength and plasticity of metallic glass are studied. The simulated results are in line with the characteristics of experimentally observed hardening effects. In addition, analysis based on local von Mises strain suggests that the hardening is induced by confined microplasticity and stiffening in regions of the originally preferred yielding path, requiring a higher applied load to trigger a secondary one.

  4. Strain hardening in polymer glasses: limitations of network models.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Robert S; Robbins, Mark O

    2007-09-14

    Simulations are used to examine the microscopic origins of strain hardening in polymer glasses. While traditional entropic network models can be fit to the total stress, their underlying assumptions are inconsistent with simulation results. There is a substantial energetic contribution to the stress that rises rapidly as segments between entanglements are pulled taut. The thermal component of stress is less sensitive to entanglements, mostly irreversible, and directly related to the rate of local plastic rearrangements. Entangled and unentangled chains show the same strain hardening when plotted against the microscopic chain orientation rather than the macroscopic strain.

  5. Statistical thermodynamics of strain hardening in polycrystalline solids.

    PubMed

    Langer, J S

    2015-09-01

    This paper starts with a systematic rederivation of the statistical thermodynamic equations of motion for dislocation-mediated plasticity proposed in 2010 by Langer, Bouchbinder, and Lookman [Acta Mat. 58, 3718 (2010)ACMAFD1359-645410.1016/j.actamat.2010.03.009]. It then uses that theory to explain the anomalous rate-hardening behavior reported in 1988 by Follansbee and Kocks and to explore the relation between hardening rate and grain size reported in 1995 by Meyers et al. A central theme is the need for physics-based, nonequilibrium analyses in developing predictive theories of the strength of polycrystalline materials.

  6. Impact of Scaled Technology on Radiation Testing and Hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief overview of some of the radiation challenges facing emerging scaled digital technologies with implications on using consumer grade electronics and next generation hardening schemes. Commercial semiconductor manufacturers are recognizing some of these issues as issues for terrestrial performance. Looking at means of dealing with soft errors. The thinned oxide has indicated improved TID tolerance of commercial products hardened by "serendipity" which does not guarantee hardness or say if the trend will continue. This presentation also focuses one reliability implications of thinned oxides.

  7. Temperature influence on water transport in hardened cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Drouet, Emeline; Poyet, Stéphane; Torrenti, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-15

    Describing water transport in concrete is an important issue for the durability assessment of radioactive waste management reinforced concrete structures. Due to the waste thermal output such structures would be submitted to moderate temperatures (up to 80 °C). We have then studied the influence of temperature on water transport within hardened cement pastes of four different formulations. Using a simplified approach (describing only the permeation of liquid water) we characterized the properties needed to describe water transport (up to 80 °C) using dedicated experiments. For each hardened cement paste the results are presented and discussed.

  8. Precipitation hardening of a novel aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, Oscar Marcelo

    2002-09-15

    Deterioration of properties in cast aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) due to matrix/reinforcement chemical reactions is absent when AlB{sub 2} particles are used as reinforcements. This communication reports the fabrication of a heat-treatable AMC reinforced with borides. Final hardness values can be adjusted by solution and precipitation, which harden the composite. Evolution of the microstructure is concisely presented as observed by secondary electron microscopy. Precipitation hardening of the aluminum matrix, observed by microhardness measurements, has been corroborated by differential thermal analysis.

  9. Statistical thermodynamics of strain hardening in polycrystalline solids

    DOE PAGES

    Langer, James S.

    2015-09-18

    This paper starts with a systematic rederivation of the statistical thermodynamic equations of motion for dislocation-mediated plasticity proposed in 2010 by Langer, Bouchbinder, and Lookman. The paper then uses that theory to explain the anomalous rate-hardening behavior reported in 1988 by Follansbee and Kocks and to explore the relation between hardening rate and grain size reported in 1995 by Meyers et al. A central theme is the need for physics-based, nonequilibrium analyses in developing predictive theories of the strength of polycrystalline materials.

  10. Strain Hardening in Polymer Glasses: Limitations of Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoy, Robert S.; Robbins, Mark O.

    2007-09-01

    Simulations are used to examine the microscopic origins of strain hardening in polymer glasses. While traditional entropic network models can be fit to the total stress, their underlying assumptions are inconsistent with simulation results. There is a substantial energetic contribution to the stress that rises rapidly as segments between entanglements are pulled taut. The thermal component of stress is less sensitive to entanglements, mostly irreversible, and directly related to the rate of local plastic rearrangements. Entangled and unentangled chains show the same strain hardening when plotted against the microscopic chain orientation