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Sample records for age hypertension diabetes

  1. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia and Diseases of Aging: Obesity, Diabetes Mellitus, and Hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Christopher M.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Rickett, Edith M.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Associations between respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and several chronic diseases, including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension, have been documented in recent years. Although most evidence suggests reduced RSA is the result of chronic disease rather than the cause, some studies have documented reduced RSA among at-risk individuals prior to disease onset. These results raise the possibility that decreased vagal tone may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain chronic diseases. Presented here is a brief overview of studies which examine the relationship between vagal tone, as measured by RSA and baroreflex gain, and diseases of aging, including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Mechanisms by which vagal tone may be related to disease processes are discussed. In addition, we present results from a population-based study of RSA and hypertension in older adults. Consistent with previous studies, we found an inverse relationship between RSA and age, cigarette use, and diabetes. In logistic regression models which control for age, cigarette use, and diabetes, we found RSA was a significant negative predictor of hypertension. We conclude that the relationship between RSA and hypertension is somewhat independent of the age-related decline in parasympathetic activity. PMID:17034928

  2. Burden of Hypertension and Diabetes among Urban Population Aged ≥ 60 years in South Delhi: A Community Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Anil Kumar; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Kalaivani, Mani; Pandav, Chandrakant S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction India is going through a demographic transition, and the number of elderly is expected to increase both in absolute numbers, as well as in proportion. The elderly are one of the most vulnerable and high–risk group in terms of health status in any society, and more so for non- communicable diseases. Aims To estimate the prevalence of diabetes and hypertension among elderly persons and association with socio-demographic variables; & to assess the awareness, treatment and control status of those with diabetes and hypertension. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional community based study was carried out in a resettlement colony of South-east Delhi in Dakshinpuri Extension, Dr. Ambedkar Nagar. Elderly persons aged 60 years and above were selected by cluster random sampling. Information about self-reported diseases, socio-demographic variables was collected; fasting blood sugar and blood pressure were measured. Prevalence of diabetes and hypertension were calculated and association was tested by Chi-square test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used. Results A total of 710 elderly persons participated in the study. Diabetes was seen in 24.0% and 67% were hypertensive. Isolated hypertension was detected in 25.9%. No statistically significant difference by gender (p=0.11), age (p=0.16), education (p=0.31) and economic dependency (p=0.28), was seen in both diabetes and hypertension. Out of 167 persons with diabetes, 62.3% were on treatment and 33.6% were under control; while out of 477 hypertensives, 41% were under treatment and only one-third of them had their blood pressure under control. Conclusion This study highlighted a significant burden of non-communicable diseases amongst elderly persons in a low-middle class community in Delhi. It also showed the lack of awareness about their disease conditions and need for screening, diagnostic and treatment services at the primary level. PMID:27134900

  3. Hypertension and aging.

    PubMed

    Buford, Thomas W

    2016-03-01

    Hypertension is a highly prevalent condition with numerous health risks, and the incidence of hypertension is greatest among older adults. Traditional discussions of hypertension have largely focused on the risks for cardiovascular disease and associated events. However, there are a number of collateral effects, including risks for dementia, physical disability, and falls/fractures which are increasingly garnering attention in the hypertension literature. Several key mechanisms - including inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction - are common to biologic aging and hypertension development and appear to have key mechanistic roles in the development of the cardiovascular and collateral risks of late-life hypertension. The objective of the present review is to highlight the multi-dimensional risks of hypertension among older adults and discuss potential strategies for treatment and future areas of research for improving overall care for older adults with hypertension. PMID:26835847

  4. A systematic review of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension in imaging studies of cognitive aging: time to establish new norms

    PubMed Central

    Meusel, Liesel-Ann C.; Kansal, Nisha; Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; Yuen, William; MacIntosh, Bradley J.; Greenwood, Carol E.; Anderson, Nicole D.

    2014-01-01

    The rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and hypertension in older adults, and the deleterious effect of these conditions on cerebrovascular and brain health, is creating a growing discrepancy between the “typical” cognitive aging trajectory and a “healthy” cognitive aging trajectory. These changing health demographics make T2DM and hypertension important topics of study in their own right, and warrant attention from the perspective of cognitive aging neuroimaging research. Specifically, interpretation of individual or group differences in blood oxygenation level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) or positron emission tomography (PET H2O15) signals as reflective of differences in neural activation underlying a cognitive operation of interest requires assumptions of intact vascular health amongst the study participants. Without adequate screening, inclusion of individuals with T2DM or hypertension in “healthy” samples may introduce unwanted variability and bias to brain and/or cognitive measures, and increase potential for error. We conducted a systematic review of the cognitive aging neuroimaging literature to document the extent to which researchers account for these conditions. Of the 232 studies selected for review, few explicitly excluded individuals with T2DM (9%) or hypertension (13%). A large portion had exclusion criteria that made it difficult to determine whether T2DM or hypertension were excluded (44 and 37%), and many did not mention any selection criteria related to T2DM or hypertension (34 and 22%). Of all the surveyed studies, only 29% acknowledged or addressed the potential influence of intersubject vascular variability on the measured BOLD or PET signals. To reinforce the notion that individuals with T2DM and hypertension should not be overlooked as a potential source of bias, we also provide an overview of metabolic and vascular changes associated with T2DM and hypertension, as they relate to cerebrovascular and

  5. Diabetes and Hypertension in Urban Bhutanese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Bhakta Raj; Sharma, Krishna Prasad; Chapagai, Rup Narayan; Palzom, Dorji

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bhutan is a mountainous country with 31% urban population. There is no information on prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in Bhutan yet. This was the first study of its kind conducted in the capital city. Objective: To determine prevalence of diabetes, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and hypertension in urban Bhutanese population aged 25 to 74 years. Materials and Methods: Stratified two-stage sampling was adopted to include 2474 respondents (Males: 1132, Females: 1342) equally distributed among different age and sex groups. A questionnaire containing demographic, educational and social details and history of diabetes and hypertension was administered on the sampled population the previous evening and blood pressure measured the next morning in nearby camp where fasting blood samples were collected and an oral glucose tolerance test done. Results: Age and sex standardized prevalence of diabetes, IGT and IFG were 8.2.0, 21.6 and 4%, respectively. Only 66.5% of the population had normal blood sugar. Prevalence of diabetes and IGT increased progressively with increasing age. Prevalence of hypertension was 26% (Males: 28.3%, Females: 23.2%). It was observed that 54.1% of diabetes population had hypertension. Conclusion: The study shows that not only is prevalence of diabetes and hypertension high in the urban Bhutanese but also there is a high diagnosis and treatment gap in these disorders. PMID:24019598

  6. Hypertension in diabetic pregnancy: impact and long-term outlook.

    PubMed

    Colatrella, Antonietta; Loguercio, Valentina; Mattei, Luca; Trappolini, Massimo; Festa, Camilla; Stoppo, Michela; Napoli, Angela

    2010-08-01

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy can be chronic, pregestational or just diagnosed before the 20th week, or newly diagnosed in the second half of pregnancy. Any type of hypertension is more frequent in diabetic pregnancies with a different distribution among different types of diabetes. Most of the evidence is for pre-eclampsia associated with a marked increase in primary caesarean section, preterm birth and more need for neonatal intensive care. Different risk factors and pregnancy outcomes would support the hypothesis that pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension might be largely separate entities, but this position is not unanimously accepted. Chronic hypertension increases with age and duration of diabetes, predicting increased rates of prematurity and neonatal morbidity, especially when associated with superimposed pre-eclampsia. Long-term consequences are observed in women whose pregnancy was complicated by hypertension such as chronic hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20832742

  7. Phytotherapy of hypertension and diabetes in oriental Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ziyyat, A; Legssyer, A; Mekhfi, H; Dassouli, A; Serhrouchni, M; Benjelloun, W

    1997-09-01

    In order to select the main medicinal plants used in folk medicine to treat arterial hypertension and/or diabetes, a survey was undertaken in different areas of oriental Morocco. The patients (370 women and 256 men) were divided into three groups: diabetics (61%), hypertensives (23%) and hypertensive diabetic persons (16%). On average, 67.51% of patients regularly use medicinal plants. This proportion is perceptibly the same in all groups and does not depend on sex, age and socio-cultural level. This result shows that phytotherapy is widely adopted in northeastern Morocco. For diabetes, 41 plants were cited, of which the most used were Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (Leguminosae), Globularia alypum L. (Globulariaceae), Artemisia herba-alba Asso. (Compositae), Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad. (Cucurbitaceae) and Tetraclinis articulata Benth. (Cupressaceae). In the hypertension's therapy 18 vegetal species were reported, of which the most used were Allium sativum L. (Liliaceae), Olea europea L. (Oleaceae), Arbutus unedo L. (Ericaceae), Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) and Petroselinum crispum A.W. Hill (Apiaceae). Among the 18 species used for hypertension, 14 were also employed for diabetes. Moreover, these two diseases were associated in 41% of hypertensives. These findings suggest that hypertension observed in this region would be in a large part related to diabetes. PMID:9324004

  8. Arsenic and diabetes and hypertension in human populations: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-J. Wang, S.-L.; Chiou, J.-M.; Tseng, C.-H.; Chiou, H.-Y.; Hsueh, Y.-M.; Chen, S.-Y.; Wu, M.-M.; Lai, M.-S.

    2007-08-01

    Long-term exposure to ingested arsenic from drinking water has been well documented to be associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and hypertension in a dose-response relationship among residents of arseniasis-endemic areas in southwestern Taiwan and Bangladesh. An increased risk of self-reported hypertension but not diabetes was reported in a community-based study of residents who consumed drinking water with a low level of arsenic. Increased glycosylated hemoglobin level and systolic blood pressure were observed in workers occupationally exposed to arsenic. Inconsistent findings of arsenic and diabetes in occupational studies may result from the healthy worker effect and the variation in exposure measurement, age composition, number of patients, accuracy in diagnosis and classification of underlying causes of death, competing causes of death, and method to detect diabetes. The dose-response relationship and toxicological mechanisms of arsenic-induced diabetes and hypertension need further elucidation.

  9. Diabetic Kidney Disease and Hypertension: A True Love Story

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Anand; Vyas, Sony; Agarwal, Abhishek; Abbas, Shahid; Agarwal, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes Mellitus (DM) remains one of the commonest causes of structural and functional kidney abnormalities leading to End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). The next most common cause is hypertension. It is utmost important to investigate the association between diabetic nephropathy and hypertension because it is a major causal factor of end-stage kidney failure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Aim The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between albuminuria, hypertension and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in a prospective cohort of T2DM patients in a developing country. Materials and Methods A total of 824 patients were enrolled from a tertiary healthcare center in central India. This study was performed in three groups: normal controls (232), type 2 diabetics without nephropathy (185) and type 2 diabetics with nephropathy (407). Diabetic nephropathy was clinically defined by the presence of persistent proteinuria of > 500mg/day in a diabetic patient in the absence of clinical or laboratory evidence of other kidney or urinary tract disease. Hypertension was categorized based on JNC 7 classification. Detailed clinical history was obtained from all subjects. Student’s t-test was applied to see the difference in mean values of quantitative data in two groups. Chi-Square test was applied to see the difference in frequency of discrete variables in two groups. Results A 66.3% diabetic nephropathy patients and 51.9% type 2 diabetics without nephropathy were found hypertensive in present study; In contrast only 14.7% controls had hypertension. No association of hypertension was found with age and gender in either group. Serum creatinine and eGFR was found significantly different in hypertensive diabetic nephropathy patients than normotensive (p=0.002 and <0.0001 respectively). Conclusion Our study found that hypertension was an independent risk factor for the Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). Along with this, a proportional

  10. Understanding and treating hypertension in diabetic populations

    PubMed Central

    Battistoni, Allegra; Savoia, Carmine; Tocci, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and diabetes frequently occurs in the same individuals in clinical practice. Moreover, the presence of hypertension does increase the risk of new-onset diabetes, as well as diabetes does promote development of hypertension. Whatever the case, the concomitant presence of these conditions confers a high risk of major cardiovascular complications and promotes the use integrated pharmacological interventions, aimed at achieving the recommended therapeutic targets. While the benefits of lowering abnormal fasting glucose levels in patients with hypertension and diabetes have been consistently demonstrated, the blood pressure (BP) targets to be achieved to get a benefit in patients with diabetes have been recently reconsidered. In the past, randomized clinical trials have, indeed, demonstrated that lowering BP levels to less than 140/90 mmHg was associated to a substantial reduction of the risk of developing macrovascular and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. In addition, epidemiological and clinical reports suggested that “the lower, the better” for BP in diabetes, so that levels of BP even lower than 130/80 mmHg have been recommended. Recent randomized clinical trials, however, designed to evaluate the potential benefits obtained with an intensive antihypertensive therapy, aimed at achieving a target systolic BP level below 120 mmHg as compared to those obtained with less stringent therapy, have challenged the previous recommendations from international guidelines. In fact, detailed analyses of these trials showed a paradoxically increased risk of coronary events, mostly myocardial infarction, in those patients who achieved the lowest BP levels, particularly in the high-risk subsets of hypertensive populations with diabetes. In the light of these considerations, the present article will briefly review the common pathophysiological mechanisms, the potential sites of therapeutic interactions and the currently recommended

  11. Diabetes in the Aged

    PubMed Central

    Grobin, Wulf

    1970-01-01

    In keeping with the already known high prevalence of diabetes among residents of the Jewish Home for the Aged, Toronto, annual screening disclosed an average incidence of 25.5% of abnormal glucose tolerance (two-hour post-glucose blood sugars above 140 mg./100 ml.) in residents not known to be diabetic. Forty-five (47%) of the 94 residents with abnormal screening values were considered subsequently to be diabetic according to our criteria. Long-term follow-up, particularly of 81 residents initially normoglycemic in 1964-5, confirmed that the natural course of glucose tolerance in this population was one of progressive deterioration. By contrast, improvement amounting to remission has been demonstrated in nine out of 20 residents several years after they had been declared diabetic, and is thought to have been induced by dietotherapy. Moderate hyperglycemia per se did not cause symptoms in these almost always keto-resistant and usually aglycosuric aged diabetics, who often claimed they felt better when hyperglycemic. Hypoglycemia was an ever present danger when anti-diabetic medication was used; it was the main reason for undertreatment. So far, data from our long-term study have not shown morbidity to be markedly increased in the diabetics, and mortality was found to be evenly distributed among diabetic and non-diabetic male residents. However, in the females there was a clear correlation between mortality rate and the diminished glucose tolerance. What may appear as overdiagnosis of diabetes in the aged is recommended in the hope that early institution of dietary treatment will delay the development of clinical diabetes and the need for anti-diabetic agents. This, in turn, would prevent iatrogenic hypoglycemia. It would also reduce the severity and frequency of spontaneous hypoglycemia which, we believe, occurs more commonly in the early phase of diabetes in the aged than is generally realized. PMID:5476778

  12. Hypertension and Diabetes Prevalence in Older Persons in Jamaica, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell-Fearon, K; Waldron, N; James, K; Laws, H; Holder-Nevins, D; Eldemire-Shearer, D

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Jamaican population is experiencing both a demographic and epidemiological transition. This 2012 study of 2943 community dwelling persons over sixty years of age sought to determine the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes and how it has increased since the earlier 1989 study. Hypertension was the most prevalent non-communicable disease with 61.4% and had increased from 41.4% since 1989. It increased with age and was more common in females than males. Diabetes, at 26.3%, was the third most prevalent; it had increased by 157.1% since 1989. While the majority of affected persons were on medication, control of both diseases was less than adequate. Obesity was associated with both diseases. The paper discusses the implications for healthcare systems. PMID:25781276

  13. Diabetes screening: a pending issue in hypertense/obese patients.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Armina; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Navarro-Cremades, Felipe; Cortés, Ernesto; Rizo-Baeza, María Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The literature about possible cardiovascular consequences of diagnostic inertia in diabetes is scarce. We examined the influence of undetected high fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels on the cardiovascular risk and poor control of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive or obese patients, with no previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (i.e., diagnostic inertia). A cross-sectional study during a preventive program in a Spanish region was performed in 2003-2004. The participants were aged ≥40 years and did not have diabetes but were hypertensive (n = 5, 347) or obese (n = 7, 833). The outcomes were high cardiovascular risk (SCORE ≥5%), poor control of the blood pressure (≥140/90 mmHg) and class II obesity. The relationship was examined between FBG and the main parameters, calculating the adjusted odd ratios with multivariate models. Higher values of FBG were associated with all the outcomes. A more proactive attitude towards the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in the hypertensive and obese population should be adopted. PMID:25922799

  14. Diabetes screening: a pending issue in hypertense/obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Sepehri, Armina; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Navarro-Cremades, Felipe; Cortés, Ernesto; Rizo-Baeza, María Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The literature about possible cardiovascular consequences of diagnostic inertia in diabetes is scarce. We examined the influence of undetected high fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels on the cardiovascular risk and poor control of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive or obese patients, with no previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (i.e., diagnostic inertia). A cross-sectional study during a preventive program in a Spanish region was performed in 2003–2004. The participants were aged ≥40 years and did not have diabetes but were hypertensive (n = 5, 347) or obese (n = 7, 833). The outcomes were high cardiovascular risk (SCORE ≥5%), poor control of the blood pressure (≥140/90 mmHg) and class II obesity. The relationship was examined between FBG and the main parameters, calculating the adjusted odd ratios with multivariate models. Higher values of FBG were associated with all the outcomes. A more proactive attitude towards the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in the hypertensive and obese population should be adopted. PMID:25922799

  15. Restless Legs Syndrome in Patients with Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sabic, Adela; Sinanovic, Osman; Sabic, Dzevad; Galic, Gordan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze frequency of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Patients and Methods: It was analyzed 120 subjects (from Health Center Živinice/Family Medicine Department) through a survey conducted in the period from March to June 2015, of which 30 (8 men/22 women). Subjects were 30 patients with longtime hypertension (HT)(18 men/12 women), 30 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) type I or II (9 men/21 women), 30 patients with long standing DM type I or II and HT (12 men /18 women), and 30 control subjects (12 men/18 women). RLS were evaluated by questionnaire - International RLS Study Group Criteria. The average age of patients in the group with HT was 58.70 ± 9.07, in the group with DM 48.43 ± 15.37, and in the group of patients with HT and DM 63.90 ± 7.49 years. In the control group mean age was 52.76 ± 14.83 years. Statistical data were analyzed in Excel and SSPS statistical program. Results: RLS was identified in 10 (30%) of those with HT; 7 (21%) in patients with DM, and 10 (30%) in patients with HT+DM. In the control group RLS was verified in 4 (12%) patients. Comparing the results, it was observed significant difference between the HT and the control group (p=0.0012) and HT+ DM and control group (p=0.0012). The frequency of RLS between DM and the control group was not significantly significant (p=0.107). Conclusion: RLS is frequent in patients with hypertension (30%), hypertension+ diabetes mellitus (30%), and patients with DM (21%). PMID:27147785

  16. Postpartum Healthcare After Gestational Diabetes and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, Kristin; Rogers, Stephanie; Ball, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy identify women with an elevated lifetime risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Methods: Prospective cohort of women recruited from the postpartum service of a large community-based academic obstetrical hospital after delivery of a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes (GDM) or a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP). Interviews were conducted, and validated surveys completed, before hospital discharge and again 3 months postpartum. Results: The study sample included 249 women: 111 with GDM, 127 with HDP, and 11 with both. Most, 230 (92.4%) had a PCP prior to pregnancy and 97 (39.0%) reported an office visit with their PCP during the prenatal period. Of the 176 (70.7%) participants who attended the 3-month study visit, 169 (96.0%) women with either diagnosis reported they had attended their 6-week postpartum visit. By the 3-month study visit, 51 (57.9%) women with GDM had completed follow-up glucose testing; 93 (97.9%) with HDP had follow-up blood pressure testing; and 101 (57.4%) with either diagnosis recalled ever having completed lipid screening. Women least likely to complete screening tests were those who had no college education, less than a high school level of health literacy, and who were not privately insured. Conclusion: There are important opportunities to improve postpartum testing for diabetes and CVD risk factor assessment. Most women were connected to primary care suggesting a “hand-off” to a primary care physician after pregnancy is feasible. More robust strategies may be needed to improve follow-up care for women with less education, lower health literacy, and those without private health insurance. PMID:25089915

  17. Hypertension in gestational diabetes mellitus: pathophysiology and long-term consequences.

    PubMed

    Sibai, Baha M; Ross, Michael G

    2010-03-01

    Gestational hypertension and gestational diabetes mellitus are the most frequent obstetric disorders during pregnancy. The rates of both disorders are expected to increase as a result of delayed pregnancy at a later maternal age, the epidemic of obesity and the increased frequency of using assisted reproductive technology in women with infertility. Pregnancies complicated one or both of these disorders are also associated with adverse consequences for the mother and infant (both acute and long-term). The objectives of this review are to describe the association between gestational hypertension and gestational diabetes, and to discuss approaches to management and summarize long-term consequences of gestational hypertension. PMID:20121395

  18. Health-related quality of life and help seeking among American Indians with diabetes and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Janette; Whitesell, Nancy R.; Roubideaux, Yvette; Manson, Spero M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) of American Indians with diabetes, hypertension, or both conditions using the SF36; and to explore how the HRQoL is associated with help seeking among American Indians with and without these chronic conditions. Methods We analyzed data obtained from respondents with diabetes and/or hypertension who participated in a large epidemiological study of two culturally distinct American Indian tribes. Comparison data were provided by an age, gender, and tribe matched sample from the same study who did not report either condition. Results The respondents with both diabetes and hypertension had the lowest HRQoL on all eight subscales of SF36. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed that the assumption of equivalent factor loadings for participants with and without diabetes and/or hypertension was not satisfied. Biomedical service use was significantly associated with the SF36 physical health factor in those with hypertension only. Help seeking from traditional healers was significantly negatively related to physical factor scores for all the respondents except those with diabetes only. Conclusions Participants with comorbid diabetes and hypertension had worse HRQoL. The relationships between HRQoL and different types of help seeking varied depending on the comorbidity status of the respondents. PMID:19526380

  19. The altered homeostatic theory: A hypothesis proposed to be useful in understanding and preventing ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes--including reducing the risk of age and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hellstrom, H R

    2007-01-01

    Evidence will be presented to support the usefulness of the altered homeostatic theory in understanding basic pathogenetic mechanisms of ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertension, and diabetes, and in improving prevention of these disorders. The theory argues that: IHD, hypertension, and diabetes share the same basic pathogenesis; risk factors favor a sympathetic homeostatic shift; preventative factors favor a parasympathetic homeostatic shift; risk and preventative factors oppose each other through a dynamic risk/prevention balance; and prevention should be based on improving the risk/prevention balance. Prevention based on improving the risk/prevention balance should be more effective, as this method is regarded as reflecting more accurately basic pathogenetic mechanisms. As example, the theory argues that the risk of supposedly nonmodifiable risk factors as age and the risk of relatively nonmodifiable atherosclerosis can be reduced significantly. The possible validity of the altered homeostatic theory was tested by a study based on multiple associations. Findings support a common pathogenesis for IHD, hypertension, and diabetes based on a sympathetic homeostatic shift, and the usefulness of prevention based on improving the risk/prevention balance by using standard pharmaceutical and lifestyle preventative measures. The same set of multiple and diverse risk factors favored IHD, hypertension, and diabetes, and the same set of multiple and diverse pharmaceutical and lifestyle preventative measures prevented these disorders. Also, the same set of preventative agents generally improved cognitive function and bone density, and reduced the incidence of Alzheimer's disease, atrial fibrillation, and cancer. Unexpectedly, evidence was developed that four major attributes of sympathetic activation represent four major risk factors; attributes of sympathetic activation are a tendency toward thrombosis and vasoconstriction, lipidemia, inflammation, and hyperglycemia, and

  20. Family history of hypertension and diabetes in relation to preeclampsia risk in Peruvian women.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Sixto E; Zhang, Cuilin; Qiu, Chun-Fang; Williams, Michelle A

    2003-01-01

    In a case-control study of 169 preeclamptics and 201 controls, we assessed maternal parental history of chronic hypertension and diabetes in relation to preeclampsia risk among Peruvian women. Participants provided information on parental history of the two conditions and other covariates during postpartum interviews. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for confounding by age, parity and prepregnancy adiposity. In this population, women were more likely to know the diabetes status of their parents than their hypertension status. Compared with women without a parental history of hypertension, women with a parental history of hypertension experienced a 20% increased risk of preeclampsia (OR = 1.2; 95% CI 0.7-2.2) that did not reach statistical significance. Women with a positive parental history for diabetes had a 3.4-fold increased risk of preeclampsia (95% CI 1.4-8.4). Women with a positive parental history of both hypertension and diabetes, as compared with those whose parents had neither condition, experienced a 4.6- fold increased risk of preeclampsia (OR = 4.6; 95% CI 0.9-23.0). Our results are generally consistent with the thesis that parental history of hypertension and diabetes reflects genetic and behavioral factors whereby women may be predisposed to an increased risk of preeclampsia. PMID:14530611

  1. Diabetes and Hypertension: A Comparative Review of Current Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Michael J; Horani, Tariq; DiPette, Donald J

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease plays a major role in the morbidity and mortality of patients with diabetes mellitus. In turn, hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and its prevalence is increased in diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the detection and management of elevated blood pressure (BP) is a critical component of the comprehensive clinical management of diabetics. Despite significant advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of hypertension, there continues to be debate regarding the pharmacologic treatment of hypertension, especially in high-risk groups such as in patients with diabetes mellitus with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD). This debate largely involves at what BP (ie, treatment threshold BP) to initiate pharmacologic antihypertensive therapy and subsequently what treatment target BP should be achieved (ie, goal BP). Presently, there are several guidelines that address hypertension in diabetes mellitus, including the recently released guideline from the Eighth Report of the Joint National Committee (JNC 8). Therefore, this review will compare and contrast these current guidelines, as they relate to the management and treatment of hypertension in diabetes mellitus. Since diabetes mellitus and CKD are significantly inter-related, the presence of CKD as it relates to patients with diabetes mellitus will also be addressed. PMID:26234374

  2. Prevalence of Hypertension in Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS-II) and its Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Prabha; Pathak, Rahul; Kotian, Mangalore Shashidhar; Ullal, Sheetal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is a major public health problem in India and worldwide. Since hypertension is often asymptomatic, it commonly remains undetected, leading to serious complications if untreated. Hypertension is one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease. It doubles the risk of developing coronary artery disease, increases the risk of congestive heart failure by four folds and that of cerebrovascular disease and stroke by seven folds. Hypertension is directly responsible for 57% of all stroke deaths and 42% of coronary heart disease deaths in India. Aim To identify prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in a semi urban population of Mangalore, who participated in Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS-II). Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 551 subjects aged ≥ 20 years who were randomly selected. Hypertension was diagnosed and classified according to Joint National Committee 7 (JNC) criteria. Blood pressure was measured by a doctor using calibrated sphygmomanometer. Anthropometric measurements, lipid and glucose estimations were done for all subjects. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test and student’s t-test (unpaired). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done using hypertension as dependent variable and the various risk factors as independent variables. Results Overall prevalence of hypertension in the community was 41% (227/551) (40.9% in men, 41.3% in women). Prehypertension was found in 40% (223/551) (45.4% in men, 38.1% in women), and only 18.3% (101/551) had normal blood pressure. Stage I hypertension was seen in 29.7% (164/551) (28.9% in men, 30.1% in women). Stage II hypertension was seen in 11.4% (63/551) (12% in men, 11% in women). Age, obesity, diabetes, serum cholesterol and serum triglycerides were strongly associated with hypertension. Only 46% (254/551) of the hypertensive subjects were aware that they were hypertensive. Conclusion Prevalence of hypertension was high in this

  3. Correlation between Microalbuminuria and Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Taj, Azeem; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Farrukh; Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is commonly found in patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). Microalbuminuria is the first clinical sign of involvement of kidneys in patients with type 2 diabetes. Uncontrolled hypertension induces a higher risk of cardiovascular events, including death, increasing proteinuria and progression to kidney disease. Objectives: To determine the correlation between microalbuminuria and hypertension and their association with other risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: One hundred and thirteen type 2 diabetic patients attending the diabetic clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore, Pakistan were screened for microalbuminuria and raised blood pressure. The study was conducted from November 2012 to June 2013. Results: Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1, those with normoalbuminuria (n=63) and Group 2, those having microalbuminuria (n=50). Group 2 patients showed higher blood pressure values as compared to Group 1. The results were statistically significant and showed poor glycemic control as a contributing risk factor. Conclusion: The study concluded that there is high frequency of hypertension among type 2 diabetics but still much higher among those having microalbuminuria. So, early recognition of renal dysfunction through detection of microalbuminuria and to start treatment without any delay will confer future protection from end stage renal disease as well as hypertension and its complications in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:24948969

  4. Validation of diabetes mellitus and hypertension diagnosis in computerized medical records in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized Clinical Records, which are incorporated in primary health care practice, have great potential for research. In order to use this information, data quality and reliability must be assessed to prevent compromising the validity of the results. The aim of this study is to validate the diagnosis of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the computerized clinical records of primary health care, taking the diagnosis criteria established in the most prominently used clinical guidelines as the gold standard against which what measure the sensitivity, specificity, and determine the predictive values. The gold standard for diabetes mellitus was the diagnostic criteria established in 2003 American Diabetes Association Consensus Statement for diabetic subjects. The gold standard for hypertension was the diagnostic criteria established in the Joint National Committee published in 2003. Methods A cross-sectional multicentre validation study of diabetes mellitus and hypertension diagnoses in computerized clinical records of primary health care was carried out. Diagnostic criteria from the most prominently clinical practice guidelines were considered for standard reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and global agreement (with kappa index), were calculated. Results were shown overall and stratified by sex and age groups. Results The agreement for diabetes mellitus with the reference standard as determined by the guideline was almost perfect (κ = 0.990), with a sensitivity of 99.53%, a specificity of 99.49%, a positive predictive value of 91.23% and a negative predictive value of 99.98%. Hypertension diagnosis showed substantial agreement with the reference standard as determined by the guideline (κ = 0.778), the sensitivity was 85.22%, the specificity 96.95%, the positive predictive value 85.24%, and the negative predictive value was 96.95%. Sensitivity results were worse in patients who also had diabetes and in

  5. Management of diabetes mellitus and hypertension at UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Yusef, J I

    2000-01-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at all UNRWA primary health care facilities in Lebanon Field, to assess the quality of care of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The study reviewed 2202 records of diabetic and hypertensive patients. Both diseases were present at an early age (< 40 years), with family history, obesity and sedentary lifestyle being the main risk factors. The major complication was cardiovascular disease followed by retinopathy. Action-oriented measures to improve the organization and management of the health care services were identified. PMID:11556027

  6. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes Following Acute Myocardial Infarctions in Hypertensive Patients With or Without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Goo; Ahn, Youngkeun; Chae, Shung Chull; Hur, Seung Ho; Hong, Taek Jong; Kim, Young Jo; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Rhew, Jay Young; Chae, In Ho; Cho, Myeong Chan; Bae, Jang Ho; Rha, Seung Woon; Kim, Chong Jim; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yang Soo; Yoon, Junghan; Chung, Wook Sung; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives It is thought that patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have a poor prognosis after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but the effect of diabetes on the outcomes of hypertensive patients with AMIs has not been elucidated in the Korean population. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of diabetes on long-term clinical outcomes following AMIs in patients with hypertension. Subjects and Methods Using data from the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (November 2005 to December 2006), 2,233 hypertensive patients with AMIs were grouped as follows based on the presence of DM: group I, diabetic hypertension (n=892, 544 men, mean age=66.2±10.9 years); and group II, non-diabetic hypertension (n=1341, 938 men, mean age=63.9±12.8 years). The primary study outcomes included in-hospital death and major adverse cardiac events (MACE; cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), repeat percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass surgery) at the 1 year follow-up. Results Hypertensive patients with DM were older and more likely to be women. The diabetic group had lower blood pressure (p<0.001), a lower left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.001), a more severe degree of heart failure (p<0.001), a longer duration of coronary care unit admission (p<0.001), and a higher incidence of hyperlipidemia (p=0.007). The N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level (4602.5±8710.6 pg/mL vs. 2320.8±5837.9 pg/mL, p<0.001) was higher and the creatinine clearance (62.4±29.9 mL/min vs. 73.0±40.8 mL/min, p<0.001) was lower in the diabetic group than the non-diabetic group. Coronary angiographic findings revealed more frequent involvement of the left main stem (p=0.002) and multiple vessels (p<0.001) in the diabetic group. The rate of in-hospital death was higher in the diabetic group (p<0.001). During follow-up, the rates of composite MACE at 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months were higher in the diabetic group (p<0

  7. Accelerated Vascular Aging as a Paradigm for Hypertensive Vascular Disease: Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias; Husmann, Marc; Meyer, Matthias R

    2016-05-01

    Aging is considered the most important nonmodifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death after age 28 years. Because of demographic changes the world population is expected to increase to 9 billion by the year 2050 and up to 12 billion by 2100, with several-fold increases among those 65 years of age and older. Healthy aging and prevention of aging-related diseases and associated health costs have become part of political agendas of governments around the world. Atherosclerotic vascular burden increases with age; accordingly, patients with progeria (premature aging) syndromes die from myocardial infarctions or stroke as teenagers or young adults. The incidence and prevalence of arterial hypertension also increases with age. Arterial hypertension-like diabetes and chronic renal failure-shares numerous pathologies and underlying mechanisms with the vascular aging process. In this article, we review how arterial hypertension resembles premature vascular aging, including the mechanisms by which arterial hypertension (as well as other risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, or chronic renal failure) accelerates the vascular aging process. We will also address the importance of cardiovascular risk factor control-including antihypertensive therapy-as a powerful intervention to interfere with premature vascular aging to reduce the age-associated prevalence of diseases such as myocardial infarction, heart failure, hypertensive nephropathy, and vascular dementia due to cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we will discuss the implementation of endothelial therapy, which aims at active patient participation to improve primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27118295

  8. The Hospitalization Costs of Diabetes and Hypertension Complications in Zimbabwe: Estimations and Correlations.

    PubMed

    Mutowo, Mutsa P; Lorgelly, Paula K; Laxy, Michael; Renzaho, Andre M N; Mangwiro, John C; Owen, Alice J

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Treating complications associated with diabetes and hypertension imposes significant costs on health care systems. This study estimated the hospitalization costs for inpatients in a public hospital in Zimbabwe. Methods. The study was retrospective and utilized secondary data from medical records. Total hospitalization costs were estimated using generalized linear models. Results. The median cost and interquartile range (IQR) for patients with diabetes, $994 (385-1553) mean $1319 (95% CI: 981-1657), was higher than patients with hypertension, $759 (494-1147) mean $914 (95% CI: 825-1003). Female patients aged below 65 years with diabetes had the highest estimated mean costs ($1467 (95% CI: 1177-1828)). Wound care had the highest estimated mean cost of all procedures, $2884 (95% CI: 2004-4149) for patients with diabetes and $2239 (95% CI: 1589-3156) for patients with hypertension. Age below 65 years, medical procedures (amputation, wound care, dialysis, and physiotherapy), the presence of two or more comorbidities, and being prescribed two or more drugs were associated with significantly higher hospitalization costs. Conclusion. Our estimated costs could be used to evaluate and improve current inpatient treatment and management of patients with diabetes and hypertension and determine the most cost-effective interventions to prevent complications and comorbidities. PMID:27403444

  9. The Hospitalization Costs of Diabetes and Hypertension Complications in Zimbabwe: Estimations and Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Mutowo, Mutsa P.; Lorgelly, Paula K.; Laxy, Michael; Mangwiro, John C.; Owen, Alice J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Treating complications associated with diabetes and hypertension imposes significant costs on health care systems. This study estimated the hospitalization costs for inpatients in a public hospital in Zimbabwe. Methods. The study was retrospective and utilized secondary data from medical records. Total hospitalization costs were estimated using generalized linear models. Results. The median cost and interquartile range (IQR) for patients with diabetes, $994 (385–1553) mean $1319 (95% CI: 981–1657), was higher than patients with hypertension, $759 (494–1147) mean $914 (95% CI: 825–1003). Female patients aged below 65 years with diabetes had the highest estimated mean costs ($1467 (95% CI: 1177–1828)). Wound care had the highest estimated mean cost of all procedures, $2884 (95% CI: 2004–4149) for patients with diabetes and $2239 (95% CI: 1589–3156) for patients with hypertension. Age below 65 years, medical procedures (amputation, wound care, dialysis, and physiotherapy), the presence of two or more comorbidities, and being prescribed two or more drugs were associated with significantly higher hospitalization costs. Conclusion. Our estimated costs could be used to evaluate and improve current inpatient treatment and management of patients with diabetes and hypertension and determine the most cost-effective interventions to prevent complications and comorbidities. PMID:27403444

  10. The burden of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in rural communities in southern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isara, Alphonsus Rukevwe; Okundia, Patrick Otamere

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The African region of the world is experiencing a double epidemic of both communicable and non-communicable diseases. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus among adult residents of rural communities in southern Nigeria. Methods A community based descriptive cross-sectional study. Adults aged 18 years and above residing in the rural communities who attended a free medical outreach programme were screened for hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Data were collected using a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results Of the 845 participants, 349 (41.3%) were aged 50-69 years, 263 (31.1%) were males, and 305 (36.1%) were farmers. Overweight and obesity were found in 184 (21.8%) and 90 (10.6%) of them respectively. The overall prevalence of hypertension was 37.6% (males 43.7%, females 35.1%, p = 0.018) while that of diabetes mellitus was 4.6% (males 1.9%, females 5.8%, p = 0.012). Predictors of hypertension were age ≥ 40 years (OR = 5.04, CI: 2.99 - 8.48), overweight/obesity (OR = 1.56, CI: 1.15 - 2.13) while females are less likely to develop hypertension (OR = 0.72, CI: 0.53 - 0.98). The significant predictor of diabetes mellitus was overweight/obesity (OR = 3.53, CI: 1.78 - 6.98). Conclusion The rising prevalence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus is assuming an epidemic level in rural communities in southern Nigeria. There is an urgent need for intensive health education and community surveillance programmes targeted at rural communities in order to achieve prevention and control of these non-communicable diseases in Nigeria. PMID:26090051

  11. Predictors of cardiac morbidity in diabetic, new-onset diabetic and non-diabetic high-risk hypertensive patients: The Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial.

    PubMed

    Aksnes, Tonje A; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Rostrup, Morten; Holzhauer, Björn; Hua, Tsushung A; Julius, Stevo

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic and new-onset diabetic patients with hypertension have higher cardiac morbidity than patients without diabetes. We aimed to investigate whether baseline predictors of cardiac morbidity, the major constituent of the primary endpoint in the Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial, were different in patients with diabetes and new-onset diabetes compared to patients without diabetes. In total, 15,245 high-risk hypertensive patients in the VALUE trial were followed for an average of 4.2 years. At baseline, 5250 patients were diabetic by the 1999 World Health Organization criteria, 1298 patients developed new-onset diabetes and 8697 patients stayed non-diabetic during follow-up. Cardiac morbidity was defined as a composite of myocardial infarction and heart failure requiring hospitalization, and baseline predictors were identified by univariate and multivariate stepwise Cox regression analyses. History of coronary heart disease (CHD) and age were the most important predictors of cardiac morbidity in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. History of CHD, history of stroke and age were the only significant predictors of cardiac morbidity in patients with new-onset diabetes. Predictors of cardiac morbidity, in particular history of CHD and age, were essentially the same in high-risk hypertensive patients with diabetes, new-onset diabetes and without diabetes who participated in the VALUE trial. PMID:26808585

  12. Tooth element levels indicating exposure profiles in diabetic and hypertensive subjects from Mysore, India.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, G; Sukumar, A; Nandlal, B; Vellaichamy, S; Thanasekaran, K; Ramanathan, A L

    2009-12-01

    Element contents of teeth elucidate exposure nature, but less is known about association of tooth element concentrations of diabetics and hypertensives with exposure profile. Present study aims to estimate copper, chromium, iron, zinc, nickel, and lead concentrations in the permanent teeth of control, diabetic, and hypertensive subjects from Mysore. The results show that lead levels of teeth (Pb-T) are higher in the hypertensives and diabetics, whereas copper levels of teeth (Cu-T) are lower in the hypertensives and users of stainless steel utensils than that of controls and users of mixed utensils. The elevated Cu-T levels found in the users of mixed utensils that being made of several metals are ascribed to leaching effect of sour and spicy food of Indian cuisine. The element levels were influenced by diet (Zn-T), place of living, sex and income (Pb-T) of the subjects, but not by age, drinking water from different sources, and certain habits viz., smoking, alcohol consumption, chewing betel, and nut. Thus, it is evident that high Pb-T and low Cu-T levels may be related with diabetes and hypertension and high Pb-T and Cu-T levels, respectively, in the urbanites, and the users of mixed utensils may show different exposure profiles from environment and utensils. PMID:19352596

  13. Family history of hypertension and type 2 diabetes in relation to preeclampsia risk.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chunfang; Williams, Michelle A; Leisenring, Wendy M; Sorensen, Tanya K; Frederick, Ihunnaya O; Dempsey, Jennifer C; Luthy, David A

    2003-03-01

    In a case-control study of 190 preeclamptic patients and 373 control subjects, we assessed maternal family history of chronic hypertension and type 2 diabetes in relation to preeclampsia risk. Participants provided information on first-degree family history of the 2 conditions and other covariates during postpartum interviews. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for confounding by age, race, and obesity. Compared with women with no parental history of hypertension, women with maternal only (odds ratio=1.9), paternal only (odds ratio=1.8), or both maternal and paternal history of hypertension (odds ratio=2.6) had a statistically significant increased risk of preeclampsia. The odds ratio for women with at least one hypertensive parent and a hypertensive sibling was 4.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 11.6). Both maternal only (odds ratio=2.1; 95% confidence interval, 0.9 to 4.6) and paternal only (odds ratio=1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 3.2) history of diabetes was associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia. Women with a diabetic sibling had a 4.7-fold increased risk of preeclampsia (95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 19.8). For women with at least one hypertensive parent and at least one diabetic parent, relative to those with parents with neither diagnosis, the odds ratio for preeclampsia was 3.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 6.2). Our results are consistent with the thesis that family history of hypertension and diabetes reflects genetic and behavioral factors whereby women may be predisposed to an increased preeclampsia risk. PMID:12623936

  14. [Vascular aging, arterial hypertension and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Weisser, B

    2011-11-01

    The present review delineates the significance of intima-media-thickness, arterial stiffness and endothelial function for vascular aging. There is profound evidence for an increase in intima-media-thickness and vascular stiffness not only during healthy aging but induced also by cardiovascular risk factors. There is a central role of arterial hypertension for this progression in both structural factors. In addition, both parameters are strongly associated with cardiovascular risk. Endothelial function measured as postischemic flow-mediated vasodilatation is a functional parameter which is decreased both in healthy aging and by cardiovascular risk factors. Physical activity modifies the influence of aging and risk factors on endothelial function. A positive influence of endurance exercise on vascular stiffness and endothelial function has been demonstrated in numerous studies. In long-term studies, regular physical activity has been shown to reduce the progression of intima-media-thickness. Thus, arterial hypertension accelerates vascular aging, while physical activity has a positive influence on a variety of vascular parameters associated with vascular aging. PMID:22068448

  15. Hepatic arteriolosclerosis: a small-vessel complication of diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Maya; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Deng, Yanghong; Ciarleglio, Maria; Jain, Dhanpat

    2015-07-01

    Liver involvement in diabetes is well recognized in the form of steatohepatitis and glycogenic hepatopathy. More recently, sinusoidal fibrosis, even in the absence of steatosis, has also been suggested to be associated with diabetes (diabetic hepatosclerosis); however, case-control studies are lacking. In addition, microangiopathy (hyaline arteriolosclerosis), a well-known complication of diabetes, has not been well studied in liver. Therefore, we undertook a cross-sectional blinded study with the specific aim of evaluating the association between hepatic sinusoidal fibrosis and hepatic arteriolosclerosis (HA) with diabetes. Liver biopsy findings from 89 diabetic patients obtained between January 2006 and December 2009 were compared with those of 89 nondiabetic patients matched by age and hepatitis C virus infection status. Patients with cirrhosis, liver mass, right heart failure, significant alcohol use, or insufficient available clinical information were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for the presence of diabetes, body mass index, diabetes treatment, and comorbidities at the time of biopsy (eg, underlying liver disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia). Liver biopsies were evaluated blinded to all clinical data (including presence or absence of diabetes) for a variety of histologic features, especially patterns of fibrosis and HA. Diabetic patients had a higher average body mass index (33 vs. 30 m/kg, P=0.0039), prevalence of hypertension (78% vs. 33%, P<0.0001), and dyslipidemia (52% vs. 20%, P<0.0001). Among diabetic patients, 87% had type 2 diabetes, and 57% used insulin. Whereas sinusoidal fibrosis, with or without steatosis, was not significantly associated with the presence of diabetes, HA was significantly more prevalent among diabetic patients compared with controls: 45% versus 29% (P=0.0298). The presence of both diabetes and hypertension had a significant odds for HA: with an adjusted odds ratio of 2.632 (95% confidence interval, 1.178-5.878; P=0

  16. Knowing hypertension and diabetes: Conditions of treatability in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Susan Reynolds

    2016-05-01

    In Uganda, hypertension and diabetes have only recently been included in the health policy agenda. As they become treatable disorders, they take on more distinct contours in people's minds. This article relates knowledge about these two conditions to health institutions and technology for diagnosing and treating them. The response to the AIDS epidemic in Uganda provides an important context for, and contrast with, the emergence of hypertension and diabetes as social phenomena. Ethnographic fieldwork shows the interplay between experience of these conditions and the political economy of treatability. PMID:26233676

  17. Hypertension Management and Microvascular Insulin Resistance in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Hyun; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is in essence a vascular disease and is frequently associated with hypertension, macrovascular events, and microvascular complications. Microvascular dysfunction, including impaired recruitment and capillary rarefaction, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Microvascular insulin resistance and renin-angiotensin system upregulation are present in diabetes, and each contributes to the development of hypertension and microvascular dysfunction. In the insulin-sensitive state, insulin increases microvascular perfusion by increasing endothelial nitric oxide production, but this effect is abolished by insulin resistance. Angiotensin II, acting via the type 1 receptors, induces inflammation and oxidative stress, leading to impaired insulin signaling, reduced nitric oxide availability, and vasoconstriction. Conversely, it acts on the type 2 receptors to cause vasodilatation. Because substrate and hormonal exchanges occur in the microvasculature, antihypertensive agents targeted to improve microvascular insulin sensitivity and function may have beneficial effects beyond their capacity to lower blood pressure in patients with diabetes. PMID:20582734

  18. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes among hypertensive patients attending Kiambu district Hospital, Kenya: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Meme, Nkatha; Amwayi, Samuel; Nganga, Ziporrah; Buregyeya, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are two common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) that are closely linked: one cannot be properly managed without attention to the other. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic and pre-diabetic states that is abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) and factors associated with it among hypertensive patients in Kiambu Hospital, Kenya. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from February 2014 to April 2014. Hypertensive patients aged ≥18 attending the out-patient medical clinic were included in the study. Pregnant and known diabetic patients were excluded. Data was collected on socio-demographics, behavior, and anthropometrics. Diabetes status was based on a Glycated Haemoglobin (HbA1C) classification of ≥6.5% for diabetes, 6.0-6.4% for pre-diabetes and ≤6.0% for normal. AGR was the dependable variable and included two diabetic categories; diabetes and pre-diabetes. Results We enrolled 334 patients into the study: the mean age was 59 years (Standard deviation= 14.3). Of these patients 254 (76%) were women. Thirty two percent (107/334; 32%) were found to have AGR, with 14% (46) having un-diagnosed DM and 18%(61) with pre-diabetes. Factors associated with AGR were age ≥45 (OR = 3.23; 95% CI 1.37 ≥ 7.62), basal metabolic index (BMI) ≥ 25 Kg/m2 (OR= 3.13; 95% CI 1.53 - 6.41), low formal education (primary/none)(OR= 2; 95%CI 1.08 - 3.56) and family history of DM (OR = 2.19; 95%CI 1.16 - 4.15). Conclusion There was a high prevalence of undiagnosed AGR among hypertensive patients. This highlights the need to regularly screen for AGR among hypertensive patients as recommended by WHO. PMID:26966482

  19. Generic Medications and Blood Pressure Control in Diabetic Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Doyle M.; Letter, Abraham J.; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia J.; Safford, Monika M.; Prince, Valerie; Muntner, Paul

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate temporal improvements in blood pressure (BP) control in subjects with diabetes and policy changes regarding generic antihypertensives. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a cross-sectional study we used logistic regression models to investigate the temporal relationship between access to generic antihypertensive medications and BP control (<130/80 mmHg) in 5,375 subjects (mean age, 66 ± 9 years; 61% African American) with diabetes and hypertension (HTN) enrolled in the national Results from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study between 2003 and 2007. At enrollment, BP was measured and medications in the home determined by medication label review by a trained professional. Generic antihypertensive medication status was ascertained from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. RESULTS The percentage of subjects accessing generically available antihypertensive medications increased significantly from 66% in 2003 to 81% in 2007 (P < 0.0001), and the odds of achieving a BP <130/80 mmHg in 2007 was 66% higher (odds ratio 1.66 [95% CI 1.30–2.10]) than in 2003. Nevertheless, <50% of participants achieved this goal. African American race, male sex, limited income, and medication nonadherence were significant predictors of inadequate BP control. There was no significant relationship between access to generic antihypertensives and BP control when other demographic factors were included in the model (0.98 [0.96–1.00]). CONCLUSIONS Among African American and white subjects with HTN and diabetes, BP control remained inadequate relative to published guidelines, and racial disparities persisted. Although access to generic antihypertensives increased, this was not independently associated with improved BP control, suggesting that poor BP control is multifactorial. PMID:23150284

  20. Factors associated with hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment and control among participants in the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS).

    PubMed

    Doulougou, B; Gomez, F; Alvarado, B; Guerra, R O; Ylli, A; Guralnik, J; Zunzunegui, M V

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the factors associated with hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control, in the elderly populations of the International Mobility in Aging Study (IMIAS). Approximately 200 men and 200 women aged 65-74 years were recruited at each site (n=1995) during IMIAS' 2012 baseline survey at five cities: Kingston (Canada), Saint-Hyacinthe (Canada), Tirana (Albania), Manizales (Colombia) and Natal (Brazil). Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were taken at participants' homes. Hypertension prevalence ranged from 53.4% in Saint-Hyacinthe to 83.5% in Tirana. Diabetes and obesity were identified as risk factors in all cities. More than two-thirds of hypertensive participants were aware of their condition (from 67.3% in Saint-Hyacinthe to 85.4% in Tirana); women were more aware than men. Awareness was positively associated with diabetes in Kingston, Manizales and Natal. Though most of those aware of their hypertensive condition were being treated pharmacologically, associations between awareness and physical activity and refraining from smoking were weak. Control among treated hypertensive participants was low, especially in Tirana and Natal. Diabetes and physical inactivity were associated with poor hypertension control. Hypertension is common in the older populations of IMIAS. Diabetes is strongly associated with hypertension prevalence, awareness and lack of control of hypertension. The fact that awareness is not strongly associated with healthy behaviours suggests that antihypertensive medication is not accompanied by non-pharmacological therapies. Improved health behaviours could strengthen hypertension control. Efforts should be made to increase men's awareness of hypertension. Hypertension control in diabetic patients is a challenge. PMID:25833704

  1. Pial Collateral Reactivity During Hypertension and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu-Lung; Sweet, Julie G.; Bishop, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— We investigated vasoactive properties of leptomeningeal arterioles (LMAs) under normotensive conditions and during hypertension and aging that are known to have poor collateral flow and little salvageable tissue. Methods— LMAs, identified as distal anastomotic arterioles connecting middle and anterior cerebral arteries, were studied isolated and pressurized from young (18 weeks) or aged (48 weeks) normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY18, n=14; WKY48, n=6) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR18, n=16; SHR48, n=6). Myogenic tone and vasoactive responses to pressure as well as endothelial function and ion channel activity were measured. Results— LMAs from WKY18 had little myogenic tone at 40 mm Hg (8±3%) that increased in aged WKY48 (30±6%). However, LMAs from both WKY groups dilated to increased pressure and demonstrated little myogenic reactivity, a response that would be conducive to collateral flow. In contrast, LMAs from both SHR18 and SHR48 displayed considerable myogenic tone (56±8% and 43±7%; P<0.01 versus WKY) and constricted to increased pressure. LMAs from both WKY and SHR groups had similar basal endothelial nitric oxide and IK channel activity that opposed tone. However, dilation to sodium nitroprusside, diltiazem and 15 mmol/L KCl was impaired in LMAs from SHR18. Conclusions— This study shows for the first time that LMAs from young and aged SHR are vasoconstricted and have impaired vasodilatory responses that may contribute to greater perfusion deficit and little penumbral tissue. These results also suggest that therapeutic opening of pial collaterals is possible during middle cerebral artery occlusion to create penumbral tissue and prevent infarct expansion. PMID:27103017

  2. Correlates for cardiovascular diseases among diabetic/hypertensive patients attending outreach clinics in two Nairobi slums, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mugure, Gladys; Karama, Mohamed; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Karanja, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of death in the world. Over 80% of CVD related deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Diabetes and hypertension, whose prevalence in Kenya is on the rise, are major risk factors for CVD. Despite this, studies indicate that awareness on the management of risk factors for CVD among diabetic/hypertensive patients in African populations is generally low. The aim of the study was to determine the risk factors for CVD among diabetic and/or hypertensive patients attending diabetes and hypertension management clinics in Korogocho and Viwandani slums of Nairobi. Methods Data were collected using questionnaires administered to 206 diabetic/hypertensive patients attending the clinics between July 2010 and February 2011. A review of these patients’ medical records was done to determine the history of CVD outcomes such as hypertensive heart diseases, stroke and peripheral arterial diseases. Results Majority (66.5%) of the study participants were females mainly in the 51-65 age category. The study findings revealed that 73 (33.4%) respondents had CVD outcomes. In addition, 41.8% of the respondents were not aware of the causes of diabetes/hypertension. Age category 51-65 years had the highest (43.8%) number of respondents with CVD. Sex of the respondents and awareness of the link between hypertension and CVD were significantly associated with CVD outcomes (p<0.05) among the respondents. Conclusion Measures to improve awareness levels among patients at high risk of CVD outcomes are needed to complement other measures to reduce CVD risk among such patients. PMID:25852804

  3. Consequences of the increased autonomic nervous drive in hypertension, heart failure and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Julius, S; Valentini, M

    1998-01-01

    It is estimated that 40 million people in the USA have hypertension, 14 million are diabetic and 4 million suffer congestive heart failure. Since all three conditions are age-related, as the longevity in industrialized societies continues to improve, the overall burden of congestive heart failure, hypertension and diabetes will increase. These major diseases of civilization are characteristically associated with an increased autonomic cardiovascular drive. In our terminology the output that emanates from the central nervous system via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferents is referred to as "tone". The overall "drive" depends on the balance between inhibitory (parasympathetic) and excitatory (sympathetic) tone and the organ's responsiveness to that tone. The responsiveness, in turn, depends on the receptors' properties as well as on the intrinsic functional or anatomic properties of the responding organs. These components can change independently. For example, in the course of hypertension the alpha-adrenergic responsiveness increases whereas the beta-adrenergic responses are down-regulated. Another example is: plasma noradrenaline and sympathetic tone are increased in elderly subjects but their circulation does not show any tell-tale response of increased sympathetic tone, presumably because the responses to sympathetic tone decrease with aging. These complex interactions between the autonomic tone and organ responsiveness determine to a great extent the overall clinical impact of the autonomic abnormality in hypertension, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and in congestive heart failure. The major thesis of this review is that, whether primary or secondary, whether easily discerned or hidden, an enhanced autonomic drive, independent of the underlying condition, greatly increases the risk of poor cardiovascular outcomes. It follows that targeting the underlying autonomic imbalance in congestive heart failure, hypertension and diabetes may not only be

  4. Family history: an opportunity for early interventions and improved control of hypertension, obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    van der Sande, M. A.; Walraven, G. E.; Milligan, P. J.; Banya, W. A.; Ceesay, S. M.; Nyan, O. A.; McAdam, K. P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a family history of high-risk groups for major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) was a significant risk factor for these conditions among family members in a study population in the Gambia, where strong community and family coherence are important determinants that have to be taken into consideration in promoting lifestyle changes. METHODS: We questioned 5389 adults as to any first-degree family history of major noncommunicable diseases (hypertension, obesity, diabetes and stroke), and measured their blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI). Total blood cholesterol, triglyceride, uric acid, and creatinine concentrations were measured in a stratified subsample, as well as blood glucose (2 hours after ingesting 75 g glucose) in persons aged > or = 35 years. FINDINGS: A significant number of subjects reported a family history of hypertension (8.0%), obesity (5.4%), diabetes (3.3%) and stroke (1.4%), with 14.6% of participants reporting any of these NCDs. Subjects with a family history of hypertension had a higher diastolic BP and BMI, higher cholesterol and uric acid concentrations, and an increased risk of obesity. Those with a family history of obesity had a higher BMI and were at increased risk of obesity. Individuals with a family history of diabetes had a higher BMI and higher concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and uric acid, and their risk of obesity and diabetes was increased. Subjects with a family history of stroke had a higher BMI, as well as higher cholesterol, triglyceride and uric acid concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: A family history of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, or stroke was a significant risk factor for obesity and hyperlipidaemia. With increase of age, more pathological manifestations can develop in this high-risk group. Health professionals should therefore utilize every opportunity to include direct family members in health education. PMID:11357211

  5. The Comorbidities of Diabetes and Hypertension: Mechanisms and Approach to Target Organ Protection

    PubMed Central

    Long, Amanda N.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Up to 75% of adults with diabetes also have hypertension, and patients with hypertension alone often show evidence of insulin resistance. Thus, hypertension and diabetes are common, intertwined conditions that share a significant overlap in underlying risk factors (including ethnicity, familial, dyslipidemia, and lifestyle determinants) and complications. These complications include microvascular and macrovascular disorders. The macrovascular complications, which are well recognized in patients with longstanding diabetes or hypertension, include coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, and peripheral vascular disease. Although microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) are conventionally linked to hyperglycemia, studies have shown that hypertension constitutes an important risk factor, especially for nephropathy. The familial predisposition to diabetes and hypertension appears to be polygenic in origin, which militates against the feasibility of a “gene therapy” approach to the control or prevention of these conditions. On the other hand, the shared lifestyle factors in the etiology of hypertension and diabetes provide ample opportunity for nonpharmacological intervention. Thus, the initial approach to the management of both diabetes and hypertension must emphasize weight control, physical activity, and dietary modification. Interestingly, lifestyle intervention is remarkably effective in the primary prevention of diabetes and hypertension. These principles also are pertinent to the prevention of downstream macrovascular complications of the two disorders. In addition to lifestyle modification, most patients will require specific medications to achieve national treatment goals for hypertension and diabetes. Management of hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the underlying hypercoagulable and proinflammatory states requires the use of multiple medications in combination. PMID:21466619

  6. The effects of biofeedback in diabetes and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Angele

    2010-07-01

    The metabolic syndrome is likely to develop in patients in whom genetic predisposition, chronic stress, negative emotion, and unhealthy lifestyle habits converge. In light of the psychophysiologic aspect of most of these factors, biofeedback, relaxation, and other psychophysiologic interventions have been studied and used in patients with elements of the metabolic syndrome, particularly diabetes and hypertension. This article reviews the rationale and evidence for biofeedback for the treatment of diabetes and hypertension, which has been shown to effectively lower blood glucose and blood pressure in numerous studies. Patients with prehypertension may be a particularly appropriate target population for biofeedback for blood pressure reduction. Further research is needed to guide identification of the best candidates for psychophysiologic intervention for these conditions, although patient readiness for change is a clear prerequisite. PMID:20622080

  7. Novel treatment approaches in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Castro Torres, Yaniel; Katholi, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension represent two common conditions worldwide. Their frequent association with cardiovascular diseases makes management of hypertensive patients with T2DM an important clinical priority. Carvedilol and renal denervation are two promising choices to reduce plasma glucose levels and blood pressure in hypertensive patients with T2DM to reduce future complications and improve clinical outcomes and prognosis. Pathophysiological mechanisms of both options are under investigation, but one of the most accepted is an attenuation in sympathetic nervous system activity which lowers blood pressure and improves insulin sensitivity. Choice of these therapeutic approaches should be individualized based on specific characteristics of each patient. Further investigations are needed to determine when to consider their use in clinical practice. PMID:25126399

  8. Correlations of urinary cadmium with hypertension and diabetes in persons living in cadmium-contaminated villages in northwestern Thailand: A population study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Mahasakpan, Pranee; Limpatanachote, Pisit; Krintratun, Somyot

    2010-08-15

    Risk for hypertension and diabetes has not been conclusively found to be a result of cadmium exposure. A population-based study was conducted in 2009 to examine the correlations of urinary cadmium, a good biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, with hypertension and diabetes in persons aged 35 years and older who lived in the 12 cadmium-contaminated rural villages in northwestern Thailand. A total of 5273 persons were interviewed and screened for urinary cadmium, hypertension, and diabetes. The geometric mean level of urinary cadmium for women (2.4{+-}2.3 {mu}g/g creatinine) was significantly greater than that for men (2.0{+-}2.2 {mu}g/g creatinine). Hypertension was presented in 29.8% of the study population and diabetes was detected in 6.6%. The prevalence of hypertension significantly increased from 25.0% among persons in the lowest tertile of urinary cadmium to 35.0% in the highest tertile. In women, the rate of hypertension significantly increased with increasing urinary cadmium levels in both ever and never smokers, after adjusting for age, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and diabetes. In men, such association was less significantly found in never smokers. The study revealed no significant association between urinary cadmium and diabetes in either gender. Our study supports the hypothesis that environmental exposure to cadmium may increase the risk of hypertension. Risk for diabetes in relation to cadmium exposure remains uncertain in this exposed population.

  9. Walking vs running for hypertension, cholesterol, & diabetes risk reduction

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Background To test whether equivalent energy expenditure by moderate-intensity (e.g., walking) and vigorous-intensity exercise (e.g., running) provides equivalent health benefits. Methods and Results We used the National Runners’ (n=33,060) and Walkers’ (n=15,945) Health Study cohorts to examine the effect of differences in exercise mode and thereby exercise intensity on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. Baseline expenditure (METhr/d) was compared to self-reported, physician-diagnosed incident hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and CHD during 6.2 years follow-up. Running significantly decreased the risks for incident hypertension by 4.2% (P<10-7), hypercholesterolemia by 4.3% (P<10-14), diabetes by 12.1% (P<10-5), and CHD by 4.5% per METh/d run (P=0.05). The corresponding reductions for walking were 7.2% (P<10-6), 7.0% (P<10-8), 12.3% (P<10-4), and 9.3% (P=0.01). Relative to <1.8 METh/d, the risk reductions for 1.8 to 3.6, 3.6 to 5.4, 5.4 to 7.2, and ≥ 7.2 METh/d were: 1) 10.1%, 17.7%, 25.1% and 34.9% from running and 14.0%, 23.8%, 21.8% and 38.3% from walking for hypercholesterolemia; 2) 19.7%, 19.4%, 26.8% and 39.8% from running and 14.7%, 19.1%, 23.6% and 13.3% from walking for hypertension; 3) 43.5%, 44.1%, 47.7% and 68.2% from running and 34.1%, 44.2%, and 23.6% from walking for diabetes (too few cases for diabetes for walking >5.4 METh/d). The risk reductions were not significantly greater for running than walking for diabetes (P=0.94) or CHD (P=0.26), and only marginally greater for walking than running for hypertension (P=0.06) and hypercholesterolemia (P=0.04). Conclusion Equivalent energy expenditures by moderate (walking) and vigorous (running) exercise produced similar risk reductions for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and CHD, but there is limited statistical power to evaluate CHD conclusively. PMID:23559628

  10. Consistency with the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet among Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Suzanne; Saydah, Sharon; Cleary, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have documented whether the dietary patterns of adults with diabetes are similar to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. Our objective was to determine differences in the degree of consistency with the DASH diet among adults with self-reported diabetes (with and without self-reported high blood pressure) compared with those without either disease. It was a cross-sectional study using data from 5,867 nonpregnant, noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥20 years with two reliable 24-hour recall dietary interviews in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2003–2004 and 2005–2006. Diabetes and hypertension status were obtained from a questionnaire, and degree of consistency with the DASH diet was calculated based on nine nutrient targets (0- to 9-point DASH score). Multiple linear regression (adjusting for age, energy intake, and other covariates such as education, race, and body mass index) was performed to compare mean DASH scores and mean nutrient intakes among adults with diabetes, with and without high blood pressure, to those without either disease. No statistically significant differences were seen in mean DASH score among the three groups in the unadjusted or fully adjusted multivariable models. Compared with adults without either disease, those with only diabetes had higher intakes of fiber (8.1 g/1,000 kcal vs 7.6 g/1,000 kcal; P=0.02) and total fat as a percentage of total energy (35.3% vs 34.1%; P=0.006), and those with both diabetes and hypertension had higher sodium intake (153.0% of DASH target vs 146.6%; P=0.04). This information about individual nutrients could help guide the development of education programs. PMID:23102178

  11. Prevalence of Diabetes and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Hypertensive Adults in Rural China: Far from Leveling-Off.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shasha; Sun, Zhaoqing; Zheng, Liqiang; Guo, Xiaofan; Yang, Hongmei; Sun, Yingxian

    2015-11-01

    In recent years data from many investigations has shown a leveling-off trend in diabetes incidence. In order to explain the diabetes epidemic in rural China during the past ten years, we conducted a survey from July 2012 to August 2013. Data from comprehensive questionnaires, physical examinations, and blood tests were obtained from 5919 residents with hypertension, aged ≥ 35 years. Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were defined according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria. The overall prevalence of diabetes and IFG were 15.3% (13.6% in men, 16.8% in women) and 40.7% (44.1% in men, 34.7% in women) in the hypertensive rural Chinese population. The prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes was 6.5% (4.6% in men, 8.4% in women). The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 8.7% (9.0% in men, 8.5% in women). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that increasing age, drinking, overweight or obesity, systolic blood pressure, low HDL-C, high total cholesterol and triglycerides increased the risk of diabetes (p < 0.05). Diabetes is thus still prevalent in rural areas of China and is manifesting an accelerating trend. It remains an important public health problem in China, especially in rural areas and routine assessment for the early detection and treatment of diabetes should be emphasized. PMID:26610531

  12. Prevalence of Diabetes and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Hypertensive Adults in Rural China: Far from Leveling-Off

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shasha; Sun, Zhaoqing; Zheng, Liqiang; Guo, Xiaofan; Yang, Hongmei; Sun, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    In recent years data from many investigations has shown a leveling–off trend in diabetes incidence. In order to explain the diabetes epidemic in rural China during the past ten years, we conducted a survey from July 2012 to August 2013. Data from comprehensive questionnaires, physical examinations, and blood tests were obtained from 5919 residents with hypertension, aged ≥ 35 years. Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were defined according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria. The overall prevalence of diabetes and IFG were 15.3% (13.6% in men, 16.8% in women) and 40.7% (44.1% in men, 34.7% in women) in the hypertensive rural Chinese population. The prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes was 6.5% (4.6% in men, 8.4% in women). The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 8.7% (9.0% in men, 8.5% in women). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that increasing age, drinking, overweight or obesity, systolic blood pressure, low HDL-C, high total cholesterol and triglycerides increased the risk of diabetes (p < 0.05). Diabetes is thus still prevalent in rural areas of China and is manifesting an accelerating trend. It remains an important public health problem in China, especially in rural areas and routine assessment for the early detection and treatment of diabetes should be emphasized. PMID:26610531

  13. Epidemiology of hypertension and its relationship with type 2 diabetes and obesity in eastern Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Ramdani, Noureddine; Bouanani, Nour El Houda; Vanderpas, Jean; Hassani, Benyounès; Boutayeb, Abdeslam; Aziz, Mohammed; Mekhfi, Hassane; Bnouham, Mohammed; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq

    2014-01-01

    The major objectives of this work are to estimate the hypertension (HT) frequency in the east of Morocco and to study the relationship between HT, type 2 diabetes and obesity. Our sample is composed of 1628 adults aged 40 years and older, recruited voluntarily by using the convenience sampling method through 26 screening campaigns in urban and rural areas of the east of Morocco. We enumerated 516 hypertensive people (31.7%), without significant difference between women (32.5%) and men (30.2%). The known hypertensive people represent 10.1% of the whole sample. The frequency of HT, increases with age and it is more marked in rural (39.9%) than in urban areas (29%) (p < 0.001). It is significantly very high in diabetic subjects (69.9%) than among the non-diabetic ones (27.4%) (p < 0.001). The odd ratio (OR) of the diabetics to HT is 6.16 (IC95% [4.33-8.74]). Among the obese persons, HT is present at (40.8%) vs. (30.2%) among the subjects of normal weight (p < 0.05). The OR of the obese to HT is 1.6 (IC95% [1.26 - 2.04]). In conclusion, our results show a high frequency of HT in the east of Morocco; it affects nearly one third of the adult population aged 40 years and older. The relations between type 2 diabetes and obesity have also been identified and estimated. PMID:25392811

  14. [Intracranial hypertension in severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Blanc, P L; Bedock, B; Jay, S; Martin, A; Marc, J M

    1994-11-19

    We observed two cases of severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma and shock. In one case, coma was present at admission and in the second occurred within 15 hours. In both cases, intracranial hypertension was confirmed with an extradural captor. These findings are in agreement with observations of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Clinical data suggest that brain oedema may occur after a latency period but that clinical expression is much more rare, perhaps favoured by treatment (excessive rehydratation, alkalinization, too sharp drop in blood glucose level). In our cases, despite major fluid infusion, shock persisted requiring norepinephrine. This shock could have been the expression of the severe ketoacidosis or have resulted from an underlying infection. In case of sudden onset coma, a regularly encountered manifestation of brain oedema, respiratory assistance and mannitol infusion must be instituted rapidly. With this type of management, it should be possible to improve the severe prognosis of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:7899292

  15. Vascular Aging: Lessons From Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Feber, Janusz; Ruzicka, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension (HTN) in children is associated with early vascular aging (EVA) and underlying immunologic-metabolic abnormalities and accelerated biological maturation. Morphologic and functional vascular changes underlying EVA and HTN in children resemble those seen in the elderly including but not limited to an increase in intima-media thickness (IMT) and arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction. Although progeria syndrome leading to EVA and the development of clinically manifested cardiovascular (CV) disease in the second decade of life is a rare hereditary disorder, primary HTN, which is also associated with EVA, is much more common (reported in up to 10% in adolescents). EVA associated with HTN in children leads to the premature development of target organ injury in childhood and CV events in early adulthood. Limited evidence from prospective observational studies in children and adolescents indicates that early lifestyle measures (low salt/low sugar intake and exercise) or pharmacologic treatment of HTN, or both, partially reverses morphologic and functional changes underlying EVA such as an increase in carotid IMT and pulse wave velocity, a decrease in flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery, and an increase in oxidative stress and visceral fat. Future mechanistic and therapeutic clinical trials are desirable to assess the mechanisms and treatment strategies of EVA in the context of HTN in children and their effect on CV events in early adulthood. PMID:27040097

  16. Trends in Hypertension Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control in an Adult Type 2 Diabetes Spanish Population between 2003 and 2009

    PubMed Central

    de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Salinero-Fort, Miguel A.; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma; Gil, Ángel; Abánades-Herranz, Juan C.; Cárdenas-Valladolid, Juan; del Cura-González, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, the prevalence of hypertension is higher than in non-diabetic subjects. Despite the high cardiovascular risk involving hypertension in these patients, its prevalence and control are not well known. The aims of this study were: to estimate the hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment and control in Spanish adults with type 2 diabetes attended in Primary Care; and to analyse its time trend from 2003 to 2009. A serial cross-sectional study from 2003 to 2009 was performed in 21 Primary Care Centres in Madrid. The study population comprised all patients with diagnosed type 2 diabetes in their computerised medical history. Overall annual prevalence during the period 2003–2009 was calculated from and according to sex and age groups. Linear trend tests, regression lines and coefficients of determination were used. In 2003 89.78% (CI 87.92–91.64) of patients with type 2 diabetes suffered hypertension and 94.76% (CI: 92.85–96.67) in 2009. This percentage was greater for women and for patients over 65 years old. 30% of patients suffered previously undiagnosed hypertension in 2003 and 23.1% in 2009. 97% of diagnosed patients received pharmacological treatment and 28.79% reached the blood pressure objective in 2009. The average number of antihypertensive drugs taken was 2.72 in 2003 and 3.27 in 2009. Only 5.2% of patients with type 2 diabetes show blood pressure levels below 130/80 mmHg. Although significant improvements have been achieved in the diagnosis and control of hypertension in people with type 2 diabetes, these continue to remain far from optimum. PMID:24475171

  17. Contraceptive use in women with hypertension and diabetes: cross-sectional study in northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Tensae Tadesse; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Yigzaw, Tegbar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Women with diabetes and hypertension are at increased risk of pregnancy complications, including those from surgical delivery and their offspring are at risk for congenital anomalies. Thus, diabetic and hypertensive women of reproductive age are advised to use valid contraceptive methods for reducing unwanted pregnancy and its complications. However, contraceptive use among these segments of the population had not been previously assessed in Ethiopia. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess contraceptive use and associated factors among diabetic and hypertensive women of reproductive age on chronic follow-up care at University of Gondar and Felege Hiwot Hospitals. Methods Hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted from April to May 2012 among diabetic and hypertensive women on follow-up at the chronic illness care center. The sample size calculated was 403. Structured and pretested questionnaire was used for data collection. Data were collected using interview supplemented by chart review. The data were entered using EPI info Version 2000 and analyzed using SPSS Version 16. Frequencies, proportion, and summary statistics were used to describe the study population in relation to relevant variables. Both bivariate and multivariate analyses were run to see the association of each independent variable with contraceptive practice. Results A total of 392 married women on chronic follow-up care were interviewed making the response rate of 93.3%. The contraceptive prevalence rate was found to be 53.8%. Factors such as age 25–34 years (adjusted odds ratio, AOR [95% confidence interval, CI] =3.60 [1.05–12.36]), (AOR [95% CI] =2.29 [1.15–4.53]), having middle- and high-level incomes (AOR [95% CI] =2.12 [1.19–3.77]), (AOR [95% CI] =5.03 [2.19–11.54]), receiving provider counseling (AOR [95% CI] =9.02 [4.40–18.49]), and controlled disease condition (AOR [95% CI] =4.13 [2.35–7.28]) were significantly associated with contraceptive practice

  18. The Prevalence of Pre-hypertension in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rohani, Farzaneh; Hooman, Nakysa; Moradi, Sedighe; Mobarra, Mehdi; Najafizadeh, Mehri; Tatarpoor, Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is more common in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) than the general population. The aim of this study was to detect the pre-hypertensive stage in children with T1D and to evaluate its correlation with diabetic nephropathy compared to non-diabetic children. Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study in an out-patient clinic of a university hospital. A total of 62 which consists of 36 males and 26 females patients with stable T1D with a median age of 13 year and 42 age - sex-matched healthy children were entered in the study between September 2008 and February 2011. Three readings of blood pressure were recorded. Fasting blood sample was drawn for hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), creatinine and a 24 h urine aliquot was collected to measure microalbumin, creatinine and volume to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results: From 62 children with T1DM, 25.8% were in pre-hypertensive stage, 4.8% Stage 1, and 1.6% Stage 2. In controls, 1 (2.4%) out of 42 children was in pre-hypertensive stage (P < 0.0001). Abnormal blood pressures were correlated with eGFR and the duration of disease (P < 0.05), but there were not associated with microalbominuria or HbA1C level. Conclusions: There was a higher rate of early stage of high normal blood pressure in children with T1DM compared with the healthy controls and this abnormality was only correlated with puberty stage and glomerular filtration rate. PMID:24791191

  19. Prevalence, Awareness, and Treatment of Hypertension in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes: A Nationwide Multicenter Study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Marilia B.; Tannus, Lucianne Righeti Monteiro; Matheus, Alessandra Saldanha de Mattos; Cobas, Roberta Arnoldi; Palma, Catia C. Sousa; Silva, Aline Tiemi Kano; Negrato, Carlos Antonio; Dib, Sergio Atala; Rodacki, Melanie; Felício, João Soares; Canani, Luis Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study evaluated the prevalence, awareness, and type of treatment for hypertension in Brazil in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study that was conducted from December 2008 to December 2010 in 28 public clinics located in 20 Brazilian cities. Results. A total of 3,591 patients were studied, 56% female, average age 21.2 ± 11.7 years, with a median duration of diabetes 9.6 ± 8.1 years. Blood pressure levels were available for a total of 3,323 patients and 689 (19.2%) patients were hypertensive. Hypertensive patients were older, exhibited longer duration of diabetes, and had higher body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL-C values (P < 0.001, for all comparisons), but only 370 (53.7%) received treatment. Patient awareness of hypertension was documented in 453 (65.5%) patients. However, only 76 (22.9%) of the treated patients attained the target systolic (sBP) and diastolic blood pressures (dBP). Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that a large number of T1D patients with hypertension do not receive appropriate treatment; few of the treated T1D patients achieved the target sBP and dBP values. Greater attention should be paid to blood pressure evaluation, hypertension diagnosis, and treatment of T1D patients in Brazil. PMID:23533714

  20. Neuroinflammatory and autonomic mechanisms in diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Han, Cheng; Rice, Matthew W; Cai, Dongsheng

    2016-07-01

    Interdisciplinary studies in the research fields of endocrinology and immunology show that obesity-associated overnutrition leads to neuroinflammatory molecular changes, in particular in the hypothalamus, chronically causing various disorders known as elements of metabolic syndrome. In this process, neural or hypothalamic inflammation impairs the neuroendocrine and autonomic regulation of the brain over blood pressure and glucose homeostasis as well as insulin secretion, and elevated sympathetic activation has been appreciated as a critical mediator. This review describes the involved physiology and mechanisms, with a focus on glucose and blood pressure balance, and suggests that neuroinflammation employs the autonomic nervous system to mediate the development of diabetes and hypertension. PMID:27166279

  1. Trends in self-reported prevalence and management of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes in Swiss adults, 1997-2007

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Switzerland has a low mortality rate from cardiovascular diseases, but little is known regarding prevalence and management of cardiovascular risk factors (CV RFs: hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes) in the general population. In this study, we assessed 10-year trends in self-reported prevalence and management of cardiovascular risk factors in Switzerland. Methods data from three national health interview surveys conducted between 1997 and 2007 in representative samples of the Swiss adult population (49,261 subjects overall). Self-reported CV RFs prevalence, treatment and control levels were computed. The sample was weighted to match the sex - and age distribution, geographical location and nationality of the entire adult population of Switzerland. Results self-reported prevalence of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes increased from 22.1%, 11.9% and 3.3% in 1997 to 24.1%, 17.4% and 4.8% in 2007, respectively. Prevalence of self-reported treatment among subjects with CV RFs also increased from 52.1%, 18.5% and 50.0% in 1997 to 60.4%, 38.8% and 53.3% in 2007 for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes, respectively. Self-reported control levels increased from 56.4%, 52.9% and 50.0% in 1997 to 80.6%, 75.1% and 53.3% in 2007 for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes, respectively. Finally, screening during the last 12 months increased from 84.5%, 86.5% and 87.4% in 1997 to 94.0%, 94.6% and 94.1% in 2007 for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes, respectively. Conclusion in Switzerland, the prevalences of self-reported hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes have increased between 1997 and 2007. Management and screening have improved, but further improvements can still be achieved as over one third of subjects with reported CV RFs are not treated. PMID:21332996

  2. Diabetes and ageing-induced vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Assar, Mariam El; Angulo, Javier; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2016-04-15

    Diabetes and the ageing process independently increase the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Since incidence of diabetes increases as people get older, the diabetic older adults represent the largest population of diabetic subjects. This group of patients would potentially be threatened by the development of CVD related to both ageing and diabetes. The relationship between CVD, ageing and diabetes is explained by the negative impact of these conditions on vascular function. Functional and clinical evidence supports the role of vascular inflammation induced by the ageing process and by diabetes in vascular impairment and CVD. Inflammatory mechanisms in both aged and diabetic vasculature include pro-inflammatory cytokines, vascular hyperactivation of nuclear factor-кB, increased expression of cyclooxygenase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, imbalanced expression of pro/anti-inflammatory microRNAs, and dysfunctional stress-response systems (sirtuins, Nrf2). In contrast, there are scarce data regarding the interaction of these mechanisms when ageing and diabetes co-exist and its impact on vascular function. Older diabetic animals and humans display higher vascular impairment and CVD risk than those either aged or diabetic, suggesting that chronic low-grade inflammation in ageing creates a vascular environment favouring the mechanisms of vascular damage driven by diabetes. Further research is needed to determine the specific inflammatory mechanisms responsible for exacerbated vascular impairment in older diabetic subjects in order to design effective therapeutic interventions to minimize the impact of vascular inflammation. This would help to prevent or delay CVD and the specific clinical manifestations (cognitive decline, frailty and disability) promoted by diabetes-induced vascular impairment in the elderly. PMID:26435167

  3. Comorbidity Analysis According to Sex and Age in Hypertension Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaqi; Ma, James; Wang, Jiaojiao; Zeng, Daniel Dajun; Song, Hongbin; Wang, Ligui; Cao, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertension, an important risk factor for the health of human being, is often accompanied by various comorbidities. However, the incidence patterns of those comorbidities have not been widely studied. Aim: Applying big-data techniques on a large collection of electronic medical records, we investigated sex-specific and age-specific detection rates of some important comorbidities of hypertension, and sketched their relationships to reveal the risk for hypertension patients. Methods: We collected a total of 6,371,963 hypertension-related medical records from 106 hospitals in 72 cities throughout China. Those records were reported to a National Center for Disease Control in China between 2011 and 2013. Based on the comprehensive and geographically distributed data set, we identified the top 20 comorbidities of hypertension, and disclosed the sex-specific and age-specific patterns of those comorbidities. A comorbidities network was constructed based on the frequency of co-occurrence relationships among those comorbidities. Results: The top four comorbidities of hypertension were coronary heart disease, diabetes, hyperlipemia, and arteriosclerosis, whose detection rates were 21.71% (21.49% for men vs 21.95% for women), 16.00% (16.24% vs 15.74%), 13.81% (13.86% vs 13.76%), and 12.66% (12.25% vs 13.08%), respectively. The age-specific detection rates of comorbidities showed five unique patterns and also indicated that nephropathy, uremia, and anemia were significant risks for patients under 39 years of age. On the other hand, coronary heart disease, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, hyperlipemia, and cerebral infarction were more likely to occur in older patients. The comorbidity network that we constructed indicated that the top 20 comorbidities of hypertension had strong co-occurrence correlations. Conclusions: Hypertension patients can be aware of their risks of comorbidities based on our sex-specific results, age-specific patterns, and the comorbidity network

  4. Cardiovascular manifestations of renovascular hypertension in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sonu; Engel, Sean; Osman, Mazen; Al-Saiegh, Yousif; Wongjarupong, Asarn; Grande, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Type 2 diabetes is the leading cause of end stage renal disease in the United States. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is commonly observed in diabetic patients and impacts the rate of renal and cardiovascular disease progression. We sought to test the hypothesis that renovascular hypertension, induced by unilateral renal artery stenosis, exacerbates cardiac remodeling in leptin-deficient (db/db) mice, which serves as a model of human type II diabetes. Methods. We employed a murine model of renovascular hypertension through placement of a polytetrafluoroethylene cuff on the right renal artery in db/db mice. We studied 109 wild-type (non-diabetic, WT) and 95 db/db mice subjected to renal artery stenosis (RAS) or sham surgery studied at 1, 2, 4, and 6+ weeks following surgery. Cardiac remodeling was assessed by quantitative analysis of the percent of myocardial surface area occupied by interstitial fibrosis tissue, as delineated by trichrome stained slides. Aortic pathology was assessed by histologic sampling of grossly apparent structural abnormalities or by section of ascending aorta of vessels without apparent abnormalities. Results. We noted an increased mortality in db/db mice subjected to RAS. The mortality rate of db/db RAS mice was about 23.5%, whereas the mortality rate of WT RAS mice was only 1.5%. Over 60% of mortality in the db/db mice occurred in the first two weeks following RAS surgery. Necropsy showed massive intrathoracic hemorrhage associated with aortic dissection, predominantly in the ascending aorta and proximal descending aorta. Aortas from db/db RAS mice showed more smooth muscle dropout, loss of alpha smooth muscle actin expression, medial disruption, and hemorrhage than aortas from WT mice with RAS. Cardiac tissue from db/db RAS mice had more fibrosis than did cardiac tissue from WT RAS mice. Conclusions. db/db mice subjected to RAS are prone to develop fatal aortic dissection, which is not observed in WT mice with RAS. The db

  5. Undiagnosed hypertension in a rural district in Bangladesh: The Bangladesh Population-based Diabetes and Eye Study (BPDES).

    PubMed

    Islam, F M A; Bhuiyan, A; Chakrabarti, R; Rahman, M A; Kanagasingam, Y; Hiller, J E

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension is mainly asymptomatic and remains undiagnosed until the disease progresses. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for hypertension in rural Bangladesh. Using a population-based cluster random sampling strategy, 3096 adults aged ⩾30 years were recruited from a rural district in Bangladesh. Data collected included two blood pressure (BP) measurements, fasting blood glucose, socio-demographic and anthropometric measurements. Hypertension was defined as systolic BP (SBP) ⩾140 mm Hg or diastolic BP (DBP) ⩾90 mm Hg or self-reported diagnosed hypertension. Logistic regression techniques were used for data analyses. The crude prevalence of hypertension was 40% (95% confidence interval (CI) 38-42%) of which 82% were previously undiagnosed. People from lower socio-economic status (SES) had a significantly higher percentage of undiagnosed hypertension compared with people with higher SES (P<0.001). There was no significant gender difference in severity of hypertension. Males with higher education level compared with no education had a higher prevalence of hypertension (odds ratio 2.34, 95% CI 1.49-3.69). Older age and waist circumference in both genders, and diabetes, lack of physical activity in females were found to be associated with higher prevalence of hypertension. Our research suggests the prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension was higher in the rural area in Bangladesh than that reported from the rural area in neighbouring India and China. Lower SES was associated with a higher risk of undiagnosed hypertension. Public health programs at the grass-roots level must emphasise the provision of primary care and preventive services in managing this non-communicable disease. PMID:26108363

  6. Hypertension, Diabetes and Overweight: Looming Legacies of the Biafran Famine

    PubMed Central

    Chima, Charles; Edstedt Bonamy, Anna-Karin; Ozumba, Benjamin; Norman, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Background Sub-Saharan Africa is facing rapidly increasing prevalences of cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes and hypertension. Previous and ongoing undernutrition among pregnant women may contribute to this development as suggested by epidemiological studies from high income countries linking undernutrition in fetal life with increased burden of non-communicable diseases in later life. We undertook to study the risks for hypertension, glucose intolerance and overweight forty years after fetal exposure to famine afflicted Biafra during the Nigerian civil war (1967–1970). Methods and Findings Cohort study performed in June 27–July 31, 2009 in Enugu, Nigeria. Adults (n = 1,339) born before (1965–67), during (1968–January 1970), or after (1971–73) the years of famine were included. Blood pressure (BP), random plasma glucose (p-glucose) and anthropometrics, as well as prevalence of hypertension (BP>140/90 mmHg), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; p-glucose 7.8–11.0 mmol/l), diabetes (DM; p-glucose ≥11.1 mmol/l), or overweight (BMI>25 kg/m2) were compared between the three groups. Fetal-infant exposure to famine was associated with elevated systolic (+7 mmHg; p<0.001) and diastolic (+5 mmHg; p<0.001) BP, increased p-glucose (+0.3 mmol/L; p<0.05) and waist circumference (+3cm, p<0.001), increased risk of systolic hypertension (adjusted OR 2.87; 95% CI 1.90–4.34), IGT (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.02–2.69) and overweight (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.03–1.93) as compared to people born after the famine. Limitations of this study include the lack of birth weight data and the inability to separate effects of fetal and infant famine. Conclusions Fetal and infant undernutrition is associated with significantly increased risk of hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance in 40-year-old Nigerians. Prevention of undernutrition during pregnancy and in infancy should therefore be given high priority in health, education, and economic agendas. PMID:21042579

  7. Relationship between chronic complications, hypertension, and health-related quality of life in Portuguese patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Eduardo; Poínhos, Rui; Constante, Miguel; Pais-Ribeiro, José; Freitas, Paula; Carvalho, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and the presence or absence of hypertension and diabetes-related chronic complications in type 2 diabetes, and also the association between HRQoL and the number of chronic complications. Methods One hundred patients with type 2 diabetes were interviewed. HRQoL was evaluated using the age-adjusted Short-Form 36 dimensions (physical functioning, role-physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health). Results The mean age of the study population was 62.7±8.7 years; 54.0% were male, and 51.0% were receiving only oral hypoglycemic agents. Chronic complications were related to worse HRQoL in different dimensions: peripheral neuropathy and cardiovascular disease (all, except bodily pain), retinopathy (physical functioning, general health, vitality, and mental health), peripheral arterial disease (physical functioning, role-physical, and general health), and nephropathy (general health and vitality). Hypertension was related to worse general health and vitality. An increased number of chronic complications was associated with worse HRQoL in all dimensions of Short-Form 36 except for the bodily pain dimension. Conclusion The presence and increased number of diabetes-related chronic complications, and the presence of hypertension were related to worse age-adjusted HRQoL. Peripheral neuropathy and cardiovascular disease were more strongly related to age-adjusted HRQoL. PMID:26586958

  8. Rate of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Pregnancy Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leon, Mateo G; Moussa, Hind N; Longo, Monica; Pedroza, Claudia; Haidar, Ziad A; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Blackwell, Sean C; Sibai, Baha M

    2016-07-01

    Objective This study aims to determine the rate of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in pregnancies complicated by chronic hypertension and to compare the adverse outcomes in chronic hypertensive pregnancies with and without GDM. Study Design A secondary analysis from a multicenter trial of low-dose aspirin for preeclampsia prevention in women with chronic hypertension. The rate of GDM was evaluated among singleton pregnancies complicated with chronic hypertension and grouped according to their GDM status. Pregnancy outcomes and rates of preterm delivery < 35 weeks and < 32 weeks, preeclampsia, indicated preterm birth, small for gestational age, abruptio placentae, and perinatal death were compared between those with and without GDM. A subgroup analysis comparing women who developed superimposed preeclampsia with and without GDM was studied. Multivariate logistic-regression analysis was used to adjust for potentially confounding factors. Results A total of 763 women met the inclusion criteria: 129 (17%) developed GDM. Parity, race, maternal baseline blood pressure, antihypertensive drug use, and assignment to low-dose aspirin were not significantly different between the groups with and without GDM. Using univariate analysis, maternal age (33 vs. 24%, p = 0.03) and body mass index (88 vs. 57%, p < 0.001) were higher in those who had GDM, whereas the rate of preterm delivery < 32 weeks (12 vs. 5%, p = 0.02) was higher among those without GDM. Using logistic-regression analysis, the rate of composite adverse outcomes (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-1.47) that included indicated preterm birth, small for gestational age, abruptio placentae, and perinatal death showed no significant differences.Superimposed preeclampsia developed in 34 (26%) women with GDM and in 182 (29%) without GDM. When superimposed preeclampsia was present, it developed at an earlier gestational age among the group without GDM (35

  9. Microalbuminuria in untreated prehypertension and hypertension without diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Yontar, Osman Can; Karaagac, Kemal; Agca, Fahriye Vatansever; Tutuncu, Ahmet; Kuzeytemiz, Mustafa; Bekler, Adem; Senturk, Muhammed; Aydin, Ufuk; Demir, Şerafettin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hypertension (HT) and prehypertension (preHT) were independent predictors of cardiovascular diseases. Urinary albumin leakage is a manifestation of generalized vascular damage. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a vasoactive peptide secreted by left ventricle in response to myocytic stretch. We aimed to investigate relationship between microalbuminuria (MA) and BNP in untreated elevated blood pressures. Methods: Of 105 untreated prehypertensive subjects (53 men, 52 women), 100 hypertensive subjects (51 men, 49 women) and 57 normotensive subjects (32 men, 25 women) none had history of diabetes. Urine albumin excretion was measured by immunoradiometric assay in morning urine sample. Results: The prevalence of MA was higher in hypertensive group than in prehypertensive group and in normotensive group (Hypertensive group; 33.9%, prehypertensive; 25.9%, normotensive; 10%). Subjects with HT had higher prevalence of microalbminuria; larger body mass index, higher levels of triglycerides, blood glucose and creatinin were more common in subjects with HT than in those with preHT. In hypertensive group; patients with microalbuminuria had higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), BNP, LVMI and lower eGFR as compared to those without MA. MA was significantly correlated with LVMI, BNP and SBP. In multivariate regression analysis, SBP (β: 0.361; P < 0.001), LVMII (β: 0.267; P = 0.011) and BNP (β: 0.284; P = 0.005) were independent variables associated with MA in hypertensives. In prehypertensive group; patients with microalbuminuria had higher SBP, BNP, LVMI and lower eGFR as compared to those without MA. MA was significantly correlated with LVMI, BNP and SBP. In multivariate regression analysis, SBP (β: 0.264; P = 0.002), LVMI (β: 0.293; P = 0.001) and BNP (β: 0.168; P = 0.045) were associated with MA in prehypertensives. Conclusions: In preHT and HT, SBP, BNP and LVMI are associated with MA. In the evaluation of increased blood pressures, in case of increased BNP

  10. Effectiveness of the fixed-dose combination of olmesartan/amlodipine/hydrochlorothiazide for the treatment of hypertension in patients stratified by age, race and diabetes, CKD and chronic CVD.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is high in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as in black and elderly subjects. In addition, these subjects have the lowest control of blood pressure (BP) among the hypertensive population, and also the risk of having a morbid or fatal cardiovascular event >20% in 10 years. For these reasons, aggressive control of BP to <130/80 mm Hg for these subjects is strongly recommended by National and International guidelines. To accomplish this goal, combination therapy with two or more antihypertensive drugs with a complementary mechanism of action is necessary. Drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in combination with a calcium channel blocker (CCB) and a diuretic have been shown to be the most effective combinations to accomplish this goal. However, this will require the administration of multiple drugs given separately, which will decrease the patient compliance and adherence to treatment. Poor patient compliance and adherence to treatment is a major factor for poor BP control. Several studies have shown that patient compliance is inversely related to the number of drugs being administered. To overcome this problem, several dual and triple-drug, fixed-dose combinations with a RAS blocker, a CCB and a diuretic have been developed and marketed, which are easier to administer, and have been shown to increase patient compliance and adherence to treatment. In this concise review, the effectiveness and safety of the fixed-dose, triple-combination of the RAS blocker olmesartan medoxomil, the CCB amlodipine besylate and the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide, as well as other similar combinations for the treatment of hypertension, will be discussed. These drug combinations have been shown to be effective, safe and well tolerated by most patients. PMID:24073676

  11. Serum anti-collagen type IV IgM antibodies and development of diabetic nephropathy in diabetics with essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tsinlikov, Ivan; Tsinlikova, Ivanka; Nicoloff, George; Blazhev, Alexander; Garev, Antoan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and aims Arterial hypertension and diabetic vascular complications are connected with an elevated degradation of elastic tissue. This process leads to an increased production of antibodies to collagen type IV (ACIV Abs). In the present investigation we studied whether the serum levels of antibodies (IgG, IgM and IgA) to collagen are related with microvascular complications. Material and methods Serum levels of antibodies to collagen type IV (ACIV) IgG, IgM and IgA were measured using an ELISA method in 93 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension (AH) (mean age 61.4 ±11.3 years, diabetes duration 9.88 ±3.12 years; hypertension duration 9.28 ±4.98). These values were compared to serum antibodies to CIV in 42 age and sex matched controls. Results ACIV IgM antibodies levels in patients with AH and T2DM were statisticaly significantly higher than controls 0.178 (0.145÷0.220) vs. 0.142 (0.118÷0.173) (KW = 6.31; p = 0.01). Group 1 (patients with microvascular complications) showed significantly higher levels of ACIV IgM than controls 0.180 (0.136÷0.223) vs. 0.142 (0.118÷0.173) (KW = 5.03; p = 0.02). Patients from Group 2 showed statistically significantly higher levels of ACIV IgM than controls 0.176 (0.151÷0.202) vs. 0.142 (0.118÷0.173) (KW = 6.15; p = 0.01). ACIV IgM antibodies showed correlation with microalbuminuria (r = 0.21); (p = 0.04), BMI (r = 0.19); (p = 0.04), creatinine clearance (r = –0.36); (p = 0.01) and GFR (r = –0.34); (p = 0.02). Conclusions Our study showed an association between elevation of serum levels of ACIV IgM and development of diabetic nephropathy. We suggest that levels of ACIV IgM can be useful method for identfying a high risk for development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27095927

  12. Preoperative characteristics predicting intraoperative hypotension and hypertension among hypertensives and diabetics undergoing noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, M E; MacKenzie, C R; Gold, J P; Ales, K L; Topkins, M; Shires, G T

    1990-01-01

    We prospectively studied patients with hypertension and diabetes undergoing elective noncardiac surgery with general anesthesia to test the hypothesis that patients at high risk for prognostically significant intraoperative hemodynamic instability could be identified by their preoperative characteristics. Specifically we hypothesized that patients with a low functional capacity, decreased plasma volume, or significant cardiac comorbidity would be at high risk for intraoperative hypotension and those with a history of severe hypertension would be at risk for intraoperative hypertension. Patients who had a preoperative mean arterial pressure (MAP) greater than or equal to 110, a walking distance of less than 400 m, or a plasma volume less than 3000 cc were at increased risk of intraoperative hypotension (i.e., more than 1 hour of greater than or equal to 20 mmHg decreases in the MAP). Hypotension was also more common among patients having intra-abdominal or vascular surgery, and among those who had operations longer than 2 hours. Patients older than 70 years or with a decreased plasma volume were at increased risk of having more than 15 minutes of intraoperative elevations of greater than or equal to 20 mmHg over the preoperative MAP in combination with intraoperative hypotension; this was also more common when surgery lasted more than 2 hours. Patients who had intraoperative hypotension tended to have an immediate decrease in MAP at the onset of anesthesia and were often purposefully maintained at MAPs less than their usual level during surgery with fentanyl and neuromuscular blocking agents. Patients who had intraoperative hyper/hypotension tended to have repeated elevations in MAP above their preoperative levels during the course of surgery, and such elevations precipitated interventions with neuromuscular blocking agents and/or fentanyl. Neither pattern was more common among patients who developed net intraoperative negative fluid balances. Both hypotension and

  13. Diabetes and new-onset atrial fibrillation in a hypertensive population.

    PubMed

    Alves-Cabratosa, Lia; García-Gil, Maria; Comas-Cufí, Marc; Martí, Ruth; Ponjoan, Anna; Parramon, Dídac; Blanch, Jordi; Ramos, Rafel

    2016-05-01

    Aim The association of diabetes with new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) remains controversial. Hypertension may partly explain the risk association ascribed to diabetes. We studied the role and characteristics of diabetes in hypertensive patients with no ischemic vascular disease. Methods Records of 262,892 persons from the Information System for the Development of Research in Primary Care in Catalonia (Spain) were examined from July 2006 to December 2011. Included participants were ≥55-years-old and hypertensive with no ischemic heart disease, stroke, or peripheral artery disease. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model incidences in the diabetic and non-diabetic subgroups of our population, and among diabetic patients, diabetes duration and pharmacological treatment, hemoglobin A1C, and body mass index. Results New-onset AF incidence in diabetic patients was 13.3 per 1000 person-years (mean follow-up: 4.3 years). In non-diabetic patients, it was 10.4 per 1000 person-years (mean follow-up: 4.1 years). Diabetes hazard ratio (HR) for new-onset AF was 1.11 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.16). Diabetic patients also diagnosed with obesity had an HR of 1.41 (95% CI: 1.22-1.64). Conclusion Diabetes was modestly associated with new-onset AF in hypertensive patients with no ischemic vascular disease. Among diabetic patients, only obesity reached significance in its association with this arrhythmia. Key Messages Diabetes modestly associated with new-onset atrial fibrillation in hypertensive patients with no ischemic vascular disease. In the subgroup of patients with diabetes, only obesity reached significance in its association with atrial fibrillation. PMID:26939743

  14. Carotid Intima Media Thickness as a Measure of Cardiovascular Disease Burden in Nigerian Africans with Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Okeahialam, Basil N.; Alonge, Benjamin A.; Pam, Stephen D.; Puepet, Fabian H.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a larger study of cardiovascular risk factors in nonhypertensive type 2 diabetes patients, we subjected a cohort of diabetics to B mode ultrasonography of the carotid artery to measure the intima media thickness (IMT) and compared it with values in hypertensives and apparently normal controls matched reasonably for gender and age. All groups were comparable in terms of age and gender representation. The mean (SD) of carotid IMT right and left was 0.94 mm (0.12), 0.94 mm (0.16); 0.93 mm (0.21), 0.93 mm (0.15); 0.91 mm (0.17), 0.91 mm (0.13) for diabetic, hypertensive, and normal groups, respectively. There was a nonsignificant tendency to raised IMT for the disease groups from the normal ones. Diabetic and hypertensive Nigerians are equally burdened by cardiovascular disease risk factors. Apparently normal subjects have a reasonable degree of burden suggesting the need to evaluate them for other traditional and emerging risk factors. PMID:21748020

  15. Aging, Resistance Training, and Diabetes Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Flack, Kyle D.; Davy, Kevin P.; Hulver, Matthew W.; Winett, Richard A.; Frisard, Madlyn I.; Davy, Brenda M.

    2011-01-01

    With the aging of the baby-boom generation and increases in life expectancy, the American population is growing older. Aging is associated with adverse changes in glucose tolerance and increased risk of diabetes; the increasing prevalence of diabetes among older adults suggests a clear need for effective diabetes prevention approaches for this population. The purpose of paper is to review what is known about changes in glucose tolerance with advancing age and the potential utility of resistance training (RT) as an intervention to prevent diabetes among middle-aged and older adults. Age-related factors contributing to glucose intolerance, which may be improved with RT, include improvements in insulin signaling defects, reductions in tumor necrosis factor-α, increases in adiponectin and insulin-like growth factor-1 concentrations, and reductions in total and abdominal visceral fat. Current RT recommendations and future areas for investigation are presented. PMID:21197110

  16. Diabetes and endometrial cancer: effect modification by body weight, physical activity and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lucenteforte, E; Bosetti, C; Talamini, R; Montella, M; Zucchetto, A; Pelucchi, C; Franceschi, S; Negri, E; Levi, F; Vecchia, C La

    2007-01-01

    Among 777 endometrial cancer cases and 1550 controls from Italy and Switzerland, odds ratio was 1.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.2–2.5) for diabetes, and 5.1 for obese diabetic women as compared with non-obese non-diabetic ones. Diabetes shows a supramultiplicative effect with body mass index, but not with physical activity or hypertension. PMID:17912243

  17. A teleological view of obesity, diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Lewis

    2006-09-01

    1. The current worldwide epidemic of obesity and its major complications, namely type 2 diabetes and hypertension, is well documented. The present mini-review develops the thesis that 'thrifty' metabolic traits, evolved in the setting of intermittent famine, contribute to the obesity pandemic. 2. These thrifty traits, namely a decreased capacity for dietary thermogenesis and an increased resistance to insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, would prolong survival during famine but predispose to obesity and diabetes in the face of abundance. The regulation of dietary thermogenesis by the sympathetic nervous system also explains the well-established association between obesity and high blood pressure. 3. These observations provide a deep-seated rationale for the efficacy of lifestyle interventions in the treatment of obesity and its complications and may also provide a predicate for the development of new therapeutic strategies aimed at neutralizing the impact of these thrifty traits. Such strategies may entail, for example, therapeutic agents that enhance metabolic rate during low-energy diets, thereby reversing the physiological impediment imposed by suppression of the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:16922822

  18. Prevalence of hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus: impact of the tightening definition of high blood pressure and association with confounding risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kabakov, Emma; Norymberg, Clara; Osher, Esther; Koffler, Michael; Tordjman, Karen; Greenman, Yona; Stern, Naftali

    2006-01-01

    The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) has recommended a downward shift in target blood pressure to <130/80 mm Hg in diabetic patients, thus operatively setting a new threshold level for the definition of hypertension at 130/80 mm Hg. The authors performed a retrospective chart analysis of 2227 type 2 diabetes patients treated in one hospital-based and two community-based clinics in central Israel to determine the prevalence of hypertension as a function of three diagnostic threshold levels. The prevalence of hypertension in this cohort was 60.2%, 76.5%, and 85.8% at blood pressure thresholds of 140/90, 130/85, and 130/80 mm Hg respectively. Hypertension prevalence increased with age, reaching a rate of 94.4% in patients aged 80 years or more when the cutoff value of 130/80 mm Hg was used. At this cutoff, 93.3% and 86.6% of patients with a body mass index over or under 30 kg/m(2), respectively, were diagnosed with hypertension. As hypertension appears to eventually afflict the vast majority of diabetic patients, the minority of subjects not developing hypertension emerges as a unique group, which potentially deserves further in-depth study. PMID:17679829

  19. The Prospective Cardiovascular Münster (PROCAM) study: prevalence of hyperlipidemia in persons with hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus and the relationship to coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Assmann, G; Schulte, H

    1988-12-01

    The ongoing Prospective Cardiovascular Münster (PROCAM) study was initiated in 1979. The objectives of this trial were to determine the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in the German population, improve the prediction and early detection of CHD, and derive recommendations for the primary prevention of vascular disease from the trial results. Of male PROCAM trial participants, ages 40 to 65 years, who had been free of myocardial infarction or stroke at the time of entry and had been followed up for 4 years, longitudinal data analysis shows that hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia are independent risk factors for CHD. The concomitant occurrence of these factors leads to a cumulative increase in CHD risk. Hyperlipidemia is a more significant risk factor for CHD than hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Ongoing data from 4043 men and 1333 women, ages 50 to 65 years, show that more than 50% of all diabetics are hypertensive. Cholesterol is slightly increased in male hypertensives and diabetics of either sex, whereas low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is slightly raised in male hypertensives and female diabetics only. The serum triglyceride concentrations are higher for hypertensives and markedly higher for diabetics of both sexes. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations are decreased in hypertensives, especially in hypertensive women, and even more so in diabetics. The European Consensus Conference for primary prevention of CHD has classified hyperlipidemia into five groups (A to E). For hypertensives, the proportion of patients in group D (cholesterol between 200 and 300 mg/dl and triglyceride levels between 200 and 500 mg/dl) is 20.4% for men and 6.2% for women, about twice as high as those in the control groups. The occurrence of combined (group D) or massive hyperlipidemia (group E: cholesterol greater than 300 mg/dl and/or triglycerides greater than 500 mg/dl) is prevalent in more than 30% of all diabetics: two to

  20. Age-related changes in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YALI; LIU, JIAN; GAO, DENGFENG; WEI, JIN; YUAN, HAIFENG; NIU, XIAOLIN; ZHANG, QIAOJUN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age-related alterations in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the underlying mechanisms. Aging resulted in a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and apoptotic cells in the SHR group, which was accompanied by increased expression of oxidative stress markers (iNOS and gp47phox) and apoptotic regulatory proteins (Bax and caspase-3). In addition, the expression of PPAR-γ and Bcl-2 were progressively reduced with increasing age in the SHR group. The 32 and 64-week-old SHRs exhibited significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells, oxidative stress markers and pro-apoptotic proteins compared with age-matched WKY rats, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PPAR-γ. Compared with the 16 and 32-week-old WKY group, the 64-week-old WKY rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and pro-apoptotic markers, and increased levels apoptotic cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that both aging and hypertension enhanced brain damage and oxidative stress injury in the hippocampi of SHRs, indicated by an increased presence of apoptotic cells and astrocytes. In addition, reduced expression of PPAR-γ may contribute to the age-related brain damage in SHRs. PMID:26846626

  1. Cost effectiveness analysis of a hypertension management program in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ly, David; Fu, Alex Z; Alex, Fu Z; Hebert, Christopher; Christopher, Hebert

    2009-03-01

    Hypertension is a costly disease; however, the investment needed for a cost-neutral hypertension management program (HMP) is unknown. A Markov decision analytic model simulated the outcomes of a hypothetical HMP. Patients were between the ages of 25 and 65 years, had existing hypertension, and were newly diagnosed with diabetes. The control group received standard care. The HMP group received standard care and were enrolled in an HMP. Data regarding rates of disease states and costs were gathered from the literature. A third-party payer can invest as much as $159, $109, and $41 per person per month in an HMP for a neutral return on investment in the 5-year, 3-year, and 1-year time horizon, respectively. The HMP group achieved greater gains in quality-adjusted life-years and lower total health-related costs. As the time horizon increases, more money can be invested. HMPs can be a cost-effective and cost-neutral proposition. PMID:19302422

  2. Hypertension in people with Type 2 diabetes: knowledge-based diabetes-specific guidelines.

    PubMed

    2003-12-01

    The International Diabetes Federation (Europe) has updated these guidelines on hypertension management specifically in Type 2 diabetes in the light of recent results of the first prospective, randomized controlled studies to investigate clinical outcomes in people with diabetes and hypertension. The guidelines are knowledge based, i.e. based not only on evidence originating from clinical trials, but also from epidemiological and pathophysiological studies. A successful management strategy requires the following components: 1. Regular surveillance to detect developing hypertension and other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. 2. Considering more frequent monitoring and review of CV risk factors if any single blood pressure (BP) measurement > 140/85 mmHg (or 130/75 if microalbuminuria); when appropriate, using ambulatory or home monitoring to establish the baseline BP. 3. Considering other CV risk factors, such as a raised albumin excretion rate, in setting the intervention threshold. 4. Individualizing the target BP in accordance with other CV risk factors. 5. Agreeing lifestyle and therapeutic interventions with the patient, with education and empowerment as required. 6. Implementing lifestyle modifications, including controlling calorie, salt and alcohol intake, increased physical activity, weight control and smoking cessation. 7. Therapeutic strategy: the primary goal of therapy is to reduce BP markedly. Combination therapy is often necessary, e.g. an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and a diuretic. Some classes are particularly useful for certain patients, notably longer-acting ACE inhibitors, angiotensin 2 receptor antagonists (A2RAs) and calcium antagonists in those at risk of diabetic nephropathy, loop diuretics and thiazides in those at risk of hyperkalaemia, beta-blockers and calcium antagonists (except short-acting dihydropyridines) in patients with angina, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors after a myocardial infarction or in those with left

  3. Changing patterns of hypertension, diabetes, obesity and diet among Melanesians and Micronesians in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Eason, R J; Pada, J; Wallace, R; Henry, A; Thornton, R

    1987-05-01

    A cross-sectional survey of diabetes, hypertension, obesity and dietary patterns has been conducted in the Western Province of the Solomon Islands. Three groups--traditional and more urbanized Melanesians and semitraditional Micronesians--were compared. Abnormal glucose tolerance was rare (less than 1% over all) in Melanesians regardless of acculturation, but was present in 9.7% of adult Micronesians in whom it was associated with age; obesity; female sex; and a diet that was high in energy and refined carbohydrates. Hypertension, which was associated with advancing age and obesity, was recorded in 6.0% and 8.3% of traditional and partly urbanized Melanesians, respectively, and in 4.8% of Micronesians. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures correlated significantly with age for all except traditional Melanesian women among whom the association was limited to the systolic blood pressure only. Significant correlation coefficients were recorded between diastolic blood pressure and body mass index for both sexes and all groups, and between systolic blood pressure and body mass index for all women but only for Micronesian men. Dramatic differences in life-style and dietary patterns are described for rural and more urbanized Melanesians among whom the mean daily urinary sodium outputs were 67 and 119 mmol/L, respectively. PMID:3497330

  4. Effects of aging and uninephrectomy on renal changes in Tsukuba hypertensive mice

    PubMed Central

    INUI, YOSUKE; MOCHIDA, HIDEKI; YAMAIRI, FUMIKO; OKADA, MIYOKO; ISHIDA, JUNJI; FUKAMIZU, AKIYOSHI; ARAKAWA, KENJI

    2013-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is accelerated by various factors such as hypertension, aging and diabetes. Glomerular hyper-filtration, considered one of the major risk factors leading to diabetic nephropathy, is often encountered in diabetic patients. However, the interrelationship of these risk factors during the course and development of renal dysfunction has not been fully elucidated. In this study, the effects of aging and uninephrectomy (UNx)-induced hyperfiltration on renal changes were investigated in Tsukuba hypertensive mice (THM) carrying both human renin and angiotensinogen genes. In THM, the urinary albumin/creatinine (Alb/Cr) ratio was elevated with age without a concomitant increase in the plasma Cr concentration. Moreover, the urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin/Cr (NGAL/Cr) ratio, the renal monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA expression and the renal collagen type I α 2 (COL1A2) mRNA expression were also increased with age. Age-related albuminuria in THM is likely caused by renal tubular damage, enhanced inflammatory response and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Furthermore, following UNx, the urinary Alb/Cr ratio and the plasma Cr concentration were increased in THM. The urinary NGAL/Cr ratio and the renal MCP-1 and COL1A2 mRNA expression were not affected by UNx. These results suggested that UNx-induced albuminuria in THM was caused by glomerular dysfunction, rather than renal tubular injury. In conclusion, this study demonstrated for the first time the effects of aging and UNx on renal changes in THM. These findings strongly reinforce the significance of applying a diversity of therapeutic approaches to the management of renal dysfunction. PMID:24648949

  5. Capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension and the effect of antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fegan, P Gerard; Tooke, John E; Gooding, Kim M; Tullett, Jayne M; MacLeod, Kenneth M; Shore, Angela C

    2003-05-01

    Raised capillary pressure has been implicated in the formation of diabetic microangiopathy in type I diabetes, in which it is elevated in those with the earliest signs of diabetic kidney disease but remains normal in those without complications. In subjects with type 2 diabetes without complications, capillary pressure is normal, although alterations in the pressure waveforms suggested enhanced wave reflections. The nature of skin capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension remains to be elucidated, as does the effect of blood pressure-lowering therapy on capillary pressure in these subjects. Three studies were performed in well-matched groups. First, capillary pressure was elevated in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with normotensive subjects with type 2 diabetes (20.2 [17.4 to 22.7] mm Hg versus 17.7 [16.1 to 18.9] mm Hg, respectively, P<0.03, Mann-Whitney U test). Second, no significant difference was detected between hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertensive subjects without type 2 diabetes (19.4 [15.8 to 21.3] mm Hg versus 17.2 [15.1 to 19.8] mm Hg, respectively, P=0.5, Mann-Whitney U test). Finally, patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited to a case-control study. Seven subjects received blood pressure-lowering therapy and 8 did not. Therapy reduced capillary pressure from 18.2 [15.8 to 20.1] mm Hg to 15.9 [15.4 to 17.0] mm Hg (P=0.024 ANOVA), in contrast to the lack of effect of time alone. Mean arterial pressure was reduced from 110 [102 to 115] mm Hg to 105 [101 to 111] mm Hg (P=0.006, ANOVA). These findings provide a plausible mechanism by which reducing arterial hypertension may reduce the risk of microangiopathy in type 2 diabetes. PMID:12695416

  6. Uncontrolled Hypertension and Its Determinants in Patients with Concomitant Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi, Oladele Vincent; Yogeswaran, Parimalaranie; Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin; Goon, Daniel Ter

    2016-01-01

    Background Paucity of data on the prevalence, treatment and control of hypertension in individuals living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the rural communities of South Africa may undermine efforts to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases. This study examines the socio-demographic and clinical determinants of uncontrolled hypertension among individuals living with T2DM in the rural communities of Mthatha, South Africa. Methods This cross-sectional study involved a serially selected sample of 265 individuals living with T2DM and hypertension at Mthatha General Hospital, Mthatha. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 140mmHg and diastolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 90mmHg in accordance with the Eight Joint National Committee Report (JNC 8) (2014). We performed univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to identify the significant determinants of uncontrolled hypertension. Results Of the total participants (n = 265), the prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension was 75.5% (n = 200). In univariate analysis of all participants, male gender (p = 0.029), age≥65 years (p = 0.016), unemployed status (p<0.0001), excessive alcohol intake (p = 0.005) and consumption of western-type diet (p<0.0001) were positively associated with uncontrolled hypertension. In multivariate logistic regression (LR method) analysis, unemployed status (p<0.0001), excessive alcohol intake (p = 0.007) and consumption of western-type diet (p<0.0001) were independently and significantly associated with uncontrolled hypertension. There is significant association between increasing number and classes of anti-hypertensive drugs and uncontrolled hypertension (p = 0.05 and 0.02, respectively). Conclusion Prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension was high in individuals with concomitant hypertension and T2DM in the study population. Male sex, aging, clinic inertia, unemployed status and

  7. Social distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related risk factors in Barbados: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Howitt, Christina; Hambleton, Ian R; Rose, Angela M C; Hennis, Anselm; Samuels, T Alafia; George, Kenneth S; Unwin, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related behavioural and biological risk factors in adults in Barbados by gender, education and occupation. Design Multistage probability sampling was used to select a representative sample of the adult population (≥25 years). Participants were interviewed using standard questionnaires, underwent anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, and provided fasting blood for glucose and cholesterol measurements. Standard WHO definitions were used. Data were weighted for sampling and non-response, and were age and sex standardised to the 2010 Barbados population. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated, and prevalence ratios were calculated for behavioural and biological risk factors by demographic and socioeconomic group. Results Study response rate was 55.0%, with 764 women, 470 men. Prevalence of obesity was 33.8% (95% CI 30.7% to 37.1%); hypertension 40.6% (95% CI 36.5% to 44.9%); and diabetes 18.7% (95% CI 16.2% to 21.4%). Compared with women, men were less likely to be obese (prevalence ratio 0.5; 95% CI 0.4 to 0.7), or physically inactive (0.5; 0.4 to 0.6), but more likely to smoke tobacco (4.1; 2.5 to 6.7) and consume large amounts of alcohol in a single episode (4.6; 2.7 to 7.6). Both diabetes (0.83; 0.65 to 1.05) and hypertension (0.89; 0.79 to 1.02) were lower in men, but not significantly so. In women, higher educational level was related to higher fruit and vegetable intake, more physical activity, less diabetes and less hypercholesterolaemia (p 0.01–0.04). In men, higher education was related only to less smoking (p 0.04). Differences by occupation were limited to smoking in men and hypercholesterolaemia in women. Conclusions In this developing country population, sex appears to be a much stronger determinant of behavioural risk factors, as well as obesity and its related risks, than education or occupation. These findings have implications for meeting the commitments made

  8. Management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus by cardiovascular and endocrine physicians: a China registry

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Li, Li-Hua; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Li-Nong; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated hypertension and diabetes mellitus in two management settings, namely cardiology and endocrinology, and their associations with albuminuria while accounting for the management of these two diseases. Methods: Our multicentre registry included patients (≥20 years) seen for hypertension in cardiology or for diabetes mellitus in endocrinology. We administered a questionnaire and measured blood pressure, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c and albuminuria. Results: Presence of both hypertension and diabetes was observed in 32.9% of hypertensive patients in cardiology (n = 1291) and 58.9% of diabetic patients in endocrinology (n = 1168). When both diseases were present, the use of combination antihypertensive therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.31, P < 0.0001] and inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (OR 0.66, P = 0.0009) was less frequent in endocrinology than cardiology, and the use of combination antidiabetic therapy (OR 0.16, P < 0.0001) was less frequent in cardiology than endocrinology. The control of hypertension and diabetes, however, was not different between the two management settings (P ≥ 0.21), regardless of the therapeutic target (SBP/DBP < 140/90 or 130/80 mmHg and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c <7.0 or 6.5%). The prevalence of albuminuria was higher (P ≤ 0.02) in the presence of both diseases (23.3%) than those with either hypertension (12.6%) or diabetes alone (15.9%). Conclusion: Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were often jointly present, especially in the setting of endocrinology. The management was insufficient on the use of combination antihypertensive therapy and inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system in endocrinology and for combination antidiabetic therapy in cardiology, indicating a need for more intensive management and better control of both clinical conditions. PMID:27270188

  9. Age-related changes in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yali; Liu, Jian; Gao, Dengfeng; Wei, Jin; Yuan, Haifeng; Niu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Qiaojun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the age‑related alterations in hypertensive brain damage in the hippocampi of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the underlying mechanisms. Aging resulted in a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and apoptotic cells in the SHR group, which was accompanied by increased expression of oxidative stress markers (iNOS and gp47phox) and apoptotic regulatory proteins (Bax and caspase‑3). In addition, the expression of PPAR‑γ and Bcl‑2 were progressively reduced with increasing age in the SHR group. The 32 and 64‑week‑old SHRs exhibited significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells, oxidative stress markers and pro‑apoptotic proteins compared with age‑matched WKY rats, which was accompanied by reduced expression of PPAR‑γ. Compared with the 16 and 32‑week‑old WKY group, the 64‑week‑old WKY rats exhibited increased oxidative stress and pro‑apoptotic markers, and increased levels apoptotic cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that both aging and hypertension enhanced brain damage and oxidative stress injury in the hippocampi of SHRs, indicated by an increased presence of apoptotic cells and astrocytes. In addition, reduced expression of PPAR‑γ may contribute to the age‑related brain damage in SHRs. PMID:26846626

  10. Cardiovascular Risk Factors (Diabetes, Hypertension, Hypercholesterolemia and Metabolic Syndrome) in Older People with Intellectual Disability: Results of the HA-ID Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and the metabolic syndrome are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In older people with intellectual disability (ID), CVD is a substantial morbidity risk. The aims of the present study, which was part of the Healthy Ageing in Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study, were (1) to…

  11. Oral physiology, nutrition and quality of life in diabetic patients associated or not with hypertension and beta-blockers therapy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, L J; Foureaux, R C; Pereira, C V; Alves, M C; Campos, C H; Rodrigues Garcia, R C M; Andrade, E F; Gonçalves, T M S V

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between type 2 diabetes oral physiology, nutritional intake and quality of life has not been fully elucidated. We assessed the impact of type 2 diabetes - exclusive or associated with hypertension with beta-blockers treatment - on oral physiology, mastication, nutrition and quality of life. This cross-sectional study was performed with 78 complete dentate subjects (15 natural teeth and six masticatory units minimum; without removable or fixed prostheses), divided into three groups: diabetics (DM) (n = 20; 45·4 ± 9·5 years), diabetics with hypertension and receiving beta-blockers treatment (DMH) (n = 19; 41·1 ± 5·1 years) and controls (n = 39; 44·5 ± 11·7 years) matched for gender, age and socioeconomic status. Blood glucose, masticatory performance, swallowing threshold, taste, food intake, stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow, pH and buffering capacity of saliva were assessed. Glycemia was higher in DM than in controls (P < 0·01). No differences were observed between DM and controls for nutrition and quality of life. Both stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rate were lower in DMH (P < 0·01), which also presented the lowest number of teeth and masticatory units (P < 0·0001), and reduction in the number of chewing cycles (P < 0·01). Controls showed lower Decayed Missing Filled Teeth index (DMFT) scores in comparison with DMH (P = 0·021). Masticatory performance and saliva buffering capacity were similar among groups. Exclusive type 2 diabetes did not alter oral physiology, nutrition or quality of life. However, when hypertension and beta-blockers treatment were associated with diabetes, the salivary flow rate, chewing cycles and number of teeth decreased. PMID:27043215

  12. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and risk of diabetes in Indian women: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sutapa; Fledderjohann, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data from high-income countries suggest that women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) are more likely to develop diabetes later in life. Objective We investigated the association between pre-eclampsia and eclampsia (PE&E) during pregnancy and the risk of diabetes in Indian women. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting India. Methods Data from India's third National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005–2006), a cross-sectional survey of women aged 15–49 years, are used. Self-reported symptoms suggestive of PE&E were obtained from 39 657 women who had a live birth in the 5 years preceding the survey. The association between PE&E and self-reported diabetes status was assessed using multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for dietary intake, body mass index (BMI), tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, frequency of TV watching, sociodemographic characteristics and geographic region. Results The prevalence of symptoms suggestive of PE&E in women with diabetes was 1.8% (n=207; 95% CI 1.5 to 2.0; p<0.0001) and 2.1% (n=85; 95% CI 1.8 to 2.3; p<0.0001), respectively, compared with 1.1% (n=304; 95% CI 1.0 to 1.4) and 1.2% (n=426; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.5) in women who did not report any PE&E symptoms. In the multivariable analysis, PE&E was associated with 1.6 times (OR=1.59; 95% CI 1.31 to 1.94; p<0.0001) and 1.4 times (OR=1.36; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.77; p=0.001) higher risk for self-reported diabetes even after controlling for dietary intake, BMI and sociodemographic characteristics. Conclusions HDP is strongly associated with the risk of diabetes in a large nationally representative sample of Indian women. These findings are important for a country which is already tackling the burden of young onset of diabetes in the population. However, longitudinal medical histories and a clinical measurement of diabetes are needed in this low-resource setting. PMID:27496230

  13. Diabetes, hypertension, sanitation, and health education by high school students in Guyana, South America

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, R. M.; Mehta, K.; Soni, R.; Doyle, A.; Patel, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    We initiated a program for early detection of diabetes and hypertension, the main causes of kidney failure in Guyana, South America. We trained local high school students with the goal that these students would stay in the villages for long-term, become health advocates and shift the reliance away from physicians. This project involved 7 high school students who were taught to monitor the health of one village of 1000–1500 population each. The program will be implemented for 3 years in which the entire population of seven villages (approximately 10,000 people) will be covered. This represents 1.3% population in Guyana. We present data from the pilot study from the sample of 619 people. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 13.9%. Among diabetics, 33.7% were using insulin and 86% oral hypoglycemic agents. Prevalence of hypertension was 29.4%, 63.2% were overweight and 17% were obese. About 9.9% patients were unaware about the existence of hypertension. We have shown in our study that high school students can be used to collect health data and monitor diabetes and hypertension. There was also a significant incidence of undetected diabetes and hypertension. PMID:27194834

  14. Diabetes, hypertension, sanitation, and health education by high school students in Guyana, South America.

    PubMed

    Jindal, R M; Mehta, K; Soni, R; Doyle, A; Patel, T G

    2016-01-01

    We initiated a program for early detection of diabetes and hypertension, the main causes of kidney failure in Guyana, South America. We trained local high school students with the goal that these students would stay in the villages for long-term, become health advocates and shift the reliance away from physicians. This project involved 7 high school students who were taught to monitor the health of one village of 1000-1500 population each. The program will be implemented for 3 years in which the entire population of seven villages (approximately 10,000 people) will be covered. This represents 1.3% population in Guyana. We present data from the pilot study from the sample of 619 people. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 13.9%. Among diabetics, 33.7% were using insulin and 86% oral hypoglycemic agents. Prevalence of hypertension was 29.4%, 63.2% were overweight and 17% were obese. About 9.9% patients were unaware about the existence of hypertension. We have shown in our study that high school students can be used to collect health data and monitor diabetes and hypertension. There was also a significant incidence of undetected diabetes and hypertension. PMID:27194834

  15. Prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease in former elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Kaprio, J; Taimela, S; Sarna, S

    1994-10-01

    Diabetes, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease are less frequent among physically active subjects. The aim of the present national population-based study was to compare the prevalence of these three diseases between former Finnish elite athletes and referents. The subjects consisted of surviving former male athletes who represented Finland between the years 1920 and 1965 at least once in international competitions and referents who at the age of 20 were classified as completely healthy at a medical examination, and who responded to a questionnaire in 1985 (athletes, n = 1,282; referents n = 777). In 1985, they completed a questionnaire with medical, life-style, and psychosocial items; at that time, the leisure physical activity was greater in previous athletes than in referents. The presence or absence of the three diseases was identified from the questionnaire or from at least one of three registers: Finnish hospital inpatient discharge register, reimbursable medication register, and disability pension register. When compared with referents, both endurance and mixed-sports athletes had lower age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for all studied diseases. Compared with referents, power-sports athletes had a higher risk for high body mass index (BMI) but a lower risk for ischemic heart disease. Subjects with high BMI had an increased risk for all three diseases. Smokers had a higher risk for diabetes and ischemic heart disease compared with those who were never smokers. After adjustments for age, BMI, smoking history, and occupational group, compared with referents, former endurance athletes had the lowest ORs for diabetes (OR 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.07 to 0.81) and ischemic heart disease (OR 0.33; 0.18 to 0.61).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7934977

  16. Vigorous Exercise and Diabetic, Hypertensive, and Hypercholesterolemia Medication Use

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul T.; Franklin, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The prevalences of diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol all decrease with increased levels of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness. Whether these reductions extend beyond contemporary guideline activity levels and whether fitness affects medication use independent of activity, remains unclear. Methods Cross-sectional analyses of 62,291 male and 45,041 female runners, of whom 496 used antidiabetic, 3738 used antihypertension, and 2360 used low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)–lowering medications. Cardiorespiratory fitness was reported as speed (m/s) during a 10-km foot race. Results Medication use was significantly inversely associated with activity and fitness (P < 0.001, except LDL-C–lowering versus women’s fitness). Compared with ≤ 16 km/wk (guideline levels), the odds in men and women who ran > 64 km/wk were, respectively, 69% and 55% lower for antidiabetic, 48% and 52% lower for antihypertension, and 64% and 51% lower for LDL-C–lowering medication use. Compared with the least-fit men (< 3.25 m/s) and women (< 2.8 m/s), the odds for those who were most fit (men > 4.75 m/s; women > 4.0 m/s) were 58% and 65% lower for antidiabetic, and 76% and 55% lower for antihypertensive medication use. Odds for LDL-C–lowering medication use was 87% lower in the fittest versus the least-fit men. Adjustment for activity only moderately diminished the inverse relationships of fitness with medication use. Conclusion Among individuals who exceed current guideline levels, antidiabetic, antihypertension, and LDL-C–lowering medications are inversely related to vigorous physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness. Lower odds of medication use with higher fitness occur independently of physical activity. PMID:17986900

  17. Hypertension Is a Major Contributor to 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid–Mediated Kidney Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gangadhariah, Mahesha H.; Luther, James M.; Garcia, Victor; Paueksakon, Paisit; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Hayward, Simon W.; Love, Harold D.; Falck, John R.; Manthati, Vijaya L.; Imig, John D.; Schwartzman, Michal L.; Zent, Roy; Capdevila, Jorge H.

    2015-01-01

    In the kidney, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) is a primary cytochrome P450 4 (Cyp4)–derived eicosanoid that enhances vasoconstriction of renal vessels and induces hypertension, renal tubular cell hypertrophy, and podocyte apoptosis. Hypertension and podocyte injury contribute to diabetic nephropathy and are strong predictors of disease progression. In this study, we defined the mechanisms whereby 20-HETE affects the progression of diabetic nephropathy. We used Cyp4a14KO male mice that exhibit androgen-sensitive hypertension due to increased Cyp4a12-mediated 20-HETE production. We show that, upon induction of diabetes type 1 via streptozotocin injection, Cyp4a14KO male mice developed worse renal disease than streptozotocin-treated wild-type mice, characterized by increased albuminuria, mesangial expansion, glomerular matrix deposition, and thickness of the glomerular basement membranes. Castration blunted androgen-mediated Cyp4a12 synthesis and 20-HETE production, normalized BP, and ameliorated renal damage in diabetic Cyp4a14KO mice. Notably, treatment with a 20-HETE antagonist or agents that normalized BP without affecting Cyp4a12 expression and 20-HETE biosynthesis also ameliorated diabetes-mediated renal damage and albuminuria in Cyp4a14KO male mice. Taken together, these results suggest that hypertension is the major contributor to 20-HETE–driven diabetes-mediated kidney injury. PMID:25071086

  18. Hypertension is a major contributor to 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-mediated kidney injury in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gangadhariah, Mahesha H; Luther, James M; Garcia, Victor; Paueksakon, Paisit; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Hayward, Simon W; Love, Harold D; Falck, John R; Manthati, Vijaya L; Imig, John D; Schwartzman, Michal L; Zent, Roy; Capdevila, Jorge H; Pozzi, Ambra

    2015-03-01

    In the kidney, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) is a primary cytochrome P450 4 (Cyp4)-derived eicosanoid that enhances vasoconstriction of renal vessels and induces hypertension, renal tubular cell hypertrophy, and podocyte apoptosis. Hypertension and podocyte injury contribute to diabetic nephropathy and are strong predictors of disease progression. In this study, we defined the mechanisms whereby 20-HETE affects the progression of diabetic nephropathy. We used Cyp4a14KO male mice that exhibit androgen-sensitive hypertension due to increased Cyp4a12-mediated 20-HETE production. We show that, upon induction of diabetes type 1 via streptozotocin injection, Cyp4a14KO male mice developed worse renal disease than streptozotocin-treated wild-type mice, characterized by increased albuminuria, mesangial expansion, glomerular matrix deposition, and thickness of the glomerular basement membranes. Castration blunted androgen-mediated Cyp4a12 synthesis and 20-HETE production, normalized BP, and ameliorated renal damage in diabetic Cyp4a14KO mice. Notably, treatment with a 20-HETE antagonist or agents that normalized BP without affecting Cyp4a12 expression and 20-HETE biosynthesis also ameliorated diabetes-mediated renal damage and albuminuria in Cyp4a14KO male mice. Taken together, these results suggest that hypertension is the major contributor to 20-HETE-driven diabetes-mediated kidney injury. PMID:25071086

  19. Rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ stimulant, abrogates diabetes-evoked hypertension by rectifying abnormalities in vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    El-Bassossy, Hany M; Abo-Warda, Shaymaa M; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    In addition to insulin sensitization, rosiglitazone exhibits favourable circulatory effects. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that rosiglitazone protects against hypertension and vascular derangements caused by diabetes. Diabetes was induced by a single bolus injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p.). After 2 weeks, rats were started on a treatment regimen of 5 mg/kg rosiglitazone daily for a period of 6 weeks. The control group consisted of rats treated with vehicle (distilled water) for the same period of time. After 6 weeks treatment, blood pressure (BP) was recorded and serum levels of glucose, advanced glycation end-products (AGE), triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) were determined. In in vitro experiments, concentration-response curves were constructed to phenylephrine (PE), KCl and acetylcholine (ACh) in thoracic aorta rings. In addition, ACh-induced nitric oxide (NO) generation and KCl-induced intracellular Ca accumulation were determined in the aorta. Compared with values in control rats, both diastolic and systolic BP were increased in diabetic rats. Rosiglitazone treatment of diabetic rats abolished the increase in diastolic BP and significantly reduced the increased systolic BP without affecting the development of hyperglycaemia. The possibility that changes in vascular reactivity and/or lipid profile contributed to the effects of rosiglitazone on BP in diabetic rats was investigated. In aortic rings from diabetic rats, contractile responses to KCl were increased, whereas the relaxant responses to ACh were decreased. In rings from diabetic rosiglitazone-treated rats, the exaggerated response to KCl and the impaired response to ACh were abolished. Furthermore, rosiglitazone abrogated impaired ACh-stimulated NO generation in aortas isolated from diabetic rats. Diabetes in rats was accompanied by elevated levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-C and AGE. Rosiglitazone treatment

  20. Chinese Herbal Medicine Treatment Improves the Overall Survival Rate of Individuals with Hypertension among Type 2 Diabetes Patients and Modulates In Vitro Smooth Muscle Cell Contractility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Ju; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Fung; Shiao, Yi-Tzone; Wang, Chang-Bi; Chien, Wen-Kuei; Chen, Jin-Hua; Liu, Xiang; Tsang, Hsinyi; Lin, Ting-Hsu; Liao, Chiu-Chu; Huang, Shao-Mei; Li, Ju-Pi; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Pang, Hao-Yu; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lan, Yu-Ching; Liu, Yu-Huei; Chen, Shih-Yin; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic, multifactorial, and metabolic disorder accounting for 90% diabetes cases worldwide. Among them, almost half of T2D have hypertension, which is responsible for cardiovascular disease, morbidity, and mortality in these patients. The Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) prescription patterns of hypertension individuals among T2D patients have yet to be characterized. This study, therefore, aimed to determine their prescription patterns and evaluate the CHM effect. A cohort of one million randomly sampled cases from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) was used to investigate the overall survival rate of CHM users, and prescription patterns. After matching CHM and non-CHM users for age, gender and date of diagnosis of hypertension, 980 subjects for each group were selected. The CHM users were characterized with slightly longer duration time from diabetes to hypertension, and more cases for hyperlipidaemia. The cumulative survival probabilities were higher in CHM users than in non-CHM users. Among these top 12 herbs, Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan, Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San, Dan-Shen, and Ge-Gen were the most common herbs and inhibited in vitro smooth muscle cell contractility. Our study also provides a CHM comprehensive list that may be useful in future investigation of the safety and efficacy for individuals with hypertension among type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:26699542

  1. Chinese Herbal Medicine Treatment Improves the Overall Survival Rate of Individuals with Hypertension among Type 2 Diabetes Patients and Modulates In Vitro Smooth Muscle Cell Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Fung; Shiao, Yi-Tzone; Wang, Chang-Bi; Chien, Wen-Kuei; Chen, Jin-Hua; Liu, Xiang; Tsang, Hsinyi; Lin, Ting-Hsu; Liao, Chiu-Chu; Huang, Shao-Mei; Li, Ju-Pi; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Pang, Hao-Yu; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lan, Yu-Ching; Liu, Yu-Huei; Chen, Shih-Yin; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic, multifactorial, and metabolic disorder accounting for 90% diabetes cases worldwide. Among them, almost half of T2D have hypertension, which is responsible for cardiovascular disease, morbidity, and mortality in these patients. The Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) prescription patterns of hypertension individuals among T2D patients have yet to be characterized. This study, therefore, aimed to determine their prescription patterns and evaluate the CHM effect. A cohort of one million randomly sampled cases from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) was used to investigate the overall survival rate of CHM users, and prescription patterns. After matching CHM and non-CHM users for age, gender and date of diagnosis of hypertension, 980 subjects for each group were selected. The CHM users were characterized with slightly longer duration time from diabetes to hypertension, and more cases for hyperlipidaemia. The cumulative survival probabilities were higher in CHM users than in non-CHM users. Among these top 12 herbs, Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan, Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San, Dan-Shen, and Ge-Gen were the most common herbs and inhibited in vitro smooth muscle cell contractility. Our study also provides a CHM comprehensive list that may be useful in future investigation of the safety and efficacy for individuals with hypertension among type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:26699542

  2. Sodium-22 influx into erythrocytes from diabetic hypertensive patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gambhir, K.K.; Mathews, J.; Parui, R.; Cruz, I.A.; Hosten, A.O.; Dillard, M.G. )

    1990-10-01

    We have studied the percentage of 22Na+ uptake in cell suspensions; 0.4 to 2.0 x 10(9) erythrocytes/mL from diabetic uremic patients with secondary hypertension and from normal subjects. Suspensions from diabetic uremic patients with secondary hypertension 0.42 +/- 0.06 to 2.05 +/- 0.28; normal subjects showed a percentage uptake of 22Na+ of 0.27 +/- 0.05 to 1.28 +/- 0.22. The uptake of 22Na+ in 2.0 x 10(9) cells/mL was 60% more (P less than .05) in diabetic uremic patients than in the controls. These studies indicate that 22Na+ influx determinations may be used to distinguish secondary hypertensive patients from normal subjects.

  3. Epicardial fat thickness: distribution and association with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome in the ELSA-Brasil study.

    PubMed

    Graeff, Daniela Bertol; Foppa, Murilo; Pires, Julio Cesar Gall; Vigo, Alvaro; Schmidt, Maria Ines; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Mill, Jose Geraldo; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow

    2016-04-01

    Epicardial fat thickness (EFT) has emerged as a marker of cardiometabolic risk, but its clinical use warrants proper knowledge of its distribution and associations in populations. We aimed to describe the distribution of EFT, its demographic correlates and independent associations with diabetes, hypertension and metabolic syndrome (MS) in free-living Brazilian adults. From the baseline echocardiography of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)-a cohort study of civil servants aged 35-74 years-EFT was measured from a randomly selected sample of 998 participants as the mean of two paraesternal windows obtained at end systole (EFTsyst) and end diastole (EFTdiast). From the 421 individuals free of diabetes, hypertension and MS, we defined EFT reference values and the EFTsyst 75th percentile cut-off. Median EFTsyst was 1.5 (IQR 0-2.6) mm; a large proportion (84 %) had EFTdiast = 0. EFT was higher in women and lower in blacks, and increased with age and BMI. Although EFT was higher in those with diabetes, hypertension, and MS, EFT associations were reduced when adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity, and were non-significant after adjusting for obesity measures. In conclusion, the amount of EFT in this large multiethnic population is smaller than reported in other populations. EFT reference values varied across demographic and clinical variables, EFT associations with cardiometabolic variables being largely explained by age, sex, ethnicity and central obesity. Although EFT can help identify individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk, it will likely have a limited additional role compared to current risk stratification strategies. PMID:26585750

  4. Isotopic test of capillary permeability to albumin in diabetic patients: effects of hypertension, microangiopathy, and duration of diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Valensi, P.; Attali, J.R.; Behar, A.; Sebaoun, J.

    1987-09-01

    Capillary permeability to albumin (CPA) was studied by performing an isotopic noninvasive test with venous compression on 87 nonselected diabetics with no edema, no cardiac failure, and no peripheral vascular disease. Excessive albumin retention (AR greater than or equal to 8%) ten minutes after removal of the compression was found in 27 patients (31%). The radioactivity disappearance curve was then analyzed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). An abnormal isotopic CPA test was thus found in at least 45 out of the 87 patients. The prevalence of an abnormal test was not different in type 1 and type 2 diabetics. We studied the independent effects of hypertension, presence of specific clinical signs of microangiopathy (retinopathy and/or significant proteinuria), and duration of diabetes. Among diabetics free of specific clinical signs of microangiopathy, the prevalence of an AR greater than or equal to 8% was significantly higher in those with hypertension (11/19) than in those with normal blood pressure (2/28) and in nondiabetic hypertensive patients (0/16). Among normotensive diabetics, the prevalence of an abnormal test was higher, but not significantly, in patients with specific clinical signs of microangiopathy (8/11) than in those free of them (7/18). Seven normotensive diabetics without specific clinical signs of microangiopathy had an abnormal test; five of them had had diabetes for more than five years. The prevalence of diabetes of more than five years duration was significantly higher in patients with an abnormal test (35/45) than in normotensive diabetics free of specific clinical signs of microangiopathy with a normal test (4/11).

  5. Is global cardiovascular risk considered in current practice? Treatment and control of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes according to patients’ risk level

    PubMed Central

    Roccatagliata, Daria; Avanzini, Fausto; Monesi, Lara; Caimi, Vittorio; Lauri, Davide; Longoni, Paolo; Marchioli, Roberto; Tombesi, Massimo; Tognoni, Gianni; Roncaglioni, Maria Carla

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To assess the pharmacological treatment and the control of major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in everyday practice according to the patients’ cardiovascular risk level. Methods In a cross-sectional study general practitioners (GPs) had to identify a random sample of their patients with cardiovascular risk factors or diseases and collect essential data on the pharmacological treatment and control of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes according to the patients’ cardiovascular risk level and history of cardiovascular disease. Participants were subjects of both sexes, aged 40–80 years, with at least one known cardiovascular risk factor or a history of cardiovascular diseases. Results From June to December 2000, 162 Italian GPs enrolled 3120 of their patients (2470 hypertensives, 1373 hyperlipidemics, and 604 diabetics). Despite the positive association between the perceived level of global cardiovascular risk and lipid-lowering drug prescriptions in hyperlipidemic subjects (from 26% for lowest risk to 56% for highest risk p < 0.0001) or the prescription of combination therapy in hypertensives (from 41% to 70%, p < 0.0001) and diabetics (from 24% to 43%, p = 0.057), control was still inadequate in 48% of diabetics, 77% of hypertensives, and 85% of hyperlipidemics, with no increase in patients at highest risk. Trends for treatment and control were similar in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Conclusions Even in high-risk patients, despite a tendency towards more intensive treatment, pharmacological therapy is still under used and the degree of control of blood pressure, cholesterol level and diabetes is largely unsatisfactory. PMID:17323606

  6. Regional variation in the prevalence of overweight/obesity, hypertension and diabetes and their correlates among the adult rural population in India.

    PubMed

    Meshram, I I; Vishnu Vardhana Rao, M; Sudershan Rao, V; Laxmaiah, A; Polasa, K

    2016-04-14

    A community-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in five regions of India by adopting a multistage random sampling procedure. Information was collected from the participants about socio-demographic particulars such as age, sex, occupation, education, etc. Anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and waist and hip circumferences were measured and three measurements of blood pressure were obtained. Fasting blood sugar was assessed using a Glucometer. Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics, χ(2) test for association and logistic regression analysis. A total of 7531 subjects were covered for anthropometry and blood pressure. The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity was 29 and 21%, respectively, and was higher in the Southern region (40% each) as compared with other regions. The prevalence of hypertension was 18 and 16% and diabetes was 9·5% each among men and women, respectively. The risk of hypertension and diabetes was significantly higher among adults from the Southern and Western regions, the among elderly, among overweight/obese individuals and those with abdominal obesity. In conclusion, the prevalence of overweight/obesity and hypertension was higher in the Southern region, whereas diabetes was higher in the Southern and Western regions. Factors such as increasing age, male sex, overweight/obesity, and abdominal obesity were important risk factors for hypertension and diabetes. Appropriate health and nutrition education should be given to the community to control these problems. PMID:26867590

  7. Association Between Maternal Diabetes in Utero and Age at Offspring's Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pettitt, David J.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Beyer, Jennifer; Hillier, Teresa A.; Liese, Angela D.; Mayer-Davis, Beth; Loots, Beth; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Liu, Lenna; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Linder, Barbara; Dabelea, Dana

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to examine age of diabetes diagnosis in youth who have a parent with diabetes by diabetes type and whether the parent's diabetes was diagnosed before or after the youth's birth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The cohort comprised SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study participants (diabetes diagnosis 2001–2005) with a diabetic parent. SEARCH is a multicenter survey of youth with diabetes diagnosed before age 20 years. RESULTS—Youth with type 2 diabetes were more likely to have a parent with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes (mother 39.3%; father 21.2%) than youth with type 1 diabetes (5.3 and 6.7%, respectively, P < 0.001 for each). Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed 1.68 years earlier among those exposed to diabetes in utero (n = 174) than among those whose mothers’ diabetes was diagnosed later (P = 0.018, controlled for maternal diagnosis age, paternal diabetes, sex, and race/ethnicity). Age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes for 269 youth with and without in utero exposure did not differ significantly (difference 0.96 year, P = 0.403 after adjustment). Controlled for the father's age of diagnosis, father's diabetes before the child's birth was not associated with age at diagnosis (P = 0.078 for type 1 diabetes; P = 0.140 for type 2 diabetes). CONCLUSIONS—Type 2 diabetes was diagnosed at younger ages among those exposed to hyperglycemia in utero. Among youth with type 1 diabetes, the effect of the intrauterine exposure was not significant when controlled for mother's age of diagnosis. This study helps explain why other studies have found higher age-specific rates of type 2 diabetes among offspring of women with diabetes. PMID:18694977

  8. Relationship between blood pressure reverse dipping and type 2 diabetes in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lu; Yan, Bin; Gao, Ya; Su, Dan; Peng, Liyuan; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Yuhuan; Han, Donggang; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that nocturnal variations of blood pressure (BP) were closely related to type 2 diabetes. However, little information has been revealed about the relationship between reverse-dipper pattern of BP and type 2 diabetes. In this cross-sectional study, BP variations of 531 hypertensive patients were evaluated with ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Diagnosis of diabetes in Chinese adults was made according to diabetes diagnostic criteria of 2015. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between type 2 diabetes and ABPM results. In the study, patients with reverse-dipper pattern (32.3%) had the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes compared with dippers (21.4%) and nondippers (23.3%). After multivariate logistic regression, reverse-dipper BP pattern (OR 2.067, P = 0.024) and nondipper BP pattern (OR 1.637, P = 0.039) were found to be correlated with type 2 diabetes compared with dipper pattern. The results of our study also suggested that type 2 diabetes might contribute to the reverse-dipper pattern of BP (OR 1.691, P = 0.023). In addition, fasting glucose was negatively correlated with the decline rate of nocturnal SBP (r = -0.095, P = 0.029). Reverse-dipper pattern of BP in ABPM may be independently associated with type 2 diabetes in patients with hypertension. PMID:27109832

  9. Biomarkers of lipid peroxidation related to hypertension in aging.

    PubMed

    Yavuzer, Hakan; Yavuzer, Serap; Cengiz, Mahir; Erman, Hayriye; Doventas, Alper; Balci, Huriye; Erdincler, Deniz Suna; Uzun, Hafize

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the influence of aging on the levels of lipid peroxidation (quantified as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) content), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), hexanoyl lysine (HEL), 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and determine their relationships to the demographic and cardiovascular risk factors in elderly hypertensive (HT) patients. This study consisted of four groups: two elderly groups with 30 HT patients (11 males, 19 females) and 30 normotensive healthy volunteers (15 males, 15 females), and two young groups with 30 HT patients (13 males, 17 females) and 30 normotensive healthy volunteers (12 males, 18 females). In the elderly control group, the TBARS, LOOH, HEL and 8-iso-PGF2α levels, and the carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) were significantly higher than in the young control group. The TBARS, LOOH, HEL and 8-iso-PGF2α levels and the CIMT measurements were significantly higher in the elderly HT group than in the young HT group. In addition, the TAC levels were significantly lower in the elderly and young HT groups than in the elderly and young control groups. The CIMT was significantly positively correlated with TBARS (r=0.40, P<0.001), HEL (r= 0.30, P=0.001), LOOH (r= 0.44, P<0.001) and 8-iso-PGF2α (r= 0.32, P<0.001) in all of the HT groups. It seems that in elderly patients, the LOOH and TBARS are better biomarkers of lipid peroxidation in hypertension in terms of sensitivity. In all of the HT groups, 8-iso-PGF2α had the highest sensitivity. Hypertension is associated with lipid peroxidation due to an impaired oxidant/antioxidant status. Increased lipid peroxidation and decreased antioxidants with aging indicate that peroxidative damage further increases with higher blood pressure and the aging process. PMID:26763852

  10. Targeting AGEs Signaling Ameliorates Central Nervous System Diabetic Complications in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohamed Naguib; El-Bassossy, Hany M; Barakat, Waleed

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic endocrine disorder associated with several complications as hypertension, advanced brain aging, and cognitive decline. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is an important mechanism that mediates diabetic complications. Upon binding to their receptor (RAGE), AGEs mediate oxidative stress and/or cause cross-linking with proteins in blood vessels and brain tissues. The current investigation was designed to investigate the effect of agents that decrease AGEs signaling, perindopril which increases soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and alagebrium which cleaves AGEs cross-links, compared to the standard antidiabetic drug, gliclazide, on the vascular and central nervous system (CNS) complications in STZ-induced (50 mg/kg, IP) diabetes in rats. Perindopril ameliorated the elevation in blood pressure seen in diabetic animals. In addition, both perindopril and alagebrium significantly inhibited memory decline (performance in the Y-maze), neuronal degeneration (Fluoro-Jade staining), AGEs accumulation in serum and brain, and brain oxidative stress (level of reduced glutathione and activities of catalase and malondialdehyde). These results suggest that blockade of AGEs signaling after diabetes induction in rats is effective in reducing diabetic CNS complications. PMID:26491434

  11. Targeting AGEs Signaling Ameliorates Central Nervous System Diabetic Complications in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Mohamed Naguib; El-Bassossy, Hany M.; Barakat, Waleed

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic endocrine disorder associated with several complications as hypertension, advanced brain aging, and cognitive decline. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is an important mechanism that mediates diabetic complications. Upon binding to their receptor (RAGE), AGEs mediate oxidative stress and/or cause cross-linking with proteins in blood vessels and brain tissues. The current investigation was designed to investigate the effect of agents that decrease AGEs signaling, perindopril which increases soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and alagebrium which cleaves AGEs cross-links, compared to the standard antidiabetic drug, gliclazide, on the vascular and central nervous system (CNS) complications in STZ-induced (50 mg/kg, IP) diabetes in rats. Perindopril ameliorated the elevation in blood pressure seen in diabetic animals. In addition, both perindopril and alagebrium significantly inhibited memory decline (performance in the Y-maze), neuronal degeneration (Fluoro-Jade staining), AGEs accumulation in serum and brain, and brain oxidative stress (level of reduced glutathione and activities of catalase and malondialdehyde). These results suggest that blockade of AGEs signaling after diabetes induction in rats is effective in reducing diabetic CNS complications. PMID:26491434

  12. Effects of 12-month valsartan therapy on glycation and oxidative stress markers in type 2 diabetic subjects with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Naoko; Hirose, Hiroshi; Saisho, Yoshifumi; Saito, Ikuo; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2008-11-01

    Although it has been reported that angiotensin II receptor blockers inhibited the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in vitro and in vivo, whether they can do so clinically is not clear. We investigated the effects of 12-month valsartan therapy on various markers of inflammation, glycation, and oxidation in type 2 diabetic subjects with hypertension. We started 40 mg/day valsartan treatment in 15 type 2 diabetic patients with hypertension. In 6 patients, the dose of valsartan was increased to 80 mg/day after 6 months and maintained until 12 months. Metabolic parameters including BMI and serum high molecular weight (HMW)-adiponectin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) as an inflammation marker, AGEs, paraoxonase activity, platelet-activating factor (PAF)- acetylhydrolase activity, and urine 8-isoprostane levels were measured at baseline and after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Urine microalbumin level and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) were also measured. Even after valsartan therapy, the blood pressure levels of the patients were not decreased significantly. Serum AGEs and urine 8-isoprostane levels decreased at both 6 and 12 months (P < 0.05 for both), although other metabolic and oxidative markers were unchanged. Though urine microalbumin levels tended to be decreased after 6 and 12 months of valsartan treatment, the changes were not significant. Mean IMT at 12 months was not changed from the baseline value. In conclusion, the findings suggest that treatment with valsartan, even at a low dose, may ameliorate some glycation and oxidative stress markers independently of an effect on blood pressure in hypertensive type 2 diabetic subjects. PMID:19075484

  13. Comparison of self-reported and biomedical data on hypertension and diabetes: findings from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS)

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined the level of agreement between biomedical and self-reported measurements of hypertension and diabetes in a Chinese national community sample, and explored associations of the agreement and possible contextual effects among provinces and geographic regions in China. Design Secondary analysis of a cohort sample. Setting and participants Community samples were drawn from the national baseline survey of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS, 2011–2012) through multistage probability sampling, which included households with members 45 years of age or above with a total sample size of 17 708 individuals. Outcome measures Sensitivity, specificity and κ were used as measurements of agreements or validity; variance of validity measures among provinces and communities was estimated using random-effects models. Results Self-reports for hypertension and diabetes showed high specificity (96.3% and 98.3%, respectively) but low sensitivity (56.3% and 61.5%, respectively). Agreement between self-reported data and biomedical measurements was moderate for both hypertension (κ 0.57) and diabetes (κ 0.65), with respondents who were older, of higher socioeconomic status, better educated and who had hospital admissions in the past 12 months showing stronger agreements than their counterparts. Large and significant variations in the sensitivity among provinces for hypertension, and among communities for both hypertension and diabetes, could neither be attributed to the effects of respondents’ characteristics nor to the contextual effects of city–village differences. Conclusions As a considerable number of people in the overall sample were unaware of their conditions, self-reports will lead to an underestimation of the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes. However, in more developed communities or provinces, self-reported data can be a reliable estimate of the prevalence of the two conditions. Further investigations of

  14. Serum Superoxide Dismutase Is Associated with Vascular Structure and Function in Hypertensive and Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Blázquez-Medela, Ana M; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Recio-Rodriguez, José I; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with cardiac and vascular defects leading to hypertension and atherosclerosis, being superoxide dismutase (SOD) one of the main intracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms. Although several parameters of vascular function and structure have a predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in hypertensive patients, there are no studies on the involvement of SOD serum levels with these vascular parameters. Thus, we assessed if SOD serum levels are correlated with parameters of vascular function and structure and with cardiovascular risk in hypertensive and type 2 diabetic patients. We enrolled 255 consecutive hypertensive and diabetic patients and 52 nondiabetic and nonhypertensive controls. SOD levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Vascular function and structure were evaluated by pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, ambulatory arterial stiffness index, and carotid intima-media thickness. We detected negative correlations between SOD and pressure wave velocity, peripheral and central augmentation index and ambulatory arterial stiffness index, pulse pressure, and plasma HDL-cholesterol, as well as positive correlations between SOD and plasma uric acid and triglycerides. Our study shows that SOD is a marker of cardiovascular alterations in hypertensive and diabetic patients, since changes in its serum levels are correlated with alterations in vascular structure and function. PMID:26635913

  15. Serum Superoxide Dismutase Is Associated with Vascular Structure and Function in Hypertensive and Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Recio-Rodriguez, José I.; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with cardiac and vascular defects leading to hypertension and atherosclerosis, being superoxide dismutase (SOD) one of the main intracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms. Although several parameters of vascular function and structure have a predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in hypertensive patients, there are no studies on the involvement of SOD serum levels with these vascular parameters. Thus, we assessed if SOD serum levels are correlated with parameters of vascular function and structure and with cardiovascular risk in hypertensive and type 2 diabetic patients. We enrolled 255 consecutive hypertensive and diabetic patients and 52 nondiabetic and nonhypertensive controls. SOD levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Vascular function and structure were evaluated by pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, ambulatory arterial stiffness index, and carotid intima-media thickness. We detected negative correlations between SOD and pressure wave velocity, peripheral and central augmentation index and ambulatory arterial stiffness index, pulse pressure, and plasma HDL-cholesterol, as well as positive correlations between SOD and plasma uric acid and triglycerides. Our study shows that SOD is a marker of cardiovascular alterations in hypertensive and diabetic patients, since changes in its serum levels are correlated with alterations in vascular structure and function. PMID:26635913

  16. A Curriculum-Based Health Service Program in Hypertension, Diabetes, Venereal Diseases and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Samuel T.; Janer, Ann L.

    1978-01-01

    Special screening and education courses in hypertension, diabetes, venereal disease, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were added as electives at the Auburn University School of Pharmacy. Applied learning experiences for students and services to the community are achieved. Course goals and content and behavioral objectives in each area are…

  17. Dyslipidemia, Hypertension and Diabetes Metaflammation. A Unique Mechanism for 3 Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Morales-Villegas, E

    2014-07-01

    The main current threat to the human race is the correlation and synergy between two determining triumvirates of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and death. The first triumvirate is constituted by obesity, metaflammation and insulin resistance; the second triumvirate is constituted by atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The etiopathogenic driving force for both triumvirates is the global epidemic of obesity. Metaflammation and insulin resistance are associated with obesity; in turn, insulin resistance determines a high risk for the development of atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus, the three of them being factors responsible for vascular endothelial injury and substrates involved in the genesis of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and death. The present chapter will address both triumvirates. Firstly, the current concepts of obesity, metaflammation and insulin resistance will be reviewed; emphasizing the second (metaflammation) for being a concept that has revolutionized and integrated our understanding of the harmful effects of obesity. Secondly, the impact of insulin resistance in the regulation of intermediary metabolism and endothelial function will be addressed; this will facilitate the understanding of the inextricable link between atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Thus, this chapter aims to present to the clinician the best knowledge to link epidemics of obesity and cardiovascular death, through the sequence of metaflammation, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors (mixed dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus). PMID:24993281

  18. Multimorbidity and Persistent Depression among Veterans with Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findley, Patricia; Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the association between multimorbidity and persistent depression among cohorts of veterans with diabetes, heart disease, or hypertension. The retrospective longitudinal analysis used national administrative data on around 1.38 million Veteran Health Administration clinic users merged with Medicare claims data.…

  19. Food choices, health behavior, and risk factors for hypertension and diabetes among Lower Mississippi Delta residents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lifestyle choices, such as diet, engaging in physical activity, and using tobacco or alcohol, affect health and are affected by health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between food choices, behavior, diet, and hypertension and diabetes. In a representative sample of 1487...

  20. Treatment of hypertensive patients with diabetes: beyond blood pressure control and focus on manidipine.

    PubMed

    Saiz Satjes, Margarita; Martinez-Martin, Francisco J

    2016-07-01

    Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors should be considered as the first-line therapy in the treatment of patients with hypertension and diabetes. However, most of the diabetic subjects with hypertension require at least two drugs to achieve blood pressure targets. The ACCOMPLISH trial suggested that the best combination in the treatment of high-risk hypertensive patients should include a renin-angiotensin system inhibitor and a dihydropyridine. However, not all dihydropyridines block the same receptors. Those dihydropyridines that block T-type calcium channel blockers may provide additional advantages. A number of studies suggest that compared with amlodipine, manidipine have the same antihypertensive efficacy, but with a lesser risk of ankle edema. In addition, manidipine, but not amlodipine, significantly reduces urinary albumin excretion rates. PMID:27221471

  1. Hearing Loss as a Function of Aging and Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon; Kim, MyungGu; Chung, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2014-01-01

    Background Although hearing loss may be caused by various factors, it is also a natural phenomenon associated with the aging process. This study was designed to assess the contributions of diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension, both chronic diseases associated with aging, as well as aging itself, to hearing loss in health screening examinees. Methods This study included 37,773 individuals who underwent health screening examinations from 2009 to 2012. The relationships between hearing threshold and subject age, hearing threshold at each frequency based on age group, the degree of hearing loss and the presence or absence of hypertension and DM were evaluated. Results The prevalence of hearing loss increased with age, being 1.6%, 1.8%, 4.6%, 14.0%, 30.8%, and 49.2% in subjects in their twenties, thirties, forties, fifties, sixties, and seventies, respectively (p<0.05). Hearing value per frequency showed aging-based changes, in the order of 6000, 4000, 2000, 1000 and 500 Hz, indicating greater hearing losses at high frequencies. The degree of hearing loss ranged from mild to severe. Aging and DM were correlated with the prevalence of hearing loss (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant association between hearing loss and hypertension after adjusting for age and DM. Conclusions The prevalence of hearing loss increases with age and the presence of DM. Hearing loss was greatest at high frequencies. In all age groups, mild hearing loss was the most common form of hearing loss. PMID:25549095

  2. Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus: A Preliminary South African Health Promotion Activity Using Service-Learning Principles.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sunitha C; Paphitis, Sharli Anne

    2016-06-01

    A marked increase in the chronic non-communicable diseases such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the South African population is in concert with global trends. A health promotion activity carried out by pharmacy students for school learners during the Sasol National Festival of Science and Technology (SciFest) in South Africa was used as a service-learning opportunity. Pilot tested quizzes on hypertension and diabetes were used to determine the level of knowledge of attendees before and after taking the computer based quiz. Posters, information leaflets and interactive models on these two conditions were also used to reach out to the larger population. Of the 203 participants for the hypertension quiz, 169 completed both the pre- and post-intervention quizzes. Similarly, 86 of the 104 participants for the diabetes quiz, completed both the pre- and post-intervention quizzes. The results show that the post-intervention quiz resulted in a significant increase in the scores from 78.2 to 85.6 % in the case of Hypertension while a marginal increase from 94.2 to 95.5 % was obtained in the case of diabetes. The knowledge of the SciFest attendees with regard to both conditions is above average and improved further after the educational intervention. Health promotion activities which include interactive educational methods and culturally appropriate materials carried out by pharmacy students during service-learning courses are important for improving the awareness on the prevention of these chronic health conditions. Heath promotion service-learning courses can assist in addressing the health care gaps which arise because of a lack of co-ordinated efforts between NGO's and local Government to address the prevention and management of non-communicable diseases such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26659854

  3. Air Pollution and Incidence of Hypertension and Diabetes in African American Women Living in Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Patricia F.; White, Laura F.; Jerrett, Michael; Brook, Robert D.; Su, Jason G.; Seto, Edmund; Burnett, Richard; Palmer, Julie R.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that longer-term exposure to air pollutants over years confers higher risks of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than shorter term exposure. One explanation is that cumulative adverse effects that develop over longer durations lead to the genesis of chronic disease. Preliminary epidemiological and clinical evidence suggest that air pollution may contribute to the development hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Methods and Results We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for incident hypertension and diabetes associated with exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a cohort of African American women living in Los Angeles. Pollutant levels were estimated at participant residential addresses with land use regression models (NOx) and interpolation from monitoring station measurements (PM2.5). Over follow-up from 1995-2005, 531 incident cases of hypertension and 183 incident cases of diabetes occurred. When pollutants were analyzed separately, the IRR for hypertension for a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was 1.48 (95% CI 0.95-2.31) and the IRR for the interquartile range (12.4 parts per billion) of NOx was 1.14 (95% CI 1.03-1.25). The corresponding IRRs for diabetes were 1.63 (95% CI 0.78-3.44) and 1.25 (95% CI 1.07-1.46). When both pollutants were included in the same model, the IRRs for PM2.5 were attenuated and the IRRs for NOx were essentially unchanged for both outcomes. Conclusions Our results suggest that exposure to air pollutants, especially traffic-related pollutants, may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and possibly of hypertension. PMID:22219348

  4. Dapagliflozin reduces albuminuria in patients with diabetes and hypertension receiving renin‐angiotensin blockers

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, E.; Gause‐Nilsson, I.; Cain, V. A.; Sjöström, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To characterize the effect of dapagliflozin on albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and to determine whether effects on albuminuria were mediated through changes in glycated haemoblogin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP), body weight or eGFR. Methods We conducted a post hoc analysis of data pooled from two phase III clinical trials in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) on stable angiotensin‐converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker therapy, randomly assigned to dapagliflozin 10 mg/day or matched placebo. This analysis included only patients with microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria at baseline. Results Patients were randomized to receive dapagliflozin 10 mg (n = 167) or placebo (n = 189). Dapagliflozin resulted in greater 12‐week reductions in albuminuria compared with placebo: −33.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) −45.4, −18.2]. The reduction in albuminuria was also present after adjusting for age, sex and changes in HbA1c, SBP, body weight and eGFR: −23.5% (95% CI −37.6, −6.3). There was a decrease in eGFR with dapagliflozin versus placebo that was readily reversed 1 week after last dose. No serious renal‐related adverse events were observed in any group. Conclusions Dapagliflozin was effective in lowering albuminuria in patients with T2DM and hypertension using renin‐angiotensin system blockade therapy. Reductions in albuminuria were still present after adjusting for changes in HbA1c, SBP, body weight and eGFR. Dapagliflozin‐induced improvements in glycaemic control and reductions in SBP, coupled with other potentially beneficial renal effects, may lead to a reduced long‐term renal and cardiovascular risk. PMID:26936519

  5. Association of obesity and treated hypertension and diabetes with cognitive ability in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Depp, Colin A; Strassnig, Martin; Mausbach, Brent T; Bowie, Christopher R; Wolyniec, Paula; Thornquist, Mary H; Luke, James R; McGrath, John A; Pulver, Ann E; Patterson, Thomas L; Harvey, Philip D

    2014-01-01

    Objectives People with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia are at greater risk for obesity and other cardio-metabolic risks, and several prior studies have linked these risks to poorer cognitive ability. In a large ethnically homogenous outpatient sample, we examined associations among variables related to obesity, treated hypertension and/or diabetes, and cognitive abilities in these two patient populations. Methods In a study cohort of outpatients with either bipolar disorder (n = 341) or schizophrenia (n = 417), we investigated the association of self-reported body mass index and current use of medications for hypertension or diabetes with performance on a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. We examined sociodemographic and clinical factors as potential covariates. Results Patients with bipolar disorder were less likely to be overweight or obese than patients with schizophrenia, and also less likely to be prescribed medication for hypertension or diabetes. However, obesity and treated hypertension were associated with worse global cognitive ability in bipolar disorder (as well as with poorer performance on individual tests of processing speed, reasoning/problem-solving, and sustained attention), with no such relationships observed in schizophrenia. Obesity was not associated with symptom severity in either group. Conclusions Although less prevalent in bipolar disorder compared to schizophrenia, obesity was associated with substantially worse cognitive performance in bipolar disorder. This association was independent of symptom severity and not present in schizophrenia. Better understanding of the mechanisms and management of obesity may aid in efforts to preserve cognitive health in bipolar disorder. PMID:24725166

  6. Advanced glycation end-products: a common pathway in diabetes and age-related erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Neves, D

    2013-08-01

    Reactive derivatives of non-enzymatic glucose-protein condensation reactions integrate a heterogeneous group of irreversible adducts called advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Numerous studies have investigated the role of the AGEs in cardiovascular system; however, its contribution to erectile dysfunction (ED) that is an early manifestation of cardiovascular disease has been less intensively investigated. This review summarizes the most recent advances concerning AGEs effects in the cavernous tissue of the penis and in ED onset, particularly on diabetes and aging, conditions that not only favor AGEs formation, but also increase risk of developing ED. The specific contribution of AGE on intra- and extracellular deposition of insoluble complexes, interference in activity of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase, NO bioavailability, endothelial-dependent vasodilatation, as well as molecular pathways activated by receptor of AGEs are presented. Finally, the interventional actions that prevent AGEs formation, accumulation or activity in the cavernous tissue and that include nutritional pattern modulation, nutraceuticals, exercise, therapeutic strategies (statins, anti-diabetics, inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-5, anti-hypertensive drugs) and inhibitors of AGEs formation and crosslink breakers, are discussed. From this review, we conclude that despite the experiments conducted in animal models pointing to the AGE/RAGE axis as a potential interventional target with respect to ED associated with diabetes and aging, the clinical data have been very disappointing and, until now, did not provide evidence of benefits of treatments directed to AGE inactivation. PMID:23822116

  7. Contribution of socioeconomic factors and health care access to the awareness and treatment of diabetes and hypertension among older Mexican adults

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram; Drumond-Andrade, Flávia Cristina; Riosmena, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate changes in self-report and treatment of diabetes and hypertension between 2001 and 2012 among Mexican aged 50–80, assessing the contribution of education and health insurance coverage. Materials and methods The Mexican Health and Aging Study was used to estimate associations of education and insurance on prevalence and treatment of diabetes and hypertension in 2001 and 2012. Multivariate decomposition was used to assess the contribution of changes in the composition of covariates vs. their “effects” on changes in prevalence and treatment over time. Results Increases in the prevalence/diagnosis and treatment during the period are largely attributable to the expansion of health insurance. Its effects on diagnosis/prevalence and treatment have also increased over time. Conclusions The expansion of Seguro Popular likely improved screening and treatment. More research is needed to assess if these have translated into better control and a lower burden of disease. PMID:26172227

  8. Benefits of Fixed Dose Combination of Ramipril/Amlodipine in Hypertensive Diabetic Patients: A Subgroup Analysis of RAMONA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Simonyi, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combination of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium channel blockers has been successfully used in the antihypertensive therapy for many years. Fixed dose combinations of ramipril/amlodipine have a benefit effect for patients to achieve target blood pressure (BP). This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of fixed dose combinations of ramipril and amlodipine (Egiramlon®) in hypertensive diabetic patients. Methods: Hypertensive diabetic patients who were enrolled into the RAMONA trial were included in this open, prospective, Phase IV observational clinical study. Patients had mild-to-moderate hypertension and failed to reach target BP levels through their previous therapy. During the four months of observation, patients took part in three visits (1st day = visit 1, 1st month = visit 2, and 4th month = visit 3) where they received a fixed dose combination of 5/5, 5/10, 10/5, or 10/10 mg ramipril/amlodipine, respectively, with the possibly required dose titrations, based on the decision of their attending physician. Target BP for diabetic patients was <140/85 mmHg. BP levels were measured in all visits, by taking two readings at 2-min interval. Laboratory tests including full blood count, renal function test, electrolytes, blood glucose, serum cholesterol, uric acid, triglycerides, liver function test, creatinine kinase, and midstream urinalysis were performed at visit 1 and visit 3. Results: The 6423 patients completed the study. Among these patients, 1276 (19.9%) patients suffered from type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mean age of these diabetic patients was 64.2 ± 10.0 years; 707 (55.4%) patients were males. Target BP was achieved by 891 (69.8%) of diabetic patients at visit 3 (primary endpoint). BP decreased from 157.5/91.3 ± 9.6/7.6 mmHg (visit 1) to 130.9/79.6 ± 7.4/5.8 mmHg (visit 3). As for the secondary endpoint of the study, total cholesterol decreased from 5.50 ± 1.13 mmol/L (visit 1) to 5.20 ± 0.95 mmol/L (P = 0

  9. Clinical analysis of endometrial cancer patients with obesity, diabetes, and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiang-Hua; Jia, Hong-Yan; Xue, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Shi-Zhang; Wang, Zhong-Qin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to study the postoperation outcome and incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in endometrial cancer (EC) patients with or without hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. This analysis included 219 patients with endometrial carcinoma who were treated between 2002 and 2012 at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yangzhou University Hospital. Patients were divided into five groups based on the comorbidities. Group 1 EC & Diabetes, Group 2 EC & Hypertension, Group 3 EC & Obesity, Group 4 EC Combined two, Group 5 no combined. Then the five groups were analyzed in postoperation outcomes and DVT incidence using one-way analysis of variance or Pearson χ2 tests. we found that there was no significant difference in pelvic lymph node metastasis (P=0.102), aortic lymph node metastasis (P=0.221), and operative time (P=0.503). But there was significant difference in blood loss (P<0.01), hospital stay (P<0.01). No significant difference (P>0.05) in treatment outcome between surgical operation, surgical operation+ radiotherapy and radiotherapy. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism have some significantly (P<0.01) (P<0.01), respectively. Compared to patients who simply suffer from endometrial cancer, diabetes make patients easy bleeding in surgery and increase hospitalization time in corresponding. VTE is a common complication of EC surgery with comorbidities, such as diabetes and hypertension, and it’s a remarkable proportion of events occurring late after surgery. PMID:24753771

  10. The goal of blood pressure in the hypertensive patient with diabetes is defined: now the challenge is go from recommendations to practice.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Lopez-Lopez, Jose; Lopez-Lopez, Cristina; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Miguel I

    2014-01-01

    The recent Latin American and European guidelines published this year has proposed as a goal for blood pressure control in patients with diabetes type 2 a value similar or inferior to 140/90 mmHg. High blood pressure is the leading cause of cardiovascular diseases and deaths globally. Although once hypertension is detected, 80% of individuals are on a pharmacologic therapy only a minority is controlled. Diabetes also is a risk factor for other serious chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Whether specifically targeting lower fasting glucose levels can reduce cardiovascular outcomes remains unknown. Hypertension is present in 20% to 60% of patients with type 2 diabetes, depending on age, ethnicity, obesity, and the presence of micro or macro albuminuria. High blood pressure substantially increases the risk of both macro and micro vascular complications, doubling the risk of all-cause mortality and stroke, tripling the risk of coronary heart disease and significantly hastening the progression of diabetic nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Thus, blood pressure lowering is a major priority in preventing cardiovascular and renal events in patients with diabetes and hypertension. During many years the BP goals recommended in patients with diabetes were more aggressive than in patients without diabetes. As reviewed in this article many clinical trials have demonstrated not only the lack of benefits of lowering the BP below 130/80 mmHg, but also the J-shaped relationship in DM patients. Overall we discuss the importance of define the group of patients in whom significant BP reduction could be particularly dangerous and, on the other hand, those with a high risk of stroke who could benefit most from an intensive hypotensive therapy. In any case, the big challenge now is avoid the therapeutic inertia (leaving diabetic patients with BP values of 140/90 mmHg or higher) at all costs, as this would lead to an unacceptable toll in terms of human lives

  11. Increased Circulating ANG II and TNF-α Represents Important Risk Factors in Obese Saudi Adults with Hypertension Irrespective of Diabetic Status and BMI

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M.; Bindahman, Lotfi S.; Al-Attas, Omar S.; Saleem, Tahia H.; Alokail, Majed S.; Alkharfy, Khalid M.; Draz, Hossam M.; Yakout, Sobhy; Mohamed, Amany O.; Harte, Alison L.; McTernan, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Central adiposity is a significant determinant of obesity-related hypertension risk, which may arise due to the pathogenic inflammatory nature of the abdominal fat depot. However, the influence of pro-inflammatory adipokines on blood pressure in the obese hypertensive phenotype has not been well established in Saudi subjects. As such, our study investigated whether inflammatory factors may represent useful biomarkers to delineate hypertension risk in a Saudi cohort with and without hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2). Subjects were subdivided into four groups: healthy lean controls (age: 47.9±5.1 yr; BMI: 22.9±2.1 Kg/m2), non-hypertensive obese (age: 46.1±5.0 yr; BMI: 33.7±4.2 Kg/m2), hypertensive obese (age: 48.6±6.1 yr; BMI: 36.5±7.7 Kg/m2) and hypertensive obese with DMT2 (age: 50.8±6.0 yr; BMI: 35.3±6.7 Kg/m2). Anthropometric data were collected from all subjects and fasting blood samples were utilized for biochemical analysis. Serum angiotensin II (ANG II) levels were elevated in hypertensive obese (p<0.05) and hypertensive obese with DMT2 (p<0.001) compared with normotensive controls. Systolic blood pressure was positively associated with BMI (p<0.001), glucose (p<0.001), insulin (p<0.05), HOMA-IR (p<0.001), leptin (p<0.01), TNF-α (p<0.001) and ANG II (p<0.05). Associations between ANG II and TNF-α with systolic blood pressure remained significant after controlling for BMI. Additionally CRP (p<0.05), leptin (p<0.001) and leptin/adiponectin ratio (p<0.001) were also significantly associated with the hypertension phenotype. In conclusion our data suggests that circulating pro-inflammatory adipokines, particularly ANG II and, TNF-α, represent important factors associated with a hypertension phenotype and may directly contribute to predicting and exacerbating hypertension risk. PMID:23251471

  12. Associations between Active Travel to Work and Overweight, Hypertension, and Diabetes in India: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Christopher; Agrawal, Sutapa; Sullivan, Ruth; Vaz, Mario; Kurpad, Anura; Bharathi, A. V.; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Reddy, Kolli Srinath; Kinra, Sanjay; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing active travel (walking, bicycling, and public transport) is promoted as a key strategy to increase physical activity and reduce the growing burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) globally. Little is known about patterns of active travel or associated cardiovascular health benefits in low- and middle-income countries. This study examines mode and duration of travel to work in rural and urban India and associations between active travel and overweight, hypertension, and diabetes. Methods and Findings Cross-sectional study of 3,902 participants (1,366 rural, 2,536 urban) in the Indian Migration Study. Associations between mode and duration of active travel and cardiovascular risk factors were assessed using random-effect logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, caste, standard of living, occupation, factory location, leisure time physical activity, daily fat intake, smoking status, and alcohol use. Rural dwellers were significantly more likely to bicycle (68.3% versus 15.9%; p<0.001) to work than urban dwellers. The prevalence of overweight or obesity was 50.0%, 37.6%, 24.2%, 24.9%; hypertension was 17.7%, 11.8%, 6.5%, 9.8%; and diabetes was 10.8%, 7.4%, 3.8%, 7.3% in participants who travelled to work by private transport, public transport, bicycling, and walking, respectively. In the adjusted analysis, those walking (adjusted risk ratio [ARR] 0.72; 95% CI 0.58–0.88) or bicycling to work (ARR 0.66; 95% CI 0.55–0.77) were significantly less likely to be overweight or obese than those travelling by private transport. Those bicycling to work were significantly less likely to have hypertension (ARR 0.51; 95% CI 0.36–0.71) or diabetes (ARR 0.65; 95% CI 0.44–0.95). There was evidence of a dose-response relationship between duration of bicycling to work and being overweight, having hypertension or diabetes. The main limitation of the study is the cross-sectional design, which limits causal inference for the associations found

  13. Isolated Systolic Hypertension in Young and Middle-Aged Adults and 31-Year Risk for Cardiovascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Yuichiro; Stamler, Jeremiah; Garside, Daniel B.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Franklin, Stanley S.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Liu, Kiang; Greenland, Philip; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥140 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) <90 mm Hg, in younger and middle-aged adults is increasing in prevalence. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to assess the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) with ISH in younger and middle-aged adults. METHODS CVD risks were explored in 15,868 men and 11,213 women 18 to 49 years of age (mean age 34 years) at baseline, 85% non-Hispanic white, free of coronary heart disease (CHD) and antihypertensive therapy, from the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry study. Participant classifications were as follows: 1) optimal-normal blood pressure (BP) (SBP <130 mm Hg and DBP <85 mm Hg); 2) high-normal BP (130 to 139/85 to 89 mm Hg); 3) ISH; 4) isolated diastolic hypertension (SBP <140 mm Hg and DBP ≥90 mm Hg); and 5) systolic diastolic hypertension (SBP ≥140 mm Hg and DBP ≥90 mm Hg). RESULTS During a 31-year average follow-up period (842,600 person-years), there were 1,728 deaths from CVD, 1,168 from CHD, and 223 from stroke. Cox proportional hazards models were adjusted for age, race, education, body mass index, current smoking, total cholesterol, and diabetes. In men, with optimal-normal BP as the reference stratum, hazard ratios for CVD and CHD mortality risk for those with ISH were 1.23 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03 to 1.46) and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.04 to 1.58), respectively. ISH risks were similar to those with high-normal BP and less than those associated with isolated diastolic hypertension and systolic diastolic hypertension. In women with ISH, hazard ratios for CVD and CHD mortality risk were 1.55 (95% CI: 1.18 to 2.05) and 2.12 (95% CI: 1.49 to 3.01), respectively. ISH risks were higher than in those with high-normal BP or isolated diastolic hypertension and less than those associated with systolic diastolic hypertension. CONCLUSIONS Over long-term follow-up, younger and middle-aged adults with ISH

  14. Age-related autoregulatory dysfunction and cerebromicrovascular injury in mice with angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Peter; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Tarantini, Stefano; Deak, Ferenc; Koller, Akos; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension in the elderly substantially contributes to cerebromicrovascular damage and promotes the development of vascular cognitive impairment. Despite the importance of the myogenic mechanism in cerebromicrovascular protection, it is not well understood how aging affects the functional adaptation of cerebral arteries to high blood pressure. Hypertension was induced in young (3 months) and aged (24 months) C57/BL6 mice by chronic infusion of angiotensin II (AngII). In young hypertensive mice, the range of cerebral blood flow autoregulation was extended to higher pressure values, and the pressure-induced tone of middle cerebral artery (MCA) was increased. In aged hypertensive mice, autoregulation was markedly disrupted, and MCAs did not show adaptive increases in myogenic tone. In young mice, the mechanism of adaptation to hypertension involved upregulation of the 20-HETE (20-hydroxy-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid)/transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C (TRPC6) pathway and this mechanism was impaired in aged hypertensive mice. Downstream consequences of cerebrovascular autoregulatory dysfunction in aged AngII-induced hypertensive mice included exacerbated disruption of the blood–brain barrier and neuroinflammation (microglia activation and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines), which were associated with impaired hippocampal dependent cognitive function. Collectively, aging impairs autoregulatory protection in the brain of mice with AngII-induced hypertension, potentially exacerbating cerebromicrovascular injury and neuroinflammation. PMID:23942363

  15. Glucose and the risk of hypertension in first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Janghorbani, Mohsen; Bonnet, Fabrice; Amini, Masoud

    2015-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that plasma glucose (PG) levels is associated with the incidence of hypertension (HT) in nondiabetic and non-hypertensive first-degree relatives (FDR) of people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A total of 1089 FDR without diabetes and/or HT of consecutive patients with T2D 30-70 years old were examined and followed for a mean (s.d.) of 6.9 (1.7) years for HT incidence. At baseline and through follow-up, participants underwent a standard 75 gm 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. HT was defined according to the criteria of the Seventh Report of Joint National Committee. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate hazard ratio for incident HT and plotted a receiver operating characteristic curve to assess discrimination. The PG levels at baseline were associated with incidence of HT, independently of age, gender, obesity and high cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, education and systolic blood pressure. Those with impaired glucose tolerance were 54% (hazard ratio 1.54; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.33, 1.77) more likely to develop HT than those with normal glucose tolerance. Those with impaired fasting glucose were also 23% (hazard ratio 1.23; 95% CI 1.01, 1.50) more likely to develop HT. High PG levels were consistently associated with incident HT. PMID:25693857

  16. Novel Association of WNK4 Gene, Ala589Ser Polymorphism in Essential Hypertension, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Heidari, Farzad; Haghvirdizadeh, Polin; Ataollahi Eshkoor, Sima; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    With-no-lysine (K) Kinase-4 (WNK4) consisted of unique serine and threonine protein kinases, genetically associated with an autosomal dominant form of hypertension. Argumentative consequences have lately arisen on the association of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms of WNK4 gene and essential hypertension (EHT). The aim of this study was to determine the association of Ala589Ser polymorphism of WNK4 gene with essential hypertensive patients in Malaysia. WNK4 gene polymorphism was specified utilizing mutagenically separated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method in 320 subjects including 163 cases and 157 controls. Close relation between Ala589Ser polymorphism and elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) was recognized. Sociodemographic factors including body mass index (BMI), age, the level of fasting blood sugar (FBS), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglyceride (TG) in the cases and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (p < 0.05). The distribution of allele frequency and genotype of WNK4 gene Ala589Ser polymorphism showed significant differences (p < 0.05) between EHT subjects with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and normotensive subjects, statistically. The WNK4 gene variation influences significantly blood pressure increase. Ala589Ser probably has effects on the enzymic activity leading to enhanced predisposition to the disorder. PMID:27314050

  17. Effects of age and diabetes on scleral stiffness.

    PubMed

    Coudrillier, Baptiste; Pijanka, Jacek; Jefferys, Joan; Sorensen, Thomas; Quigley, Harry A; Boote, Craig; Nguyen, Thao D

    2015-07-01

    The effects of diabetes on the collagen structure and material properties of the sclera are unknown but may be important to elucidate whether diabetes is a risk factor for major ocular diseases such as glaucoma. This study provides a quantitative assessment of the changes in scleral stiffness and collagen fiber alignment associated with diabetes. Posterior scleral shells from five diabetic donors and seven non-diabetic donors were pressurized to 30 mm Hg. Three-dimensional surface displacements were calculated during inflation testing using digital image correlation (DIC). After testing, each specimen was subjected to wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements of its collagen organization. Specimen-specific finite element models of the posterior scleras were generated from the experimentally measured geometry. An inverse finite element analysis was developed to determine the material properties of the specimens, i.e., matrix and fiber stiffness, by matching DIC-measured and finite element predicted displacement fields. Effects of age and diabetes on the degree of fiber alignment, matrix and collagen fiber stiffness, and mechanical anisotropy were estimated using mixed effects models accounting for spatial autocorrelation. Older age was associated with a lower degree of fiber alignment and larger matrix stiffness for both diabetic and non-diabetic scleras. However, the age-related increase in matrix stiffness was 87% larger in diabetic specimens compared to non-diabetic controls and diabetic scleras had a significantly larger matrix stiffness (p = 0.01). Older age was associated with a nearly significant increase in collagen fiber stiffness for diabetic specimens only (p = 0.06), as well as a decrease in mechanical anisotropy for non-diabetic scleras only (p = 0.04). The interaction between age and diabetes was not significant for all outcomes. This study suggests that the age-related increase in scleral stiffness is accelerated in eyes with

  18. Implementation of Management Strategies for Diabetes and Hypertension: from Local to Global Health in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Gerald S.; Wang, Tracy Y.; Boulware, L. Ebony; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Li, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are chronic conditions that are growing in prevalence as major causal factors for cardiovascular disease. The need for chronic illness surveillance, population risk management, and successful treatment interventions are critical to reduce the burden of future cardiovascular disease. In order to address these problems, it will require population risk stratification, task sharing and shifting, and community- as well as network -based care. Information technology tools also provide new opportunities for identifying those at risk and for implementing comprehensive approaches to achieving the goal of improved health locally, regionally, nationally and globally. This article discusses ongoing efforts at one university health center in the implementation of management strategies for diabetes and hypertension at the local, regional, national, and global levels. PMID:25754564

  19. Country of birth affects blood pressure in the French hypertensive diabetic population

    PubMed Central

    Aoun Bahous, Sola; Thomas, Frédérique; Pannier, Bruno; Danchin, Nicolas; Safar, Michel E.

    2015-01-01

    In a population of 56,242 individuals living in France, we showed that individuals born in France have significantly different levels of blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular (CV) risk factors than African and Asian populations born in their own country but living long-term in France (average duration of stay, 5–10 years). The objective of our study was to investigate the impact of country of birth on BP and CV risk factors in a subpopulation of 9245 patients selected solely on the diagnosis of hypertension, either alone or with simultaneous type 2 diabetes. In the subgroup of individuals with hypertension alone, brachial systolic, diastolic, mean and pulse pressure (PP), heart rate (HR), augmentation index and PP amplification were significantly higher in African-born than French- and Asian-born populations. In the subgroup of individuals with both hypertension and diabetes, only augmentation index, PP amplification and brachial and central PP, but not brachial systolic, diastolic, mean BP, and HR, were elevated when the African-born subgroup was compared to the French- and Asian-born populations. Increased body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), and deprivation scores, but not increased plasma lipids or glycemia, were consistently associated with the African-born population. The combination of diabetes and hypertension in African populations was associated with increased aortic stiffness and PP, together with greater body weight and WHR. In individuals with increased PP and hence systolic hypertension, increased PP requires systolic BP to be reduced whereas notable reductions in diastolic BP may have deleterious consequences. PMID:26388785

  20. The Effects of Shift Work on Sleeping Quality, Hypertension and Diabetes in Retired Workers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanjun; Liu, Yuewei; Huang, Xiji; Rong, Yi; He, Meian; Wang, Youjie; Yuan, Jing; Wu, Tangchun; Chen, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Background Shift work has been associated with adverse health effects by disturbing circadian rhythms. However,its potential long-term health effects and the persistent effects after leaving shifts have not been well established. Methods and Results We studied 26,463 workers from Tongji-Dongfeng Cohort in China. All the participants are retired employees of Dongfeng Motor Company. Information on demographics, occupational history and medical history were gathered through questionnaires. After adjusting potential confounders in the logistic regression models, shift work was associated with poor sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension independently. We observed significant effects of shift work on poor sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension; the ORs (95%CI) are 1.18 (1.09–1.27), 1.10 (1.03–1.17) and 1.05 (1.01–1.09) respectively. In the further analysis, we found elevated ORs (95%CI) for participants with poor sleeping quality, the ORs (95%CI) are 1.34 (1.08–1.60), 1.13 (1.05–1.21), 1.05 (1.03–1.07) and 1.05 (1.01–1.09) for 1–4, 5–9, 10–19, ≥20 years of shift work respectively. However, with the extension of leaving shift work duration, the effects of shift work on sleep quality gradually reduced. Conclusions Shift work may be an independent risk factor for sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension even in retired workers. Applicable intervention strategies are needed for prevention of sleep loss, diabetes, and hypertension for shift workers. PMID:23976988

  1. Prevalence and Sociodemographic Determinants of Hypertension History among Women in Reproductive Age in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Nyarko, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hypertension is a global health problem. Yet, studies on hypertension rarely focus on women in Ghana. The purpose of this study is to ascertain the prevalence and sociodemographic determinants of hypertension history among Ghanaian women in reproductive age. Methods. This study used data from the 2014 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were carried out to ascertain the prevalence and determinants of hypertension history among the respondents. Results. The study found that the overall prevalence of hypertension history among the respondents was 7.5%; however, there were vast variations within most of the sociodemographic categories. Age, level of education, marital status, work status, and wealth status had a significant relationship with hypertension history among the respondents. Women in advanced age groups, highly educated, married, and widowed/divorced/separated, nonworking women, and women from wealthy households were at higher risk of having hypertension history. Conclusion. Myriads of sociodemographic factors determine the hypertension history of women in Ghana. It is therefore essential to target medical and psychosocial hypertension interventions at Ghanaian women in the higher risk groups. PMID:27200184

  2. Free access to hypertension and diabetes medicines among the elderly: a reality yet to be constructed.

    PubMed

    Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; da Silveira, Denise Silva; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida; Domingues, Marlos Rodrigues; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso

    2010-06-01

    The study evaluated free access to hypertension and diabetes medicines and the reasons reported for lack of access. The sample included 4,003 elderly people living in Primary Care Unit coverage areas from 41 Southern and Northeastern Brazilian cities. Free access was higher in the Northeast (62.4%). The strategy of the Family Health Program (Programa Saúde da Família - PSF) was more effective in providing access than the traditional model, with higher results in the Northeast (61.2%) than in the South (39.6%). Around 20% of medicines included in the Hypertension and Diabetes Program and 26% of those included in the National Essential Medicines List (RENAME) were paid out of pocket. In the Northeast, 25% of insulin and 32% of oral antidiabetics were paid out of pocket. Unavailability in the public sector and a lack of money determined the lack of access. Although the PSF, Hypertension and Diabetes Program and RENAME expanded free access, supplies were insufficient. A greater connection between programs and a clear definition of responsibilities can improve medicine acquisition process, increasing the effectiveness of pharmaceutical assistance. PMID:20657981

  3. Treatment of Diabetes and/or Hypertension Using Medicinal Plants in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Tsabang, N; Yedjou, CG; Tsambang, LWD; Tchinda, AT; Donfagsiteli, N; Agbor, GA; Tchounwou, PBB; Nkongmeneck, BA

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants have served as valuable starting materials for drug development in both developing and developed countries. Today, more than 80% of the people living in Africa were depended on medicinal plants based medicines to satisfy their healthcare needs. The main goal of the present study was to collect and document information on herbal remedies traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes and/or hypertension in Cameroon. To reach this objective, data were collected from 328 patients who have been diagnosed at least once by a physician as diabetics and/or hypertension patients. One hundred and eighty two (182) among them took for a period of 10 days different varieties of medicinal plants which were prepared in form of decoction, maceration and infusion and administered orally twice or three times daily. As result, 70% of patients who used plants were relieved at the end of the treatment. Thirty-three plants have been recorded and documented for the treatment of diabetes and/or hypertension. The results of this study can stimulate a sustainable development by providing the basis for drugs discovery and by documenting biodiversity for long time exploitation. PMID:26550547

  4. A look inside the diabetic brain: Contributors to diabetes-induced brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Wrighten, Shayna A.; Piroli, Gerardo G.; Grillo, Claudia A.; Reagan, Lawrence P.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from diabetes is a problem that is gaining more acceptance and attention. Recent evidence suggests morphological, electrophysiological and cognitive changes, often observed in the hippocampus, in diabetic individuals. Many of the CNS changes observed in diabetic patients and animal models of diabetes are reminiscent of the changes seen in normal aging. The central commonalities between diabetes-induced and age-related CNS changes have led to the theory of advanced brain aging in diabetic patients. This review summarizes the findings of the literature as they relate to the relationship between diabetes and dementia and discusses some of the potential contributors to diabetes-induced CNS impairments. PMID:19022375

  5. Target blood pressure in diabetes patients with hypertension--what is the accumulated evidence in 2011?

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter M

    2011-08-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that hypertension is an important risk factor for both macrovascular and microvascular complications in patients with diabetes, but the problem remains to identify appropriate goals for preventive therapies. A number of guidelines (the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2007, the Joint National Committee (JNC)-VII 2003, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2011) have for example advocated a blood pressure goal of less than 130/80 mmHg, but this suggestion has been challenged by findings in recent trials and meta-analyses (2011). The European Society of Hypertension (ESH) therefore recommends a systolic blood pressure goal of "well below" 140 mmHg. Based on evidence from both randomized controlled trials (hypertension optimal treatment (HOT), action in diabetes and vascular disease: preterax and diamicron MR controlled evaluation (ADVANCE), action to control cardiovascular risk in diabetes (ACCORD)) and observational studies (ongoing telmisartan alone and in combination with ramipril global endpoint trial (ONTARGET), international verapamil-trandolapril study (INVEST), treat to new targets (TNT), and the National Diabetes Register (NDR)), it has been shown that the benefit for stroke reduction remains even at lower achieved blood pressure levels, but the risk of coronary events may be uninfluenced or even increased at lower systolic blood pressure levels. In a recent meta-analysis, it was therefore concluded that the new recommended goal should be 130-135 mmHg systolic blood pressure for most patients with type 2 diabetes. Other risk factors should also be controlled with a more ambitious strategy applied in the younger patients with shorter diabetes duration, but a more cautious approach in the elderly and frail patients with a number of vascular or non-vascular co-morbidities. In patients from East Asia, such as China, the stroke risk is relatively higher than the risk of

  6. Incident diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease risk in exercising hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul T; Franklin, Barry A

    2015-11-15

    Exercise may be an important treatment for hypercholesterolemic patients, particularly in statin users who are at increased diabetes risk. We therefore used Cox proportional hazard analyses to compare running and walking dose (metabolic equivalent hours/day [MET-h/d]) to diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in hypercholesterolemic patients. There were 60 diabetic- and 373 CVD-related deaths during a 10.1-year mortality surveillance of 6,688 hypercholesterolemic patients. In addition, there were 177 incident nonfatal diabetes, 815 incident nonfatal hypertensions, and 323 incident nonfatal CVD events during a 6.4-year follow-up of 6,971 hypercholesterolemic patients who supplied follow-up questionnaires. Fatal and nonfatal diabetes risk decreased 26% (p = 0.002) and 19% (p ≤0.0001) per MET-h/d, respectively, and relative to <1.07 MET-h/d decreased 35% (p = 0.19) and 55% (p ≤0.0001), respectively, for 1.8 to 3.6 MET-h/d and 73% (p = 0.02) and 71% (p ≤0.0001), respectively, for ≥3.6 MET-h/d. Fatal and nonfatal CVD risk decreased 8% (p = 0.008) and 3% (p = 0.22) per MET-h/d, respectively, and relative to <1.07 MET-h/d decreased 10% (p = 0.45) and 36% (p = 0.008) for 1.8 to 3.6 MET-h/d, respectively, and 37% (p = 0.009) and 26% (p = 0.10), respectively, for ≥3.6 MET-h/d. Incident hypertension risk decreased 4% (p = 0.01) per MET-h/d, and relative to <1.07 MET-h/d decreased 29% (p = 0.002) for 1.8 to 3.6 MET-h/d and 31% (p = 0.001) for ≥3.6 MET-h/d. In conclusion, running and walking for exercise lowers diabetes, hypertension, and CVD risk in hypercholesterolemic patients and should more than compensate for the purported 9% increase in diabetes risk from statin use. By preventing morbidity and mortality for a specific existing medical condition, some exercise expenses may qualify for flexible spending account expenditures in hypercholesterolemic patients when prescribed by a physician. PMID:26423772

  7. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system improves cerebral microcirculatory perfusion in diabetic hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Estato, Vanessa; Obadia, Nathalie; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Freitas, Felipe Santos; Reis, Patrícia; Castro-Faria Neto, Hugo; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    We examined the functional and structural microcirculatory alterations in the brain, skeletal muscle and myocardium of non-diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and diabetic SHR (D-SHR), as well as the effects of long-term treatment with the angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonist olmesartan and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril. Diabetes was experimentally induced by a combination of a high-fat diet with a single low dose of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection). D-SHR were orally administered with olmesartan (5 mg/kg/day), enalapril (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 28 days, and compared with vehicle-treated non-diabetic SHR or normotensive non-diabetic Wistar-Kyoto rats. The cerebral and skeletal muscle functional capillary density of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats was assessed using intravital fluorescence videomicroscopy. Chronic treatment with olmesartan or enalapril significantly lowered blood pressure and reversed brain functional capillary rarefaction. Brain oxidative stress was reduced to non-diabetic control levels in animals treated with olmesartan or enalapril. Histochemical analysis of the structural capillary density showed that both olmesartan and enalapril increased the capillary-to-fiber ratio in skeletal muscle and the capillary-to-fiber volume density in the left ventricle. Olmesartan and enalapril also prevented collagen deposition and the increase in cardiomyocyte diameter in the left ventricle. Our results suggest that the association between hypertension and diabetes results in microvascular alterations in the brain, skeletal muscle and myocardium that can be prevented by chronic blockade of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:23466285

  8. Pyridostigmine enhances atrial tachyarrhythmias in aging spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Halil; Scridon, Alina; Oréa, Valérie; Chapuis, Bruno; Chevalier, Philippe; Barrès, Christian; Julien, Claude

    2015-10-01

    This study examined whether chronic administration of pyridostigmine, a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor, would exacerbate episodes of spontaneous atrial tachyarrhythmia (AT) in conscious, aging, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Telemetric recordings of electrocardiogram (ECG, n = 5) and ECG/arterial pressure (n = 3) were performed in male 49-week old SHRs. After a 1-week period of continuous recording under baseline conditions, rats were implanted with osmotic minipumps that delivered pyridostigmine (15 mg/kg/day subcutaneously) for either 1 (n = 8) or 3 (n = 5) weeks. In the latter case, sympathovagal balance was assessed during the last infusion week by measuring heart rate (HR) changes in response to administration of cardiac autonomic blockers. An additional 1-week recording was performed after explantation of minipumps. Significant (P = 0.02) reductions in HR with no consistent changes in arterial pressure were observed. Frequency and duration of AT episodes were increased by pyridostigmine (0.01 ≤ P ≤ 0.07). This increase was sustained across the 3-week treatment period and reversible after cessation of treatment. Autonomic blockade revealed that intrinsic HR was above (P = 0.04) resting HR, pointing to a shift of sympathovagal balance towards vagal predominance. However, the respiratory-related component of HR variability (high-frequency power of RR interval) was lowered (P = 0.01) by pyridostigmine treatment, indicating reduced vagal modulation of HR. The results are consistent with a pathogenic role of the parasympathetic nervous system in the aging SHR model, and raise the possibility that sustained vagal activation may facilitate atrial arrhythmias. PMID:26174159

  9. [The link between trace elements and metabolic syndrome/oxidative stress in essential hypertension with or without type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Gouaref, Ines; Bellahsene, Zina; Zekri, Samia; Alamir, Barkahoum; Koceir, Elhadj-Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between trace elements (TE) and essential hypertension (EH) is subtle and complex. This relationship is mediated by endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, oxidative stress (OS) and athero-inflammatory state. The aim of this study was to examine the TE impact; particularly selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) as predictive type 2 diabetes biomarkers in a hypertensive subject. The study was undertaken on 400 adult patients (40-60 years), who were divided in 4 groups: hypertensive (H), type 2 diabetes (T2D), hypertensive-diabetic (HD) and healthy group. Patients were phenotyped regarding their metabolic syndrome profile using the NCEP/ATPIII criteria. Hypertension was defined as systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg, respectively. The SBP and DBP measurements by electronic blood pressure using Omron 705 CP(®) type. Insulin resistance was assessed by Homa-IR model. Metabolic and inflammatory parameters were determined by Cobas Integra(®); the TE investigated by mass spectrometric atomic absorption; the OS markers evaluated by Randox kits. Serum Se concentrations are reduced in all groups, concomitantly with a marked depletion GPx activity in the HD group. However, Zn levels were decreased than in H and HD groups, but unchanged in T2D group. In contrast, Mn levels are increased in all groups; whereas the Cu levels increased only in H and HD groups, concomitantly with cytosolic SOD-Cu/Zn and mitochondrial SOD-Mn depletion. The Zn/Cu ratio decreases significantly in hypertensive group but not in diabetics groups. It appears that Zn/Cu ratio reflects the transition from hypertension phase to hypertension associated with T2D. Ultimately, TE plays an important role in the hypertension pathophysiology and can be considered as predictive T2D biomarkers in hypertensive patients. PMID:27029728

  10. Prevention of diabetes in hypertensive patients: Results and implications from the VALUE trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ming-Sheng; Schulman, Ivonne Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of experimental and clinical studies have provided evidence indicating that pharmacological blockade of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) by either angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers reduces the incidence of new onset type 2 diabetes in subjects with hypertension and/or cardiovascular disease, independently of antihypertensive and cardiovascular protective effects. The beneficial effects of RAS inhibition on the development of diabetes have been largely attributed to improvements in peripheral insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. This review focuses on recent experimental and clinical evidence supporting the role of RAS inhibition in the reduction of new onset type 2 diabetes and the mechanisms that may be involved. PMID:19475773

  11. Differences in hypertension prevalence among U.S. black and white women of childbearing age.

    PubMed Central

    Geronimus, A T; Andersen, H F; Bound, J

    1991-01-01

    Hypertension and its sequelae complicate pregnancy and can result in poor perinatal outcomes. Overall, U.S. blacks are more likely to be hypertensive than whites, but the degree to which this is true among women of childbearing age (including teenagers) is unknown. Using data from the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II), the authors describe hypertension prevalence rates for 422 black and 2,700 white reproductive-age women. The authors present observed data and also predicted prevalence rates derived by modeling the odds of hypertension using logistic regression statistical techniques. They find that black-white differences in hypertension prevalence are negligible among teenagers, but they are pronounced in the older reproductive ages. They estimate that twice the proportion of black women relative to white are hypertensive during pregnancy. Their results suggest that differential rates of hypertension between black and white women may contribute to the persistent excess infant mortality among blacks, but conclusive results cannot be determined from these data. These data are also valuable for the design and evaluation of screening, intervention, and followup programs for hypertensive disease among young women. PMID:1908590

  12. Assessing hypertension in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

    PubMed

    Davis, H S; Merry, H R; MacKnight, C; Rockwood, K

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the self-report hypertension variables in the CSHA, recorded in the screening questionnaire and the Self-Administered Risk Factor (SARF) questionnaire. The two questions showed high agreement (phi coefficient 0.83). Each was modestly but significantly associated with other simultaneous reports of heart disease and stroke, and with subsequent mortality. Only the SARF asked questions about treatment; controlling for treatment effects, five-year survival was longest among those with no hypertension and no treatment (mean survival time 1,645 days; 95% CI 1,632 to 1,658), and shortest for those with no reported hypertension who were receiving "antihypertensive" medications presumably prescribed for other cardiovascular disease (mean survival time 1,496 days; 95% CI 1,457 to 1,535). The SARF questions incorporating high blood pressure and treatment appear preferable to assess the risks associated with hypertension. PMID:11892958

  13. Renovascular hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Renal hypertension; Hypertension - renovascular; Renal artery occlusion; Stenosis - renal artery; Renal artery stenosis ... blood pressure to rise. Risk factors for atherosclerosis: High blood pressure Smoking Diabetes High cholesterol Heavy alcohol use Cocaine ...

  14. Evidence-based approach for managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tashko, Gerti; Gabbay, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control is a critical part of managing patients with type 2 diabetes. Perhaps it is the single most important aspect of diabetes care, which unlike hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia can reduce both micro- and macrovascular complications. Hypertension is more prevalent in individuals with diabetes than general population, and in most cases its treatment requires two or more pharmacological agents (about 30% of individuals with diabetes need 3 or more medications to control BP). In this article we describe the key evidence that has contributed to our understanding that reduced BP translates into positive micro- and macrovascular outcomes. We review the data supporting current recommendation for BP target < 130/80 mmHg. Two studies suggest that a lower BP goal could be even more beneficial. We also present the comparative benefits of various antihypertensive drugs in reducing diabetes-related micro- and macrovascular complications. Finally we propose an evidence-based algorithm of how to initiate and titrate antihypertensive pharmacotherapy in affected individuals. Overall, achieving BP < 130/80 mmHg is more important than searching for the “best” antihypertensive agent in patients with diabetes. PMID:21949619

  15. Augmented Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness and Adhesion when Hypertension is Superimposed on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sehgel, Nancy L.; Sun, Zhe; Hong, Zhongkui; Hunter, William C.; Hill, Michael A.; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension and aging are both recognized to increase aortic stiffness, but their interactions are not completely understood. Most prior studies have attributed increased aortic stiffness to changes in extracellular matrix proteins that alter mechanical properties of the vascular wall. Alternatively, we hypothesized that a significant component of increased vascular stiffness in hypertension is due to changes in the mechanical and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells, and that aging would augment the contribution from vascular smooth muscle cells compared to the extracellular matrix. Accordingly, we studied aortic stiffness in young (16 wks) and old (64 wks) spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto wild-type controls. Systolic and pulse pressures were significantly increased in young spontaneously hypertensive rats, compared to young Wistar-Kyoto rats, and these continued to rise in old spontaneously hypertensive rats, compared to age-matched controls. Excised aortic ring segments exhibited significantly greater elastic moduli in both young and old spontaneously hypertensive rats vs. Wistar-Kyoto rats. Vascular smooth muscle cells were isolated from the thoracic aorta, and stiffness and adhesion to fibronectin were measured by atomic force microscopy. Hypertension increased both vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion, and these increases were both augmented with aging. By contrast, hypertension did not affect histological measures of aortic collagen and elastin, which were predominantly changed by aging. This supports the concept that stiffness and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells are novel mechanisms contributing to the increased aortic stiffness occurring with hypertension superimposed on aging. PMID:25452471

  16. Long-Term Effects of Incident Diabetes Mellitus on Cardiovascular Outcomes in People Treated for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Barzilay, Joshua I.; Davis, Barry R.; Pressel, Sara L.; Cutler, Jeffrey A.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Black, Henry R.; Cushman, William C.; Ford, Charles E.; Margolis, Karen L.; Moloo, Jamaluddin; Oparil, Suzanne; Piller, Linda B.; Simmons, Debra L.; Sweeney, Mary Ellen; Whelton, Paul K.; Wong, Nathan D.; Wright, Jackson T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Thiazide-type diuretics are associated with an increased incidence of diabetes as compared to other anti-hypertension medications. In this study we determined long-term cardiovascular disease (CVD) consequences of incident diuretic-associated diabetes compared to the effects of incident diabetes associated with calcium channel and ACE inhibitor use. Methods and Results 22,418 participants from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial with baseline diabetes, incident diabetes (7.5% with chlorthalidone, 5.6% with amlodipine, and 4.3% with lisinopril), or no diabetes at 2 years of in-trial follow-up were followed for a mean total of 6.9 years (2.9 years in-trial and 4 additional years post-trial through the use of national data bases). The primary outcome was CVD mortality (death due to coronary heart disease [CHD], stroke, heart failure, or other CVD). Among other outcomes were all-cause mortality, non-CVD mortality, and CHD (nonfatal myocardial infarction/fatal CHD). Participants on chlorthalidone with incident diabetes versus no diabetes had consistently lower, non-significant risk for CVD mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.74–1.47), all-cause mortality (HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.82–1.30), and non-CVD mortality (HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.77–1.42) than participants with incident diabetes on amlodipine or lisinopril (HR’s 1.22–1.53). Participants with incident diabetes had elevated CHD risk compared to those with no diabetes (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.09–1.96) but those on chlorthalidone had significantly lower risk than those on lisinopril (HR 1.18 versus 2.57, p for interaction = 0.04). Conclusions Our findings suggest that thiazide-related incident diabetes has less adverse long-term CVD impact than incident diabetes that develops on other antihypertensive medications. PMID:22396585

  17. Effect of total knee arthroplasty on type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Shrinand V; Arora, Arvind; Mathesul, Ambarish A

    2013-01-01

    Context: Advanced osteoarthritis of knee joint if bilateral, severely restricts patient mobility. This acts as an aggravating factor for pre existing comorbid elements of metabolical syndrome (MS) like Type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension as patients are unable to carry out therapeutic walks. Successfully implanted total knee arthroplasty (TKA) increases physical activity and enables to carry out therapeutic walks thus may help in better control of type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The objective of this prospective study was to find whether TKA for osteoarthritis knee had any effect to improve blood glucose levels and reduce blood pressure. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done in which patients operated for tricompartmental osteoarthritis of knee with associated comorbidities like Type II diabetes mellitus or hypertension during a period of 2008 and 2009 were studied. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled (55 diabetics, 65 hypertensives) who met our inclusion criteria. Preoperative knee society score, lower extremity activity scale fasting blood glucose level and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were compared with one year followup values. The KSS and LEAS scores were analysed by the Wilcoxon signed ranked test, while the fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels and systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were analysed by paired ‘t’ test. Results: The reduction of systolic blood pressure by 8 mmHg (t = 5.6, P value < 0.05) and diastolic blood pressure by 6 mmHg (t = 7.6, P value < 0.05) was recorded which was statistically significant. However, no statistically significant effect on fasting blood glucose levels was observed (t = -0.77, P value = 0.442). KSS improved in DM from preoperative 29 to 86 and LEAS improved from 6.7 to 11.3. Conclusions: Authors are of the opinion that successful total knee replacement results in increased physical activity and reduces blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) in hypertensives

  18. Sex-Specific Prevalence of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Middle-Aged Population of China: A Subgroup Analysis of the 2007–2008 China National Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaojun; Xing, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Wenhui; Wang, Na; Xie, Lingding; Yang, Wenying

    2015-01-01

    The sex difference in the prevalence rates of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) among the middle-aged population in China remain largely unknown. Therefore, we analyzed differences in the prevalence of diabetes, self-reported CVDs, and some CVD risk factors among men and women in the middle-aged population (30–49 years) and in individuals aged 50 years and older using data from the China National Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Study of 2007–2008. Middle-aged men appeared to have significantly a higher prevalence of diabetes and self-reported CVDs than middle-aged women (8.07% vs 5.06% for diabetes, P < 0.001; 0.64% vs 0.22% for CVDs, P < 0.001). Men also showed higher rates of central obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia than women (all P < 0.01). Compared with women, men were more likely to drink alcohol and smoke cigarettes but less likely to be under diet control. The sex-specific differences in prediabetes, CVD, and CVD risk factors between men and women were diminished or even reversed in the population aged 50 years and older. No sex-specific differences were found in the prevalences of a family history of diabetes, coronary heart disease, and hypertension (P > 0.05) in middle-aged population. Specific strategies to reduce modifiable risk factors for the prevention and control of diabetes and CVD may be warranted in this population. PMID:26406982

  19. DPP-4 Inhibitor Reduces Central Blood Pressure in a Diabetic and Hypertensive Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cosenso-Martin, Luciana Neves; Giollo-Junior, Luiz Tadeu; Vilela-Martin, José Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are among the main risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Pharmacotherapy for DM should not only improve blood glucose control, but also provide beneficial glucose-independent cardiovascular effects. The central systolic blood pressure (SBP) has become more important than the brachial SBP in the assessment of cardiovascular risk.This case report describes the effect of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, on the central SBP in a 54-year-old woman with hypertension and DM. She was submitted to applanation tonometry (AT) before and after vildagliptin association. AT of the radial artery is a non-invasive method that indirectly assesses arterial stiffness by calculating the central SBP and the augmentation index (AIx).After 3 months of follow-up using vildagliptin, central SBP and AIx were improved. Moreover, she presented better glycemic control.This case suggests an effect of DPP-4 inhibitor on arterial stiffness parameter (central SBP) in a hypertensive and diabetic patient, which shows a glucose-independent beneficial cardiovascular effect of this group of drugs. PMID:26166078

  20. Effects of psychological stress on hypertension in middle-aged Chinese: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yin, Sufeng; Fan, Hongmin; Feng, Fumin; Yuan, Juxiang

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect and relative contributions of different types of stress on the risk of hypertension. Using cluster sampling, 5,976 community-dwelling individuals aged 40-60 were selected. Hypertension was defined according to the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee, and general psychological stress was defined as experiencing stress at work or home. Information on known risk factors of hypertension (e.g., physical activity levels, food intake, smoking behavior) was collected from participants. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the associations between psychological stress and hypertension, calculating population-attributable risks and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). General stress was significantly related to hypertension (odds ratio [OR] = 1.247, 95% CI [1.076, 1.446]). Additionally, after adjustment for all other risk factors, women showed a greater risk of hypertension if they had either stress at work or at home: OR = 1.285, 95% CI (1.027, 1.609) and OR = 1.231, 95% CI (1.001, 1.514), respectively. However, this increased risk for hypertension by stress was not found in men. General stress contributed approximately 9.1% (95% CI [3.1, 15.0]) to the risk for hypertension. Thus, psychological stress was associated with an increased risk for hypertension, although this increased risk was not consistent across gender. PMID:26043027

  1. Drug related problems in type 2 diabetes patients with hypertension: a cross-sectional retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients with hypertension are at increased risk for experiencing drug-related problems (DRPs) since they often receive multiple medications and have multiple comorbidities. To date, there is a lack of studies conducted in T2DM patients with hypertension. This study aims to analyze the DRPs and identify factors affecting the DRPs in this patient population. Method This retrospective study involved T2DM patients with hypertension and was conducted at a tertiary hospital in Malaysia from January 2009 to December 2011. The assessment of DRPs was based on the Pharmaceutical Network Care Europe (PCNE) tool version 5.01. Results Two hundred patients with a total of 387 DRPs were identified. Among these patients, 90.5% had at least one DRP, averaging 1.9 ± 1.2 problems per patient. The most common DRPs encountered were insufficient awareness of health and diseases (26%), drug choice problems (23%), dosing problems (16%) and drug interactions (16%). The most implicated drugs were aspirin, clopidogrel, simvastatin, amlodipine and metformin. The six domains of DRPs found to have statistically significant associations were renal impairment, polypharmacy, cardiovascular disease, elderly status, and duration of hospital stay. Conclusions Early identification of the types and patterns of DRPs and the factors associated to them may enhance the prevention and management of DRPs in T2DM patients with hypertension. PMID:23289895

  2. Serum Concentrations of Endothelin-1 and Matrix Metalloproteinases-2, -9 in Pre-Hypertensive and Hypertensive Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kostov, Krasimir; Blazhev, Alexander; Atanasova, Milena; Dimitrova, Anelia

    2016-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is one of the most potent vasoconstrictors known to date. While its plasma or serum concentrations are elevated in some forms of experimental and human hypertension, this is not a consistent finding in all forms of hypertension. Matrix metalloproteinases -2 and -9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9), which degrade collagen type IV of the vascular basement membrane, are responsible for vascular remodeling, inflammation, and atherosclerotic complications, including in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In our study, we compared concentrations of ET-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in pre-hypertensive (PHTN) and hypertensive (HTN) T2D patients with those of healthy normotensive controls (N). ET-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were measured by ELISA. Concentrations of ET-1 in PHTN and N were very similar, while those in HTN were significantly higher. Concentrations of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in PHTN and HTN were also significantly higher compared to N. An interesting result in our study is that concentrations of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in HTN were lower compared to PHTN. In conclusion, we showed that increased production of ET-1 in patients with T2D can lead to long-lasting increases in blood pressure (BP) and clinical manifestation of hypertension. We also demonstrated that increased levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in pre-hypertensive and hypertensive patients with T2D mainly reflect the early vascular changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover. PMID:27490532

  3. General and Gender Characteristics of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Among the Younger and Older Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mukhtar, Samir Burhanaldin; Fadhil, Nabeel Najib; Hanna, Bassam Edward

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To study the characteristics of cardiovascular risk factors in regard to age (before and after 60) and gender. Many reports refer to the higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among the younger type 2 diabetics in comparison with the older population. Methods The study included 462 randomly recruited type 2 diabetic subjects (above and below 60 years) attending Al-Zahrawi Private Hospital in Mosul City-Iraq, during the period from June to August 2011. They were analyzed in regard to age, duration of diabetes, smoking, socioeconomic status, anthropometric indices, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c and serum lipids. Data were analyzed using chi-square and unpaired Z test. Results Duration of diabetes, diastolic blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, number of hypercholesterolemic patients, number of patients having unfavorable total cholesterol/HDL ratio (≥5) and positive family history of coronary heart disease were all significantly higher in the younger diabetics. In addition, younger diabetic females were distinguished by a larger number of hypertensive patients, higher level of systolic blood pressure, higher means of body mass index, total cholesterol and LDL, and larger number of patients having low HDL-C (<1 mmol/L). The younger diabetic males were distinct by a larger number of smokers, number of smoked cigarettes/day, and longer duration of smoking. All parameters ranged between p<0.05 and p<0.005. Conclusion Cardiovascular risk factors were significantly higher among younger type 2 diabetics (<60 years), particularly females. PMID:23074547

  4. The Improvement of Hypertension by Probiotics: Effects on Cholesterol, Diabetes, Renin, and Phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lye, Huey-Shi; Kuan, Chiu-Yin; Ewe, Joo-Ann; Fung, Wai-Yee; Liong, Min-Tze

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are live organisms that are primarily used to improve gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, lactose intolerance, and to inhibit the excessive proliferation of pathogenic intestinal bacteria. However, recent studies have suggested that probiotics could have beneficial effects beyond gastrointestinal health, as they were found to improve certain metabolic disorders such as hypertension. Hypertension is caused by various factors and the predominant causes include an increase in cholesterol levels, incidence of diabetes, inconsistent modulation of renin and imbalanced sexual hormones. This review discusses the antihypertensive roles of probiotics via the improvement and/or treatment of lipid profiles, modulation of insulin resistance and sensitivity, the modulation of renin levels and also the conversion of bioactive phytoestrogens as an alternative replacement of sexual hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. PMID:19865517

  5. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oparil, S; Calhoun, D A

    1989-03-01

    An estimated 58 million Americans are at increased risk of morbidity and premature death due to high blood pressure (BP) and require some type of therapy or systematic monitoring. This article focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of hypertension, new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of secondary hypertension, and current views of the most appropriate nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy for essential hypertension. In view of the extremely high prevalence of the disorder, emphasis is placed on efficient and cost-effective strategies for diagnosing and managing the hypertensive patient. Recent evidence indicates that nonpharmacologic therapy, including dietary potassium and calcium supplements, reduction of salt intake, weight loss for the obese patient, regular exercise, a diet high in fiber and low in cholesterol and saturated fats, smoking cessation, and moderation of alcohol consumption produces significant sustained reductions in BP while reducing overall cardiovascular risk. Accordingly, nonpharmacologic antihypertensive therapy should be included in the treatment of all hypertensive patients. In persons with mild hypertension, nonpharmacologic approaches may adequately reduce BP, thereby avoiding the expense and potential side effects of drug therapy. In patients with more severe hypertension, nonpharmacologic therapy, used in conjunction with pharmacologic therapy, can reduce the dosage of antihypertensive medications necessary for BP control. Patients treated with nonpharmacologic therapy only should be followed closely, and if BP control is not satisfactory, drug therapy should be added. The large number of drugs available for use in hypertension treatment, coupled with our rapidly expanding knowledge of the pathophysiology of hypertension and of the adverse effects of these drugs in individual patient groups, make it possible to individualize antihypertensive treatment. When used as monotherapy, most agents

  6. Age- and Hypertension-Associated Protein Aggregates in Mouse Heart Have Similar Proteomic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Mercanti, Federico; Wang, Xianwei; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Tackett, Alan J; Prayaga, Sastry V S; Romeo, Francesco; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are largely defined by protein aggregates in affected tissues. Aggregates contain some shared components as well as proteins thought to be specific for each disease. Aggregation has not previously been reported in the normal, aging heart or the hypertensive heart. Detergent-insoluble protein aggregates were isolated from mouse heart and characterized on 2-dimensional gels. Their levels increased markedly and significantly with aging and after sustained angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Of the aggregate components identified by high-resolution proteomics, half changed in abundance with age (392/787) or with sustained hypertension (459/824), whereas 30% (273/901) changed concordantly in both, each P<0.05. One fifth of these proteins were previously associated with age-progressive neurodegenerative or cardiovascular diseases, or both (eg, ApoE, ApoJ, ApoAIV, clusterin, complement C3, and others involved in stress-response and protein-homeostasis pathways). Because fibrosis is a characteristic of both aged and hypertensive hearts, we posited that aging of fibroblasts may contribute to the aggregates observed in cardiac tissue. Indeed, as cardiac myofibroblasts "senesced" (approached their replicative limit) in vitro, they accrued aggregates with many of the same constituent proteins observed in vivo during natural aging or sustained hypertension. In summary, we have shown for the first time that compact (detergent-insoluble) protein aggregates accumulate during natural aging, chronic hypertension, and in vitro myofibroblast senescence, sharing many common proteins. Thus, aggregates that arise from disparate causes (aging, hypertension, and replicative senescence) may have common underlying mechanisms of accrual. PMID:26975704

  7. Metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes in youth: from diagnosis to treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Overweight and obesity in youth is a worldwide public health problem. Overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescents have a substantial effect upon many systems, resulting in clinical conditions such as metabolic syndrome, early atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia, hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Obesity and the type of body fat distribution are still the core aspects of insulin resistance and seem to be the physiopathologic links common to metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and T2D. The earlier the appearance of the clustering of risk factors and the higher the time of exposure, the greater will be the chance of developing coronary disease with a more severe endpoint. The age when the event may occur seems to be related to the presence and aggregation of risk factors throughout life. The treatment in this age-group is non pharmacological and aims at promoting changes in lifestyle. However, pharmacological treatments are indicated in special situations. The major goals in dietary treatments are not only limited to weight loss, but also to an improvement in the quality of life. Modification of risk factors associated to comorbidities, personal satisfaction of the child or adolescent and trying to establish healthy life habits from an early age are also important. There is a continuous debate on the best possible exercise to do, for children or adolescents, in order to lose weight. The prescription of physical activity to children and adolescents requires extensive integrated work among multidisciplinary teams, patients and their families, in order to reach therapeutic success. The most important conclusion drawn from this symposium was that if the growing prevalence of overweight and obesity continues at this pace, the result will be a population of children and adolescents with metabolic syndrome. This would lead to high mortality rates in young adults, changing the current increasing trend of worldwide longevity. Government actions and a better

  8. Parathyroidectomy Ameliorates Glucose and Blood Pressure Control in a Patient with Primary Hyperparathyroidism, Type 2 Diabetes, and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Singh, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Effect of parathyroidectomy on glucose control and hypertension is controversial. Here, we report a case of a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension in whom parathyroidectomy ameliorated both glucose control and blood pressure. Once high serum calcium levels were noticed, ultrasonography of neck confirmed a well-defined oval hypoechoic mass posterior to the right lobe of the thyroid, confirmed by scintiscan. Parathyroidectomy resulted in improvement of blood pressure and blood glucose. We could stop insulin and antihypertensive medications. We conclude that in patients with type 2 diabetes with vague complaints like fatigue, body ache, and refractory hypertension, as a part of the diagnostic workup, clinicians should also check serum calcium levels and parathyroid hormone to rule out hyperparathyroidism. Correction of hyperparathyroidism may result in improvement of hypertension and glucose control. PMID:26380561

  9. Boldine Ameliorates Vascular Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction: Therapeutic Implication for Hypertension and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Yeh Siiang; Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that a growing list of natural products, as components of the daily diet or phytomedical preparations, are a rich source of antioxidants. Boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxy-aporphine], an aporphine alkaloid, is a potent antioxidant found in the leaves and bark of the Chilean boldo tree. Boldine has been extensively reported as a potent “natural” antioxidant and possesses several health-promoting properties like anti-inflammatory, antitumor promoting, antidiabetic, and cytoprotective. Boldine exhibited significant endothelial protective effect in animal models of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In isolated thoracic aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rats, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and db/db mice, repeated treatment of boldine significantly improved the attenuated acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. The endothelial protective role of boldine correlated with increased nitric oxide levels and reduction of vascular reactive oxygen species via inhibition of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits, p47phox and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2, and angiotensin II–induced bone morphogenetic protein-4 oxidative stress cascade with downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and bone morphogenetic protein-4 expression. Taken together, it seems that boldine may exert protective effects on the endothelium via several mechanisms, including protecting nitric oxide from degradation by reactive oxygen species as in oxidative stress–related diseases. The present review supports a complimentary therapeutic role of the phytochemical, boldine, against endothelial dysfunctions associated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus by interfering with the oxidative stress–mediated signaling pathway. PMID:25469805

  10. Boldine Ameliorates Vascular Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction: Therapeutic Implication for Hypertension and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yeh Siiang; Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that a growing list of natural products, as components of the daily diet or phytomedical preparations, are a rich source of antioxidants. Boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxy-aporphine], an aporphine alkaloid, is a potent antioxidant found in the leaves and bark of the Chilean boldo tree. Boldine has been extensively reported as a potent "natural" antioxidant and possesses several health-promoting properties like anti-inflammatory, antitumor promoting, antidiabetic, and cytoprotective. Boldine exhibited significant endothelial protective effect in animal models of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In isolated thoracic aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rats, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and db/db mice, repeated treatment of boldine significantly improved the attenuated acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. The endothelial protective role of boldine correlated with increased nitric oxide levels and reduction of vascular reactive oxygen species via inhibition of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits, p47 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2, and angiotensin II-induced bone morphogenetic protein-4 oxidative stress cascade with downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and bone morphogenetic protein-4 expression. Taken together, it seems that boldine may exert protective effects on the endothelium via several mechanisms, including protecting nitric oxide from degradation by reactive oxygen species as in oxidative stress-related diseases. The present review supports a complimentary therapeutic role of the phytochemical, boldine, against endothelial dysfunctions associated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus by interfering with the oxidative stress-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:25469805

  11. Effects of valsartan versus amlodipine in diabetic hypertensive patients with or without previous cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kentaro; Kondo, Takahisa; Muramatsu, Takashi; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Nagahiro, Takanori; Maeda, Kengo; Shintani, Satoshi; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2013-12-01

    Recently, we reported that angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), valsartan, and calcium channel blocker (CCB), amlodipine, had similar effects on the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in diabetic hypertensive patients. We assessed the difference of cardiovascular protective effects between ARB and CCB in patients with and without previous CVD, respectively. A total of 1,150 Japanese diabetic hypertensive patients were randomized to either valsartan or amlodipine treatment arms, which were additionally divided into 2 groups according to the presence of previous CVD at baseline (without CVD, n = 818; with CVD, n = 332). The primary composite outcomes were sudden cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, or hospitalization for heart failure. The incidence of primary end point events in patients with previous CVD was 3.5-times greater than that in patients without previous CVD (64.1 vs 17.9/1,000 person-years). The ARB- and the CCB-based treatment arms showed similar incidence of composite CVD events in both patients without previous CVD (hazard ratio [HR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76 to 2.40) and those with previous CVD (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.31). The ARB-treatment arm showed less incidence of stroke compared with the CCB-based treatment arm in patients with previous CVD (HR 0.24, 95% CI 0.05 to 1.11, p = 0.068), whereas the 2 treatment arms showed similar incidence of stroke in patients without previous CVD (HR 1.52, 95% CI 0.59 to 3.91). In conclusion, the ARB- and the CCB-based treatments exerted similar protective effects of CVD events regardless of the presence of previous CVD. For stroke events, the ARB may have more protective effects than the CCB in diabetic hypertensive patients with previous CVD. PMID:24035165

  12. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and diabetic vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2005-02-01

    Diabetic vascular complication is a leading cause of acquired blindness, end-stage renal failure, a variety of neuropathies and accelerated atherosclerosis, which could account for disabilities and high mortality rates in patients with diabetes. Chronic hyperglycemia is essentially involved in the development and progression of diabetic micro- and macroangiopathy. Among various metabolic derangements implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complication, advanced glycation end product (AGE) hypothesis is most compatible with the theory of 'hyperglycemic memory'. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of diabetic vascular complication, specially focusing on AGEs and their receptor (RAGE) system. Several types of AGE inhibitors and their therapeutic implications in this devastating disorder are also discussed here. PMID:18220586

  13. Association of Elevated Serum Lipoprotein(a), Inflammation, Oxidative Stress and Chronic Kidney Disease with Hypertension in Non-diabetes Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon; Pingmuanglaew, Patcharin; Tangvarasittichai, Orathai

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular risk factor. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], inflammation, oxidative stress and chronic kidney disease (CKD) exacerbate the response to tissue injury and acts as markers of the vascular disease, especially in glomerulosclerosis. We compared the clinical characteristics of 138 non-diabetes hypertensive women (ndHT) patients with 417 non-diabetes normotensive subjects and tested the association of hypertension with Lp(a), inflammation, CKD and oxidative stress by using multiple logistic regression. BP, BMI, waist circumference, creatinine, Lp(a), inflammation and malondialdehyde levels were significantly higher and CKD state in the ndHT patients (p < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression showed hypertension associated with increased Lp(a), inflammation, ORs and 95 % CIs were 2.52 (1.33, 4.80), 2.75 (1.44, 5.27) after adjusting for their covariates. Elevated serum Lp(a) and inflammation levels concomitants with increased oxidative stress and CKD were the major risk factors associated with hypertension and implications for the increased risk of HT and vascular disease. PMID:27605742

  14. Renal disease and hypertension in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ismail, N; Becker, B; Strzelczyk, P; Ritz, E

    1999-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic data demonstrate a dramatic increase in the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), thus dispelling the mistaken belief that renal prognosis is benign in NIDDM. Currently, the leading cause of ESRD in the United States, Japan, and in most industrialized Europe is NIDDM, accounting for nearly 90% of all cases of diabetes. In addition to profound economic costs, patients with NIDDM and diabetic nephropathy have a dramatically increased morbidity and premature mortality. NIDDM-related nephropathy varies widely among racial and ethnic groups, genders and lifestyles; and gender may interact with race to affect the disease progression. While the course of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) progresses through well-defined stages, the natural history of NIDDM is less well characterized. NIDDM patients with coronary heart disease have a higher urinary albumin excretion rate at the time of diagnosis and follow-up. This greater risk may also be associated with hypertension and hyperlipidemia, and genes involved in blood pressure are obvious candidate genes for diabetic nephropathy. Hyperglycemia appears to be an important factor in the development of proteinuria in NIDDM, but its role and the influence of diet are not yet clear. Tobacco smoking can also be deleterious to the diabetic patient, and is also associated with disease progression. Maintaining euglycemia, stopping smoking and controlling blood pressure may prevent or slow the progression of NIDDM-related nephropathy and reduce extrarenal injury. Treatment recommendations include early screening for hyperlipidemia, appropriate exercise and a healthy diet. Cornerstones of management should also include: (1) educating the medical community and more widely disseminating data supporting the value of early treatment of microalbuminuria; (2) developing a comprehensive, multidisciplinary team approach that involves physicians

  15. Evidence From ElderSmile for Diabetes and Hypertension Screening in Oral Health Programs

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Stephen; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Metcalf, Sara S.; Greenblatt, Ariel Port; De La Cruz, Leydis; Kunzel, Carol; Northridge, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The ElderSmile clinical program was initiated in northern Manhattan in 2006. ElderSmile is a comprehensive community-based program offering education, screening and treatment services for seniors in impoverished communities. Originally focused on oral health, ElderSmile was expanded in 2010 to include diabetes and hypertension education and screening. More than 1,000 elders have participated in the expanded program to date. Quantitative and qualitative findings support a role for dental professionals in screening for these primary care sensitive conditions. PMID:26451080

  16. Effect of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in alloxan-induced diabetic WBN/Kob rats.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Hamano, Hiroko; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Narama, Isao

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between hypertension and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) has recently been reported in clinical research, but it remains unclear whether hypertension is a risk factor for DPN. To investigate the effects of hypertension on DPN, we analyzed morphological features of peripheral nerves in diabetic rats with hypertension. Male WBN/Kob rats were divided into 2 groups: alloxan-induced diabetic rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt (DOCA-salt) treatment (ADN group) and nondiabetic rats with DOCA-salt treatment (DN group). Sciatic, tibial (motor) and sural (sensory) nerves were subjected to qualitative and quantitative histomorphological analysis. Systolic blood pressure in the two groups exhibited a higher value (>140 mmHg), but there was no significant difference between the two groups. Endoneurial blood vessels in both groups presented endothelial hypertrophy and narrowing of the vascular lumen. Electron microscopically, duplication of basal lamina surrounding the endothelium and pericyte of the endoneurial vessels was observed, and this lesion appeared to be more frequent and severe in the ADN group than the DN group. Many nerve fibers of the ADN and DN groups showed an almost normal appearance, whereas morphometrical analysis of the tibial nerve showed a significant shift to smaller fiber and myelin sizes in the ADN group compared with DN group. In sural nerve, the fiber and axon-size significantly shifted to a smaller size in ADN group compared with the DN group. These results suggest that combined diabetes and hypertension could induce mild peripheral nerve lesions with vascular changes. PMID:26989296

  17. Effect of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in alloxan-induced diabetic WBN/Kob rats

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Hamano, Hiroko; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Narama, Isao

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between hypertension and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) has recently been reported in clinical research, but it remains unclear whether hypertension is a risk factor for DPN. To investigate the effects of hypertension on DPN, we analyzed morphological features of peripheral nerves in diabetic rats with hypertension. Male WBN/Kob rats were divided into 2 groups: alloxan-induced diabetic rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt (DOCA-salt) treatment (ADN group) and nondiabetic rats with DOCA-salt treatment (DN group). Sciatic, tibial (motor) and sural (sensory) nerves were subjected to qualitative and quantitative histomorphological analysis. Systolic blood pressure in the two groups exhibited a higher value (>140 mmHg), but there was no significant difference between the two groups. Endoneurial blood vessels in both groups presented endothelial hypertrophy and narrowing of the vascular lumen. Electron microscopically, duplication of basal lamina surrounding the endothelium and pericyte of the endoneurial vessels was observed, and this lesion appeared to be more frequent and severe in the ADN group than the DN group. Many nerve fibers of the ADN and DN groups showed an almost normal appearance, whereas morphometrical analysis of the tibial nerve showed a significant shift to smaller fiber and myelin sizes in the ADN group compared with DN group. In sural nerve, the fiber and axon-size significantly shifted to a smaller size in ADN group compared with the DN group. These results suggest that combined diabetes and hypertension could induce mild peripheral nerve lesions with vascular changes. PMID:26989296

  18. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Poulter, Neil R; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Caulfield, Mark

    2015-08-22

    Raised blood pressure is the biggest single contributor to the global burden of disease and to global mortality. The numbers of people affected and the prevalence of high blood pressure worldwide are expected to increase over the next decade. Preventive strategies are therefore urgently needed, especially in less developed countries, and management of hypertension must be optimised. Genetic advances in some rare causes of hypertension have been made lately, but the aggregate effect on blood pressure of all the genetic loci identified to date is small. Hence, intervention on key environmental determinants and effective implementation of trial-based therapies are needed. Three-drug combinations can control hypertension in about 90% of patients but only if resources allow identification of patients and drug delivery is affordable. Furthermore, assessment of optimal drug therapy for each ethnic group is needed. PMID:25832858

  19. Are the Rates of Hypertension and Diabetes Higher in People from Lower Socioeconomic Status in Bangladesh? Results from a Nationally Representative Survey

    PubMed Central

    Tareque, Md. Ismail; Koshio, Atsushi; Tiedt, Andrew D.; Hasegawa, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Objective A well-established belief regarding inequalities in health around the world is that hypertension and diabetes are higher in groups of lower socioeconomic status. We examined whether rates of hypertension, diabetes, and the coexistence of hypertension and diabetes are higher in people from a lower socioeconomic status than in those from a higher socioeconomic status in Bangladesh. Methods We investigated a nationally representative dataset from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey with objective measures for hypertension and diabetes. A wealth index was constructed from data on household assets using principal components analysis. Chi-square tests and logistic regressions were performed to test the associations between wealth level, hypertension and diabetes. Findings People from the highest wealth quintile were significantly more likely to have hypertension (Adjusted odds ratios [AOR] = 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-2.25), diabetes (AOR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.21-2.71), and the coexistence of hypertension and diabetes (AOR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.05-4.49) than people from the lowest wealth quintile. The odds of having hypertension, diabetes, and their coexistence were higher for older people, women, people who engaged in less physical labor, and people who were overweight and obese. Conclusion Wealthier people, particularly people from the fourth and highest wealth quintiles, should be careful to avoid unhealthy lifestyles to prevent hypertension and diabetes. Health policy makers and planners are urged to target wealthier strata in terms of hypertension and diabetes initiatives while paying special attention to older people, women, people who engage in less physical labor, and individuals who are overweight. PMID:26017066

  20. Reduced Diabetic, Hypertensive, and Cholesterol Medication Use with Walking

    PubMed Central

    WILLIAMS, PAUL T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the relationships of walking distance, frequency, and intensity to the prevalence of antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and LDL cholesterol–lowering medications use. Methods Cross-sectional analyses of 32,683 female and 8112 male participants of the National Walkers’ Health Study, of whom 2.8% and 7.4% reported antidiabetic, 14.3% and 29.0% reported antihypertensive, and 7.3% and 21.5% reported LDL cholesterol–lowering medication use, respectively. Results Weekly walking distance, longest walk, and walking intensity were inversely related to the prevalence of antidiabetic (males: P < 0.001, females: P < 0.0001), antihypertensive (males: P < 0.01, females: P < 0.0001), and LDL cholesterol–lowering medications (males: P < 0.01, females: P < 0.0001). Each medication remained significantly related to both walking intensity and longest weekly walk when adjusted for total weekly distance. Compared with men and women who walked at a speed of < 1.2 m/s, those who walked > 2.1 m/s had 48% and 52% lower odds for antihypertensive, 68% and 59% lower odds for antidiabetic, and 53% and 40% lower odds for LDL cholesterol–lowering medications, respectively, when adjusted for age, smoking, and diet. The longest usual weekly walk was a better discriminator of medication status than the total cumulative distance per week, particularly in men. Conclusion These results are consistent with the hypothesis that antidiabetic, antihypertensive, and LDL cholesterol–lowering medication use may be reduced substantially by walking more intensely and farther each week, and by including longer walks. PMID:18379204

  1. Platelet aggregation and serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity in pregnancy associated with diabetes, hypertension and HIV.

    PubMed

    Leal, Claudio A M; Leal, Daniela B R; Adefegha, Stephen A; Morsch, Vera M; da Silva, José E P; Rezer, João F P; Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Abdalla, Faida H; Schetinger, Maria R C

    2016-07-01

    Platelet aggregation and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity were evaluated in pregnant women living with some disease conditions including hypertension, diabetes mellitus and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The subject population is consisted of 15 non-pregnant healthy women [control group (CG)], 15 women with normal pregnancy (NP), 7 women with hypertensive pregnancy (HP), 10 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 12 women with human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnancy (HIP) groups. The aggregation of platelets was checked using an optical aggregometer, and serum ADA activity was determined using the colorimetric method. After the addition of 5 µM of agonist adenosine diphosphate, the percentage of platelet aggregation was significantly (p < 0·05) increased in NP, HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with the CG, while the addition of 10 µM of the same agonist caused significant (p < 0·05) elevations in HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with CG. Furthermore, ADA activity was significantly (p < 0·05) enhanced in NP, HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with CG. In this study, the increased platelet aggregation and ADA activity in pregnancy and pregnancy-associated diseases suggest that platelet aggregation and ADA activity could serve as peripheral markers for the development of effective therapy in the maintenance of homeostasis and some inflammatory process in these pathophysiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27273565

  2. High prevalence of diagnosis of diabetes, depression, anxiety, hypertension, asthma and COPD in the total population of Stockholm, Sweden – a challenge for public health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge on the prevalence of disease in total populations. Such studies have historically been difficult to conduct but the development of health data registers has facilitated large-scale studies on recorded diagnoses in entire regions. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of diagnosis of six common diseases in the Swedish capital region. Methods The study population included all living persons who resided in Stockholm County, Sweden, on December 31st 2011 (N = 2 093 717). Information on all consultations between 2007 and 2011 was obtained from primary health care, specialist outpatient care and inpatient care. Prevalence was defined as the proportion of individuals with a recorded diagnosis of diabetes, depression, anxiety disorders, hypertension, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during the five year period, respectively. Analyses were done by age and gender. Results Hypertension had the highest five-year prevalence (12.2%), followed by depression (6.6%), diabetes mellitus (6.2%), asthma (5.9%), anxiety disorders/phobia (4.8%), and COPD (1.8%). Diabetes was more common in men (5.3% of women and 7.1% of men) while depression (8.7% in women and 4.4% in men) and anxiety (6.3% in women and 3.4% in men) were considerably more common in women. Smaller gender differences were also found for hypertension (13.0% in women and 11.4% in men), asthma (6.4% in women and 5.4% in men) and COPD (2.1% in women and 1.6% in men). Diabetes, hypertension and COPD increased markedly with age, whereas anxiety, depression and asthma were fairly constant in individuals above 18 years. During one year of observation, more than half of all patients had only been diagnosed in primary health care, with hypertension being the diagnosis with the largest proportion of patients only identified in primary health care (70.6%). Conclusion The prevalence of common diseases in the population can be estimated by combining data gathered

  3. Variations in Aging, Gender, Menopause, and Obesity and Their Effects on Hypertension in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu C.; Lo, Tsai C.; Chang, Jui H.; Kuo, Hsien W.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. We assessed obesity, sex, menopause, and gender differences on hypertension in a Hakka-majority Taiwanese sample. Methods. 9621 subjects aged 20 and over participated in this community-based study. Trained nurses collected blood pressure (BP) measurements and anthropometric indices, including weight, height, hip circumference (HC), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), waist to height ratio (WHtR), and waist to hip ratio (WHR). Results. Levels of systolic and diastolic BP significantly increased at a dose-dependent relationship based on four anthropometric indices (BMI, WC, WHR, and WHtR); the slopes for SBP and DBP differed. After controlling for other covariates using multivariate logistic regression, we found the adjusted odds ratios (OR) of hypertension to be significantly related to the four anthropometric indices. Notably, the effect of obesity on the ORs for hypertension was considerably higher in premenopausal women, but we found no such phenomenon among men. BMI, WC, WHR, and WHtR had significant linear associations with BP. Conclusion. Obesity indices are significantly correlated with the risk of hypertension across gender and age, with BMI having the highest relative potency. The effect of obesity on the risk of hypertension is especially high in premenopausal women, implying a relationship between hormones and hypertension. PMID:25436143

  4. Hypertension management algorithm for type 2 diabetic patients applied in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypertension frequently coexists with type 2 diabetes (DM), and increases the risk of cardiovascular outcomes. The aim of the study was to obtain/maintain blood pressure (BP) goals (ADA/JNC 7) according to a stepwise algorithm using the medication supplied by the Brazilian government. Methods A one-year, single-arm interventional study conducted with type 2 diabetes patients. Intervention consisted of intensification of lifestyle changes and sequential prescription of drugs: diuretic; ACE inhibitors; β-adrenergic blocking agent and calcium channel blocking agent if BP >130/80 mmHg. Results Seventy-eight patients completed the trial. During intervention, the number of antihypertensive tablets rose (3.6 ± 3.5 vs. 5.9 ± 3.5 pills/patient; p <0.001), as the number of antihypertensive classes increased (1.8 ± 1.0 vs. 2.70 ± 1.2; p < 0.01) and the overall drop of BP was 11 mmHg for SBP (145.0 ± 22.8 vs. 133.7 ± 20.9 mmHg; p < 0.01) and 5 mmHg for DBP (78.7 ± 11.5 vs. 73.7 ± 10.5 mmHg; p = 0.001). Although the number of patients with BP in target almost doubled [14 (18.7%) vs. 30 (38.5%) p = 0.008], less than 40% of the patients achieved the proposed goals. Conclusions A BP algorithm applied to type 2 diabetic and hypertensive patients is able to lower BP, however more than half of the patients did not achieve the ADA/JNC 7 targets demonstrating the complexity of BP control in this population. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT06260 PMID:24028306

  5. Rates of Complications and Mortality in Older Diabetes Patients: The Diabetes and Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Elbert S.; Laiteerapong, Neda; Liu, Jennifer Y.; John, Priya M.; Moffet, Howard H.; Karter, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Importance In the coming decades, the population of older adults with diabetes is expected to grow substantially. Understanding the clinical course of diabetes in this population is critical for establishing evidence-based clinical practice recommendations, research priorities, allocating resources, and setting health policies. Objective Contrast rates of diabetes complications and mortality across age and diabetes duration categories. Design, Setting, Participants This cohort study (2004–2010) included 72,310 older (≥60 years of age) patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in a large, integrated healthcare delivery system. Incidence densities (events per 1000 person-years (pys)) were calculated for each age category (60s, 70s, 80+ years) and duration of diabetes (shorter: 0–9 years vs. longer: 10+ years). Main Outcome Measures Incident acute hyperglycemic events, acute hypoglycemic events (hypoglycemia), microvascular complications [end-stage renal disease (ESRD), peripheral vascular disease, lower extremity amputation, advanced eye disease], cardiovascular complications [coronary artery disease (CAD), cerebrovascular disease (CVD), congestive heart failure (CHF)], and all-cause mortality. Results Among older adults with diabetes of short duration, cardiovascular complications followed by hypoglycemia were the most common non-fatal complications. For example, among 70–79 year olds with short duration of diabetes, CAD and hypoglycemia rates were higher (11.5 and 5.0/1000 pys respectively), compared to ESRD (2.6/1000), amputation (1.3/1000), and acute hyperglycemic events (0.8/1000). We observed a similar pattern among subjects in the same age group with long diabetes duration where CAD and hypoglycemia had some of the highest incidence rates (19.0 and 15.9 /1000 pys respectively), compared to ESRD (7.6/1000), amputation (4.3/1000), and acute hyperglycemic events (1.8/1000). For a given age group, rates of each outcome, particularly hypoglycemia and

  6. Effect of exercise on placental blood flow in pregnancies complicated by hypertension, diabetes or intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Rauramo, I; Forss, M

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a standardized exercise test on intervillous placental blood flow were studied in 13 hypertensive, 10 diabetic and 8 cholestatic pregnant women in late pregnancy, and the results were compared with those of a normal control group. Analysis of variance for repeated measures revealed that in all the pathologic groups, placental blood flow was lower than in the controls. In all groups placental blood flow rose slightly 1 min after the cessation of exercise. The diabetics showed a decreased placental blood flow 30 min after the cessation of the exercise test (p less than 0.02). In diabetics, a fall was found in stroke volume, from 63 +/- 12 ml (mean +/- SD) before the exercise to 53 +/- 11 ml 30 min after the cessation of exercise (p less than 0.05), and a rise in peripheral vascular resistance, from 1540 +/- 200 (mean +/- SD) dynes/cm5 before exercise to 1750 +/- 390 dynes/cm5 30 min after the cessation of exercise (p less than 0.05). Pre-eclamptic patients had a higher peripheral vascular resistance than had normal controls. Pre-eclamptic, diabetic and cholestatic patients had lower cardiac index values than the normal subjects. The difference was significant in the pre-eclamptic and diabetic patients at 30 min after the cessation of exercise. Maternal heart rate, and systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures rose significantly from values at rest to values at the end of exercise in all groups. One of the pre-eclamptic patients showed a 74% decline in placental blood flow 1 min after the cessation of exercise coincident with fetal bradycardia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3176908

  7. Diabetes and Age-Related Demographic Differences in Risk Factor Control

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Brent M.; Li, Jiexiang; Wolfman, Tamara E.; Sinopoli, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Background Disparate vascular outcomes in diabetes by race/ethnicity may reflect differential risk factor control, especially pre-Medicare. Methods Assess concurrent target attainment for glycohemoglobin <7%, non-HDL-cholesterol <130 mg/dL, and blood pressure <140/<90 mmHg in white, black, and Hispanic diabetics <65 (younger) and ≥65 (older) years. NHANES 1999–2010 data were analyzed on diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetics ≥18 years. Results Concurrent target attainment was higher in whites (18.7%) than blacks (13.4% [p=0.02] and Hispanics (10.3%, p<0.001) <65 but not ≥65 years (20.0% vs. 15.9% [p=0.13], 19.5% [p=0.88]). Disparities in healthcare insurance among younger whites, blacks, and Hispanics, respectively, (87.4% vs. 81.1% (p<0.01), 68.0% (p<0.001) and infrequent healthcare (0–1 visits/year; 14.3% vs. 15.0% (p=NS), 32.0% (p<0.001) declined with age. Cholesterol treatment predicted concurrent control in both age groups (multivariable odds ratio >2, p<0.001). Risk factor awareness and treatment were lower in Hispanics than whites. When treated, diabetes and hypertension control were greater in whites than blacks or Hispanics. Conclusions Concurrent risk factor control is low in all diabetics and could improve with greater statin use. Insuring younger adults, especially Hispanic, could raise risk factor awareness and treatment. Improving treatment effectiveness in younger black and Hispanic diabetics could promote equitable risk factor control. PMID:24952652

  8. Hospitalizations from Hypertensive Diseases, Diabetes, and Arrhythmia in Relation to Low and High Temperatures: Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Bai, Li; Li, Qiongsi; Wang, Jun; Lavigne, Eric; Gasparrini, Antonio; Copes, Ray; Yagouti, Abderrahmane; Burnett, Richard T; Goldberg, Mark S; Villeneuve, Paul J; Cakmak, Sabit; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which ambient temperatures contribute to the burden of hospitalizations from hypertensive diseases, diabetes, and arrhythmia. To fill this knowledge gap, we conducted a time-series study comprising entire population of Ontario, Canada during 1996-2013. A distributed lag non-linear model was developed to estimate the cumulative effect of temperatures over a 21-day lag period. We computed the burden of hospitalizations attributable to cold and heat. Furthermore, we separated the burden into components related to mild and extreme temperatures. Compared to the temperature with minimum risk of morbidity, cold temperatures (1(st) percentile) were associated with a 37% (95% confidence interval: 5%, 78%) increase in hypertension-related hospitalizations whereas no significant association with hot temperatures (99(th) percentile) was observed. Cold and hot temperatures were also associated with a 12% (1%, 24%) and a 30% (6%, 58%) increase in diabetes-related hospitalizations, respectively. Arrhythmia was not linked to temperatures. These estimates translate into ~10% of hypertension-related hospitalizations attributable to total cold, and ~9% from mild cold. Similarly, ~11% of diabetes-related hospitalizations were due to total heat, virtually all of which were from mild heat. In conclusion, ambient temperatures, especially in moderate ranges, contribute to excess hospitalizations from hypertension and diabetes. PMID:27456033

  9. Hospitalizations from Hypertensive Diseases, Diabetes, and Arrhythmia in Relation to Low and High Temperatures: Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li; Li, Qiongsi; Wang, Jun; Lavigne, Eric; Gasparrini, Antonio; Copes, Ray; Yagouti, Abderrahmane; Burnett, Richard T.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Villeneuve, Paul J.; Cakmak, Sabit; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which ambient temperatures contribute to the burden of hospitalizations from hypertensive diseases, diabetes, and arrhythmia. To fill this knowledge gap, we conducted a time-series study comprising entire population of Ontario, Canada during 1996–2013. A distributed lag non-linear model was developed to estimate the cumulative effect of temperatures over a 21-day lag period. We computed the burden of hospitalizations attributable to cold and heat. Furthermore, we separated the burden into components related to mild and extreme temperatures. Compared to the temperature with minimum risk of morbidity, cold temperatures (1st percentile) were associated with a 37% (95% confidence interval: 5%, 78%) increase in hypertension-related hospitalizations whereas no significant association with hot temperatures (99th percentile) was observed. Cold and hot temperatures were also associated with a 12% (1%, 24%) and a 30% (6%, 58%) increase in diabetes-related hospitalizations, respectively. Arrhythmia was not linked to temperatures. These estimates translate into ~10% of hypertension-related hospitalizations attributable to total cold, and ~9% from mild cold. Similarly, ~11% of diabetes-related hospitalizations were due to total heat, virtually all of which were from mild heat. In conclusion, ambient temperatures, especially in moderate ranges, contribute to excess hospitalizations from hypertension and diabetes. PMID:27456033

  10. [Blood pressure control in eldery hypertension].

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Kazuaki

    2006-01-01

    Case of diabetes mellitus associated with essential hypertension are mostly type 2 diabetes mellitus(NIDDM) in elderly patients. In the JNC VI and JSH 2004, it is recommended that the therapeutic target blood pressure level should be lower then 130/80 mmHg in hypertension complicated with diabetes mellitus, and this target has recently obtained wide acceptance. On the other hand, the target blood pressure in elderly is recommended below 140/90 mmHg. Accordingly, diabetes mellitus in elderly hypertensives should be treated similarly as in the young and middle-aged. Because ACE inhibitors/ARBs or Ca blockers increase insulin sensitivity, these drugs should be used as the first choice in cases of elderly hypertensive patients complicated with diabetes mellitus. PMID:16408451

  11. Obesity and Cognitive Dysfunction in Heart Failure: The Role of Hypertension, Type 2 Diabetes, and Physical Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is common in heart failure (HF). Obesity is a known risk factor for cognitive dysfunction in HF, though the mechanisms remain unclear. Obesity increases risk for conditions like hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), as well as poor fitness levels and this may serve as one possible pathway accounting for association between obesity and cognitive dysfunction. Aims We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to test whether the combination of hypertension, T2DM, and reduced fitness mediate the association between obesity and cognitive dysfunction. Methods 200 HF patients completed neuropsychological testing and a physical fitness assessment. Hypertension and T2DM were ascertained via self-report and medical records. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Results 43% of the sample was obese. Hypertension (70%) and T2DM (36%) were common, and fitness levels were reduced. The SEM model with these factors as mediators between BMI and cognitive function demonstrated excellent fit (CFI = 0.98; RMSEA = .03). Higher BMI correlated with hypertension, T2DM, and poorer fitness. Each of these factors predicted worse cognition. Models that isolated medical comorbidities and physical fitness as the mediator were weaker than the full model. Conclusions Increased risk for medical comorbidities and reduced fitness levels helped to explain the negative effects of obesity on cognitive dysfunction in HF. Prospective studies should confirm this pattern and examine weight loss benefits cognitive function in HF. Keywords: Physical fitness; cognitive function; heart failure; obesity; hypertension; type 2 diabetes mellitus PMID:24829294

  12. Synergistic effect of hypertension with diabetes mellitus and gender on severity of coronary atherosclerosis: Findings from Tehran Heart Center registry

    PubMed Central

    Masoudkabir, Farzad; Poorhosseini, Hamidreza; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ali; Hakki, Elham; Roayaei, Pegah; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We performed this study to evaluate the possible synergism between hypertension and other conventional risk factors of coronary artery disease (CAD) on an angiographic severity of coronary atherosclerosis. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on 10502 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography in the cardiac catheterization laboratory of Tehran Heart Center Hospital (Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran), and their conventional risk factors including male gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), dyslipidemia, smoking, and family history of premature CAD were recorded. The severity of coronary atherosclerosis evaluated by calculation of Gensini’s score. RESULTS All aforementioned conventional risk factors of CAD were independently associated with severity of CAD. Multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that hypertension had synergistic effect with male gender [Excess Gensini’s score: 5.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.72-9.15, P < 0.001] and also with DM (Excess Gensini’s score: 3.99, 95% CI: 0.30-7.69, P = 0.034) on severity of CAD. No interaction was observed between hypertension and smoking, dyslipidemia and also with a family history of CAD. CONCLUSION Hypertension has a synergistic effect with DM and male gender on the severity of CAD. These findings imply that more effective screening and treatment strategies should be considered for early diagnosis and tight control of hypertension in male and diabetic people for prevention of advanced CAD. PMID:26862339

  13. Improvement of diabetes, obesity and hypertension in type 2 diabetic KKA{sup y} mice by bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yoshida, Jiro; Kodera, Yukihiro . E-mail: kodera_y@wakunaga.co.jp; Katoh, Akira . E-mail: katoh@st.seikei.ac.jp; Takada, Jitsuya . E-mail: takada@hl.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Hiromu . E-mail: sakurai@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp

    2006-07-07

    Previously, we found that bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) (VO(alx){sub 2}) exhibits a potent hypoglycemic activity in type 1-like diabetic mice. Since the enhancement of insulin sensitivity is involved in one of the mechanisms by which vanadium exerts its anti-diabetic effects, VO(alx){sub 2} was further tested in type 2 diabetes with low insulin sensitivity. The effect of oral administration of VO(alx){sub 2} was examined in obesity-linked type 2 diabetic KKA{sup y} mice. Treatment of VO(alx){sub 2} for 4 weeks normalized hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension in KKA{sup y} mice; however, it had no effect on hypoadiponectinemia. VO(alx){sub 2} also improved hyperleptinemia, following attenuation of obesity in KKA{sup y} mice. This is the first example in which a vanadium compound improved leptin resistance in type 2 diabetes by oral administration. On the basis of these results, VO(alx){sub 2} is proposed to enhance not only insulin sensitivity but also leptin sensitivity, which in turn improves diabetes, obesity and hypertension in an obesity-linked type 2 diabetic animal.

  14. Saga of renin-angiotensin system and calcium channels in hypertensive diabetics: does it have a therapeutic edge?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun H S; Ramarao, P

    2005-01-01

    Current understanding of the genesis of diabetic vascular disease suggests that vascular complications, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, are associated with changes in structural and functional parameters. Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays an important role in the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications. Most of the negative cardiovascular actions of angiotensin II are mediated through AT1 receptors, whereas the AT2 receptors mediate largely beneficial effects. Hence, compared to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), selective AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) should provide additional end organ protection via AT2 receptors activation. Although ACEIs are useful therapeutically, they are being currently displaced by ARBs. Enhanced calcium ion channel activity is reported in vascular smooth muscles from diabetic animal models. Clinical benefits of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) in diabetic hypertensive patients are controversial, but there is increasing experimental evidence for the beneficial effects of dihydropyridine-type CCBs. Although the treatment of hypertension in diabetics reduces cardiovascular and microvascular complications, the ideal strategy for treating hypertension in diabetics has not been well defined and warrants a combination approach. Only limited clinical data regarding the use of ARBs in combination with CCBs in diabetics are available. The experimental data suggest that combination of a CCB and an AT1 receptor blocker, or a hypothetical dual blocker of AT1 receptors as well as of calcium channels would be an ideal regimen. There is, however, no conclusive clinical evidence to support the combined use of these drugs. This review highlights the available experimental data that support the therapeutic benefits of this combination. PMID:16007228

  15. Pharmacologic management of types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus and their complications in women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Mimi S; Coppenrath, Valerie A; Dallinga, Bree A

    2015-02-01

    The numbers of women of childbearing age with pregestational diabetes mellitus (diabetes existing before pregnancy) are increasing, primarily because more patients are developing type 2 diabetes at younger ages. The teratogenicity associated with hyperglycemia in early pregnancy is well documented, and tight glucose control minimizes the risk of congenital malformation. Preconception planning is essential; thus contraception that does not worsen complications of diabetes is desirable. In addition, because contraceptives are not 100% effective, the treatment of elevated blood glucose levels, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in these women requires consideration of unplanned pregnancy. We summarized the literature to aid clinicians in choosing individualized treatment that minimizes risk in case pregnancy occurs and maximizes benefit in preventing the complications of diabetes. In women with well-controlled diabetes without vascular disease, all contraceptive methods are safe. Intrauterine devices are recommended due to their minimal effects on risk factors for diabetic complications and their lack of reliance on patient adherence for efficacy. Among insulins, the insulin analogs-insulin lispro, insulin aspart, and insulin detemir-offer patients greater convenience than regular insulin and NPH insulin, and they are safe in case of unplanned pregnancy. Of the noninsulin agents, glyburide and metformin are the safest during pregnancy, but many of the other agents pose minimal risk as long as they are withdrawn during early pregnancy. The risks and benefits of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in women with compelling indications must be weighed individually. In hypertensive patients at a high risk for unplanned pregnancy, nifedipine should be considered due to literature supporting its safety during early pregnancy. Pravastatin is recommended for women with dyslipidemia who are using effective contraception because there have been no reports of birth defects with

  16. Diabetes and Hypertension Quality Measurement in Four Safety-Net Sites

    PubMed Central

    Benkert, R.; Dennehy, P.; White, J.; Hamilton, A.; Tanner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In this new era after the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, the literature on lessons learned with electronic health record (EHR) implementation needs to be revisited. Objectives Our objective was to describe what implementation of a commercially available EHR with built-in quality query algorithms showed us about our care for diabetes and hypertension populations in four safety net clinics, specifically feasibility of data retrieval, measurements over time, quality of data, and how our teams used this data. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2008 to October 2012 in four safety-net clinics located in the Midwest and Western United States. A data warehouse that stores data from across the U.S was utilized for data extraction from patients with diabetes or hypertension diagnoses and at least two office visits per year. Standard quality measures were collected over a period of two to four years. All sites were engaged in a partnership model with the IT staff and a shared learning process to enhance the use of the quality metrics. Results While use of the algorithms was feasible across sites, challenges occurred when attempting to use the query results for research purposes. There was wide variation of both process and outcome results by individual centers. Composite calculations balanced out the differences seen in the individual measures. Despite using consistent quality definitions, the differences across centers had an impact on numerators and denominators. All sites agreed to a partnership model of EHR implementation, and each center utilized the available resources of the partnership for Center-specific quality initiatives. Conclusions Utilizing a shared EHR, a Regional Extension Center-like partnership model, and similar quality query algorithms allowed safety-net clinics to benchmark and improve the quality of care across differing patient populations and health care

  17. Effects of dapagliflozin on blood pressure in hypertensive diabetic patients on renin-angiotensin system blockade.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael A; Mansfield, Traci A; Alessi, Federica; Iqbal, Nayyar; Parikh, Shamik; Ptaszynska, Agata

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Dapagliflozin improves glycemic control and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in T2DM patients. This double-blind phase III study evaluated the effects of dapagliflozin on glycemic control and blood pressure in patients with inadequately controlled T2DM and hypertension, despite ongoing therapy with a renin-angiotensin system blocker. Patients were randomized to receive dapagliflozin 10 mg (n = 302) or placebo (n = 311) once daily for 12 weeks. Endpoints were change from baseline to week 12 in seated SBP and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c); longitudinal repeated-measures analysis was performed. Additional endpoints included other hemodynamic measures, serum uric acid, fasting plasma glucose, body weight, blood lipids and heart rate. After 12 weeks, dapagliflozin-treated versus placebo-treated patients showed significant reductions in HbA1c (-0.6% vs -0.1%, p < 0.0001), mean seated SBP (-10.4 vs -7.3 mmHg, p = 0.0010) and mean 24 h ambulatory SBP (-9.6 vs -6.7 mmHg, p = 0.0043). Dapagliflozin also reduced body weight compared with placebo (-1.0 vs -0.3 kg). Dapagliflozin was well tolerated, with adverse events consistent with previous studies. Dapagliflozin improved glycemic control, and reduced SBP as well as body weight in patients with poorly controlled T2DM and hypertension. PMID:26623980

  18. Associations of Undergoing a Routine Medical Examination or Not with Prevalence Rates of Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lingling; Tian, Danping; Li, Li; Deng, Xin; Deng, Jing; Ning, Peishan; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Undergoing a routine medical examination may be associated with the prevalence rate of chronic diseases from a population-based household interview survey. However, this important issue has not been examined so far. Methods: Data came from the first health service household interview of Hunan province, China, in 2013. A Rao–Scott chi-square test was performed to examine the difference in prevalence rates between subgroups. Adjusted odds ratio (OR) was calculated using the PROC SURVEYLOGISTIC procedure of SAS9.1 statistical software. Results: In total, 24,282 residents of 8400 households were surveyed. A higher proportion of elderly adults had undergone a medical examination within the prior 12 months compared with young adults (≥65 years, 60%; 45–64 years, 46%; 18–44 years, 37%). After controlling for location, sex, and household income per capita, undergoing a medical examination was significantly associated with high prevalence rates of hypertension (adjusted OR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.1–3.5) and of diabetes mellitus (adjusted OR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.7–6.5) for young adults aged 18–44 years. The associations were not statistically significant for age groups 45–64 years and 65 years or older. Conclusion: The prevalence rates of hypertension and diabetes mellitus may be seriously underestimated for young adults not undergoing a routine medical examination in a health household interview survey. PMID:27347985

  19. Effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Katada, J; Daida, H; Kitamura, F; Yokoyama, K

    2016-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control is important to ameliorate cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, achieving the target BP with a single drug is often difficult. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antihypertensive effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) as add-on therapy to renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitor(s) in patients with hypertension and DM. Studies were searched through October 2014 in MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Randomized, controlled trials or prospective, observational studies regarding concomitant administration of MRA and RAS inhibitor(s) in patients with DM were included. Articles were excluded if the mean systolic BP (SBP) was <130 mm Hg before randomization for interventional studies or at baseline for prospective cohort studies. We identified nine eligible studies (486 patients): five randomized placebo-controlled trials; three randomized active drug-controlled trials; and one single-arm observational study. The mean differences in office SBP and diastolic BP (DBP) between the MRA and placebo groups were -9.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) -12.9 to -5.9) and -3.8 (95% CI, -5.5 to -2.2) mm Hg, respectively. Subgroup analysis results for study type, age, baseline office SBP and follow-up duration were similar to those of the main analysis. MRA mildly increased serum potassium (0.4 mEq l(-1); 95% CI, 0.3-0.5 mEq l(-1)). A consistent reduction of albuminuria across these studies was also demonstrated. MRA further reduced SBP and DBP in patients with hypertension and DM already taking RAS inhibitors. Serum potassium levels should be monitored to prevent hyperkalemia. PMID:26674759

  20. Effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, S; Katada, J; Daida, H; Kitamura, F; Yokoyama, K

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control is important to ameliorate cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, achieving the target BP with a single drug is often difficult. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antihypertensive effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) as add-on therapy to renin–angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitor(s) in patients with hypertension and DM. Studies were searched through October 2014 in MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Randomized, controlled trials or prospective, observational studies regarding concomitant administration of MRA and RAS inhibitor(s) in patients with DM were included. Articles were excluded if the mean systolic BP (SBP) was <130 mm Hg before randomization for interventional studies or at baseline for prospective cohort studies. We identified nine eligible studies (486 patients): five randomized placebo-controlled trials; three randomized active drug-controlled trials; and one single-arm observational study. The mean differences in office SBP and diastolic BP (DBP) between the MRA and placebo groups were −9.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) −12.9 to −5.9) and −3.8 (95% CI, −5.5 to −2.2) mm Hg, respectively. Subgroup analysis results for study type, age, baseline office SBP and follow-up duration were similar to those of the main analysis. MRA mildly increased serum potassium (0.4 mEq l−1; 95% CI, 0.3–0.5 mEq l−1). A consistent reduction of albuminuria across these studies was also demonstrated. MRA further reduced SBP and DBP in patients with hypertension and DM already taking RAS inhibitors. Serum potassium levels should be monitored to prevent hyperkalemia. PMID:26674759

  1. Evidence insufficient to confirm the value of population screening for diabetes and hypertension in low- and-middle-income settings.

    PubMed

    Durão, Solange; Ajumobi, Oluwayemisi; Kredo, Tamara; Naude, Celeste; Levitt, Naomi S; Steyn, Krisela; Bradshaw, Debbie; Young, Taryn

    2015-02-01

    To assess the evidence from systematic reviews on the effect on morbidity and mortality of blanket screening for hypertension or diabetes mellitus compared with targeted, opportunistic or no screening, we searched for relevant systematic reviews and conducted duplicate study selection, data extraction and quality appraisal. Results were summarised narratively. We included two completed reviews of moderate quality and one ongoing Cochrane review. In one completed review, general health checks had no effect on total morbidity or mortality or on healthcare services compared with no health checks. In the other, intensive hypertension screening methods were ineffective in increasing screening uptake or detecting new cases compared with less intensive methods. Both reviews included studies in high-income settings. There is insufficient evidence from currently available systematic reviews to confirm a beneficial effect of blanket screening for hypertension and/or diabetes compared with other types of screening methods in low- and middle-income settings. Scarce resources are being mobilised to implement mass screening intervention for diabetes and hypertension without adequate evidence of its effects. A systematic review is needed to assess clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and overall impact on the health system of screening strategies, especially in low- and middle-income settings such as exist in South Africa. Robust evaluation of these outcomes would then be necessary to inform secondary prevention strategies. PMID:26242524

  2. Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in the older population: results from the multiple national studies on ageing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Qian, Dongfu; Hu, Dan

    2016-02-01

    The international comparisons that provided useful epidemiologic information of hypertension in the elderly people is still sparse; we aim to provide the latest international estimates on the burden of hypertension. These sampling methods of the selection of surveys mainly used multistage population registry; this cross-national study of 63,014 adults aged ≥50 years was from in four high-income countries, four upper-middle-income countries (UMICs), and three low-middle-income countries (LMICs). Overall, the age-standardized prevalence of hypertension among the adult population aged ≥50 years was 53.2% (51.9% of men and 54.3% of women). The high-income countries and UMICs had more or less twice the prevalence of hypertension compare with LMICs. The rates of awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension were 55.6%, 44.1%, and 17.1%, respectively, and awareness and control of hypertension were lowest in UMICs and treatment of hypertension was lowest in LMICs. Among this multiple national study population, hypertension was very common among elderly population. Even more worrisome is that the rates of awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension were relatively low in UMICs and IMICs. These results indicate that improving the ability to control and prevention of hypertension in resource-limited settings is needed. PMID:26778770

  3. The role of AGEs and AGE inhibitors in diabetic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M C; Baynes, J W; Thorpe, S R; Cooper, M E

    2005-06-01

    Prolonged hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and oxidative stress in diabetes result in the production and accumulation of AGEs. It is now clear that AGEs contribute to the development and progression of cardiovascular disease in diabetes, as well as other complications. AGEs are thought to act through receptor-independent and dependent mechanisms to promote vascular damage, fibrosis and inflammation associated with accelerated atherogenesis. As a result, novel therapeutic agents to reduce the accumulation of AGEs in diabetes have gained interest as potential cardioprotective approaches. A variety of agents have been developed which are examined in detail in this review. These include aminoguanidine, ALT-946, pyridoxamine, benfotiamine, OPB-9195, alagebrium chloride, N-phenacylthiazolium bromide and LR-90. In addition, it has been demonstrated that a number of established therapies have the ability to reduce the accumulation of AGEs in diabetes including ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists, metformin, peroxisome proliferators receptor agonists, metal chelators and some antioxidants. The fact that many of these inhibitors of AGEs are effective in experimental models, despite their disparate mechanisms of action, supports the keystone role of AGEs in diabetic vascular damage. Nonetheless, the clinical utility of AGE inhibition remains to be firmly established. Optimal metabolic and blood pressure control, that is achieved early and sustained indefinitely, remains the best recourse for inhibition of AGEs until more specific interventions become a clinical reality. PMID:16026265

  4. Role of digitalis-like substance in the hypertension of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and simulated weightlessness in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamnani, M. B.; Chen, S.; Haddy, F. J.; Yuan, C.; Mo, Z.

    1998-01-01

    We have examined the role of plasma Na+-K+ pump inhibitor (SPI) in the hypertension of streptozotocin induced insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM) in reduced renal mass rats. The increase in blood pressure (BP) was associated with an increase in extracellular fluid volume (ECFV), and SPI and a decrease in myocardial Na+,K+ATPase (NKA) activity, suggesting that increased SPI, which inhibits cardiovascular muscle (CVM) cell NKA activity, may be involved in the mechanism of IDDM-hypertension. In a second study, using prolonged suspension resulted in a decrease in cardiac NKA activity, suggesting that cardiovascular deconditioning following space flight might in part result from insufficient SPI.

  5. [Latin American consensus on hypertension in patients with diabetes type 2 and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Sánchez, Ramiro A; Diaz, Margarita; Cobos, Leonardo; Bryce, Alfonso; Parra-Carrillo, Jose Z; Lizcano, Fernando; Lanas, Fernando; Sinay, Isaac; Sierra, Iván D; Peñaherrera, Ernesto; Bendersky, Mario; Schmid, Helena; Botero, Rodrigo; Urina, Manuel; Lara, Joffre; Foss, Milton C; Márquez, Gustavo; Harrap, Stephen; Ramírez, Agustín J; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    The present document has been prepared by a group of experts, members of cardiology, endocrinology, internal medicine, nephrology and diabetes societies of Latin American countries, to serve as a guide to physicians taking care of patients with diabetes, hypertension and comorbidities or complications of both conditions. Although the concept of metabolic syndrome is currently disputed, the higher prevalence in Latin America of that cluster of metabolic alterations has suggested that metabolic syndrome is a useful nosography entity in the context of Latin American medicine. Therefore, in the present document, particular attention is paid to this syndrome in order to alert physicians on a particular high-risk population, usually underestimated and undertreated. These recommendations result from presentations and debates by discussion panels during a 2-day conference held in Bucaramanga, in October 2012, and all the participants have approved the final conclusions. The authors acknowledge that the publication and diffusion of guidelines do not suffice to achieve the recommended changes in diagnostic or therapeutic strategies, and plan suitable interventions overcoming knowledge, attitude and behavioural barriers, preventing both physicians and patients from effectively adhering to guideline recommendations. PMID:24863082

  6. [Latin American consensus on hypertension in patients with diabetes type 2 and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Sánchez, Ramiro A; Díaz, Margarita; Cobos, Leonardo; Bryce, Alfonso; Parra-Carrillo, José Z; Lizcano, Fernando; Lanas, Fernando; Sinay, Isaac; Sierra, Iván D; Peñaherrera, Ernesto; Benderky, Mario; Schmid, Helena; Botero, Rodrigo; Urina, Manuel; Lara, Joffre; Foos, Milton C; Márquez, Gustavo; Harrap, Stephen; Ramírez, Agustín J; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The present document has been prepared by a group of experts, members of Cardiology, Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, Nephrology and Diabetes societies of Latin American countries, to serve as a guide to physicians taking care of patients with diabetes, hypertension and comorbidities or complications of both conditions. Although the concept of metabolic syndrome is currently disputed, the higher prevalence in Latin America of that cluster of metabolic alterations has suggested that metabolic syndrome is useful nosography entity in the context of Latin American medicine. Therefore, in the present document, particular attention is paid to this syndrome in order to alert physicians on a particular high- risk population, usually underestimated and undertreated. These recommendations results from presentation and debates by discussion panels during a 2-day conference held in Bucaramanga, in October 2012, and all the participants have approved the final conclusions. The authors acknowledge that the publication and diffusion of guidelines do not suffice to achieve the recommended changes in diagnostic or therapeutic strategies, and plan suitable interventions overcoming both physicians and patients from effectively adhering to guideline recommendations. PMID:24365579

  7. High-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate improves blood pressure in patients with diabetes and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Ali; Khalili, Mohammad; Haghighat, Neda; Eghtesadi, Shahryar; Shidfar, Farzad; Heidari, Iraj; Ebrahimpour-Koujan, Soraiya; Eghtesadi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to examine the effects of high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate on lipid profiles, weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, and inflammation in individuals with Type 2 diabetes and hypertension. METHODS Sixty individuals [32 in dark chocolate group (DCG) and 28 in white chocolate group (WCG)] with Type 2 diabetes on stable medication were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study. Subjects were randomized to consume 25 g DCG or WCG for 8 weeks. Changes in weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, lipid profile, and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured at the beginning and end of the intervention. This clinical trial was registered at the Iranian registry of clinical trials. RESULTS In DCC group, compared with baseline, serum levels of Apo A-1 (P = 0.045) was increased and fasting blood sugar (FBS) (P = 0.027), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (P = 0.025), Apo B (P = 0.012) and Log of hsCRP (P = 0.043) levels were decreased at the end of study. No changes were seen within the WCG in studied parameters. High polyphenol chocolate consumption compared to white chocolate resulted in significant decrease in of systolic (−5.93 ± 6.25 vs. −1.07 ± 7.97 mmHg, P = 0.004) and diastolic blood pressure (−6.4 ± 6.25 vs. 0.17 ± 7.9 mmHg, P = 0.002), FBS (−7.84 ± 19.15 vs. 4.00 ± 20.58 mg/dl, P = 0.019) over the course of 8 weeks of daily chocolate consumption neither weight nor body mass index and TG levels altered from baseline. CONCLUSION High polyphenol chocolate is effective in improving TG levels in hypertensive patients with diabetes and decreasing blood pressure and FBS without affecting weight, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance or glycemic control. PMID:26089927

  8. 2D-1H proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study on brain metabolite alterations in patients with diabetic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Ye, Bi-Di; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Zhong-Xian; Liu, Yan-Yan; Wu, Ren-Hua; Geng, Kuan; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible metabolic alterations in the frontal cortex and parietal white matter in patients with diabetic hypertension (DHT) using proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging. A total of 33 DHT patients and 30 healthy control subjects aged between 45 and 75 were included in the present study. All subjects were right‑handed. The spectroscopy data were collected using a GE Healthcare 1.5T MR scanner. The multi‑voxels were located in the semioval center (repetition time/echo time=1,500 ms/35 ms). The area of interest was 8x10x2 cm in volume and contained the two sides of the frontal cortex and the parietal white matter. The spectra data were processed using SAGE software. The ratios of brain metabolite concentrations, particularly for N‑acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) and Choline (Cho)/Cr were calculated and analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0. The NAA/Cr ratio of the bilateral prefrontal cortex of the DHT group was significantly lower than that of the control group (left t=‑7.854, P=0.000 and right t=‑5.787, P=0.000), The Cho/Cr ratio was also much lower than the control group (left t=2.422, P=0.024 and right t=2.920, P=0.007). NAA/Cr ratio of the left parietal white matter of the DHT group was extremely lower than that of the control group (t=‑4.199, P=0.000). Therefore, DHT may result in metabolic disorders in the frontal cortex and parietal white matter but the metabolic alterations are different in various regions of the brain. The alteration in cerebral metabolism is associated with diabetes and hypertension. The ratios of NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr are potential metabolic markers for the brain damage induced by DHT. PMID:25652580

  9. Age and hypertension strongly induce aortic stiffening in rats at basal and matched blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Lindesay, George; Ragonnet, Christophe; Chimenti, Stefano; Villeneuve, Nicole; Vayssettes-Courchay, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Age and hypertension are major causes of large artery remodeling and stiffening, a cardiovascular risk factor for heart and kidney damage. The aged spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model is recognized for human cardiovascular pathology, but discrepancies appeared in studies of arterial stiffness. We performed experiments using a robust analysis via echo tracking in 20-week adult (n = 8) and 80-week-old SHR (n = 7), with age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY, n = 6;6) at basal and matched levels of blood pressure (BP). After anesthesia with pentobarbital, abdominal aortic diameter and pressure were recorded and BP was decreased by clonidine i.v. At basal BP, aortic pulse distension, compliance, and distensibility (AD) were reduced and stiffness index increased with age and hypertension and further altered with age + hypertension. When BP was adjusted in SHR to that of normotensive rats (130 mmHg), there was no difference between 20-week-old SHR and WKY Importantly, the age effect was maintained in both WKY and SHR and accentuated by hypertension in old rats. At 130 mmHg, with similar pulse pressure in the four groups, AD (kPa(-3)) = 24.2 ± 1 in 20 weeks WKY, 19.7 ± 1.4 in 20 weeks SHR, 12.4 ± 1.3 in 80 weeks WKY and 6.6 ± 0.6 in 80 weeks SHR; distension = 7.6 ± 0.4%, 6.7 ± 0.6%, 3.7 ± 0.3%, and 1.8 ± 0.2% in the same groups. In conclusion, reduced distensibility, that is, stiffening due to age is clearly shown here in both WKY and SHR as well as a synergistic effect of age and hypertension. This technique will allow new studies on the mechanisms responsible and drug intervention. PMID:27233301

  10. Can the Treatment of Hypertension in the Middle-Aged Prevent Dementia in the Elderly?

    PubMed

    Coca, Antonio; Monteagudo, Eila; Doménech, Mónica; Camafort, Miguel; Sierra, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension, one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease, is thought to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment. Studies have associated hypertension with subjective cognitive failures and objective cognitive decline. Subjective cognitive failures may reflect the early phase of a long pathological process leading to cognitive decline and dementia that has been associated with hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors. The underlying cerebral structural change associated with cognitive decline may be a consequence of the cerebral small-vessel disease induced by high blood pressure and may be detected on magnetic resonance imaging as white matter hyperintensities, cerebral microbleeds, lacunar infarcts or enlarged perivascular spaces. The increasing interest in the relationship between hypertension and cognitive decline is based on the fact that blood pressure control in middle-aged subjects may delay or stop the progression of cognitive decline and reduce the risk of dementia in the elderly. Although more evidence is required, several studies on hypertension have shown a beneficial effect on the incidence of dementia. PMID:27075454

  11. Healthful Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Hypertension Among Women With a History of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Zhu, Yeyi; Chavarro, Jorge E; Bao, Wei; Tobias, Deirdre K; Ley, Sylvia H; Forman, John P; Liu, Aiyi; Mills, James; Bowers, Katherine; Strøm, Marin; Hansen, Susanne; Hu, Frank B; Zhang, Cuilin

    2016-06-01

    Women who developed gestational diabetes mellitus represent a high-risk population for hypertension later in life. The role of diet in the progression of hypertension among this susceptible population is unknown. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 3818 women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus in the Nurses' Health Study II as part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women's Health Study. These women were followed-up from 1989 to 2011. Incident hypertension was identified through self-administered questionnaires that were validated previously by medical record review. Adherence scores for the alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010, the alternative Mediterranean diet, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension were computed for each participant. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the associations between dietary scores and hypertension while adjusting for major risk factors for hypertension. We documented 1069 incident hypertension cases during a median of 18.5 years of follow-up. After adjustment for major risk factors for hypertension, including body mass index, alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010, alternative Mediterranean diet, and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension scores were significantly inversely associated with the risk of hypertension; hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval comparing the extreme quartiles (highest versus lowest) were 0.76 (0.61-0.94; P for linear trend =0.03) for AHEI score, 0.72 (0.58-0.90; P for trend =0.01) for Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension score, and 0.70 (0.56-0.88; P for trend =0.002) for alternative Mediterranean diet score. Adherence to a healthful dietary pattern was related to a lower subsequent risk of developing hypertension among women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:27091899

  12. Hypertension and diabetes-related morbidity and mortality trends in a municipality in the countryside of São Paulo1

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Andreia Francesli Negri; Lima, Juliana Cristina; Beccaria, Lucia Marinilza; Ribeiro, Rita de Cassia Helú Mendonça; Ribeiro, Daniele Favaro; Cesarino, Claudia Bernardi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to identify the main causes for hospital admissions and deaths related to systemic arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM), and to analyze morbidity and mortality trends, in a municipality in São Paulo's countryside, by comparing two three-years periods, 2002 to 2004 and 2010 to 2012. Methods: cross-sectional study which used secondary data regarding deaths from the Information System on Mortality and concerning hospital admissions from the DataSus Hospital Information System. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted. Results: from 2002 to 2012, 325,439 people were admitted to hospitals, 14.7% of them due to circulatory system diseases (CSD) and 0.7% due to DM. The deaths distributed as the following: 29,027 deaths (31.5%) were due to CSD; 8.06% due to cerebrovascular diseases (CVD); and 2.75% due to DM. There was a significant association between admittance and death causes and patients' gender and age in the three-year periods (p<0.001). The highest lethality in hospital admissions was found to be due to CVD (10%). That trend showed that mortality rates dropped, younger patients were admitted due to DM, and older patients were admitted due to CVD - they were more often females. Conclusion: the main causes for hospital admissions were the CSDs; main mortality causes were the CVDs in hypertensive and diabetic women. Those findings can back public policies which prioritize the promotion of health. PMID:26626008

  13. Exercise Blood Pressure and the Risk for Future Hypertension Among Normotensive Middle‐Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Assaf; Grossman, Ehud; Katz, Moshe; Kivity, Shaye; Klempfner, Robert; Segev, Shlomo; Goldenberg, Ilan; Sidi, Yehezkel; Maor, Elad

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to examine whether exercise blood pressure can be used to predict the development of hypertension in normotensive middle‐aged adults. Methods and Results We investigated 7082 normotensive subjects who were annually screened in a tertiary medical center and completed maximal treadmill exercise tests at each visit. After the initial 3 years, subjects were divided into approximate quartiles according to their average exercise systolic and diastolic blood pressure responses (≤158; 158 to 170; 170 to 183; ≥183 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and ≤73; 73 to 77; 77 to 82; ≥82 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure). Mean age of the study population was 48±9 years and 73% were men. Average baseline resting blood pressure was 120/77±12/7 mm Hg. During a follow‐up of 5±3 years, 1036 (14.6%) subjects developed hypertension. The cumulative probability of new‐onset hypertension at 5 years was significantly increased with increasing quartiles of exercise systolic blood pressure (5%, 9%, 17%, and 35%, respectively; P<0.001), with a similar association shown for diastolic blood pressure. After adjustment for baseline resting blood pressure and clinical parameters, each 5‐mm Hg increments in exercise either systolic or diastolic blood pressures were independently associated with respective 11% (P<0.001) and 30% (P<0.001) increased risk for the development of hypertension. Conclusions In normotensive middle‐aged individuals, blood pressure response to exercise is associated with future development of hypertension. PMID:25904593

  14. Correlative studies on the effects of obesity, diabetes and hypertension on gene expression in omental adipose tissue of obese women

    PubMed Central

    Fain, J N

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A major consequence of obesity is the enormous expansion of and enhanced inflammatory response seen in visceral adipose tissue. I hypothesized that the expression of inflammatory markers in visceral omental fat would correlate with the extent of visceral adiposity as measured by waist circumference or body mass index and that diabetes and hypertension, defined as subjects taking anti-hypertensive drugs, would be associated with changes in mRNA expression in visceral fat. Design and methods: The expression of 106 mRNAs by RT-PCR was examined in observational studies using extracts of omental fat of obese women undergoing bariatric surgery as well as the circulating levels of some adipokines. We also compared the mRNA levels of 65 proteins in omental fat removed during gastric bypass surgery of women with and without hypertension and those with type 2 diabetes. Results: Out of 106 mRNAs the expression of 10 mRNAs in omental fat of women not taking anti-hypertensive drugs correlated with waist circumference while 7 different mRNAs had significant correlations with circulating glucose. The correlations of waist circumference with mRNA expression were abolished, except for interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), in women taking anti-hypertensive drugs. The correlations of blood glucose with omental fat mRNA expression were abolished, except for that of Akt1 and Akt2, in women taking anti-hypertensive drugs. However, the expression of 4 different mRNAs in omental fat was affected by circulating glucose in subjects taking anti-hypertensive drugs. The circulating levels of IL-1 RA, but not fatty acid binding protein 4, adipsin and phospholipase A2, correlated with both waist circumference and mRNA expression in omental fat. Conclusion: In female bariatric surgery patients, the mRNA expression of some proteins in omental fat was affected by the degree of obesity, whereas hypertension and diabetes affected a separate set of mRNAs. PMID:23154658

  15. Role of haem oxygenase in the renoprotective effects of soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition in diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Elmarakby, Ahmed A; Faulkner, Jessica; Pye, Chelsey; Rouch, Katelyn; Alhashim, Abdulmohsin; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Baban, Babak

    2013-10-01

    We have shown previously that inhibition of sEH (soluble epoxide hydrolase) increased EETs (epoxyeicosatrienoic acids) levels and reduced renal injury in diabetic mice and these changes were associated with induction of HO (haem oxygenase)-1. The present study determines whether the inhibition of HO negates the renoprotective effect of sEH inhibition in diabetic SHR (spontaneously hypertensive rats). After 6 weeks of induction of diabetes with streptozotocin, SHR were divided into the following groups: untreated, treated with the sEH inhibitor t-AUCB {trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid}, treated with the HO inhibitor SnMP (stannous mesoporphyrin), and treated with both inhibitors for 4 more weeks; non-diabetic SHR served as a control group. Induction of diabetes significantly increased renal sEH expression and decreased the renal EETs/DHETEs (dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid) ratio without affecting HO-1 activity or expression in SHR. Inhibition of sEH with t-AUCB increased the renal EETs/DHETEs ratio and HO-1 activity in diabetic SHR; however, it did not significantly alter systolic blood pressure. Treatment of diabetic SHR with t-AUCB significantly reduced the elevation in urinary albumin and nephrin excretion, whereas co-administration of the HO inhibitor SnMP with t-AUCB prevented these changes. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed elevations in renal fibrosis as indicated by increased renal TGF-β (transforming growth factor β) levels and fibronectin expression in diabetic SHR and these changes were reduced with sEH inhibition. Co-administration of SnMP with t-AUCB prevented its ability to reduce renal fibrosis in diabetic SHR. In addition, SnMP treatment also prevented t-AUCB-induced decreases in renal macrophage infiltration, IL-17 expression and MCP-1 levels in diabetic SHR. These findings suggest that HO-1 induction is involved in the protective effect of sEH inhibition against diabetic renal injury. PMID:23611540

  16. Plasma Cardiotrophin-1 as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes-Induced Target Organ Damage and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Recio-Rodriguez, José I.; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Fernández-Martín, José L.; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B.; López-Novoa, José M.; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The search for biomarkers of hypertension and diabetes-induced damage to multiple target organs is a priority. We analyzed the correlation between plasma cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a chemokine that participates in cardiovascular remodeling and organ fibrosis, and a wide range of parameters currently used to diagnose morphological and functional progressive injury in left ventricle, arteries, and kidneys of diabetic and hypertensive patients, in order to validate plasma levels of CT-1 as clinical biomarker. This is an observational study with 93 type 2-diabetic patients, 209 hypertensive patients, and 82 healthy controls in which we assessed the following parameters: plasma CT-1, basal glycaemia, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH by electrocardiographic indexes), peripheral vascular disease (by pulse wave velocity—PWV, carotid intima-media thickness—C-IMT, and ankle-brachial index—ABI), and renal impairment (by microalbuminuria, albumin/creatinine urinary ratio, plasma creatinine concentrations, and glomerular filtration rate). Hypertensive or diabetic patients have higher plasma CT-1 than control patients. CT-1 positively correlates with basal glycaemia, SBP, DBP, PP, LVH, arterial damage (increased IMT, decreased ABI), and early renal damage (microalbuminuria, elevated albumin/creatinine ratio). CT-1 also correlates with increased 10-year cardiovascular risk. Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that CT-1 was associated with arterial injury assessed by PWV, IMT, ABI, and cardiac damage evaluated by Cornell voltage duration product. Increases in plasma CT-1 are strongly related to the intensity of several parameters associated to target organ damage supporting further investigation of its diagnostic capacity as single biomarker of cardiovascular injury and risk and, possibly, of subclinical renal damage. PMID:26222851

  17. Plasma Cardiotrophin-1 as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes-Induced Target Organ Damage and Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Recio-Rodriguez, José I; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Fernández-Martín, José L; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; López-Novoa, José M; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The search for biomarkers of hypertension and diabetes-induced damage to multiple target organs is a priority. We analyzed the correlation between plasma cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a chemokine that participates in cardiovascular remodeling and organ fibrosis, and a wide range of parameters currently used to diagnose morphological and functional progressive injury in left ventricle, arteries, and kidneys of diabetic and hypertensive patients, in order to validate plasma levels of CT-1 as clinical biomarker.This is an observational study with 93 type 2-diabetic patients, 209 hypertensive patients, and 82 healthy controls in which we assessed the following parameters: plasma CT-1, basal glycaemia, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH by electrocardiographic indexes), peripheral vascular disease (by pulse wave velocity-PWV, carotid intima-media thickness-C-IMT, and ankle-brachial index-ABI), and renal impairment (by microalbuminuria, albumin/creatinine urinary ratio, plasma creatinine concentrations, and glomerular filtration rate).Hypertensive or diabetic patients have higher plasma CT-1 than control patients. CT-1 positively correlates with basal glycaemia, SBP, DBP, PP, LVH, arterial damage (increased IMT, decreased ABI), and early renal damage (microalbuminuria, elevated albumin/creatinine ratio). CT-1 also correlates with increased 10-year cardiovascular risk. Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that CT-1 was associated with arterial injury assessed by PWV, IMT, ABI, and cardiac damage evaluated by Cornell voltage duration product.Increases in plasma CT-1 are strongly related to the intensity of several parameters associated to target organ damage supporting further investigation of its diagnostic capacity as single biomarker of cardiovascular injury and risk and, possibly, of subclinical renal damage. PMID:26222851

  18. DIVERSITY OF VASCULAR REACTIVITY AND THE TREATMENT RESPONSE IN DIABETIC, HYPERTENSIVE, HYPERLIPIDEMIC, AND HEALTHY RATS SUBJECTED TO HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Zhu, Yu; Chen, Xiang-Yun; Liu, Liang-Ming; Li, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The current diagnosis and treatment guidelines for severe trauma and shock are all for healthy population. Few studies focused on the pathophysiological features and treatments in metabolic diseases after severe trauma and shock. Vascular reactivity is significantly decreased after severe trauma and shock. Improving the vascular reactivity with arginine vasopressin (AVP) and phorbol-12 myristate-13-acetate (PMA) is beneficial to trauma and shock. Whether the cardiovascular function and treatment responses have the own features in hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic patients after traumatic hemorrhagic shock is not known. Using hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic and healthy rats, we compared the change patterns in cardiovascular function including vascular reactivity, tissue perfusion, and the hemodynamics after hemorrhagic shock and their responses to AVP, PMA, and common antishock agents including dopamine and norepinephrine. A same degree of hemorrhagic shock (40% hemorrhage or mean arterial pressure maintained at 40 mm Hg for 2 h) resulted in a more obvious decrease in vascular reactivity, hemodynamics, tissue perfusion, and mitochondrial function of liver and kidney in hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic rats, and a more rapidly natural death than in healthy rats. The effectiveness of AVP and PMA in these diseased rats was lower than in healthy rats. The effective dosage of common antishock agents including norepinephrine, dopamine, and AVP in healthy rats was wider than that in these diseased rats. Among the antishock agents used in the current study, AVP had the best effect in improving animal survival and vascular reactivity both in healthy and in diseased rats. These findings suggest that hypertensive, diabetic, and hyperlipidemic rats have a worse vascular reactivity and organ function than the healthy rats after traumatic hemorrhagic shock, which result in the worse treatment responses and effects to vasoactive agents. Lower dose

  19. Brain lesions, hypertension and cognitive ageing in the 1921 and 1936 Aberdeen birth cohorts.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alison D; Staff, Roger T; McNeil, Chris J; Salarirad, Sima; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to model the relative effects of positive (childhood intelligence) and negative (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived white matter hyperintensities (WMH)) predictors of late-life intelligence in two well-characterised normal cohorts aged 68 and 78 and to measure the influence of hypertension on WMH and lifelong cognitive change. The Scottish Mental Surveys of 1932 and 1947 tested the intelligence of almost all school children at age 11. One hundred and one participants born in 1921 and 233 participants born in 1936 had brain MRI, with measurement of WMH using Scheltens' scale, and tests of late-life fluid intelligence. Structural equation models of the effect of childhood intelligence and brain WMH on the general intelligence factor 'g' in late life in the two samples were constructed using AMOS 18. Similar models were constructed to test the effect of hypertension on WMH and lifelong cognitive change. Fluid intelligence scores were lower and WMH scores were higher in the older samples. Hypertensive participants in both samples had more WMH than normotensive participants. The positive influence of childhood intelligence on 'g' was greater in the younger sample. The negative effect of WMH on 'g' was linear and greater in the older sample due to greater WMH burden. The negative effect of hypertension on lifelong cognitive ageing was all mediated via MRI-derived brain WMH. The positive relationship between childhood and late-life intelligence decreases with age. The negative relationship between WMH and late-life intelligence is linear and increases with age. PMID:21424787

  20. Folic Acid and Vitamins D and B12 Correlate With Homocysteine in Chinese Patients With Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, or Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xudong; Xing, Xubin; Xu, Rong; Gong, Qing; He, Yue; Li, Shuijun; Wang, Hongfu; Liu, Cong; Ding, Xin; Na, Rishu; Liu, Zhiwen; Qu, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Elevated serum homocysteine has been shown to be a risk factor for hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).We characterized the relationships between the serum levels of homocysteine, folic acid, and vitamins D2, D3, and B12 in patients with T2DM, CVD, and hypertension in Shanghai, China. The levels of these serum biochemical markers were determined for 9311 Chinese patients (mean age: 79.50 ± 13.26 years) with T2DM (N = 839), hypertension (N = 490), or CVD (N = 7925). The demographic and serum biochemical data were compared using an analysis of variance. We performed stratified analyses using Pearson linear regression to investigate correlations between the different variables in the T2DM, CVD, and hypertension groups and in patients aged < 50, 50 to 64, 65 to 80, and ≥80 years. A subgroup analysis was also performed to identify correlations between the serum biochemical markers. Stratified chi-squared analyses were performed based on the levels of folic acid and total vitamin D.In all 3 patient groups, elevated levels of vitamin D2 and homocysteine were observed, whereas the levels of folic acid and vitamins D3 and B12 were lower than the reference range for each serum marker (P < 0.05 for all). The linear regression and stratified analyses showed that the highest levels of folic acid and vitamins D2 and D3 correlated with the lowest level of homocysteine in T2DM, CVD, and hypertension patients (P < 0.05 for all), whereas the highest level of vitamin B12 correlated with a lowest level of homocysteine in CVD patients only (P < 0.05).Our results indicate that the contributions of both vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 should be considered in investigations of the effects of vitamin D supplements in T2DM, CVD, and hypertension patients. Our findings warrant future studies of the benefits of vitamin D and folic acid supplements for reducing the risk of T2DM, CVD, and hypertension in elderly Chinese

  1. Folic Acid and Vitamins D and B12 Correlate With Homocysteine in Chinese Patients With Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, or Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xudong; Xing, Xubin; Xu, Rong; Gong, Qing; He, Yue; Li, Shuijun; Wang, Hongfu; Liu, Cong; Ding, Xin; Na, Rishu; Liu, Zhiwen; Qu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Elevated serum homocysteine has been shown to be a risk factor for hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We characterized the relationships between the serum levels of homocysteine, folic acid, and vitamins D2, D3, and B12 in patients with T2DM, CVD, and hypertension in Shanghai, China. The levels of these serum biochemical markers were determined for 9311 Chinese patients (mean age: 79.50 ± 13.26 years) with T2DM (N = 839), hypertension (N = 490), or CVD (N = 7925). The demographic and serum biochemical data were compared using an analysis of variance. We performed stratified analyses using Pearson linear regression to investigate correlations between the different variables in the T2DM, CVD, and hypertension groups and in patients aged < 50, 50 to 64, 65 to 80, and ≥80 years. A subgroup analysis was also performed to identify correlations between the serum biochemical markers. Stratified chi-squared analyses were performed based on the levels of folic acid and total vitamin D. In all 3 patient groups, elevated levels of vitamin D2 and homocysteine were observed, whereas the levels of folic acid and vitamins D3 and B12 were lower than the reference range for each serum marker (P < 0.05 for all). The linear regression and stratified analyses showed that the highest levels of folic acid and vitamins D2 and D3 correlated with the lowest level of homocysteine in T2DM, CVD, and hypertension patients (P < 0.05 for all), whereas the highest level of vitamin B12 correlated with a lowest level of homocysteine in CVD patients only (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that the contributions of both vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 should be considered in investigations of the effects of vitamin D supplements in T2DM, CVD, and hypertension patients. Our findings warrant future studies of the benefits of vitamin D and folic acid supplements for reducing the risk of T2DM, CVD, and hypertension in

  2. Influence of dyslipidemia in control of arterial hypertension among type-2 diabetics in the western region of the Republic of Macedonia

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Ylber; Kamberi, Amet; Ferati, Fatmir; Rexhepi, Atila; Pocesta, Bekim; Orovcanec, Nikola; Lala, Dali; Polisi, Gafur; Iseni, Mair; Mirto, Arben; Zeqiri, Agim

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of dyslipidemia in control of blood pressure in patients with type 2 Diabetes. To test the hypothesis that, blood pressure and lipid levels are not sufficiently controlled in patients with type 2 Diabetes, in the western region of the Republic of Macedonia. Background: Abnormalities of lipid and lipoprotein levels in the serum (dyslipidemia) are recognized as major modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors and have been identified as independent risk factors for essential hypertension, giving rise to the term dyslipidemic hypertension. While patient-related data from primary care that demonstrate an under-treatment of blood pressure and dyslipidemia in type 2 Diabetics are vastly available in clinical practice, results from population-based studies are scarce. Material and methods: The study was conducted on outpatients in Primary Health Care Clinics in 8 cities on the western region of the Republic of Macedonia. Prospectively the tests were performed on 600 (45.6% women and 54.4% men) participants with a mean age of 62 ± 5.8. Study participants were selected among primary care patients, who were actively on therapy for diabetes mellitus and hypertension during the period of March 2013 - March 2014. Patients’ demographic characteristics, clinical laboratory and drug usage data were obtained. The patients were classified according to the BP control, into 2 groups. Results: A total of 600 patients, of which 45.6% female and 54.3% male, completed the survey and had data for a 1-year medical record review. It was observed that a high percentage, 65.3% of patients, did not have controlled blood pressure despite the ongoing medical treatment, according to evidence and current guidelines in a cohort of hypertensive diabetics. (Chi-square: 19.85, p<0.001). Among participants with controled BP, untreated or insufficiently treated dyslipidemia was recorded in 23% of them, whereas among participants with uncontrolled BP, untreated

  3. Tendency for age-specific mortality with hypertension in the European Union from 1980 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lichan; Pu, Cunying; Shen, Shutong; Fang, Hongyi; Wang, Xiuzhi; Xuan, Qinkao; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Tendency for mortality in hypertension has not been well-characterized in European Union (EU). Mortality data from 1980 to 2011 in EU were used to calculate age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR, per 100,000), annual percentage change (APC) and average annual percentage change (AAPC). The Joinpoint Regression Program was used to compare the changes in tendency. Mortality rates in the most recent year studied vary between different countries, with the highest rates observed in Slovakia men and Estonia women. A downward trend in ASMR was demonstrated over all age groups. Robust decreases in ASMR were observed for both men (1991-1994, APC = -13.54) and women (1996-1999, APC = -14.80) aged 55-65 years. The tendency of systolic blood pressure (SBP) from 1980 to 2009 was consistent with ASMR, and the largest decrease was observed among Belgium men and France women. In conclusion, SBP associated ASMR decreased significantly on an annual basis from 1980 to 2009 while a slight increase was observed after 2009. Discrepancies in ASMR from one country to another in EU are significant during last three decades. With a better understanding of the tendency of the prevalence of hypertension and its mortality, efforts will be made to improve awareness and help strict control of hypertension. PMID:25932090

  4. Tendency for age-specific mortality with hypertension in the European Union from 1980 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Lichan; Pu, Cunying; Shen, Shutong; Fang, Hongyi; Wang, Xiuzhi; Xuan, Qinkao; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Tendency for mortality in hypertension has not been well-characterized in European Union (EU). Mortality data from 1980 to 2011 in EU were used to calculate age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR, per 100,000), annual percentage change (APC) and average annual percentage change (AAPC). The Joinpoint Regression Program was used to compare the changes in tendency. Mortality rates in the most recent year studied vary between different countries, with the highest rates observed in Slovakia men and Estonia women. A downward trend in ASMR was demonstrated over all age groups. Robust decreases in ASMR were observed for both men (1991-1994, APC = -13.54) and women (1996-1999, APC = -14.80) aged 55-65 years. The tendency of systolic blood pressure (SBP) from 1980 to 2009 was consistent with ASMR, and the largest decrease was observed among Belgium men and France women. In conclusion, SBP associated ASMR decreased significantly on an annual basis from 1980 to 2009 while a slight increase was observed after 2009. Discrepancies in ASMR from one country to another in EU are significant during last three decades. With a better understanding of the tendency of the prevalence of hypertension and its mortality, efforts will be made to improve awareness and help strict control of hypertension. PMID:25932090

  5. Choice of ACE inhibitor combinations in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes: update after recent clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Gentile, Giorgio; Angeli, Fabio; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The diabetes epidemic continues to grow unabated, with a staggering toll in micro- and macrovascular complications, disability, and death. Diabetes causes a two- to fourfold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease, and represents the first cause of dialysis treatment both in the UK and the US. Concomitant hypertension doubles total mortality and stroke risk, triples the risk of coronary heart disease and significantly hastens the progression of microvascular complications, including diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, blood pressure reduction is of particular importance in preventing cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Successful antihypertensive treatment will often require a combination therapy, either with separate drugs or with fixed-dose combinations. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor plus diuretic combination therapy improves blood pressure control, counterbalances renin-angiotensin system activation due to diuretic therapy and reduces the risk of electrolyte alterations, obtaining at the same time synergistic antiproteinuric effects. ACE inhibitor plus calcium channel blocker provides a significant additive effect on blood pressure reduction, may have favorable metabolic effects and synergistically reduce proteinuria and the rate of decline in glomerular filtration rate, as evidenced by the GUARD trial. Finally, the recently published ACCOMPLISH trial showed that an ACE inhibitor/calcium channel blocker combination may be particularly useful in reducing cardiovascular outcomes in high-risk patients. The present review will focus on different ACE inhibitor combinations in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, in the light of recent clinical trials, including GUARD and ACCOMPLISH. PMID:19475778

  6. Determining the amounts of urea and glucose in urine of patients with renal complications from diabetes mellitus and hypertension by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bispo, Jeyse A. M.; Silveira, Landulfo; Vieira, Elzo E. d. S.; Fernandes, Adriana B.

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus and hypertension diseases are frequently found in the same patient, which if untreated predispose to atherosclerotic and kidney diseases. The objective of this study was to identify potential biomarkers in the urine of diabetic and hypertensive patients through dispersive near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Urine samples were collected from patients with diabetes and hypertension but no complications (LG), high degree of complications (HG), and control ones: one fraction was submitted to biochemical tests and another one was stored frozen (-20°C) until spectral analysis. Samples were warmed up and placed in an aluminum sample holder for Raman spectra collection using a dispersive spectrometer (830 nm wavelength, 300 mW laser power and 20 s exposure time). Spectra were then submitted to Principal Components Analysis. The PCA loading vectors 1 and 3 revealed spectral features of urea/creatinine and glucose, respectively; the PCA scores showed that patients with diabetes/hypertension (LG and HG) had higher amount of glucose in the urine compared to the normal group (p < 0.05), which can bring serious consequences to patients. Also, the PCA scores showed that the amount of urea decreased in the groups with diabetes/hypertension (p < 0.05), which generates the same concern as it is a marker that has a strong importance in the metabolic changes induced by such diseases. These results, applied to the analysis of urine of patients with diabetes/hypertension, can lead to early diagnostic information of complications and a possible disease prognosis in the patients where no complications from diabetes and hypertension were found.

  7. Understanding and living with glaucoma and non-communicable diseases like hypertension and diabetes in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site: a qualitative study from Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shakya-Vaidya, Suraj; Povlsen, Lene; Shrestha, Binjwala; Grjibovski, Andrej M.; Krettek, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is one of the most common causes of irreversible blindness. A possible association between POAG and non-communicable diseases such as hypertension and diabetes suggests that the incidence of POAG may increase. People with POAG in Nepal usually present late to hospital and have poor knowledge of glaucoma. Objectives Anticipating a knowledge gap regarding these diseases, this study aimed to explore the knowledge of POAG, hypertension, and diabetes in the community and barriers to health care. Design We conducted this qualitative study in the Jhaukhel-Duwakot Health Demographic Surveillance Site (JD-HDSS), a peri-urban community near Kathmandu, a capital city of Nepal. To study how disease influences knowledge, we conducted focus group discussions separately for men and women with and without pre-existing POAG, hypertension, and diabetes. Data were analyzed using the framework analysis approach. Results Although people suffering from POAG, hypertension, and/or diabetes exhibited adequate knowledge of hypertension and diabetes, they lacked in-depth knowledge of POAG. People believed mostly in internal health locus of control. Perception of disease consequences and impact of disease on daily life was influenced by pre-existing POAG, hypertension, and/or diabetes but only in men. Gender disparity was observed regarding health literacy, health perception, and health barriers, which put women in a more difficult situation to tackle their health. We also revealed a gap between knowledge, attitude, and practice of health among women and healthy men. Conclusion Although people in JD-HDSS exhibited adequate knowledge regarding hypertension and diabetes, they lacked in-depth knowledge about POAG. This study demonstrated gender difference in health literacy and access to health care, making women more vulnerable towards disease. We also demonstrated a gap between knowledge, attitude, and practice of health. However, tailored health

  8. The Geography of Diabetes among the General Adults Aged 35 Years and Older in Bangladesh: Recent Evidence from a Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Mobarak Hossain; Gruebner, Oliver; Kraemer, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report geographical variations of sex-specific diabetes by place of residence (large cities/city corporations, small towns/other urban areas, rural areas) and region of residence (divided into seven divisions) among general adults (35+ years of age) in Bangladesh. Methods The recent cross-sectional data, extracted from the nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011, was used. A total of 3,720 men and 3,823 women aged 35+ years, who participated in the fasting blood sugar testing, were analysed. Any person with either fasting plasma glucose level (mmol/L) ≥7.0 or taking medication for diabetes was considered as a person with diabetes. Results The prevalence of diabetes was 10.6% in men and 11.3% in women. Bivariable analyses indicated significant variations of diabetes by both geographical variables. The prevalence was highest in city corporations (men 18.0%, women 22.3%), followed by small towns (men 13.6%, women 15.2%) and rural areas (men 9.3%, women 9.5%). Regional disparities in diabetes prevalence were also remarkable, with the highest prevalence in Chittagong division and lowest prevalence in Khulna division. Multivariable logistic regression analyses provided mixed patterns of geographical disparities (depending on the adjusted variables). Some other independent risk factors for diabetes were advancing age, higher level of education and wealth, having TV (a proxy indicator of physical activity), overweight/obesity and hypertension. Conclusions Over 10% of the general adults aged 35 years and older were having diabetes. Most of the persons with diabetes were unaware of this before testing fasting plasma glucose level. Although significant disparities in diabetes prevalence by geographical variables were observed, such disparities are very much influenced by the adjusted variables. Finally, we underscore the necessities of area-specific strategies including early diagnosis and health education programmes for changing

  9. Effect of One-Week Salt Restriction on Blood Pressure Variability in Hypertensive Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Kayama, Yosuke; Ohashi, Kennosuke; Hayashi, Takeshi; Ishizawa, Sho; Yokota, Tamotsu; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased short-term blood pressure (BP) variability on 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) is known to be a risk factor for cardiovascular events. However, very few studies have evaluated the effect of salt restriction on BP variability particularly in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the effect of salt restriction on systolic BP (SBP) variability. Methods and Results 10 hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes and not receiving antihypertensive agents were enrolled in the study. After admission, all patients received a salt-restricted diet and appropriate anti-diabetic treatments and were followed up for 7 consecutive days using ABPM. After the 7-day treatment, the median [interquartile range (IQR)] coefficient of variation (CV) for diurnal SBP variability changed from day 1 to day 7–13.0 [10.8 to 16.8] % to 13.3 [9.1 to 18.9] % (P = 0.959)—and the median [IQR] change between days 1 and 7 was -0.3 [-3.2 to 2.9] %. In addition, CV for BP variability and circadian rhythm of BP varied greatly on a day-by-day basis for 7 days, compared to mean BP values. Interestingly, increased SBP variability was associated with greater day-by-day changes in circadian rhythm of BP. Conclusions Salt restriction during 7-day hospitalization led to a -0.3 [-3.2 to 2.9] (median [IQR]) % change from baseline in CV for diurnal SBP variability in 10 hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes not receiving antihypertensive agents. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000016243 PMID:26731185

  10. Role of renal medullary oxidative and/or carbonyl stress in salt-sensitive hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takefumi; Ogawa, Susumu; Cowely, Allen W; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    1. Salt-sensitive hypertension is commonly associated with diabetes, obesity and chronic kidney disease. The present review focuses on renal mechanisms involved in the development of this type of hypertension. 2. The renal medullary circulation plays an important role in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. In vivo animal studies have demonstrated that the balance between nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the renal medulla is an important element of salt-sensitive hypertension. The medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) in the outer medulla is an important source of NO and ROS production and we have explored the mechanisms that stimulate their production, as well as the effects of NO superoxide and hydrogen peroxide on mTAL tubular sodium reabsorption and the regulation of medullary blood flow. 3. Angiotensin II-stimulated NO produced in the mTAL is able to diffuse from the renal mTAL to the surrounding vasa recta capillaries, providing a mechanism by which to increase medullary blood flow and counteract the direct vasoconstrictor effects of angiotensin II. Enhanced oxidative stress attenuates NO diffusion in this region. 4. Carbonyl stress, like oxidative stress, can also play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease, such as insulin resistance, salt-sensitive hypertension and renal vascular complications. 5. Despite the large number of studies undertaken in this area, there is as yet no drug available that directly targets renal ROS. Oxidative and/or carbonyl stress may be the next target of drug discovery to protect against salt-sensitive hypertension and associated end-organ damage. PMID:22150746

  11. Hypertension Is a Key Feature of the Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects Aging with HIV.

    PubMed

    Martin-Iguacel, Raquel; Negredo, Eugènia; Peck, Robert; Friis-Møller, Nina

    2016-06-01

    With widespread and effective antiretroviral therapy, the life expectancy in the HIV population has dramatically improved over the last two decades. Consequently, as patients are aging with HIV, other age-related comorbidities, such as metabolic disturbances and cardiovascular disease (CVD), have emerged as important causes of morbidity and mortality. An overrepresentation of traditional cardiovascular risk factors (RF), toxicities associated with long exposure to antiretroviral therapy, together with residual chronic inflammation and immune activation associated with HIV infection are thought to predispose to these metabolic complications and to the excess risk of CVD observed in the HIV population. The metabolic syndrome (MS) represents a clustering of RF for CVD that includes abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Hypertension is a prevalent feature of the MS in HIV, in particular in the aging population, and constitutes an important RF for CVD. Physicians should screen their patients for metabolic and cardiovascular risk at the regular visits to reduce MS and the associated CVD risk among people aging with HIV, since many of RF are under-diagnosed and under-treated conditions. Interventions to reduce these RF can include lifestyle changes and pharmacological interventions such as antihypertensive and lipid-lowering therapy, and treatment of glucose metabolism disturbances. Changes in antiretroviral therapy to more metabolic neutral antiretroviral drugs may also be considered. PMID:27131801

  12. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of bilayer tablets of nebivolol hydrochloride and nateglinide for the treatment of diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ryakala, Harika; Dineshmohan, S; Ramesh, Alluri; Gupta, V R M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension are two common diseases that often coexist. The most common cause of death in the diabetic patient is heart disease. In the present investigation we combine Nebivolol and Nateglinide for better patient compliance. IR layer was formulated using various superdisintegrants like Crospovidone, Croscarmellose sodium, and sodium starch glycolate and SR layer was formulated using polymers and gums like HPMC E15, ethyl cellulose, Gaur gum, and Xanthan gum. The disintegration and dissolution study of both layers showed that inclusion of surfactant (sodium lauryl sulphate) to the tablet formulation (IR) and dissolution medium (SR) enhanced the release of drugs from both layers. Kinetic studies of optimized IR layer (NBL8) and SR layer (N9) showed good linearity with regression coefficient of 0.9714 (Higuchi model) and 0.9931 (zero order kinetics), respectively. The above results reveal that the optimized IR layer of Nebivolol (NBL8) and SR layer of Nateglinide (N9) might be suitable for the treatment of diabetes and hypertension by sequential release of the two drugs in a bilayer tablet. IR-immediate release, SR-sustain release, NBL8-Nebivolol 8, N9-Nateglinide 9. PMID:25648606

  13. Formulation and In Vitro Evaluation of Bilayer Tablets of Nebivolol Hydrochloride and Nateglinide for the Treatment of Diabetes and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ryakala, Harika; Dineshmohan, S.; Ramesh, Alluri; Gupta, V. R. M.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension are two common diseases that often coexist. The most common cause of death in the diabetic patient is heart disease. In the present investigation we combine Nebivolol and Nateglinide for better patient compliance. IR layer was formulated using various superdisintegrants like Crospovidone, Croscarmellose sodium, and sodium starch glycolate and SR layer was formulated using polymers and gums like HPMC E15, ethyl cellulose, Gaur gum, and Xanthan gum. The disintegration and dissolution study of both layers showed that inclusion of surfactant (sodium lauryl sulphate) to the tablet formulation (IR) and dissolution medium (SR) enhanced the release of drugs from both layers. Kinetic studies of optimized IR layer (NBL8) and SR layer (N9) showed good linearity with regression coefficient of 0.9714 (Higuchi model) and 0.9931 (zero order kinetics), respectively. The above results reveal that the optimized IR layer of Nebivolol (NBL8) and SR layer of Nateglinide (N9) might be suitable for the treatment of diabetes and hypertension by sequential release of the two drugs in a bilayer tablet. IR-immediate release, SR-sustain release, NBL8-Nebivolol 8, N9-Nateglinide 9. PMID:25648606

  14. Differential effects of age and history of hypertension on regional brain volumes and iron

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigue, Karen M.; Haacke, E. Mark; Raz, Naftali

    2010-01-01

    Aging affects various structural and metabolic properties of the brain. However, associations among various aspects of brain aging are unclear. Moreover, those properties and associations among them may be modified by age-associated increase in vascular risk. In this study, we measured volume of brain regions that vary in their vulnerability to aging and estimated local iron content via T2* relaxometry. In 113 healthy adults (19–83 years old), we examined prefrontal cortex (PFC), primary visual cortex (VC), hippocampus (HC), entorhinal cortex (EC), caudate nucleus (Cd), and putamen (Pt). In some regions (PFC, VC, Cd, Pt) age-related differences in iron and volume followed similar patterns. However, in the medial temporal structures, volume and iron content exhibited different age trajectories. Whereas age-related volume reduction was mild in HC and absent in EC, iron content evidenced significant age-related declines. In hypertensive participants significantly greater iron content was noted in all examined regions. Thus, iron content as measured by T2* may be a sensitive index of regional brain aging and may reveal declines that are more prominent than gross anatomical shrinkage. PMID:20923707

  15. The relationship between serum albumin levels and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahbap, Elbis; Sakaci, Tamer; Kara, Ekrem; Sahutoglu, Tuncay; Koc, Yener; Basturk, Taner; Sevinc, Mustafa; Akgol, Cuneyt; Kayalar, Arzu O.; Ucar, Zuhal A.; Bayraktar, Feyza; Unsal, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum albumin levels and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (24-h ABPM) recordings in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients. METHODS: A total of 354 patients (mean [SD] age: 55.5 [14.3] years, 50% females) with essential hypertension and 24-h ABPM recordings were included. Patient 24-h nighttime and daytime ABPM values, systolic and diastolic dipping status and average nocturnal dipping were recorded. The correlations between serum albumin levels and nocturnal systolic and diastolic dipping were evaluated, and correlates of average nocturnal systolic dipping were determined via a linear regression model. RESULTS: Overall, 73.2% of patients were determined to be non-dippers. The mean (SD) levels of serum albumin (4.2 [0.3] g/dL vs. 4.4 [0.4] g/dL, p<0.001) and the average nocturnal systolic (15.2 [4.8] mmHg vs. 0.3 [6.6] mmHg, p<0.001) and diastolic dipping (4.2 [8.6] mmHgvs. 18.9 [7.0] mmHg, p<0.001) were significantly lower in non-dippers than in dippers. A significant positive correlation was noted between serum albumin levels and both systolic (r=0.297, p<0.001) and diastolic dipping (r=0.265, p<0.001). The linear regression analysis revealed that for each one-unit increase in serum albumin, the average nocturnal dip in systolic BP increased by 0.17 mmHg (p=0.033). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate an association between serum albumin levels and the deterioration of circadian BP rhythm among essential hypertensive patients along with the identification of a non-dipper pattern in more than two-thirds of patients. Our findings emphasize the importance of serum albumin levels, rather than urinary albumin excretion, as an independent predictor of nocturnal systolic dipping, at least in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients with moderate proteinuria. PMID:27276394

  16. A pilot study for evaluation of the efficacy and safety of telmisartan in reducing microalbuminuria in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, R B; Kulkarni, B N; Hariharan, R S; Naikwadi, Akram; Gawde, Ashish; Baliga, Vidyagauri; Desai, Anish

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate efficacy and tolerability of telmisartan, an angiotensim II receptor blocker, in reducing microalbuminuria in adult Indian hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prospective, open-label, non-comparative, assessor-blind, multicentric, pilot study was conducted in 60 eligible hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and microalbuminuria after obtaining their informed consent. The study was approved by the respective institutional review boards. Each patient received telmisartan 40 mg initially once daily for first 4 weeks which was titrated upwards to 80 mg once daily for the next 8 weeks. Blood pressure was assessed at the end of every 2 weeks and urinary albumin excretion and creatinine clearance were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of therapy. Safety outcome measures included monitoring of physical examination, laboratory parameters and monitoring treatment-emergent adverse events. Fifty-five patients completed the study while 5 cases were lost to follow-up. The mean age of the patients was 48.27 years. Of the total patients 63.6% were males and 46.4% were females. At baseline the mean urinary albumin excretion rate was 131.81 +/- 38.82 mg/minute. A statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction (32.96%) in urinary albumin excretion rate occurred after 12 weeks of therapy (118.36 +/- 37.22). The mean pre-study systolic blood pressure was 165.05 +/- 15.24 mmHg which was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced to 123.72 +/- 5.88 mmHg at the end of 12 weeks. At baseline the mean diastolic blood pressure was 103.55 +/- 9.84 mmHg which was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced to 84.71 +/- 8.54 mmHg. The JNC-VII goal of blood pressure below 130/80 was achieved in 34 (61.8%)of the 55 patients at the end of 12 weeks. Both fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels were well-controlled at the end of the study. Telmisartan was well tolerated with only 9.09% of the patients reported mild and transient adverse events like fatigue

  17. Risk Factors for Macro- and Microvascular Complications among Older Adults with Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes: Findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Sheena M.; Fitzgerald, Anthony P.; Buckley, Claire M.; Canavan, Ronan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore risk factors for macro- and microvascular complications in a nationally representative sample of adults aged 50 years and over with type 2 diabetes in Ireland. Methods. Data from the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) (2009–2011) was used in cross-sectional analysis. The presence of doctor diagnosis of diabetes, risk factors, and macro- and microvascular complications were determined by self-report. Gender-specific differences in risk factor prevalence were assessed with the chi-squared test. Binomial regression analysis was conducted to explore independent associations between established risk factors and diabetes-related complications. Results. Among 8175 respondents, 655 were classified as having type 2 diabetes. Older age, being male, a history of smoking, a lower level of physical activity, and a diagnosis of high cholesterol were independent predictors of macrovascular complications. Diabetes diagnosis of 10 or more years, a history of smoking, and a diagnosis of hypertension were associated with an increased risk of microvascular complications. Older age, third-level education, and a high level of physical activity were protective factors (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Early intervention to target modifiable risk factors is urgently needed to reduce diabetes-related morbidity in the older population in Ireland. PMID:27294152

  18. Association between comorbid conditions and BADL/IADL disability in hypertension patients over age 45

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jiahui; Ren, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension usually coexists with other chronic conditions and can cause disability in relation to activities of daily living. We examined the association between the number and categories of comorbid conditions and disability affecting activities of daily living in hypertension patients. The data were collected from the 2013 follow-up survey of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS), which contains information about chronic conditions and disability. Additionally, socio-demographic characteristics of 3754 hypertension patients aged 45 and older were included in this study. Comorbid conditions included dyslipidemia, stroke, and 12 other chronic conditions. Disability in relation to activities of daily living was assessed using the basic activities of daily living (BADL) and the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) instruments. Differences in BADL/IADL disability among patients with different comorbid conditions were compared using the chi-square test, and the influence of chronic conditions and socio-demographic characteristics on BADL/IADL disability was analyzed using logistic models. Without considering the influence of specific chronic conditions on BADL/IADL, hypertension patients with additional comorbid conditions were more likely to suffer from BADL/IADL disability. When considering the effect of specific chronic conditions, the number of comorbid conditions did not significantly influence BADL/IADL disability. Dyslipidemia, chronic lung disease, stroke, memory-related diseases, and arthritis/rheumatism were associated with BADL disability. Chronic lung diseases, heart diseases, stroke, stomach/digestive system diseases, emotional/nervous/psychiatric problems, memory-related diseases, arthritis/rheumatism, and asthma were associated with IADL disability. Additionally, female, people with lower education level, people living in village, and people living in middle and western China were more likely suffer from BADL

  19. The spectrum of unhealthy drug use and quality of care for hypertension and diabetes: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Samet, Jeffrey H; Cheng, Debbie M; Bernstein, Judith; Wang, Na; German, Jacqueline; Saitz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although it is well known that addiction is associated with adverse medical consequences, the effects of the spectrum of unhealthy drug use (illicit drug or prescription misuse) on chronic conditions such as hypertension and diabetes are understudied. This study evaluated the associations between measures of drug use (ie, frequency, severity and type) and standard quality metrics for inadequate blood pressure (BP) and blood glucose (BG) control. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Participants Adult primary care patients with unhealthy drug use and hypertension or diabetes. Setting Urban hospital-based primary care practice. Measurements Outcomes were (1) inadequate BP (systolic BP ≥140 or diastolic BP ≥90) and (2) inadequate BG (glycated haemoglobin ≥8%) control (Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set criteria). Drug use was characterised by a primary independent variable, drug use frequency, and two secondary variables, severity of use and drug type. We fit separate regression models for each drug use measure and outcome. Results Overall, 40% (65/164) of the sample with hypertension had inadequate BP control and 44% (24/54) of those with diabetes had inadequate BG control. More frequent drug use was not significantly associated with inadequate BP control (adjusted OR (AOR) 0.67; 95% CI 0.31 to 1.46, highest vs lowest tertile; AOR 0.72; 95% CI 0.36 to 1.41, middle vs lowest tertile) or BG control (AOR 0.27; 95% CI 0.07 to 1.10, highest vs lowest tertile; AOR 1.01; 95% CI 0.38 to 2.69, middle vs lowest tertile). Drug use severity was also not associated with BP or BG control. Cocaine use was associated with inadequate BG control compared to marijuana use (AOR 8.82; 95% CI1.86 to 41.90). Conclusions Among primary care patients with recent drug use and hypertension or diabetes, drug type was significantly associated with inadequate BG, but not BP control. Frequency and severity of use were not significant predictors of either outcome. PMID

  20. Effect of aliskiren and valsartan combination versus aliskiren monotherapy on hemostatic biomarkers in hypertensive diabetics: Aliskiren and Valsartan Impact in Diabetics pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; Pokov, Alex N; Aradi, Daniel; Can, Mehmet; DiNicolantonio, James; Kipshidze, Nodar; Atar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Valsartan is known to inhibit platelet activity in both in vitro and ex vivo clinical setting, whereas aliskiren in vitro modulates antithrombin-III in plasma. The authors tested how aliskiren and valsartan combination versus aliskiren monotherapy will affect hemostatic biomarkers in mild-to-moderate hypertensive diabetics in the frame of the Aliskiren and Valsartan Impact in Diabetics (AVID) trial. A total of 52 patients with type 2 diabetes and mild-to-moderate hypertension were equally randomized to aliskiren (150-300 mg/d) and valsartan (160 mg/d) versus aliskiren (150-300 mg/d) alone for 4 weeks. A total of 25 biomarkers were serially measured, of which 16 are related to platelet function, 6 to coagulation, and 3 to fibrinolysis. Aliskiren monotherapy has no significant impact on any of the assessed biomarkers. In contrast, valsartan on top of aliskiren provided significant inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P=0.032), decreased shear-induced activation measured with PFA-100 analyzer (P=0.041), and diminished expression of GP IIb/IIIa activity (P=0.027) measured by PAC-1 antibody, GP Ib (CD42b, P=0.033), vitronectin receptor (CD51/61, P=0.046), P-selectin (CD62p, P=0.026), lysosome-associated membrane protein (CD107a, P=0.042), and CD40-ligand (CD154, P=0.048). In AVID trial, valsartan in combination with aliskiren mildly but significantly inhibited platelets, confirming previous observations. In contrast, aliskiren monotherapy does not enhance antithrombin activity, suggesting that previous data probably represent a laboratory artifact. Importantly, these randomized data were generated on top of low-dose daily aspirin, supporting extra benefit for combination use of angiotensin receptor blockers and renin inhibitors in high-risk diabetic population. PMID:23698186

  1. Resistant hypertension and chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-04-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient's history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of "non-dipper" hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  2. Resistant Hypertension and Chronotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing’s syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient’s history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of “non-dipper” hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  3. [Combination of measurement of retinal vascular caliber, adaptive optics and fluorescent angiography in early diagnosis and monitoring of diabetic and hypertensive retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Stepushina, O A; Bol'shunov, A V

    2011-01-01

    15 patients with diabetic and hypertensive retinopathy are examined. Retinal vascular caliber was measured using adaptive multifocal fundus camera (AMFC), fundus camera "Topcon" TRS-NW200 and FAG. Combination of retinal vascular caliber measurement and fundus foto using AMFC in patients with ametropia and astigmatismus showed apparently lower arteriolovenular coefficient (A VC) compared with that estimated using FAG imaging. Retinal vascular caliber measurement using adaptive optics is a highly sensitive method of visualization and monitoring of early signs of diabetic and hypertensive retinopathy. PMID:21721269

  4. Cerebral blood volume and vasodilation are independently diminished by aging and hypertension: A near infrared spectroscopy study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Senescent changes in brain microvascular circulation may cause or contribute to age-related cognitive decline. Such changes are promoted partly by aging, but also by chronic hypertension, a leading treatable cause of cognitive decline. We aimed to non-invasively detect in vivo the senescent changes...

  5. Differential Responses to Blood Pressure and Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Wistar-Kyoto Rats and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Effects of Antioxidant (Honey) Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O.; Sulaiman, Siti A.; Wahab, Mohd Suhaimi Ab; Sirajudeen, Kuttulebbai N. S.; Salleh, Md Salzihan Md; Gurtu, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis and/or complications of hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus. A combination of these disorders increases the risk of developing cardiovascular events. This study investigated the effects of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg; ip)-induced diabetes on blood pressure, oxidative stress and effects of honey on these parameters in the kidneys of streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Diabetic WKY and SHR were randomized into four groups and received distilled water (0.5 mL) and honey (1.0 g/kg) orally once daily for three weeks. Control SHR had reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), catalase (CAT) activity, and total antioxidant status (TAS). SBP, activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) were elevated while TAS was reduced in diabetic WKY. In contrast, SBP, TAS, activities of GPx and GR were reduced in diabetic SHR. Antioxidant (honey) treatment further reduced SBP in diabetic SHR but not in diabetic WKY. It also increased TAS, GSH, reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio, activities of GPx and GR in diabetic SHR. These data suggest that differences in types, severity, and complications of diseases as well as strains may influence responses to blood pressure and oxidative stress. PMID:21673929

  6. Association between serum myeloperoxidase levels and coronary artery disease in patients without diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpour, Zahra; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Gharaaty, Maryam; Sadeghi, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme, elevated in the atheroma and serum of a patient with atherosclerotic vessels. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the serum MPO level is related to the presence of plaque in patients without risk factors, such as, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Materials and Methods: A serum sample was collected from patients who referred for angiography. The MPO level was measured in the serum samples of 40 patients without risk factors for atherosclerosis using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The MPO level was 245.5 ± 13.8 (ng/ml) in patients with atherosclerosis and 213.9 ± 8.9 (ng/ml) in patients without atherosclerosis. There was a significant difference between the groups (P = 0.002). The odds ratio was 0.67 (0.95 CI, 0.17 – 2.5) for patients with and without coronary atherosclerosis. Conclusion: Although the MPO concentration is higher in patients suffering from atherosclerosis, it is not a predictor of coronary artery disease in patients without diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. PMID:27376042

  7. Comparison of Azelnidipine and Trichlormethiazide in Japanese Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Hypertension: The COAT Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Takihata, Masahiro; Nakamura, Akinobu; Kondo, Yoshinobu; Kawasaki, Satsuki; Kimura, Mari; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study compared the efficacy and safety of azelnidipine with that of trichlormethiazide in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with hypertension. Methods In a multicenter, open-label trial, 240 patients with adequately controlled diabetes (HbA1c ≤ 7.0%) under lifestyle modification and/or administration of hypoglycemic agents and inadequately controlled hypertension (systolic blood pressure [sBP] ≥ 130 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure [dBP] ≥ 80 mmHg) who were being treated with olmesartan were enrolled. Participants were randomly assigned to an azelnidipine group or a trichlormethiazide group and were followed up for 48 weeks. Main outcome measure was the difference in the change in HbA1c levels from the baseline values at 48 weeks between these two groups. Results Of the 240 subjects that were enrolled, 209 subjects (azelnidipine group: 103 patients, trichlormethiazide group: 106 patients) completed this trial. At 48 weeks, the following changes were observed in the azelnidipine and trichlormethiazide groups, respectively: HbA1c levels, 0.19 ± 0.52% and 0.19 ± 0.54%; sBP/dBP, -10.7 ± 9.6/-6.6 ± 6.6 mmHg and -7.1 ± 7.7/-3.3 ± 6.1 mmHg (P < 0.001 for both sBP and dBP). In both groups, dizziness (12 patients [11.7%] and 16 patients [15.1%]) and edema (16 patients [15.5%] and 7 patients [6.6%], P = 0.047) were observed during the 48-week follow-up period. Conclusions Azelnidipine was more effective for controlling blood pressure than trichlormethiazide in Japanese type 2 diabetes patients, whereas trichlormethiazide was more effective for reducing albuminuria than azelnidipine. Both of these agents, however, similarly exacerbated glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients with hypertension. Trial Registration UMIN 000006081. PMID:25938807

  8. Task shifting to non-physician clinicians for integrated management of hypertension and diabetes in rural Cameroon: a programme assessment at two years

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The burden of non-communicable chronic diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, increases in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the majority of the rural population does still not have access to adequate care. The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of integrating care for hypertension and type 2 diabetes by task shifting to non-physician clinician (NPC) facilities in eight rural health districts in Cameroon. Methods Of the 75 NPC facilities in the area, 69 (87%) received basic equipment and training in hypertension and diabetes care. Effectiveness was assessed after two years on status of equipment, knowledge among trained NPCs, number of newly detected patients, retention of patients under care, treatment cost to patients and changes in blood pressure (BP) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) among treated patients. Results Two years into the programme, of 54 facilities (78%) available for re-assessment, all possessed a functional sphygmomanometer and stethoscope (65% at baseline); 96% stocked antihypertensive drugs (27% at baseline); 70% possessed a functional glucose meter and 72% stocked oral anti-diabetics (15% and 12% at baseline). NPCs' performance on multiple-choice questions of the knowledge-test was significantly improved. During a period of two years, trained NPCs initiated treatment for 796 patients with hypertension and/or diabetes. The retention of treated patients at one year was 18.1%. Hypertensive and diabetic patients paid a median monthly amount of 1.4 and 0.7 Euro respectively for their medication. Among hypertensive patients with ≥ 2 documented visits (n = 493), systolic BP decreased by 22.8 mmHg (95% CI: -20.6 to -24.9; p < 0.0001) and diastolic BP by 12.4 mmHg (-10.9 to -13.9; p < 0.0001). Among diabetic patients (n = 79) FPG decreased by 3.4 mmol/l (-2.3 to -4.5; p < 0.001). Conclusions The integration of hypertension and diabetes into primary health care of NPC facilities in rural Cameroon was feasible in terms

  9. Ocular Inflammation in Uveal Tract in Aged Obese Type 2 Diabetic Rats (Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Fatty Rats)

    PubMed Central

    Kemmochi, Yusuke; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Ohta, Takeshi; Yasui, Yuzo; Toyoda, Kaoru; Kakimoto, Kochi; Shoda, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    We report uveitis observed in an obese type 2 diabetes rat model, Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Leprfa (SDT fatty) rats aged over 50 weeks. The eyes of SDT fatty rats (16 animals: 7 males and 9 females with 50 or 60 weeks of age) were examined histopathologically. Infiltration of inflammatory cells in the uveal tract was observed in 13 of 16 animals. One female showed severe inflammation affecting the entire uveal tract including the iris, ciliary body, and choroid with a variety of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages). Those changes clinically mimic the findings of diabetic iridocyclitis in diabetic patients. Uveitis associated with diabetes can occur in diabetic patients but the pathogenesis still remains unknown. Since increased extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen and abscess in the genital and lower urinary tracts were observed in some SDT fatty rats, increased susceptibility to infection, prolongation of inflammatory states, and disorders of the immune system were considered to be possible factors of the uveitis in aged SDT fatty rats. There have been few reports on how diabetes has influence on the development of uveitis associated with bacterial infection. The SDT fatty rat can be an animal model to investigate diabetes-associated uveitis. PMID:25295283

  10. Induction of hemeoxygenase-1 reduces renal oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Elmarakby, Ahmed A; Faulkner, Jessica; Baban, Babak; Sullivan, Jennifer C

    2012-01-01

    The renoprotective mechanisms of hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) in diabetic nephropathy remain to be investigated. We hypothesize that HO-1 protects the kidney from diabetic insult via lowering renal oxidative stress and inflammation. We used control and diabetic SHR with or without HO-1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) treatment for 6 weeks. Urinary albumin excretion levels were significantly elevated in diabetic SHR compared to control and CoPP significantly attenuated albumin excretion. Immuno-histochemical analysis revealed an elevation in TGF-β staining together with increased urinary collagen excretion in diabetic versus control SHR, both of which were reduced with CoPP treatment. Renal oxidative stress markers were greater in diabetic SHR and reduced with CoPP treatment. The increase in renal oxidative stress was associated with an elevation in renal inflammation in diabetic SHR. CoPP treatment also significantly attenuated the markers of renal inflammation in diabetic SHR. In vitro inhibition of HO with stannous mesoporphyrin (SnMP) increased glomerular NADPH oxidase activity and inflammation and blocked the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of CoPP. These data suggest that the reduction of renal injury in diabetic SHR upon induction of HO-1 are associated with decreased renal oxidative stress and inflammation, implicating the role of HO-1 induction as a future treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22518298

  11. Effects of Aged Garlic Extract on Left Ventricular Diastolic Function and Fibrosis in a Rat Hypertension Model

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yuki; Noda, Akiko; Miyata, Seiko; Minoshima, Makoto; Sugiura, Mari; Kojima, Jun; Otake, Masafumi; Furukawa, Mayuko; Cheng, Xian Wu; Nagata, Kohzo; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2013-01-01

    Daily consumption of garlic is known to lower the risk of hypertension and ischemic heart disease. In this study, we examined whether aged garlic extract (AGE) prevents hypertension and the progression of compensated left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. DS rats were randomly divided into three groups: those fed an 8% NaCl diet until 18 weeks of age (8% NaCl group), those additionally treated with AGE (8% NaCl + AGE group), and control rats maintained on a diet containing 0.3% NaCl until 18 weeks of age (0.3% NaCl group). AGE was administered orally by gastric gavage once a day until 18 weeks of age. LV mass was significantly higher in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 0.3% NaCl group at 18 weeks of age, but significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 8% NaCl group. No significant differences were observed in systolic blood pressure (SBP) between the 8% NaCl and 8% NaCl + AGE groups at 12 and 18 weeks of age. LV end-diastolic pressure and pressure half-time at 12 and 18 weeks of age were significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group compared with the 8% NaCl group. AGE significantly reduced LV interstitial fibrosis at 12 and 18 weeks of age. Chronic AGE intake attenuated LV diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis without significantly decreasing SBP in hypertensive DS rats. PMID:24172194

  12. Effects of aged garlic extract on left ventricular diastolic function and fibrosis in a rat hypertension model.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuki; Noda, Akiko; Miyata, Seiko; Minoshima, Makoto; Sugiura, Mari; Kojima, Jun; Otake, Masafumi; Furukawa, Mayuko; Cheng, Xian Wu; Nagata, Kohzo; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2013-01-01

    Daily consumption of garlic is known to lower the risk of hypertension and ischemic heart disease. In this study, we examined whether aged garlic extract (AGE) prevents hypertension and the progression of compensated left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. DS rats were randomly divided into three groups: those fed an 8% NaCl diet until 18 weeks of age (8% NaCl group), those additionally treated with AGE (8% NaCl + AGE group), and control rats maintained on a diet containing 0.3% NaCl until 18 weeks of age (0.3% NaCl group). AGE was administered orally by gastric gavage once a day until 18 weeks of age. LV mass was significantly higher in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 0.3% NaCl group at 18 weeks of age, but significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 8% NaCl group. No significant differences were observed in systolic blood pressure (SBP) between the 8% NaCl and 8% NaCl + AGE groups at 12 and 18 weeks of age. LV end-diastolic pressure and pressure half-time at 12 and 18 weeks of age were significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group compared with the 8% NaCl group. AGE significantly reduced LV interstitial fibrosis at 12 and 18 weeks of age. Chronic AGE intake attenuated LV diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis without significantly decreasing SBP in hypertensive DS rats. PMID:24172194

  13. Blood pressure regulation during the aging process: the end of the 'hypertension era'?

    PubMed

    Benetos, Athanase; Salvi, Paolo; Lacolley, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    The elderly blood pressure paradigm reflects all of the demographic, technological and therapeutic changes over the past 20-30 years that make it now possible to propose a more integrative approach of 'hypertension'. The aim of the present review was to address what does measured blood pressure really mean and what are its determinants during the aging process. We show that standard blood pressure measurements are not adequate or even misleading for the evaluation of cardiovascular risk especially in the elderly patients and that there is a necessity of a transition to a new approach in determining the arterial risk. Direct arterial measurements including analysis of central and peripheral arterial waveforms and assessment of pulse wave velocity can be reliable and easily performed measurements as an alternative to blood pressure-Korotkoff approach. For these measurements, there are currently sufficient clinical data showing their association with cardiovascular risk. There is also the emergence of reference values and beneficial elements of regression by treatment. This new approach as well as recent knowledge on vascular hemodynamics and biology, represent the swan song for the hypertension concept as defined by blood pressure values. PMID:21157369

  14. Age- and gender-specific associations between sleep duration and incident hypertension in a Chinese population: the Kailuan study.

    PubMed

    Song, Q; Liu, X; Wang, X; Wu, S

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the age- and sex-dependent association between sleep duration and incident hypertension in a Chinese population. The Kailuan prospective cohort study recruited 101 510 participants. Those participants were followed for an average of 3.98 years and the data obtained from 32 137 participants out of 101 510 were analyzed in this study. Sleep duration was categorized as five groups of⩽5, 6, 7, 8 and ⩾9 h. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to analyze the association of sleep duration with incident hypertension. The 3.98 years' follow-up data showed that 12 732 out of 32 137 participants developed hypertension. Short duration of sleep (⩽5 h per night) was associated with an increased risk of hypertension in woman (hazard ratio (HR) 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02 to 1.58) and participants aged <60 years (HR 1.11; 95% CI 1.02-1.21), when compared with the group reported with 7 h of sleep per day. This study suggested that short sleep duration could cause an increased risk of hypertension in Chinese females and population aged <60 years. PMID:26763887

  15. [Childhood hypertension].

    PubMed

    Takemura, Tsukasa

    2015-11-01

    For accurate diagnosis of childhood hypertension, selection of appropriate manchette size according to the child age and the circumstantial size of upper limb is essentially important. In addition, except for the emergency case of hypertension, repeated measurement of blood pressure would be desirable in several weeks interval. Recently, childhood hypertension might be closely related to the abnormality of maternal gestational period caused by the strict diet and the maternal smoking. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease(DOHaD) theory is now highlighted in the pathogenesis of adulthood hypertension. To prevent hypertension of small-for-date baby in later phase of life, maternal education for child nursing should be conducted. In children, secondary hypertension caused by renal, endocrinologic, or malignant disease is predominant rather than idiopathic hypertension. PMID:26619664

  16. Adaptation and validation of the Distress Scale for Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vega, Ingrid Patricia; Doubova, Svetlana V; Aguirre-Hernandez, Rebeca; Infante-Castañeda, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the Distress Scale for Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension (DSDH17M). Setting Two family medicine clinics affiliated with the Mexican Institute of Social Security. Participants 722 patients with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension (235 patients with diabetes, 233 patients with hypertension and 254 patients with both diseases). Design A cross-sectional survey. Methods The validation procedures included: (1) content validity using a group of experts, (2) construct validity from exploratory factor analysis, (3) internal consistency using Cronbach's α, (4) convergent validity between DSDH17M and anxiety and depression using the Spearman correlation coefficient, (5) discriminative validity through the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and (6) test–retest reliability using intraclass correlation coefficient. Results The DSDH17M has 17 items and three factors explaining 67% of the total variance. Cronbach α ranged from 0.83 to 0.91 among factors. The first factor of ‘Regime-related Distress and Emotional Burden’ moderately correlated with anxiety and depression scores. Discriminative validity revealed that patients with obesity, those with stressful events and those who did not adhere to pharmacological treatment had significantly higher distress scores in all DSDH17M domains. Test–retest intraclass correlation coefficient for DSDH17M ranged from 0.92 to 0.97 among factors. Conclusions DSDH17M is a valid and reliable tool to identify distress of patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26936903

  17. Marital Status, Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Death among African American Women and Men: Incidence and Prevalence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Hilary M.; Coresh, Josef; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and African Americans disproportionately experience more cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and diabetes. The literature documents a complex relationship between marital status and health, which varies by gender. We prospectively examine…

  18. [Resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2008-04-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as a persistent blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic, is unusual. The diagnosis requires ruling out initially pseudoresistance and a lack of compliance with treatment. Ambulatory blood pressure recording allow the recognition of white coat hypertension. When there is a clinical or laboratory suspicion, secondary causes of hypertension should be discarded. Excessive salt intake, the presence of concomitant diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, obesity, and psychiatric conditions such as panic attacks, anxiety and depression, should also be sought. The presence of target organ damage requires a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. Recent clinical studies indicate that the administration of aldosterone antagonists as a fourth therapeutic line provides significant additional blood pressure reduction, when added to previous antihypertensive regimens in subjects with resistant hypertension. The possible blood pressure lowering effects of prolonged electrical activation of carotid baroreceptors is under investigation. PMID:18769797

  19. Telemonitoring and Protocolized Case Management for Hypertensive Community-Dwelling Seniors With Diabetes: Protocol of the TECHNOMED Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Finlay Aleck; Wood, Peter William; Boulanger, Pierre; Fradette, Miriam; Klarenbach, Scott; Edwards, Alun L; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna M; Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram; Rabi, Doreen; Majumdar, Sumit Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes and hypertension are devastating, deadly, and costly conditions that are very common in seniors. Controlling hypertension in seniors with diabetes dramatically reduces hypertension-related complications. However, blood pressure (BP) must be lowered carefully because seniors are also susceptible to low BP and attendant harms. Achieving “optimal BP control” (ie, avoiding both undertreatment and overtreatment) is the ultimate therapeutic goal in such patients. Regular BP monitoring is required to achieve this goal. BP monitoring at home is cheap, convenient, widely used, and guideline endorsed. However, major barriers prevent proper use. These may be overcome through use of BP telemonitoring—the secure teletransmission of BP readings to a health portal, where BP data are summarized for provider and patient use, with or without protocolized case management. Objective To examine the incremental effectiveness, safety, cost-effectiveness, usability, and acceptability of home BP telemonitoring, used with or without protocolized case management, compared with “enhanced usual care” in community-dwelling seniors with diabetes and hypertension. Methods A 300-patient, 3-arm, pragmatic randomized controlled trial with blinded outcome ascertainment will be performed in seniors with diabetes and hypertension living independently in seniors’ residences in greater Edmonton. Consenting patients will be randomized to usual care, home BP telemonitoring alone, or home BP telemonitoring plus protocolized pharmacist case management. Usual care subjects will receive a home BP monitor but neither they nor their providers will have access to teletransmitted data. In both telemonitored arms, providers will receive telemonitored BP data summaries. In the case management arm, pharmacist case managers will be responsible for reviewing teletransmitted data and initiating guideline-concordant and protocolized changes in BP management. Results Outcomes will be

  20. Serum Uric Acid and Hypertension in Adults: a Paradoxical Relationship in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Wadwa, R. Paul; Sirota, Jeffrey C.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared to non-diabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in non-diabetic adults. We assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6-years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years, n=393) and without (38±9 years n=685) T1D in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In non-diabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable-models adjusted for cardiovascular risk-factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable-adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in non-diabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable-adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  1. The relationship of bone and blood lead to hypertension: Further analyses of the normative aging study data

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.; Kim, Rokho; Korrick, S. |; Rotnitzky, A.

    1996-12-31

    In an earlier report based on participants in the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study, we found a significant association between the risk of hypertension and lead levels in tibia. To examine the possible confounding effects of education and occupation, we considered in this study five levels of education and three levels of occupation as independent variables in the statistical model. Of 1,171 active subjects seen between August 1991 and December 1994, 563 provided complete data for this analysis. In the initial logistic regression model, acre and body mass index, family history of hypertension, and dietary sodium intake, but neither cumulative smoking nor alcohol ingestion, conferred increased odds ratios for being hypertensive that were statistically significant. When the lead biomarkers were added separately to this initial logistic model, tibia lead and patella lead levels were associated with significantly elevated odds ratios for hypertension. In the final backward elimination logistic regression model that included categorical variables for education and occupation, the only variables retained were body mass index, family history of hypertension, and tibia lead level. We conclude that education and occupation variables were not confounding the association between the lead biomarkers and hypertension that we reported previously. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Socio-Economic Differences in the Association between Self-Reported and Clinically Present Diabetes and Hypertension: Secondary Analysis of a Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Gerald; Forrest, Lynne F.; Adams, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes and hypertension are key risk factors for coronary heart disease. Prevalence of both conditions is socio-economically patterned. Awareness of presence of the conditions may influence risk behaviour and use of preventative services. Our aim was to examine whether there were socio-economic differences in awareness of hypertension and diabetes in a UK population. Method Data from the Scottish Health Survey was used to compare self-reported awareness of hypertension and diabetes amongst those found on examination to have these conditions, by socioeconomic position (SEP) (measured by occupation, education and income). Odds ratios of self-reported awareness against presence, and the sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of self-reporting as a measure of the presence of the condition, were calculated. Results Presence and self-reported awareness of both conditions increased as SEP decreased, on most measures. There was only one significant difference in awareness by SEP once other factors had been taken into account. Sensitivity showed that those in the most disadvantaged groups were most likely to self-report awareness of their hypertension, and specificity showed that those in the least disadvantaged groups were most likely to self-report awareness of its absence. There were few differences of note for diabetes. Conclusion We found no consistent pattern in the associations between SEP and the presence and self-reported awareness of hypertension and diabetes amongst those with these conditions. Without evidence of differences, it is important that universal approaches continue to be applied to the identification and management of those at risk of these and other conditions that underpin cardiovascular disease. PMID:26466384

  3. The hemodynamic patterns in hypertensive men and women of different age.

    PubMed

    Krzesiński, P; Stańczyk, A; Gielerak, G; Piotrowicz, K

    2016-03-01

    Aging is associated with cardiovascular remodeling, which can be accelerated in arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between hemodynamic profile and age, as well as to identify the role of sex in hemodynamic patterns of aging in AH. The study comprised 326 patients with AH (mean age: 44.3 years). Two-dimensional echocardiography was performed to evaluate, that is, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) and ejection fraction (LVEF), and ICG to evaluate, that is, acceleration time index (ACI), velocity index (VI), total arterial compliance (TAC), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) and thoracic fluid content (TFC). The statistical analysis included interquartile comparison in subgroups of age <19-37 years (Q1), 38-44 years (Q2), 45-51 years (Q3) and 52-68 years (Q4). Aging was associated with: (1) higher prevalence of LVDD (Q1 vs Q4: 11.0% vs 24.7%, P=0.023); (2) altered LV systolic performance-ACI (81.4 vs 64.0 1/100 Ω s(-2), P=0.0001), VI (50.5 vs 42.8 1/1000 Ω s(-1), P=0.006), LVEF (65.4% vs 67.0%, NS); and (3) increased afterload-TAC (2.25 vs 1.87 ml mm Hg(-1), P=0.0001), SVRI (2182 vs 2407 dyn s m(2) cm(-)(5); P=0.045). The 'U-shaped' relation to age was observed for TFC. The above-mentioned hemodynamic trends were more pronounced in men, whereas females presented the 'middle-aged delay'. The influence of aging on cardiovascular system shows in progressive arterial stiffness and impaired left ventricular function. Thoracic fluid reduction may be compensatory to vasoconstriction but its efficiency declines with age. The patterns of cardiovascular aging are different in men and women. PMID:26134620

  4. Age- and hypertension-induced changes in abnormal contractions in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Jablonskis, Lina T; Head, Richard J

    2002-12-01

    The current investigation explored the potential age-dependant modulation of abnormal spontaneous constrictions (thromboxane-like) in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) aorta, observed only after the inhibition of endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO). Aortic rings from SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats of varying ages (4, 8, 12, and 18 months) were mounted in organ baths, and changes in tension were monitored. Inhibition of NO with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (NOLA) unmasked a slow contraction, which appeared to be age dependent (p < 0.05). This contraction was found in SHRs of all age groups and in older WKY rats. Denuding the endothelium in young SHRs did not influence the constriction, confirming a nonendothelial cell origin, while in the older groups this led to a 30-40% reduction in contraction. Comparable attenuation of the constrictor response was observed after incubation of endothelium intact rings with superoxide dismutase (100 U/ml) or 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Of the residual activity that was unaffected by free radical scavengers or de-endothelialization, 60-70% was sensitive to cyclooxygenase inhibition by indomethacin and/or ibuprofen. The thromboxane (TxA ) receptor antagonist SQ29548 induced a complete reversal of the abnormal constriction. In contrast, thromboxane synthetase inhibition had no effect, ruling out any involvement of TxA in mediating this abnormality. Collectively, these observations support the view that as compared with the normotensive setting, contraction induced by NO inhibition in the SHR develops prematurely and deteriorates more rapidly during the aging process. In aged rats, prostaglandin endoperoxide intermediates PGG /H and endothelium-derived free radicals rather than TxA per se appear to contribute to the NOLA-dependent TxA -like vasoconstriction. PMID:12451327

  5. The effect of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy on small for gestational age and stillbirth: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Victoria M; Joseph, KS; Murphy, Kellie E; Magee, Laura A; Ohlsson, Arne

    2004-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are leading causes of maternal, fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, studies attempting to quantify the effect of hypertension on adverse perinatal outcomes have been mostly conducted in tertiary centres. This population-based study explored the frequency of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and the associated increase in small for gestational age (SGA) and stillbirth. METHODS: We used information on all pregnant women and births, in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, between 1988 and 2000. Pregnancies were excluded if delivery occurred < 20 weeks, if birthweight was < 500 grams, if there was a high-order multiple pregnancy (greater than twin gestation), or a major fetal anomaly. RESULTS: The study population included 135,466 pregnancies. Of these, 7.7% had mild pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), 1.3% had severe PIH, 0.2% had HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets), 0.02% had eclampsia, 0.6% had chronic hypertension, and 0.4% had chronic hypertension with superimposed PIH. Women with any hypertension in pregnancy were 1.6 (95% CI 1.5-1.6) times more likely to have a live birth with SGA and 1.4 (95% CI 1.1-1.8) times more likely to have a stillbirth as compared with normotensive women. Adjusted analyses showed that women with gestational hypertension without proteinuria (mild PIH) and with proteinuria (severe PIH, HELLP, or eclampsia) were more likely to have infants with SGA (RR 1.5, 95% CI 1.4-1.6 and RR 3.2, 95% CI 2.8-3.6, respectively). Women with pre-existing hypertension were also more likely to give birth to an infant with SGA (RR 2.5, 95% CI 2.2-3.0) or to have a stillbirth (RR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9-5.4). CONCLUSIONS: This large, population-based study confirms and quantifies the magnitude of the excess risk of small for gestational age and stillbirth among births to women with hypertensive disease in pregnancy. PMID:15298717

  6. Early Vascular Aging in Normotensive Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Comparison With Young Patients Having Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Morreale, Massimiliano; Mulè, Giuseppe; Ferrante, Angelo; D'ignoto, Francesco; Cottone, Santina

    2016-08-01

    Connective tissue diseases, like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), are associated with early and accelerated atherosclerosis. Recently, the concept of "early vascular aging" (EVA) has been more widely accepted. Aortic stiffness is one of the important markers of EVA. We evaluated EVA and subclinical atherosclerosis, by measuring aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), in 50 normotensive patients with SLE (mean age: 39 ± 12 years). We compared these participants with 50 age- and sex-matched patients with essential hypertension (EH) and 20 healthy controls. Each participant underwent 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), aPWV, and cIMT measurements. Clinic and 24-hour ABPM values were significantly lower in patients with SLE and controls when compared with the participants having EH (all P < .0001), but aPWV and cIMT were significantly lower in the control group when compared with patients having SLE and EH (all P < .001). Overall, patients with SLE and EH had similar cIMT and aPWV values (P = .31 and P = .47, respectively). Our results suggest that SLE has a similar deleterious impact on EVA as EH. PMID:26535012

  7. Therapeutic efficacy of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells in diabetic polyneuropathy is impaired with aging or diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Masaki; Kamiya, Hideki; Himeno, Tatsuhito; Naruse, Keiko; Nakashima, Eitaro; Watarai, Atsuko; Shibata, Taiga; Tosaki, Takahiro; Kato, Jiro; Okawa, Tetsuji; Hamada, Yoji; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Oiso, Yutaka; Nakamura, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Recent studies have shown that cell transplantation therapies, such as endothelial precursor cells, bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and mesenchymal stem cells, are effective on diabetic polyneuropathy through ameliorating impaired nerve blood flow in diabetic rats. Here, we investigated the effects of BM-MNCs transplantation in diabetic polyneuropathy using BM-MNCs derived from adult (16-week-old) diabetic (AD), adult non-diabetic (AN) or young (8-week-old) non-diabetic (YN) rats. Materials and Methods BM-MNCs of AD and AN were isolated after an 8-week diabetes duration. The BM-MNCs were characterized using flow cytometry analysis of cell surface markers and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of several cytokines. BM-MNCs or saline were injected into hind limb muscles. Four weeks later, the thermal plantar test, nerve conduction velocity, blood flow of the sciatic nerve and capillary-to-muscle fiber ratio were evaluated. Results The number of CD29+/CD90+ cells that host mesenchymal stem cells in BM-MNCs decreased in AD compared with AN or YN, and transcript expressions of basic fibroblast growth factor and nerve growth factor in BM-MNCs decreased in AD compared with AN or YN. Impaired thermal sensation, decreased blood flow of the sciatic nerve and delayed nerve conduction velocity in 8-week-diabetic rats were significantly ameliorated by BM-MNCs derived from YN, whereas BM-MNCs from AD or AN rats did not show any beneficial effect in these functional tests. Conclusions These results show that cytokine production abilities and the mesenchymal stem cell population of BM-MNCs would be modified by aging and metabolic changes in diabetes, and that these differences could explain the disparity of the therapeutic efficacy of BM-MNCs between young and adult or diabetic and non-diabetic patients in diabetic polyneuropathy. PMID:25802721

  8. How information about the time requirements and legacy effects of treatments influence decision-making in patients with diabetes and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Laiteerapong, Neda; Fairchild, Paige C; Nathan, Aviva G; Quinn, Michael T; Huang, Elbert S

    2016-01-01

    Objective When deciding about diabetes treatments, patients are typically uninformed about how much time is required before (time requirements), or for how long treatments change outcomes (legacy effects). However, patients may be motivated to adopt treatments with time-related treatment information. We explored whether this information alters a patients' likelihood of starting medications. Research design and methods We conducted semistructured interviews with 60 adults with type 2 diabetes for <10 years and hypertension on oral medications. We measured change in likelihood of starting medications after receiving time requirement (diabetes, 10 years; hypertension, 3 years) and legacy effect (diabetes, 10 additional years; hypertension, none) information. Responses were analyzed for themes about time-related treatment information. Results At baseline, 70% of participants reported being very likely to start a recommended medication. Nearly half (40%) were less likely to start a diabetes medication after being informed of time requirements; but after being informed of legacy effects, 32% reported being more likely. Fewer participants changed likelihoods of starting antihypertensives with time-related information. Many participants expressed that medications' benefits were important to them regardless of time-related information. Participants considered time requirements for diabetes medications too long and compared them to their life expectancy. Many participants were interested in legacy effects of diabetes medications because they looked forward to discontinuing medications, although some expressed doubt that benefits could persist after stopping medications. Conclusions While prolonged time requirements may dissuade patients from adopting treatments, the promise of legacy effects may motivate patients to commit to diabetes treatments. PMID:27158521

  9. The Role of AGE/RAGE Signaling in Diabetes-Mediated Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AGE/RAGE signaling has been a well-studied cascade in many different disease states, particularly diabetes. Due to the complex nature of the receptor and multiple intersecting pathways, the AGE/RAGE signaling mechanism is still not well understood. The purpose of this review is to highlight key areas of AGE/RAGE mediated vascular calcification as a complication of diabetes. AGE/RAGE signaling heavily influences both cellular and systemic responses to increase bone matrix proteins through PKC, p38 MAPK, fetuin-A, TGF-β, NFκB, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in both hyperglycemic and calcification conditions. AGE/RAGE signaling has been shown to increase oxidative stress to promote diabetes-mediated vascular calcification through activation of Nox-1 and decreased expression of SOD-1. AGE/RAGE signaling in diabetes-mediated vascular calcification was also attributed to increased oxidative stress resulting in the phenotypic switch of VSMCs to osteoblast-like cells in AGEs-induced calcification. Researchers found that pharmacological agents and certain antioxidants decreased the level of calcium deposition in AGEs-induced diabetes-mediated vascular calcification. By understanding the role the AGE/RAGE signaling cascade plays diabetes-mediated vascular calcification will allow for pharmacological intervention to decrease the severity of this diabetic complication. PMID:27547766

  10. Impact of Comorbidities on Acute Injury and Recovery in Preclinical Stroke Research: Focus on Hypertension and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ergul, Adviye; Hafez, Sherif; Fouda, Abdelrahman; Fagan, Susan C

    2016-08-01

    Human ischemic stroke is very complex, and no single preclinical model can comprise all the variables known to contribute to stroke injury and recovery. Hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia are leading comorbidities in stroke patients. The use of predominantly young adult and healthy animals in experimental stroke research has created a barrier for translation of findings to patients. As such, more and more disease models are being incorporated into the research design. This review highlights the major strengths and weaknesses of the most commonly used animal models of these conditions in preclinical stroke research. The goal is to provide guidance in choosing, reporting, and executing appropriate disease models that will be subjected to different models of stroke injury. PMID:27026092

  11. Distribution of blood pressure & correlates of hypertension in school children aged 5-14 years from North east India

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Prasanta Kr.; Devi, Utpala; Biswas, Dipankar; Kalita, Hem Ch.; Sharma, Meenakshi; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Elevated blood pressure (BP) in the young predicts serious cardiovascular events in the adults. High prevalence of adult hypertension reported from Assam, North East (NE) India may be linked with elevated blood pressure in the childhood. The present study was an attempt to describe the distribution of BP and correlates of hypertension in children aged 5-14 yr. Methods: A total of 10,003 school children from 99 schools of Dibrugarh district, Assam, NE India, were surveyed by stratified random cluster method. Blood pressure, demographic and anthropometric information were recorded. Blood pressure was categorized in to normal, prehypertension, stage I and stage II hypertension. Results: Girls had significantly higher (104.2 ± 12.0 vs. 103.2 ± 11.6 mm Hg, P<0.001) mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) than boys. Both SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) revealed significant correlation with age, height, weight and BMI in overall and in gender specific analysis. Hypertension was found in 7.6 per cent school children (Boys: 7.3%, Girls: 7.8%). In multivariable analysis older age (OR 3.3, 95% CI: 2.82-3.91), children from tea garden community (OR 1.3, 95% CI: 1.08-1.55) and other community (OR 1.4, 95% CI: 1.18-1.73) and overweight (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1) were independently associated with hypertension. Interpretation & conclusions: Mean blood pressure in the young school children of 5-14 yr was high. A programme comprising screening, early detection and health promotion through school health programmes may help prevent future complications of hypertension. PMID:26458345

  12. Pulmonary vascular pressure profiles in broilers selected for susceptibility to pulmonary hypertension syndrome: age and sex comparisons.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Eanes, M L; Hamal, K R; Anthony, N B

    2010-09-01

    Broilers that are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites) have an elevated pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) when compared with PHS-resistant broilers. Two distinctly different syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH), both are associated with increases in PAP. Pulmonary arterial hypertension occurs when the right ventricle must elevate the PAP to overcome increased resistance to flow through restrictive pulmonary arterioles upstream from the pulmonary capillaries. In contrast, PVH is commonly caused by increased downstream (postcapillary) resistance. The sites of resistance to pulmonary blood flow are deduced by making contemporaneous measurements of the PAP and the wedge pressure (WP) and calculating the transpulmonary pressure gradient (TPG) (TPG = PAP - WP). We obtained PAP and WP values from 8-, 12-, 16-, 20-, and 24-wk-old anesthetized male and female broilers from a PHS-susceptible line. Pressures were recorded as a catheter was advanced through a wing vein to the pulmonary artery and onward until the WP was obtained. In addition to sex and age comparisons of vascular pressure gradients, the data also were pooled to obtain 3 cohorts for broilers having the lowest PAP values (n = 52; range: 12 to 22.9 mmHg), intermediate PAP values (n = 63; range: 23 to 32.9 mmHg), and highest PAP values (n = 62; range: 33 to 62 mmHg) independent of age or sex. Within each of the age, sex, and PAP cohort comparisons, broilers with elevated PAP consistently exhibited the hemodynamic characteristics of pulmonary arterial hypertension (elevated PAP and TPG combined with a normal WP) and not PVH (elevated PAP and WP combined with a normal or reduced TPG). Susceptibility to PHS can be attributed primarily to pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with increased precapillary (arteriole) resistance. PMID:20709965

  13. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  14. Review of new hypertension guidelines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P-Y

    2015-01-01

    The Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) released its new guidelines on the management of adult hypertension in Dec 2013. The key departures from JNC 7 include target blood pressures and thresholds for initiation of elderly patients and in patients under age 60 with diabetes and kidney disease. In this review, we analyse the critical questions, basis of new recommendations, major deviations from JNC 7, the strengths and limitations of changes in previous management guidelines. PMID:25683948

  15. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats due to age-related arginase activation in intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nara, Akina; Nagai, Hisashi; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Ogura, Sayoko; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Kuwahira, Ichiro; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is prevalent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Aging induces arginase activation and reduces nitric oxide (NO) production in the arteries. Intermittent hypoxia (IH), conferred by cycles of brief hypoxia and normoxia, contributes to OSAS pathogenesis. Here, we studied the role of arginase and aging in the pathogenesis of PAH in adult (9-mo-old) and young (2-mo-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to IH or normoxia for 4 weeks and analyzed them with a pressure-volume catheter inserted into the right ventricle (RV) and by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Western blot analysis was conducted on arginase, NO synthase isoforms, and nitrotyrosine. IH induced PAH, as shown by increased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, in adult rats but not in young rats. IH increased expression levels of arginase I and II proteins in the adult rats. IH also increased arginase I expression in the pulmonary artery endothelium and arginase II in the pulmonary artery adventitia. Furthermore, IH reduced pulmonary levels of nitrate and nitrite but increased nitrotyrosine levels in adult rats. An arginase inhibitor (N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-1-arginine) prevented IH-induced PAH and normalized nitrite and nitrate levels in adult rats. IH induced arginase up-regulation and PAH in adult rats, but not in young rats, through reduced NO production. Our findings suggest that arginase inhibition prevents or reverses PAH. PMID:25490411

  16. Serum uric acid and hypertension in adults: a paradoxical relationship in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Paul Wadwa, R; Sirota, Jeffrey C; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Rivard, Christopher J; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel B; Johnson, Richard J; Maahs, David M

    2014-04-01

    Adults with type 1 diabetes have lower serum uric acid levels compared with nondiabetic adults. Little is known about the relationship between serum uric acid and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes and whether it differs from the positive relationship found in nondiabetic adults. The authors assessed the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships over 6 years between serum uric acid and blood pressure in adults with (35±9 years [n=393]) and without (38±9 years [n=685]) type 1 diabetes in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study. In nondiabetic adults, serum uric acid was associated with systolic blood pressure in multivariable models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. In adults with type 1 diabetes, a negative association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure after multivariable adjustments. A positive association was observed between serum uric acid and systolic blood pressure in nondiabetic adults. In contrast, an inverse relationship was demonstrated after multivariable adjustments in type 1 diabetes. PMID:24667019

  17. A case of obesity, diabetes and hypertension treated with very low calorie diet (VLCD) followed by successful pregnancy with intrauterine insemination (IUI).

    PubMed

    Katsuki, A; Sumida, Y; Ito, K; Murashima, S; Gabazza, E C; Furuta, M; Yano, Y; Sugiyama, T; Toyoda, N; Adachi, Y

    2000-12-01

    The patient was a 32-year-old obese woman with a history of type 2 diabetes and hypertension for 6 years. Although she was treated with antihypertensive agents and intensive insulin therapy, her hyperglycemia was difficult to control. She wanted to have a baby but pregnancy was not recommended because her diabetes was under poor control and the use of antihypertensive medication. To achieve good control of obesity, diabetes and hypertension, she was admitted to our clinical department for weight reduction using very low calorie diet (VLCD). During VLCD she had a 19.8 kg reduction in body weight and her blood glucose and blood pressure were in good control without the use of drugs. Five months later, she became pregnant after the fourth trial of intrauterine insemination (IUI) and gave birth to a female baby under insulin therapy. This is the first report that showed the usefulness of VLCD for prepregnant control of glucose metabolism and blood pressure in an obese hypertensive patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:11228055

  18. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) co-localize with AGE receptors in the retinal vasculature of diabetic and of AGE-infused rats.

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, A. W.; Li, Y. M.; Gardiner, T. A.; Bucala, R.; Archer, D. B.; Vlassara, H.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), formed from the nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and lipids with reducing sugars, have been implicated in many diabetic complications; however, their role in diabetic retinopathy remains largely unknown. Recent studies suggest that the cellular actions of AGEs may be mediated by AGE-specific receptors (AGE-R). We have examined the immunolocalization of AGEs and AGE-R components R1 and R2 in the retinal vasculature at 2, 4, and 8 months after STZ-induced diabetes as well as in nondiabetic rats infused with AGE bovine serum albumin for 2 weeks. Using polyclonal or monoclonal anti-AGE antibodies and polyclonal antibodies to recombinant AGE-R1 and AGE-R2, immunoreactivity (IR) was examined in the complete retinal vascular tree after isolation by trypsin digestion. After 2, 4, and 8 months of diabetes, there was a gradual increase in AGE IR in basement membrane. At 8 months, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells of the retinal vessels showed dense intracellular AGE IR. AGE epitopes stained most intensely within pericytes and smooth muscle cells but less in basement membrane of AGE-infused rats compared with the diabetic group. Retinas from normal or bovine-serum-albumin-infused rats were largely negative for AGE IR. AGE-R1 and -R2 co-localized strongly with AGEs of vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells of either normal, diabetic, or AGE-infused rat retinas, and this distribution did not vary with each condition. The data indicate that AGEs accumulate as a function of diabetes duration first within the basement membrane and then intracellularly, co-localizing with cellular AGE-Rs. Significant AGE deposits appear within the pericytes after long-term diabetes or acute challenge with AGE infusion conditions associated with pericyte damage. Co-localization of AGEs and AGE-Rs in retinal cells points to possible interactions of pathogenic significance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID

  19. Fenofibrate and Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Knickelbein, Jared E; Abbott, Akshar B; Chew, Emily Y

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common and sight-threatening microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is a leading cause of blindness among working-aged adults. Medical therapies including intensive control of hyperglycemia and hypertension have been shown to reduce the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The association of dyslipidemia and treatment with statins with diabetic retinopathy is inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. However, two recent randomized clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of systemic fenofibrate therapy in reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy independently of serum lipid levels. These findings suggest that fenofibrate may be an effective strategy for reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy, thus reducing the large and growing public health burden of treating the sight-threatening complications of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27525681

  20. Type 2 diabetes model TSOD mouse is exposed to oxidative stress at young age

    PubMed Central

    Murotomi, Kazutoshi; Umeno, Aya; Yasunaga, Mayu; Shichiri, Mototada; Ishida, Noriko; Abe, Hiroko; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes (TSOD) mouse, a model of obese type 2 diabetes, older than around 11 weeks of age develops diabetic phenotypes. Previous studies have indicated that the development of diabetes is partly due to three loci associated with body weight and glucose homeostasis. However, little is known about the initial events triggering the development of the diabetic phenotypes in TSOD mouse. Here, we investigated the alteration of diabetes-related parameters, including the levels of blood glucose and inflammatory cytokines, and the oxidative stress status, in young TSOD mice. TSOD mice at 5 weeks of age showed increases in body weight and plasma total cholesterol level, but not hyperglycemia or impaired glucose tolerance, compared with age-matched control Tsumura Suzuki Non-Obese (TSNO) mice. Plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 were not detected in TSOD mice at 5 weeks of age. However, plasma total hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (tHODE), a biomarker of oxidative stress, was increased in TSOD mice relative to TSNO mice at same age. The results demonstrated that young TSOD mice are exposed to oxidative stress before developing the diabetic phenotypes, and suggested that oxidative stress is an initial event triggering the development of diabetes in TSOD mice. PMID:25411529

  1. Effects of exercise on kidney function among non-diabetic patients with hypertension and renal disease: randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease is an important public health threat. Such patients present high morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease, with low quality of life and survival, and also high expenditure resulting from the treatment. Arterial hypertension is both a cause and a complication of kidney disease; also, arterial hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease among patients with kidney diseases. There is some evidence that exercise interventions may be beneficial to chronic kidney disease patients, but previous studies included only end-stage patients, i.e. those undergoing dialysis. This study aims to evaluate the effect of exercise on kidney function, quality of life and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease among non-diabetic chronic hypertensive kidney disease patients who are not undergoing dialysis. Methods The participants will be located through screening hypertensive patients attended within the public healthcare network in Pelotas, a city in south of Brazil. Eligible individuals will be those with glomerular filtration rate between 15 and 59 ml/min x 1.73 m2. The randomization will be done in fixed-size blocks of six individuals such that 75 participants will be allocated to each group. At baseline, information on demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral, anthropometric, blood pressure and quality-of-life variables will be collected, and laboratory tests will be performed. The intervention will consist of three weekly physical exercise sessions lasting 60–75 minutes each, with a total duration of 16 weeks. The outcomes will be the kidney function progression rate, quality of life, blood pressure, lipid profile, hemoglobin level, ultrasensitive C-reactive protein level, and ankle-arm index. The patients in both groups (intervention and control) will be reassessed and compared partway through the study (8th week), at the end of the intervention (16th week) and in the 8th week after the end of the

  2. HbA1c Alone Is a Poor Indicator of Cardiometabolic Risk in Middle-Aged Subjects with Pre-Diabetes but Is Suitable for Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Seán R.; Perry, Ivan J.; Phillips, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement is recommended as an alternative to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for the diagnosis of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. However, evidence suggests discordance between HbA1c and FPG. In this study we examine a range of metabolic risk features, pro-inflammatory cytokines, acute-phase response proteins, coagulation factors and white blood cell counts to determine which assay more accurately identifies individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving a random sample of 2,047 men and women aged 46-73 years. Binary and multinomial logistic regression were employed to examine risk feature associations with pre-diabetes [either HbA1c levels 5.7-6.4% (39-46 mmol/mol) or impaired FPG levels 5.6-6.9 mmol/l] and type 2 diabetes [either HbA1c levels >6.5% (>48 mmol/mol) or FPG levels >7.0 mmol/l]. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to evaluate the ability of HbA1c to discriminate pre-diabetes and diabetes defined by FPG. Results Stronger associations with diabetes-related phenotypes were observed in pre-diabetic subjects diagnosed by FPG compared to those detected by HbA1c. Individuals with type 2 diabetes exhibited cardiometabolic profiles that were broadly similar according to diagnosis by either assay. Pre-diabetic participants classified by both assays displayed a more pro-inflammatory, pro-atherogenic, hypertensive and insulin resistant profile. Odds ratios of having three or more metabolic syndrome features were also noticeably increased (OR: 4.0, 95% CI: 2.8-5.8) when compared to subjects diagnosed by either HbA1c (OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.2-1.8) or FPG (OR: 3.0, 95% CI: 1.7-5.1) separately. Conclusions In middle-aged Caucasian-Europeans, HbA1c alone is a poor indicator of cardiometabolic risk but is suitable for diagnosing diabetes. Combined use of HbA1c and FPG may be of additional benefit for detecting individuals at highest odds of

  3. Physical activity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension – insights into motivations and barriers from the MOBILE study

    PubMed Central

    Duclos, Martine; Dejager, Sylvie; Postel-Vinay, Nicolas; di Nicola, Sylvie; Quéré, Stéphane; Fiquet, Béatrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Although physical activity (PA) is key in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and hypertension, it is difficult to implement in practice. Methods Cross-sectional, observational study. Participating physicians were asked to recruit two active and four inactive patients, screened with the Ricci-Gagnon (RG) self-questionnaire (active if score ≥16). Patients subsequently completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The objective was to assess the achievement of individualized glycated hemoglobin and blood pressure goals (<140/90 mmHg) in the active vs inactive cohort, to explore the correlates for meeting both targets by multivariate analysis, and to examine the barriers and motivations to engage in PA. Results About 1,766 patients were analyzed. Active (n=628) vs inactive (n=1,138) patients were more often male, younger, less obese, had shorter durations of diabetes, fewer complications and other health issues, such as osteoarticular disorders (P<0.001 for all). Their diabetes and hypertension control was better and obtained despite a lower treatment burden. The biggest difference in PA between the active vs inactive patients was the percentage who declared engaging in regular leisure-type PA (97.9% vs 9.6%), also reflected in the percentage with vigorous activities in International Physical Activity Questionnaire (59.5% vs 9.6%). Target control was achieved by 33% of active and 19% of inactive patients (P<0.001). Active patients, those with fewer barriers to PA, with lower treatment burden, and with an active physician, were more likely to reach targets. The physician’s role emerged in the motivations (reassurance on health issues, training on hypoglycemia risk, and prescription/monitoring of the PA by the physician). A negative self-image was the highest ranked barrier for the inactive patients, followed by lack of support and medical concerns. Conclusion Physicians should consider PA prescription as seriously as any drug

  4. Roles of the AGE-RAGE system in vascular injury in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Yamagishi, S; Yonekura, H; Doi, T; Tsuji, H; Kato, I; Takasawa, S; Okamoto, H; Abedin, J; Tanaka, N; Sakurai, S; Migita, H; Unoki, H; Wang, H; Zenda, T; Wu, P S; Segawa, Y; Higashide, T; Kawasaki, K; Yamamoto, H

    2000-05-01

    This study concerns whether advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) are related to microvascular derangement in diabetes, exemplified by pericyte loss and angiogenesis in retinopathy and by mesangial expansion in nephropathy. AGE caused a decrease in viable pericytes cultivated from bovine retina. On the other hand, AGE stimulated the growth and tube formation of human microvascular endothelial cells (EC), this being mediated by autocrine vascular endothelial growth factor. In AGE-exposed rat mesangial cells, type IV collagen synthesis was induced. Those AGE actions were dependent on a cell surface receptor for AGE (RAGE), because they were abolished by RAGE antisense or ribozyme. The AGE-RAGE system may thus participate in the development of diabetic microangiopathy. This proposition was supported by experiments with animal models; several indices characteristic of retinopathy were correlated with circulating AGE levels in OLETF rats. The predisposition to nephropathy was augmented in RAGE transgenic mice when they became diabetic. PMID:10865836

  5. Socio-Economic Status of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Hypertension Attending the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, North-West Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okoduwa, Stanley Irobekhian Reuben; Umar, Ismaila Alhaji; Ibrahim, Sani; Bello, Fatima; Ndidi, Uche Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are lifestyle interrelated diseases of global significance. Interestingly, the prevalence of these diseases in Africa and indeed Nigeria seems to be on the increase. This study, therefore, investigated the socioeconomic status (based on income, education and occupational activity) of 400 subjects (52% female and 48% male) aged 20 years and above who were sampled randomly among the newly diagnosed HTN and/or T2D cases at the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, North-West Nigeria. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect information from the subjects. From the result obtained, most of the respondents who live in towns or city suffer from either HTN or T2D while more town dwellers (28%) suffer from a combination of both diseases. It was also discovered that most respondents who suffer from HTN and from a combination of HTN and T2D belong to the old generation (60-79 years). There is higher prevalence rate of diabetes among the respondents who had no formal education or attended only basic Arabic schools. Most respondents who earn good income (₦50,000-₦100,000 and above ₦100,000) suffer HTN, T2D and a combination of both diseases. Those engaged in heavy occupational activities had the lowest prevalence of the disease compared with those of light or moderate occupational activities. These data will be found useful in planning intervention healthcare preventive programs especially on public enlightenment workshops and seminars to educate the populace on the importance of lifestyle modification, healthy diet and regular exercises. PMID:25560354

  6. The Age-Specific Quantitative Effects of Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes: A Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Farzadfar, Farshad; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Woodward, Mark; Wormser, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Whitlock, Gary; Qiao, Qing; Lewington, Sarah; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; vander Hoorn, Stephen; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Ali, Mohammed K.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Ezzati, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of systolic blood pressure (SBP), serum total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and body mass index (BMI) on the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have been established in epidemiological studies, but consistent estimates of effect sizes by age and sex are not available. Methods We reviewed large cohort pooling projects, evaluating effects of baseline or usual exposure to metabolic risks on ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease (HHD), stroke, diabetes, and, as relevant selected other CVDs, after adjusting for important confounders. We pooled all data to estimate relative risks (RRs) for each risk factor and examined effect modification by age or other factors, using random effects models. Results Across all risk factors, an average of 123 cohorts provided data on 1.4 million individuals and 52,000 CVD events. Each metabolic risk factor was robustly related to CVD. At the baseline age of 55–64 years, the RR for 10 mmHg higher SBP was largest for HHD (2.16; 95% CI 2.09–2.24), followed by effects on both stroke subtypes (1.66; 1.39–1.98 for hemorrhagic stroke and 1.63; 1.57–1.69 for ischemic stroke). In the same age group, RRs for 1 mmol/L higher TC were 1.44 (1.29–1.61) for IHD and 1.20 (1.15–1.25) for ischemic stroke. The RRs for 5 kg/m2 higher BMI for ages 55–64 ranged from 2.32 (2.04–2.63) for diabetes, to 1.44 (1.40–1.48) for IHD. For 1 mmol/L higher FPG, RRs in this age group were 1.18 (1.08–1.29) for IHD and 1.14 (1.01–1.29) for total stroke. For all risk factors, proportional effects declined with age, were generally consistent by sex, and differed by region in only a few age groups for certain risk factor-disease pairs. Conclusion Our results provide robust, comparable and precise estimates of the effects of major metabolic risk factors on CVD and diabetes by age group. PMID:23935815

  7. Alterations of Dermal Connective Tissue Collagen in Diabetes: Molecular Basis of Aged-Appearing Skin

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Angela J.; Robichaud, Patrick; Balimunkwe, Rebecca Mutesi; Fisher, Gary J.; Hammerberg, Craig; Yan, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of the collagen, the major structural protein in skin, contribute significantly to human skin connective tissue aging. As aged-appearing skin is more common in diabetes, here we investigated the molecular basis of aged-appearing skin in diabetes. Among all known human matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), diabetic skin shows elevated levels of MMP-1 and MMP-2. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) coupled real-time PCR indicated that elevated MMPs in diabetic skin were primarily expressed in the dermis. Furthermore, diabetic skin shows increased lysyl oxidase (LOX) expression and higher cross-linked collagens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) further indicated that collagen fibrils were fragmented/disorganized, and key mechanical properties of traction force and tensile strength were increased in diabetic skin, compared to intact/well-organized collagen fibrils in non-diabetic skin. In in vitro tissue culture system, multiple MMPs including MMP-1 and MM-2 were induced by high glucose (25 mM) exposure to isolated primary human skin dermal fibroblasts, the major cells responsible for collagen homeostasis in skin. The elevation of MMPs and LOX over the years is thought to result in the accumulation of fragmented and cross-linked collagen, and thus impairs dermal collagen structural integrity and mechanical properties in diabetes. Our data partially explain why old-looking skin is more common in diabetic patients. PMID:27104752

  8. Arterial hypertension – prevalence of risk factors and morbide associations that increase cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Sur, G; Sur, M; Kudor-Szabadi, L; Sur, L; Sporis, D; Sur, D

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypertension represents a serious problem in Romania, as there are over 3 million hypertensive people in our country. There is a high incidence of deaths caused by hypertension. We performed an analytical prospective study that aims to determine: prevalence of arterial hypertension in a population from Cluj county, distribution on age and gender, arterial hypertension severity, association of hypertension with other cardiovascular risk factors. Our study included 2266 patients, age 14 years old up to over 90 years old, both masculine and feminine gender, known with hypertension and new-diagnosed ones. Each subject was submitted to an interview based on a questionnaire. Diagnosis of arterial hypertension was established according to ESH criteria that consider as hypertension: values over 140/90 mmHg. Out of all subjects submitted to the study 647 (29.74%) were diagnosed with arterial hypertension and, from these, 102 (15.13%) were new-diagnosed patients. We found out a predominance of arterial hypertension at the age of 51-60 and over 60, an increased involvement of feminine sex; an association of hypertension with other major cardiovascular risk factors: obesity, diabetes, dislypidemia. Arterial hypertension represents an important health problem in Romania due to an increased prevalence, major impact on morbidity and mortality by cardiovascular and cerebro-vascular disease. These facts accentuate the necessity of an early diagnosis, of making people aware of the severity of the disease and it’s impact on their lifestyle. PMID:21977116

  9. Pulmonary Vascular Pressure Profiles in Broilers Selected for Susceptibility to Pulmonary Hypertension Syndrome: Age and Gender Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Wideman, R. F.; Eanes, M. L.; Hamal, K. R.; Anthony, N. B.

    2011-01-01

    Broilers that are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites) have an elevated pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) when compared with PHS-resistant broilers. Two distinctly different syndromes, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH), both are associated with increases in PAP. Pulmonary arterial hypertension occurs when the right ventricle must elevate the PAP to overcome increased resistance to flow through restrictive pulmonary arterioles upstream from the pulmonary capillaries. In contrast, PVH is commonly caused by increased downstream (post-capillary) resistance. The sites of resistance to pulmonary blood flow are deduced by making contemporaneous measurements of the PAP and the wedge pressure (WP), and calculating the trans-pulmonary pressure gradient (TPG = PAP-WP). We obtained PAP and WP values from 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 wk old anesthetized male and female broilers from a PHS-susceptible line. Pressures were recorded as a catheter was advanced through a wing vein to the pulmonary artery and onward until the WP was obtained. In addition to gender and age comparisons of vascular pressure gradients, the data also were pooled to obtain three cohorts for broilers having the lowest PAP values (n = 52; range: 12 to 22.9 mmHg), intermediate PAP values (n = 63; range: 23 to 32.9 mmHg), and highest PAP values (n = 62; range: 33 to 62 mmHg) independent of age or gender. Within each of the age, gender and PAP cohort comparisons, broilers with elevated PAP consistently exhibited the hemodynamic characteristics of PAH (elevated PAP and TPG combined with a normal WP) and not PVH (elevated PAP and WP combined with a normal or reduced TPG). Susceptibility to PHS can be attributed primarily to pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with increased pre-capillary (arteriole) resistance. PMID:20709965

  10. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) type II among Iranian elderly population and its association with other age-related diseases, 2012.

    PubMed

    Taheri Tanjani, Parisa; Moradinazar, Mehdi; Esmail Mottlagh, Mohammad; Najafi, Farid

    2015-01-01

    DM type II is one of the most common chronic diseases. The objective of this study is to investigate the prevalence of DM and its association with other age-related diseases in Iran, 2012. In this cross-sectional study, people aged 60 years and over were selected using multistage sampling method. Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Activity of Daily Living (ADL), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15 items) questionnaires were used. History of common disorders was taken through self-report, medical records and the results of clinical examinations. A total of 1350 old people were studied. DM type II was found in 297 (22.0%) subjects and 371 (27.5%) of subjects were not aware of their DM status. Hypertension (55.6%), high serum cholesterol (51.8%), malnutrition (40.1%), Alzheimer's disease (16.9%), weight loss within past year (16.1%), weight gain within past year (11.7%), frailty (64.6%), insomnia (50.1%), and vision problems (62.6%) were significantly more common in diabetics. Those who were not aware of their status of DM either were between diabetics and non-diabetics or more similar to non-diabetics. Considering high prevalence of age-related diseases among Iranian elderly people, in particular women and those with DM type II, preventive measures are recommended so as to decrease and control DM type II and its consequent complications. PMID:25623857

  11. Self-Esteem in Diabetic Adolescents: Relationship Between Age at Onset and Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Christopher M.; Morrow, Lisa A.

    1986-01-01

    The self-esteem of 125 diabetic and 82 nondiabetic adolescents was examined with the Piers-Harris scale. Girls who developed diabetes before five years of age had poorer self-concept scores than early onset boys, whereas boys and girls in the later onset or control groups had equivalent scores. This interaction was restricted to Physical…

  12. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  13. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment and Control of Hypertension in Indonesian Adults Aged ≥40 Years: Findings from the Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS)

    PubMed Central

    Mamun, Abdullah Al; Reid, Christopher; Huxley, Rachel R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypertension is the major driver of the cardiovascular epidemic facing Indonesia in the 21st century. Understanding the socioeconomic inequalities associated with hypertension is essential for designing effective intervention strategies. The aim of the current study was to use sub-nationally representative survey data to examine socio-demographic inequalities in the prevalence, diagnosis and management of hypertension in Indonesian adults. Methods We investigated factors associated with hypertension prevalence, diagnosis, treatment and control using data on self-reported diagnosis and treatment, and blood pressure measurements, collected from 9755 respondents aged 40 years and up in the 2007 Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS 4). Results Age-standardized prevalence of hypertension among the study participants was 47.8% (95% CI: 46.8, 48.9), of which almost 70% were undiagnosed. Hypertension was significantly higher in women than men (52.3% versus 43.1%, p-value<0.001). Prevalence of hypertension increased significantly with ageing (Pfor trend <0.001). Over 91% (men: 92.1%, women: 90.0%) of hypertension cases were uncontrolled. Gender, education and socioeconomic status had differential impact on the diagnosis of hypertension and in receiving treatment. Conclusions Overall, less than a third were aware of their hypertension and a quarter of those on medication had their blood pressure effectively controlled. Men and those of younger age were more vulnerable to have undiagnosed and untreated hypertension. Substantial effort should be given to improve awareness about the condition and making provision for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27556532

  14. Cerebrolysin improves memory and ameliorates neuronal atrophy in spontaneously hypertensive, aged rats.

    PubMed

    Solis-Gaspar, Carlos; Vazquez-Roque, Ruben A; De Jesús Gómez-Villalobos, Ma; Flores, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rat has been used as an animal model of vascular dementia (VD). Our previous report showed that, SH rats exhibited dendritic atrophy of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 dorsal hippocampus and layers 3 and 5 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) at 8 months of age. In addition, we showed that cerebrolysin (Cbl), a neurotrophic peptide mixture, reduces the dendritic atrophy in aged animal models. This study aimed to determine whether Cbl was capable of reducing behavioral and neuronal alterations, in old female SH rats. The level of diastolic and systolic pressure was measured every month for the 6 first months and only animals with more than 160 mm Hg of systolic pressure were used. Female SH rats (6 months old) received 6 months of Cbl treatment. Immediately after the Cbl treatment, two behavioral tests were applied, the Morris water maze test for memory and learning and locomotor activity in novel environments. Immediately after the last behavioral test, dendritic morphology was studied with the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by a Sholl analysis. Clearly, SH rats with Cbl showed an increase in the dendritic length and dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 in the dorsal hippocampus and layers 3 and 5 of the PFC. Interestingly, Cbl improved memory of the old SH rats. Our results support the possibility that Cbl may have beneficial effects on the management of brain alterations in an animal model with VD. Synapse 70:378-389, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27164468

  15. Essential Hypertension vs. Secondary Hypertension Among Children

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Ashish; Shete, Sanjay; Hashmi, Syed Sharukh; Tyson, John E.; Barratt, Michelle S.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Milewicz, Diane M.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to determine the proportions and correlates of essential hypertension among children in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic. METHODS We evaluated 423 consecutive children and collected demographic and clinical history by retrospective chart review. RESULTS We identified 275 (65%) hypertensive children (blood pressure >95th percentile per the “Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents”) from 423 children referred to the clinic for history of elevated blood pressure. The remainder of the patients had normotension (11%), white coat hypertension (11%), prehypertension (10%), and pending diagnosis (3%). Among the 275 hypertensive children, 43% (n = 119; boys = 56%; median age = 12 years; range = 3–17 years) had essential hypertension and 57% (n = 156; boys = 66%; median age = 9 years; range = 0.08–19 years) had secondary hypertension. When compared with those with secondary hypertension, those with essential hypertension had a significantly older age at diagnosis (P = 0.0002), stronger family history of hypertension (94% vs. 68%; P < 0.0001), and lower prevalence of preterm birth (20% vs. 46%; P < 0.001). There was a bimodal distribution of age of diagnosis in those with secondary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of essential hypertension can present as early as 3 years of age and is the predominant form of hypertension in children after age of 6 years. Among children with hypertension, those with essential hypertension present at an older age, have a stronger family history of hypertension, and have lower prevalence of preterm birth. PMID:24842390

  16. Long sleep duration and afternoon napping are associated with higher risk of incident diabetes in middle-aged and older Chinese: the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Liu, Bing; Wang, Jing; Pan, An; Li, Yaru; Hu, Hua; Li, Xiulou; Yang, Kun; Yuan, Jing; Yao, Ping; Miao, Xiaoping; Wei, Sheng; Wang, Youjie; Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaomin; Guo, Huan; Yang, Handong; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Tangchun; He, Meian

    2016-06-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the independent and combined effects of sleep duration and afternoon napping on the risk of incident diabetes among a cohort of middle-aged and older Chinese adults. Methods Information of sleep and napping was obtained by questionnaires during face-to-face interviews. We categorized sleep duration into <7 h, 7∼<8 h (reference), 8∼<9 h, 9∼<10 h, and ≥ 10 h. Afternoon napping was divided into no napping (0 min) (reference), 1-30 min, 31-60 min, 61-90 min, and > 90 min. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used. Results Compared with referential sleeping group, subjects sleeping ≥10 h had a 42% higher risk of developing diabetes. The HR was 1.28 for napping > 90 min when compared with no napping. These associations were more pronounced in individuals without hypertension. Combined effects of long sleep duration and afternoon napping were further identified. Individuals with both sleep duration ≥ 10 h and napping > 60 min had a 72% higher risk of incident diabetes than those with sleeping 7∼<8 h and napping 0 min (all above p < 0.05). Conclusions Both long sleep duration and afternoon napping were independently and jointly associated with higher risk of incident diabetes. Key messages Sleep duration was associated with diabetes, but whether it is a real cause of incident diabetes especially in Chinese still remains to be elucidated. The association of afternoon napping and diabetes was not consistent and definite, we clarified this association in a large prospective study. Long sleep duration and afternoon napping were independently and jointly associated with higher risk of incident diabetes. PMID:26969344

  17. APOL1 Risk Alleles are Associated with More Severe Arteriosclerosis in Renal Resistance Vessels with Aging and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hughson, Michael D; Hoy, Wendy E; Mott, Susan A; Puelles, Victor G; Bertram, John F; Winkler, Cheryl L; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    The increased risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) among hypertensive African Americans is partly related to APOL1 allele variants. Hypertension-associated arterionephrosclerosis consists of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis. The initial glomerulosclerosis, attributed to preglomerular arteriosclerosis and ischemia, consists of focal global glomerulosclerosis (FGGS), but in biopsy studies, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is found with progression to ESKD, particularly in African Americans. This is a study of arterionephrosclerosis in successfully APOL1 genotyped autopsy kidney tissue of 159 African Americans (61 no risk alleles, 68 one risk allele, 30 two risk alleles) and 135 whites aged 18–89 years from a general population with no clinical renal disease. Glomerulosclerosis was nearly exclusively FGGS with only three subjects having FSGS-like lesions that were unrelated to APOL1 risk status. For both races, in multivariable analysis, the dependent variables of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis were all significantly related to the independent variables of older age (P < 0.001) and hypertension (P < 0.001). A relationship between APOL1 genotype and arteriosclerosis was apparent only after 35 years of age when, for any level of elevated blood pressure, more severe arteriosclerosis was found in the interlobular arteries of 14 subjects with two APOL1 risk alleles when compared to African Americans with none (n = 37, P = 0.02) or one risk alleles (n = 35, P = 0.02). With the limitation of the small number of subjects contributing to the positive results, the findings imply that APOL1 risk alleles recessively augment small vessel arteriosclerosis in conjunction with age and hypertension. FSGS was not a significant finding, indicating that in the early stages of arterionephrosclerosis, the primary pathologic influence of APOL1 genotype is vascular rather than glomerular.

  18. Effect of Long Working Hours on Self-reported Hypertension among Middle-aged and Older Wage Workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Many studies have reported an association between overwork and hypertension. However, research on the health effects of long working hours has yielded inconclusive results. The objective of this study was to identify an association between overtime work and hypertension in wage workers 45 years and over of age using prospective data. Methods Wage workers in Korea aged 45 years and over were selected for inclusion in this study from among 10,254 subjects from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Workers with baseline hypertension and those with other major diseases were excluded. In the end, a total of 1,079 subjects were included. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios and adjust for baseline characteristics such as sex, age, education, income, occupation, form of employment, body mass index, alcohol habit, smoking habit, regular exercise, and number of working days per week. Additional models were used to calculate hazard ratios after gender stratification. Results Among the 1,079 subjects, 85 workers were diagnosed with hypertension during 3974.2 person-months. The average number of working hours per week for all subjects was 47.68. The proportion of overtime workers was 61.0% (cutoff, 40 h per week). Compared with those working 40 h and less per week, the hazard ratio of subjects in the final model, which adjusted for all selected variables, working 41-50 h per week was 2.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19–4.06), that of subjects working 51-60 h per week was 2.40 (95% CI, 1.07–5.39), and that of subjects working 61 h and over per week was 2.87 (95% CI, 1.33–6.20). In gender stratification models, the hazard ratio of the females tended to be higher than that of the males. Conclusion As the number of working hours per week increased, the hazard ratio for diagnosis of hypertension significantly increased. This result suggests a positive association between overtime work and the risk of hypertension. PMID

  19. Beneficial effect of combination therapy using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor plus verapamil on circulating resistin levels in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Lozano Nuevo, Jose J; Elizalde-Barrera, Cesar I; Huerta-Ramirez, Saul; Escalante-Acosta, Bruno A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resistin levels are strongly correlated with insulin resistance and vascular inflammation. Type 2 diabetic and hypertensive patients have higher circulating levels of resistin, which is associated with endothelial dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of trandolapril (T) and its fixed-dose combination with verapamil (FDTV) on resistin levels in hypertensive, type-2 diabetic patients. METHODS: Forty type-2 diabetic patients with never-treated hypertension were randomly assigned to two groups. One group received FDTV 2 mg/180 mg once per day; the other group received T 2 mg once per day. Study drugs were administered for three months in both groups. Resistin levels were measured using ELISA at the beginning of the study and at study end. Patients were evaluated monthly for blood pressure, fasting serum glucose levels and adverse events. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA. RESULTS: All patients experienced a significant reduction in blood pressure. Both therapeutic regimens reduced resistin levels; however, FDTV treatment resulted in a greater decrease in resistin levels (mean [± SD] 25.5±13 ng/mL to 17.2±10 ng/mL) when compared with T treatment (22.4±12 ng/mL to 18.5±8 ng/mL) (P<0.05). None of the patients experienced an adverse event. CONCLUSION: Results showed that FDTV resulted in a greater reduction in resistin levels than T treatment alone. PMID:23592936

  20. A community-based controlled trial of a comprehensive psychological intervention for community residents with diabetes or hypertension

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, Qingzhi; HE, Yanling; SHI, Zhenyu; LIU, Weiqing; TAO, Hua; BU, Shiming; MIAO, Donglei; LIU, Ping; ZHANG, Xuanzhao; LI, Xiaoping; QI, Xuejun; ZHOU, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety often occur in persons with chronic physical illnesses and typically magnify the impairment caused by these physical conditions, but little attention has been paid to this issue in low- and middle-income countries. Aim Evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based psychological intervention administered by non-specialized clinicians and volunteers for alleviating depressive and anxiety symptoms in individuals with chronic physical illnesses. Methods A total of 10, 164 community residents receiving treatment for diabetes or hypertension in Shanghai were arbitrarily assigned to a treatment-as-usual condition (n=2042) or an intervention condition (n=8122) that included community-wide psychological health promotion, peer support groups, and individual counseling sessions. The self-report Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), and 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) assessed depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and quality of life at baseline and after the 6-month intervention. Results Among the 8813 individuals who completed the baseline assessment, 16% had mild or more severe depressive or anxiety symptoms (PHQ-9 or GAD-7 ≥5) and 4% had moderate or severe depressive or anxiety symptoms (PHQ-9 or GAD-7 ≥10). The education component of the intervention was effectively implemented, but only 31% of those eligible for peer-support groups and only 9% of those eligible for individual counseling accepted these interventions. The dropout rate was high (51%), and there were significant differences between those who did and did not complete the follow-up assessment. After adjusting for these confounding factors, the results in individuals who completed both assessments indicated that the intervention was associated with significant improvements in depressive symptoms (F=9.98, p<0.001), anxiety symptoms (F=12.85, p<0.001), and in the Mental Component Summary score of the SF-12 (F=16.13, p<0

  1. Effects of Jiangya Xiaoke prescription on TGF-β1 in diabetic nephropathy rats with hypertension and its mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuanshuan; Lu, Kun; Zhang, Yunfeng; Song, Xiaolian; Tan, Min; Wang, Changhui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of Jiangya Xiaoke prescription on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in diabetic nephropathy (DN) with hypertension rats and to investigate its mechanisms. Methods: DN with hypertension models were made by 4 weeks high-salt diet with high sugar and fat for male Wistar rats, and intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The model rats were randomly divided into three groups: untreated model group (n = 15); metformin group (n = 15), orally given metformin; Prescription group (n = 15), orally administrated JXR, for 8 weeks respectively. Blood pressure was measured before modeling and after treatment of 2, 4, 8 weeks. Fasting blood glucose (FBG), total triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) and urine albumin excretion (UAE) of rats were observed and recorded. Renal histomorphology with PAS staining was observed by the light microscope. TGF-β1 in kidney was detected by immunohistochemical assay and TGF-β1 mRNA in renal cortex was detected by RT-PCR. Results: The base blood pressure of rats has no significant difference before modeling (P > 0.05). After 4 weeks of treatment, compared with model group, blood pressure in metformin group decreased (P < 0.01), blood pressure in Jiangya Xiaoke prescription group was slightly lower (P < 0.05). When 8 weeks, the rebound of blood pressure in metformin group is appropriate with the model, the blood pressure of Jiangya Xiaoke prescription reduced significantly (P < 0.01). Compared with model group, FBG, UAE and TG in Jiangya Xiaoke prescription group and metformin group significantly decreased (P < 0.01), TC levels also decreased (P < 0.05). The level of TGF-β1 in Jiangya Xiaoke prescription group and the metformin group decreased (P < 0.01), and level of TGF-β1 in Jiangya Xiaoke prescription group was lower significantly than that in metformin group (P < 0.05). The mRNA expression of TGF-β1 in Jiangya Xiaoke prescription group and the metformin group was significantly

  2. Chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity in the adult population of Morocco: how to avoid "over"- and "under"-diagnosis of CKD.

    PubMed

    Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Elseviers, Monique; Zamd, Mohamed; Belghiti Alaoui, Abdelali; Benahadi, Naïma; Trabelssi, El Hassane; Bayahia, Rabia; Ramdani, Benyounès; De Broe, Marc E

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an adult Arabic-Berber population was investigated according to 2012 KDIGO guidelines. A stratified, randomized, representative sample of 10,524 participants was obtained. Weight, height, blood pressure, proteinuria (dipstick), plasma creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and fasting glycemia were measured. Abnormal results were controlled within 2 weeks; eGFR was retested at 3, 6, and 12 months. The population adjusted prevalences were 16.7% hypertension, 23.2% obesity, 13.8% glycemia, 1.6% for eGFR under 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and confirmed proteinuria 1.9% and hematuria 3.4%. Adjusted prevalence of CKD was 5.1%; distribution over KDIGO stages: CKD1: 17.8%; CKD2: 17.2%; CKD3: 52.5% (3A: 40.2%; 3B: 12.3%); CKD4: 4.4%; CKD5: 7.2%. An eGFR distribution within the sex and age categories was constructed using the third percentile as threshold for decreased eGFR. A single threshold (under 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) eGFR classifying CKD3-5 leads to "overdiagnosis" of CKD3A in the elderly, overt "underdiagnosis" in younger individuals with eGFR over 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2), below the third percentile, and no proteinuria. By using the KDIGO guidelines in a correct way, "kidney damage" (confirmed proteinuria, hematuria) and the demonstration of chronicity of decreased eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2), combined with the third percentile as a cutoff for the normality of eGFR for age and sex, overcome false positives and negatives, substantially decrease CKD3A prevalence, and greatly increase the accuracy of identifying CKD. PMID:27165829

  3. [Age-related features of immunocompetent cells of human placenta associated with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Durnova, A O; Poliakova, V O; Pal'chenko, N A

    2010-01-01

    The immune-competent cells of placenta play the important role in protection of developing fetus against infectious agents; but their dysfunction can lead to development of placental insufficiency that affects health both fetus and mother. The aim of this study was the comparative analysis of presence of immune competent cells in villous chorion of mature placenta, taken from women with diabetes of different age groups. In our study we found three subpopulations of immune cells in villous chorion of mature placenta: natural killer cells (NK), B-lymphocytes and macrophages. Prevailing subpopulation are macrophages, they are detected 1,8 times more often than B-lymphocytes, and 2,3 times more often than NK. The quantity of immune competent cells in groups with diabetes of various types is different. Thus, the greatest number of macrophages was detected in group with diabetes type II of middle age (29-35 years)-- 4.62 +/- 0.93%, B-lymphocytes in group of women with diabetes type I of younger age (18-28 years)--2.50 +/- 0.30%, NK-cells in group with diabetes type I of younger age--1.98 +/- 0,42%. Analysis of received data showed the differences in expression of markers of immune cells in women of different age groups, which brings about the conclusion of various reactance of immune system of women with diabetes depending on age. PMID:21033374

  4. Ultrafine carbon particle mediated cardiovascular impairment of aged spontaneously hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Previous studies provided compelling evidences for particulate matter (PM) associated cardiovascular health effects. Elderly individuals, particularly those with preexisting conditions like hypertension are regarded to be vulnerable. Experimental data are warranted to...

  5. Age and Sex Influence Cystatin C in Adolescents With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maahs, David M.; Prentice, Nicole; McFann, Kim; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Jalal, Diana; Bishop, Franziska K.; Aragon, Brittany; Wadwa, R. Paul

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare serum cystatin C levels, a novel biomarker of renal function, in adolescents with and without type 1 diabetes and to determine what factors affect cystatin C levels. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cystatin C was measured in youth 12–19 years of age with (n = 259, diabetes duration 9 ± 3 years, HbA1c 8.9 ± 1.6%) and without diabetes (n = 78). Data were compared by diabetes status, and linear regression was used to determine factors affecting cystatin C. RESULTS Cystatin C (0.698 ± 0.083 vs. 0.688 ± 0.127 mg/L, P = 0.40) was similar by diabetes status. In multiple linear regression, cystatin C was associated with age and serum creatinine in nondiabetic subjects and sex, age, and serum creatinine in subjects with diabetes (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest sex differences and age-related changes in cystatin C in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. An understanding of these changes is needed to determine the potential role of cystatin C as a marker of renal function in this population. PMID:21926294

  6. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Diabetic retinopathy affects men and ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Projections for Diabetic Retinopathy (2010- ...

  7. Sex-Specific Programming of Hypertension in Offspring of Late Gestation Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Katkhuda, Ragheed; Peterson, Emily S.; Roghair, Robert D.; Norris, Andrew W.; Scholz, Thomas D.; Segar, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The intrauterine environment strongly influences adult disease susceptibility. We utilized a rat model of third trimester maternal diabetes to test the hypothesis that adult offspring exposed to hyperglycemia in utero display increased blood pressure and alterations in vascular responsiveness. Methods Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection to pregnant rats on gestation day 13 (term 21 day) and partially controlled with insulin injections. Hemodynamic function was evaluated in 6–12 month old offspring. Results Male but not female offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM) had significantly increased blood pressure compared to controls, heart rate was similar. For both sexes, heart rate baroreflex responses were similar as were in vivo hemodynamic responses to angiotensin II, NOS inhibition and ganglionic blockade. Aortic contractility to angiotensin II was similar in both groups. NOS inhibition and the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate but not the SOD-mimetic Tempol significantly increased contractile responses to angiotensin II in controls but not ODM. NADPH stimulated superoxide production was greater in male ODM than controls (p<0.05). Conclusions Exposure to hyperglycemia in utero results in sex specific cardiovascular changes in adult offspring. Impaired NO - reactive oxygen species signaling may play a significant role in the hemodynamic phenotype of ODM. PMID:22805998

  8. Exaggerated blood pressure response during the exercise treadmill test as a risk factor for hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lima, S.G.; Albuquerque, M.F.P.M.; Oliveira, J.R.M.; Ayres, C.F.J.; Cunha, J.E.G.; Oliveira, D.F.; Lemos, R.R.; Souza, M.B.R.; Silva, O. Barbosa e

    2013-01-01

    Exaggerated blood pressure response (EBPR) during the exercise treadmill test (ETT) has been considered to be a risk factor for hypertension. The relationship of polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin system gene with hypertension has not been established. Our objective was to evaluate whether EBPR during exercise is a clinical marker for hypertension. The study concerned a historical cohort of normotensive individuals. The exposed individuals were those who presented EBPR. At the end of the observation period (41.7 months = 3.5 years), the development of hypertension was analyzed within the two groups. Genetic polymorphisms and blood pressure behavior were assessed as independent variables, together with the classical risk factors for hypertension. The I/D gene polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme and M235T of angiotensinogen were ruled out as risk factors for hypertension. EBPR during ETT is not an independent influence on the chances of developing hypertension. No differences were observed between the hypertensive and normotensive individuals regarding gender (P = 0.655), skin color (P = 0.636), family history of hypertension (P = 0.225), diabetes mellitus (P = 0.285), or hypertriglyceridemia (P = 0.734). The risk of developing hypertension increased with increasing body mass index (BMI) and advancing age. The risk factors, which independently influenced the development of hypertension, were age and BMI. EBPR did not constitute an independent risk factor for hypertension and is probably a preclinical phase in the spectrum of normotension and hypertension. PMID:23598646

  9. Age as an independent factor for the development of neuropathy in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Simona; Timar, Bogdan; Baderca, Flavia; Simu, Mihaela; Diaconu, Laura; Velea, Iulian; Timar, Romulus

    2016-01-01

    Population aging is unprecedented, without parallel in the history of humanity. As type 2 diabetes mellitus is predominantly more prevalent in aging populations, this creates a major public health burden. Older adults with diabetes have the highest rates of major lower-extremity amputation, myocardial infarction, visual impairment, and end-stage renal disease of any age group. The aims of our study were to assess whether age is an independent factor for the occurrence of diabetic neuropathy (DN), and to evaluate the relationship between the presence and the severity of DN and the diabetes duration and blood glucose level. In this study, we enrolled 198 patients, previously diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. For all patients, we measured hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), lipid profile, and body mass index and we assessed the presence and severity of DN using the evaluation of clinical signs and symptoms. Patients had a median age of 62 years, with a median of diabetes duration of 7 years; 55.1% of the patients were men and the average HbA1c in the cohort was 8.2%. The prevalence of DN according to Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument was 28.8%, being significantly and positively correlated with higher age (65 vs 59 years; P=0.001) and HbA1c (8.6% vs 8.0%; P=0.027). No significant correlations were observed between the severity of DN and diabetes duration, body mass index (31.9 vs 29.9 kg/m2), or the number of centimeters exceeding the normal waist circumference (25.2 vs 17.3 cm; P=0.003). In conclusion, age influences the presence of DN, independent on other risk factors. This influence persists even after adjusting for other, very important risk factors, like blood glucose level or diabetes duration. PMID:27042031

  10. Inhaled Corticosteroids Use Is Not Associated With an Increased Risk of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Jimin; Jang, Eun Jin; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Yun Jung; Choi, Seongmi; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Yim, Jae-Joon; Yoon, Ho Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There have been concerns that systemic corticosteroid use is associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and diabetes mellitus. However, the relationship between inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and the risk of PIH has not been fully examined, and there was no study investigating the association between ICS use and the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aims of the study are to determine whether the use of ICSs during pregnancy increases the risk of PIH and GDM in women. We conducted 2 nested case-control studies utilizing the nationwide insurance claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (Seoul, Republic of Korea), in which 1,306,281 pregnant women who delivered between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were included. Among them, PIH cases and GDM cases were identified and matched controls were included. Conditional logistic regression analyses adjusted by other concomitant drugs use during and before pregnancy and confounding covariates including comorbidities were performed. Total 43,908 PIH cases and 219,534 controls, and 34,190 GDM cases and 170,934 control subjects were identified. When other concomitant drugs use during pregnancy was adjusted, ICS use was associated with an increased rate of PIH (adjusted odds ratio, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.05–1.87]). ICS medication possession ratios and cumulative doses were associated with an increased risk of PIH. However, the statistical significance was not found in other models. In both unadjusted and adjusted multivariable models, ICSs use was not associated with increase in the risk of GDM. ICSs use is not associated with an increased risk of PIH and GDM. PMID:27258493

  11. Systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elliott, William J

    2007-04-01

    Hypertension is a growing public health problem worldwide. Only 37% of American hypertensives currently have their blood pressures controlled. Hypertension is traditionally diagnosed in the medical office, but both home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can help. Lifestyle modifications are recommended for everyone who has higher than "normal" blood pressure (<120/80 mm Hg). Voluminous clinical trial data support beginning drug therapy with low-dose chlorthalidone, unless the patient has a specific indication for a different drug. Additional drugs (typically in the sequence, angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker, calcium antagonist, beta-blocker, alpha-blocker, aldosterone antagonist, direct vasodilator, and centrally acting alpha(2)-agonist) can be added to achieve the blood pressure goal (usually <140/90 mm Hg, but <130/80 mm Hg for diabetics and those with chronic kidney disease). Special circumstances exist for treatment of hypertension in pregnancy, in childhood, in the elderly, and in both extremes of blood pressure (pre-hypertension or hypertensive emergencies). PMID:17398315

  12. Disparities in Age at Diabetes Diagnosis Among Asian Americans: Implications for Early Preventive Measures.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Monideepa B; Becerra, Benjamin J

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the association between Asian American ethnicity and age at diagnosis for type 2 diabetes using data from the California Health Interview Survey. Survey-weighted unadjusted and adjusted linear regressions were used to obtain mean estimates of age at diagnosis. In the adjusted regression model, ages at diagnosis were 10.5, 8.7, 8.4, and 4.2 years earlier among South Asian, Vietnamese, Filipino, and Korean populations, respectively, as compared to non-Hispanic whites; no significant difference in age at diagnosis was noted for Chinese and Japanese populations. Recommendations for diabetes screening and preventive measures specific to Asian American populations are warranted. PMID:26355827

  13. Disparities in Age at Diabetes Diagnosis Among Asian Americans: Implications for Early Preventive Measures

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the association between Asian American ethnicity and age at diagnosis for type 2 diabetes using data from the California Health Interview Survey. Survey-weighted unadjusted and adjusted linear regressions were used to obtain mean estimates of age at diagnosis. In the adjusted regression model, ages at diagnosis were 10.5, 8.7, 8.4, and 4.2 years earlier among South Asian, Vietnamese, Filipino, and Korean populations, respectively, as compared to non-Hispanic whites; no significant difference in age at diagnosis was noted for Chinese and Japanese populations. Recommendations for diabetes screening and preventive measures specific to Asian American populations are warranted. PMID:26355827

  14. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    PubMed Central

    Salako, Babatunde L.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Cooper, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH), isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH), and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH). Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5%) and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7%) were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2%) was higher among males (P = 0.048). Female subjects were more obese (P < 0.0001) and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations. PMID:25389499

  15. Neuropsychological Impairment in School-Aged Children Born to Mothers With Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Lourdes; Matute, Esmeralda; Ramírez-Dueñas, María de Lourdes; Zarabozo, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether school-aged children born to mothers with gestational diabetes show delays in their neuropsychological development. Several key neuropsychological characteristics of 32 children aged 7 to 9 years born to mothers with gestational diabetes were examined by comparing their performance on cognitive tasks to that of 28 children aged 8 to 10 years whose mothers had glucose levels within normal limits during pregnancy. The gestational diabetes group showed low performance on graphic, spatial, and bimanual skills and a higher presence of soft neurologic signs. Lower scores for general intellectual level and the working memory index were also evident. Our results suggest that gestational diabetes is associated with mild cognitive impairment. PMID:25814475

  16. Diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael; Sharma, Sanjay; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved. Complex interrelated pathophysiological mechanisms triggered by hyperglycaemia underlie the development of DR. These mechanisms include genetic and epigenetic factors, increased production of free radicals, advanced glycosylation end products, inflammatory factors and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser photocoagulation prevents severe vision loss in eyes with proliferative DR. These measures, together with increasing public awareness and access to regular screening for DR with retinal photography, and the development of new treatments to address early disease stages, will lead to better outcomes and prevent blindness for patients with DR. PMID:27159554

  17. Whole grains, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and hypertension: links to the aleurone preferred over indigestible fiber.

    PubMed

    Lillioja, Stephen; Neal, Andrew L; Tapsell, Linda; Jacobs, David R

    2013-01-01

    Higher whole grain cereal intakes are associated with substantially lower risks of type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. These reduced risks have been established in large prospective studies that now include millions of person-years of follow-up. We analyze the results of 11 major prospective studies to provide recommendations about whole grain consumption. The following review establishes the amount of whole grains that should ideally be consumed based on prospective evidence; defines the nature of whole grains; identifies that the whole grain evidence is robust and not due to confounding; and provides a detailed assessment of several potential mechanisms for the effect of whole grains on health. We draw the following conclusions. Firstly, to maintain health, 40 grams or more of whole grains should be consumed daily. This is about a bowl of whole grain breakfast cereal daily, but 80% of the population does not achieve this. Secondly, aleurone in bran is a critical grain component generally overlooked in favor of indigestible fiber. Live aleurone cells constitute 50% of millers' bran. They store minerals, protein, and the antioxidant ferulic acid, and are clearly more than just indigestible fiber. Finally, we suggest potential roles for magnesium, zinc, and ferulic acid in the development of chronic disease. If the results of prospective studies were applied to the life-style practices of modern societies there exists the potential for enormous personal health and public financial benefits. PMID:23355358

  18. β-Blockers in hypertension, diabetes, heart failure and acute myocardial infarction: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Fares, Hassan; Niazi, Asfandyar K; Chatterjee, Saurav; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Cerrato, Enrico; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Lavie, Carl J; Bell, David S; O'Keefe, James H

    2015-01-01

    β-Blockers (BBs) are an essential class of cardiovascular medications for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). However, a large body of data indicates that BBs should not be used as first-line therapy for hypertension (HTN). Additionally, new data have questioned the role of BBs in the treatment of stable coronary heart disease (CHD). However, these trials mainly tested the non-vasodilating β1 selective BBs (atenolol and metoprolol) which are still the most commonly prescribed BBs in the USA. Newer generation BBs, such as the vasodilating BBs carvedilol and nebivolol, have been shown not only to be better tolerated than non-vasodilating BBs, but also these agents do not increase the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM), atherogenic dyslipidaemia or weight gain. Moreover, carvedilol has the most evidence for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with HF and those who have experienced an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This review discusses the cornerstone clinical trials that have tested BBs in the settings of HTN, HF and AMI. Large randomised trials in the settings of HTN, DM and stable CHD are still needed to establish the role of BBs in these diseases, as well as to determine whether vasodilating BBs are exempt from the disadvantages of non-vasodilating BBs. PMID:25821584

  19. Whole Grains, Type 2 Diabetes, Coronary Heart Disease, and Hypertension: Links to the Aleurone preferred over Indigestible Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Lillioja, Stephen; Neal, Andrew L; Tapsell, Linda; Jacobs, David R

    2012-01-01

    Higher whole grain cereal intakes are associated with substantially lower risks of type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. These reduced risks have been established in large prospective studies that now include millions of person-years of follow-up. We analyze the results of 11 major prospective studies to provide recommendations about whole grain consumption. The following review establishes the amount of whole grains that should ideally be consumed based on prospective evidence; defines the nature of whole grains; identifies that the whole grain evidence is robust and not due to confounding; and provides a detailed assessment of several potential mechanisms for the effect of whole grains on health. We draw the following conclusions. Firstly, to maintain health, 40 grams or more of whole grains should be consumed daily. This is about a bowl of whole grain breakfast cereal daily, but 80% of the population does not achieve this. Secondly, aleurone in bran is a critical grain component generally overlooked in favor of indigestible fiber. Live aleurone cells constitute 50% of millers’ bran. They store minerals, protein, and the antioxidant ferulic acid, and are clearly more than just indigestible fiber. Finally, we suggest potential roles for magnesium, zinc, and ferulic acid in the development of chronic disease. If the results of prospective studies were applied to the life-style practices of modern societies there exists the potential for enormous personal health and public financial benefits. PMID:23355358

  20. Association of TNF-α G308A gene polymorphism in essential hypertensive patients without type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ghodsian, N; Akhlaghi, M; Ramachandran, V; Heidari, F; Haghvirdizadeh, P; Eshkoor, S A; Etemad, A; Jamaluddin, J A; Ismail, P

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) G308A gene polymorphism on essential hypertension (EHT) with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The project was conducted on buccal epithelial and blood cells for case and control patients, respectively. Epithelial cells were obtained from the inner part of the cheeks. Techniques including DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were utilized to assess biomarkers of DNA damage. Our results demonstrated significant differences between wild and mutated genotypes among EHT patients without T2DM. We also found a significant association between wild and mutated allele frequencies in EHT patients (P < 0.05). Clinical characteristics between the groups (EHT with or without T2DM and controls) showed statistically significant association (P < 0.05). Overall, we show that G308A polymorphism of the TNF-αgene may be a significant genetic risk factor for EHT without T2DM patients in Malaysia. PMID:26782547

  1. Effect of Forest Walking on Autonomic Nervous System Activity in Middle-Aged Hypertensive Individuals: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chorong; Ikei, Harumi; Kobayashi, Maiko; Miura, Takashi; Taue, Masao; Kagawa, Takahide; Li, Qing; Kumeda, Shigeyoshi; Imai, Michiko; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been increasing attention on the therapeutic effects of the forest environment. However, evidence-based research that clarifies the physiological effects of the forest environment on hypertensive individuals is lacking. This study provides scientific evidence suggesting that a brief forest walk affects autonomic nervous system activity in middle-aged hypertensive individuals. Twenty participants (58.0 ± 10.6 years) were instructed to walk predetermined courses in forest and urban environments (as control). Course length (17-min walk), walking speed, and energy expenditure were equal between the forest and urban environments to clarify the effects of each environment. Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate were used to quantify physiological responses. The modified semantic differential method and Profile of Mood States were used to determine psychological responses. The natural logarithm of the high-frequency component of HRV was significantly higher and heart rate was significantly lower when participants walked in the forest than when they walked in the urban environment. The questionnaire results indicated that, compared with the urban environment, walking in the forest increased “comfortable”, “relaxed”, “natural” and “vigorous” feelings and decreased “tension-anxiety,” “depression,” “anxiety-hostility,” “fatigue” and “confusion”. A brief walk in the forest elicited physiological and psychological relaxation effects on middle-aged hypertensive individuals. PMID:25739004

  2. Short telomere length is associated with arterial aging in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dudinskaya, E N; Tkacheva, O N; Shestakova, M V; Brailova, N V; Strazhesko, I D; Akasheva, D U; Isaykina, O Y; Sharashkina, N V; Kashtanova, D A; Boytsov, S A

    2015-01-01

    It is known that glucose disturbances contribute to micro- and macrovascular complications and vascular aging. Telomere length is considered to be a cellular aging biomarker. It is important to determine the telomere length role in vascular structural and functional changes in patients with diabetes mellitus. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study in a high-risk population from Moscow, Russia. The study included 50 patients with diabetes and without clinical cardiovascular disease and 49 control group participants. Glucose metabolism assessment tests, measuring intima–media complex thickness and determining the presence of atherosclerotic plaques, pulse wave velocity measurement, and telomere length measurement were administered to all participants. Vascular changes were more dramatic in patients with diabetes than in the control group, and the telomeres were shorter in patients with diabetes. Significant differences were found in the vascular wall condition among diabetes patients, and there were no substantial differences in the arterial structure between patients with ‘long’ telomeres; however, there were statistically significant differences in the vascular wall condition between patients with ‘short’ telomeres. Vascular ageing signs were more prominent in patients with diabetes. However, despite diabetes, vascular changes in patients with long telomeres were very modest and were similar to the vascular walls in healthy individuals. Thus, long lymphocyte telomeres may have a protective effect on the vascular wall and may prevent vascular wall deterioration caused by glucose metabolism disorders. PMID:26034119

  3. The effect of surgical treatment of phaeochromocytoma on concomitant arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus in a single–centre retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Pogorzelski, Ryszard; Toutounchi, Sadegh; Krajewska, Ewa; Fiszer, Patryk; Łykowski, Marcin; Szostek, Małgorzata; Jakuczun, Wawrzyniec; Pachucki, Janusz; Skórski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Phaeochromocytoma is one of the numerous causes of secondary hypertension. Furthermore, phaeochromocytoma may first present with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of our study was to evaluate the effects of adrenalectomy on patient recovery with regards to normotension and well–controlled glycaemia. Material and methods The retrospective analysis involved 67 patients with phaeochromocytoma operated between 2006 and mid-2012. The pre–operative diagnoses were made in the departments of internal medicine and endocrinology. Based on laboratory tests and diagnostic imaging, we were able to confirm the diagnosis of phaeochromocytoma in 42 (62.7%) patients. We verified the influence of adrenalectomy on the level of patient recovery, with regards to normotension and glycaemic control: arterial pressure and fasting glycaemia levels were obtained on the day of hospital discharge, at follow–up 3 months post–operatively and 1 year after surgical intervention. Results Of the 67 patients operated for phaeochromocytoma, 48 (71.6%) were treated laparoscopically, whereas 19 (28.4%) underwent open adrenalectomy. Arterial hypertension was recorded in 53 (79.1%) cases. Furthermore, among this group, diabetes mellitus coexisted in 21 (31.3%) cases. Postoperatively, 70% of cases of arterial hypertension and 90% of type 2 diabetes mellitus were cured. Additionally, a high rate of patients reported a quantitative reduced use of antihypertensive medicines. Conclusions In the majority of patients, surgical treatment of symptomatic phaeochromocytoma leads to a regression of arterial hypertension, or a reduction of the number or doses of medicines taken in one's treatment, and glucose–intolerance symptoms. PMID:25667755

  4. Antioxidant effect of garlic and aged black garlic in animal model of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Min; Gweon, Oh-Cheon; Seo, Yeong-Ju; Im, Jieun; Kang, Min-Jung; Kim, Myo-Jeong

    2009-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in the diabetic state increases oxidative stress and antioxidant therapy can be strongly correlated with decreased risks for diabetic complications. The purpose of this study is to determine antioxidant effect of garlic and aged black garlic in animal model of type 2 diabetes. The antioxidant activity of garlic and aged black garlic was measured as the activity in scavenging free radicals by the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay. Three week-old db/db mice were fed AIN-93G diet or diet containing 5% freeze-dried garlic or aged black garlic for 7 weeks after 1 week of adaptation. Hepatic levels of lipid peroxides and activities of antioxidant enzymes were measured. TEAC values of garlic and aged black garlic were 13.3 ± 0.5 and 59.2 ± 0.8 µmol/g wet weight, respectively. Consumption of aged black garlic significantly decreased hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level compared with the garlic group which showed lower TBARS level than control group (p<0.05). Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) of garlic and aged black garlic group were significantly elevated compared to the control group. Catalase (CAT) activity of aged black garlic group was increased compared with the control group. These results show that aged black garlic exerts stronger antioxidant activity than garlic in vitro and in vivo, suggesting garlic and aged black garlic, to a greater extent, could be useful in preventing diabetic complications. PMID:20016716

  5. Age and diabetes related changes of the retinal capillaries: An ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Enrica; Ripandelli, Guido; Taurone, Samanta; Feher, Janos; Plateroti, Rocco; Kovacs, Illes; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Orlando, Maria Patrizia; Micera, Alessandra; Battaglione, Ezio; Artico, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Normal human aging and diabetes are associated with a gradual decrease of cerebral flow in the brain with changes in vascular architecture. Thickening of the capillary basement membrane and microvascular fibrosis are evident in the central nervous system of elderly and diabetic patients. Current findings assign a primary role to endothelial dysfunction as a cause of basement membrane (BM) thickening, while retinal alterations are considered to be a secondary cause of either ischemia or exudation. The aim of this study was to reveal any initial retinal alterations and variations in the BM of retinal capillaries during diabetes and aging as compared to healthy controls. Moreover, we investigated the potential role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in diabetic retina.Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on 46 enucleated human eyes with particular attention to alterations of the retinal capillary wall and Müller glial cells. Inflammatory cytokines expression in the retina was investigated by immunohistochemistry.Our electron microscopy findings demonstrated that thickening of the BM begins primarily at the level of the glial side of the retina during aging and diabetes. The Müller cells showed numerous cytoplasmic endosomes and highly electron-dense lysosomes which surrounded the retinal capillaries. Our study is the first to present morphological evidence that Müller cells start to deposit excessive BM material in retinal capillaries during aging and diabetes. Our results confirm the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β within the retina as a result of diabetes.These observations strongly suggest that inflammatory cytokines and changes in the metabolism of Müller glial cells rather than changes in of endothelial cells may play a primary role in the alteration of retinal capillaries BM during aging and diabetes. PMID:26604209

  6. Hypertension Impact on Health-Related Quality of Life: A Cross-Sectional Survey among Middle-Aged Adults in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingli

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor of cardiovascular disease in China, and yet little is known about health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its associations with demographic and social-economic characteristics in middle-aged patients with hypertension. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in Chongqing, China, using a multistage stratified random sampling methodology. Data was collected on 1,224 eligible adults, aged between 45 and 53 years, including the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 to measure HRQOL. Hypertension was associated with poor state of physical functioning, role-physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, and social function (p < 0.05 for all). In multivariable analyses, education level, job conditions, average monthly income, smoking status, sleep quality, perception of relationship with family, childhood breastfeeding history, and body mass index were associated with domains of SF36 among those with hypertension (p < 0.05 for all). Hypertensive respondents with high education, marital status, breastfeeding, higher incomes, good quality of sleep, positive relationship with family, and higher body mass index have better HRQOL in middle-aged people with hypertension. Those unemployed had a better state of general health and had a poorer state of social function. Nonsmokers had a poorer state of bodily pain than smokers. This study provides detailed information of the implications for health care providers to gain a more complete picture of their hypertension patients' health.

  7. Primary Hypertension and Neurocognitive & Executive Functioning in School-aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Kupferman, Juan C.; Lande, Marc B.; Adams, Heather R.; Pavlakis, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    Data on neurocognitive function in hypertensive children are very limited. In this review, we summarize recent preliminary, early studies that suggest that children with elevated blood pressure demonstrate evidence of worse performance on direct neurocognitive testing, as well as evidence of executive dysfunction based on parent ratings, compared to matched normotensive comparison groups. Furthermore, hypertensive children may also have increased prevalence of learning disabilities as well as a blunted cerebrovascular reactivity compared to normotensive controls. Larger, prospective studies are needed to confirm and further explore these emerging but preliminary findings. PMID:22692504

  8. Ocular Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: J Kevin ...

  9. Searching for the Kinkeepers: Historian Gender, Age, and Type 2 Diabetes Family History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordimaina, Alicia M.; Sheldon, Jane P.; Kiedrowski, Lesli A.; Jayaratne, Toby Epstein

    2015-01-01

    Kinkeepers facilitate family communication and may be key to family medical history collection and dissemination. Middle-aged women are frequently kinkeepers. Using type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as a model, we explored whether the predicted gender and age effects of kinkeeping can be extended to family medical historians. Through a U.S. telephone survey,…

  10. Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE Breakers, and Other Inhibitors of Diabetes Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Rhoji; Murray, David B.; Metz, Thomas O.; Baynes, John

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation or glycoxidation end-products (AGE) increase in tissue proteins with age, and their rate of accumulation is increased in diabetes, nephropathy and inflammatory diseases. AGE inhibitors include a range of compounds that are proposed to act by trapping carbonyl and dicarbonyl intermediates in AGE formation. However, some among the newer generation of AGE inhibitors lack reactive functional groups that would trap reaction intermediates, indicating an alternative mechanism of action. We propose that AGE inhibitors function primarily as chelators, inhibiting metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. The AGE-inhibitory activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers is also consistent with their chelating activity. Finally, compounds described as AGE breakers, or their hydrolysis products, also have strong chelating activity, suggesting that these compounds also act through their chelating activity. We conclude that chelation is the common, and perhaps the primary, mechanism of action of AGE inhibitors and breakers, and that chronic, mild chelation therapy should prove useful in treatment of diabetes and age-related diseases characterized by oxidative stress, inflammation and increased chemical modification of tissue proteins by advanced glycoxidation and lipoxidation end-products.

  11. Fixed-Combination Olmesartan/Amlodipine Was Superior to Perindopril + Amlodipine in Reducing Central Systolic Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ruilope, Luis M

    2016-06-01

    This post hoc analysis from the Sevikar Compared to the Combination of Perindopril Plus Amlodipine on Central Arterial Blood Pressure in Patients With Moderate-to-Severe Hypertension (SEVITENSION) study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of olmesartan (OLM) and amlodipine (AML) in reducing central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) compared with perindopril (PER) plus AML in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients were randomized to OLM/AML 40/10 mg or PER/AML 8/10 mg for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the absolute change in CSBP from baseline to week 24, which was greater with OLM/AML (-13.72±1.14 mm Hg) compared with PER/AML (-10.21±1.11 mm Hg). The between-group difference was -3.51±1.60 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -6.66 to -0.36 mm Hg) and was within the noninferiority margin (2 mm Hg) as well as the superiority margin (0 mm Hg). In addition, OLM/AML was associated with a higher proportion of patients achieving blood pressure normalization. In hypertensive patients with diabetes, the fixed-dose combination of OLM/AML was superior to PER/AML in reducing CSBP, as well as other secondary endpoints. PMID:26395174

  12. Association of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion-Deletion Polymorphism with Hypertension in Emiratis with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Interaction with Obesity Status

    PubMed Central

    Alsafar, Habiba; Hassoun, Ahmed; Almazrouei, Shaikha; Kamal, Wala; Almaini, Mustafa; Odama, Unini; Rais, Naushad

    2015-01-01

    The association of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) insertion-deletion (I/D) polymorphism with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension has been extensively studied throughout various ethnic populations but largely with inconsistent findings. We investigated these associations in Emirati population and their interaction with obesity status. Saliva samples were collected from a total of 564 Emiratis (277 T2DM and 297 healthy). DNA was extracted and the samples were genotyped for ACE I/D polymorphism by a PCR based method followed by gel electrophoresis. Upon evaluation of the ACE I/D polymorphism amongst all T2DM, hypertensive patients, and respective controls regardless of obesity status, ACE DD genotype was not found to be associated with either T2DM [odds ratio (OR) = 1.34, p = 0.086] or hypertension [odd ratio (OR) = 1.02, p = 0.93]. When the genetic variants amongst the nonobese and obese population were analyzed separately, the risk genotype ACE DD conferred significantly increased risk of hypertension in nonobese population [odds ratio (OR) = 1.80, p = 0.02] but was found to be protective against the hypertension in the obese group ((OR) = 0.54, p = 0.01). However, there was no effect of obesity status on the association of ACE genotypes with T2DM. The risk of hypertension associated with ACE DD is modulated by obesity status and hence future genetic association studies should take obesity into account for the interpretation of data. We also confirmed that ACE I/D polymorphism is not associated with T2DM risk in Emirati population. PMID:26491214

  13. Differential effects of age on large artery stiffness and minimal vascular resistance in normotensive and mildly hypertensive individuals.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Morten B; Khatir, Dinah S; Peters, Christian D; Christensen, Kent L; Buus, Niels H

    2015-09-01

    Large artery stiffness and small artery structural changes are both cardiovascular risk factors. Arterial stiffness increases with age and blood pressure (BP), but it is unclear in which way large artery pulse wave velocity (PWV) and peripheral vascular resistance are related and whether age has any influence. In a cross-sectional study, PWV and forearm minimum vascular resistance (Rmin ) was compared with emphasis on the impact of age. Normotensive (n = 53) and untreated hypertensive (n = 23) subjects were included based on 24-h BP measurements. Age ranged from 21 to 79 years with an even distribution from each age decade. PWV was assessed using tonometry. Forearm Rmin was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography at maximal vasodilatation induced by 10 min of ischaemia in combination with skin heating and hand grip exercise. In both normotensive and hypertensive subjects, PWV correlated significantly with age and BP. Based on median age, both groups were assigned into two equally large subgroups. Normotensive older (66 ± 7 years) and younger (35 ± 10 years) persons had different carotid-femoral PWV (7.9 ± 1.8 versus 5.7 ± 0.9 m/s, P<0.01), but similar Rmin values (3.7 ± 0.9 versus 3.6 ± 1.2 mmHg/ml/min/100 ml). Hypertensive older (63 ± 6 years) and younger (40 ± 10 years) also had different PWV (8.0 ± 1.5 versus 6.7 ± 1.1 m/s, P<0.05), but the older had lower Rmin (3.1 ± 0.8 versus 4.7 ± 2.2 mmHg/ml/min/100 ml, P<0.05). In a regression analysis adjusting for age, BP, gender and heart rate, no correlation was seen between PWV and Rmin . The data suggest that age differentially affects PWV and Rmin and that BP can increase in older persons without affecting Rmin . PMID:24863666

  14. Are We in the Same Risk of Diabetes Mellitus? Gender- and Age-Specific Epidemiology of Diabetes in 2001 to 2014 in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    In the early 2000s, the prevalence of diabetes in adults aged ≥30 years in Korea was about 9% to 10%, and it remained stable. However, a nationwide survey showed that this prevalence increased over the past few years. After age-standardization using the Korean population of the year 2010, the prevalence of diabetes in adults aged ≥30 years was 10.0% to 10.8% between 2001 and 2012, which increased to 12.5% in 2013 and 11.6% in 2014. During that period, there have been changes in the gender- and age-specific prevalence of diabetes in Korean adults. The prevalence of diabetes in the elderly population increased significantly, while this prevalence in young adults, especially in young women, did not change significantly. The contribution of each diabetic risk factor, such as obesity, β-cell dysfunction, sarcopenia, and socioeconomic status, in developing diabetes has also changed during that period in each gender and age group. For young women, obesity was the most important risk factor; by contrast, for elderly diabetic patients, sarcopenia was more important than obesity as a risk factor. Considering the economic burden of diabetes and its associated comorbidities, a public health policy targeting the major risk factors in each population might be more effective in preventing diabetes. PMID:27273907

  15. Are We in the Same Risk of Diabetes Mellitus? Gender- and Age-Specific Epidemiology of Diabetes in 2001 to 2014 in the Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bo Kyung; Moon, Min Kyong

    2016-06-01

    In the early 2000s, the prevalence of diabetes in adults aged ≥30 years in Korea was about 9% to 10%, and it remained stable. However, a nationwide survey showed that this prevalence increased over the past few years. After age-standardization using the Korean population of the year 2010, the prevalence of diabetes in adults aged ≥30 years was 10.0% to 10.8% between 2001 and 2012, which increased to 12.5% in 2013 and 11.6% in 2014. During that period, there have been changes in the gender- and age-specific prevalence of diabetes in Korean adults. The prevalence of diabetes in the elderly population increased significantly, while this prevalence in young adults, especially in young women, did not change significantly. The contribution of each diabetic risk factor, such as obesity, β-cell dysfunction, sarcopenia, and socioeconomic status, in developing diabetes has also changed during that period in each gender and age group. For young women, obesity was the most important risk factor; by contrast, for elderly diabetic patients, sarcopenia was more important than obesity as a risk factor. Considering the economic burden of diabetes and its associated comorbidities, a public health policy targeting the major risk factors in each population might be more effective in preventing diabetes. PMID:27273907

  16. RAGE and AGEs in Mild Cognitive Impairment of Diabetic Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin; Huang, Rong; Lu, Sen; Xia, Wenqing; Cai, Rongrong; Sun, Haixia; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Objective Receptor for advanced glycation end products (AGEs; RAGE) binds to both AGEs and amyloid-beta peptides. RAGE is involved in chronic complications of type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. We aimed to investigate the roles of RAGE, AGEs and the Gly82Ser polymorphism of RAGE in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among type 2 diabetes patients. Methods Of the 167 hospitalized type 2 diabetes patients recruited, 82 satisfied the diagnostic criteria for MCI, and 85 matched control individuals were classified as non-MCI. Demographic data were collected, and the soluble RAGE (sRAGE) concentrations, serum AGE-peptide (AGE-P) levels, RAGE Gly82Ser genotype and neuropsychological test results were examined. Results The MCI group exhibited a decreased sRAGE level (0.87±0.35 vs. 1.05±0.52 ng/ml, p<0.01) and an increased serum AGE-P level (3.54±1.27 vs. 2.71±1.18 U/ml, p<0.01) compared with the control group. Logistic regression analysis indicated that each unit reduction in the sRAGE concentration increased the MCI risk by 54% (OR 0.46[95% CI 0.22–0.96], p = 0.04) and that each unit increase in the AGE-P level increased the MCI risk by 72% in the type 2 diabetes patients (OR 1.72[95% CI 1.31–2.28], p<0.01). The serum sRAGE level was negatively correlated with the score on the trail making test-B (TMT-B) (r = -0.344, p = 0.002), which indicates early cognitive deficits related to diabetes. Moreover, the AGE-P level was positively correlated with multiple cognitive domains (all p<0.05). No significant differences in the neuropsychological test results or serum RAGE concentrations between the different RAGE genotypes or in the RAGE genotype frequencies between the MCI and control groups were identified (all p>0.05). Conclusions The RAGE pathway partially mediates AGE-induced MCI in diabetic patients. The serum AGE-P level may serve as a serum biomarker of MCI in these individuals, and sRAGE represents a predictor and even a potential intervention target of

  17. Increased Oxidative and Nitrative Stress Accelerates Aging of the Retinal Vasculature in the Diabetic Retina

    PubMed Central

    Lamoke, Folami; Shaw, Sean; Yuan, Jianghe; Ananth, Sudha; Duncan, Michael; Martin, Pamela; Bartoli, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced retinal oxidative and nitrative stress can accelerate vascular cell aging, which may lead to vascular dysfunction as seen in diabetes. There is no information on whether this may contribute to the progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR). In this study, we have assessed the occurrence of senescence-associated markers in retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats at 8 and 12 weeks of hyperglycemia as compared to normoglycemic aging (12 and 14 months) and adult (4.5 months) rat retinas. We have found that in the diabetic retinas there was an up-regulation of senescence-associated markers SA-β-Gal, p16INK4a and miR34a, which correlated with decreased expression of SIRT1, a target of miR34a. Expression of senescence-associated factors primarily found in retinal microvasculature of diabetic rats exceeded levels measured in adult and aging rat retinas. In aging rats, retinal expression of senescence associated-factors was mainly localized at the level of the retinal pigmented epithelium and only minimally in the retinal microvasculature. The expression of oxidative/nitrative stress markers such as 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine was more pronounced in the retinal vasculature of diabetic rats as compared to normoglycemic aging and adult rat retinas. Treatments of STZ-rats with the anti-nitrating drug FeTPPS (10mg/Kg/day) significantly reduced the appearance of senescence markers in the retinal microvasculature. Our results demonstrate that hyperglycemia accelerates retinal microvascular cell aging whereas physiological aging affects primarily cells of the retinal pigmented epithelium. In conclusion, hyperglycemia-induced retinal vessel dysfunction and DR progression involve vascular cell senescence due to increased oxidative/nitrative stress. PMID:26466127

  18. Maternal Age at Birth and Childhood Type 1 Diabetes: A Pooled Analysis of 30 Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cardwell, Chris R.; Stene, Lars C.; Joner, Geir; Bulsara, Max K.; Cinek, Ondrej; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Jané, Mireia; Svensson, Jannet; Goldacre, Michael J.; Waldhoer, Thomas; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława; Gimeno, Suely G.A.; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Parslow, Roger C.; Wadsworth, Emma J.K.; Chetwynd, Amanda; Pozzilli, Paolo; Brigis, Girts; Urbonaitė, Brone; Šipetić, Sandra; Schober, Edith; Devoti, Gabriele; Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; de Beaufort, Carine E.; Stoyanov, Denka; Buschard, Karsten; Patterson, Chris C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim if the study was to investigate whether children born to older mothers have an increased risk of type 1 diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous studies using individual patient data to adjust for recognized confounders. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Relevant studies published before June 2009 were identified from MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE. Authors of studies were contacted and asked to provide individual patient data or conduct prespecified analyses. Risk estimates of type 1 diabetes by maternal age were calculated for each study, before and after adjustment for potential confounders. Meta-analysis techniques were used to derive combined odds ratios and to investigate heterogeneity among studies. RESULTS Data were available for 5 cohort and 25 case-control studies, including 14,724 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was, on average, a 5% (95% CI 2–9) increase in childhood type 1 diabetes odds per 5-year increase in maternal age (P = 0.006), but there was heterogeneity among studies (heterogeneity I2 = 70%). In studies with a low risk of bias, there was a more marked increase in diabetes odds of 10% per 5-year increase in maternal age. Adjustments for potential confounders little altered these estimates. CONCLUSIONS There was evidence of a weak but significant linear increase in the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes across the range of maternal ages, but the magnitude of association varied between studies. A very small percentage of the increase in the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes in recent years could be explained by increases in maternal age. PMID:19875616

  19. The Synergistic Effects of HIV, Diabetes, and Aging on Cognition: Implications for Practice and Research

    PubMed Central

    Vance, David E.; Fazeli, Pariya L.; Dodson, Joan E.; Ackerman, Michelle; Talley, Michele; Appel, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the obvious health problems and/or physical limitations associated with HIV, diabetes, and aging, each of these are known to independently affect cognitive functioning. While this relationship to cognition does not necessarily mean frank cognitive impairments are inevitable with HIV, diabetes, and aging, it does entail that each of these conditions may lead to poorer cognitive performance compared to younger adults and individuals without HIV and diabetes. Many individuals may be aware of the physical symptoms associated with these diseases, but may be unaware of the cognitive outcomes associated with HIV and diabetes, especially if not controlled by medication and a healthy lifestyle. Additionally, individuals may be unaware of the significance of maintaining optimal cognitive functioning in order to maintain optimal everyday functioning abilities such as driving, cooking, managing medication regimens, and negotiating finances. Given that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has allowed individuals with HIV to live to reach older adulthood, and that dysglycemia and/or type 2 diabetes can be a metabolic side effect of these medications (Biron et al., 2012; Norbiato, 2012; Raper, 2010), it is reasonable to assume that there is a subset of individuals aging with HIV and diabetes, which may become more prevalent as individuals continue to age with HIV in the coming decades. Thus, the purpose of this article is to inform healthcare providers and researchers about the cognitive outcomes associated with HIV, diabetes, and aging independently within the context of cognitive reserve, and then to examine the potential synergistic effects of these conditions in individuals living with all three (Figure 1). This article also incorporates potential intervention strategies to protect and possibly improve cognitive functioning, or at the very least mitigate cognitive loss, in this population. PMID:25099061

  20. Comparison of effects of olmesartan and telmisartan on blood pressure and metabolic parameters in Japanese early-stage type-2 diabetics with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shiho; Watada, Hirotaka; Mita, Tomoya; Ikeda, Fuki; Shimizu, Tomoaki; Uchino, Hiroshi; Fujitani, Yoshio; Hirose, Takahisa; Kawamori, Ryuzo

    2008-01-01

    Angiotensin II type-1 receptor blockers (ARBs) are regarded as first-line treatments for type-2 diabetes with hypertension. Despite the availability of various types of ARBs, there are no comparative studies of their effects on patients with diabetes. In this open-label prospective crossover study, we compared the effects of olmesartan (20 mg/day) and telmisartan (40 mg/day). Twenty Japanese early-stage type-2 diabetes patients with hypertension treated with valsartan (80 mg/day) for at least 8 weeks were recruited to this study. At study entry, valsartan was changed to olmesartan (20 mg/day) or telmisartan (40 mg/day) and administered for 8 weeks. The drugs were then switched and treatment was continued for another 8 weeks. We analyzed the blood pressure lowering effects of each drug by 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring at 0, 8, and 16 weeks. Simultaneously, we measured metabolic parameters and inflammation markers. Olmesartan lowered mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure more significantly than did telmisartan. While there were no differences between the groups in metabolic parameters, including HbA1c and adiponectin, the decreases in serum interleukin-6 and highly sensitive C-reactive protein were more significant by olmesartan treatment. Our results indicate that olmesartan has more potent arterial blood pressure lowering and anti-inflammatory effects than telmisartan. PMID:18360012

  1. Coming of age: the artificial pancreas for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thabit, Hood; Hovorka, Roman

    2016-09-01

    The artificial pancreas (closed-loop system) addresses the unmet clinical need for improved glucose control whilst reducing the burden of diabetes self-care in type 1 diabetes. Glucose-responsive insulin delivery above and below a preset insulin amount informed by sensor glucose readings differentiates closed-loop systems from conventional, threshold-suspend and predictive-suspend insulin pump therapy. Insulin requirements in type 1 diabetes can vary between one-third-threefold on a daily basis. Closed-loop systems accommodate these variations and mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia associated with tight glucose control. In this review we focus on the progress being made in the development and evaluation of closed-loop systems in outpatient settings. Randomised transitional studies have shown feasibility and efficacy of closed-loop systems under supervision or remote monitoring. Closed-loop application during free-living, unsupervised conditions by children, adolescents and adults compared with sensor-augmented pumps have shown improved glucose outcomes, reduced hypoglycaemia and positive user acceptance. Innovative approaches to enhance closed-loop performance are discussed and we also present the outlook and strategies used to ease clinical adoption of closed-loop systems. PMID:27364997

  2. The effect of aged garlic extract on blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors in uncontrolled hypertensives: the AGE at Heart trial

    PubMed Central

    Ried, Karin; Travica, Nikolaj; Sali, Avni

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension affects 30% of adults worldwide. Garlic supplements have shown promise in the treatment of uncontrolled hypertension, and the mechanism of action is biologically plausible. Our trial is the first to assess the effect of aged garlic extract on central blood pressure and arterial stiffness, regarded as important risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity. Subjects and methods A total of 88 general practice patients and community members with uncontrolled hypertension completed a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial of 12 weeks investigating the effect of daily intake of aged garlic extract (1.2 g containing 1.2 mg S-allylcysteine) or placebo on blood pressure, and secondary outcome measures of central-hemodynamics and other cardiovascular markers, including cholesterol, homocysteine, platelet function, and inflammatory markers. Results Mean blood pressure was significantly reduced by 5.0±2.1 mmHg (P=0.016) systolic, and in responders by 11.5±1.9 mmHg systolic and 6.3±1.1 mmHg diastolic compared to placebo (P<0.001). Central hemodynamic-measures tended to improve in the garlic group more than in the placebo group, including central blood pressure, central pulse pressure, mean arterial pressure, augmentation pressure, pulse-wave velocity, and arterial stiffness. While changes in other cardiovascular markers did not reach significance due to small numbers in subgroups with elevated levels, trends in beneficial effects of garlic on the inflammatory markers TNFα, total cholesterol, low-density lipid cholesterol, and apolipoproteins were observed. Aged garlic extract was highly tolerable and acceptable, and did not increase the risk of bleeding in patients on blood-thinning medication. Conclusion Our trial suggests that aged garlic extract is effective in reducing peripheral and central blood pressure in a large proportion of patients with uncontrolled hypertension, and has the potential to improve arterial stiffness, inflammation

  3. Association Between Neighborhood Disadvantage and Hypertension Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control in Older Adults: Results From the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Virginia J.; McClure, Leslie A.; Buys, Katie Crawford; Sawyer, Patricia; Allman, Richard M.; Levitan, Emily B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effect of neighborhood disadvantage (ND) on older adults’ prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension. Methods. Data were from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging, an observational study of 1000 community-dwelling Black and White Alabamians aged 65 years and older, in 1999 to 2001. We assessed hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control with blood pressure measurements and self-report data. We assessed ND with US Census data corresponding with participants’ census tracts, created tertiles of ND, and fit models with generalized estimating equations via a logit link function with a binomial distribution. Adjusted models included variables assessing personal advantage and disadvantage, place-based factors, sociodemographics, comorbidities, and health behaviors. Results. Living in mid-ND (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2, 2.1) and high-ND tertiles (AOR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.3, 2.3) was associated with higher hypertension prevalence, and living in high-ND tertiles was associated with lower odds of controlled hypertension (AOR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4, 0.6). In adjusted models, ND was not associated with hypertension awareness or treatment. Conclusions. These findings show that neighborhood environmental factors matter for hypertension outcomes and suggest the importance of ND for hypertension management in older adults. PMID:25322309

  4. Genetic Evidence for a Link Between Favorable Adiposity and Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes, Hypertension, and Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Lotta, Luca A; Tyrrell, Jessica; Smit, Roelof A J; Jones, Sam E; Donnelly, Louise; Beaumont, Robin; Campbell, Archie; Tuke, Marcus A; Hayward, Caroline; Ruth, Katherine S; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Jukema, J Wouter; Palmer, Colin C; Hattersley, Andrew; Freathy, Rachel M; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Wood, Andrew R; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N; Sattar, Naveed; Pearson, Ewan; Scott, Robert A; Frayling, Timothy M

    2016-08-01

    Recent genetic studies have identified some alleles that are associated with higher BMI but lower risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. These "favorable adiposity" alleles are collectively associated with lower insulin levels and higher subcutaneous-to-visceral adipose tissue ratio and may protect from disease through higher adipose storage capacity. We aimed to use data from 164,609 individuals from the UK Biobank and five other studies to replicate associations between a genetic score of 11 favorable adiposity variants and adiposity and risk of disease, to test for interactions between BMI and favorable adiposity genetics, and to test effects separately in men and women. In the UK Biobank, the 50% of individuals carrying the most favorable adiposity alleles had higher BMIs (0.120 kg/m(2) [95% CI 0.066, 0.174]; P = 1E-5) and higher body fat percentage (0.301% [0.230, 0.372]; P = 1E-16) compared with the 50% of individuals carrying the fewest alleles. For a given BMI, the 50% of individuals carrying the most favorable adiposity alleles were at lower risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 0.837 [0.784, 0.894]; P = 1E-7), hypertension (OR 0.935 [0.911, 0.958]; P = 1E-7), and heart disease (OR 0.921 [0.872, 0.973]; P = 0.003) and had lower blood pressure (systolic -0.859 mmHg [-1.099, -0.618]; P = 3E-12 and diastolic -0.394 mmHg [-0.534, -0.254]; P = 4E-8). In women, these associations could be explained by the observation that the alleles associated with higher BMI but lower risk of disease were also associated with a favorable body fat distribution, with a lower waist-to-hip ratio (-0.004 cm [95% CI -0.005, -0.003] 50% vs. 50%; P = 3E-14), but in men, the favorable adiposity alleles were associated with higher waist circumference (0.454 cm [0.267, 0.641] 50% vs. 50%; P = 2E-6) and higher waist-to-hip ratio (0.0013 [0.0003, 0.0024] 50% vs. 50%; P = 0.01). Results were strengthened when a meta-analysis with five additional studies was conducted

  5. Biomarkers of chronic kidney disease in the urine of diabetic/hypertensive patients by means of Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Elzo Everton de Sousa; Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martis; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Silveira, Landulfo

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and arterial hypertension (AH) are common diseases that, if untreated, predispose the patient to renal failure. This study aimed to evaluate possible biomarkers in the urine of patients with DM and AH capable to predict the chronic renal disease, by means of Raman spectroscopy. Urines were obtained from patients with DM and AH, and separated into four groups: no symptoms of diseases related to DM and AH (G1), with low clinical complications (G2), with severe clinical complications (G3), and with chronic kidney disease (G4) arised from DM and AH. It has been used a dispersive Raman spectrometer (830nm, 250mW, 20s accumulation). In the spectra of urine it was identified Raman peaks at 680cm-1 (creatinine), 1004cm-1 (urea) and 1128cm-1 (glucose). The results revealed that G2, G3 and G4 presented the creatinine peak with lower intensity than G1 (p < 0.05). It was observed that G2, G3 and G4 showed lower intensity of the urea peak compared to G1 (p < 0.05) and G4 showed lower intensity compared to G2 and G3 (p < 0.05). Despite not significant, the glucose peak showed lower intensity in G1 when compared to the other groups. A model for classification of groups according to clinical criteria, using Sparse Multinomial Logistic Regression, taking as inputs the intensities of creatine, urea and glucose peaks allowed correct classification of 88.9% for G1, 36.8% for G2, 43.8% for G3 and 84.2% for G4. These results demonstrated the possibility of obtaining diagnostic information for complications of kidney disease associated to DM and AH, particularly the renal failure.

  6. Access to Treatment for Diabetes and Hypertension in Rural Cambodia: Performance of Existing Social Health Protection Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli, Maryam; Jacobs, Bart; Men, Chean Rithy; Nilsen, Kristine; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases (NCD) pose challenges to Cambodia’s health system. Medicines for NCD are on the National Essential Medicines List but no clinical guidelines support their utilization. Two social health protection schemes aimed at the informal sector population exist (Health Equity Funds and Insurance) together with two disease-specific interventions (a Peer Educator Network and Chronic Diseases Clinics) targeted at NCD patients. This study examines performance of these various schemes in relation to NCD. Methods Cross-sectional household survey among 709 individuals self-reporting diabetes and/or hypertension in three geographical locations in rural Cambodia using a structured questionnaire investigating diagnostic and treatment pathways, health seeking behaviour, health expenditures, and financial coping mechanisms. Results Two third of respondents with NCD were female and 55% did not belong to any scheme. The majority (59%) were diagnosed in the private sector and only 56% were on allopathic treatment that was mainly sought in the private sector (49%). Outpatient treatment cost was higher in the private sector and when using multiple providers of care. The majority were indebted, 11% due to health-related expenses. Contrary to social health protection schemes, disease-specific interventions offered better access to allopathic treatment and provided medicines in accordance with NEML. Conclusion The benefit packages of existing social health protection schemes and services in the public health sector should be adjusted to cater for the needs of people living with NCD in rural Cambodia. Initiatives that offer active disease management strategies and promote patients and community participation appear more successful in increasing treatment adherence and decreasing the risk of financial hardship. PMID:26815916

  7. Risk of Diabetes in Older Adults with Co-Occurring Depressive Symptoms and Cardiometabolic Abnormalities: Prospective Analysis from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Cassandra; Deschênes, Sonya; Au, Bonnie; Smith, Kimberley; Schmitz, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    High depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities are independently associated with an increased risk of diabetes. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of co-occurring depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities on risk of diabetes in a representative sample of the English population aged 50 years and older. Data were from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. The sample comprised of 4454 participants without diabetes at baseline. High depressive symptoms were based on a score of 4 or more on the 8-item binary Centre for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression scale. Cardiometabolic abnormalities were defined as 3 or more cardiometabolic risk factors (hypertension, impaired glycemic control, systemic inflammation, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high triglycerides, and central obesity). Cox proportional hazards regressions assessed the association between co-occurring depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities with incidence of diabetes. Multiple imputation by chained equations was performed to account for missing data. Covariates included age, sex, education, income, smoking status, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and cardiovascular comorbidity. The follow-up period consisted of 106 months, during which 193 participants reported a diagnosis of diabetes. Diabetes incidence rates were compared across the following four groups: 1) no or low depressive symptoms and no cardiometabolic abnormalities (reference group, n = 2717); 2) high depressive symptoms only (n = 338); 3) cardiometabolic abnormalities only (n = 1180); and 4) high depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities (n = 219). Compared to the reference group, the hazard ratio for diabetes was 1.29 (95% CI 0.63, 2.64) for those with high depressive symptoms only, 3.88 (95% CI 2.77, 5.44) for those with cardiometabolic abnormalities only, and 5.56 (95% CI 3.45, 8.94) for those with both high depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic

  8. Risk of Diabetes in Older Adults with Co-Occurring Depressive Symptoms and Cardiometabolic Abnormalities: Prospective Analysis from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Cassandra; Deschênes, Sonya; Au, Bonnie; Smith, Kimberley; Schmitz, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    High depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities are independently associated with an increased risk of diabetes. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of co-occurring depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities on risk of diabetes in a representative sample of the English population aged 50 years and older. Data were from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. The sample comprised of 4454 participants without diabetes at baseline. High depressive symptoms were based on a score of 4 or more on the 8-item binary Centre for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale. Cardiometabolic abnormalities were defined as 3 or more cardiometabolic risk factors (hypertension, impaired glycemic control, systemic inflammation, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high triglycerides, and central obesity). Cox proportional hazards regressions assessed the association between co-occurring depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities with incidence of diabetes. Multiple imputation by chained equations was performed to account for missing data. Covariates included age, sex, education, income, smoking status, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and cardiovascular comorbidity. The follow-up period consisted of 106 months, during which 193 participants reported a diagnosis of diabetes. Diabetes incidence rates were compared across the following four groups: 1) no or low depressive symptoms and no cardiometabolic abnormalities (reference group, n = 2717); 2) high depressive symptoms only (n = 338); 3) cardiometabolic abnormalities only (n = 1180); and 4) high depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic abnormalities (n = 219). Compared to the reference group, the hazard ratio for diabetes was 1.29 (95% CI 0.63, 2.64) for those with high depressive symptoms only, 3.88 (95% CI 2.77, 5.44) for those with cardiometabolic abnormalities only, and 5.56 (95% CI 3.45, 8.94) for those with both high depressive symptoms and cardiometabolic

  9. Renoprotective effects of berberine as adjuvant therapy for hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Evaluation via biochemical markers and color Doppler ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    DAI, PEIFENG; WANG, JUNHUA; LIN, LIN; ZHANG, YANYAN; WANG, ZHENGPING

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are complex and serious diseases that may ultimately lead to renal complications. Adequate control of blood glucose and blood pressure contributes to decreased renal risks, but may not be sufficient for certain patients. The current study was undertaken to investigate the renoprotective effects of berberine as an adjuvant therapy to standard hypotensive and hypoglycemic treatment in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this 2-year clinical study, 69 hypertensive patients with T2DM, whose blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) were adequately controlled by hypotensive and oral hypoglycemic agents prior to the study, were enrolled and randomly assigned into control (33 cases) and add-on (36 cases) groups. Berberine was orally administrated to the patients in the add-on group concomitantly with standard hypotensive and hypoglycemic treatment. Baseline characteristics, including the levels of FPG, glycated hemoglobin, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, urinary albumin-to-creatine ratio (UACR), urinary osteopontin and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) were determined. Furthermore, the oxidative stress markers malondialdehyde, urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and total-antioxidant capacity, and the inflammatory parameters vascular adhesion molecule-1, C-reactive protein and high molecular weight-adiponectin were evaluated. In addition, ultrasonographic parameters, including peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity and renal arterial resistance index were determined. After treatment, it was observed that the control and add-on treatments were able to adequately control blood pressure and blood glucose. Patients in the add-on group exhibited significant reductions in renal damage biochemical markers (UACR, urinary osteopontin and KIM-1) and improved renal hemodynamics, in addition to reduced inflammation and oxidative stress

  10. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to <140/90 mm Hg. In the Chronic Renal Disease in Turkey (CREDIT) study (n=10,748), the overall prevalence of chronic kidney (including all stages) disease was 15.7% and increased with advancing age. In the same population, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

  11. Prevalence of hypertension in school going children of Surat city, Western India

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Nirav; Goyal, Jagdish P.; Kumar, Nagendra; Parmar, Indira; Shah, Vijay B.; Charan, Jaykaran

    2011-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of hypertension (HT) is an important strategy in its control. Previous studies have documented that hypertension may begin in adolescence, perhaps even in childhood. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypertension and risk factors among school going children in Surat city, south Gujarat, India. Materials and Methods: School going children aged between 6 to 18 years, of two schools were selected by purposive sampling method and blood pressure measurements were taken by mercury sphygmomanometer as per recommendation of American heart association. Hypertension is considered when blood pressure is more than 95th percentile according to update on task force report (2004) and children having hypertension in first and second recording repeat measurement was done to confirm hypertension after a week. Results: Total prevalence of hypertension in our study was 6.48%. Hypertension in males was 6.74% (<10 yrs 5.88%, 10-13yrs 6.04%, >13yrs 9.19%) and in females was 6.13% (<10yrs 0.62%, 10-13yrs 8.67%,.13yrs 8.48%). Prevalence of obesity in hypertension was 8.7% against normotensive 1.1% (P <0.05). Prevalence of hypertension in family members of hypertensive was 18.6% and in normotensive 13.1% (P =0.1). Prevalence of diabetes mellitus in family members of hypertensive was 23.4% and 13.7% in normotensive (P<0.05); while prevalence of ischemic heart disease in family members was 12.34% in hypertensive and 8.3% in normotensive (P <0.05). Conclusion: Prevalence of hypertension was 6.48% in the study subjects. We identified obesity, family history of diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease was found to be significant association for childhood hypertension. PMID:22135481

  12. Treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Michael; Cunha-Vaz, José

    2008-01-01

    The number of patients with type 2 diabetes continues to rise; an anticipated 300 million people will be affected by 2025. The immense social and economic burden of the condition is exacerbated by the initial asymptomatic nature of type 2 diabetes, resulting in a high prevalence of micro-and macrovascular complications at presentation. Diabetic retinopathy, one of the potential microvascular complications associated with diabetes, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the two most frequent retinal degenerative diseases, and are responsible for the majority of blindness due to retinal disease. Both conditions predominantly affect the central macula, and are associated with the presence of retinal edema and an aggressive inflammatory repair process that accelerates disease progression. The associated retinal edema and the inflammatory repair process are directly involved in the breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). Yet, the underlying alterations to the BRB caused by the diseases are very different. The coexistence of the two conditions appears to be relatively uncommon, suggesting that diabetes may even protect patients from developing neovascular AMD. However, it is thought that the inflammatory repair responses associated with diabetic retinopathy and neovascular AMD may be cumulative and, in patients affected by both, could result in chronic diffuse cystoid edema. Treatment considerations in such patients should, therefore, include the role of retinal edema and the increased susceptibility of patients with diabetes to potential systemic side effects associated with agents administered repeatedly for neovascular AMD treatment. PMID:19668728

  13. Effect of vitamin C on inflammation and metabolic markers in hypertensive and/or diabetic obese adults: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ellulu, Mohammed S; Rahmat, Asmah; Patimah, Ismail; Khaza’ai, Huzwah; Abed, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is well associated as being an interfering factor in metabolic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes by increasing the secretion of proinflammatory markers from adipose tissue. Having healthy effects, vitamin C could work as an anti-inflammatory agent through its antioxidant capacity. Registration Registration number: FPSK_Mac [13]04. Objective The aim of the study reported here was to identify the effect of vitamin C on reducing the levels of inflammatory markers in hypertensive and/or diabetic obese adults. Subjects and methods Sixty-four obese patients, who were hypertensive and/or diabetic and had high levels of inflammatory markers, from primary health care centers in Gaza City, Palestine, were enrolled into one of two groups in an open-label, parallel, randomized controlled trial. A total of 33 patients were randomized into a control group and 31 patients were randomized into an experimental group. The experimental group was treated with 500 mg vitamin C twice a day. Results In the experimental group, vitamin C significantly reduced the levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), fasting blood glucose (FBG), and triglyceride (TG) after 8 weeks of treatment (overall: P<0.001); no changes appeared in total cholesterol (TC). In the control group, there were significant reductions in FBG and TG (P=0.001 and P=0.026, respectively), and no changes in hs-CRP, IL-6, or TC. On comparing the changes in the experimental group with those in the control group at the endpoint, vitamin C was found to have achieved clinical significance in treating effectiveness for reducing hs-CRP, IL-6, and FBG levels (P=0.01, P=0.001, and P<0.001, respectively), but no significant changes in TC or TG were found. Conclusion Vitamin C (500 mg twice daily) has potential effects in alleviating inflammatory status by reducing hs-CRP, IL-6, and FBG in hypertensive and/or diabetic obese patients. PMID:26170625

  14. Ultra-low microcurrent in the management of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and chronic wounds: Report of twelve cases and discussion of mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bok Y.; AL-Waili, Noori; Stubbs, Dean; Wendell, Keith; Butler, Glenn; AL-Waili, Thia; AL-Waili, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of both types of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases including hypertension. The low levels of antioxidants accompanied by raised levels of markers of free radical damage play a major role in delaying wound healing. Ultra-low microcurrent presumably has an antioxidant effect, and it was shown to accelerate wound healing. The purpose of the study is to investigate the efficacy of ultra-low microcurrent delivered by the Electro Pressure Regeneration Therapy (EPRT) device (EPRT Technologies-USA, Simi Valley, CA) in the management of diabetes, hypertension and chronic wounds. The EPRT device is an electrical device that sends a pulsating stream of electrons in a relatively low concentration throughout the body. The device is noninvasive and delivers electrical currents that mimic the endogenous electric energy of the human body. It is a rechargeable battery-operated device that delivers a direct current (maximum of 3 milliAmperes) of one polarity for 11.5 minutes, which then switched to the opposite polarity for another 11.5 minutes. The resulting cycle time is approximately 23min or 0.000732 Hz and delivers a square wave bipolar current with a voltage ranging from 5V up to a maximum of 40 V. The device produces a current range of 3 mA down to 100 nA. Twelve patients with long standing diabetes, hypertension and unhealed wounds were treated with EPRT. The patients were treated approximately for 3.5 h/day/5 days a week. Assessment of ulcer was based on scale used by National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Consensus Development Conference. Patients were followed-up with daily measurement of blood pressure and blood glucose level, and their requirement for medications was recorded. Treatment continued from 2-4 months according to their response. Results showed that diabetes mellitus and hypertension were well controlled after using this device, and their wounds were markedly healed (30-100%). The patients

  15. [Clinical and tomographic aspects of hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease associated with hypertensive crisis in adults under 50 years of age].

    PubMed

    Arismendi-Morillo, G J; Fernández-Abreu, M; Añez-Moreno, R E

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze both the clinical and tomographic aspects of the hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease (HCd), associated with hypertensive crisis in adults under 50 years of age. Forty six patients, who were not under anticoagulant therapy, were not using illegal drugs, who had not a cerebral tumor disease, and who had neither arteriovenous malformations nor past traumatic episodes, were studied. Seventy eight percent of the patients had preexisted arterial hypertension, 30% of them had at least a previous emergency for a hypertensive crisis. Mortality for intracerebral hematoma (ICH) and for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was 21% and 23% respectively. In 68% of the cases, ICH was located in the deep structures of the brain. Asymmetric ventricular system, compression or the absence of mesencephalic cisterna were significantly associated (p > 0.01; p > 0.001 respectively) with higher mortality. There was not a significant difference between the deceased and the survivors in relation with their systolic and diastolic arterial pressure on admission to the emergency unit. A significant positive relation was found between the severity of the injury (percentage of patients with an Scale Coma Glasgow < or = 8 points) and the mortality percentage for the type of HCd (r = 0.81 for ICH; p < 0.001, r = 0.98 for SAH; p < 0.001). Age and a low Scale Coma Glasgow score on the admission, represent unfavorable prognostic factors. Due to the different criteria used to evaluate the tomographic characteristics of intracerebral hematomas, comparisons of the present results with other findings can be difficult. PMID:11029832

  16. Uteroplacental insufficiency causes a nephron deficit, modest renal insufficiency but no hypertension with ageing in female rats.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Karen M; Mazzuca, Marc Q; Siebel, Andrew L; Mibus, Amy; Arena, Debbie; Tare, Marianne; Owens, Julie A; Wlodek, Mary E

    2009-06-01

    In rats, uteroplacental insufficiency induced by uterine vessel ligation restricts fetal growth and impairs mammary development compromising postnatal growth. In male offspring, this results in a nephron deficit and hypertension which can be reversed by improving lactation and postnatal growth. Here, growth, blood pressure and nephron endowment in female offspring from mothers which underwent bilateral uterine vessel ligation (Restricted) on day 18 of pregnancy were examined. Sham surgery (Control) and a reduced litter group (Reduced at birth to 5, equivalent to Restricted group) were used as controls. Offspring (Control, Reduced, Restricted) were cross-fostered on postnatal day 1 onto a Control (normal lactation) or Restricted (impaired lactation) mother. Restricted-on-Restricted offspring were born small but were of similar weight to Control-on-Control by postnatal day 35. Blood pressure was not different between groups at 8, 12 or 20 weeks of age. Glomerular number was reduced in Restricted-on-Restricted offspring at 6 months without glomerular hypertrophy. Cross-fostering a Restricted pup onto a Control dam resulted in a glomerular number intermediate between Control-on-Control and Restricted-on-Restricted. Blood pressure, along with renal function, morphology and mRNA expression, was examined in Control-on-Control and Restricted-on-Restricted females at 18 months. Restricted-on-Restricted offspring did not become hypertensive but developed glomerular hypertrophy by 18 months. They had elevated plasma creatinine and alterations in renal mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-beta(1), collagen IV (alpha1) and matrix matelloproteinase-9. This suggests that perinatally growth restricted female offspring may be susceptible to onset of renal injury and renal insufficiency with ageing in the absence of concomitant hypertension. PMID:19359373

  17. Advanced glycation end products overload might explain intracellular cobalamin deficiency in renal dysfunction, diabetes and aging.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rima; Shannan, Batool; Herrmann, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to aging. Cobalamin (Cbl) is required for cell growth and functions, and its deficiency causes serious complications. Diabetics and renal patients show high concentrations of Cbl, but metabolic evidence of Cbl deficiency that is reversible after Cbl treatment. Cbl might be sequestered in blood and cannot be delivered to the cell. Megalin mediates the uptake of transcobalamin-Cbl complex into the proximal tubule cells. Megalin is involved in the uptake and degradation of AGEs. In aging, diabetes or renal dysfunction, AGEs might overload megalin thus lowering Cbl uptake. Transcobalamin-Cbl might retain in blood. Shedding of megalin and transcobalamin receptor under glycation conditions is also a possible mechanism of this phenomenon. PMID:21880434

  18. The synergistic effects of HIV, diabetes, and aging on cognition: implications for practice and research.

    PubMed

    Vance, David E; Fazeli, Pariya L; Dodson, Joan E; Ackerman, Michelle; Talley, Michele; Appel, Susan J

    2014-10-01

    Thanks to highly active antiretroviral therapy, many people infected with HIV will likely live into old age. Although this is a welcome prognosis, new issues are emerging that may complicate the ability to successfully age in this clinical population. HIV and aging independently are related to cognitive impairments, so there are concerns that those aging with HIV may be more at risk of such cognitive impairments. Moreover, highly active antiretroviral therapy itself can create metabolic disorders, such as prediabetes and/or frank type 2 diabetes, which have also been linked to poorer cognitive functioning. Thus, concerns increase that, as people age with HIV and develop comorbid metabolic disorders that may lead to type 2 diabetes, they will be at triple risk of developing cognitive impairments that can impair everyday functioning and reduce quality of life. This article explores these issues and provides implications for practice and research. PMID:25099061

  19. Investigating health and diabetes perceptions among Hmong American children, 9-18 years of age.

    PubMed

    Mulasi-Pokhriyal, Urvashi; Smith, Chery

    2011-06-01

    After immigrating to the United States (US), obesity and diabetes have increased among the Hmong. Therefore, this study investigated how Hmong children perceive health and diabetes risk so that appropriate interventions may be planned. Hmong children (N = 335), ages 9-18 years participated in this study. A survey used Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) as the theoretical framework and silhouette drawing instrument. Heights and weights were measured and body mass indexes (BMIs) were calculated. About half of the children were either overweight (BMI ≥ 85th < 95th percentile) or obese (BMI ≥ 95th percentile). About 75% chose average sized silhouettes as healthiest and heaviest silhouettes as diabetic shape. Environmental influences including food availability, parents, and media influenced children's health perceptions. Results suggest a need for culturally appropriate interventions, aiming towards a child's environment and educating them about risks associated with obesity and diabetes. PMID:20686849

  20. Assessment of the Effects of Rehabilitation After Cerebrovascular Accident in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension as Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Tanovic, Edina; Selimovic, Senad; Tanovic, Haris

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of rehabilitation, to determine the prevalence of major risk factors in cerebrovascular accident and their consequences, as well as to propose measures and procedures that will affect the better rehabilitation. Methods: The survey analyzed: age, sex, duration of rehabilitation, activities in daily life through the Barthel index at admission and at discharge, presence of risk factors HTA and DM. The study included a total of 116 patients, the majority of patients are older than 61 years. We had 49% of male patients and 51% of female patients and they spent 31-40 days at the rehabilitation. Results: The most common risk factor is HTA (83%) and diabetes (33%). Most of the patients at admission had a BI from 0 to 4 (32.7%), and at discharge BI in the range 17-20 (36.2%). Statistical analysis shows that there is a statistically significant correlation between the BI at admission, BI at discharge and risk factors of HTA and diabetes mellitus. Conclusions: the rehabilitation results in most patients is good results of rehabilitation. The most important risk factors in patients are HTA, DM and directly affect on results of rehabilitation. For the better results we should have energetic fight against risk factors for HTA and DM through primary and secondary prevention and patient education about early detection and treatment of these risk factors. PMID:24937938

  1. Detection of erythrocytes influenced by aging and type 2 diabetes using atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hua; Xing, Xiaobo; Zhao, Hongxia; Chen, Yong; Huang, Xun; Ma, Shuyuan; Ye, Hongyan; Cai, Jiye

    2010-01-22

    The pathophysiological changes of erythrocytes are detected at the molecular scale, which is important to reveal the onset of diseases. Type 2 diabetes is an age-related metabolic disorder with high prevalence in elderly (or old) people. Up to now, there are no treatments to cure diabetes. Therefore, early detection and the ability to monitor the progression of type 2 diabetes are very important for developing effective therapies. Type 2 diabetes is associated with high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. These abnormalities may disturb the architecture and functions of erythrocytes at molecular scale. In this study, the aging- and diabetes-induced changes in morphological and biomechanical properties of erythrocytes are clearly characterized at nanometer scale using atomic force microscope (AFM). The structural information and mechanical properties of the cell surface membranes of erythrocytes are very important indicators for determining the healthy, diseased or aging status. So, AFM may potentially be developed into a powerful tool in diagnosing diseases.

  2. Dynapenic Obesity and Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in Middle-Aged Japanese Men

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ryoko; Sawada, Susumu S.; Lee, I-Min; Matsushita, Munehiro; Gando, Yuko; Okamoto, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Koji; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Miyachi, Motohiko; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Background The independent and combined associations of muscle strength and obesity on the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese men remain unclear. Methods Hand grip strength was cross-sectionally evaluated between 2011 and 2013 to assess muscle strength in 5039 male workers aged 40 to 64 years. Weight and height were measured, and overweight/obesity was defined as a body mass index ≥25 kg/m2. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes, defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dL and/or hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5% and/or self-reported physician-diagnosed diabetes, was evaluated. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the prevalence of type 2 diabetes were obtained using a logistic regression model. Results In total, 611 participants had type 2 diabetes, and 1763 participants were overweight/obese. After adjustment for covariates, we found an inverse association between muscle strength and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (P for trend <0.01). In addition, when the analyses were stratified by obesity status, the multivariable-adjusted OR per 2-standard-deviation increase in muscle strength was 0.64 (95% CI, 0.49–0.83) in the overweight/obese group, compared to a weaker relationship in the normal-weight group (OR 0.79 per 2-standard-deviation increase; 95% CI, 0.60–1.06). Conclusions Dynapenia, an age-related decrease in muscle strength, is associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes, and this relationship is stronger in overweight/obese middle-aged Japanese men than in normal-weight men. PMID:26256772

  3. Target organ damage and cardiovascular complications in patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes in Spain: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Cea-Calvo, Luis; Conthe, Pedro; Gómez-Fernández, Pablo; de Alvaro, Fernando; Fernández-Pérez, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Background Target organ damage (mainly cardiac and renal damage) is easy to evaluate in outpatient clinics and offers valuable information about patient's cardiovascular risk. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using simple methods, the prevalence of cardiac and renal damage and its relationship to the presence of established cardiovascular disease (CVD), in patients with hypertension (HT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods The RICARHD study is a multicentre, cross-sectional study made by 293 investigators in Nephrology and Internal Medicine Spanish outpatient clinics, and included patients aged 55 years or more with HT and type 2 DM with more than six months of diagnosis. Demographic, clinical and biochemical data, and CVD were collected from the clinical records. Cardiac damage was defined by the presence of electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy (ECG-LVH), and renal damage by a calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of <60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and/or the presence of an albumin/creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g; or an urinary albumin excretion (UAE) ≥ 30 mg/24 hours. Results 2339 patients (mean age 68.9 years, 48.2% females, 51.3% with established CVD) were included. ECG-LVH was present in 22.9% of the sample, GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2 in 45.1%, and abnormal UAE in 58.7%. Compared with the reference patients (those without neither cardiac nor renal damage), patients with ECG-LVH alone (OR 2.20, [95%CI 1.43–3.38]), or kidney damage alone (OR 1.41, [1.13–1.75]) showed an increased prevalence of CVD. The presence of both ECG-LVH and renal damage was associated with the higher prevalence (OR 3.12, [2.33–4.19]). After stratifying by gender, this relationship was present for both, men and women. Conclusion In patients with HT and type 2 DM, ECG-LVH or renal damage, evaluated using simple methods, are associated with an increased prevalence of established CVD. The simultaneous presence of both cardiac and renal damage was associated to the

  4. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetic retinopathy Islets of Langerhans Pancreas Insulin pump Type I diabetes Diabetic blood circulation in foot Food and insulin release ... Saunders; 2015:chap 39. Dungan KM. Management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de ... hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome Gestational diabetes Hardening of the ...

  5. Chronic treatment with red wine modulates the purinergic neurotransmission and decreases blood pressure in hypertensive SHR and diabetic-STZ rats.

    PubMed

    Musial, Diego C; Bomfim, Guilherme H S; Miranda-Ferreira, Regiane; Caricati-Neto, Afonso; Jurkiewicz, Aron; Jurkiewicz, Neide H

    2015-01-01

    It is known that red wine has cardioprotective properties. However, its influence is unknown about purinergic system. Therefore, we study the influence of the treatment with red wine or ethanol in purinergic neurotransmission. We used Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), diabetic streptozotocin-induced WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), treated with red wine (12.5%) or ethanol (12.5%). The cardiovascular function stimulated with purinergic agonists and systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed. In atria of diabetics and SHRs, the P1 receptor response was decreased, unlike the P2 receptor response was increased. Likewise, in aorta the affinity to adenosine (ADO) was decreased from SHRs and diabetics. Furthermore, the P2X function was increased just SHRs. All these alterations were improved after treatment with red wine, resulting in reduction of SBP from diabetics and SHRs, but not when treated with ethanol. This study has important implications, because it is shown that consumption of red wine can improve cardiovascular system by purinergic neurotransmission. PMID:26088281

  6. Low-intensity voluntary running lowers blood pressure with simultaneous improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and insulin sensitivity in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng-Wei; Qian, Feng-Lei; Wang, Jian; Tao, Tao; Guo, Jing; Wang, Lie; Lu, Ai-Yun; Chen, Hong

    2008-03-01

    Our objective is to examine the effects of voluntary running at different intensity levels on blood pressure, endothelium-dependent vessel dysfunction and insulin resistance in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with severe hypertension. Ten-month-old male and female SHR with severe hypertension were assigned to voluntary running at either low intensity (30% of maximal aerobic velocity) or moderate intensity (60% of maximal aerobic velocity) on a motor-driven treadmill for 6 weeks, 20 min per day and 7 days per week. Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats and SHR were kept under sedentary conditions as controls. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured by the tail-cuff method. At the end of the exercise training, blood samples were collected for glucose, insulin and lipids assay, and aortae were isolated to examine their function in vitro. Low-intensity but not moderate-intensity running significantly lowered blood pressure in both male and female SHR (p<0.01). There was significant impairment in acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in SHR (p<0.01), which was improved by low-intensity training (p<0.05). Nitric oxide synthase blockade abrogated the improvement in endothelium-dependent relaxation. Hypertensive rats had elevated blood glucose and insulin levels with lowered insulin sensitivity that was ameliorated by low-intensity running. A significant increase in blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and a significant decrease in triglycerides were found in exercised SHR. In conclusion, low-intensity voluntary exercise lowers hypertension in aged SHR with severe hypertension. Exercise-induced simultaneous improvement in endothelium-dependent vessel relaxation and insulin sensitivity may act concomitantly in attenuating cardiovascular risk factors in aged hypertensive rats with significantly high blood pressure. PMID:18497475

  7. Air pollution and blood lipid markers levels: Estimating short and long-term effects on elderly hypertension inpatients complicated with or without type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Sanhua; Liu, Ranran; Wei, Youxiu; Feng, Lin; Lv, Xuemin; Tang, Fei

    2016-08-01

    With the development of society and the economy, many Chinese cities are shrouded in pollution haze for much of the year. Scientific studies have identified various adverse effects of air pollutants on human beings. However, the relationships between air pollution and blood lipid levels are still unclear. The objective of this study is to explore the short and long-term effects of air pollution on eight blood lipid markers among elderly hypertension inpatients complicated with or without type 2 diabetes (T2D). Blood lipid markers which met the pre-established inclusion criteria were exported from the medical record system. Air pollution data were acquired from the official environmental protection website. Associations between the air quality index and the blood lipid indexes were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and further Bonferroni correction. In an exposure time of 7 days or longer, blood lipid markers were somewhat affected by poor air quality. However, the results could not predict whether atherosclerosis would be promoted or inhibited by poorer air condition. Changes of blood lipid markers of hypertension inpatients with or without T2D were not completely the same, but no blood lipid markers had an opposite trend between the two populations. The air quality index was associated with changes to blood lipid markers to some extent in a population of hypertension inpatients with or without T2D. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential mechanism by which air pollutants induce blood lipids changes. PMID:27180144

  8. Differential proteomics analysis of proteins from human diabetic and age-related cataractous lenses

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Shao, Jun; Yao, Yong; Chu, Zhao Dong; Yu, Qian Qian; Zhao, Wei; Lin, Qing; Zhang, Zi Yin

    2013-01-01

    Backgound: To investigate the differential lens proteomics between diabetic cataract, age-related cataract, and natural subjects. Materials and Methods: Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), mass spectrometry (MS), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were employed. Total soluble proteins in lenses of type I diabetic cataract, age-related cataract (nondiabetic) patients, and normal control were extracted and subjected to 2-DE. The differential protein spots were recovered, digested with trypsin, and further applied to MALDI-TOF-MS. ELISA analysis was used to determine the levels of differential proteins in lenses of three groups. Results: 2-DE analysis reflected that lens proteins of normal control, diabetic, and age-related cataract subjects were in the section of pH 5-9 and the relative molecular weights were 14-97 kDa, while relative molecular weight of more abundant crystallines was localized at 20-31 kDa. five differential protein spots were detected and identified using MALDI-TOF-MS, including beta-crystallin A3, alpha-crystallin B chain, chain A of crystal structure of truncated human beta-B1-crystallin, beta-crystallin B1, and an interesting unnamed protein product highly similar to alpha-crystallin B chain, respectively. ELISA analysis revealed that lenses of diabetic cataract patients should contain significantly more concentrations of beta-crystallin A3, alpha-crystallin B chain, and beta-crystallin B1 than those of age-related cataract patients and normal control. Conclusion: This study clearly reflected the differential proteins of diabetic cataract, age-related cataract lenses compared with natural subjects, and it is helpful for the further research on the principles and mechanisms of different types of cataract. PMID:24520233

  9. Effect of Expectation of Care on Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications Among Hypertensive Blacks: Analysis of the Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) Trial.

    PubMed

    Grant, Andrea Barnes; Seixas, Azizi; Frederickson, Keville; Butler, Mark; Tobin, Jonathan N; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2016-07-01

    Novel ideas are needed to increase adherence to antihypertensive medication. The current study used data from the Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) study, a sample of 442 hypertensive African Americans, to investigate the mediating effects of expectation of hypertension care, social support, hypertension knowledge, and medication adherence, adjusting for age, sex, number of medications, diabetes, education, income, employment, insurance status, and intervention. Sixty-six percent of patients had an income of $20,000 or less and 56% had a high school education or less, with a mean age of 57 years. Greater expectation of care was associated with greater medication adherence (P=.007), and greater social support was also associated with greater medication adherence (P=.046). Analysis also showed that expectation of care mediated the relationship between hypertension knowledge and medication adherence (P<.05). Expectation of care and social support are important factors for developing interventions to increase medication adherence among blacks. PMID:26593105

  10. Association of serum fatty acid and estimated desaturase activity with hypertension in middle-aged and elderly Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Ding, Fang; Wang, Feng-Lei; Yan, Jing; Ye, Xiong-Wei; Yu, Wei; Li, Duo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the cross-sectional associations of serum fatty acid (FA) and related Δ-desaturase with hypertension among 2,447 community-dwellers aged 35–79 years living in Zhejiang Province, China. Individual FA was determined in serum, Δ5-desaturase (D5D) and Δ6-desaturase (D6D) activities were indirectly estimated by FA product/precursor ratios. Participants in the highest quartile of D5D component scores (20:4n–6, 20:5n–3, 22:6n–3 and D5D) have significantly lower odds of hypertension compared with individuals in the lowest (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.46–0.98). When further stratified by gender, high D5D component scores were significantly associated with lower odds of hypertension in women (OR = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.35–0.80), but not in men (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.52-1.18). Multivariate-adjusted prevalent OR for an interquartile increment of individual FA and estimated desaturase was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.08–1.50) for 16:0, 1.15 (95% CI: 1.01–1.30) for 16:1n–7, 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80–0.99) for 22:6n–3, 1.32 (95% CI: 1.01–1.72) for D6D (18:3n–6/18:2n–6), and 0.74 (95% CI: 0.56, 0.98) for D5D (20:4n–6/20:3n–6). Present findings suggested that high serum 22:6n–3 and D5D as well as low 16:0, 16:1n–7 and D6D were associated with a low prevalence of hypertension in this Chinese population. PMID:27006169

  11. Acceptance Factors of Mobile Apps for Diabetes by Patients Aged 50 or Older: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Reichelt, Julius; Bellmann, Maike; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile apps for people with diabetes offer great potential to support therapy management, increase therapy adherence, and reduce the probability of the occurrence of accompanying and secondary diseases. However, they are rarely used by elderly patients due to a lack of acceptance. Objective We investigated the question “Which factors influence the acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older?” Particular emphasis was placed on the current use of mobile devices/apps, acceptance-promoting/-inhibiting factors, features of a helpful diabetes app, and contact persons for technical questions. This qualitative study was the third of three substudies investigating factors influencing acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older. Methods Guided interviews were chosen in order to get a comprehensive insight into the subjective perspective of elderly diabetes patients. At the end of each interview, the patients tested two existing diabetes apps to reveal obstacles in (first) use. Results Altogether, 32 patients with diabetes were interviewed. The mean age was 68.8 years (SD 8.2). Of 32 participants, 15 (47%) knew apps, however only 2 (6%) had already used a diabetes app within their therapy. The reasons reported for being against the use of apps were a lack of additional benefits (4/8, 50%) compared to current therapy management, a lack of interoperability with other devices/apps (1/8, 12%), and no joy of use (1/8, 12%). The app test revealed the following main difficulties in use: nonintuitive understanding of the functionality of the apps (26/29, 90%), nonintuitive understanding of the menu navigation/labeling (19/29, 66%), font sizes and representations that were too small (14/29, 48%), and difficulties in recognizing and pressing touch-sensitive areas (14/29, 48%). Furthermore, the patients felt the apps lacked individually important functions (11/29, 38%), or felt the functions that were offered were unnecessary for their own

  12. Risk factors on hypertensive disorders among Jordanian pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Amal K

    2014-03-01

    Eight percent of pregnancies involve hypertensive disorders, which can have serious complications for mothers and children. There has only been minimal research into hypertension in pregnancy in developing countries, including Jordan. Therefore, this study aimed to identify how frequent certain risk factors that apply to hyper-tensive disorders during pregnancy were among women in the Jordanian capital of Amman. A prospective case-control study was conducted on 184 Jordanian pregnant patients with hypertensive disorders and 172 age-matched control subjects recruited from the maternity ward of a tertiary public hospital in Amman city; they were followed-up until 85 days after the birth (late puerperium). A standardized questionnaire pilot-tested was completed by participants that included demographic data and known risk factors for hypertension in pregnancy. Statistical analysis SPSS was conducted to compare the frequency of risk factors using Fisher's exact test, chi-square, Student's t-tests, as well as multivariate logistic regression was conducted to identify independent risk factors. The results showed that chronic hypertension, prenatal hypertension, family history of preeclampsia, diabetes, high BMI, nulliparity, previous preeclampsia history and low education level were identified as risk factors for hypertensive disorders in pregnancy in this population; Moreover, diabetes, chronic hypertension and family history of preeclampsia were found to be independent risk factors. The results of the study contribute to the currently limited knowledge about the modifiable risk factors for hypertensive disorders during pregnancy among the Jordanian population, and could therefore be extremely useful for clinicians providing prenatal care. PMID:24576373

  13. Self-Management in Early Adolescence and Differences by Age at Diagnosis and Duration of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Ariana; Whittemore, Robin; Minges, Karl E.; Murphy, Kathryn M.; Grey, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to describe the frequency of diabetes self-management activities, processes, and goals among early adolescents. In addition, differences in self-management by age at diagnosis and duration of diabetes were explored. Methods A cross-sectional design was used to analyze baseline data from 320 adolescents with T1DM enrolled in a multisite clinical trial. Participants completed questionnaires on demographic/clinical characteristics and self-management. Results There was a transitional pattern of self-management with a high frequency of diabetes care activities, problem solving, and goals and variable amounts of collaboration with parents. After controlling for therapy type and age, youth with short diabetes duration reported performing significantly more diabetes care activities than individuals with a longer duration. Individuals with short diabetes duration had more frequent communication than individuals with a longer duration, which was associated with diagnosis in adolescence. Among those diagnosed as school age children, those with short diabetes duration reported significantly more diabetes goals than those with a longer duration. Conclusions A more specific understanding of self-management may help clinicians provide more targeted education and support. Adolescents with a long duration of diabetes need additional self-management support, particularly for diabetes care activities and communication. PMID:24470042

  14. Hypoglycemia-Related Electroencephalogram Changes Are Independent of Gender, Age, Duration of Diabetes, and Awareness Status in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Remvig, Line Sofie; Elsborg, Rasmus; Sejling, Anne-Sophie; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Sønder Snogdal, Lena; Folkestad, Lars; Juhl, Claus B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Neuroglycopenia in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results in reduced cognition, unconsciousness, seizures, and possible death. Characteristic changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG) can be detected even in the initial stages. This may constitute a basis for a hypoglycemia alarm device. The aim of the present study was to explore the characteristics of the EEG differentiating normoglycemia and hypoglycemia and to elucidate potential group differences. Methods We pooled data from experiments in T1DM where EEG was available during both normoglycemia and hypo-glycemia for each subject. Temporal EEG was analyzed by quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) analysis with respect to absolute amplitude and centroid frequency of the delta, theta, alpha, and beta bands, and the peak frequency of the unified theta–alpha band. To elucidate possible group differences, data were subsequently stratified by age group (± 50 years), gender, duration of diabetes (± 20 years), and hypoglycemia awareness status (normal/impaired awareness of hypoglycemia). Results An increase in the log amplitude of the delta, theta, and alpha band and a decrease in the alpha band centroid frequency and the peak frequency of the unified theta–alpha band constituted the most significant hypoglycemia indicators (all p < .0001). The size of these qEEG changes remained stable across all strata. Conclusions Hypoglycemia-associated EEG changes remain stable across age group, gender, duration of diabetes, and hypoglycemia awareness status. This indicates that it may be possible to establish a general algorithm for hypoglycemia detection based on EEG measures. PMID:23294778

  15. Hippocampal calcium dysregulation at the nexus of diabetes and brain aging

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Olivier; Anderson, Katie L.; DeMoll, Chris; Brewer, Lawrence D.; Landfield, Philip W.; Porter, Nada M.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence is associating disorders of lipid and glucose metabolism, including the overlapping conditions of insulin resistance/metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes, with moderate cognitive impairment in normal aging and elevated risk of Alzheimer’s disease. It appears that a common feature of these conditions is deficient insulin signaling, likely affecting the brain as well as canonical peripheral target tissues. A number of studies have documented that insulin directly affects brain processes and that reduced insulin signaling results in impaired learning and memory. Several studies have also shown that deficient insulin signaling induces Ca2+ dysregulation in neurons. Because brain aging is associated with substantial Ca2+ dyshomeostasis, it has been proposed that deficient insulin signaling exacerbates or accelerates aging-related Ca2+ dyshomeostasis. However, there have been few studies examining insulin interactions with Ca2+ regulation in aging animals. We have been testing predictions of the Ca2+ dysregulation/diabetes/brain aging hypothesis and have found that insulin and insulin sensitizers (thiazolidinediones) target several hippocampal Ca2+-related processes affected by aging, including larger Ca2+ transients and Ca2+-dependent afterhyperpolarizations, and counteract the effects of aging on those processes. Thus, while additional testing is needed, the results to date are consistent with the view that effects of deficient insulin signaling on brain aging are mediated in part by neuronal Ca2+ dyshomeostasis. PMID:23872402

  16. Treating young adults with type 2 diabetes or monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Owen, Katharine R

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly recognised that diabetes in young adults has a wide differential diagnosis. There are many monogenic causes, including monogenic beta-cell dysfunction, mitochondrial diabetes and severe insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes in the young is becoming more prevalent, particularly after adolescence. It's important to understand the clinical features and diagnostic tools available to classify the different forms of young adult diabetes. Classic type 1 diabetes is characterised by positive β-cell antibodies and absence of endogenous insulin secretion. Young type 2 diabetes is accompanied by metabolic syndrome with obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Monogenic β-cell dysfunction is characterised by non-autoimmune, C-peptide positive diabetes with a strong family history, while mitochondrial diabetes features deafness and other neurological involvement. Severe insulin resistance involves a young-onset metabolic syndrome often with a disproportionately low BMI. A suspected diagnosis of monogenic diabetes is confirmed with genetic testing, which is widely available in specialist centres across the world. Treatment of young adult diabetes is similarly diverse. Mutations in the transcription factors HNF1A and HNF4A and in the β-cell potassium ATP channel components cause diabetes which responds to low dose and high dose sulfonylurea agents, respectively, while glucokinase mutations require no treatment. Monogenic insulin resistance and young-onset type 2 diabetes are both challenging to treat, but first line management involves insulin sensitisers and aggressive management of cardiovascular risk. Outcomes are poor in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to both older onset type 2 and type 1 diabetes diagnosed at a similar age. The evidence base for treatments in monogenic and young-onset type 2 diabetes relies on studies of moderate quality at best and largely on extrapolation from work conducted in older type 2 diabetes subjects. Better quality

  17. Proteome wide reduction in AGE modification in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice by hydralazine mediated transglycation

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Suresh K.; Bhat, Shweta; Golegaonkar, Sandeep B.; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G.; Deshmukh, Arati B.; Patil, Harshal S.; Bhosale, Santosh D.; Shaikh, Mahemud L.; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V.; Boppana, Ramanamurthy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J.

    2013-01-01

    The non-enzymatic reaction between glucose and protein can be chemically reversed by transglycation. Here we report the transglycation activity of hydralazine using a newly developed MALDI-TOF-MS based assay. Hydralazine mediated transglycation of HbA1c, plasma proteins and kidney proteins was demonstrated in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice, as evidenced by decrease in protein glycation, as well as presence of hydralazine-glucose conjugate in urine of diabetic mice treated with hydralazine. Hydralazine down regulated the expression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE), NADPH oxidase (NOX), and super oxide dismutase (SOD). These findings will provide a new dimension for developing intervention strategies for the treatment of glycation associated diseases such as diabetes complications, atherosclerosis, and aging. PMID:24126953

  18. Television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L; Hamer, M

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the longitudinal association between television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus in an elderly sample of adults in England. Methods Analyses of data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. At baseline (2008), participants reported their television viewing time and physical activity level. Diabetes mellitus was recorded from self-reported physician diagnosis at 2-year follow-up. Associations between television viewing time and combined television viewing time and physical activity level with risk of incident diabetes mellitus at follow-up were examined using adjusted logistic regression models. Results A total of 5964 participants (mean ± sd age 65 ± 9 years at baseline, 44% male) were included in the analyses. There was an association between baseline television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus at 2-year follow-up (≥ 6 h/day compared with <2 h/day; odds ratio 4.27, 95% CI 1.69, 10.77), although the association was attenuated to the null in final adjusted models that included BMI. Participants who were inactive/had high television viewing time at baseline were almost twice as likely to have diabetes mellitus at 2-year follow-up than those who were active/had low television viewing time (fully adjusted odds ratio 1.94, 95% CI 1.02, 3.68), although active participants reporting high television viewing were not at risk. Conclusion Interventions to reduce the incidence of diabetes in the elderly that focus on both increasing physical activity and reducing television viewing time might prove useful. PMID:24975987

  19. Advanced BrainAGE in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Franke, Katja; Gaser, Christian; Manor, Brad; Novak, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Aging alters brain structure and function and diabetes mellitus (DM) may accelerate this process. This study investigated the effects of type 2 DM on individual brain aging as well as the relationships between individual brain aging, risk factors, and functional measures. To differentiate a pattern of brain atrophy that deviates from normal brain aging, we used the novel BrainAGE approach, which determines the complex multidimensional aging pattern within the whole brain by applying established kernel regression methods to anatomical brain magnetic resonance images (MRI). The "Brain Age Gap Estimation" (BrainAGE) score was then calculated as the difference between chronological age and estimated brain age. 185 subjects (98 with type 2 DM) completed an MRI at 3Tesla, laboratory and clinical assessments. Twenty-five subjects (12 with type 2 DM) also completed a follow-up visit after 3.8 ± 1.5 years. The estimated brain age of DM subjects was 4.6 ± 7.2 years greater than their chronological age (p = 0.0001), whereas within the control group, estimated brain age was similar to chronological age. As compared to baseline, the average BrainAGE scores of DM subjects increased by 0.2 years per follow-up year (p = 0.034), whereas the BrainAGE scores of controls did not change between baseline and follow-up. At baseline, across all subjects, higher BrainAGE scores were associated with greater smoking and alcohol consumption, higher tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) levels, lower verbal fluency scores and more severe deprepession. Within the DM group, higher BrainAGE scores were associated with longer diabetes duration (r = 0.31, p = 0.019) and increased fasting blood glucose levels (r = 0.34, p = 0.025). In conclusion, type 2 DM is independently associated with structural changes in the brain that reflect advanced aging. The BrainAGE approach may thus serve as a clinically relevant biomarker for the detection of abnormal patterns of brain aging associated with type 2 DM

  20. Diabetes and CVD risk during angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment in hypertension: a study of 15 990 patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasvold, L P; Bodegård, J; Thuresson, M; Stålhammar, J; Hammar, N; Sundström, J; Russell, D; Kjeldsen, S E

    2014-01-01

    Differences in clinical effectiveness between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in the primary treatment of hypertension are unknown. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients treated with ARBs or ACEis. Patients initiated on enalapril or candesartan treatment in 71 Swedish primary care centers between 1999 and 2007 were included. Medical records data were extracted and linked with nationwide hospital discharge and cause of death registers. The 11 725 patients initiated on enalapril and 4265 on candesartan had similar baseline characteristics. During a mean follow-up of 1.84 years, 36 482 patient-years, the risk of new diabetes onset was lower in the candesartan group (hazard ratio (HR) 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69–0.96, P=0.01) compared with the enalapril group. No difference between the groups was observed in CVD risk (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.87–1.13, P=0.86). More patients discontinued treatment in the enalapril group (38.1%) vs the candesartan group (27.2%). In a clinical setting, patients initiated on candesartan treatment had a lower risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes and lower rates of drug discontinuation compared with patients initiated on enalapril. No differences in CVD risk were observed. PMID:25211055

  1. Regional Variability of Lifestyle Factors and Hypertension with Prediabetes and Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Population-Based KORA-F4 and SHIP-TREND Studies in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Margit; Peters, Annette; Schipf, Sabine; Krabbe, Christine; Völzke, Henry; Tamayo, Teresa; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Meisinger, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) shows regional differences in Germany. The purpose of the project was to compare the prevalence of prediabetes and undiagnosed T2D in two regions in Germany, the Northeast and the South, and to evaluate their associations with regional variations in lifestyle factors and hypertension. Methods Data from the KORA-F4 study (South Germany, 2006–2008) and the SHIP-TREND study (Northeast Germany, 2008–2012) were used. Participants aged 35–79 years without T2D with an overnight fasting of more than 8 hours and an oral glucose tolerance test were included: KORA-F4: n = 2,616 and SHIP-TREND: n = 1,968. Results The prevalence of prediabetes/newly diagnosed T2D was especially high in men (about 60%) and women (about 50%) in the Northeast, followed by men (about 50%) and women (about 30%) in the South. Lifestyle factors associated with T2D varied between the regions: more participants in the Northeast were active smokers and the percentages of people with overweight or obesity were greater than in their southern counterparts. However, these differences could not explain the striking disparity in prediabetes/newly diagnosed T2D. The frequency of hypertension was also distinctly higher in the Northeast than in the South and clearly associated with prediabetes/newly diagnosed T2D. Especially in men living in the Northeast, screening individuals with blood pressure ≥ 140/90mmHg might reveal up to 70% of those with prediabetes/newly diagnosed T2D. Conclusions Knowledge about regional variability in T2D and related risk factors is important for the planning of diabetes prevention programs. In our analyses, common lifestyle factors did not nearly explain these variations between the northern SHIP-TREND and the southern KORA-F4 studies. Further examinations of regional socioeconomic, political, environmental and other aspects are needed. Meanwhile, targeted diabetes prevention strategies with a special focus on men living in the

  2. Influence of Age at Diagnosis and Time-Dependent Risk Factors on the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Forga, Luis; Goñi, María José; Cambra, Koldo; García-Mouriz, Marta; Iriarte, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To determine the influence of age at onset of type 1 diabetes and of traditional vascular risk factors on the development of diabetic retinopathy, in a cohort of patients who have been followed up after onset. Methods. Observational, retrospective study. The cohort consists of 989 patients who were followed up after diagnosis for a mean of 10.1 (SD: 6.8) years. The influence of age at diagnosis, glycemic control, duration of diabetes, sex, blood pressure, lipids, BMI, and smoking is analyzed using Cox univariate and multivariate models with fixed and time-dependent variables. Results. 135 patients (13.7%) developed diabetic retinopathy. The cumulative incidence was 0.7, 5.9, and 21.8% at 5-, 10-, and 15-year follow-up, respectively. Compared to the group with onset at age <10 years, the risk of retinopathy increased 2.5-, 3-, 3.3-, and 3.7-fold in the groups with onset at 10–14, 15–29, 30–44, and >44 years, respectively. During follow-up we also observed an association between diabetic retinopathy and HbA1c levels, HDL-cholesterol, and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion. The rate of diabetic retinopathy is higher in patients who were older at type 1 diabetes diagnosis. In addition, we confirmed the influence of glycemic control, HDL-cholesterol, and diastolic blood pressure on the occurrence of retinopathy. PMID:27213158

  3. Adverse Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on the Skeleton of Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Ardura, Juan Antonio; Lozano, Daniel; Bolívar, Oskarina Hernández; López-Herradón, Ana; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Irene; Proctor, Alexander; van der Eerden, Bram; Schreuders-Koedam, Marijke; van Leeuwen, Johannes; Alcaraz, María José; Mulero, Francisca; de la Fuente, Mónica; Esbrit, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the possibility that a diabetic (DM) status might worsen age-related bone deterioration was explored in mice. Male CD-1 mice aged 2 (young control group) or 16 months, nondiabetic or made diabetic by streptozotocin injections, were used. DM induced a decrease in bone volume, trabecular number, and eroded surface, and in mineral apposition and bone formation rates, but an increased trabecular separation, in L1-L3 vertebrae of aged mice. Three-point bending and reference point indentation tests showed slight changes pointing to increased frailty and brittleness in the mouse tibia of diabetic old mice. DM was related to a decreased expression of both vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor 2, which paralleled that of femoral vasculature, and increased expression of the pro-adipogenic gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and adipocyte number, without affecting β-catenin pathway in old mouse bone. Concomitant DM in old mice failed to affect total glutathione levels or activity of main anti-oxidative stress enzymes, although xanthine oxidase was slightly increased, in the bone marrow, but increased the senescence marker caveolin-1 gene. In conclusion, DM worsens bone alterations of aged mice, related to decreased bone turnover and bone vasculature and increased senescence, independently of the anti-oxidative stress machinery. PMID:26386012

  4. Age at the time of sulfonylurea initiation influences treatment outcomes in KCNJ11-related neonatal diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Brian W.; Carmody, David; Tadie, Elizabeth C.; Pastore, Ashley N.; Dickens, Jazzmyne T.; Wroblewski, Kristen E.; Naylor, Rochelle N.; Philipson, Louis H.; Greeley, Siri Atma W.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Individuals with heterozygous activating mutations of the KCNJ11 gene encoding a subunit of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) can usually be treated with oral sulfonylurea (SU) pills in lieu of insulin injections. The aim of this study was to test our hypothesis that younger age at the time of initiation of SU therapy is correlated with lower required doses of SU therapy, shorter transition time and decreased likelihood of requiring additional diabetes medications. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study using data on 58 individuals with neonatal diabetes due to KCNJ11mutations identified through the University of Chicago Monogenic Diabetes Registry (http://monogenicdiabetes.uchicago.edu/registry). We assessed the influence of age at initiation of SU therapy on treatment outcomes. Results HbA1c fell from an average of 8.5% (69 mmol/mol) before transition to 6.2% (44 mmol/mol) after SU therapy (p < 0.001). Age of initiation of SU correlated with the dose (mg kg−1 day−1) of SU required at follow-up (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). Similar associations were observed across mutation subtypes. Ten participants required additional glucose-lowering medications and all had initiated SU at age 13 years or older. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions/interpretation Earlier age at initiation of SU treatment is associated with improved response to SU therapy. Declining sensitivity to SU may be due to loss of beta cell mass over time in those treated with insulin. Our data support the need for early genetic diagnosis and appropriate personalised treatment in all cases of neonatal diabetes. PMID:25877689

  5. Peripheral Levels of AGEs and Astrocyte Alterations in the Hippocampus of STZ-Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Nardin, Patrícia; Zanotto, Caroline; Hansen, Fernanda; Batassini, Cristiane; Gasparin, Manuela Sangalli; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic patients and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus (DM) models exhibit signals of brain dysfunction, evidenced by neuronal damage and memory impairment. Astrocytes surrounding capillaries and synapses modulate many brain activities that are connected to neuronal function, such as nutrient flux and glutamatergic neurotransmission. As such, cognitive changes observed in diabetic patients and experimental models could be related to astroglial alterations. Herein, we investigate specific astrocyte changes in the rat hippocampus in a model of DM induced by STZ, particularly looking at glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), S100B protein and glutamate uptake, as well as the content of advanced glycated end products (AGEs) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as a consequence of elevated hyperglycemia and the content of receptor for AGEs in the hippocampus. We found clear peripheral alterations, including hyperglycemia, low levels of proinsulin C-peptide, elevated levels of AGEs in serum and CSF, as well as an increase in RAGE in hippocampal tissue. We found specific astroglial abnormalities in this brain region, such as reduced S100B content, reduced glutamate uptake and increased S100B secretion, which were not accompanied by changes in GFAP. We also observed an increase in the glucose transporter, GLUT-1. All these changes may result from RAGE-induced inflammation; these astroglial alterations together with the reduced content of GluN1, a subunit of the NMDA receptor, in the hippocampus may be associated with the impairment of glutamatergic communication in diabetic rats. These findings contribute to understanding the cognitive deficits in diabetic patients and experimental models. PMID:27084774

  6. Effect of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on inflammation and metabolic markers in hypertensive and/or diabetic obese adults: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ellulu, Mohammed S.; Khaza'ai, Huzwah; Patimah, Ismail; Rahmat, Asmah; Abed, Yehia

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is a degree of excess weight that predisposes people to metabolic syndromes via an inflammatory mechanism. Hypertensive and diabetic people have higher risks of developing systemic inflammation. Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC ω-3 PUFAs) can reduce the cardiovascular events and help against inflammation. Objective To identify the effects of LC ω-3 PUFAs on reducing the levels of inflammatory markers on hypertensive and/or diabetic obese adults. Materials and methods Sixty-four patients, who were hypertensive and/or diabetic obese with high levels of inflammatory markers, from primary healthcare centers of Gaza City, Palestine, enrolled in two groups of an open-label, parallel, randomized, controlled trial for 8 weeks. Thirty-three patients were in the control group, and 31 patients were in the experimental group. The experimental group was treated with a daily dose of 300 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 200 mg of docosahexaenoic acid. Results Treatment with LC ω-3 PUFAs significantly reduced the level of high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP) [14.78±10.7 to 8.49±6.69 mg/L, p<0.001], fasting blood glucose (FBG) [178.13±58.54 to 157.32±59.77 mg/dL, p=0.024], and triglyceride (TG) [209.23±108.3 to 167.0±79.9 mg/dL, p<0.05] after 8 weeks of treatment, whereas no significant changes appeared in interleukin 6 (IL-6) and total cholesterol (TC). In the control group, significant reduction was detected for FBG [187.15±64.8 to 161.91±37.9 mg/dL, p<0.05] and TG [202.91±107.0 to 183.45±95.82 mg/dL, p<0.05], and no changes for hs-CRP, IL-6, or TC. By comparing the experimental group with the changes of control group at the endpoint, LC ω-3 PUFAs did not reach the clinical significance in treating effectiveness for any of the clinical variables. Conclusion LC ω-3 PUFAs have recommended effects on health; the obtained results can improve the role of LC ω-3 PUFAs as a protective factor on inflammation and metabolic

  7. Prevalence and predictors of adult hypertension in an urban eastern Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, D S; Kabir, Zubair; Dash, Ashok K; Das, B C

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of hypertension and to identify predictors of adult hypertension specifically in an underdeveloped urban region of eastern India. Study design Population-based cross-sectional study, with multi-stage random sampling technique. Settings A main urban city located in South Orissa in eastern India. Participants 1178 adults 20–80 years of age randomly selected from 37 electoral wards of an urban locale. Statistical methods Descriptive and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results The prevalence of hypertension was 36%. Significant predictors of hypertension were age, central obesity, inadequate fruit intake, diabetes, low high-density lipoprotein level and physical inactivity. Conclusions One-third of the adults in this urban population of eastern India are reported to be hypertensive and the classical risk factors have been found to contribute to the increased burden, which reinforces the importance of preventive cardiovascular interventions in tackling this burden.

  8. The prevalence of and risk factors for hypertension in adults living in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Onal, A E; Erbil, S; Ozel, S; Aciksari, K; Tumerdem, Y

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of and risk factors for hypertension were determined among habitants in the European side of Istanbul who are 25 years and older. Eight administrative districts were selected with the method of simple random sampling. The participants were selected through systematic calling from address lists. Between 17 and 22 June 2002, the questionnaires were applied to the participants in a face-to-face interview; then arterial blood pressures, body weights and heights of the participants were measured. Of 423 adults participating in the study, 35.5% were hypertensive; 35.9% were obese, 27.9% were overweight and 2.1% were underweight. Risk factors for hypertension such as age, gender, educational status, social security, family history of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, medical history of diabetes and congestive heart failure, smoking and alcohol use, and body mass index in the hypertensive and non-hypertensive groups were investigated by means of logistic regression analysis. Age [odds ratio (OR): 5.20, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.18-12.40], body mass index (OR: 2.22, 95% CI: 1.57-3.16) and smoking (OR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.55-0.95) were found to be correlated with hypertension. The results showed that the prevalence of hypertension was high in Istanbul, and obesity, being overweight and advanced age were the risk factors for hypertension. PMID:15083638

  9. Correlation of liver enzymes with diabetes and pre-diabetes in middle-aged rural population in China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun-hui; Liu, Qian; Yang, Yan; Liu, Zhe-long; Hu, Shu-hong; Zhou, Xin-rong; Yuan, Gang; Zhang, Mu-xun; Tao, Jing; Yu, Xue-feng

    2016-02-01

    The survey aimed to explore the association of liver transaminases with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and pre-diabetes (pre-DM) in the middle-aged rural population in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 10 800 middle-aged subjects who lived in rural area of central China. The 75-g oral glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Participants were asked to complete physical examination and standard questionnaire. The serum liver transaminases (ALT and GGT), HbA1C and serum lipids were measured. In middle-aged rural population, the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glucose combined with impaired glucose tolerance (IFG+IGT) and DM was 4.0%, 11.8%, 2.6% and 10.0%, respectively. Some measurements were higher in males than in females, such as waist hip ratio (WHR), blood pressure, fasting blood glucose (FBG), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and liver enzymes (ALT and GGT). Further, we found that elevated serum GGT and ALT levels were significantly positively correlated with the prevalence of DM, independent of central obesity, serum lipid and insulin resistance (IR) in both genders. However, the correlation of GGT and ALT with pre-DM was determined by genders and characteristics of liver enzymes. Higher serum GGT was indicative of IGT in both genders. The association of serum ALT with pre-DM was significant only in female IGT group. In conclusion, our present survey shows both serum GGT and ALT are positively associated with DM, independent of the cardiovascular risk factors in both genders. PMID:26838740

  10. Depot-Specific Changes in Fat Metabolism with Aging in a Type 2 Diabetic Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Eun; Choi, Jung Mook; Chang, Eugene; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Kang, Eun Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat accretion is a hallmark of aging and is associated with aging-induced metabolic dysfunction. PPARγ agonist was reported to improve insulin sensitivity by redistributing fat from visceral fat to subcutaneous fat. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which aging affects adipose tissue remodeling in a type 2 diabetic animal model and through which PPARγ activation modulates aging-related fat tissue distribution. At the ages of 21, 31 and 43 weeks, OLETF rats as an animal model of type 2 diabetes were evaluated for aging-related effects on adipose tissue metabolism in subcutaneous and visceral fat depots. During aging, the ratio of visceral fat weight to subcutaneous fat weight (V/S ratio) increased. Aging significantly increased the mRNA expression of genes involved in lipogenesis such as lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid binding protein aP2, lipin 1, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, which were more prominent in visceral fat than subcutaneous fat. The mRNA expression of adipose triglyceride lipase, which is involved in basal lipolysis and fatty acid recycling, was also increased, more in visceral fat compared to subcutaneous fat during aging. The mRNA levels of the genes associated with lipid oxidation were increased, whereas the mRNA levels of genes associated with energy expenditure showed no significant change during aging. PPARγ agonist treatment in OLETF rats resulted in fat redistribution with a decreasing V/S ratio and improved glucose intolerance. The genes involved in lipogenesis decreased in visceral fat of the PPARγ agonist-treated rats. During aging, fat distribution was changed by stimulating lipid uptake and esterification in visceral fat rather than subcutaneous fat, and by altering the lipid oxidation. PMID:26894429

  11. Correlates of Physical Activity Among Middle-Aged and Older Korean Americans at Risk for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Benjamin; Sadarangani, Tina; Wyatt, Laura C.; Zanowiak, Jennifer M.; Kwon, Simona C.; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Lee, Linda; Islam, Nadia S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore correlates of meeting recommended physical activity (PA) among middle-aged and older Korean Americans at risk for diabetes mellitus (DM). Design and Methods PA patterns and their correlates were assessed among 292 middle-aged and older Korean Americans at risk for DM living in New York City (NYC) using cross-sectional design of baseline information from a diabetes prevention intervention. PA was assessed by self-report of moderate and vigorous activity, results were stratified by age group (45-64 and 65-75), and bivariate analyses compared individuals performing less than sufficient PA and individuals performing sufficient PA. Logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios predicting sufficient PA. Findings After adjusting for sex, age group, years lived in United States, marital status, health insurance and body mass index (BMI), sufficient PA was associated with male sex, older age, lower BMI, eating vegetables daily, and many PA-specific questions (lack of barriers, confidence, and engagement). When stratified by age group, male sex and eating vegetables daily was no longer significant among Koreans age 65 to 75 years of age, and BMI was not significant for either age group. Conclusions PA interventions targeting this population may be beneficial and should consider the roles of sex, age, physical and social environment, motivation, and self-efficacy. Clinical Relevance Clinical providers should understand the unique motivations for PA among Korean Americans and recognize the importance of culturally driven strategies to enable lifestyle changes and support successful aging for diverse populations. PMID:26641597

  12. Depot-Specific Changes in Fat Metabolism with Aging in a Type 2 Diabetic Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Eun; Park, Cheol-Young; Choi, Jung Mook; Chang, Eugene; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Kang, Eun Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul; Cha, Bong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat accretion is a hallmark of aging and is associated with aging-induced metabolic dysfunction. PPARγ agonist was reported to improve insulin sensitivity by redistributing fat from visceral fat to subcutaneous fat. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which aging affects adipose tissue remodeling in a type 2 diabetic animal model and through which PPARγ activation modulates aging-related fat tissue distribution. At the ages of 21, 31 and 43 weeks, OLETF rats as an animal model of type 2 diabetes were evaluated for aging-related effects on adipose tissue metabolism in subcutaneous and visceral fat depots. During aging, the ratio of visceral fat weight to subcutaneous fat weight (V/S ratio) increased. Aging significantly increased the mRNA expression of genes involved in lipogenesis such as lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid binding protein aP2, lipin 1, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, which were more prominent in visceral fat than subcutaneous fat. The mRNA expression of adipose triglyceride lipase, which is involved in basal lipolysis and fatty acid recycling, was also increased, more in visceral fat compared to subcutaneous fat during aging. The mRNA levels of the genes associated with lipid oxidation were increased, whereas the mRNA levels of genes associated with energy expenditure showed no significant change during aging. PPARγ agonist treatment in OLETF rats resulted in fat redistribution with a decreasing V/S ratio and improved glucose intolerance. The genes involved in lipogenesis decreased in visceral fat of the PPARγ agonist-treated rats. During aging, fat distribution was changed by stimulating lipid uptake and esterification in visceral fat rather than subcutaneous fat, and by altering the lipid oxidation. PMID:26894429

  13. Cardioprotective effect of pioglitazone in diabetic and non-diabetic rats subjected to acute myocardial infarction involves suppression of AGE-RAGE axis and inhibition of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khodeer, Dina M; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Farag, Noha E; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2016-05-01

    Insulin resistance increases risk of cardiovascular diseases. This work investigated the protective effect of pioglitazone on myocardial infarction (MI) in non-diabetic and diabetic rats, focusing on its role on advanced glycated endproducts (AGEs) and cardiac apoptotic machinery. Male rats were divided into 2 experiments: experiment I and II (non-diabetic and diabetic rats) were assigned as saline, MI (isoproterenol, 85 mg/kg, daily), and MI+pioglitazone (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg). Injection of isoproterenol in diabetic rats produced greater ECG disturbances compared to non-diabetic rats. Treatment with pioglitazone (5 mg/kg) reduced the infarct size and improved some ECG findings. Pioglitazone (10 mg/kg) enhanced ECG findings, improved the histopathological picture and downregulated apoptosis in cardiac tissues. Whereas the higher dose of pioglitazone (20 mg/kg) did not improve most of the measured parameters but rather worsened some of them, such as proapoptotic markers. Importantly, a positive correlation was found between serum AGEs and cardiac AGE receptors (RAGEs) versus caspase 3 expression in the two experiments. Therefore, the current effect of pioglitazone was, at least in part, mediated through downregulation of AGE-RAGE axis and inhibition of apoptosis. Consequently, these data suggest that pioglitazone, at optimized doses, may have utility in protection from acute MI. PMID:27119311

  14. Cardiovascular disease and type 1 diabetes: prevalence, prediction and management in an ageing population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siang Ing; Patel, Mitesh; Jones, Christopher M; Narendran, Parth

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of mortality in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). However, evidence of its risks and management is often extrapolated from studies in type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients or the general population. This approach is unsatisfactory given that the underlying pathology, demographics and natural history of the disease differ between T1D and T2D. Furthermore, with a rising life expectancy, a greater number of T1D patients are exposed to the cardiovascular (CV) risk factors associated with an ageing population. The aim of this review is to examine the existing literature around CVD in T1D. We pay particular attention to CVD prevalence, how well we manage risk, potential biomarkers, and whether the studies included the older aged patients (defined as aged over 65). We also discuss approaches to the management of CV risk in the older aged. The available data suggest a significant CVD burden in patients with T1D and poor management of CV risk factors. This is underpinned by a poor evidence base for therapeutic management of CV risk specifically for patients with T1D, and in the most relevant population - the older aged patients. We would suggest that important areas remain to be addressed, particularly exploring the risks and benefits of therapeutic approaches to CVD management in the older aged. PMID:26568811

  15. Cardiovascular disease and type 1 diabetes: prevalence, prediction and management in an ageing population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Siang Ing; Patel, Mitesh; Jones, Christopher M.; Narendran, Parth

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of mortality in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). However, evidence of its risks and management is often extrapolated from studies in type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients or the general population. This approach is unsatisfactory given that the underlying pathology, demographics and natural history of the disease differ between T1D and T2D. Furthermore, with a rising life expectancy, a greater number of T1D patients are exposed to the cardiovascular (CV) risk factors associated with an ageing population. The aim of this review is to examine the existing literature around CVD in T1D. We pay particular attention to CVD prevalence, how well we manage risk, potential biomarkers, and whether the studies included the older aged patients (defined as aged over 65). We also discuss approaches to the management of CV risk in the older aged. The available data suggest a significant CVD burden in patients with T1D and poor management of CV risk factors. This is underpinned by a poor evidence base for therapeutic management of CV risk specifically for patients with T1D, and in the most relevant population – the older aged patients. We would suggest that important areas remain to be addressed, particularly exploring the risks and benefits of therapeutic approaches to CVD management in the older aged. PMID:26568811

  16. Confocal Raman study of aging process in diabetes mellitus human voluntaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Liliane; Téllez Soto, Claudio Alberto; dos Santos, Laurita; Ali, Syed Mohammed; Fávero, Priscila Pereira; Martin, Airton A.

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of AGEs [Advanced Glycation End - products] occurs slowly during the human aging process. However, its formation is accelerated in the presence of diabetes mellitus. In this paper, we perform a noninvasive analysis of glycation effect on human skin by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy. This technique uses a laser of 785 nm as excitation source and, by the inelastic scattering of light, it is possible to obtain information about the biochemical composition of the skin. Our aim in this work was to characterize the aging process resulting from the glycation process in a group of 10 Health Elderly Women (HEW) and 10 Diabetic Elderly Women (DEW). The Raman data were collected from the dermis at a depth of 70-130 microns. Through the theory of functional density (DFT) the bands positions of hydroxyproline, proline and AGEs (pentosidine and glucosepane) were calculated by using Gaussian 0.9 software. A molecular interpretation of changes in type I collagen was performed by the changes in the vibrational modes of the proline (P) and hydroxyproline (HP). The data analysis shows that the aging effects caused by glycation of proteins degrades type I collagen differently and leads to accelerated aging process.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid is drained primarily via the spinal canal and olfactory route in young and aged spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of CSF dynamics are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved in quantification and visualization. In particular, there is debate surrounding the route of CSF drainage. Our aim was to quantify CSF flow, volume, and drainage route dynamics in vivo in young and aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) using a novel contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) method. Methods ICP was recorded in young (2–5 months) and aged (16 months) SHR. Contrast was administered into the lateral ventricles bilaterally and sequential CT imaging was used to visualize the entire intracranial CSF system and CSF drainage routes. A customized contrast decay software module was used to quantify CSF flow at multiple locations. Results ICP was significantly higher in aged rats than in young rats (11.52 ± 2.36 mmHg, versus 7.04 ± 2.89 mmHg, p = 0.03). Contrast was observed throughout the entire intracranial CSF system and was seen to enter the spinal canal and cross the cribriform plate into the olfactory mucosa within 9.1 ± 6.1 and 22.2 ± 7.1 minutes, respectively. No contrast was observed adjacent to the sagittal sinus. There were no significant differences between young and aged rats in either contrast distribution times or CSF flow rates. Mean flow rates (combined young and aged) were 3.0 ± 1.5 μL/min at the cerebral aqueduct; 3.5 ± 1.4 μL/min at the 3rd ventricle; and 2.8 ± 0.9 μL/min at the 4th ventricle. Intracranial CSF volumes (and as percentage total brain volume) were 204 ± 97 μL (8.8 ± 4.3%) in the young and 275 ± 35 μL (10.8 ± 1.9%) in the aged animals (NS). Conclusions We have demonstrated a contrast-enhanced CT technique for measuring and visualising CSF dynamics in vivo. These results indicate substantial drainage of CSF via spinal and olfactory routes, but there was little evidence of drainage via sagittal sinus arachnoid granulations in either young or aged animals

  18. Reduced activity of SKC a and Na-K ATPase underlies the accelerated impairment of EDH-type relaxations in mesenteric arteries of aging spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kong, Billy W C; Man, Ricky Y K; Gao, Yuansheng; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-06-01

    Aging is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction due to reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) and/or reduced endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations (EDH). This study examines the hypothesis that hypertension aggravates the impairment of EDH-type relaxation due to aging. EDH-type relaxations were studied in superior mesenteric arteries isolated from Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats of 12, 36, 60, and 72 weeks of age. EDH-type relaxations in WKY were reduced with aging, and this was associated with an impairment of the function of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SKC a) and sodium-potassium ATPase (Na-K ATPase). EDH-type relaxation in SHR was smaller than that in WKY arteries, and further reduction occurred with aging. Pharmacological experiments suggested a reduced involvement of SKC a and Na-K ATPase and activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and silent information regulator T1 (sirtuin-1; SIRT1) in mesenteric arteries of 12-week-old SHR. These pharmacological findings suggest that in superior mesenteric arteries of the rat, the reduction in EDH-type relaxation occurs with aging and that such a reduction is exacerbated in hypertension. The latter exacerbation appears to involve proteins associated with the process of cellular senescence and is related to impaired function of SKC a and Na-K ATPase, a phenomenon that is also observed in mesenteric arteries of older normotensive rats. PMID:26171229

  19. [Use and perceptions of information and communication technologies in patients with hypertension, dyslipidemia or diabetes in a national hospital in Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Rivas-Nieto, Andrea C; Málaga, Germán; Ruiz-Grosso, Paulo; Huayanay-Espinoza, Carlos A; Curioso, Walter H

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the use and perceptions towards information and communication technologies (ICT) in 206 patients with arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes, recruited from the outpatient clinic in a national hospital in Lima, Peru. 54.4% were older adults and 70.4% were women. The use of daily phone calls was 44.7%. Most had never used a computer (78.2%), email (84%) or the Internet (84%). Many have never sent (80.6%) or received (69.9%) a text message. 70% had at some time forgotten to take their medicine. 72.8% would like to be reminded to take their medication and 67.9% had a family member who could help them with access to ICT. Despite the low use of ICT in this population, there is willingness and expectation from the patients to participate in programs that implement them. PMID:26338388

  20. Diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Merlin C; Brownlee, Michael; Susztak, Katalin; Sharma, Kumar; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A M; Zoungas, Sophia; Rossing, Peter; Groop, Per-Henrik; Cooper, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is arguably the most important target of microvascular damage in diabetes. A substantial proportion of individuals with diabetes will develop kidney disease owing to their disease and/or other co-morbidity, including hypertension and ageing-related nephron loss. The presence and severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) identify individuals who are at increased risk of adverse health outcomes and premature mortality. Consequently, preventing and managing CKD in patients with diabetes is now a key aim of their overall management. Intensive management of patients with diabetes includes controlling blood glucose levels and blood pressure as well as blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; these approaches will reduce the incidence of diabetic kidney disease and slow its progression. Indeed, the major decline in the incidence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) over the past 30 years and improved patient prognosis are largely attributable to improved diabetes care. However, there remains an unmet need for innovative treatment strategies to prevent, arrest, treat and reverse DKD. In this Primer, we summarize what is now known about the molecular pathogenesis of CKD in patients with diabetes and the key pathways and targets implicated in its progression. In addition, we discuss the current evidence for the prevention and management of DKD as well as the many controversies. Finally, we explore the opportunities to develop new interventions through urgently needed investment in dedicated and focused research. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/NKHDzg. PMID:27188921

  1. Identification of phenotypes at risk of transition from diastolic hypertension to isolated systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Esposito, R; Izzo, R; Galderisi, M; De Marco, M; Stabile, E; Esposito, G; Trimarco, V; Rozza, F; De Luca, N; de Simone, G

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about the potential progression of hypertensive patients towards isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) and about the phenotypes associated with the development of this condition. Aim of this study was to detect predictors of evolution towards ISH in patients with initial systolic-diastolic hypertension. We selected 7801 hypertensive patients free of prevalent cardiovascular (CV) diseases or severe chronic kidney disease and with at least 6-month follow-up from the Campania Salute Network. During 55±44 months of follow-up, incidence of ISH was 21%. Patients with ISH at the follow-up were significantly older (P<0.0001), had longer duration of hypertension, higher prevalence of diabetes and were more likely to be women (all P<0.0001). They exhibited higher baseline left ventricular mass index (LVMi), arterial stiffness (pulse pressure/stroke index), relative wall thickness (RWT) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT; all P<0.001). Independent predictors of incident ISH were older age (odds ratio (OR)=1.14/5 years), female gender (OR=1.30), higher baseline systolic blood pressure (OR=1.03/5 mm Hg), lower diastolic blood pressure (OR=0.89/5 mm Hg), longer duration of hypertension (OR=1.08/5 months), higher LVMi (OR=1.02/5 g m(-2.7)), arterial stiffness (OR=2.01), RWT (OR=1.02), IMT (OR=1.19 mm(-1); all P<0.0001), independently of antihypertensive treatment, obesity, diabetes and fasting glucose (P>0.05). Our findings suggest that ISH is a sign of aggravation of the atherosclerotic disease already evident by the target organ damage. Great efforts should be paid to prevent this evolution and prompt aggressive therapy for arterial hypertension should be issued before the onset of target organ damage, to reduce global CV risk. PMID:26355832

  2. Baseline Prevalence of Heart Diseases, Hypertension, Diabetes, and Obesity in Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Potential Threats in the Recovery Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases impede the recovery trajectory of acutely injured persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). This study compares the odds of prevalent heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity between persons with TSCI and persons with lower extremity fractures (LEF) who were discharged from acute care facilities. Methods: 1,776 patients with acute TSCI (cases) and 1,780 randomly selected patients with LEF (controls) discharged from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2009, from all nonfederal hospitals were identified. Data extracted from uniform billing files were compared between cases and controls in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for sociodemographic and clinical covariables. Results: Thirty percent of patients with acute TSCI had at least 1 of 4 conditions compared with 18% of patients with LEF (P < .0001). Persons with acute TSCI were 4 times more likely (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% CI, 1.65–9.97) to have obesity, 2.7 times more likely to have heart disease (P < .001), 2 times more likely to have hypertension (P < .001), and 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes (P = .044) at the onset of TSCI. Disproportionately more Blacks than Whites have TSCI and chronic diseases. Conclusion: This study suggests that there is an increased burden of cardiovascular and cardiometabolic diseases among persons with acute TSCI compared with LEF trauma controls. Unattended comorbid conditions will affect quality of life and the recovery process. This warrants continuous monitoring and management of chronic diseases during the rehabilitation process. PMID:23960701

  3. Dual inhibitors for aspartic proteases HIV-1 PR and renin: advancements in AIDS-hypertension-diabetes linkage via molecular dynamics, inhibition assays, and binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Tzoupis, Haralambos; Leonis, Georgios; Megariotis, Grigorios; Supuran, Claudiu T; Mavromoustakos, Thomas; Papadopoulos, Manthos G

    2012-06-28

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR) and renin are primary targets toward AIDS and hypertension therapies, respectively. Molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) free-energy calculations and inhibition assays for canagliflozin, an antidiabetic agent verified its effective binding to both proteins (ΔG(pred) = -9.1 kcal mol(-1) for canagliflozin-renin; K(i,exp)= 628 nM for canagliflozin-HIV-1 PR). Moreover, drugs aliskiren (a renin inhibitor) and darunavir (an HIV-1 PR inhibitor) showed high affinity for HIV-1 PR (K(i,exp)= 76.5 nM) and renin (K(i,pred)= 261 nM), respectively. Importantly, a high correlation was observed between experimental and predicted binding energies (r(2) = 0.92). This study suggests that canagliflozin, aliskiren, and darunavir may induce profound effects toward dual HIV-1 PR and renin inhibition. Since patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have a high risk of developing hypertension and diabetes, aliskiren-based or canagliflozin-based drug design against HIV-1 PR may eliminate these side-effects and also facilitate AIDS therapy. PMID:22621689

  4. Brain nitric oxides synthase in major pelvic ganglia of aged (LETO) and diabetic (OLETF) rats.

    PubMed

    Salama, N; Tamura, M; Tsuruo, Y; Ishimura, K; Kagawa, S

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of aging and diabetes mellitus (DM) on brain nitric oxide synthase (bNOS) expression in major pelvic ganglia (MPG) of rats. Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty rats (12, 30, and 70 weeks old), which are genetic models with non-insulin-dependent DM (NIDDM), and age-matched nondiabetic Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka controls were used. The MPG of all rats in this study were subjected to cryo-sectioning and staining with bNOS polyclonal AB and rhodamine-conjugated rabbit IgG. Fluorescence intensities of the stained neurons were assessed in randomly selected fields per each specimen. Animals of both groups revealed significant decline in the staining intensity of their neurons with aging and the progress of DM, but diabetic rats showed more decline than controls. In conclusion, both aging and NIDDM could decrease bNOS expression in rat MPG. However, NIDDM has a more evident effect than aging on that expression. The decrease in bNOS may cause a disturbance in functions of the target pelvic structures of these ganglia under both conditions. PMID:12230824

  5. Similar decline in mortality rate of older persons with and without type 2 diabetes between 1993 and 2004 the Icelandic population-based Reykjavik and AGES-Reykjavik cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A decline in mortality rates due to cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality has led to increased life expectancy in the Western world in recent decades. At the same time, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, a disease associated with a twofold excess risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality, has been increasing. The objective of this study was to estimate the secular trend of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality rates in two population-based cohorts of older persons, with and without type 2 diabetes, examined 11 years apart. Methods 1506 participants (42% men) from the population-based Reykjavik Study, examined during 1991–1996 (median 1993), mean age 75.0 years, and 4814 participants (43% men) from the AGES-Reykjavik Study, examined during 2002–2006 (median 2004), mean age 77.2 years, age range in both cohorts 70–87 years. The main outcome measures were age-specific mortality rates due to cardiovascular disease and all causes, over two consecutive 5.7- and 5.3-year follow-up periods. Results A 32% decline in cardiovascular mortality rate and a 19% decline in all-cause mortality rate were observed between 1993 and 2004. The decline was greater in those with type 2 diabetes, as illustrated by the decline in the adjusted hazard ratio of cardiovascular mortality in individuals with diabetes compared to those without diabetes, from 1.88 (95% CI 1.24-2.85) in 1993 to 1.46 (95% CI 1.11-1.91) in 2004. We also observed a concurrent decrease in major cardiovascular risk factors in both those with and without diabetes. A higher proportion of persons with diabetes received glucose-lowering, hypertensive and lipid-lowering medication in 2004. Conclusions A decline in cardiovascular and all-cause mortality rates was observed in older persons during the period 1993–2004, in both those with and without type 2 diabetes. This decline may be partly explained by improvements in cardiovascular risk factors and medical treatment over the period

  6. Physical Disability Trajectories in Older Americans with and without Diabetes: The Role of Age, Gender, Race or Ethnicity, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Ching-Ju; Wray, Linda A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This research combined cross-sectional and longitudinal data to characterize age-related trajectories in physical disability for adults with and without diabetes in the United States and to investigate if those patterns differ by age, gender, race or ethnicity, and education. Design and Methods: Data were examined on 20,433 adults aged 51…

  7. Influence of Age on Incident Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Prostate Cancer Survivors Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morgans, Alicia K.; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Koyama, Tatsuki; Albertsen, Peter C.; Goodman, Michael; Hamilton, Ann S.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Stanford, Janet L.; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Resnick, Matthew J.; Barocas, Daniel A.; Penson, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Observational data suggest that androgen deprivation therapy increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Using data from the population based PCOS we evaluated whether age at diagnosis and comorbidity impact the association of androgen deprivation therapy with incident diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods We identified men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer diagnosed from 1994 to 1995 who were followed through 2009 to 2010. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the relationship of androgen deprivation therapy exposure (2 or fewer years, greater than 2 years or none) with incident diabetes and cardiovascular disease, adjusting for age at diagnosis, race, stage and comorbidity. Results Of 3,526 eligible study participants 2,985 without diabetes and 3,112 without cardiovascular disease comprised the cohorts at risk. Androgen deprivation therapy was not associated with an increased risk of diabetes or cardiovascular disease in men diagnosed with prostate cancer before age 70 years. Prolonged androgen deprivation therapy and increasing age at diagnosis in older men was associated with an increased risk of diabetes (at age 76 years OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.0–4.4) and cardiovascular disease (at age 74 years OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0–3.5). Men with comorbidities were at greater risk for diabetes (OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.3–7.9) and cardiovascular disease (OR 8.1, 95% CI 4.3–15.5) than men without comorbidities. Conclusions Prolonged androgen deprivation therapy exposure increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in men diagnosed with prostate cancer who are older than approximately 75 years, especially those with other comorbidities. Older men who receive prolonged androgen deprivation therapy should be closely monitored for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25451829

  8. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... glucose or pre-diabetes. These levels are risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) test: Normal is less than 5.7%; prediabetes is 5.7 to 6.4%; and diabetes is 6.5% or higher. Oral ...

  9. Site-specific AGE modifications in the ECM: a role for glyoxal in protein damage in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Voziyan, Paul; Brown, Kyle L.; Chetyrkin, Sergei; Hudson, Billy

    2014-01-01

    Non-enzymatic modification of proteins in hyperglycemia is a major proposed mechanism of diabetic complications. Specifically, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from hyperglycemia-induced reactive carbonyl species (RCS) can have pathogenic consequences when they target functionally critical protein residues. Modification of a small number of these critical residues, often undetectable by the methodologies relying on measurements of total AGE levels, can cause significant functional damage. Therefore, detection of specific sites of protein damage in diabetes is central to understanding molecular basis of diabetic complications and for identification of biomarkers which are mechanistically linked to the disease. The current paradigm of RCS-derived protein damage places the major focus on methylglyoxal (MGO), an intermediate of cellular glycolysis. We propose that glyoxal (GO) is a major contributor to extracellular matrix (ECM) damage in diabetes. Here, we review the current knowledge and provide new data about GO-derived site-specific ECM modification in experimental diabetes. PMID:23492568

  10. Technology Use in Transition-Age Patients With Type 1 Diabetes: Reality and Promises.

    PubMed

    Los, Evan; Ulrich, Jenae; Guttmann-Bauman, Ines

    2016-05-01

    Youth with chronic illnesses have the greatest risk for a decline in their health management during transition-age. Because of this demonstrated and well-known issue, research has focused on how to improve the transition of care process. Despite the increasing number of technological devices on the market and the advances in telemedicine modalities available to patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), the utilization of technology is still suboptimal among patients of transition-age (ages 13-25). This article reviews the available resources, patterns of use in transition-age youth, and explores opportunities to advance technology use in transitioning patients with T1D from pediatric to adult care. PMID:26892506

  11. Experimental induction of type 2 diabetes in aging-accelerated mice triggered Alzheimer-like pathology and memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Jogender; Chauhan, Balwantsinh C; Chauhan, Neelima B

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease constituting ~95% of late-onset non-familial/sporadic AD, and only ~5% accounting for early-onset familial AD. Availability of a pertinent model representing sporadic AD is essential for testing candidate therapies. Emerging evidence indicates a causal link between diabetes and AD. People with diabetes are >1.5-fold more likely to develop AD. Senescence-accelerated mouse model (SAMP8) of accelerated aging displays many features occurring early in AD. Given the role played by diabetes in the pre-disposition of AD, and the utility of SAMP8 non-transgenic mouse model of accelerated aging, we examined if high fat diet-induced experimental type 2 diabetes in SAMP8 mice will trigger pathological aging of the brain. Results showed that compared to non-diabetic SAMP8 mice, diabetic SAMP8 mice exhibited increased cerebral amyloid-β, dysregulated tau-phosphorylating glycogen synthase kinase 3β, reduced synaptophysin immunoreactivity, and displayed memory deficits, indicating Alzheimer-like changes. High fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic SAMP8 mice may represent the metabolic model of AD. PMID:24121970

  12. Experimental Induction of Type 2 Diabetes in Aging-Accelerated Mice Triggered Alzheimer-Like Pathology and Memory Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Mehla, Jogender; Chauhan, Balwantsinh C.; Chauhan, Neelima B.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease constituting ~95% of late-onset non-familial/sporadic AD, and only ~5% accounting for early-onset familial AD. Availability of a pertinent model representing sporadic AD is essential for testing candidate therapies. Emerging evidence indicates a causal link between diabetes and AD. People with diabetes are >1.5-fold more likely to develop AD. Senescence-accelerated mouse model (SAMP8) of accelerated aging displays many features occurring early in AD. Given the role played by diabetes in the pre-disposition of AD, and the utility of SAMP8 non-transgenic mouse model of accelerated aging, we examined if high fat diet-induced experimental type 2 diabetes in SAMP8 mice will trigger pathological aging of the brain. Results showed that compared to non-diabetic SAMP8 mice, diabetic SAMP8 mice exhibited increased cerebral amyloid-β, dysregulated tau-phosphorylating glycogen synthase kinase 3β, reduced synaptophysin immunoreactivity, and displayed memory deficits, indicating Alzheimer-like changes. High fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic SAMP8 mice may represent the metabolic model of AD. PMID:24121970

  13. Impaired musculoskeletal response to age and exercise in PPARβ(-/-) diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, He; Desvergne, Beatrice; Ferrari, Serge; Bonnet, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Fragility fractures are recognized complication of diabetes, but yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. This is particularly pronounced in type 2 diabetes in which the propensity to fall is increased but bone mass is not necessarily low. Thus, whether factors implicated in the development of insulin resistance and diabetes directly impact on the musculoskeletal system remains to be investigated. PPARβ(-/-) mice have reduced metabolic activity and are glucose intolerant. We examined changes in bone and muscle in PPARβ(-/-) mice and investigated both the mechanism behind those changes with age as well as their response to exercise. Compared with their wild type, PPARβ(-/-) mice had an accelerated and parallel decline in both muscle and bone strength with age. These changes were accompanied by increased myostatin expression, low bone formation, and increased resorption. In addition, mesenchymal cells from PPARβ(-/-) had a reduced proliferation capacity and appeared to differentiate into more of an adipogenic phenotype. Concomitantly we observed an increased expression of PPARγ, characteristic of adipocytes. The anabolic responses of muscle and bone to exercise were also diminished in PPARβ(-/-) mice. The periosteal bone formation response to direct bone compression was, however, maintained, indicating that PPARβ controls periosteal bone formation through muscle contraction and/or metabolism. Taken together, these data indicate that PPARβ deficiency leads to glucose intolerance, decreased muscle function, and reduced bone strength. On a molecular level, PPARβ appears to regulate myostatin and PPARγ expression in muscle and bone, thereby providing potential new targets to reverse bone fragility in patients with metabolic disturbances. PMID:25279796

  14. Hypertension and acute myocardial infarction: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pedrinelli, Roberto; Ballo, Piercarlo; Fiorentini, Cesare; Denti, Silvia; Galderisi, Maurizio; Ganau, Antonello; Germanò, Giuseppe; Innelli, Pasquale; Paini, Anna; Perlini, Stefano; Salvetti, Massimo; Zacà, Valerio

    2012-03-01

    History of hypertension is a frequent finding in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and its recurring association with female sex, diabetes, older age, less frequent smoking and more frequent vascular comorbidities composes a risk profile quite distinctive from the normotensive ischemic counterpart.Antecedent hypertension associates with higher rates of death and morbid events both during the early and long-term course of AMI, particularly if complicated by left ventricular dysfunction and/or congestive heart failure. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade, through either angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, angiotensin II receptor blockade or aldosterone antagonism, exerts particular benefits in that high-risk hypertensive subgroup.In contrast to the negative implications carried by antecedent hypertension, higher systolic pressure at the onset of chest pain associates with lower mortality within 1 year from coronary occlusion, whereas increased blood pressure recorded after hemodynamic stabilization from the acute ischemic event bears inconsistent relationships with recurring coronary events in the long-term follow-up.Whether antihypertensive treatment in post-AMI hypertensive patients prevents ischemic relapses is uncertain. As a matter of fact, excessive diastolic pressure drops may jeopardize coronary perfusion and predispose to new acute coronary events, although the precise cause-effect mechanisms underlying this phenomenon need further evaluation. PMID:22317927

  15. Twin Chorionicity and the Risk of Hypertensive Disorders: Gestational Hypertension and Pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Bartnik, Pawel; Kosinska-Kaczynska, Katarzyna; Kacperczyk, Joanna; Ananicz, Wojciech; Sierocińska, Aleksandra; Wielgos, Miroslaw; Szymusik, Iwona

    2016-08-01

    Twin gestation is known to be a risk factor for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. However, the relationship between hypertensive disorders (pre-eclampsia (PE) and gestational hypertension (GH)) and chorionicity of twin pregnancy is unclear, and published data is conflicting. We decided to analyze the relationship between placentation and prevalence of hypertensive disorders. It was a retrospective cohort study. 312 twin pregnancies delivered between 2009 and 2014 were analyzed, 79 of which were monochorionic and 233 dichorionic. The occurrence of PE and GH was established according to American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (ACOG) guidelines. Hypertensive disorders were diagnosed significantly more often in dichorionic than in monochorionic twin pregnancies (19.7% vs. 8.9%; OR = 2.53 95% CI 1.04-6.45; p = .03). PE occurred more frequently in DCP (13.3% vs. 3.8%; OR = 3.88 95% CI 1.09-16.46; p = .02). There were no differences between those two groups in the prevalence of GH (6.4% vs. 5.1%; p = .79). The logistic regres