Science.gov

Sample records for age left school

  1. No Child, No School, No State Left behind: Schooling in the Age of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopmann, Stefan Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Why and under which conditions do international student assessment programmes like PISA have success? How can the results of these assessments be useful for advocates of different, even contradictory, policies? What might explain different patterns of using assessment as a tool for school governance? Drawing on historical and comparative research,…

  2. No School Left Unscathed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The author maintains that the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 brands good schools with "failing" labels, places the heaviest burdens on states that were already striving to meet challenging education goals, imposes inflexible rules, and fails to make good on promises to pay for programs that would help struggling schools meet the demands…

  3. No School Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraw, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this special issue of "Educational Psychologist" is to consider the challenges of schooling in the age of accountability. Four experts were invited to review and evaluate the relationship between school accountability and school improvement, professional development, assessment, and student motivation. Each article provides suggestions…

  4. The School Age Criminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgenstern, Robert

    School age crime has increased a great deal in recent decades and a review of types of school age criminals may help school officials develop policies and programs to handle the problem. Both increased crime and improved news coverage have made the general public more concerned about school crime and school age criminals. A comparison of crime…

  5. Urban School Principals and the "No Child Left Behind" Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Mary E.; Canfield-Davis, Kathy; Anderson, Keith LeMar

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated how six practicing school principals responded to the requirements of the No Child Left Behind law (United States Congress Public Law 107-110, 2002, January, No Child Left Behind Act, http://www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/107-110.pdf ) in light of the multicultural leadership demands presented by an urban…

  6. Early Learning Left Out: Building an Early-Learning System to Secure America's Future. Federal, State and School District Investments by Child Age. 4th Edition. 2010-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    As a society, are we investing enough in our youngest children? The BUILD Initiative's latest report, Early Learning Left Out, by CFPC director Charles Bruner, provides a clear answer that current investments fall far short. The report draws upon the most recent federal, state, and public school budget information--and what we know about effective…

  7. Left Out and Left Behind: NCLB and the American High School. Every Child A Graduate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joftus, Scott; Maddox-Dolan, Brenda

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) was created to address the unsatisfactory learning outcomes of U.S. students, especially minority and poor students who continue to perform at significantly lower levels than their peers. The NCLB requires states, districts, and high schools to take steps to ensure that all students meet high academic…

  8. No Child Left Behind and High School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Although No Child Left Behind (NCLB) aims to close the achievement gap that parallels race and class, some of its key provisions are at odds with reforms that are successfully overhauling the large, comprehensive high schools that traditionally have failed students of color and low-income students in urban areas. While small, restructured schools…

  9. School-age children development

    MedlinePlus

    ... the parent is concerned about their well-being. Peer acceptance becomes more important during the school-age ... are highly active. They need physical activity and peer approval, and want to try more daring and ...

  10. School-Age NOTES, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scofield, Richard T., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the 12 monthly issues of a newsletter providing support and information for providers of child care for school-age children. The featured articles for each month are: (1) "Tips for New and Old for the New School Year" (September); (2) "Train Them and Retain Them: Keeping Quality Staff" (October); (3) "What Older Kids…

  11. 76 FR 2617 - No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR Chapter I No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction... that the No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee will... Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee was established...

  12. 76 FR 20287 - No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR Chapter I No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction... that the No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee will.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated...

  13. Early School Leavers: High School Students Who Left School before Graduating, 1983-1984. Publication No. 459.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joubert, Lionel; And Others

    The Los Angeles Unified School District has funded several innovative prevention/recovery programs to determine indicators that will help local schools identify the potential early leaver. This annual study for the 1983-84 school year examines the number of students in grades 10 through 12 who left school without a diploma. Findings cover all…

  14. School Restructuring Options Under No Child Left Behind: "What Works When?" Reopening as a Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Several years after the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), there are persistently low-performing schools in every state that face increasingly strong consequences for failing to improve student achievement sufficiently. In particular, schools that fail to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) for five consecutive years must…

  15. School-Age Child Care. Fastback 454.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBuffe, James R.; Hargreaves, Sherran A.

    Currently at least 5 million children--some estimates are as high as 15 million--are left unsupervised before or after school for 3 or more hours a day. In response to the problems of these latchkey children, many public schools are now developing some form of school-based or school-related before- and after-school child care programs. The purpose…

  16. Latchkey Children and School-Age Child Care. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Fink, Dale B.

    This ERIC Digest provides an overview of school-age child care (SACC) programs and suggests reasons for their growth. Discussion points out that escalating interest in SACC has paralleled the raising numbers of children left on their own, and that educators are only the latest in a parade of civic and professional groups which have gone on record…

  17. 75 FR 15389 - No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR CHAPTER VI No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction... that the No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee will... Child Left Behind Act of 2001. DATES: The Committee's second meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on April...

  18. School-Age Child Care: Innovative Public School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERS Spectrum, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Innovative school-age day care programs include Tennessee's Extended School Program; Hawaii's After-School Plus program; San Antonio's Kid's Involvement Network (offering middle school supervision); Aurora, Colorado's state-licensed Year-Round School Recreation Plan; and Pomona, California's Child Development Program. These public school programs…

  19. Mixed Age Groups in Swedish Nursery School and Compulsory School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundell, Knut

    Before 1970, no mixed-age groups existed in Swedish nursery schools. By 1991, 43 percent of children enrolled in nursery school were in mixed-age groups of ages 1 to 6 years, and 37 percent were in groups of children ages 3 to 6 years. Mixed-age groups are assumed to have advantages, including positive influences on learning and social…

  20. Seizure Management for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frueh, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    As many as 325,000 school-age children, ages 5-14, have epilepsy in the U.S. Thankfully, with medication, surgery, a special diet or vagus nerve stimulation, most go to school and fully participate in school activities. Children who continue to have seizures, however, may run into problems. Many of these problems can be overcome or prevented…

  1. Left-lateralized early neurophysiological response for Chinese characters in young primary school children.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaohua; Li, Su; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Si'en; Weng, Xuchu

    2011-04-01

    Adult readers consistently show an enhanced early event-related potential (ERP) response, N170, for visual words compared with other stimuli at left posterior electrodes. Developmental studies with words in alphabetic languages showed that this neurophysiological specialization for print develops rapidly from 6 to 10-years of age and becomes established around 10-11 years of age. Here we report for the first time the development of the word-related N170 in Chinese children learning to read Chinese, a logographic writing system radically different from alphabetic scripts in visual and linguistic features. We recorded ERP responses elicited by Chinese characters and line drawings of common objects in three groups of primary school children at 7, 9, and 11 years of age as well as college students. Results showed that the amplitude of N170 evoked by Chinese characters in the 7-year-old group was significantly larger than that in the 11-year-old group and the adult readers. Remarkably, all four age groups - even the youngest group - showed an increased and left-lateralized N170 response for Chinese characters, as compared with line drawings, suggesting that a relatively specialized mechanism for processing Chinese characters is already emergent by as early as 7 years of age. Our results, combined with studies of non-Chinese child readers suggest that the developmental pattern of word-related N170 is highly similar across different scripts, possibly reflecting increased visual processing expertise that children acquire through everyday reading. PMID:21310213

  2. School Bus Accidents and Driver Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMichael, Judith

    The study examines the rates and types of school bus accidents according to the age of the school bus driver. Accident rates in North Carolina for the school year 1971-72 were analyzed using three sources of data: accident reports, driver and mileage data, and questionnaires administered to a sample of school bus drivers. Data were obtained on…

  3. Student Achievement and Efficiency in Missouri Schools and the No Child Left Behind Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primont, Diane F.; Domazlicky, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    The 2001 No Child Left Behind Act requires that schools make ''annual yearly progress'' in raising student achievement, or face possible sanctions. The No Child Left Behind Act places added emphasis on test scores, such as scores from the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP), to evaluate the performance of schools. In this paper, we investigate…

  4. Home Schooling Comes of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lines, Patricia M.

    1996-01-01

    As state legislators, school boards, and the public at large become more receptive, home-schoolers are gaining access to more resources, including those at public schools. Researchers disagree over home schooling's effects on academic achievement and social development. Home schooling could be an important resource for studying how children learn…

  5. Early Learning Left Out: An Examination of Public Investments in Education and Development by Child Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruner, Charles; Elias, Victor; Stein, Debbie; Schaefer, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    This study presents the most comprehensive picture, to date, of public investments in the education and development of children by three age groupings--the early learning years (roughly 0-5), the school-aged years (roughly 6-18), and the college-aged years (roughly 19-23). It is based upon detailed analysis of state, federal, and school district…

  6. Supporting Children's Transition to School Age Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2016-01-01

    While a great deal of research has focused on children's experiences as they start school, less attention has been directed to their experiences--and those of their families and educators--as they start school age care. This paper draws from a recent research project investigating practices that promote positive transitions to school and school…

  7. School Age Child Care: A Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ellen; And Others

    This paper examines on-site, school-age child care and the relationship between attendance at on-site, after-school child care programs and familial, environmental, and developmental factors. Topics discussed include: (1) the quality of school-based environments in kindergarten and child care; (2) the socioeconomic status and size of families of…

  8. Age versus Schooling Effects on Intelligence Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Sorel; Cohen, Nora

    1989-01-01

    A study of effects of age and schooling in grades five and six on raw scores from a variety of general ability tests found that schooling: (1) is the major factor underlying the increase of intelligence test scores as a function of age; and (2) has a larger effect on verbal than nonverbal tests. (RH)

  9. Enhancing No Child Left Behind--School Mental Health Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Brian P.; Burke, Robert; Hare, Isadora; Mills, Carrie; Owens, Celeste; Moore, Elizabeth; Weist, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 was signed into law by President George W. Bush in January 2002 and is regarded as the most significant federal education policy initiative in a generation. The primary focus of the No Child Left Behind Act is on promoting educational success for all children; however, the legislation also contains…

  10. No Child Left Thinking: Democracy at Risk in Canada's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westheimer, Joel

    2010-01-01

    The author titled this article "No Child Left Thinking" because for the past 10 years he has been studying the effects of education initiatives such as the U.S. "No Child Left Behind Act" or the various provincial testing and accountability policies in Canada and their impact on teachers' ability to teach critical thinking and students' ability to…

  11. Indiana High School Principals' Response to No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Patricia J.

    2009-01-01

    The research problem for this qualitative study was "Effective response to No Child Left Behind (NCLB) by school leadership is critical to public school success or failure in Indiana. Because high schools have been the first and most-often to 'fail' under NCLB, knowing principals' concerns and the leadership and implementation…

  12. Charter Schools and No Child Left Behind: Sacrificing Autonomy for Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillings, Cara

    2005-01-01

    Amid concerns about standards, testing, and accountability, talk of the impact of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) on another recent education reform, charter schooling, is conspicuously absent. As public schools, charter schools across the country are subject to NCLB's testing requirements. At first blush, it seems only fair that charter schools…

  13. School Restructuring Options Under No Child Left Behind: Exploring What Works When. Newsletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, 2006

    2006-01-01

    To provide decision makers with the information they need to make informed decisions about school restructuring, The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement recently commissioned a series of papers titled "School Restructuring Options Under No Child Left Behind: What Works When?" Each of the four papers focuses on one of the first…

  14. The Effects of No Child Left Behind on School Services and Student Outcomes. Conference Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reback, Randall; Rockoff, Jonah E.; Schwartz, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    Under the "No Child Left Behind Act" (NCLB), in theory, schools on the margin for meeting AYP face strong short-term incentives to increase students' pass rates on specific exams, and may change their behavior accordingly. Using a comprehensive, national, school-level data set concerning schools' AYP status, student characteristics, and student…

  15. No Child Left Behind: The Mathematics of Guaranteed Failure. NCLB: Failed Schools--Or Failed Law?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Lowell C.

    2004-01-01

    The signing of the No Child Left Behind Act on January 8, 2002, moved the federal effort to influence K-12 schooling to a new and higher level--more aggressive, focused, and directive. The act requires that school districts and schools demonstrate adequate yearly progress (AYP) toward a particular goal: universal student achievement of standards…

  16. Nonmarital School-Age Motherhood: Family, Individual, and School Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin A.; Manlove, Jennifer; Glei, Dana A.; Morrison, Donna R.

    Despite a voluminous literature on the determinants of adolescent parenthood, little research exists on school-level influences on nonmarital, school-age motherhood. To address this gap, analyses of data from the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS) were conducted to determine individual, family, and school-level predictors of nonmarital…

  17. School-Age Ideas and Activities for After School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas-Foletta, Karen; Cogley, Michele

    This guide describes activities for school-age children in after-school day care programs. These activities may also be used in other settings. An introductory section discusses program philosophy, room arrangement, multicultural curriculum, program scheduling, summer programs and holiday care, field trips and special programs, age grouping,…

  18. School's Out! Group Day Care for the School Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Elizabeth; Milich, Cynthia

    This report on group day care is designed to: (1) examine the kinds of group programs for school-age children which exist in Los Angeles County, (2) describe the conditions necessary for program operation, and (3) consider the issue of quality as it relates to community expansion of day care services for children of school age. The report is…

  19. 75 FR 59672 - No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee-Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR Chapter I No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction... Bureau of Indian Affairs is announcing that the No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated...

  20. 75 FR 36117 - No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee-Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking... Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee will hold its third... (505) 563-3811. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The No Child Left Behind School Facilities and...

  1. 76 FR 54162 - No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee-Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR Chapter I No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction... Affairs is announcing that the No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated...

  2. Quantification of Protein Expression Changes in the Aging Left Ventricle of Rattus norvegicus

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jennifer E.; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Schwacke, John H.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Zile, Michael R.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    As the heart ages, electrophysiological and biochemical changes can occur, and the ventricle in many cases loses distensibility, impairing diastolic function. How the proteomic signature of the aged ventricle is unique in comparison to young hearts is still under active investigation. We have undertaken a quantitative proteomics study of aging left ventricles (LVs) utilizing the isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ) methodology. Differential protein expression was observed for 117 proteins including proteins involved in cell signaling, the immune response, structural proteins, and proteins mediating responses to oxidative stress. For many of these proteins, this is the first report of an association with the aged myocardium. Additionally, two proteins of unknown function were identified. This work serves as the basis for making future comparisons of the aged left ventricle proteome to that of left ventricles obtained from other models of disease and heart failure. PMID:19603826

  3. Approaches to School-Age Child Care. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Coltin, Lillian

    This ERIC Digest provides basic information about school-age day care programs. Discussion focuses briefly on options available to families with school-age children, developmental needs of school-age children, characteristics of high quality school-age programs, supportive services for self-care, and ways of improving school-age child care…

  4. One School's Approach to No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ivan A.

    2005-01-01

    The NO VACANCY sign has been hanging out at the Columbia-Montour Area Vocational-Technical School (CMAVTS) for the past several years. A variety of reasons may have contributed to the building being at full capacity. A new administrative director, Steve Walk, was hired in 1999 to change the image of the school. Since his arrival, High Schools That…

  5. Left Back: A Century of Failed School Reforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravitch, Diane

    This book recounts how American schools undertook reform after reform, based on unproven and unworkable theories, resulting in attention being diverted from the schools' essential purpose: the intellectual development of every child. American educators have committed three historical errors. First, they tried to turn the school into a vehicle for…

  6. It Takes More Than a Hero: School Restructuring in Ohio under the No Child Left Behind Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    This report describes Ohio's school restructuring efforts under the No Child Left Behind Act, including findings from interviews with state officials and case studies of nine schools in four school districts: Cincinnati Public Schools, Cleveland Metropolitan School District, Mansfield City Schools, and Mount Vernon City Schools. Key findings from…

  7. Suicide among School Age Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This pamphlet is designed to assist school personnel in dealing with youth suicide by providing information, and prevention, intervention, and postvention activities. The foreword briefly covers problems facing adolescents that may lead to suicide, and mentions the after effects on the family, school, and community. A message from New York…

  8. No Art Teacher Left Behind: Professional Development that Really Matters in an Age of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Teacher professional development is a chief concern of states, districts, and schools in the wake of high-stakes accountability measures such as No Child Left Behind (NCLB). The goals and practices of professional development are often disconnected, and this misalignment affects art teachers in unique ways. Art teachers are often "left…

  9. Parenting School-Age Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... childhood. She will spend more time with her peers, both in and out of school. These playmates ... deal with the stresses associated with your child's peer relationships. From time to time she may have ...

  10. School-age children development

    MedlinePlus

    ... that genetic background, as well as nutrition and exercise, may affect a child's growth. A sense of ... are many causes of school failure, including: Learning disabilities, such a reading disability Stressors, such as bullying ...

  11. School and District Leadership. No Child Left Behind Policy Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthes, Katy

    The newly reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA 2001) reflects and reinforces a major shift in thinking about the roles and responsibilities of school board members, district superintendents, and principals. School and district leaders will face substantial challenges as they adjust to ESEA requirements, including pressure to…

  12. No Child Left Behind and High School Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumenaker, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Astronomy was a required subject in the first American secondary level schools, the academies of the 18th century. When these were supplanted a century later by public high schools, astronomy still was often required, subsumed into courses of Natural Philosophy. Reasons given at that time to support astronomy as a part of general education include…

  13. Lenin's Lessons on Schooling for the Left in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxley, Simon

    2015-01-01

    If the recent revival in academic interest in Lenin's theory has overlooked his few writings on education, this may be because they appear to offer so little. This paper seeks to rectify this oversight. Whilst acknowledging that Lenin's educational offerings are thin, it is proposed that those on the left in the Twenty-First Century might…

  14. Families with School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The…

  15. Increasing Participation in No Child Left Behind School Choice. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernez, Georges; Li, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This is one in a series of policy briefs on key education issues prepared by the RAND Corporation for the Obama administration. No Child Left Behind gave students in low-performing schools the opportunity to switch schools, but only a small percentage of eligible students exercise the option. The low rate of uptake is due to operational issues and…

  16. 76 FR 33180 - Tribal Consultation on No Child Left Behind School Facilities and Construction Negotiated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR Chapter I Tribal Consultation on No Child Left Behind School Facilities... School Road, NW., Suite 312, Albuquerque, NM 87104; telephone (505) 563-3805; fax (505) 563-3811. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Pursuant to the Congressional mandate set out in the No Child...

  17. Coming of Age: Transitioning from Middle School to High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciminero, Sandra Elser

    2012-01-01

    To celebrate a milestone in eighth-graders' lives--leaving middle school and moving on to high school--the author assigns them the "Coming of Age" project, which examines the big idea of identity and promotes the move from self-reflection to self-expression. The project also includes writing components that correspond to each of the nine…

  18. Games Schools Play: How Schools near the Proficiency Threshold Respond to Accountability Pressures under No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Vivian C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore state and school responses to accountability pressures under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Section 2 presents a framework for summarizing the many positive and negative ways in which states, schools, and teachers respond to accountability pressures under NCLB. Section 3 focuses on state accountability…

  19. Writing and Drawing Performance of School Age Children: Is There Any Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonoti, Fotini; Vlachos, Filippos; Metallidou, Panagiota

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate possible relationships between writing and drawing performance of school-aged children, in order to compare the two skills at the within-individual level. The sample consisted of 182 right- and left-handed children, aged 8 to 12 years. Children were examined by the Greek adaptation of the Luria-Nebraska…

  20. Serving Hispanic School-Aged Children in after School Programming: Implications for School Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Joy Pastan

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. school-age population has been experiencing dramatic demographic changes over the past two decades. Hispanic students constitute the fastest growing student group today, and this growth is expected to continue such that there will be more Hispanic school-aged children than non-Hispanic school-aged children in 2050. Unfortunately, Hispanic…

  1. Left Behind: Are Public Schools Failing Indian Kids?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirado, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    American Indian children have the poorest academic performance among public school students. Reasons include poverty, racism, cultural incompatibility, low teacher expectations, high student mobility, lack of American Indian teachers, communication and learning differences, and cultural bias in standardized tests. New Mexico initiatives to improve…

  2. Creating Better School-Age Care Jobs: Model Work Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Peggy

    Built on the premise that good school-age care jobs are the cornerstone of high-quality services for school-age youth and their families, this guide presents model work standards for school-age care providers. The guide begins with a description of the strengths and challenges of the school-age care profession. The model work standards are…

  3. Effect of age on left ventricular function during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hakki, A.H.; DePace, N.L.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of age on left ventricular performance during exercise in 79 patients with coronary artery disease (greater than or equal to 50% narrowing of one or more major coronary arteries). Fifty patients under the age of 60 years (group I) and 29 patients 60 years or older (group II) were studied. Radionuclide angiograms were obtained at rest and during symptom-limited upright bicycle exercise. The history of hypertension, angina or Q wave myocardial infarction was similar in both groups. Multivessel coronary artery disease was present in 30 patients (60%) in group I and in 19 patients (66%) in group II (p . not significant). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the hemodynamic variables (at rest or during exercise) of left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and cardiac index. Exercise tolerance was higher in group I than in group II (7.8 +/- 0.4 versus 5.7 +/- 0.4 minutes, p . 0.009), although the exercise heart rate and rate-pressure product were not significantly different between the groups. There was poor correlation between age and ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume at rest and during exercise. Abnormal left ventricular function at rest or an abnormal response to exercise was noted in 42 patients (84%) in group I and in 25 patients (86%) in group II (p . not significant). Thus, in patients with coronary artery disease, age does not influence left ventricular function at rest or response to exercise. Older patients with coronary artery disease show changes in left ventricular function similar to those in younger patients with corresponding severity of coronary artery disease.

  4. School-Age NOTES, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scofield, Richard T., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document is comprised of the 12 monthly issues of a newsletter providing support and information for providers of child care for school-age children. The featured articles for each month are: (1) "Re-Evaluating Praise" (September); (2) "Making the Season Brighter: Tips To Create More Inclusive Holiday Programs" (October); (3) "Transitions:…

  5. Fostering the School Age Child: Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piers, James C.

    "Fostering the School Age Child" is a manual for use in training families providing service to children in foster care. Including instructor's materials and participants' course content, this instructor's manual is divided into eight lessons. Separate instructional sessions focus on development and behavior; building discipline and teaching…

  6. Energy Retrofit for Aging K-12 Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    3D/International, Houston, TX.

    Successfully retrofitting aging K-12 schools using energy conservation measures (ECM) that can improve the physical plant and reduce energy consumption are explored. Topics explore how certain ECM measures can benefit educational facilities, why retrofitting begun sooner rather than later is important, how to finance the retrofit program, and the…

  7. Childhood Depression in School Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Sandra M.

    At any one time, between 2 percent and 17 percent of the school-age population in the United States experiences moderate to severe depression. Too often, depression goes unrecognized, damaging self-esteem, ruining academic achievement, and disrupting families. This paper discusses childhood depression and treatment. Following an introduction…

  8. School Age Child Care Staff Training Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Jane S.; And Others

    A formative and summative evaluation was made of eight school-age child care (SACC) training workshops conducted in 1989-90 for 190 participants in upstate New York. (The focus of the SACC workshops was to "train the trainers," as well as to provide trainees with quality materials and instruction for future training with their staff members.) All…

  9. School-Age Child Care Trend Report: Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2007-01-01

    According to the author, school-age care is the fastest growing segment of the early childhood arena and possibly the least visible. While programs have been serving school-age children in out-of-school hours since the turn of the century, it is only in recent years that professionals have started to view school-age care as a distinct discipline…

  10. "No Child Left Behind" State Education Report, School Year 2003-04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State of Hawaii Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This document contains statistical information for the following performance targets for school years 2002-03 and 2003-04 in the state of Hawaii: (1) reading; (2) mathematics; (3) graduation; and (4) retention. The federal "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) law requires the state to report this information. The state performance of these groups are…

  11. Left-Behind Children in Rural Primary Schools: The Case of Sichuan Province

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Wenyan; Hou, Longlong; Chen, Wentao

    2008-01-01

    During China's economic transformation, much of the rural population migrated to urban areas in search of employment opportunities. "Left-behind children" are the product of this phenomenon and need significant attention. Our study adopted elementary school students in Sichuan province as the subjects. After carefully studying their academic…

  12. No Child Left Behind and Administrative Costs: A Resource Dependence Study of Local School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    This study considers the impact of federal funding on the administrative expenditures of local school districts since the passage of the No-Child-Left-Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. Under NCLB, federal education funds were made contingent upon a variety of accountability and reporting standards, creating new administrative costs and challenges for…

  13. No Poor Child Left Unrecruited: How NCLB Codifies and Perpetuates Urban School Militarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furumoto, Rosa

    2005-01-01

    A critical theoretical framework is used to analyze the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) federal legislation and its role in codifying and perpetuating educational practices and policies that contribute to growing campus militarism in urban schools serving low-income African American and Latino students. The author argues that NCLB Section 9528 is part…

  14. School District Responsibilities in Addressing Parental Involvement in No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Kim S.

    2010-01-01

    No Child Left Behind, Section 1118, Title I is devoted solely to parental involvement. Section 1118 requires school districts receiving Title I funds to develop and implement a written plan for parent involvement. Parental involvement is examined through teachers' responses concerning their engagement of parents in student achievement. Results…

  15. Not Quite "Deja Vu All over Again": "No Child Left Behind" Meets Effective Schools Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Thomas V.; Roberson, Thelma J.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the connections between No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and the Effective Schools Research Movement. Using historical methodology, the authors argue that although both were premised on building capacity, over time the reform that became NCLB evolved to focus on accountability. This shift disconnected the reform from its research…

  16. Schools Out! Family Day Care for the School Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Elizabeth; Milich, Cynthia

    This paper presents a study of family day care services for school age children. The study involved telephone and home interviews concerning services provided by a sample of 247 family day care mothers from the Los Angeles area. The paper is divided into two parts. Part I describes the results of the interviews in numerical form and includes short…

  17. VISION SCREENING PROGRAMS, PRE-SCHOOL AND SCHOOL AGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TREGANZA, AMORITA; AND OTHERS

    VISION PROBLEMS CAN BE DETECTED IN PRESCHOOL AND SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN BY THE USE OF THE APPROPRIATE TESTS OUTLINED IN THIS BOOKLET. THESE TESTS ARE DESIGNED TO BE ADMINISTERED IN PART BY LAY PERSONNEL UNDER THE DIRECTION OF AN OPTOMETRIC CONSULTANT. THE ENTIRE PROGRAM CONSISTS OF THE COMPLETION OF A DEVELOPMENTAL QUESTIONNAIRE BY THE PARENTS, AN…

  18. Prehypertension and Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Middle-Aged Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Shin Yi; Kim, Sujin; Lee, Chang Kwan; Cho, Eun Jeong; Cho, Soo Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is known to be a marker of myocardial damage, in particular myocardial fibrosis resulting from hypertension (HT). However, few studies have shown an association between the grade of diastolic dysfunction and blood pressure classification. We investigated the association between diastolic dysfunction and prehypertension (preHT) in apparently healthy adults who underwent routine health examinations. Subjects and Methods The study sample included 4261 Koreans, 45 to 64 years of age with no previous history of HT, diabetes mellitus, malignancy, proven coronary artery disease, or valvular heart disease based on echocardiography, who underwent routine health examinations including echocardiography. The subjects were classified into three groups based on resting blood pressure: prehypertensive, hypertensive, and normotensive. Results The prevalence of preHT in our study was 42.1%. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, alcohol consumption, fasting blood sugar, serum lipid profile, and body mass index, left ventricular diastolic dysfunction grades 1 and 2 were significantly more frequent in subjects with preHT (odds ratio [OR] 1.66 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.40-1.96] and 1.37 [95% CI 0.95-1.97], respectively). When analyzed according to gender, the increased OR was especially notable in males. Conclusion Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction appears to be significantly associated with preHT in Korean middle-aged males. PMID:27482263

  19. City Initiatives in School-Age Child Care. SACC Action Research Paper No. 1. School-Age Child Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannett, Ellen

    Features contributing to the success of six city-wide, comprehensive school-age program models are highlighted. Models are Seattle, Washington's Community Partnerships for School-Age Child Care; Madison, Wisconsin's School-Age Child Care Project; Irvine, California's Irvine Child Care Project; Houston, Texas' After-School Partnership; Los Angeles,…

  20. Auditory Sensitivity in School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trehub, Sandra E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Obtained thresholds for octave-band noises with center frequencies of 0.4, 1, 2, 4, and 10 kHz and 1/3-octave band noises centered at 10 and 20 kHz from children aged 6 to 16 years. Compared results with findings for infants, preschool children, and adults. Continuing sensitivity improvements were evident from infancy well into the school years.…

  1. Exit and Entry: Why Parents in Utah Left Public Schools and Chose Private Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukhari, Patras; Randall, E. Vance

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the factors that influenced parental decisions to exit a public school and enroll their children in a private school. It also explored why parents chose the specific private school their child attends and the level of satisfaction they have with their private school choice. The key reasons for leaving public education were: (a)…

  2. Mathematical modeling of left ventricular dimensional changes in mice during aging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianyi; Chiao, Ying Ann; Wang, Yunji; Voorhees, Andrew; Han, Hai-Chao; Lindsey, Merry L; Jin, Yu-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac aging is characterized by diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV), which is due in part to increased LV wall stiffness. In the diastolic phase, myocytes are relaxed and extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical determinant to the changes of LV wall stiffness. To evaluate the effects of ECM composition on cardiac aging, we developed a mathematical model to predict LV dimension and wall stiffness changes in aging mice by integrating mechanical laws and our experimental results. We measured LV dimension, wall thickness, LV mass, and collagen content for wild type (WT) C57/BL6J mice of ages ranging from 7.3 months to those of 34.0 months. The model was established using the thick wall theory and stretch-induced tissue growth to an isotropic and homogeneous elastic composite with mixed constituents. The initial conditions of the simulation were set based on the data from the young mice. Matlab simulations of this mathematical model demonstrated that the model captured the major features of LV remodeling with age and closely approximated experimental results. Specifically, the temporal progression of the LV interior and exterior dimensions demonstrated the same trend and order-of-magnitude change as our experimental results. In conclusion, we present here a validated mathematical model of cardiac aging that applies the thick-wall theory and stretch-induced tissue growth to LV remodeling with age. PMID:23281647

  3. Mathematical modeling of left ventricular dimensional changes in mice during aging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac aging is characterized by diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV), which is due in part to increased LV wall stiffness. In the diastolic phase, myocytes are relaxed and extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical determinant to the changes of LV wall stiffness. To evaluate the effects of ECM composition on cardiac aging, we developed a mathematical model to predict LV dimension and wall stiffness changes in aging mice by integrating mechanical laws and our experimental results. We measured LV dimension, wall thickness, LV mass, and collagen content for wild type (WT) C57/BL6J mice of ages ranging from 7.3 months to those of 34.0 months. The model was established using the thick wall theory and stretch-induced tissue growth to an isotropic and homogeneous elastic composite with mixed constituents. The initial conditions of the simulation were set based on the data from the young mice. Matlab simulations of this mathematical model demonstrated that the model captured the major features of LV remodeling with age and closely approximated experimental results. Specifically, the temporal progression of the LV interior and exterior dimensions demonstrated the same trend and order-of-magnitude change as our experimental results. In conclusion, we present here a validated mathematical model of cardiac aging that applies the thick-wall theory and stretch-induced tissue growth to LV remodeling with age. PMID:23281647

  4. Communicating for Quality in School Age Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartmel, Jennifer; Grieshaber, Susan

    2014-01-01

    School Age Care (SAC) services have existed in Australia for over 100 years but they have tended to take a back seat when compared with provision for school-aged children and those under school age using early childhood education and care (ECEC) services. Many SAC services are housed in shared premises and many children attending preparatory or…

  5. Building Creativity Training: Drawing with Left Hand to Stimulate Left Brain in Children Age 5-7 Years Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saputra, Yanty Hardi; Sabana, Setiawan

    2016-01-01

    Researcher and professionals that started researching about brains since 1930 believe that left brain is a rational brain, which is tightly related with the IO, rational thinking, arithmetic thinking, verbal, segmental, focus, serial (linear), finding the differences, and time management, Meanwhile right brain is the part of brain that controlled…

  6. Aldosterone antagonism fails to attenuate age-associated left ventricular fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun Seok; Cirrincione, Georgina; Thomas, D Paul; McCormick, Richard J; Boluyt, Marvin O

    2007-04-01

    Collagen accumulates disproportionately in cardiac remodeling induced by hypertension and associated with advancing age. Spironolactone (Spiro), an aldosterone antagonist, attenuates the accumulation of collagen induced by hypertension. It was hypothesized that Spiro would attenuate the age-associated increase in percent collagen in the heart. Female Fisher 344 rats at 3 months (Y), 12 months (M), and 21 months (O) of age were treated with Spiro (30 mg/kg/d) or vehicle (Veh) for 2 months, yielding six groups: Y-Veh, Y-Spiro, M-Veh, M-Spiro, O-Veh, and O-Spiro. Hearts were harvested for immunoblotting, RNA blotting, and biochemical analysis. Percent collagen in the left ventricle and septum was greatest in the oldest rats. Spiro did not significantly attenuate the age-associated increase in collagen fraction or the age-associated increases in expression of atrial natriuretic factor and beta-myosin heavy chain messenger RNA. Chronic aldosterone antagonism does not attenuate the age-associated increase in collagen fraction in the female Fisher 344 rat heart. PMID:17452731

  7. [Alcoholism in school-age children].

    PubMed

    Jasinsky, M

    1975-11-01

    Curiosity motivated consumption of illegal drugs by young people decreased during the last 5 years. At the same time the problem of school-children abusing alcohol increased. This has to be seen against the background of more general epidemiological data of alcohol consumption in the Federal Republic of Germany: --between 1961 and 1974 the expenditure for alcoholic beverages more than doubled; --according to serious estimations there are between 700,000 and 1 million of alcoholics in this country (from these about 8-10% being minors); --the average age of inmates of clinics for alcoholics dropped considerably during the last decade. Main findings of a follow-up survey conducted (size of sample: about 10,000 school-children in Hamburg, age 13-20, representative of a total of 110,000) are: --more than 25% of the above mentioned 110,000 school-children showed a rather excessive drinking behaviour (i.e. having been drunk 1-5 or more than 5 times during a period of 2 months prior to the interviews); --positive correlations were found to exist between excessive drinking habits and certain psycho-social variables (i.e. broken home, suicide-attempts, excessive consumption of alcohol by the parents, etc.); --the subgroup of those school-children who were users of illegal drugs: about 60% of them belong also to the category of "excessive alcohol user". Reasons for the general increase of alcohol consumption in Western Germany are for instance: --a change of drinking habits (more frequently, drinking at home and alone); --a shift of preferances (from relatively low percentage-beverages like beer and wine to so-called hard liquors); --an increase of alcohol consumption among those societal groups--the young and women--who formerly were almost abstinent. Some reasons and causes for the increase of alcohol consumption among school-children are: --being exposed to negative model-behaviour of adults and especially of parents; --peer-group pressure; --the discovery of school

  8. Perceptions of Alternative School Teachers and Administrators about the Impact of the No Child Left behind Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queenan, Carla Glover

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate and examine the perceptions of alternative school teachers and administrators about the impact of No Child Left Behind on their students and school. Through the lens of alternative school practitioners, this study examined the intersection of at-risk students, alternative education programs,…

  9. U.S. Department of Education 2008 No Child Left Behind -- Blue Ribbon Schools Program: Statistical Summary of National Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Blue Ribbon Schools Program honors public and private K-12 schools that are either academically superior in their state or that demonstrate dramatic gains in student achievement. This document includes 2008 statistical information for public and private blue ribbon schools for 45 states. In addition to summarized totals,…

  10. [Young children, toddlers and school age children].

    PubMed

    Heller-Rouassant, Solange; Flores-Quijano, María Eugenia

    2016-09-01

    Cow´s milk represents a very important source of proteins of high biological value and calcium in the child´s diet. The aim of this article is to review the available evidences of its role in nutrition of young children and school age children. Its main benefits are related with effects in linear growth, bone health and oral health, as protein source in early severe malnutrition, and it does not appears to influence metabolic syndrome risk and autism. High protein content in cow´s milk and increased protein consumption by children during the complementary feeding period is associated to the risk of developing a high body mass index and obesity in school-age children; therefore, milk consumption should be mildly restricted during the second year of life and to 480-720 ml/day during the first years of life. Its relationship with some diseases has not been confirmed, and milk consumption is associated with iron deficiency. The use of low-fat cow's milk instead of regular milk in young children remains controversial and its introduction is not advised before 2 to 4 years of age. PMID:27603883

  11. Families with school-age children.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The authors assess the potential capacity of schools to help meet the needs of working families through changes in school schedules and after-school programs and conclude that the flexibility parents need to balance family-work responsibilities probably cannot be found in the school setting. They argue that workplaces are better able than schools to offer the flexibility that working parents need to attend to basic needs of their children, as well as to engage in activities that enhance their children's academic performance and emotional and social well-being. Two types of flexible work practices seem especially well suited to parents who work: flextime arrangements that allow parents to coordinate their work schedules with their children's school schedules, and policies that allow workers to take short periods of time off--a few hours or a day or two-to attend a parent-teacher conference, for example, or care for a child who has suddenly fallen ill. Many companies that have instituted such policies have benefited through employees' greater job satisfaction and employee retention. Yet despite these measured benefits to employers, workplaces often fall short of being family friendly. Many employers do not offer such policies or offer them only to employees at certain levels or in certain types of jobs. Flexible work practices are almost nonexistent for low-income workers, who are least able to afford alternative child care and may need flexibility the most. Moreover the authors find that even employees in firms with flexible practices such as telecommuting may be reluctant to take advantage of them, because the workplace culture

  12. Influence of Age-Related Versus Non-Age-Related Renal Dysfunctionon Survival in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Brisco, Meredith A.; Han, Gang; Laur, Olga; Kula, Alexander J.; Cheng, Susan J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2013-01-01

    Normal aging results in a predictable decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and low GFR is associated with worsened survival. If this survival disadvantage is directly caused by the low GFR, as opposed to the disease causing the low GFR, the risk should be similar regardless of the underlying mechanism. Our objective was to determine if age related declines in estimated GFR (eGFR) carry the same prognostic importance as disease attributable losses in patients with ventricular dysfunction. We analyzed the Studies Of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) limited data set (n=6337). The primary analysis focused on determining if the eGFR mortality relationship differed by the extent the eGFR was consistent with normal ageing. Mean eGFR was 65.7 ± 19.0ml/min/1.73m2. Across the range of age in the population (27 to 80 years), baseline eGFR decreased by 0.67 ml/min/1.73m2 per year (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). The risk of death associated with eGFR was strongly modified by the degree to which the low eGFR could be explained by aging (p interaction <0.0001). For example, in a model incorporating the interaction, uncorrected eGFR was no longer significantly related to mortality (adjusted HR=1.0 per 10 ml/min/1.73m2, 95% CI 0.97–1.1, p=0.53) whereas a disease attributable decrease in eGFR above the median carried significant risk (adjusted HR=2.8, 95% CI 1.6–4.7, p<0.001). In conclusion, in the setting of LV dysfunction, renal dysfunction attributable to normal aging had a limited risk for mortality, suggesting that the mechanism underlying renal dysfunction is critical in determining prognosis. PMID:24216124

  13. School-Age NOTES Newsletter, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scofield, Richard T., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the 12 monthly issues of a newsletter providing support and information for providers of child care for school-age children. The featured articles for each month are: (1) "Reflections on the School-Age Field" (September); (2) "Tips for Effective Service-Learning Projects in Out-of-School Time Programs" (October); (3)…

  14. Age and Schooling Effects on Early Literacy and Phoneme Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Anna; Carroll, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Previous research on age and schooling effects is largely restricted to studies of children who begin formal schooling at 6 years of age, and the measures of phoneme awareness used have typically lacked sensitivity for beginning readers. Our study addresses these issues by testing 4 to 6 year-olds (first 2 years of formal schooling in the United…

  15. Altered left ventricular performance in aging physically active mice with an ankle sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michael J; Guderian, Sophie; Wikstrom, Erik A; Huot, Joshua R; Peck, Bailey D; Arthur, Susan T; Marino, Joseph S; Hubbard-Turner, Tricia

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the impact of differing physical activity levels throughout the lifespan, using a musculoskeletal injury model, on the age-related changes in left ventricular (LV) parameters in active mice. Forty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three running wheel groups (transected CFL group, transected ATFL/CFL group, SHAM group) or a SHAM Sedentary group (SHAMSED). Before surgery and every 6 weeks after surgery, LV parameters were measured under 2.5 % isoflurane inhalation. Group effects for daily distance run was significantly greater for the SHAM and lesser for the ATLF/CFL mice (p = 0.013) with distance run decreasing with age for all mice (p < 0.0001). Beginning at 6 months of age, interaction (group × age) was noted with LV posterior wall thickness-to-radius ratios (h/r) where h/r increased with age in the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice while the SHAM and CFL mice exhibited decreased h/r with age (p = 0.0002). Passive filling velocity (E wave) was significantly greater in the SHAM mice and lowest for the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice (p < 0.0001) beginning at 9 months of age. Active filling velocity (A wave) was not different between groups (p = 0.10). Passive-to-active filling velocity ratio (E/A ratio) was different between groups (p < 0.0001), with higher ratios for the SHAM mice and lower ratios for the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice in response to physical activity beginning at 9 months of age. Passive-to-active filling velocity ratio decreased with age (p < 0.0001). Regular physical activity throughout the lifespan improved LV structure, passive filling velocity, and E/A ratio by 6 to 9 months of age and attenuated any negative alterations throughout the second half of life. The diastolic filling differences were found to be significantly related to the amount of activity performed by 9 months and at the end of the lifespan. PMID:26803818

  16. Schools in the Age of Technology: Ideas for Instructional Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, James H., IV; Frank, Charlotte K.

    This document profiles five schools that were selected as winners of the "Fifth Annual Business Week Awards for Instructional Innovation: Schools in the Age of Technology": Bailey's Elementary School for the Arts and Sciences (Falls Church, Virginia); Hunterdon Central Regional High School (Flemington, New Jersey); John Muir Elementary School…

  17. Professional Learning Communities in Improved Illinois Elementary Schools: The Value of Professional Learning Communities for Leaders of Illinois Elementary Schools Formerly in "No Child Left Behind" Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Steven James

    2012-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 has created a system, which potentially labeled 82% of US school as "failing" in 2011. Consequences for failing schools go beyond public ostracism to the release of numerous staff and school leaders or the closing of the…

  18. Birth Order and Maladaptive Behavior in School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    Drawing on Alfred Adler's theories on the effect of birth order on maladaptive behavior in children, this study focused on the relationship between birth order and the referral to counseling of school-aged children with maladaptive disorder. School-aged children (N=217) with academic or behavioral problems, ages 5 to 18, were referred to the staff…

  19. No Child Left Behind and Its Effect on Recruiting and Retaining Special Education Teachers in Rural South Carolina School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Deborah S.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the No Child Left Behind Act as it relates to the recruiting and retention of special education teachers in rural school districts. The focus of the research was to examine those factors that have influenced teachers to leave the profession or to seek employment in more urban school districts. Data for the study were collected…

  20. School Leaders as both Colonized and Colonizers: Understanding Professional Identity in an Era of No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Alisha Lauren

    2010-01-01

    This study positioned the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2002 as a reified colonizing entity, inscribing its hegemonic authority upon the professional identity and work of school principals within their school communities of practice. Pressure on educators and students intensifies each year as the benchmark for Adequate Yearly Progress…

  1. Oil and Water Still: How No Child Left Behind Limits and Distorts Environmental Education in US Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenewald, David A.; Manteaw, Bob Offei

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the problematic tensions between schooling and environmental education in the United States, with a special focus on the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. Today in the United States, this powerful federal legislation dominates the discourse and practice of schooling, and works against the aims of environmental education in…

  2. School Communication in the Age of Google

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porterfield, Kitty; Carnes, Meg

    2012-01-01

    The debate about social media in schools--about should we or should we not--is already over. Social media is here to stay. The only relevant question now is how long it will take school leaders to adopt new ways and adapt the new technologies to support teaching, learning, and communication among the adults in schools. For schools to pretend that…

  3. Quantitative investigations on the human entorhinal area: left-right asymmetry and age-related changes.

    PubMed

    Heinsen, H; Henn, R; Eisenmenger, W; Götz, M; Bohl, J; Bethke, B; Lockemann, U; Püschel, K

    1994-08-01

    The total nerve cell numbers in the right and in the left human entorhinal areas have been calculated by volume estimations with the Cavalieri principle and by cell density determinations with the optical disector. Thick gallocyanin-stained serial frozen sections through the parahippocampal gyrus of 22 human subjects (10 female, 12 male) ranging from 18 to 86 years were analysed. The laminar composition of gallocyanin (Nissl)-stained sections could easily be compared with Braak's (1972, 1980) pigmentoarchitectonic study, and Braak's nomenclature of the entorhinal laminas was adopted. Cell-sparse laminae dissecantes can more clearly be distinguished in Nissl than in aldehydefuchsin preparations. These cell-poor dissecantes, lamina dissecans externa (dis-ext), lamina dissecans 1 (dis-1) and lamina dissecans 2 (dis-2), were excluded from nerve cell number determinations. An exact delineation of the entorhinal area is indispensable for any kind of quantitative investigation. We have defined the entorhinal area by the presence of pre-alpha cell clusters and the deeper layers of lamina principalis externa (pre-beta and gamma) separated from lamina principalis interna (pri) by lamina dissecans 1 (dis-1). The human entorhinal area is quantitatively characterized by a left-sided (asymmetric) higher pre-alpha cell number and an age-related nerve cell loss in pre as well as pri layers. At variance with other CNS cortical and subcortical structures, the neuronal number of the entorhinal area appears to decrease continuously from the earliest stages analysed, although a secular trend has to be considered. The asymmetry in pre-alpha cell number is discussed in the context of higher human mental capabilities, especially language. PMID:7818090

  4. No Child Left Behind and the Spectacle of Failing Schools: The Mythology of Contemporary School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, David A.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses what David Berliner (2005) has called the perverse "spectacle of fear" (208) surrounding issues of teacher quality and accountability in contemporary school reform. Drawing principally on the critical semiotics of Roland Barthes' essay, "The World of Wrestling" (1957), it examines the way that this spectacle works to…

  5. Impact of Chronic Changes in Arterial Compliance and Resistance on Left Ventricular Aging in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, Peter; Redfield, Margaret M.; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Borlaug, Barry A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Left ventricular (LV) systolic elastance (Ees) and diastolic elastance (Eed) correlate with arterial elastance (Ea), but it is unknown how chronic changes in arterial compliance and resistance, which determine Ea, might differentially affect cardiac properties with aging. We sought to characterize chronic changes in pulsatile and resistive arterial load and correlate them with longitudinal changes in LV structure and function in a prospective, community-based study. Methods and results Comprehensive echocardiography was performed in 722 subjects participating in a randomly-selected community-based study at two examinations separated by 4 years, allowing for assessment of LV Ees, Eed, end diastolic volume (EDV), Ea, total arterial compliance and systemic vascular resistance at both examinations. Chronic changes in resistance and heart rate were the dominant contributors to change in Ea. Changes in arterial compliance had little impact on changes in Ea, but were strongly associated with changes in Ees. The combination of increased resistance and decreased compliance was associated with the largest increase in LV diastolic stiffness, an effect that was mediated by decrease in LVEDV. In contrast, subjects with both improved arterial compliance and decreased resistance displayed an increase in LVEDV over time, with no increase in LV Eed. Conclusion Increases in pulsatile arterial load with aging contribute more to LV systolic stiffening, while combined pulsatile and resistive loading changes are associated with positive and negative chamber remodeling and diastolic stiffness. Therapies designed to improve arterial resistance particularly enhance aortic compliance may hold promise to deter or reverse cardiac aging and its sequelae. PMID:25359272

  6. Different Predictors of Right and Left Ventricular Metabolism in Healthy Middle-Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Heiskanen, Marja A.; Leskinen, Tuija; Eskelinen, Jari-Joonas; Heinonen, Ilkka H. A.; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Virtanen, Kirsi; Pärkkä, Jussi P.; Hannukainen, Jarna C.; Kalliokoski, Kari K.

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the right ventricle (RV) plays a crucial role in the outcome of various cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies on RV metabolism are sparse although evidence implies it may differ from left ventricular (LV) metabolism. Therefore, the aims of this study were (1) to determine predictors of RV glucose uptake (GU) and free fatty acid uptake (FFAU) and (2) to compare them to predictors of LV metabolism in healthy middle-aged men. Altogether 28 healthy, sedentary, middle-aged (40–55 years) men were studied. Insulin-stimulated GU and fasting FFAU were measured by positron emission tomography and RV and LV structural and functional parameters by cardiac magnetic resonance. Several parameters related to whole-body health were also measured. Predictors of RV and LV metabolism were determined by pairwise correlation analysis, lasso regression models, and variable clustering using heatmap. RVGU was most strongly predicted by age and moderately by RV ejection fraction (EF). The strongest determinants of RVFFAU were exercise capacity (peak oxygen uptake), resting heart rate, LVEF, and whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake rate. When considering LV metabolism, age and RVEF were associated also with LVGU. In addition, LVGU was strongly, and negatively, influenced by whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake rate. LVFFAU was predicted only by LVEF. This study shows that while RV and LV metabolism have shared characteristics, they also have unique properties. Age of the subject should be taken into account when measuring myocardial glucose utilization. Ejection fraction is related to myocardial metabolism, and even so that RVEF may be more closely related to GU of both ventricles and LVEF to FFAU of both ventricles, a finding supporting the ventricular interdependence. However, only RV fatty acid utilization associates with exercise capacity so that better physical fitness in a relatively sedentary population is related with decreased RV fat metabolism

  7. School Age Child Care in Virginia: 1993 Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Child Day Care and Early Childhood Programs, Richmond, VA.

    School-age child care (SACC) programs based on-site in Virginia elementary schools were surveyed to determine the scope of such programs across the commonwealth, and to look more comprehensively at existing programs in terms of operators, activities, affordability, and other issues. In January 1993, the survey was sent to school superintendents in…

  8. Building Peer Relationships in School Age Care. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachy, Cindy L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This workshop section includes four essays: (1) "Building Lifelong Relationships: School Age Programs at Work" (Cindy L. Teachey); (2) "Building Friendships in School Age Programs" (Joan M. Bergstrom); (3) "On the Rocky Road to Friendship: Emerging Peer Relationships" (Kay Albrecht); (4) "Helping Teachers Understand Their Role in Supporting Peer…

  9. Family Day Care and the School-Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Michelle Seligson

    This paper provides portions of a workshop discussion at the Wheelock Conference on School-Age Child Care concerning the role of family day care for school-age children. The workshop participants included family day care providers affiliated with the day care system in the Greater Boston area, administrators of a family day care system which also…

  10. Assessing attachment in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, Patricia; Kozlowska, Kasia; Landini, Andrea

    2010-04-01

    The School-age Assessment of Attachment (SAA) is a newly developed clinical tool to identify pattern of attachment using the Dynamic-Maturational Model of attachment and adaptation (DMM). Seven picture cards were used to elicit fantasy stories and recalled episodes. The transcribed discourse was analyzed to yield one of 13 DMM attachment classifications, together with possible unresolved traumas and losses, and modifiers (depression and intrusions). In this article, we outline the steps necessary to validate an assessment tool, describe the development of the SAA, and report data from a preliminary clinical study testing the SAA's reliability, validity, and utility. Concurrent construct, familial, and discriminant validity were evaluated in terms of mental health status and exposure to danger on a sample of 5-12-year-old children, drawn from clinical ( n = 51) and normative (n = 40) populations. The SAA (a) differentiated children referred for psychiatric diagnosis from those in the normative population; (b) accounted for 31% of the variance (46% when family variables were added); (c) identified risk children in the normative sample; and (d) suggested risk factors associated with children's psychiatric disorder. PMID:20176770

  11. Portraiture of Rural Pennsylvania Elementary School Administrators Implementing the Mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act within the Context of a Reading Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbie, Linda D.

    2010-01-01

    The signing of the No Child Left Behind Act in 2002 has created "potholes" for elementary school administrators as they seek to make Adequate Yearly Progress on the Pennsylvania School System Assessment (PSSA). This study includes three rural Pennsylvania elementary school administrators implementing the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act. …

  12. Age and School-Type Differences in Children's Beliefs about School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmberg, Lars-Erik; Wanner, Brigitte; Little, Todd D.

    2008-01-01

    Age and school-type differences (primary school and three types of secondary school) in self-related beliefs about ability, effort, and difficulty were investigated in a study of 1723 Berlin youth. Consistent with selective ability-stratified schooling, multi-group structural equation models revealed: (1) mean-level belief differences reflecting…

  13. Perceptions of School Nurses regarding Obesity in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyers, Pamela; Bugle, Linda; Jackson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is epidemic in the nation's school-age population with African American and Hispanic children and adolescents specifically at risk. School nurses at elementary and middle public schools in the Missouri 8th Congressional District were surveyed regarding their perceptions of childhood obesity. School nurses supported preventive interventions…

  14. Fact Sheet on School-Age Children's Out-of-School Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Beth

    This fact sheet details information on the ways children spend their out-of-school time. The fact sheet includes information on the number of school-age children with working parents; enrolled in before- or after-school programs; and spending time without adult supervision. Also highlighted are the risks to children during out-of-school hours for…

  15. The Effect of Age-Correction on IQ Scores among School-Aged Children Born Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Rachel M.; George, Wing Man; Cole, Carolyn; Marshall, Peter; Ellison, Vanessa; Fabel, Helen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of age-correction on IQ scores among preterm school-aged children. Data from the Flinders Medical Centre Neonatal Unit Follow-up Program for 81 children aged five years and assessed with the WPPSI-III, and 177 children aged eight years and assessed with the WISC-IV, were analysed. Corrected IQ scores were…

  16. Reading and Coherent Motion Perception in School Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassaliete, Evita; Lacis, Ivars; Fomins, Sergejs; Krumina, Gunta

    2015-01-01

    This study includes an evaluation, according to age, of the reading and global motion perception developmental trajectories of 2027 school age children in typical stages of development. Reading is assessed using the reading rate score test, for which all of the student participants, regardless of age, received the same passage of text of a medium…

  17. The Influence of High School Dropout and School Disengagement on the Risk of School-Age Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manlove, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    Used recent longitudinal cohort of eighth graders to examine whether measures of school engagement predicted school-age pregnancy among white, black, and Hispanic teens. Found that high student engagement was associated with postponing pregnancy. Among white and Hispanic teens, dropouts were more likely than others to have school-age pregnancies.…

  18. HEALTH OF CHILDREN OF SCHOOL AGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LESSER, ARTHUR

    A HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE STUDY OF SCHOOL HEALTH PROGRAMS, THIS REPORT PRESENTS STATISTICS ON (1) THE NATION'S CHILD POPULATION, (2) CHILDREN IN LOW-INCOME FAMILIES, (3) ILLNESSES OF CHILDHOOD, (4) SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES, AND (5) TRENDS IN THE PROVISION OF HEALTH CARE FOR CHILDREN. THE REPORT EMPHASIZES THE GAPS IN CHILD HEALTH SUPERVISION…

  19. Age-related changes in the attentional control of visual cortex: A selective problem in the left visual hemifield

    PubMed Central

    Nagamatsu, Lindsay S.; Carolan, Patrick; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa Y.L.; Handy, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    To what extent does our visual-spatial attention change with age? In this regard, it has been previously reported that relative to young controls, seniors show delays in attention-related sensory facilitation. Given this finding, our study was designed to examine two key questions regarding age-related changes in the effect of spatial attention on sensory-evoked responses in visual cortex –– are there visual field differences in the age-related impairments in sensory processing, and do these impairments co-occur with changes in the executive control signals associated with visual spatial orienting? Therefore, our study examined both attentional control and attentional facilitation in seniors (aged 66 to 74 years) and young adults (aged 18 to 25 years) using a canonical spatial orienting task. Participants responded to attended and unattended peripheral targets while we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) to both targets and attention-directing spatial cues. We found that not only were sensory-evoked responses delayed in seniors specifically for unattended events in the left visual field as measured via latency shifts in the lateral occipital P1 elicited by visual targets, but seniors also showed amplitude reductions in the anterior directing attentional negativity (ADAN) component elicited by cues directing attention to the left visual field. At the same time, seniors also had significantly higher error rates for targets presented in the left vs. right visual field. Taken together, our data thus converge on the conclusion that age-related changes in visual spatial attention involve both sensory-level and executive attentional control processes, and that these effects appear to be strongly associated with the left visual field. PMID:21356222

  20. Effects of Aged Garlic Extract on Left Ventricular Diastolic Function and Fibrosis in a Rat Hypertension Model

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yuki; Noda, Akiko; Miyata, Seiko; Minoshima, Makoto; Sugiura, Mari; Kojima, Jun; Otake, Masafumi; Furukawa, Mayuko; Cheng, Xian Wu; Nagata, Kohzo; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2013-01-01

    Daily consumption of garlic is known to lower the risk of hypertension and ischemic heart disease. In this study, we examined whether aged garlic extract (AGE) prevents hypertension and the progression of compensated left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. DS rats were randomly divided into three groups: those fed an 8% NaCl diet until 18 weeks of age (8% NaCl group), those additionally treated with AGE (8% NaCl + AGE group), and control rats maintained on a diet containing 0.3% NaCl until 18 weeks of age (0.3% NaCl group). AGE was administered orally by gastric gavage once a day until 18 weeks of age. LV mass was significantly higher in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 0.3% NaCl group at 18 weeks of age, but significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 8% NaCl group. No significant differences were observed in systolic blood pressure (SBP) between the 8% NaCl and 8% NaCl + AGE groups at 12 and 18 weeks of age. LV end-diastolic pressure and pressure half-time at 12 and 18 weeks of age were significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group compared with the 8% NaCl group. AGE significantly reduced LV interstitial fibrosis at 12 and 18 weeks of age. Chronic AGE intake attenuated LV diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis without significantly decreasing SBP in hypertensive DS rats. PMID:24172194

  1. Effects of aged garlic extract on left ventricular diastolic function and fibrosis in a rat hypertension model.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuki; Noda, Akiko; Miyata, Seiko; Minoshima, Makoto; Sugiura, Mari; Kojima, Jun; Otake, Masafumi; Furukawa, Mayuko; Cheng, Xian Wu; Nagata, Kohzo; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2013-01-01

    Daily consumption of garlic is known to lower the risk of hypertension and ischemic heart disease. In this study, we examined whether aged garlic extract (AGE) prevents hypertension and the progression of compensated left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. DS rats were randomly divided into three groups: those fed an 8% NaCl diet until 18 weeks of age (8% NaCl group), those additionally treated with AGE (8% NaCl + AGE group), and control rats maintained on a diet containing 0.3% NaCl until 18 weeks of age (0.3% NaCl group). AGE was administered orally by gastric gavage once a day until 18 weeks of age. LV mass was significantly higher in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 0.3% NaCl group at 18 weeks of age, but significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group than in the 8% NaCl group. No significant differences were observed in systolic blood pressure (SBP) between the 8% NaCl and 8% NaCl + AGE groups at 12 and 18 weeks of age. LV end-diastolic pressure and pressure half-time at 12 and 18 weeks of age were significantly lower in the 8% NaCl + AGE group compared with the 8% NaCl group. AGE significantly reduced LV interstitial fibrosis at 12 and 18 weeks of age. Chronic AGE intake attenuated LV diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis without significantly decreasing SBP in hypertensive DS rats. PMID:24172194

  2. School mobility and school-age children's social adjustment.

    PubMed

    Dupere, Veronique; Archambault, Isabelle; Leventhal, Tama; Dion, Eric; Anderson, Sara

    2015-02-01

    This study explored how nonpromotional school changes, a potentially major event for children, were associated with 3 forms of social maladjustment: isolation/withdrawal, affiliation with maladjusted peers, and aggression toward peers. Given that school mobility frequently co-occurs with family transitions, the moderating role of these transitions was investigated. These issues were examined in 2 longitudinal samples of U.S. (N = 1,364) and Canadian (N = 1,447) elementary school children. Propensity weighted analyses controlling for premobility individual, family, and friends' characteristics indicated that children who experienced both school and family transitions were at risk of either social withdrawal (in the Canadian sample) or affiliation with socially maladjusted peers (in the U.S. sample). These findings suggest the importance of considering both the social consequences of school mobility and the context in which such mobility occurs. PMID:25485607

  3. The No Child Left Behind Comparability Provision and Within-District Resource Distribution: An Examination of One Florida School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaprnka, Danielle L.

    2012-01-01

    The intent of Title I of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 is to ensure that all students, regardless of their socioeconomic status, are provided a fair and equitable opportunity to meet challenging academic performance standards. Given such, Title I legislation provides for federal funding to be administered to school districts and schools…

  4. No Child Left Behind Act and the Closing of the Achievement Gap in Suffolk County Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, John Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, 55 of the 72 Suffolk County public schools were analyzed using archival data gleaned from the New York State Education Department's BEDS report for the years 2000 to 2005. Three primary research questions were used to determine if the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 had an impact on four ethnic groups, wealth of different…

  5. Questions and Answers on the Participation of Private Schools in Providing Supplemental Educational Services (SES) under "No Child Left Behind"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), as amended by the "No Child Left Behind Act" (NCLB), provides for "supplemental educational services" for disadvantaged students. Supplemental educational services (SES) are tutoring and other academic enrichment provided outside of the regular school day to eligible public school…

  6. Doing Discipline Differently: The Greenfield Middle School Story. Children Left Behind Policy Briefs. Supplementary Analysis 3-A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, M. Karega; Skiba, Russell

    2004-01-01

    One key finding of the "Children Left Behind" series has been the critical role of school leadership in setting the tone for how the day-to-day discipline and management of misbehavior is conducted. Interview and survey data from the second and third briefing papers have demonstrated that: (1) principals are sharply divided in their attitudes…

  7. Chronic Respiratory Diseases of School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGovern, John P.

    1976-01-01

    The author examines the problems of chronic respiratory disease in school-age children from a medical viewpoint, including recognition and diagnosis, commonly encountered diseases, their effect on participation in physical exercise, emotional factors, medication, and emergency care. (MB)

  8. Aging Education in Elementary School Textbooks in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chin-Shan

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of an aging society, the older population is gradually increasing and people are living longer than ever before. However, older people are often portrayed in school textbooks as insignificant, unhealthy, sad, passive, and dependent. That is, ageism emerges in school textbooks in subtle ways. Under this circumstance, children may…

  9. Analysis of Exit Interviews with Students Who Left the Combined BA-MD Degree Program of the UMKC School of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Louise; Mares, Kenneth R.

    Exit interviews were conducted with 21 students who withdrew or were dismissed from the University of Missouri, Kansas City, School of Medicine. Female, minority, and rural students were disproportionately represented among students who left the program. Of 22 students who left the program during June 1983-January 1985, 16 left during the first 2…

  10. After-School Programs for School-Age Children and Parents: A Review of the Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Betty-Jo Armstrong

    Prompted by the lack of federal involvement in extended day programs for elementary school students in Chicago, this literature review presents background information on national after-school programs for school-age children. Discussed are the history of federal involvement in child care, current federal legislation and programs, the participation…

  11. School-Age Child Care: Texas School District Involvement: A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Kristen; Temple, Judy

    With increasing numbers of parents at work or in training and education programs when children get out of school, the existence and quality of school-age child care (SACC) affects not only families, but the community as a whole. Texas school district involvement with SACC was examined, and qualities of model programs and barriers to developing…

  12. Working with Homeless School-Aged Children: Barriers to School Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groton, Danielle; Teasley, Martell L.; Canfield, James P.

    2013-01-01

    With the needs and challenges of adolescent homelessness on the rise, the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (MVA) was crafted as a public policy initiative aimed at facilitating access to schools for this population. While school social workers are the designated personnel for practice with homeless school-aged children, we know little about…

  13. An Examination of Compulsory School Attendance Ages and High School Dropout and Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, Rebecca N.; Reschly, Amy L.

    2011-01-01

    An increasingly popular, but underresearched, initiative aimed at reducing high school dropout is raising the compulsory school attendance age. This study used a national data set from academic years 2001-02 to 2005-06 to examine the grade level at which students drop out, rates of dropout over time, and high school completion by state, region of…

  14. Status of School Age Child Care or Extended Day Programs in Minnesota Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    This report is based upon survey responses from 139 school districts and 59 nonpublic schools in Minnesota that offer School Age Child Care (SACC), or extended day programs. The report presents data on public and private SACC programs related to: (1) administration and growth; (2) number of children served; (3) types of services offered; (4)…

  15. State and Local Implementation of the "No Child Left Behind Act." Volume I--Title I School Choice, Supplemental Educational Services, and Student Achievement. A Report from the National Longitudinal Study of "No Child Left Behind" (NLS-"NCLB")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Ron; Gill, Brian; Razquin; Booker, Kevin; Lockwood, J. R., III

    2007-01-01

    This report presents findings about the relationship between participation in the Title I school choice and supplemental educational services options and student achievement from the National Longitudinal Study of "No Child Left Behind" (NLS-"NCLB"). A key component of the "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001" ("NCLB") was to provide options to…

  16. The Middle School Concept Meets the Age of Assessments: How One Middle School Has Adapted to the New Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seed, Allen H.; Watts, Cherry

    2011-01-01

    The Middle School Concept brings together good teaching practices with the unique needs of pre-adolescent students. Since the passing of the NCLB, more and more attention has been generated on the results of high stakes testing. The question of what happens to the middle school concept when it confronts the demands of this new age of testing is…

  17. Teasing among School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nacev, Vladimir; Brubach, April

    Teasing is an attempt to look better at the expense of someone else. This abuse may be as mild as verbal bantering or as severe as group violence against others. The chronically oppressed student may conclude that school is a frightening and unfriendly place. Teasing has recently become the focus of psychological research and this paper provides a…

  18. Psychological Skills Education for School Aged Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haslam, Ian R.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the potential for teaching psychological skills to student athletes in school sport programs, outlining a conceptual approach to psychological skills training for athletic coaches. The paper details how to develop a psychological skills education curriculum, explaining issues of curriculum sequence and implementation strategies in the…

  19. Orthographic Word Knowledge Growth in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagovich, Stacy A.; Pak, Youngju; Miller, Margaret D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Natural reading experiences provide an opportunity for the development of orthographic word knowledge as well as other forms of partial word knowledge. The purpose of this study was to compare the orthographic word knowledge growth of school-age children with relatively low language skills (LL group) to that of age- and gender-matched…

  20. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among School Age Palestinian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khamis, Vivian

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to assess the prevalence of PTSD among Palestinian school-age children. Variables that distinguish PTSD and non-PTSD children were examined, including child characteristics, socioeconomic status, family environment, and parental style of influence. Method: Participants were 1,000 children aged 12 to 16 years.…

  1. School-Age Children in CCDBG: 2012 Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Hannah; Reeves, Rhiannon

    2014-01-01

    The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary funding source for federal child care subsidies to low-income working families, as well as improving child care quality. CCDBG provides child care assistance to children from birth to age 13. This fact sheet highlights key information about school-age children and CCDBG. This…

  2. High School Motivation and Engagement: Gender and Age Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    This brief report presents on gender and age effects in academic motivation and engagement. The results are based on an updated and much expanded dataset (from prior research) of 33,778 students from 92 high schools in Australia. Findings show there are significant gender and age effects--a number of which are qualified by the interaction of…

  3. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and…

  4. School Entry Age and Future Adjustment of Inner City Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, William R.

    Randomly selected fourth grade teachers completed the Peterson and Quay Behavior Problem Checklist on 304 inner city children classified according to their age at entry into kindergarten. Findings revealed that earlier entry age children (children who were comparatively young when they started school) scored highest on the conduct subtest of the…

  5. Left Atrial Volume and Pulmonary Artery Diameter Are Noninvasive Measures of Age-Related Diastolic Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Guillermo; Hermosillo-Rodriguez, Jesus; Pham, Thuy; Granillo, Alejandro; Hartley, Craig J; Reddy, Anilkumar; Osuna, Patricia Mejia; Entman, Mark L; Taffet, George E

    2016-09-01

    Impaired cardiac diastolic function occurs with aging in many species and may be difficult to measure noninvasively. In humans, left atrial (LA) volume is a robust measure of chronic diastolic function as the LA is exposed to increased left ventricular filling pressures. We hypothesized that LA volume would be a useful indicator of diastolic function in aging mice. Further, we asked whether pressures were propagated backwards affecting pulmonary arteries (PAs) and right ventricle (RV). We measured LA, PA, and RV infundibulum dimensions with echocardiography and used mouse-specific Doppler systems and pressure catheters for noninvasive and invasive measures. As C57BL/6 mice aged from 3 to 29-31 months, LA volume almost tripled. LA volume increases correlated with traditional diastolic function measures. Within groups of 14- and 31-month-old mice, LA volume correlated with diastolic function measured invasively. In serial studies, mice evaluated at 20 and 24 months showed monotonic increases in LA volume; other parameters changed less predictably. PA diameters, larger in 30-month-old mice than 6-month-old mice, correlated with LA volumes. Noninvasive LA volume and PA diameter assessments are useful and state independent measures of diastolic function in mice, correlating with other measures of diastolic dysfunction in aging. Furthermore, serial measurements over 4 months demonstrated consistent increases in LA volume suitable for longitudinal cardiac aging studies. PMID:26511013

  6. School age test or procedure preparation

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of communication. Older children may benefit from films that show children of the same age explaining, ... procedure. Ask your health care provider if such films are available for your child to watch. Drawing ...

  7. An Examination of Primary School Attendance and Completion among Secondary School Age Adolescents in Post-Conflict Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sierra Leone was ravaged by a civil war between 1991 and 2002. Since the end of the war, it has witnessed an unprecedented increase in school enrollments. Although school enrollment has increased, the number of school age children who are out of school remains high. The focus of international agencies is on children of primary school age, yet a…

  8. Outcome at school-age after neonatal mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Gunn, T R; Lepore, E; Outerbridge, E W

    1983-06-01

    103 school-age children (5 to 12 years) who survived mechanical ventilation for neonatal respiratory failure were evaluated for growth, neurological, intellectual, psychological and school function in order to determine those children most at risk for handicap. A major handicap occurred in seven children, preventing attendance at normal school or normal classes. Neurological sequelae were significantly associated with perinatal asphyxia and with birthweights of 1500g or less, and neurological sequelae and socio-economic factors were the major determinants of ability. The effects of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) experience on parents and subsequent parent-child relationships were also investigated: 67 per cent of the mothers were very upset by the experience and many continue to worry excessively about the health of their child. Parents who visited their child in the NICU frequently were significantly more anxious and overprotective, restricting many activities even when the child was of school age. PMID:6873492

  9. Rural Left-behind Children's Academic Psychology in Western China and the School Management Countermeasures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Jihai; Mao, Yaqing

    2008-01-01

    Left-behind children refer to those left behind by parents working away from home and taken care of by only one of the parents or relatives because one or both of the parents go out to work in the city. By using questionnaires, this study involves 8,627 rural pupils chosen from 10 provinces to examine academic psychological characteristics,…

  10. Quality Care for School-Age Children: A Self-Instructional Guide To Help Staff Plan and Implement a Quality Program for School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childcare Resources, Birmingham, AL.

    The purpose of this manual is to provide school-age child care center staff in Alabama with information about school-age children that facilitates program planning and provides a basis for implementing and evaluating a high quality school-age child care (SACC) program. Sections of the manual discuss: (1) teacher competencies addressed by the…

  11. The Impact of the Adequate Yearly Progress Requirement of the Federal "No Child Left Behind" Act on Schools in the Great Lakes Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Edward W.; Mathis, William J.; Garcia, David R.

    2005-01-01

    This study finds that nearly every school in the Great Lakes states is threatened to fail the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) requirements mandated by the federal "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) Act. NCLB holds schools and districts accountable for student achievement on state standardized tests and schools that do not make AYP face sanctions. A…

  12. The Impact of the Adequate Yearly Progress Requirement of the Federal "No Child Left Behind" Act on Schools in the Great Lakes Region. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Edward W.; Mathis, William J.; Garcia, David R.

    2005-01-01

    This executive summary describes a study that finds nearly every school in the Great Lakes states is threatened to fail the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) requirements mandated by the federal "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) Act. NCLB holds schools and districts accountable for student achievement on state standardized tests and schools that do not…

  13. Perspectives on Change: A Continued Struggle for Academic Success and Cultural Relevancy at an American Indian School in the Midst of No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Warrior Elementary is a pubic school within the Navajo Nation. District and school reforms fought against school closure or private restructuring due to pressures associated with repeated failure on standardized tests under the 2001 No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. Warrior Elementary saw tremendous academic gains on these tests one year after a…

  14. The End of the Reading Age: Grade and Age Effects in Early Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, James R.M.; Martin, Frances

    2004-01-01

    During the school years, psychological test norms may be indexed by age or by grade. A number of studies have shown that using age-based norms appears to produce biases associated with grade assignment. Cahan and Cohen [Child Dev. 60 (1989) 1239-1249] showed that the effect of one grade was over twice the effect of 1 year of age for most verbal…

  15. Variability in the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act in Wisconsin school districts and science departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher L.

    In the United States of America, the public education system is comprised of over 14,000 school districts. Each of these unique districts is being affected by the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. In turn, this diverse population of school districts is determining the impact on education of this sweeping federal education policy. This study examines eight of those school districts to determine their actions related to the early phase of the implementation of one portion of NCLB, the accountability provisions prescribing standardized assessment for the determination of Adequate Yearly Progress. Specifically, this study examines what these eight Wisconsin school districts, serving from 1,000 to over 5,000 students, did with the student achievement data resulting from their state assessment, the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examinations (WKCE). A wide variety of responses were found in how school districts used the WKCE data. The eight school districts were examined to determine what features of their organizations were responsible for how they responded to the enactment of the AYP provisions, specifically how they used the WCKE data. District responses were found to be determined by district size, governance structures, personnel, and dispositions. The interactions of these characteristics were considered in light of organizational studies using conceptualizations borrowed from ecology and the theory of evolution and by studies of school districts.

  16. Primary School Attendance and Completion among Lower Secondary School Age Children in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    At the World Education Forum in Dakar in 2000, governments pledged to achieve education for all by 2015. However, if current enrollment trends continue, the number of out-of-school children could increase from current levels. Greater focus is needed on lower secondary school age (13-16 years) children. These children are not included estimates of…

  17. The Evolution of the School-Entry Age Effect in a School Tracking System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhlenweg, Andrea M.; Puhani, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    In Germany, students are streamed at age ten into an academic or nonacademic track. We demonstrate that the randomly allocated disadvantage of being born just before as opposed to just after the cutoff date for school entry leads to substantially different schooling experiences. Relatively young students are initially only two-thirds as likely to…

  18. Evaluation of Obesity in School-Age Children.

    PubMed

    Dobashi, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    To prevent obesity in middle age, early precautions and interventions are required during childhood. Therefore, it is very important to accurately evaluate the degree of overweight in children. Body mass index (BMI) is widely used worldwide in adults, but not in children. Because standard BMI, which is calculated using the average height and weight for age, changes widely during growth, a constant cut-off point cannot be set for children. An international unified method defining childhood obesity has not been established. In many countries, BMI-for-age percentile (BMI%) value or Z (standard deviation) score is used, whereas in Japan, the percentage of overweight (POW), which is the modified weight-for-height method, is used. We compared BMI% values with POW values obtained using the anthropometric data of elementary and junior high school students based on the Japanese school survey conducted in 2000 and found that the values for the degree of overweight were significantly different between the two methods. It became clear that tall students were easily defined as being overweight, whereas short students tended to be evaluated as being underweight when using BMI%. POW method seemed to be more appropriate than BMI% for school-age children. Abdominal obesity, excess visceral adipose tissue (VAT), is highly associated with obesity-related complications. Waist circumference (WC) is now accepted as an appropriate guide to VAT accumulation. The cut-off value of WC defining excess VAT is 80 cm at the umbilical level in Japanese school-age children. It is not easy to decide the obesity criteria and optimum WC in school-age children. Childhood obesity should be discussed more internationally. PMID:26510873

  19. Demographic, Environmental, Access, and Attitude Factors that Influence Walking to School by Elementary School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Ariel; Vogt, Christine A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Walking to school has been identified as an activity that contributes to children's daily exercise requirements. The purpose of this study was to better understand factors that influence walking to school by elementary school-aged children. Methods: A sample of 1,897 elementary school-aged children (84% response rate; 3rd-5th graders)…

  20. The Nuclear Age: A Curriculum Guide for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ground Zero, Washington, DC.

    Intended as a starting point for junior and senior high school teachers, this guide contains five lessons that give an overview of the nuclear age and provide the most basic information that students must learn in order to understand the threat of nuclear war. Topics of the lessons include the history of weapons development, how nuclear weapons…

  1. Twins and Siblings: Concordance for School-Age Mental Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Ronald S.

    1977-01-01

    The analysis of WISC scores for 314 school-age twins and 221 of their siblings revealed high concordance of full-scale and verbal IQ for monozygotic twins. The IQ concordance for dizygotic twins, twin-sibling pairs, and sibling pairs were comparable to each other but significantly lower than that for monozygotic twins. (Author/JMB)

  2. School-Aged Victims of Sexual Abuse: Implications for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishon, Phillip M.

    Each year in the United States, thousands of school-aged children become involved in sexual activities arranged by adults for purposes of pleasure and profit. Nationwide, annual profits from the child pornography industry and from female and male child prostitution are in the tens of millions of dollars. Heretofore, the majority of…

  3. Rational-Emotive Assessment of School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiuseppe, Raymond

    1990-01-01

    Focuses on assessment of emotions and irrational beliefs in Rational-Emotive Therapy with school-aged children. Argues that, for children to understand and agree to process of disputing irrational beliefs, practitioner first assesses individual child's emotional vocabulary, his/her understanding of relationship between disturbed emotion and…

  4. Executive Dysfunction in School-Age Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambek, Rikke; Tannock, Rosemary; Dalsgaard, Soeren; Trillingsgaard, Anegen; Damm, Dorte; Thomsen, Per Hove

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The study examined executive function deficits (EFD) in school-age children (7 to 14 years) with ADHD. Method: A clinical sample of children diagnosed with ADHD (n = 49) was compared to a population sample (n = 196) on eight executive function (EF) measures. Then, the prevalence of EFD in clinical and non-clinical children was examined…

  5. Executive Function in Very Preterm Children at Early School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarnoudse-Moens, Cornelieke S. H.; Smidts, Diana P.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke

    2009-01-01

    We examined whether very preterm ([less than or equal to] 30 weeks gestation) children at early school age have impairments in executive function (EF) independent of IQ and processing speed, and whether demographic and neonatal risk factors were associated with EF impairments. A consecutive sample of 50 children (27 boys and 23 girls) born very…

  6. Special Education Forms. Volume 1: School-Age Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Sandra; And Others

    This document comprises forms (and directions for their use) used in Oregon in conjunction with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) for school-aged children. Forms are identified as either required or optional and are presented in a two-page format, with one page identifying the form, explaining its purposes, and providing…

  7. School-Age NOTES. September 1980 to August 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scofield, Richard T., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This document compiles the first 12 volumes of "School-Age Notes" (a total of 78 issues). Originally published six times a year, the journal changed to monthly with volume 12. The following list of topics covered in volume 12 provide good examples of the journal's typical coverage: (1) indicators of the quality of child care staff; (2) the quality…

  8. Free and Compulsory School Age Requirements. ECS 50-State Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aragon, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers across the nation continue to push for expanded free and compulsory school age requirements. More states are considering granting students earlier access to a free education so that they can begin their academic pursuits earlier in life. Similarly, every year a number of states consider extending the upper limit for compulsory school…

  9. Self-Control in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Gendler, Tamar Szabó; Gross, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Conflicts between immediately rewarding activities and more enduringly valued goals abound in the lives of school-age children. Such conflicts call upon children to exercise self-control, a competence that depends in part on the mastery of metacognitive, prospective strategies. The "process model of self-control" organizes these…

  10. Evaluating and treating school-aged children who stutter.

    PubMed

    Yaruss, J Scott

    2010-11-01

    School-based speech-language pathologists are often called upon to treat children who stutter, though many clinicians have reported that they feel uncomfortable working with this population. Fortunately, there is much that speech-language pathologists can do to help children who stutter speak more easily and minimize the adverse impact of stuttering in both academic and social settings. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with a guide to some of the key issues they should consider when working with school-aged children who stutter. The goal is to encourage clinicians to develop a better understanding of how stuttering can affect school-aged children, how the adverse effects of the disorder can be documented so children can be qualified for treatment, and, ultimately, how the negative consequences of stuttering can be minimized through a comprehensive approach to treatment. PMID:21080298

  11. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf.

    PubMed

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and severity of injury, and functional outcomes. Seventy percent of the children sustained a TBI from a fall. We also found that playing golf was associated with 40% of the TBIs, with three (30%) children being unrestrained passengers in a moving golf cart and another one (10%) was struck by a golf club. Injury awareness could have benefited or prevented most injuries, and school nurses are in the best position to provide preventative practice education. In golf-centric communities, prevention of golf-related injuries should include education within the schools. PMID:25899097

  12. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    PubMed Central

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0–15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and severity of injury, and functional outcomes. Seventy percent of the children sustained a TBI from a fall. We also found that playing golf was associated with 40% of the TBIs, with three (30%) children being unrestrained passengers in a moving golf cart and another one (10%) was struck by a golf club. Injury awareness could have benefited or prevented most injuries, and school nurses are in the best position to provide preventative practice education. In golf-centric communities, prevention of golf-related injuries should include education within the schools. PMID:25899097

  13. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  14. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  15. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  16. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... employer to attend school. (b) If you apply before the school year has started and the school is not a high... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. If you apply for child's benefits...

  17. Intersections between School Reform, the Arts, and Special Education: The Children Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourigan, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    Arts education and special education within public schools have faced similar challenges in the wake of school reform. Services and programming have been reduced, leaving a larger gap in resources and accessibility. Because of loopholes in policy, new reform initiatives such as vouchers and charter schools will continue to marginalize students…

  18. Are Boys Left Behind? The Evolution of the Gender Achievement Gap in Beijing's Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Using one cohort of 7235 middle school students in Beijing, China, we examined the evolution of the gender achievement gap in middle school. Our study found a more significant female dominance than in U.S. studies: even though boys gradually caught up during middle school, especially in Math and Science, and the gender achievement gap decreased…

  19. Prevalence of ADHD in Qatari School-Age Children.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Lori G; Kamal, Madeeha

    2014-01-10

    Objective: The purpose of this quantitative survey study is to provide current accurate estimates of the number of students with ADHD in Qatar Independent and English Medium Private Schools, so that adequate support will be available to assist in the educational growth and development of these students. Method: This cross-sectional descriptive study of teacher observational ratings used a standardized rating scale. Teachers completed the SNAP-IV. Rating Scales for more than 5,000 students from Qatar Independent Schools and private English Medium Schools between November 2011 and November 2012 in Qatar Grades 1 through 12. Results: Results align with and extend the previous study of ADHD in Qatar and the current worldwide prevalence. Conclusion: Enhanced analyses were conducted to identify differences between age groups, genders, and between Private and Independent Schools. Implications for teachers, administrators, and medical personnel are discussed. (J. of Att. Dis. XXXX; XX(X) X-XX). PMID:24412969

  20. The Effects of a School-Based Atopy Care Program for School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hosihn; Lee, Youngjin

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a school-based atopy care program (SACP) for children with atopic dermatitis (AD). The program is administered by health teachers who are also school nurses. The study compared groups using a pre- and post-test design. Participants were children with AD and their parents (98 dyads; 32 in the test group and 66 in the control group) sampled from four elementary schools in Seoul. After completing the SACP, parents in the test group had significantly increased knowledge of AD (p = .04) and a greater sense of parental efficacy (p = .02) when compared with the control group. This study derived guidelines that elementary health teachers can use in practice for school-aged children with AD. We concluded that there is sufficient evidence of effectiveness for the SACP to be used as a model for chronic disease management in school-aged children. PMID:24942774

  1. Effects of aging on left atrial reservoir, conduit, and booster pump function: a multi-institution acoustic quantification study

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, K; Mor-Avi, V; Gorcsan, J; DeMaria, A; Kimball, T; Monaghan, M; Perez, J; Weinert, L; Bednarz, J; Edelman, K; Kwan, O; Glascock, B; Hancock, J; Baumann, C; Lang, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the feasibility of measuring left atrial (LA) function with acoustic quantification (AQ) and then assess the effects of age and sex on LA reservoir, conduit, and booster pump function.
PATIENTS AND SETTING—165 subjects without cardiovascular disease, 3-79 years old, were enrolled by six tertiary hospital centres.
INTERVENTIONS—Continuous LA AQ area data were acquired and signal averaged to form composite waveforms which were analysed off-line.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Parameters of LA performance according to age and sex.
RESULTS—Signal averaged LA waveforms were sufficiently stable and detailed to allow automated analysis in all cases. An age related increase in LA area was noted. LA reservoir function did not vary with age or sex. All parameters of LA passive and active emptying revealed a significant age dependency. Overall, the passive emptying phase accounted for 66% of total LA emptying ranging from 76% in the youngest to 44% in the oldest decade. LA contraction accounted for 34% of atrial emptying in all subjects combined with the older subjects being more dependent on atrial booster pump function. When adjusted for atrial size, there were no sex related differences in LA function.
CONCLUSIONS—LA reservoir, conduit, and booster pump function can be assessed with automated analysis of signal averaged LA area waveforms. As LA performance varies with age, establishment of normal values should enhance the evaluation of pathologic states in which LA function is important.


Keywords: aging; atrium; echocardiography PMID:11179264

  2. Knowledge before School-Age, Is Power during School-Age: A Study of Urban Preschool and the Learning Disabled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tylia

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine if urban preschool decreased the likelihood of future identification of learning disabled (LD). According to the Child Development Institute (2010) and the Learning Disabilities Association of America (2010), four to ten percent of the school-aged students in this country are learning disabled.…

  3. Effectiveness of a Safe Routes to School Program in Preventing School-Aged Pedestrian Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2005, the US Congress allocated $612 million for a national Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to encourage walking and bicycling to schools. We analyzed motor vehicle crash data to assess the effectiveness of SRTS interventions in reducing school-aged pedestrian injury in New York City. Methods: Using geocoded motor vehicle crash data for 168 806 pedestrian injuries in New York City between 2001 and 2010, annual pedestrian injury rates per 10 000 population were calculated for different age groups and for census tracts with and without SRTS interventions during school-travel hours (defined as 7 am to 9 am and 2 pm to 4 pm, Monday through Friday during September through June). Results: During the study period, the annual rate of pedestrian injury decreased 33% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 30 to 36) among school-aged children (5- to 19-year-olds) and 14% (95% CI: 12 to 16) in other age groups. The annual rate of school-aged pedestrian injury during school-travel hours decreased 44% (95% CI: 17 to 65) from 8.0 injuries per 10 000 population in the preintervention period (2001–2008) to 4.4 injuries per 10 000 population in the postintervention period (2009–2010) in census tracts with SRTS interventions. The rate remained virtually unchanged in census tracts without SRTS interventions (0% [95% CI: –8 to 8]). Conclusions: Implementation of the SRTS program in New York City has contributed to a marked reduction in pedestrian injury in school-aged children. PMID:23319533

  4. Age- and exercise-related sympathetic activity in untrained volunteers, trained athletes and patients with impaired left-ventricular contractility.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, M; Schmid, P; Keul, J

    1984-11-01

    To study the influence of training, aging and left-ventricular contractility on the sympathetic nervous system, responses of plasma catecholamines and density of adrenoreceptors on intact blood cells were evaluated in 21 dynamically trained subjects, 8 statically trained weight lifters, 15 healthy young and 15 old control subjects, and 55 post-infarction patients. Plasma catecholamines are indicators of the overall sympathetic tone, while the density of adrenoreceptors is a cellular indicator of the sensitivity to catecholamines. Static and dynamic training result in lower catecholamine response at identical work loads during incremental ergometric tests. Higher density of beta 2 receptors on intact leucocytes and higher sensitivity to isoproterenol are seen in the dynamically trained test subjects. Higher density of alpha 2 receptors on intact thrombocytes is found in the weight lifters. Despite the training-dependent control of the sympathetic activity bradycardia occurs only in endurance-trained subjects, indicating an additionally increased vagal control. The exercise-related tachycardia of the weight lifters, on the other hand, points to an insufficient vagal control of the cardiac sinus rate. Decrease of physical fitness, as related to aging, a deficit in physical training and impaired left-ventricular contractility are connected with a higher sympathetic activity at identical work loads and a lower beta-receptor density on intact blood cells and, in cardiac patients, on myocardial cells as well (Bristow et al. 1982). Changes in the sympathetic system may amplify the age- and disease-dependent decrease of the cardiac function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6526026

  5. Plenty of action left in northern Europe's middle-aged offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.J.

    1994-08-15

    Northern Europe's offshore oil industry this year has begun to reveal several symptoms generally associated with middle age. Though in its prime in terms of oil production, North Sea industry has begun a dramatic slimming program. It has started a search for fresh experiences, and it has begun to revisit the big successes of its youth. The paper cites examples demonstrating these trends. The paper then discusses production, outlook for exploration, trends in the United Kingdom, development advances in the natural gas industry, exploration activities, and redevelopment projects.

  6. DIETARY HABITS OF SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN IN TBILISI.

    PubMed

    Mebonia, N; Trapaidze, D; Kvanchakhadze, R; Zhizhilashvili, S; Kasradze, N

    2015-11-01

    Study Goal was to determine dietary habits in school-aged children. Sampling of children was conducted in two stages. In the first stage, five schools in Nadzaladevi district of city Tbilisi were randomly selected. On the second stage the study groups from the appropriate school-aged students (10-14 years old children) were also randomly selected. All student participants filled out standardized and adopted questionnaires suggested by the American Academy of family physicians. Data were analyzed by using EpiInfo 7th version. Statistical analyses looked at correlations between criteria of unhealthy diet (such as morning without breakfast, frequent consumption of non-alcoholic beverages and fast food products) and overweight/obesity. A Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated by using CDC tool. 175 children with ages of 10-14 years (47% boys) were included and interviewed. Half of the children noted that they love or like fast food products. 10% - visits fast food places 2-3 times a week together with a family. 11% - visits fast food places 5 times a week and even more. 34% - do not start morning with breakfast; 15% - eat only twice a day; 26% - add salt to their dishes; 58% - drink non-alcoholic beverages every day or many times during a week; 24% - are overweight; 29% suffer from obesity; 25% noted that fast food places are located near schools. Very weak correlation was found between unhealthy diet (morning without breakfast, frequent consumption of non-alcoholic beverages and fast food products) and overweight/obesity. According to study results, dietary habits of school-age children in Tbilisi is unhealthy; to improve nutritional habits is essential: (1) promote consumer (students, parents and teachers) awareness on a healthy diet, (2) educate children, adolescents and adults about nutrition and healthy dietary practices, (3) encourage to raise awareness about the salt consumption in recommended doses in children. PMID:26656554

  7. Developing a Quality School-Age Child Care Program: An Information and Training Manual for Directors of School-Age Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childcare Resources, Birmingham, AL.

    This manual for directors of school-age child care (SACC) programs contains six sections. Section I provides a rationale for SACC. Section II describes characteristics of school-age children. The extensive Section III discusses characteristics of high quality SACC. After an initial discussion of the importance of out-of-school time, the section…

  8. Caring for Your School-Age Child: Ages 5 to 12. The Complete and Authorative Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schor, Edward L., Ed.

    The middle years of childhood are challenging for both children and their parents, as children master skills and develop behaviors that will strongly influence their later health and well-being. This parenting manual offers up-to-date information and guidelines on key emotional, physical, and behavioral issues that parents of school-age children…

  9. Effects of major-road vehicle speed and driver age and gender on left-turn gap acceptance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuedong; Radwan, Essam; Guo, Dahai

    2007-07-01

    Because the driver's gap-acceptance maneuver is a complex and risky driving behavior, it is a highly concerned topic for traffic safety and operation. Previous studies have mainly focused on the driver's gap acceptance decision itself but did not pay attention to the maneuver process and driving behaviors. Using a driving simulator experiment for left-turn gap acceptance at a stop-controlled intersection, this study evaluated the effects of major traffic speed and driver age and gender on gap acceptance behaviors. The experiment results illustrate relationships among drivers' left-turn gap decision, driver's acceleration rate, steering action, and the influence of the gap-acceptance maneuver on the vehicles in the major traffic stream. The experiment results identified an association between high crash risk and high traffic speed at stop-controlled intersections. The older drivers, especially older female drivers, displayed a conservative driving attitude as a compensation for reduced driving ability, but also showed to be the most vulnerable group for the relatively complex driving maneuvers. PMID:17239808

  10. Left out. Forgotten? Recent High School Graduates and the Great Recession. Work Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Carl; Zukin, Cliff; Szeltner, Mark; Stone, Charley

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the findings of a nationally representative sample of 544 recent high school graduates from the classes of 2006 through 2011. The purpose of this study is to understand how recent high school graduates who are not attending college full time are faring in the workforce, specifically looking at those individuals who graduated…

  11. No Gifted Student Left Behind: Building a High School Library Media Center for the Gifted Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graboyes, Alanna S.

    2007-01-01

    The Library Media Center of the Maggie L. Walker Governor's School, a high school specializing in Government and International Studies, located in Richmond, Virginia, serves close to 650 gifted students in grades 9-12. The skills of Governor's students range from the neophyte ninth-grade researcher to experienced faculty members embarking on their…

  12. No Teacher Left Behind: A Study of Teacher Attrition in Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, President George W. Bush signed into law the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), which is intended to ensure that each classroom has a highly qualified teacher. Current research, however, shows approximately 27% of teachers hired each year leave the profession; in addition, approximately 50% of teachers with less than five years experience…

  13. [Influence of pedagogy on vigilance in school age children].

    PubMed

    Zaczyk-Martin, C; Nuttens, M C; Hautekeete, M; Salomez, J L; Lequien, P

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between vigilance and pedagogy was studied in 3 middle classes of primary school (children aged between 8 and 9 yrs). Three different types of pedagogy, belonging to 3 major pedagogic currents were evaluated: the pedagogy of Maria Montessori, the traditional one and the so-called "open" pedagogy. The vigilance of children was tested with the psychometric test of Zazzo. The rate of performance of the test was significantly different according to the nature of pedagogy after adjustment of the only 2 confusing factors between the 3 schools: the age of the children and the degree of the mother. This difference was in favor of the pedagogy of Maria Montessori compared with the 2 others. It was observed on the results to the tests but also on learning. PMID:2170913

  14. The Development of Associate Learning in School Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Brian T.; Pietrzak, Robert H.; Snyder, Peter J.; Thomas, Elizabeth; Mayes, Linda C.; Maruff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Associate learning is fundamental to the acquisition of knowledge and plays a critical role in the everyday functioning of the developing child, though the developmental course is still unclear. This study investigated the development of visual associate learning in 125 school age children using the Continuous Paired Associate Learning task. As hypothesized, younger children made more errors than older children across all memory loads and evidenced decreased learning efficiency as memory load increased. Results suggest that age-related differences in performance largely reflect continued development of executive function in the context of relatively developed memory processes. PMID:25014755

  15. Raising Our Sights: No High School Senior Left Behind. Final Report, National Commission on the High School Senior Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, NJ.

    Educational institutions, families, and communities are not meeting the educational needs of more than 50 percent of the students enrolled in public and private schools in the United States. In 1997, only 43 percent of high school seniors reported themselves to be in demanding "academic" programs, compared with 45 percent in "general education"…

  16. Optimizing Population Screening of Bullying in School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaillancourt, Tracy; Trinh, Vi; McDougall, Patricia; Duku, Eric; Cunningham, Lesley; Cunningham, Charles; Hymel, Shelley; Short, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    A two-part screening procedure was used to assess school-age children's experience with bullying. In the first part 16,799 students (8,195 girls, 8,604 boys) in grades 4 to 12 were provided with a definition of bullying and then asked about their experiences using two general questions from the Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire (1996). In the…

  17. Assessing the Likelihood That Virginia Schools Will Meet the Proficiency Goals of the No Child Left Behind Act. Issues & Answers. REL 2007-No. 012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Louis

    2007-01-01

    This report investigates progress in Virginia public schools in satisfying the requirement of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 that every student be proficient in reading and math by 2014. It develops a variable change model that uses observed baseline proficiency and proficiency trends at individual schools to forecast gains for six subgroups…

  18. 20 CFR 219.55 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age... school attendance for child age 18. The child will be asked to submit (on a form furnished by the Board... statement from an official of the school verifying that the child is attending school full-time. The...

  19. Thugs, Hooligans and Snotty Noses: The Implications of Leading and Managing an All-Age School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swidenbank, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    While there has been a tradition of all-age schooling within the private sector it has not, until recently, been typical in state schools. However, there appears to be a growing trend in which all-age schools, i.e. schools that comprise multiple phases (usually primary and secondary) are becoming more popular. This article summarises the main…

  20. Planning Manual for School-Age Child Care in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainhart, Dolly

    This manual was designed to assist concerned individuals and organizations within communities in New Mexico to develop and plan effective school-age child care programs. Emphasized are the first steps in initiating and implementing school-age child care in a community. Chapter I discusses the need for school-age child care programs and the…

  1. Money and age in schools: Bullying and power imbalances.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Enrique; Castellanos, Melisa

    2015-05-01

    School bullying continues to be a serious problem around the world. Thus, it seems crucial to clearly identify the risk factors associated with being a victim or a bully. The current study focused in particular on the role that age and socio-economic differences between classmates could play on bullying. Logistic and multilevel analyses were conducted using data from 53,316 5th and 9th grade students from a representative sample of public and private Colombian schools. Higher age and better family socio-economic conditions than classmates were risk factors associated with being a bully, while younger age and poorer socio-economic conditions than classmates were associated with being a victim of bullying. Coming from authoritarian families or violent neighborhoods, and supporting beliefs legitimizing aggression, were also associated with bullying and victimization. Empathy was negatively associated with being a bully, and in some cases positively associated with being a victim. The results highlight the need to take into account possible sources of power imbalances, such as age and socio-economic differences among classmates, when seeking to prevent bullying. In particular, interventions focused on peer group dynamics might contribute to avoid power imbalances or to prevent power imbalances from becoming power abuse. Aggr. Behav. 41:280-293, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25219327

  2. Changes in ADHD Symptom Endorsement: Preschool to School Age

    PubMed Central

    Curchack-Lichtin, Jocelyn T.; Chacko, Anil; Halperin, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate endorsement patterns among the 18 DSM-IV symptoms of ADHD in a longitudinal sample of children with and without ADHD (n=144), as assessed at ages 4–5, 5–6, and 6–7 years. Method Symptom endorsements and diagnoses were determined at all time-points via K-SADS-PL interview administered to parents and supplemented by teacher questionnaires and clinician observations. Changes in endorsement patterns over time for each of the 18 DSM-IV symptoms were ascertained. Results Several symptoms, particularly those of inattention, were infrequently endorsed and of apparently limited diagnostic utility at ages 4–5; hyperactive/impulsive symptoms were more frequently endorsed among young children with ADHD than were inattentive symptoms. However, by ages 6–7, inattention items were somewhat superior at discriminating ADHD from Non-ADHD children. Conclusions Several DSM-IV and now DSM-V symptoms provide limited diagnostic differentiation prior to school-age, particularly those most commonly observed in the context of formal schooling. Consideration should be made in future iterations of the DSM that account for such developmental and contextual differences. PMID:24343794

  3. School-age pregnancy: why hasn't prevention worked?

    PubMed

    Males, M

    1993-12-01

    Adolescent pregnancy or sexually transmitted disease (STD) reduction has not occurred, despite sexuality education and abstinence programs, and intensive publicity and community initiatives. An obstacle to adolescent pregnancy, STD, and childbearing prevention is the assumption that adolescent sexuality is a closed system of activity among peers. When a nation is consumed with the preoccupation of condoms versus chastity debates, and is ignoring high poverty levels and abuse of the young, adolescent girls will seek escape from harsh childhoods in early family formation with young adult men. There is a high correlation between poverty rates and teenage birth, AIDS, and STD rates. Schools are not able to produce magical solutions to teenage pregnancy when adult lawmakers abnegate their responsibility to provide for youth well-being. Adolescent pregnancy will occur regardless of the expansion of curative programs such as school-based clinics; fundamental changes in assumptions, attitudes, and policies are needed. Beneficial aspects of programming appear to be fact-based sexuality and contraceptive education, counseling and referrals for youths with histories of child abuse, and child care classes and flexible school schedules for parenting students. A statistical profile in California indicates that 85% of all fathers of babies born to girls between ages of 11 and 18 years were adults. More than 50% of mothers aged 11-15 years were impregnated by adult men. Fathers' average age for births among junior high school mothers was 15-26 years, when the youngest and the oldest 2.5% of fathers are eliminated. There is a greater likelihood that a man older than 23 years will impregnate a junior high girl than will a junior high boy. The partner age gap is greatest among the very young girls. The California profile of father's age is similar to birth patterns in other states and similar to the national average. An examination of STDs shows a higher rate of STDs among females

  4. Sentence comprehension in post-institutionalized school-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, Chantal; Roeber, Barbara J.; Smith, Mary E.; Pollak, Seth D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated sentence comprehension and spatial working memory abilities in a sample of internationally adopted, post-institutionalized (PI) children. We compared the performance of these PI children to an age-matched group of children living with their birth families. We hypothesized that PI children would perform below clinical threshold on tasks of sentence comprehension and that poor sentence comprehension would be associated with poor performance in working memory. Method Twenty-three PI children and 36 comparison children were administered sentence comprehension and spatial memory tasks from standardized assessments. Results Some oral sentence comprehension skills and the spatial working memory skills were weaker in the school-aged PI children than in the age-matched comparison children. A mediational analysis demonstrated that poor spatial working memory performance partially explains the sentence comprehension differences between the two groups. Conclusion These findings provide valuable information to better plan early intervention and special education for PI children. PMID:22199198

  5. Prevalence of Parasomnia in School aged Children in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Ghalebandi, Mirfarhad; Salehi, Mansour; Rasoulain, Maryam; Naserbakht, Morteza; Salarifar, Mohammad Hosien

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Parasomnias can create sleep disruption; in this article we assessed parasomnias in school-aged children in Tehran. Methods In spring 2005, a total of 6000 sleep questionnaires were distributed to school-aged children in 5 districts of Tehran (Iran). A modified Pediatrics sleep questionnaire with 34 questions was used. Results Parasomnias varied from 0.5% to 5.7% among the subjects as follows: 2.7% sleep talking, 0.5% sleepwalking, 5.7% bruxism, 2.3% enuresis, and nightmare 4%. A group of children showed parasomnias occasionally- this was 13.1% for sleep talking, 1.4% for sleepwalking, 10.6% for bruxism, 3.1% for enuresis and 18.4% for nightmares. Conclusion A high proportion of children starting school suffer from sleep problems. In many cases this is a temporary, developmentally related phenomenon, but in 6% of the children the disorder is more serious and may be connected with various stress factors and further behavioral disturbances. PMID:22952526

  6. Health/Home Economics Classroom Activities for Secondary Schools. Schools in an Aging Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    As the fastest-growing segment of society, older adults can be valuable resources for schools. The intent of this guide is to promote education for, with, and about older adults; to confront stereotypic images; and to present an accurate and balanced view of aging. The manual consists of 21 lesson plans for secondary teachers of health and home…

  7. Improving Clinical Practice: A School-Age and School-Based Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallach, Geraldine P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the author presents a conceptual framework for intervention at school-age levels reflecting upon a number of aspects raised by Kamhi (2014) in the lead article of this forum. The focus is on the persistence of traditional practices, components of language intervention, and prioritizing goals for students with language…

  8. School Nurses Can Address Existing Gaps in School-Age Sleep Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willgerodt, Mayumi A.; Kieckhefer, Gail M.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep has been linked to a host of physical, behavioral, and emotional outcomes, and research has documented that youth across the globe are experiencing inadequate sleep. Despite this knowledge, however, very little research has been conducted on school-age children; much of the extant research has focused on infants, toddlers, preschoolers,…

  9. Effects of Age, Gender, School Class on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills of Nigerian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin; Onyeaso, Chukwudi Ochi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The need for training of schoolchildren on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as potential bystander CPR providers is growing globally but Nigeria is still behind and lacks basic necessary data. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of age, gender and school class on CPR skills of Nigerian secondary school…

  10. School Nurse Interventions in Managing Functional Urinary Incontinence in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Charisse L.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary incontinence (UI) in school-age children is a prevalent yet underrecognized problem that has remained in the shadow of other concerns commonly perceived as more prominent or urgent. There is good evidence that functional UI in children can be treated and managed effectively. When there is no structural or neurologic…

  11. School nurses can address existing gaps in school-age sleep research.

    PubMed

    Willgerodt, Mayumi A; Kieckhefer, Gail M

    2013-06-01

    Sleep has been linked to a host of physical, behavioral, and emotional outcomes, and research has documented that youth across the globe are experiencing inadequate sleep. Despite this knowledge, however, very little research has been conducted on school-age children; much of the extant research has focused on infants, toddlers, preschoolers, adolescents, and adults. School-age children exhibit increasing independence around health-related behaviors, which provide health professionals the opportunity to educate and promote healthy sleep behaviors. This commentary extends previous research reviews by identifying the current gaps in sleep research, highlighting future directions needed in sleep research, and explaining why school nurses are best suited to address this growing public health issue. PMID:23054101

  12. The school age child with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Lynn; Kelly, Michelle M; Reynolds, Kathryn; Conlan, Misty; Taylor, Felisha

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in the United States, there are approximately 1 in 150 adults living with congenital heart disease (CHD) (). Infant and childhood mortality related to CHD decreased by 31% between 1987 and 2005 (). This survival trend is predicted to increase each year due to advancements in treatment and management of CHD. This significant shift in the epidemiology of CHD requires nurses to take action in preparing children with CHD and their families for their teenage years and young adulthood. The school-age child is the ideal age to begin teaching the child about their healthcare needs and how to care for themselves in preparation for the future. The school-age child with CHD has specific physical, intellectual, emotional, and developmental needs that must be considered and managed using a multidisciplinary approach. Pediatric nurses must be aware of these needs as they help the child and their family seamlessly and successfully transition into young adulthood as a happy and healthy CHD survivor. PMID:25330332

  13. Improving Low-Performing Schools: Lessons from Five Years of Studying School Restructuring Under No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Caitlin

    2009-01-01

    This report synthesizes findings from five years of state-level research and local case studies of school restructuring by the Center on Education Policy (CEP). The research reported here began in Michigan in the summer and fall of 2004 and gradually expanded to include five additional states--California, Georgia, Maryland, New York, and Ohio--as…

  14. Comparison of Efficacy and Safety of Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion in Patients Aged <75 to ≥ 75 Years.

    PubMed

    Freixa, Xavier; Gafoor, Sameer; Regueiro, Ander; Cruz-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Shakir, Samera; Omran, Heyder; Berti, Sergio; Santoro, Gennaro; Kefer, Joelle; Landmesser, Ulf; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Sievert, Horst; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Nietlispach, Fabian; Gloekler, Steffen; Aminian, Adel; Danna, Paolo; Rezzaghi, Marco; Stock, Friederike; Stolcova, Miroslava; Costa, Marco; Ibrahim, Reda; Schillinger, Wolfgang; Park, Jai-Wun; Meier, Bernhard; Tzikas, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) is emerging as a promising alternative to oral anticoagulation. Because aged patients present a greater risk of not only cardioembolic events but also major bleeding, LAAO might represent a valid alternative as this would allow oral anticoagulation cessation while keeping cardioembolic protection. The objective of the study was to explore the safety and efficacy of LAAO in elderly patients. Data from the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug multicenter registry were analyzed. The cohort was categorized in 2 groups (<75 vs ≥ 75 years). A total of 1,053 subjects were included in the registry. Of them, 219 were excluded because of combined procedures. As a result, 828 subjects were included (54.6% ≥ 75 years). Procedural success was high and similar in both groups (97.3%). Acute procedural major adverse events were not statistically different among groups (3.2% in <75 years vs 5.1%; p = 0.17) although stratified analysis showed a higher incidence of cardiac tamponade in elderly patients (0.5% vs 2.2%; p = 0.04). With a median follow-up of 16.8 months, no significant differences in stroke/TIA (1.9% vs 2.3%; p = 0.89) and major bleeding (1.7% vs 2.6%; p = 0.54) were observed. In conclusion, LAAO was associated with similar procedural success in patients aged <75 and ≥ 75 years although older patients had a higher incidence of cardiac tamponade. At follow-up, stroke and major bleeding rates were similar among groups. PMID:26552507

  15. Elementary school age children's comprehension of specific idiomatic expressions.

    PubMed

    Brinton, B; Fujiki, M; Mackey, T A

    1985-08-01

    This study explored the ability of elementary school age children to comprehend six idiomatic expressions. Eighty linguistically normal children, 20 from each of four different grade levels (kindergarten, second grade, fourth grade, and sixth grade) participated as subjects. All of the children completed a task designed to probe comprehension of specific idioms. A short story was presented, after which the subjects were required to identify events in the story, which were described using idiomatic phrases. When examined as a group, comprehension of the idioms studied improved with increasing age. However, when examined individually, performance was found to be highly variable from idiom to idiom. These results are discussed with regard to clinical implications in the assessment and management of language-disordered children. PMID:4019816

  16. Change with age in regression construction of fat percentage for BMI in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Mishima, Takaaki; Watanabe, Eiji; Seki, Kazuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, curvilinear regression was applied to the relationship between BMI and body fat percentage, and an analysis was done to see whether there are characteristic changes in that curvilinear regression from elementary to middle school. Then, by simultaneously investigating the changes with age in BMI and body fat percentage, the essential differences in BMI and body fat percentage were demonstrated. The subjects were 789 boys and girls (469 boys, 320 girls) aged 7.5 to 14.5 years from all parts of Japan who participated in regular sports activities. Body weight, total body water (TBW), soft lean mass (SLM), body fat percentage, and fat mass were measured with a body composition analyzer (Tanita BC-521 Inner Scan), using segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis & multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. Height was measured with a digital height measurer. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as body weight (km) divided by the square of height (m). The results for the validity of regression polynomials of body fat percentage against BMI showed that, for both boys and girls, first-order polynomials were valid in all school years. With regard to changes with age in BMI and body fat percentage, the results showed a temporary drop at 9 years in the aging distance curve in boys, followed by an increasing trend. Peaks were seen in the velocity curve at 9.7 and 11.9 years, but the MPV was presumed to be at 11.9 years. Among girls, a decreasing trend was seen in the aging distance curve, which was opposite to the changes in the aging distance curve for body fat percentage. PMID:21483178

  17. Narrative development in late talkers: early school age.

    PubMed

    Paul, R; Hernandez, R; Taylor, L; Johnson, K

    1996-12-01

    Children with slow expressive language development (SELD) as toddlers and a control group of children with normal language development (NL) were followed to early school age. Children with SELD were, at that point, subdivided into two groups: those who had moved within the normal range of expressive language (the History of Expressive Language Delay [HELD] subgroup); and those who continued to score below the normal range in expressive language at school age (the Expressive Language Delay [ELD] subgroup). During their kindergarten, first, and second grade years, they were administered a narrative generation task. Narratives were analyzed for MLU, lexical diversity, amount of information included, proportion of complete cohesive ties, and overall stage of narrative maturity. In kindergarten, children with normal language history scored significantly higher than those with HELD and ELD on lexical diversity and narrative stage; and higher than those with ELD in proportion of complete cohesive ties. In first grade, children with normal language history again scored significantly higher than those with HELD and ELD on narrative maturity, with no other significant differences. In second grade, there were no significant differences among the groups. PMID:8959614

  18. Increasing Public Awareness and Developing Community Based Strategies for Quality School-Age Child Care Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber, Susan Way

    A framework for gaining community involvement in planning for school-age child care initiatives is reported. The framework incorporates a plan than could be used as a model for the involvement of the public school system. Four primary components are described: (1) a "Kids' Council" Saturday meeting in which third graders in school-age child care…

  19. Single Parents, Working Mothers and the Educational Achievement of Secondary School Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, David E.; And Others

    This paper presents a replication of previous research which estimated a structural equation model relating elementary school age students' achievement to the number of parents and maternal work. The research presented here focuses on secondary school age students, and provides partial support for previous findings in which elementary school age…

  20. Effects of Age and Schooling on 22 Ability and Achievement Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrell, James Lamar

    2013-01-01

    Although much educational research has investigated the relative effectiveness of different educational interventions and policies, little is known about the absolute net benefits of K-12 schooling independent of growth due to chronological age and out-of-school experience. The nearly universal policy of age tracking in schools makes this a…

  1. Midlife blood pressure change and left ventricular mass and remodelling in older age in the 1946 British birth cohort study†

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arjun K.; Hardy, Rebecca J.; Francis, Darrel P.; Chaturvedi, Nishi; Pellerin, Denis; Deanfield, John; Kuh, Diana; Mayet, Jamil; Hughes, Alun D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Antecedent blood pressure (BP) may contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of current BP. Blood pressure is associated with left ventricular mass index (LVMI) which independently predicts CVD. We investigated the relationship between midlife BP from age 36 to 64 and LVMI at 60–64 years. Methods and results A total of 1653 participants in the British 1946 Birth Cohort underwent BP measurement and echocardiography aged 60–64. Blood pressure had previously been measured at 36, 43, and 53 years. We investigated associations between BP at each age and rate of change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) between 36–43, 43–53, and 53–60/64 years on LVMI at 60–64 years. Blood pressure from 36 years was positively associated with LVMI. Association with SBP at 53 years was independent of SBP at 60–64 years and other potential confounders (fully adjusted β at 53 years = 0.19 g/m2; 95% CI: 0.11, 0.27; P < 0.001). Faster rates of increase in SBP from 43 to 53 years and 53 to 60/64 years were associated with increased LVMI. Similar relationships were seen for diastolic, pulse, and mean pressure. Rate of increase in SBP between 43–53 years was associated with largest change in LVMI (β at 43–53 years = 3.12 g/m2; 95% CI: 1.53, 4.72; P < 0.001). People on antihypertensive medication (43 years onwards) had greater LVMI even after adjustment for current BP (β at 43 years = 12.36 g/m2; 95% CI: 3.19, 21.53; P = 0.008). Conclusion Higher BP in midlife and rapid rise of SBP in 5th decade is associated with higher LVMI in later life, independent of current BP. People with treated hypertension have higher LVMI than untreated individuals, even accounting for their higher BP. Our findings emphasize importance of midlife BP as risk factor for future CVD. PMID:25246483

  2. Isolation of Left Common Carotid Artery with Its Origin Proximal to Patent Ductus Arteriosus Presenting in Adult Age

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha R.; Joshi, Saurabh; Kale, Kiran; Jain, Rahul; Bava, Jernail Singh

    2016-01-01

    Anomalies of aortic arch are a common occurrence. Such anomalies of right sided aortic arch with its various branching patterns are of clinical importance. Rarer anomalies include isolation (deficient connection) of either left subclavian artery or left common carotid artery; that is, they do not have their origin from aorta or its major branches. We present a case of an 18-year-old male who presented with gradual onset pulsatile swelling with bruit in neck on left side and was evaluated by CT brain and neck angiography. CT angiography revealed right sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery and isolated left common carotid artery. Very few cases of such an anomaly have been documented in the literature but none in an adult. PMID:27213071

  3. Scratching the Surface of "No Child Left Behind": How "No Child Left Behind" Unfairly Affects Schools with Significant Proportions of Disadvantaged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Since the passage of Lyndon Johnson's 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act, standards-based testing has become a government initiative and part of a massive educational reform throughout the country. By January 8 2002, President Bush signed "No Child Left Behind" into law as the latest iteration of Johnson's early educational reform. Under…

  4. Electrocardiographic Left Ventricular Hypertrophy as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Disease Independent of Left Ventricular Anatomy in Subjects Aged ≥65 Years.

    PubMed

    Leigh, J Adam; O'Neal, Wesley T; Soliman, Elsayed Z

    2016-06-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) diagnosed by electrocardiography (ECG-LVH) and echocardiography (echo-LVH) are independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. However, it is unknown if ECG-LVH retains its predictive properties independent of LV anatomy. We compared the risk of CVD associated with ECG-LVH and echo-LVH in 4,076 participants (41% men, 86% white) from the Cardiovascular Health Study, who were free of baseline CVD. ECG-LVH was defined with Minnesota ECG Classification criteria from baseline ECG data. Echo-LVH was defined by gender-specific LV mass values normalized to body surface area (male: >102 g/m(2); female: >88 g/m(2)). ECG-LVH was detected in 144 participants (3.5%) and echo-LVH in 430 participants (11%). Over a median follow-up of 10.6 years, 2,274 CVD events occurred. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis adjusted for common CVD risk factors, ECG-LVH (hazard ratio [HR] 1.84, 95% CI 1.51 to 2.24) and echo-LVH (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.54) were associated with an increased risk for CVD events. The association between ECG-LVH and CVD events was not substantively altered with further adjustment for echo-LVH (HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.45 to 2.15). In conclusion, the association of ECG-LVH with CVD events is not dependent on echo-LVH. This finding provides support to the concept that ECG-LVH is an electrophysiological marker with predictive properties independent of LV anatomy. PMID:27067620

  5. Intrinsic and Extrinsic School Motivation as a Function of Age: The Mediating Role of Autonomy Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillet, Nicolas; Vallerand, Robert J.; Lafreniere, Marc-Andre K.

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the present research was to investigate school intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and amotivation as a function of age in a sample of 1,600 elementary and high school students aged 9-17 years. First, results revealed a systematic decrease in intrinsic motivation and self-determined extrinsic motivation from age 9 to 12 years,…

  6. Shame Solutions: How Shame Impacts School-Aged Children and What Teachers Can Do to Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Though many psychologists and researchers argue over the age at which humans first experience shame, all agree that by age two children have the capacity to be shamed (Lansky and Morrison 1997). School-aged children have invariably been exposed to shame at home and receive an extra dose of it in our current school system. This essay investigates…

  7. Profiling oral narrative ability in young school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Westerveld, Marleen F; Gillon, Gail T

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to determine if oral narrative comprehension and production measures derived in a fictional story retelling task could be used to create a profile of strengths and weaknesses in oral narrative ability (Profile of Oral Narrative Ability: PONA) in young school-aged children. The story retelling task was field-tested with 169 typically developing children, aged between 5;0 and 7;6 years. Children listened twice to an unfamiliar story while looking at the pictures in a book. Comprehension questions were asked after the first exposure. Following the second exposure, children were asked to retell the story without the use of the pictures. Story retellings were analysed on measures of semantics, morphosyntax, verbal productivity, and narrative quality. Results indicated sensitivity for age on measures of comprehension, narrative quality, semantics, and verbal productivity, but not for morphosyntactic measures. Factor analysis indicated that oral narrative performance comprised three factors, explaining more than 80% of the variance. Two clinical case examples are presented, which show the potential of the PONA to reveal different patterns of strengths and weaknesses across the oral narrative measures. Although early evidence suggests the potential usefulness of the PONA, further research is now needed to test the validity, reliability and clinical application of this tool. PMID:20433337

  8. Breastfeeding, lung volumes and alveolar size at school-age

    PubMed Central

    Dogaru, Cristian M; Narayanan, Manjith; Spycher, Ben D; Pescatore, Anina M; Owers-Bradley, John; Beardsmore, Caroline S; Silverman, Michael; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies found larger lung volumes at school-age in formerly breastfed children, with some studies suggesting an effect modification by maternal asthma. We wanted to explore this further in children who had undergone extensive lung function testing. The current study aimed to assess whether breastfeeding was associated with larger lung volumes and, if so, whether all compartments were affected. We also assessed association of breastfeeding with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), which measures freedom of gas diffusion in alveolar-acinar compartments and is a surrogate of alveolar dimensions. Additionally, we assessed whether these effects were modified by maternal asthma. Methods We analysed data from 111 children and young adults aged 11–21 years, who had participated in detailed lung function testing, including spirometry, plethysmography and measurement of ADC of 3Helium (3He) by MR. Information on breastfeeding came from questionnaires applied in early childhood (age 1–4 years). We determined the association between breastfeeding and these measurements using linear regression, controlling for potential confounders. Results We did not find significant evidence for an association between duration of breastfeeding and lung volumes or alveolar dimensions in the entire sample. In breastfed children of mothers with asthma, we observed larger lung volumes and larger average alveolar size than in non-breastfed children, but the differences did not reach significance levels. Conclusions Confirmation of effects of breastfeeding on lung volumes would have important implications for public health. Further investigations with larger sample sizes are warranted. PMID:26180638

  9. Twilight in the Valley of the Sun: Nonprofit Arts and Culture Programs in Arizona's Public Schools Post-No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the presence and impact of nonprofit arts and culture programs in partnership with Arizona's public schools. Arts and culture offerings are limited by many facets of the educational system, including the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), as evidenced by researchers and participants' responses in this study. The author argues…

  10. Instruction Matters: Lessons from a Mixed-Method Evaluation of Out-of-School Time Tutoring under No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Annalee G.; Burch, Patricia Ellen; Stewart, Mary S.; Acosta, Rudy; Heinrich, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Under supplemental educational services ("supplemental services"), a parental choice provision of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), schools that have not made adequate yearly progress in increasing student achievement are required to offer low-income families free, afterschool tutoring. Existing research shows low…

  11. Considering New Paths for Success: An Examination of the Research and Methods on Urban School-University Partnerships Post-No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Joseph E.; Hunt, Rebecca D.; Johnson, Laura Ruth; Wickman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines urban school-university partnership research after No Child Left Behind. Central to the review is an analysis in the trend of research methods utilized across studies. It was found that many studies are single-case studies or anecdotal. There are few quantitative, sustained qualitative, or mixed-methods studies represented in…

  12. Giving Parents Options: Strategies for Informing Parents and Implementing Public School Choice and Supplemental Educational Services Under "No Child Left Behind"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Since the passage of the "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001" (NCLB), the evidence that it is working has continued to grow. Because of this law, teachers and parents are getting the information and help they need to help every child reach his or her best in school--and as a result, student achievement is rising across America. While school…

  13. Effects of the Emphasis on Achieving Adequate Yearly Progress on Teachers and Administrators at Schools under the Constraints of No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Cathy Ann Burnett

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of the emphasis on achieving Adequate Yearly Progress at elementary schools under the regulations of the No Child Left Behind legislation. Qualitative data were gathered through interviews with fifty educators: forty-three teachers and seven administrators. All of the educators worked at six…

  14. The Modern U.S. High School Astronomy Course, Its Status and Makeup, and the Effects of No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumenaker, Larry

    2009-01-01

    A 2007 nationwide mixed-methods survey of high school astronomy teachers reports on its current characteristics and its changes over intervening decades that included the introduction of standards and the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Some changes found include section enrollments trending downward even while the total number of courses offered…

  15. Behavior Management for School Aged Children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Pfiffner, Linda J.; Haack, Lauren M.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Behavior management treatments are the most commonly used nonpharmacological approaches for treating ADHD and associated impairments. This review focuses on behavioral parent training interventions for school age children in the home setting and adjunctive treatments developed to extend effects across settings. The underlying theoretical basis and content of these interventions are described. Empirical support includes numerous randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses showing positive effects of these interventions on child compliance, ADHD symptoms and impairments, parent-child interactions, parenting and parenting stress. These studies support categorization of behavior management treatment as a well-established, evidence-based treatment for ADHD. Factors for consideration in clinical decision-making and future directions for research are provided. PMID:25220083

  16. Bicycle safety knowledge and behavior in school age children.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, S R; Nagel, R W

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine school age children's knowledge of bicycling rules of the road and their bicycling behaviors. A one-page questionnaire was administered in the classroom to 276 of 300 children in grades 4 through 8 of an upper middle class suburban school district. The children were questioned regarding their knowledge of three basic bicycling rules of the road, prior bicycle safety instruction, use of bicycle helmets, and the occurrence and severity of previous bicycle accidents. Students who reported receiving previous bicycle safety instruction were more knowledgeable than those receiving no instruction regarding rule 2, always stop at a stop sign or red light (90% compared with 74%), and rule 3, always stop and look when approaching a street from a driveway or alley (74% compared with 60%). Students who did not know rule 3 were more likely to have had a recent bicycle accident in which their bicycle was damaged (21% compared with 8%) and to have ever gone to the hospital or a physician because of injuries sustained in a bicycle accident (19% compared with 9%). Children who lacked knowledge of basic bicycling rules were more likely to have had a significant bicycling accident. Bicycle safety instruction increases children's knowledge of these rules and should be promoted by physicians caring for children. PMID:2345336

  17. A longitudinal investigation of children internationally adopted at school age.

    PubMed

    Helder, Emily J; Mulder, Elizabeth; Gunnoe, Marjorie Linder

    2014-11-01

    Most existing research on children adopted internationally has focused on those adopted as infants and toddlers. The current study longitudinally tracked several outcomes, including cognitive, behavioral, emotional, attachment, and family functioning, in 25 children who had been internationally adopted at school age (M = 7.7 years old at adoption, SD = 3.4, range = 4-15 years). We examined the incidence of clinically significant impairments, significant change in outcomes over the three study points, and variables that predicted outcomes over time. Clinically significant impairments in sustained attention, full-scale intelligence, reading, language, executive functioning, externalizing problems, and parenting stress were common, with language and executive functioning impairments present at higher levels in the current study compared with past research focusing on children adopted as infants and toddlers. Over the three study points, significant improvements across most cognitive areas and attachment functioning were observed, though significant worsening in executive functioning and internalizing problems was present. Adoptive family-specific variables, such as greater maternal education, smaller family size, a parenting approach that encouraged age-expected behaviors, home schooling, and being the sole adopted child in the family were associated with greater improvement across several cognitive outcomes. In contrast, decreased parenting stress was predicted by having multiple adopted children and smaller family sizes were associated with greater difficulties with executive functioning. Child-specific variables were also linked to outcomes, with girls displaying worse attachment and poorer cognitive performance and with less time in orphanage care resulting in greater adoption success. Implications for future research and clinical applications are discussed. PMID:25380232

  18. A longitudinal investigation of children internationally adopted at school age.

    PubMed

    Helder, Emily J; Mulder, Elizabeth; Gunnoe, Marjorie Linder

    2016-01-01

    Most existing research on children adopted internationally has focused on those adopted as infants and toddlers. The current study longitudinally tracked several outcomes, including cognitive, behavioral, emotional, attachment, and family functioning, in 25 children who had been internationally adopted at school age (M = 7.7 years old at adoption, SD = 3.4, range = 4–15 years). We examined the incidence of clinically significant impairments, significant change in outcomes over the three study points, and variables that predicted outcomes over time. Clinically significant impairments in sustained attention, full-scale intelligence, reading, language, executive functioning, externalizing problems, and parenting stress were common, with language and executive functioning impairments present at higher levels in the current study compared with past research focusing on children adopted as infants and toddlers. Over the three study points, significant improvements across most cognitive areas and attachment functioning were observed, though significant worsening in executive functioning and internalizing problems was present. Adoptive family-specific variables, such as greater maternal education, smaller family size, a parenting approach that encouraged age-expected behaviors, home schooling, and being the sole adopted child in the family were associated with greater improvement across several cognitive outcomes. In contrast, decreased parenting stress was predicted by having multiple adopted children and smaller family sizes were associated with greater difficulties with executive functioning. Child-specific variables were also linked to outcomes, with girls displaying worse attachment and poorer cognitive performance and with less time in orphanage care resulting in greater adoption success. Implications for future research and clinical applications are discussed. PMID:26835531

  19. Preschool and school age activities: comparison of urban and suburban populations.

    PubMed

    Damore, Dorothy T

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare urban and suburban preschool and school age activities. A prospective survey using a convenience sample was conducted at one urban and one suburban primary care pediatric office. Questionnaires were completed for 66 urban preschool children, 70 suburban preschool children, 57 urban school age children and 61 suburban school age children during the school year. Also, questionniaires were completed for 63 suburban school age children during the summer. The suburban preschool children spent more time outdoors, were read to more frequently, visited the library more frequently and more often attended summer camp. The suburban school age children spent more time outdoors, more frequently participated in a community sport league and more often attended summer camp. The urban school age children watched more television or videos. During the summer, suburban school age children spent more time outdoors, while during the school year, suburban school age children used the library more frequently. Important differences exist between the activities of urban and suburban children in two practices in the New York metropolitan area. Pediatricians caring for urban children may have an important opportunity to promote participation in sports and educational activities. PMID:12027270

  20. Using inquiry-based instruction to meet the standards of No Child Left Behind for middle school earth science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael W.

    This study examined the effectiveness of a specific instructional strategy employed to improve performance on the end-of-the-year Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) as mandated by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. A growing body of evidence suggests that the perceived pressure to produce adequate aggregated scores on the CRCT causes teachers to neglect other relevant aspects of teaching and attend less to individualized instruction. Rooted in constructivist theory, inquiry-based programs provide a o developmental plan of instruction that affords the opportunity for each student to understand their academic needs and strengths. However, the utility of inquiry-based instruction is largely unknown due to the lack of evaluation studies. To address this problem, this quantitative evaluation measured the impact of the Audet and Jordan inquiry-based instructional model on CRCT test scores of 102 students in a sixth-grade science classroom in one north Georgia school. A series of binomial tests of proportions tested differences between CRCT scores of the program participants and those of a matched control sample selected from other district schools that did not adopt the program. The study found no significant differences on CRCT test scores between the treatment and control groups. The study also found no significant performance differences among genders in the sample using inquiry instruction. This implies that the utility of inquiry education might exist outside the domain of test scores. This study can contribute to social change by informing a reevaluation of the instructional strategies that ideally will serve NCLB high-stakes assessment mandates, while also affording students the individual-level skills needed to become productive members of society.

  1. Treatment of femur fractures in school-aged children using elastic stable intramedullary nailing: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Keith; Hsu, Jason E; Wenger, Dennis R; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2011-09-01

    Femur fractures are common long-bone injuries in school-aged children (6-12 years). Among the various acceptable treatment options, elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) has gained popularity over recent years although the level of evidence for ESIN is low. This study was a systematic review of the literature to examine the outcomes and complications of ESIN in school-aged children and to critically evaluate the quality of the available literature. Although most complications were minor, some series report complication rates of more than 50%. Union rates are high. Malunion or mechanical axis malalignment, on the other hand, is common, and leg length discrepancy and overgrowth are also not unusual. Symptomatic implants are common, particularly if the distal ends of the nail are left long and prominent. Refracture was noted to be uncommon in this population. ESIN is a well-accepted and reliable option for treatment of femur fractures in school-aged children. Advantages are decreased length of hospital stay, early return to function, and high union rates. Care must be taken to obtain and maintain reduction, and caution is advised in older and heavier children. PMID:21829144

  2. Age estimation based on bone length using 12 regression models of left hand X-ray images for Asian children below 19 years old.

    PubMed

    Darmawan, M F; Yusuf, Suhaila M; Abdul Kadir, M R; Haron, H

    2015-03-01

    Age estimation was used in forensic anthropology to help in the identification of individual remains and living person. However, the estimation methods tend to be unique and applicable only to a certain population. This paper analyzed age estimation using twelve regression models carried out on X-ray images of the left hand taken from an Asian data set for subjects under the age of 19. All the nineteen bones of the left hand were measured using free image software and the statistical analysis were performed using SPSS. There are two methods to determine age in this study which are single bone method and all bones method. For single bone method, S-curve regression model was found to have the highest R-square value using second metacarpal for males, and third proximal phalanx for females. For age estimation using single bone, fifth metacarpal from males and fifth proximal phalanx from females can be used due to the lowest mean square error (MSE) value. To conclude, multiple linear regressions is the best techniques for age estimation in cases where all bones are available, but if not, S-curve regression can be used using single bone method. PMID:25456051

  3. Possible Mechanisms Underlying Aging-Related Changes in Early Diastolic Filling and Long Axis Motion—Left Ventricular Length and Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Peverill, Roger E.; Chou, Bon; Donelan, Lesley; Mottram, Philip M.; Gelman, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The transmitral E wave and the peak velocity of early diastolic mitral annular motion (e`) both decrease with age, but the mechanisms underlying these age-related changes are incompletely understood. This study investigated the possible contributions of blood pressure (BP) and left ventricular end-diastolic length (LVEDL) to age-related reductions in E and e`. Methods The study group were 82 healthy adult subjects <55 years of age who were not obese or hypertensive. Transmitral flow and mitral annular motion were recorded using pulsed-wave Doppler. LVEDL was measured from the mitral annular plane to the apical endocardium. Results Age was positively correlated with diastolic BP and septal wall thickness (SWT), inversely correlated with LVEDL (β = -0.25) after adjustment for sex and body surface area, but was not related to left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD). Age was also inversely correlated with E (r = -0.36), septal e`(r = -0.53) and lateral e`(r = -0.53). On multivariable analysis, E was inversely correlated with diastolic BP and LVEDD, septal e`was inversely correlated with diastolic BP and positively correlated with SWT and LVEDL, after adjusting for body mass index, whilst lateral e`was inversely correlated with diastolic BP and positively correlated with LVEDL. Conclusion The above findings are consistent with higher BP being a contributor to age-related reductions in both E and e`and shortening of LVEDL with age being a contributor to the age-related reduction in e`. An implication of these findings is that slowing of myocyte relaxation is unlikely to be the sole, and may not be the main, mechanism underlying age-related decreases in E and e`. PMID:27351745

  4. Relative Age Effects Are a Developmental Problem in Tennis: But Not Necessarily when You're Left-Handed!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loffing, Florian; Schorer, Jorg; Cobley, Steve P.

    2010-01-01

    Relative Age Effects (RAEs), describing attainment inequalities as a result of interactions between biological age and age-grouping procedures, have been demonstrated across many sports contexts. This study examined whether an additional individual characteristic (i.e., handedness) mediated RAEs in tennis. Relative age and handedness distributions…

  5. [Maternal Predictors of Body Mass Index of Pre-school and School Age Children].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Félix, Rosario E; Flores-Peña, Yolanda; Cárdenas-Villareal, Valia M; Moral de la Rubia, José; Ruvalcaba Rodríguez, María D; Hernandez-Carranco, Roandy G

    2015-09-01

    The objective was to identify maternal variables that could be used as predictors of the child's body mass index (BMI). We considered the following variables: (a) socio-demographic (age, education, occupation, marital status and family income); (b) anthropometric (BMI); and (c) upbringing strategies (monitoring and limits for eating habits, monitoring and sedentary behavior limits, discipline and control in feeding. A predictive correlational study was carried out with 537 dyads (mother-child). Children enrolled in 4 public schools (2 for pre-school children and 2 for primary school children) were selected for probabilistic, random sampling. The mothers answered the Feeding and Activity Upbringing Strategies Scale, giving socio-demographic information and the dyads' weight and height was measured. The data were analyzed for correlations and path analysis. It was found that the average age of mothers was 34.25 years (SD=6.91), with 12.40 years of education (SD=3.36), 53.3% mentioned that they were housewives and 46.7% had a paid job outside of the home; 38.5% showed pre-OB and 27.3% some degree of OB. The child's average age was 7.26 years (SD=2.46), and 3.2% showed low weight, 59.6% normal weight and 37.2% OW-0B. It was found that working outside the home, having a higher maternal BMI, less control and more discipline in feeding are variables that predict higher BMI in the child. We recommend the design of interventions to reduce and treat the child's OW-OB taking into account the predictors that were found. PMID:26821487

  6. Internet and Independent E-Learning of School Age Children in Thailand (One Study)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Schools generally have been unable to keep up with the rapid technical changes in modern society. As a result, primary school age children worldwide are becoming self-taught independent e-learners and the gap between what they know and are able to do exceeds the learning outcomes for their schools' ICT (information communication technology)…

  7. Dietary Diversity as a Correlate of Undernutrition among School-Age Children in Southwestern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olumakaiye, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study was conducted to determine the association between undernutrition and dietary diversity among school-age children in southwestern Nigeria. Methods: A total of 600 school children were randomly selected from six private and six public schools in the region. A standardized FAO-published 24-hour diet recall…

  8. Gender Differences in Food Preferences of School-Aged Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caine-Bish, Natalie L.; Scheule, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Background: Schools have the opportunity, through the National School Lunch Program and Local School Wellness Policies, to have a significant impact on healthy eating behaviors. An understanding of children's and adolescents' food preferences in relation to gender and age will facilitate the successful creation of both healthy and financially…

  9. Building a Method for Researching Attribution of Meaning by Children Aged 5 to 6 in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tertoolen, Anja; van Oers, Bert; Geldens, Jeannette; Popeijus, Herman

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the first phase of a research project in which we looked for the voices of young children, aged 5 to 6, in school. What do children experience in school? What do they see as the meaning of school? What is their motivation? Children have the right to be listened to. The question is which settings, under which circumstances,…

  10. Academic Achievement, Employment, Age and Gender and Students' Experience of Alternative School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poyrazli, Senel; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Meister, Denise G.; Forthun, Larry; Coatsworth, J. Doug; Grahame, Kamini Maraj

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to explore associations between academic achievement, employment, gender, and age in relation to students' sense of school membership and perception of adults in school. The sample consisted of 102 secondary, alternative school students. Results indicated that students with a more positive perception…

  11. Screen-Related Sedentary Behaviours of School-Aged Children: Principals' and Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Meizi; Piche, Leonard; Beynon, Charlene; Kurtz, Joanne; Harris, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To solicit school principals' and teachers' perspectives on children's screen-related sedentary behaviour and to identify possible solutions to reduce sedentary behaviours among school-aged children. Method: In-person interviews using a semi-structured interview guide were conducted with school principals and grades five and six…

  12. Attention and Memory in School-Age Children Surviving the Terrorist Attack in Beslan, Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrimin, Sara; Moscardino, Ughetta; Capello, Fabia; Axia, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of terrorism on children's cognitive functioning and school learning. The primary purpose of this study was to report on cognitive functioning among school-age children 20 months after a terrorist attack against their school. Participants included 203 directly and indirectly exposed children from Beslan and 100…

  13. Does Raising the State Compulsory School Attendance Age Achieve the Intended Outcomes? REL 2014-005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Philip E.; Duncan, Teresa G.

    2013-01-01

    Maryland recently raised its compulsory school attendance age from 16 to 18 in two stages: from 16 to 17 at the beginning of the 2014-15 school year and from 17 to 18 at the beginning of the 2016-17 school year (Maryland Senate Bill 362, 2012). The Maryland State Department of Education, a member of Regional Educational Laboratory…

  14. Military Training of Youths of School Age in Foreign Countries. Bulletin, 1917, No. 25

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jesien, W. S.

    1917-01-01

    The matter presented in this circular relates to the military training of youths of school age, conducted either as a part of the regular school work or by independent agencies. Military instruction, of the exact nature and to the same extent as that given to soldiers, is not found in the schools of any country of Europe except the special…

  15. Middle-School-Age Outcomes in Children with Very Low Birthweight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, H. Gerry; Klein, Nancy; Minich, Nori M.; Hack, Maureen

    2000-01-01

    Compared outcomes of middle-school-age children born at very low (less than 750-g) or low birthweights (750 to 1,499-g) and full-term. Found that the very-low-weight group fared less well at school age than the low weight and term groups on cognitive functioning, achievement, behavior, and academic performance. Those without neurosensory disorders…

  16. Sleep and Television and Computer Habits of Swedish School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garmy, Pernilla; Nyberg, Per; Jakobsson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sleep, television and computer habits and enjoyment and feelings of tiredness in school of school-age children and adolescents in Sweden. An instrument found to be valid and reliable here was distributed to 3,011 children aged 6, 7, 10, 14, and 16 years. Those sleeping less than the median length of time…

  17. What Happens? Relationship of Age and Gender with Science Attitudes from Elementary to Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorge, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of 1008 students from rural New Mexico in elementary and middle schools from ages 9 through 14. A large decrease in science attitudes between the ages of 11 and 12 years, corresponding with the move from elementary to middle school was observed. (Contains 1 figure and 3 tables.)

  18. The Agelink Project Replication Manual: An Intergenerational School-Age Child-Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crites, Marsha; And Others

    Chapter 1 of this document introduces AgeLink, a 5-year model intergenerational child care project for school-age children. The project implemented after-school services that linked children with volunteer older adults in 17 western North Carolina counties. Ten sites participated in the project between 1984 and 1989, and 11 sites currently have…

  19. Tall Poppies: Bullying Behaviors Faced by Australian High-Performance School-Age Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Maureen; Calder, Angela; Allen, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about Australian high-performance school-age athletes' experiences as victims of the tall poppy syndrome. Tall poppies are successful individuals bullied by those who are less successful in order to "normalize them." Nineteen current or previous national or international high-performance school-age athletes were…

  20. Sleep Problems in Chinese School-Aged Children with a Parent-Reported History of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shenghui; Jin, Xinming; Yan, Chonghuai; Wu, Shenghu; Jiang, Fan; Shen, Xiaoming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to survey the prevalence of parent-reported ADHD diagnosis and to assess its associations with sleep problems among urban school-aged children in China. Method: A random sample of 20,152 school-aged children participated in a cross-sectional survey in eight cities of China. A parent-administered questionnaire and the…

  1. Unmet Needs of Families of School-Aged Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Hilary K.; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Hunter, Duncan; Kelley, Elizabeth; Cobigo, Virginie

    2012-01-01

    Background: To aid decision making regarding the allocation of limited resources, information is needed on the perceived unmet needs of parents of school-aged children with an autism spectrum disorder. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 101 Canadian families of school-aged children with an autism spectrum disorder.…

  2. 20 CFR 404.745 - Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of school attendance for child age 18 or older. 404.745 Section 404.745 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Evidence Evidence for Child's and Parent's Benefits § 404.745 Evidence of school attendance for...

  3. Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, and Health-Related Quality of Life in School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Xiangli; Chang, Mei; Solmon, Melinda A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the association between physical activity (PA), physical fitness, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among school-aged children. Methods: Participants were 201 children (91 boys, 110 girls; M[subscript age] = 9.82) enrolled in one school in the southern US. Students' PA (self-reported PA, pedometer-based PA)…

  4. School-Age Child Care: An Action Manual for the 90s and Beyond. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Allenson, Michael

    Evidence suggests that self-care among school-age children has significant costs to the children, in the form of increased fearfulness and loneliness, heightened vulnerability to peer pressure, and greater likelihood of substance abuse. In response to the need for quality school-age care, this book serves as a guide for anyone wanting to implement…

  5. No Time to Waste: An Action Agenda for School-Age Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Fink, Dale Borman

    This book for persons interested in setting up high quality school-age child care (SACC) programs: (1) provides background information and a rationale; (2) describes a collaborative model of program development; (3) discusses program funding and resources; (4) considers approaches to recognizing high quality school-age child care; and (5) offers…

  6. Sensory evaluation of a novel vegetable in school age children.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, Helen; Palfreyman, Zoe; Morizet, David

    2016-05-01

    A behavioural sensory task was undertaken to further understanding into whether children's sensory evaluation of a new vegetable is associated with tasting and food neophobia scores. A sample of ninety-five children, aged 7-11 years, was recruited from a primary school in inner city Birmingham, UK. They were asked to rate the sight, smell and feel of a familiar vegetable (carrot) and an unfamiliar vegetable (celeriac) in a randomised order to control for order effects. They were then asked to try the each vegetable, and rate its taste. It was found that children rated the sensory characteristics of the familiar vegetable more positively than the novel vegetable across all sensory domains (p < 0.05). Refusing to try the novel vegetable was associated with food neophobia scores and olfactory ratings. The ratings of the taste of the novel vegetable were associated with olfactory and tactile ratings. In addition there was a clear developmental shift in the sample with younger children being more likely to rate the novel vegetable as 'looking strange' and older children rating the novel vegetable as 'smelling strange'. This research strengthens the idea that sensory information is important in children deciding to try, and their hedonic evaluation of the taste of a new vegetable. PMID:26809143

  7. School-Aged Functioning of Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder before Age Three: Parent-Reported Diagnostic, Adaptive, Medication, and School Placement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towle, Patricia O.; Vacanti-Shova, Karyn; Shah, Shristi; Higgins-D'alessandro, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Eighty children with early autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnoses (under 36 months) were identified using a chart abstraction protocol applied to early intervention charts. Parents filled out questionnaires by mail when the children were school-aged (ages 6-16 years). Similar to previous studies, approximately 20 % no longer had ASD diagnoses;…

  8. School Entrance Recommendation: A Question of Age or Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horstschräer, Julia; Muehler, Grit

    2014-01-01

    Fixed cutoff dates regulating school entry create disadvantages for children who are young relative to their classmates. Early and late school enrollment, though, might mitigate these disadvantages. In this paper, we analyze in a first step which factors determine school entry, if entrance screenings allow for early and late enrollment. Second, we…

  9. What Makes a Leader? Relative Age and High School Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhuey, Elizabeth; Lipscomb, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Economists have identified a substantial adult wage premium attached to high school leadership activity. Unresolved is the extent to which it constitutes human capital acquisition or proxies for an "innate" unobserved skill. We document a determinant of high school leadership activity that is associated purely with school structure, rather than…

  10. From HORSA Huts to ROSLA Blocks: The School Leaving Age and the School Building Programme in England, 1943-1972

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Steven; McCulloch, Gary; Woodin, Tom

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the connections between the school building programme in England and the raising of the school leaving age (ROSLA) from 14 to 15 in 1947 and then to 16 in 1972. These two major developments were intended to help to ensure the realisation of "secondary education for all" in the postwar period. The combination led in practice to…

  11. Selected Alternatives for Serving More High School-Aged Students in the Vocational-Technical Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Marwick, Mitchell, and Co., Hartford, CT.

    This final report discusses a project designed to study increased use of the 16 vocational-technical (VT) schools in Connecticut to serve more individuals of high school age; compare advantages and disadvantages of feasible alternatives; and recommend viable approaches for increasing facility use for serving more individuals. Chapter I outlines…

  12. Active Travel to School: Findings from the Survey of US Health Behavior in School-Aged Children, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yong; Ivey, Stephanie S.; Levy, Marian C.; Royne, Marla B.; Klesges, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Whereas children's active travel to school (ATS) has confirmed benefits, only a few large national surveys of ATS exist. Methods: Using data from the Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) 2009-2010 US survey, we conducted a logistic regression model to estimate the odds ratios of ATS and a linear regression model to estimate…

  13. A Predictive Study of Advantages Associated with School-based School-Age Child Care: Implications for Program Policy Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mick; Wallinga, Charlotte

    2000-01-01

    Examined institutional advantages of school-age child care (SACC) programming in schools. A study of 63 SACC programs in 2 southeastern states revealed that community support, number of extracurricular activities, and frequency of academic activities significantly contributed to predicting advantages associated with SAC programming. (Contains 23…

  14. Reliability and Validity of the Acanthosis Nigricans Screening Tool for Use in Elementary School-Age Children by School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Leslie K.; Hall, Lynne M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of an acanthosis nigricans (AN) screening tool for use in elementary school-age children of different ethnic groups. Cross-sectional data were collected via observation of 288, 5- to 12-year-old school-age children. Three nurse clinicians used a 0-4 grade AN screening tool to rate…

  15. Helping Your Child Succeed in School, with Activities for Children Ages 5 through 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Office of Intergovernmental and Interagency Affairs.

    At the heart of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 is a promise to raise standards for all children and to help all children meet those standards. This booklet provides information that parents can use to help their child succeed in school. Following an introduction, the second section of the booklet, "The Basics," offers suggestions for parents…

  16. Accountability Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testani, Rocco E.; Mayes, Joshua A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the reversal of the dismissal of an "unfunded-mandates" challenge to the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) brought by the National Education Association (NEA), several of its affiliates, and a number of school districts by the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. The decision in "School District of the City of…

  17. Are seat belt restraints as effective in school age children as in adults? A prospective crash study

    PubMed Central

    Halman, Stephen I; Chipman, Mary; Parkin, Patricia C; Wright, James G

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study effectiveness of seat belts for protecting school age children in road vehicle crashes. Design Crash examinations by trained investigators. Setting Ten Canadian university based crash investigation centres. Subjects 470 children aged 4-14 years, with 168 selected for detailed analysis, and 1301 adults. Main outcomes measures Use of seat belts by vehicle occupants; severity of injury adjusted for age and crash severity. Results Overall, 40% (189/470) of children were unbelted. Of the 335 children in cars driven by belted adults, 73 (22%) were unbelted. The odds of sustaining fatal or moderately severe injury (injury severity score ⩾4) for children in the front passenger seat was more than nine times higher for unbelted children than for belted ones (odds ratio 9.8 (95% confidence interval 2.4 to 39.4)) and for those in the rear left seat was more than two times higher for unbelted than for belted children (2.6 (1.1 to 5.9)). The protection afforded by seat belts compared favourably with the results for adults in the same seat positions (odds ratios for unbelted v belted adults of 2.4 and 2.7 for front and rear seat passengers respectively). Conclusions Seat belts helped to protect school age children from injury in road vehicle crashes. However, 40% of children were unbelted. Despite standard seat belts being designed for adults, school age children were at least as well protected as adults. What is already known on this topicAlthough child restraints protect young children in road vehicle crashes, it is not known whether standard seat belts used by school age children work as wellSchool age children are often unbelted in carsWhat this study addsData from detailed crash assessments indicate that seat belts protected children at least as well as adultsAdults were more likely than children to be belted, and 22% of children travelling with belted drivers were unbelted PMID:12003883

  18. A school-aged child with delayed reading skills.

    PubMed

    Stein, M T; Zentall, S; Shaywitz, S E; Shaywitz, B A

    1999-10-01

    During a health supervision visit, the father of a 7.5-year-old African American second-grader asked about his son's progress in reading. He was concerned when, at a recent teacher-parent conference to review Darren's progress, the teacher remarked that Darren was not keeping up with reading skills compared with others in his class. She said that he had difficulty sounding out some words correctly. In addition, he could not recall words he had read the day before. The teacher commented that Darren was a gregarious, friendly child with better-than-average verbal communication skills. His achievement at math was age-appropriate; spelling, however, was difficult for Darren, with many deleted letters and reversals of written letters. A focused history did not reveal any risk factors for a learning problem in the prenatal or perinatal periods. Early motor, language, and social milestones were achieved on time. Darren had not experienced any head injury, loss of consciousness, or chronic medical illness. He had several friends, and his father denied any behavioral problems at home or at school. His teacher completed a DSM-IV-specific behavioral survey for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It did not show any evidence of ADHD. Darren's father completed 1 year of college and is currently the manager of a neighborhood convenience store. His mother had a high school education; she recalled that she found it difficult to complete assignments that required reading or writing. She is employed as a waitress. Darren does not have any siblings. The pediatrician performed a complete physical examination, the results of which were normal, including visual acuity, audiometry, and a neurological examination. It was noted that Darren seemed to pause several times in response to questions or commands. On two occasions, during finger-nose testing and a request to assess tandem gait, directions required repetition. Overall, he was pleasant and seemed to enjoy the visit. His

  19. Increasing Left and Right Brain Communication to Improve Learning for Tenth Grade Students in a Public School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory correlation research study was to determine if students who engaged in exercises designed to increase left and right brain hemisphere connections would score higher on identical tests than those who did not perform the exercises. Because the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act requires students to reach benchmarks of…

  20. Formal Reasoning Skills of Secondary School Students as Related to Gender, Age, School Type and Learning Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shemesh, Michal; Lazarowitz, Reuven

    This study investigated: (1) whether boys and girls master formal reasoning tasks to the same degree at the same age; (2) if the variance of boys' and girls' performance in formal tasks could be predicted by the same cognitive learning abilities; and (3) what are the main and interactional effects of age, sex, and school type on the variance of…

  1. Long Run Returns to Education: Does Schooling Lead to an Extended Old Age?

    PubMed Central

    van Kippersluis, Hans; O’Donnell, Owen; van Doorslaer, Eddy

    2011-01-01

    While there is no doubt that health is strongly correlated with education, whether schooling exerts a causal impact on health is not firmly established. We exploit a Dutch compulsory schooling law to estimate the causal effect of education on mortality. The reform provides a powerful instrument, significantly raising years of schooling, which, in turn, has a significant and robust negative effect on mortality. For men surviving to age 81, an extra year of schooling is estimated to reduce the probability of dying before the age of 89 by almost 3 percentage points relative to a baseline of 50 percent. PMID:21874068

  2. Aging Education for High School Students: Effectiveness According to the Mode of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalor, Janice Marie

    This paper discusses a study undertaken to analyze pre-and posttest scores of junior high and high school students involved in an aging education unit. Objectives were to determine whether a unit on aging helped students relate to aging as part of the life cycle and to assess the success of different modes of instruction (i.e. independent study,…

  3. High School Psychology: A Coming of Age Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Kenneth D.; Hammer, Elizabeth Yost; Blair-Broeker, Charles T.; Ernst, Randal M.

    2013-01-01

    Although institutional recognition of high school psychology is fairly recent, psychology and psychological subject matters have a history dating to at least the 1830s. By the middle of the twentieth century, high school psychology courses existed in nearly all U.S. states, and enrollments grew throughout the second half of the century. However,…

  4. Excess weight gain in elementary school-aged Hispanic children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current data was collected as part of a 6-year longitudinal study in which elementary schools from a southeast Texas school district were provided with resources to encourage children to make healthier choices. The objective of the current study was to evaluate children’s change in body mass ind...

  5. Keys to Quality in School-Age Child Care. Trainer's Guide for Using the Video and Viewer's Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Roberta L.

    Based on observations of hundreds of school-age child care programs across the nation and conversations with parents, children, and professionals in school-age care, this training guide is intended to help parents, caregivers, and interested citizens to develop quality school-age programs in their communities. The guide begins by summarizing an…

  6. Too Young to Leave the Nest: The Effects of School Starting Age. NBER Working Paper No. 13969

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

    2008-01-01

    Does it matter when a child starts school? While the popular press seems to suggest it does, there is limited evidence of a long-run effect of school starting age on student outcomes. This paper uses data on the population of Norway to examine the role of school starting age on longer-run outcomes such as IQ scores at age 18, educational…

  7. Academic achievement, employment, age and gender and students' experience of alternative school.

    PubMed

    Poyrazli, Senel; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Meister, Denise G; Forthun, Larry; Coatsworth, J Doug; Grahame, Kamini Maraj

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to explore associations between academic achievement, employment, gender, and age in relation to students' sense of school membership and perception of adults in school. The sample consisted of 102 secondary, alternative school students. Results indicated that students with a more positive perception of school personnel also reported a greater sense of school membership. Male students and older students had a more negative perception of administrators relative to female and younger students. In addition, students who worked tended to report higher grades than students who did not. Study implications are discussed. PMID:19086669

  8. Interactions of Short-Term and Chronic Treadmill Training With Aging of the Left Ventricle of the Heart.

    PubMed

    Walton, Richard D; Jones, Sandra A; Rostron, Kerry A; Kayani, Anna C; Close, Graeme L; McArdle, Anne; Lancaster, Matthew K

    2016-08-01

    With aging, there is a decline in cardiac function accompanying increasing risk of arrhythmias. These effects are likely to be mechanistically associated with age-associated changes in calcium regulation within cardiac myocytes. Previous studies suggest that lifelong exercise can potentially reduce age-associated changes in the heart. Although exercise itself is associated with changes in cardiac function, little is known about the interactions of aging and exercise with respect to myocyte calcium regulation. To investigate this, adult (12 months) and old (24 months) C57/Bl6 mice were trained using moderate-intensity treadmill running. In response to 10 weeks' training, comparable cardiac hypertrophic responses were observed, although aging independently associated with additional cardiac hypertrophy. Old animals also showed increased L- and T-type calcium channels, the sodium-calcium exchange, sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, and collagen (by 50%, 92%, 66%, 88%, and 113% respectively). Short-term exercise training increased D-type and T-type calcium channels in old animals only, whereas an increase in sodium-calcium exchange was seen only in adult animals. Long-term (12 months) training generally opposed the effects of aging. Significant hypertrophy remained in long-term trained old animals, but levels of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, sodium-calcium exchange, and collagen were not significantly different from those found in the adult trained animals. PMID:26248561

  9. Interactions of Short-Term and Chronic Treadmill Training With Aging of the Left Ventricle of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Richard D.; Jones, Sandra A.; Rostron, Kerry A.; Kayani, Anna C.; Close, Graeme L.; McArdle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    With aging, there is a decline in cardiac function accompanying increasing risk of arrhythmias. These effects are likely to be mechanistically associated with age-associated changes in calcium regulation within cardiac myocytes. Previous studies suggest that lifelong exercise can potentially reduce age-associated changes in the heart. Although exercise itself is associated with changes in cardiac function, little is known about the interactions of aging and exercise with respect to myocyte calcium regulation. To investigate this, adult (12 months) and old (24 months) C57/Bl6 mice were trained using moderate-intensity treadmill running. In response to 10 weeks’ training, comparable cardiac hypertrophic responses were observed, although aging independently associated with additional cardiac hypertrophy. Old animals also showed increased L- and T-type calcium channels, the sodium–calcium exchange, sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, and collagen (by 50%, 92%, 66%, 88%, and 113% respectively). Short-term exercise training increased D-type and T-type calcium channels in old animals only, whereas an increase in sodium–calcium exchange was seen only in adult animals. Long-term (12 months) training generally opposed the effects of aging. Significant hypertrophy remained in long-term trained old animals, but levels of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, sodium–calcium exchange, and collagen were not significantly different from those found in the adult trained animals. PMID:26248561

  10. The Left Hand Second to Fourth Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Does Not Discriminate World-Class Female Gymnasts from Age Matched Sedentary Girls

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Maarten W.; Claessens, Albrecht L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. Methods In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129), competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129), alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley) and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) using AN(C)OVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. Results Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020) did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018), either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p<0.01), weight (53.9±7.6 kg vs 46.2 6.3 kg p<0.01), BMI (20.51±2.41 kg/m2 vs 19.05±1.56 kg/m2), skeletal age (15.2±1.1 y vs 14.5±1.2 y p>0.01), somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01), mesomorphy (p<0.01) and ectomorphy (p<0.05) respectively) all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. Conclusion Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples

  11. Perinatal Factors Associated with Poor Neurocognitive Outcome in Early School Age Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Jennifer R.; Gustafson, Kathryn E.; Smith, P. Brian; Ellingsen, Kirsten M.; Tompkins, K. Brooke; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Cotten, C. Michael; Goldstein, Ricki F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determine predictors of neurocognitive outcome in early school age congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) survivors. Study design Prospective study of infants with CDH at Duke University Medical Center. Neurocognitive delay (NCD) at school age (4 to 7 years) was defined as a score < 80 in any of the following areas: Verbal Scale IQ, Performance Scale IQ, Expressive Language, or Receptive Language. Logistic regression, Fisher’s exact, and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to examine the relationship between NCD at early school age and 6 demographic and 18 medical variables. Results Of 43 infants with CDH, twenty seven (63%) survived to hospital discharge, and 16 (59%) returned for school age testing at a median age of 4.9 years. Seven (44%) of the children evaluated had NCD. Patch repair (p=0.01), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO; p=0.02), days on ECMO (p=0.01), days of mechanical ventilation (p=0.049), and post-operative use of inhaled nitric oxide (p=0.02) were found to be associated with NCD at early school age. Conclusions CDH survivors are at risk for neurocognitive delay persisting into school age. Perinatal factors such as patch repair and ECMO treatment may aid in identifying CDH survivors at high risk for continued learning difficulties throughout childhood. PMID:23583126

  12. Dreams Deferred: A Qualitative Study of Latino Youth Who Left High School Prior to Obtaining a Diploma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnet, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Each fall, approximately one million children enter the ninth grade with little prospect of completing high school. Of the 1.1 million students projected to leave school without a diploma for the 2012 school year, a staggering 27 percent (approximately 310,000) will be of Latino descent (Alliance for Excellent Education, 2012). The purpose of this…

  13. Using Fuzzy Logic to Identify Schools Which May Be Misclassified by the No Child Left Behind Adequate Yearly Progress Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    This investigation developed, tested, and prototyped a Fuzzy Inference System (FIS) that would assist decision makers in identifying schools that may have been misclassified by existing Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) methods. This prototype was then used to evaluate Louisiana elementary schools using published school data for Academic Year 2004. …

  14. Aging: ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb+ uptake rate and responsiveness to digoxin in rat left atrial muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.H.; Seifen, E.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work in anesthetized rats has demonstrated that the sensitivity to cardiotoxic actions of cardiotonic steroids is increased in senescence, and studies in crude homogenates and partially purified membrane preparations have suggested that this altered responsiveness is related to an aging-associated reduction in the sarcolemmal content of Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase. This decrease in Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase could enhance the sensitivity to digitalis-like compounds by reducing the reserve capacity of the Na+-pump and thus the extent of digitalis-induced pump inhibition required before the onset of toxicity. Current experiments examined dose-dependent actions of digoxin in atrial muscle isolated from 3-, 12- and 24- to 25-month-old rats and determined if alterations in responsiveness correlated with changes in ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake rate, an estimate of Na+-pump activity. Atrial preparations from aged rats were more sensitive to the cardiotoxic actions of digoxin; however, the inotropic efficacy before the onset of toxicity was not affected by age. Both 1) the maximum attainable ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake rate and 2) the difference between maximum uptake rate and that monitored in preparations stimulated at 4.0 Hz decreased progressively with age. These results indicate that atrial muscle from aged rats is more sensitive to direct toxic effects of digoxin and suggest that this lower tolerance is mediated, at least in part, by a reduction in Na+-pump reserve capacity.

  15. Dyslipidemia in Overweight and Obese School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Finn, Pamela

    2015-09-01

    Dyslipidemia often affects overweight and obese adolescents and can be present along with hypertension, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. This article is the third of six discussing the comorbidities of childhood obesity and will focus on the individual parts of the lipid profile and the impact of dyslipidemia on the heart and other body systems. Since few pharmacologic therapies are approved to treat dyslipidemia in children and adolescents younger than 18, treatment consists of lifestyle changes that can be supported and modeled by the school nurse. The school nurse can also be an advocate for a healthy lifestyle in the school district and community. More success in the treatment of dyslipidemia will be realized with less attention to changing the individual and more attention to changing the wider populations, including schools and the community. PMID:26219905

  16. Preschool and school age children under welfare reform.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, S M; Kerker, B D

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the behavioral and school problems of young children whose mothers participated in two different income support programs, Jobs First and AFDC. The analyses also included measures of maternal education, maternal health, maternal psychological factors, and family environment. There were no differences in child school or behavioral problems across the income support programs. Children, however, were more likely to have school problems if they were older or if their mothers received less than a high school education, reported child behavioral problems or made criteria for depression on the CIDI. Behavioral problems were more likely to occur if mothers reported violence in the home, many depressive symptoms on the CES-D, few child positive qualities, or if the child had repeated a grade. Several familial factors, then, must be addressed in order to ensure that children excel both academically and behaviorally. PMID:11758877

  17. Developmental and Psycho-Social Effects of HIV in School-Aged Population: Educational Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beverly, Cheryl L.; Thomas, Suzanne B.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the developmental and psychosocial characteristics of the increasing number of school-aged persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Educational ramifications of these characteristics and strategies for providing safe teaching and learning environments are presented. (DB)

  18. Does the School Performance Variable Used in the International Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) Study Reflect Students' School Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder-Puig, Rosemarie; Griebler, Robert; Samdal, Oddrun; King, Matthew A.; Freeman, John; Duer, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Given the pressure that educators and policy makers are under to achieve academic standards for students, understanding the relationship of academic success to various aspects of health is important. The international Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) questionnaire, being used in 41 countries with different school and…

  19. Malaria in school-age children in Africa: an increasingly important challenge

    PubMed Central

    Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Brooker, Simon J; Clarke, Sian E; Fernando, Deepika; Gitonga, Caroline W; Schellenberg, David; Greenwood, Brian

    2014-01-01

    School-age children have attracted relatively little attention as a group in need of special measures to protect them against malaria. However, increasing success in lowering the level of malaria transmission in many previously highly endemic areas will result in children acquiring immunity to malaria later in life than has been the case in the past. Thus, it can be anticipated that in the coming years there will be an increase in the incidence of both uncomplicated and severe malaria in school-age children in many previously highly endemic areas. In this review, which focuses primarily on Africa, recent data on the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and on the incidence of clinical malaria in African school-age children are presented and evidence that malaria adversely effects school performance is reviewed. Long-lasting insecticide treated bednets (LLIN) are an effective method of malaria control but several studies have shown that school-age children use LLINs less frequently than other population groups. Antimalarial drugs are being used in different ways to control malaria in school-age children including screening and treatment and intermittent preventive treatment. Some studies of chemoprevention in school-age children have shown reductions in anaemia and improved school performance but this has not been the case in all trials and more research is needed to identify the situations in which chemoprevention is likely to be most effective and, in these situations, which type of intervention should be used. In the longer term, malaria vaccines may have an important role in protecting this important section of the community from malaria. Regardless of the control approach selected, it is important this is incorporated into the overall programme of measures being undertaken to enhance the health of African school-age children. PMID:25145389

  20. The Design and Implementation of a Summer Care Program for School Age Children of Working Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpini, Joyce

    An elementary school administrator designed and implemented a 12-week summer program for school-age children that provided educational, recreational, and cultural opportunities. Each week of activities centered on a specific theme. Recreational opportunities included sports activities, outdoor games, organized indoor games, free play, swimming,…

  1. Age, Gender and Job Satisfaction among Elementary School Head Teachers in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghazi, Safdar Rehman; Maringe, Felix

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore general job satisfaction of elementary school head teachers in Pakistan with respect to their age and gender. One hundred and eighty head teachers were sampled from government elementary schools of Toba Tek Singh, Punjab, Pakistan, to collect the relevant data using a modified version of the Minnesota…

  2. Pilot Testing "Okay with Asthma"[TM]: An Online Asthma Intervention for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tami H.; Hauenstein, Emily J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is the leading cause of missed school days despite advancements in asthma treatment. This may be, in part, due to a lack of understanding about asthma. "Okay With Asthma"[TM], an online story with psychosocial management strategies for school-age children, was pilot tested to measure its effect on asthma knowledge and attitude. The online…

  3. Variations in Students' School- and Teacher-Related Attitudes across Gender, Ethnicity, and Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Jeremy R.; Riccio, Cynthia A.; Reynolds, Cecil R.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined differences across gender, ethnicity, and age with regard to the nature of participants' self-reported attitudes toward school and teachers, based on previous research suggesting that students' school- and teacher-related attitudes appear to have an influence on academic achievement. This study employed an archival…

  4. Teacher Views about the Starting Age of the First Grade Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ari, Asim

    2014-01-01

    This research critically investigated the implementation in Turkey of starting elementary-school first grade at age 5 (60 months) according to teacher feedback. While the study is designed as qualitative, a kind of single case study approach is used with a group of 50 volunteer first-grade teachers serving in 15 elementary schools in the Eskisehir…

  5. Anxiety in Elementary School-Aged Students: A Growing Need for Interventions by Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Carla-Dyann

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety symptoms expressed by elementary school-aged students was a problem in an elementary school south of Atlanta, Georgia. These behaviors were negatively impacting the performance and behaviors of fourth and fifth grade students in and out of the educational environment. The purpose of this study was to determine if teaching anxiety reduction…

  6. Adventures in Peacemaking: A Conflict Resolution Activity Guide for School-Age Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreidler, William J.; Furlong, Lisa

    This guide includes hundreds of hands-on, engaging activities designed to meet the unique needs of after-school programs, camps, and recreation centers. The activities teach the skills of creative conflict resolution to school-age children through games, cooperative team challenges, drama, crafts, music, and cooking. It includes easy-to-implement…

  7. Youth as Design Partners: Age-Appropriate Websites for Middle and High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Anthony S.; Smith, Kathelene McCarty; Sun, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the impact of using best practices identified in previous studies in designing age-appropriate websites for middle and high school youth. Utilizing a mixed-method approach, 31 middle and 22 high school youth took part in six focus groups across four states. Participants were introduced to a website specifically designed for…

  8. Catching the Age Wave: Building Schools with Senior Citizens in Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kevin J.

    Examining the trend toward an older U.S. population, this paper discusses why educators and school facility planners should consider designing multipurpose schools that specifically contribute to stronger intergenerational links. Reasons include: ending age segregation, enriching the lives of children and seniors, creating support for public…

  9. Physical Fitness, Academic Achievement, and Socioeconomic Status in School-Aged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Dawn P.; Peterson, Thomas; Blair, Cheryl; Schutten, Mary C.; Peddie, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study examined the association between physical fitness and academic achievement and determined the influence of socioeconomic status (SES) on the association between fitness and academic achievement in school-aged youth. Methods: Overall, 1,701 third-, sixth-, and ninth-grade students from 5 school districts participated in the…

  10. Factors Associated with Screen Time among School-Age Children in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Ok Kyung; Sung, Kyung Mi; Kim, Hee Kyung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics with screen time among school-age children in Korea. This study employed a nonexperimental, cross-sectional study design. A total of 370 children attending four elementary schools participated in the study. Self-report…

  11. Helping Students Cope in an Age of Terrorism: Strategies for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chibbaro, Julia S.; Jackson, C. Marie

    2006-01-01

    School counselors experience unique challenges as they struggle to provide students with coping skills geared to the outside world including acts of terrorism. School-aged students in the United States are one of the most vulnerable populations in the event of a terrorist act. This article offers a review of the current and most relevant…

  12. A Longitudinal Analysis of Sex Differences in Math and Spatial Skills in Primary School Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachance, Jennifer A.; Mazzocco, Michele M. M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a longitudinal study designed to assess possible sex differences in math achievement, math ability, and math-related tasks during the primary school age years. Participants included over 200 children from one public school district. Annual assessments included measures of math ability, math calculation achievement scores, rapid naming…

  13. Childhood Fears, Neurobehavioral Functioning and Behavior Problems in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushnir, Jonathan; Sadeh, Avi

    2010-01-01

    The objective is to examine underlying associations between childhood fears, behavior problems and neurobehavioral functioning (NBF) in school-age children. Healthy, regular school children (N = 135), from second, fourth and sixth grade classes were assessed. Data regarding children's fears and behavioral problems were obtained with the Revised…

  14. Effects of Age, Gender and Educational Background on Strength of Motivation for Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusurkar, Rashmi; Kruitwagen, Cas; ten Cate, Olle; Croiset, Gerda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of selection, educational background, age and gender on strength of motivation to attend and pursue medical school. Graduate entry (GE) medical students (having Bachelor's degree in Life Sciences or related field) and Non-Graduate Entry (NGE) medical students (having only completed high school),…

  15. The Effects of Age at Arrival and Enclave Schools on the Academic Performance of Immigrant Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Kalena E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between age at arrival and immigrant-receiving high schools (i.e., enclave schools) on the academic performance of first- and second-generation immigrant children using data from the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS). The CILS survey was conducted in two major immigrant-receiving cities in the…

  16. Increased BOLD activation in the left parahippocampal cortex after 1 year of medical school: an association with cumulative verbal memory learning.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Michaël; Gauvreau, Claudie; Theriault, Denis; Madrolle, Stéphanie; Lepage, Jean-François; Whittingstall, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Although several studies have shown left-right hippocampus asymmetry during learning, it is unclear whether such asymmetry also exists for the parahippocampal cortex, a structure within the limbic system that is also involved in memory and learning. Using a common mental navigation task known to activate the bilateral parahippocampal cortex, this study aimed at determining how BOLD activation in these two areas changes after 1 year of medical school, a program characterized by intensive verbal learning. Fifteen first-year medical students participated in this study and underwent two sessions of functional MRI, at a 1-year interval. In the first session, we observed marginal differences between left and right parahippocampal cortex activity. However, 1 year later, left parahippocampal activation significantly increased (+4.7%), whereas the right remained stable. These results bring new information as to how intensive learning can modify regional metabolism in the human brain and how the left parahippocampal region is particularly important for cumulative verbal memory. PMID:26606418

  17. Do I turn left or right? Effects of sex, age, experience and exit route on maze test performance in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Damien S; Hazel, Susan J; Kind, Karen L; Liu, Hong; Marini, Danila; Owens, Julie A; Pitcher, Julia B; Gatford, Kathryn L

    2015-02-01

    Brain development and function are susceptible to perturbation by environmental factors. Sheep are increasingly being used as a neurodevelopmental model due to timing similarities with humans, but effects of age, experience and sex on cognition are not well characterised in this species. We therefore studied memory and reversal learning in sheep using a modified Y-maze at two ages: naive 18 weeks old (18N: 23 male, 17 female), experienced 40 week old sheep that had previously been tested at 18 weeks (40E: 22 male, 17 female), and naive 40 weeks old (40N: 4 male, 10 female). Younger naive animals (18N) required more trials and time to solve the first reversal task (task R1) than 40E (P=0.007 and P<0.001 respectively). Experience also improved outcomes, with 40N sheep requiring more time to solve tasks L (P=0.034) and R1 (P=0.002) than 40E. Increasing age (40N cf. 18N) decreased bleat frequency in tasks R1, M2 and R2 (each P<0.05). In 40N females, outcomes also differed by exit method in task R1, with those that exited via an indirect route taking less time to pass tasks R1 (P=0.009) and R2 (P=0.015) than those that used a direct route. Age plus experience improved learning outcomes, demonstrating knowledge retention for 22 weeks in this species, whilst age alone affected mostly behavioral responses. These results provide comparison data, and can be utilised to improve experimental design, for studies of neurodevelopment in the sheep. PMID:25449405

  18. School Quality and the Development of Cognitive Skills between Age Four and Six

    PubMed Central

    Borghans, Lex; Golsteyn, Bart H. H.; Zölitz, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the extent to which young children develop their cognitive ability in high and low quality schools. We use a representative panel data set containing cognitive test scores of 4-6 year olds in Dutch schools. School quality is measured by the school’s average achievement test score at age 12. Our results indicate that children in high-quality schools develop their skills substantially faster than those in low-quality schools. The results remain robust to the inclusion of initial ability, parental background, and neighborhood controls. Moreover, using proximity to higher-achieving schools as an instrument for school choice corroborates the results. The robustness of the results points toward a causal interpretation, although it is not possible to erase all doubt about unobserved confounding factors. PMID:26182123

  19. Effects of Age and Schooling on Intellectual Performance: Estimates Obtained from Analysis of Continuous Variation in Age and Length of Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliffordson, Christina; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    2008-01-01

    The effects of age and schooling on different aspects of intellectual performance, taking track of study into account, are investigated. The analyses were based on military enlistment test scores, obtained by 48,269 males, measuring Fluid ability (Gf), Crystallized intelligence (Gc), and General visualization (Gv) ability. A regression method,…

  20. Do motor skills in infancy and early childhood predict anxious and depressive symptomatology at school age?

    PubMed

    Piek, Jan P; Barrett, Nicholas C; Smith, Leigh M; Rigoli, Daniela; Gasson, Natalie

    2010-10-01

    Research has identified a relationship between social-emotional problems and motor impairment in both pre-school and school-age children. The aim of the current study was to determine how motor performance in infancy and early childhood is related to levels of anxious and depressive symptomatology at age 6-12 years. Fifty participants were assessed by their parents 11 times between the ages of 4 months and 4 years using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ), and once between the age of 6 and 12 years using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). The ASQ scores were used to obtain the stability (variance) of fine and gross motor performance. Once gestational age, sex and age of testing were taken into account, the stability of gross motor scores predicted both the anxiety/depression measure and the anxious score from the CBCL. It appears that how variable a young child's gross motor development is from 4 months to 4 years predicts the level of anxious/depressive symptoms at school age. These findings may assist in the early identification of children at risk of anxiety disorders and depression at school age. PMID:20650535

  1. Visual Development and Neuropsychological Profile in Preterm Children from 6 Months to School Age.

    PubMed

    Sayeur, Mélissa Sue; Vannasing, Phetsamone; Tremblay, Emmanuel; Lepore, Franco; McKerral, Michelle; Lassonde, Maryse; Gallagher, Anne

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this semilongitudinal study was to investigate the development of central visual pathways in children born preterm but without major neurologic impairments and to establish their cognitive and behavioral profile at school age. Ten children born preterm were assessed at 6 months and at school age, using visual evoked potentials at both time points and cognitive and behavioral tests at school age. We also tested 10 age-matched children born full-term. At 6 months' corrected age, we found no significant differences between preterm and full-term groups for either amplitude or latency of N1 and P1 components. At school age, the preterm group manifested significantly higher N1 amplitudes and tended to show higher P1 amplitudes than the full-term group. We found no significant differences in cognitive and behavioral measures at school age. These results suggest that preterm birth affects visual pathways development, yet the children born preterm did not manifest cognitive problems. PMID:25414236

  2. On the Negative Attitude towards Left-Handedness of Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makashvili, Malkhaz; Taliashvili, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    Present study was aimed to determine the reasons behind negative attitude of some teachers to the left-handed writing of their pupils. Total of 745 primary school teachers of both sexes, mean age 34, Caucasians, citizens of the Republic Georgia, served as respondents in the study presented. Teachers were requested to answer in writing the…

  3. "I Wish Kids Didn't Watch So Much TV": Out-of-School Time in Three Low Income Communities. School-Age Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Beth M.; And Others

    Research suggests that how children spend their out-of-school hours can significantly affect their social development and school success. The Out-of-School Time Study, conducted by the School-Age Child Care Project at the Wellesley College Center for Research on Women, investigated how young low-income children in three urban communities spent…

  4. Handwriting, Visuomotor Integration, and Neurological Condition at School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoorn, Jessika F.; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; Peters, Lieke H. J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study investigated the relationships between handwriting, visuomotor integration, and neurological condition. We paid particular attention to the presence of minor neurological dysfunction (MND). Method : Participants were 200 children (131 males, 69 females; age range 8-13y) of whom 118 received mainstream education (mean age 10y 5mo, SD…

  5. [Food and nutrition knowledge of school-age children's mothers from elementary and high school from different socioeconomic levels].

    PubMed

    Ivanovic, D; Castro, C G; Ivanovic, R

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the degree of knowledge on food and nutrition of school-age children's mothers from Chile's Metropolitan Region and to measure the impact of socioeconomic, sociocultural and demographic variables on knowledge. A representative and proportional sample of 4,509 school-age children was chosen from Chile's Metropolitan Region and the degree of knowledge on food and nutrition on mothers of 1,985 of them was determined. The sample was stratified according to grade (I, II, IV, VI, VIII elementary school grades and I and IV high school grades), sex, type of school and geographic area. Socioeconomic status (SES) was determined through Graffar's modified method. The degree of knowledge on food and nutrition was assessed by a test based on the specific objectives pursued by the elementary school curriculum programs of the Ministry of Education and submitted to adequate statistical proofs for its content validity and reliability. Mother's schooling level mean was 9.7 +/- 4.0 y. The field study was carried out on 1986-1987. Statistical procedures included analysis of variance, Student "t" test for comparison of the means, correlation and regression. Results revealed that mothers did not know food and nutrition matters in fundamental aspects related to the observance of a healthy lifestyle, both, for themselves and their family. The degree of knowledge of food and nutrition significantly and positively correlated with SES, mother's schooling and occupation level, housing conditions (quality and sanitation) and age, and significantly and inversely correlated with the number of sons and crowding, besides of being significantly higher in urban than rural mothers. Mother's schooling level and geographic area were the independent variables with the greatest explanatory power in the food and nutrition knowledge variance (r2 = 0.1723), but mother's schooling level explains 93.2% of the explained variance. Results suggest the need to

  6. Age- and schooling-related effects on executive functions in young children: a natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Marie S; Ponitz, Claire Cameron; McCready, Elizabeth A; Shah, Priti; Sims, Brian C; Jewkes, Abigail M; Morrison, Frederick J

    2008-11-01

    We employed a cutoff design in order to examine age- and schooling-related effects on executive functions. Specifically, we looked at development of working memory and response inhibition over the period of 1 school year in prekindergarten and kindergarten students born within 4 months of each other. All children improved on executive function and word-decoding tasks from the beginning to the end of the year. Additionally, we found prekindergarten- and kindergarten-schooling effects for the working memory and word-decoding tasks (p < .05), and a trend-level prekindergarten-schooling effect for the response inhibition task (p < .10). PMID:18982508

  7. Computers and Children of Primary School Age: Issues and Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siann, Gerda; Macleod, Hamish

    1986-01-01

    Results of a study of disadvantaged primary school children which focused on effects of exposure to Logo, microcomputer social interaction, and children's expressed interest in computers, are discussed in context of relevant literature. It is concluded computer literacy should be primary goal at this level and computer equity is crucial. (MBR)

  8. School Subject Preferences: Age and Gender Differences Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colley, Ann; Comber, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Presents a study that focused on the school subject preferences of 11-12 year old girls (n=144) and boys (n=218) and 15-16 year old girls (n=269) and boys (n=300). Reports that there are gender differences in subject preference, while more traditional subjects were favored. (CMK)

  9. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related…

  10. EDUCATIONAL AND MEDICAL SERVICES TO SCHOOL-AGE EXPECTANT MOTHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles City Schools, CA.

    AN INTERAGENCY PROGRAM FOR UNWED PREGNANT TEENAGERS IN THE LOS ANGELES PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICT IS EVALUATED IN THIS REPORT. FUNDED UNDER TITLE I OF THE ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION ACT, THE PROGRAM IS CONDUCTED IN OR ADJACENT TO SIX LOS ANGELES DISTRICT HEALTH CENTERS. IN ADDITION TO REGULAR MEDICAL AND INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL, THE PROGRAM'S…

  11. Day School Israel Education in the Age of Birthright

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomson, Alex; Deitcher, Howard

    2010-01-01

    What are North American Jewish day schools doing when they engage in Israel education, what shapes their practices, and to what ends? In this article, we report on a multi-method study inspired by these questions. Our account is organized around an analytical model that helps distinguish between what we call the vehicles, intensifiers, and…

  12. Epilepsy in School-Aged Children: More than Just Seizures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Colin; Ballantine, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder in childhood and can have a significant impact on a child's schooling. Children with epilepsy may have special educational needs due to having learning disability, specific learning difficulties, specific cognitive deficits or having symptoms associated with ASD, ADHD, depression or anxiety. These…

  13. Behavior Correlates of Rorschach Response in School Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Frances G.

    Teachers in a private special education school for students with learning and/or adjustment difficulties completed Bristol Social Adjustment Guides (BSAGs), an observation scale for identifying maladaptive classroom behaviors, for 157 students (7-21 years old). Rorschachs were administered to the same group of students. Data from each test were…

  14. Assessment of Abdominal Pain in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Polly Gerber

    2003-01-01

    Pediatric abdominal pain can be a difficult condition to accurately assess for the nurse to determine whether the child's need is for teaching, treating, or transferring. This article describes the process as well as practical tips to be used by the nurse in the school setting. Distinguishing characteristics and findings, including key physical…

  15. School-Age Pregnancy: Why Hasn't Prevention Worked?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Males, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Neither sexuality education nor abstinence programs have reduced adolescent pregnancy or sexually transmitted disease. The article presents recent data, explains why prevention does not work, and describes crucial factors that school and community prevention programs fail to incorporate (adult-teen intercourse, teen-teen intercourse, adult…

  16. Generations at School: Building an Age-Friendly Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovely, Suzette; Buffum, Austin G.; Barth, Roland S.

    2007-01-01

    Today's workforce comprises distinct generational cohorts-Veterans, Baby Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millennials. "Generations at School" provides educators with the knowledge and tools to create and sustain true collaboration, teamwork, and consensus. Suzette Lovely and Austin G. Buffum introduce the traits and tipping points of these diverse age…

  17. School Finance Systems: Aging Structures in Need of Renovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan; Clune, William H.

    1998-01-01

    Traditional school-finance systems need dramatic change to make them more supportive of the goals and strategies of standards. The shortcomings of current structures are reviewed, and suggestions are provided for changing finance structures, including a shift from fiscal equity toward educational adequacy. Elements to enhance a new system are…

  18. Generations at School: Building an Age-Friendly Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovely, Suzette

    2010-01-01

    In schools around the country, Gen Xers, Millennials, Baby Boomers, and even a Veteran or two are working side by side. While anyone holding a job in this shaky economy is grateful, gratitude does not make generational clashes less difficult. Adding to the mix, many Baby Boomers initially poised for a mass exodus by 2010 are holding on for dear…

  19. Schooling, Literacies and Biopolitics in the Global Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Ross; Apple, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines how particular dynamics of globalization, including pressures to restructure economies for informational labor, shape and are shaped by processes of public schooling and the development of diverse literacies (understood here as the control of certain forms of life). More specifically, this article analyzes how, in an era of…

  20. Sleep and television and computer habits of Swedish school-age children.

    PubMed

    Garmy, Pernilla; Nyberg, Per; Jakobsson, Ulf

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sleep, television and computer habits and enjoyment and feelings of tiredness in school of school-age children and adolescents in Sweden. An instrument found to be valid and reliable here was distributed to 3,011 children aged 6, 7, 10, 14, and 16 years. Those sleeping less than the median length of time reported a significantly lower degree of enjoyment of school. Short sleep was found to be associated with having a bedroom TV, spending more than 2 hr a day at the TV or the computer, being tired in school, and having difficulties both in waking up and in sleeping. Discussing sleep and media habits with schoolchildren and their parents regarding matters of optimal sleep and of how media habits affect sleep and learning is seen to be an important task of the school health service. PMID:22472633

  1. Working Memory in Early-School-Age Children with Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cui, Jifang; Gao, Dingguo; Chen, Yinghe; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Ya

    2010-01-01

    Using a battery of working memory span tasks and n-back tasks, this study aimed to explore working memory functions in early-school-age children with Asperger's syndrome (AS). Twelve children with AS and 29 healthy children matched on age and IQ were recruited. Results showed: (a) children with AS performed better in digit and word recall tasks,…

  2. School Effects and Ethnic, Gender and Socio-Economic Gaps in Educational Achievement at Age 11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Steve

    2014-01-01

    There are long-standing achievement gaps in England associated with socio-economic status (SES), ethnicity and gender, but relatively little research has evaluated interactions between these variables or explored school effects on such gaps. This paper analyses the national test results at age 7 and age 11 of 2,836 pupils attending 68 mainstream…

  3. Aging at the University of Minnesota's School of Social Work: Historiography of Gerontological Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moone, Rajean P.

    2007-01-01

    With the dramatic shift in the population as the baby boom generation ages, education in gerontology is becoming an important component in schools of social work. Historically, gerontology has not been important in social work programs. This historical analysis examined the incorporation of aging related courses at the University of Minnesota's…

  4. Can Mild Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss Affect Developmental Abilities in Younger School-Age Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ðokovic, Sanja; Gligorovic, Milica; Ostojic, Sanja; Dimic, Nadežda; Radic-Šestic, Marina; Slavnic, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    The research study was conducted for the purpose of examining the influence of mild bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (MBSNHL) on developmental abilities of younger school-age children. The sample encompassed 144 children with MBSNHL, aged 7.5-11 (M = 8.85). MBSNHL (20-40 dB HL) was identified by pure tone audiometry. The control group…

  5. Narrative Skill and Syntactic Complexity in School-Age Children with and without Late Language Emergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domsch, Celeste; Richels, Corrin; Saldana, Michelle; Coleman, Cardin; Wimberly, Clayton; Maxwell, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children who do not produce single words by the expected age have been described as "late talkers" or as demonstrating "late language emergence" (LLE). Although their short-term growth in vocabulary is often strong, longer-term consequences of LLE remain in dispute. It has been argued that the majority of school-age children who had…

  6. Speech Disruptions in the Sentence Formulation of School-Age Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finneran, Denise A.; Leonard, Laurence B.; Miller, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many school-age children with specific language impairment produce sentences that appear to conform to the adult grammar. It may be premature to conclude from this, however, that their language formulation ability is age appropriate. Aims: To determine whether a more subtle measure of language use, speech disruptions during sentence…

  7. The Relative Effects of Chronological Age on Hispanic Students' School Readiness and Grade 2 Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlong, Michael; Quirk, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relations of age, preschool experience, and gender with children's school readiness levels at kindergarten entry. The sample included 5,512 children of predominantly Hispanic heritage and from families experiencing low socioeconomic circumstances. A series of between-subjects ANOVAs indicated that age ("Eta"[superscript 2]…

  8. Classroom Age Composition and Rates of Change in School Readiness for Children Enrolled in Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Elizabeth R.; Greenfield, Daryl B.; Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite policy and theoretical support for mixed-age classrooms in early childhood, research examining associations between age-mixing and children's outcomes is inconclusive and warrants further investigation, particularly in preschools serving children who are at risk for poor adjustment to formal schooling. One recent study conducted in…

  9. Sleep Patterns of School-Age Children with Asperger Syndrome or High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allik, Hiie; Larsson, Jan-Olov; Smedje, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Sleep patterns of 32 school-age children with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high-functioning autism (HFA) were compared to those of 32 typically developing age- and gender-matched children, using parent survey and one week of diary and actigraphic monitoring. Parents of children with AS/HFA more commonly reported that their children had difficulty…

  10. Syllable-Timed Speech Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Cheryl; O'Brian, Sue; Harrison, Elisabeth; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This clinical trial determined the outcomes of a simple syllable-timed speech (STS) treatment for school-age children who stutter. Method: Participants were 10 children, ages 6-11 years, who stutter. Treatment involved training the children and their parents to use STS at near normal speech rates. The technique was practiced in the clinic…

  11. The Effect of Age on Acquisition of a Second Language for School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Virginia P.

    Research on second language learning suggests that age or age-related factors are a major variable in the acquisition of a second language for school. In the early stages of acquisition, older students are faster and more efficient learners, with the advantage of more advanced cognitive development in the first language. This early advantage…

  12. A Twin-Study of Sleep Difficulties in School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Alice M.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling V.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines frequency, overlap, and genetic and environmental influences on sleep difficulties, which are understudied in school-aged children. The Sleep Self Report and the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire were completed by 300 twin pairs (aged 8 years) and their parents. Child report suggested more frequent sleep problems than…

  13. Real-Time Language Processing in School-Age Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, James W.

    2006-01-01

    Background:School-age children with specific language impairment (SLI) exhibit slower real-time (i.e. immediate) language processing relative to same-age peers and younger, language-matched peers. Results of the few studies that have been done seem to indicate that the slower language processing of children with SLI is due to inefficient…

  14. Suicide Ideation and Social Desirability among School-Aged Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miotto, P.; Preti, A.

    2008-01-01

    A mixed male-female sample of 950 school-aged adolescents, corresponding to 10% of the young population aged 15-19 living in a rural district of Northeast Italy, was investigated with self-reported questionnaires about the links between social desirability and suicide ideation. On the whole 30.6% of females and 23.9% of males reported suicidal…

  15. The British Conservative Government and the Raising of the School Leaving Age, 1959-1964

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Gary; Cowan, Steven; Woodin, Tom

    2012-01-01

    This paper establishes and explains the important role of the Conservative Government of 1959-1964 in supporting the raising of the school leaving age in Britain from the age of 15 to 16. This was a significant and high-profile national issue that generated much educational, social and political debate around conflicting priorities during this…

  16. Cohesive Adequacy in the Narrative Samples of School-Age Children Who Use African American English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton-Ikard, RaMonda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the type and adequacy of cohesive devices that are produced by school-age children who use African American English (AAE). Method: The language samples of 33 African American children, ages 7, 9, and 11 years, were transcribed, analyzed, and coded for AAE use and cohesive adequacy (e.g., personal reference,…

  17. School-Age Children Talk about Chess: Does Knowledge Drive Syntactic Complexity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nippold, Marilyn A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined language productivity and syntactic complexity in school-age children in relation to their knowledge of the topic of discussion--the game of chess. Method: Children (N = 32; mean age = 10;11 [years;months]) who played chess volunteered to be interviewed by an adult examiner who had little or no experience playing…

  18. A Brief Screening Battery for Predicting School Achievement at Ages Seven and Nine Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Robert; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The Beery-Butkenica Developmental Test and the Caldwell Test were the best predictors. Combining the academic performance with visual-motor integration results at age seven years yielded 89 percent accuracy of prediction at age nine years. The false-positive rate represents the problem of mislabeling children as school failures. (Author)

  19. Mood Symptoms and Emotional Responsiveness to Threat in School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borelli, Jessica L.; Sbarra, David A.; Crowley, Michael J.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical accounts of depression underscore its relation to negative emotional experiences; yet few empirical studies examine emotional experiences in adults with depression, with even less work on depression and emotion in children. Using a nonclinical sample of school-aged children (n = 89) ages 8 to 12, this study evaluated whether greater mood…

  20. Urban Neighbourhood Quality and School Leaving Age: Gender Differences and Some Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flouri, Eirini; Ereky-Stevens, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    This study used longitudinal data from the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) to examine the role of neighbourhood quality, assessed when cohort members were aged five, in boys' and girls' school leaving age. It was expected that, since context is in general more strongly predictive of boys' rather than girls' behaviour, neighbourhood quality would…

  1. School-Age Children of Fathers with Substance Use Disorder: Are They a High Risk Population?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peleg-Oren, Neta; Rahav, Giora; Teichman, Meir

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the association between parental substance use and the increased risk among school-age children to developing psychosocial problems. Data were collected from 148 children aged 8-11 from urban areas in Israel. The following variables were assessed by four self-report questionnaires administered to the children: …

  2. Speech and Articulatory Rates of School-Age Children in Conversation and Narrative Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturm, Jennifer A.; Seery, Carol H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study provides preliminary reference data for speech and articulatory rates of school-age children in conversational and narrative speaking contexts. Method: Participants included 36 typically developing children in 3 groups of 12 participants at ages 7, 9, and 11 years. Conversational and narrative speech rates were measured in…

  3. Speaking Rate Characteristics of Elementary-School-Aged Children Who Do and Do Not Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Kenneth J.; Byrd, Courtney T.; Mazzocchi, Elizabeth M.; Gillam, Ronald B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare articulation and speech rates of school-aged children who do and do not stutter across sentence priming, structured conversation, and narration tasks and to determine factors that predict children's speech and articulation rates. Method: 34 children who stutter (CWS) and 34 age- and gender-matched children who do not stutter…

  4. The Last Thing We Have Left: A Single-Case Study of a Small, Rural, Mill-Town School Closing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallenbeck, Amy Talitha

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative, single-case study explored the closing of a small, rural, historic, mill-town school in the southeastern United States and why people were upset with the closing of the school. Through the responses of 12 purposefully selected participants, the study focused on attitudes, perceptions, and values of students and parents, school…

  5. No Child Left Bilingual: Accountability and the Elimination of Bilingual Education Programs in New York City Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menken, Kate; Solorza, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Although educational policies for emergent bilinguals in New York City schools have historically supported the provision of bilingual education, the past decade has borne witness to a dramatic loss of bilingual education programs in city schools. This study examines the factors that determine language education policies adopted by school…

  6. Target-distractor similarity has a larger impact on visual search in school-age children than spacing.

    PubMed

    Huurneman, Bianca; Boonstra, F Nienke

    2015-01-01

    In typically developing children, crowding decreases with increasing age. The influence of target-distractor similarity with respect to orientation and element spacing on visual search performance was investigated in 29 school-age children with normal vision (4- to 6-year-olds [N = 16], 7- to 8-year-olds [N = 13]). Children were instructed to search for a target E among distractor Es (feature search: all flanking Es pointing right; conjunction search: flankers in three orientations). Orientation of the target was manipulated in four directions: right (target absent), left (inversed), up, and down (vertical). Spacing was varied in four steps: 0.04°, 0.5°, 1°, and 2°. During feature search, high target-distractor similarity had a stronger impact on performance than spacing: Orientation affected accuracy until spacing was 1°, and spacing only influenced accuracy for identifying inversed targets. Spatial analyses showed that orientation affected oculomotor strategy: Children made more fixations in the "inversed" target area (4.6) than the vertical target areas (1.8 and 1.9). Furthermore, age groups differed in fixation duration: 4- to 6-year-old children showed longer fixation durations than 7- to 8-year-olds at the two largest element spacings (p = 0.039 and p = 0.027). Conjunction search performance was unaffected by spacing. Four conclusions can be drawn from this study: (a) Target-distractor similarity governs visual search performance in school-age children, (b) children make more fixations in target areas when target-distractor similarity is high, (c) 4- to 6-year-olds show longer fixation durations than 7- to 8-year-olds at 1° and 2° element spacing, and (d) spacing affects feature but not conjunction search-a finding that might indicate top-down control ameliorates crowding in children. PMID:25613761

  7. Reconceptualizing Parent Involvement in Minority Communities: Expanding No Child Left Behind to Improve Student Achievement in African American Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Eustace G.

    2006-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind parental involvement mandates have a direct impact on the work of administrators. Although the legislation is perceived as comprehensive regarding the implementation of parent involvement activities, the rigorous application of these strategies has not had the desired outcomes in low-performing, predominantly African…

  8. Relative Age in School and Suicide among Young Individuals in Japan: A Regression Discontinuity Approach

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence collected in many parts of the world suggests that, compared to older students, students who are relatively younger at school entry tend to have worse academic performance and lower levels of income. This study examined how relative age in a grade affects suicide rates of adolescents and young adults between 15 and 25 years of age using data from Japan. Method We examined individual death records in the Vital Statistics of Japan from 1989 to 2010. In contrast to other countries, late entry to primary school is not allowed in Japan. We took advantage of the school entry cutoff date to implement a regression discontinuity (RD) design, assuming that the timing of births around the school entry cutoff date was randomly determined and therefore that individuals who were born just before and after the cutoff date have similar baseline characteristics. Results We found that those who were born right before the school cutoff day and thus youngest in their cohort have higher mortality rates by suicide, compared to their peers who were born right after the cutoff date and thus older. We also found that those with relative age disadvantage tend to follow a different career path than those with relative age advantage, which may explain their higher suicide mortality rates. Conclusion Relative age effects have broader consequences than was previously supposed. This study suggests that policy intervention that alleviates the relative age effect can be important. PMID:26309241

  9. Assessing Defense Structure in School-Age Children Using the Response Evaluation Measure-71-Youth Version (REM-Y-71)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Katy B.; Medic, Sanja; Yasnovsky, Jessica; Steiner, Hans

    2006-01-01

    This study used the Response Evaluation Measure-Youth (REM-Y-71), a self-report measure of 21 defense reactions, among school-age children. Participants were elementary and middle school students (n=290; grades 3-8; age range: 8-15; mean=11.73). Factor analysis revealed a 2-factor defense structure consistent with structure among high school and…

  10. Maternal Schooling and Children's Relative Inequalities in Developmental Outcomes: Evidence from the 1947 School Leaving Age Reform in Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabates, Ricardo; Duckworth, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates whether mothers' participation in post-compulsory education impacts on children's relative inequalities across four developmental outcomes. The empirical analysis uses information from children born in 1958 in Britain. Mothers of the 1958 British cohort were affected by the 1947 school leaving age reform, which increased…

  11. [Bamako school age children and their diet from street vendors].

    PubMed

    Chauliac, M; Monnier, T; Bendech, M A

    1994-01-01

    Eating outside the home is very common in African cities. Food is bought from street vendors and eaten on the street. A large proportion of these consumers are school children, but little is known about what they buy, and the reasons why they make the choices they do. We therefore surveyed 494 second and sixth year primary school children in 1993. They were all enrolled at schools or Muslim colleges in both affluent and underprivileged areas of Bamako (Mali). The language used for the survey was Bambara. Almost all the children had money, mostly given by either or both of their parents and in most cases supplemented by odd jobs. The richest group of children were those in the sixth year in the more privileged areas. However, within a district or a (school) class, there was no correlation between the family's socio-economic group (SEG) and money available to the child. The proportions of children in each area, SEG and class buying the following classes of food were nearly identical; drinks, ice cream, groundnuts, fruit, cooked meals, uncooked meals, and sweets. The amount of money available correlated with the purchase of cooked or uncooked meals and drinks. The amount spent on food correlated with the money available, and the relationship is particularly clear for cooked and uncooked meals. The independence of the children in buying food represents a large part of the total daily food budget of the family. Their true diet and its nutritional value should therefore be quantified. Strategies targeting these children to help improve their diet would have a favorable effect on nutrition, because of their autonomy. Any such strategy should involve the street vendors so as to improve the quality of their products. PMID:7850193

  12. The Predictive Utility of Early Childhood Disruptive Behaviors for School-Age Social Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Wilson, Melvin N.

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that school-age children with disruptive behavior (DB) problems frequently demonstrate impaired social skills and experience rejection from peers, which plays a crucial role in the pathway to more serious antisocial behavior. A critical question is which DB problems in early childhood are prognostic of impaired social functioning in school-age children. This study examines the hypothesis that aggression in early childhood will be the more consistent predictor of compromised social functioning than inattentive, hyperactive-impulsive, or oppositional behavior. Participants included an ethnically diverse sample of 725 high-risk children from 3 geographically distinct areas followed from ages 2 to 8.5. Four latent growth models of DB from child ages 2 to 5, and potential interactions between dimensions, were used to predict latent parent and teacher ratings of school-age social dysfunction. Analyses were conducted in a multi-group format to examine potential differences between intervention and control group participants. Results showed that age 2 aggression was the DB problem most consistently associated with both parent- and teacher-rated social dysfunction for both groups. Early starting aggressive behavior may be particularly important for the early identification of children at risk for school-age social difficulties. PMID:25526865

  13. The LMS and Z Scale Growth Reference for Saudi School-age Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    El Mouzan, Mohammad I.; Al Salloum, Abdullah A.; Alqurashi, Mansour M.; Al Herbish, Abdullah S.; Al Omar, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: To establish L, M, and S parameters and z score reference for the assessment of nutrition and growth of Saudi school-age children and adolescents. Subjects and Methods: Data from the original cross-sectional study were reanalyzed. The L, M, and S parameters and z scores were calculated for weight, height and body mass index for school-age children and adolescents. Results: A total of 19,299 subjects from 5 to 18 years of age were included. All were Saudi nationals and 9,827 (50.9%) were boys. The L M S parameters and z scores for weight for age, height for age, and BMI for age for boys and girls are presented in detailed tables across the age of commonly used z scores (+3, +2, +1, 0, -1, -2, -3). Graphs corresponding to the same parameters (weight, height, and BMI) showing the main z scores across all ages from 5 to 18 years are illustrated. Conclusion: This report provides the first reference for nutritional status and growth of Saudi school-age children and adolescents. This tool is essential for more accurate assessment of growth and nutrition in various clinical conditions and research. PMID:27488329

  14. The Effects of Self-Management Education for School-Age Children on Asthma Morbidity: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Emily; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of asthma self-management education for school-age children on number of school days missed, emergency department visits and hospital admissions were evaluated through a systematic review of the published research. A total of 9 studies on asthma education programs that were conducted in schools by school nurses and health educators and…

  15. The Second Digital Divide and Its Effect on African-American (K-12) School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    The qualitative phenomenological study explored the perceptions of educators and parents of African-American (K-12) school-age children on how the children were using technology. The study was conducted in the Memphis City Public School System (MCS) and was limited to three schools in a school district. Common themes emerged from the analysis of…

  16. The development of global motion discrimination in school aged children

    PubMed Central

    Bogfjellmo, Lotte-Guri; Bex, Peter J.; Falkenberg, Helle K.

    2014-01-01

    Global motion perception matures during childhood and involves the detection of local directional signals that are integrated across space. We examine the maturation of local directional selectivity and global motion integration with an equivalent noise paradigm applied to direction discrimination. One hundred and three observers (6–17 years) identified the global direction of motion in a 2AFC task. The 8° central stimuli consisted of 100 dots of 10% Michelson contrast moving 2.8°/s or 9.8°/s. Local directional selectivity and global sampling efficiency were estimated from direction discrimination thresholds as a function of external directional noise, speed, and age. Direction discrimination thresholds improved gradually until the age of 14 years (linear regression, p < 0.05) for both speeds. This improvement was associated with a gradual increase in sampling efficiency (linear regression, p < 0.05), with no significant change in internal noise. Direction sensitivity was lower for dots moving at 2.8°/s than at 9.8°/s for all ages (paired t test, p < 0.05) and is mainly due to lower sampling efficiency. Global motion perception improves gradually during development and matures by age 14. There was no change in internal noise after the age of 6, suggesting that local direction selectivity is mature by that age. The improvement in global motion perception is underpinned by a steady increase in the efficiency with which direction signals are pooled, suggesting that global motion pooling processes mature for longer and later than local motion processing. PMID:24569985

  17. Unfunded Mandates? An Analysis of Pontiac School Board v. Spellings, the Legal Challenge to the No Child Left Behind Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savich, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to analyze the court case Pontiac v. Spellings, a legal challenge to the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act filed in 2005. The methodology was to examine and analyze the briefs filed and the court decisions to analyze the legal arguments made by the parties to the lawsuit. The results were that the U.S. Circuit Court for…

  18. An Aging Teacher Corps: How Should School Systems Respond?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebes, Sherry

    The teaching corps is undergoing a transformation as the teaching population ages. In the past, "burned-out" teachers could be transferred or could change professions. The economics of the 1980's leaves dissatisfied teachers with no alternative but to remain in teaching. This paper examines ways to help administrators and teachers cope with this…

  19. Sentence Comprehension in Postinstitutionalized School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmarais, Chantal; Roeber, Barbara J.; Smith, Mary E.; Pollak, Seth D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated sentence comprehension and spatial working memory abilities in a sample of internationally adopted, postinstitutionalized (PI) children. The authors compared the performance of these PI children with that of an age-matched group of children living with their birth families. They hypothesized that PI…

  20. Making Tobacco Education Relevant to the School Age Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seffrin, John R.

    1981-01-01

    Due to the trend toward more smoking among the young and to the effect of smoking on human health and life, educators need to devise effective antismoking programs as part of the secondary curriculum. The real problem lies in educating youths prior to the age at which the decision to smoke is made. (JN)

  1. The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Harold

    This book argues against the politicization of literature and presents a guide to the great works and essential writers of the ages, the "Western Canon." The book studies 26 writers and seeks to isolate the qualities that made these authors canonical, that is, authoritative in Western culture. Noting that although originally the "Canon" meant the…

  2. School-Age Children in CCDBG: 2010 Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Hannah; Firgens, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary source of federal funding for child care subsidies for low-income working families and to improve child care quality for low-income families. CCDBG provides child care assistance to children from birth to age 13. This fact sheet highlights key information about infants and toddlers…

  3. Uniquely Human Self-Control Begins at School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Esther; Misch, Antonia; Hernandez-Lloreda, Victoria; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Human beings have remarkable skills of self-control, but the evolutionary origins of these skills are unknown. Here we compare children at 3 and 6 years of age with one of humans' two nearest relatives, chimpanzees, on a battery of reactivity and self-control tasks. Three-year-old children and chimpanzees were very similar in their abilities to…

  4. School-Age Children in CCDBG: 2009 Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Hannah; Lim, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary source of federal funding for child care subsidies for low-income working families and to improve child care quality. CCDBG provides child care assistance to children from birth to age 13. In fiscal year 2010, states received $5 billion in federal CCDBG funds. States are expected to…

  5. Learning and Schooling in the Age of Mobilism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Cathleen A.; Soloway, Elliot

    2011-01-01

    Speeding past the Steve Jobs Post-PC Era into the Age of Mobilism, the authors foresee how, by 2015, each and every student in America's K-12 classrooms will be using their own mobile computing device, with those devices engendering the most disruptive transformation in education in 150 years. Classrooms will move from today's "I Teach"…

  6. School Readiness of Moderately Preterm Children at Preschool Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perricone, Giovanna; Morales, M. Regina; Anzalone, Germana

    2013-01-01

    The study investigates the preschool readiness of moderately preterm children and, in particular, the likely presence of learning disabilities at preschool age. Its theoretical model detects linguistic comprehension and expression; memory-related metacognition and cognition skills; orientation and motor coordination skills; premathematics and…

  7. The Condition of Education 2009: Indicator 8--Language Minority School-Age Children. NCES 2009-081

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planty, Michael; Hussar, William; Snyder, Thomas; Kena, Grace; KewalRamani, Angelina; Kemp, Jana; Bianco, Kevin; Dinkes, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    "The Condition of Education" is a congressionally mandated report that provides an annual portrait of education in the United States. This document includes information from "The Condition of Education 2009" about language minority school-age children. Between 1979 and 2007, the number of school-age children (children ages 5-17) who spoke a…

  8. School Anxiety Inventory-Short Version: Factorial Invariance and Latent Mean Differences Across Gender and Age in Spanish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingles, Candido J.; Garcia-Fernandez, Jose M.; Marzo, Juan C.; Martinez-Monteagudo, Maria C.; Estevez, Estefania

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the factorial invariance and latent mean differences of the School Anxiety Inventory-Short Version across gender and age groups for 2,367 Spanish students, ranging in age from 12 to 18 years. Configural and measurement invariance were found across gender and age samples for all dimensions of the School Anxiety Inventory-Short…

  9. Behavior problems at ages 6 and 11 and high school academic achievement: longitudinal latent variable modeling.

    PubMed

    Breslau, Naomi; Breslau, Joshua; Miller, Elizabeth; Raykov, Tenko

    2011-02-28

    Previous studies documented long-run effects of behavior problems at the start of school on academic achievement. However, these studies did not examine whether the observed effects of early behavior problems are explained by more proximate behavior problems, given the tendency of children's behavior problems to persist. Latent variable modeling was applied to estimate the effects of behavior problems at ages 6 and 11 on academic achievement at age 17, using data from a longitudinal study (n=823). Behavior problems at ages 6 and 11, each stage independently of the other, predicted lower math and reading test scores at age 17, controlling for intelligence quotient (IQ), birth weight, maternal characteristics, family and community environment, and taking into account behavior problems at age 17. Behavior problems at the start of school, independent of later behavior problems, exert lingering effects on achievement by impeding the acquisition of cognitive skills that are the foundation for later academic progress. PMID:20719395

  10. Dietary and Physical Activity/Inactivity Factors Associated with Obesity in School-Aged Children123

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Rodriguez, Marcela; Melendez, Guillermo; Nieto, Claudia; Aranda, Marisol; Pfeffer, Frania

    2012-01-01

    Diet and physical activity (PA) are essential components of nutritional status. Adequate nutrition and an active lifestyle are key factors during childhood, because food habits track into adulthood. Children spend more time in school than in any other environment away from home. Studying the diet factors and patterns of PA that affect obesity risk in children during school hours and the complete school day can help identify opportunities to lower this risk. We directly measured the time children spent performing moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) at school, compared the amount and intensity of PA during school hours with after-school hours, and tried to determine if diet behaviors and PA or inactivity were associated with excess weight and body fat. This cross-sectional study included 143 normal-weight (NLW) and 48 obese children aged 8–10 y. Diet data were obtained from two 24-h recalls. Body composition was measured by bioimpedance. Screen time and sports participation data were self-reported. NLW children drank/ate more dairy servings than the obese children, who consumed more fruit-flavored water than the NLW group. Consumption of soft drinks, sugar-added juices, and fresh juices was low in both groups. Children were less active during school hours than after school. MVPA was lower during school hours in the obese group than in the NLW group. Schools, parents, and authorities should be more involved in promoting strategies to improve the dietary habits and PA levels of school-aged children, because this group is not achieving the recommended level of daily MVPA. PMID:22798003

  11. Dietary and physical activity/inactivity factors associated with obesity in school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rodriguez, Marcela; Melendez, Guillermo; Nieto, Claudia; Aranda, Marisol; Pfeffer, Frania

    2012-07-01

    Diet and physical activity (PA) are essential components of nutritional status. Adequate nutrition and an active lifestyle are key factors during childhood, because food habits track into adulthood. Children spend more time in school than in any other environment away from home. Studying the diet factors and patterns of PA that affect obesity risk in children during school hours and the complete school day can help identify opportunities to lower this risk. We directly measured the time children spent performing moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) at school, compared the amount and intensity of PA during school hours with after-school hours, and tried to determine if diet behaviors and PA or inactivity were associated with excess weight and body fat. This cross-sectional study included 143 normal-weight (NLW) and 48 obese children aged 8-10 y. Diet data were obtained from two 24-h recalls. Body composition was measured by bioimpedance. Screen time and sports participation data were self-reported. NLW children drank/ate more dairy servings than the obese children, who consumed more fruit-flavored water than the NLW group. Consumption of soft drinks, sugar-added juices, and fresh juices was low in both groups. Children were less active during school hours than after school. MVPA was lower during school hours in the obese group than in the NLW group. Schools, parents, and authorities should be more involved in promoting strategies to improve the dietary habits and PA levels of school-aged children, because this group is not achieving the recommended level of daily MVPA. PMID:22798003

  12. Racial Bullying and Victimization in Canadian School-Aged Children: Individual and School Level Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larochette, Anne-Claire; Murphy, Ashley Nicole; Craig, Wendy M.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous individual factors, including race, have been identified to date that may place children at risk for bullying involvement. The importance of the school's environment on bullying behaviours has also been highlighted, as the majority of bullying occurs at school. The variables associated with racial bullying and victimization, however, have…

  13. New Futures School: A Comprehensive Program for School-Age Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albuquerque Public Schools, NM.

    New Futures School is designed for any girl who is 13-19 years old; has a doctor's certificate of pregnancy; and has not yet graduated from high school. In the education area, traditional scheduling is used to minimize the effects of absenteeism. A special Infant Observation Center, a major program component serves as a babysitting facility, a…

  14. Historic Neighborhood Schools in the Age of Sprawl: Why Johnny Can't Walk to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaumont, Constance E.

    This report examines public policy effects on historic neighborhood school expansion, renovation, and replacement needs. It addresses four basic questions: (1) Are public policies inadvertently sabotaging the very type of community-centered school that many parents and educators are calling for today? (2) Do some policies and practices promote…

  15. Frequent Visitors: Somatization in School-Age Children and Implications for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Matthews, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    There is a gap in the nursing literature regarding children who frequently visit school nurses' offices with recurrent unexplained physical symptoms. A review of the scientific health literature was undertaken to examine the clinical presentation, associated variables, and implications for school nurses regarding children who are frequent school…

  16. School Mobility and School-Age Children's Social Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupere, Veronique; Archambault, Isabelle; Leventhal, Tama; Dion, Eric; Anderson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how nonpromotional school changes, a potentially major event for children, were associated with 3 forms of social maladjustment: isolation/withdrawal, affiliation with maladjusted peers, and aggression toward peers. Given that school mobility frequently co-occurs with family transitions, the moderating role of these transitions…

  17. Pre-School Quality and Educational Outcomes at Age 11: Low Quality Has Little Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylva, Kathy; Melhuish, Edward; Sammons, Pam; Siraj-Blatchford, Iram; Taggart, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the effects of pre-school quality on children's cognitive and behavioural outcomes at age 11 using a large-scale longitudinal study of 3000+ children in England (EPPE/EPPSE). The ECERS-R and a curricular extension to it (ECERS-E) were used to assess the quality of provision in 141 pre-school settings attended by the children.…

  18. Age, Gender and Load-Related Influences on Left Ventricular Geometric Remodeling, Systolic Mid-Wall Function, and NT-ProBNP in Asymptomatic Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi; Sung, Kuo-Tzu; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Yeh, Hung-I

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced age is associated with left ventricle (LV) remodeling and impaired cardiac function that may increase the risk of heart failure. Even so, studies regarding age-related cardiac remodeling in a large, asymptomatic Asian population remain limited. Materials and Methods We studied 8,410 asymptomatic participants (49.7 ±11.7 y, 38.9% women) in a health evaluation cohort (2004–2012) at a tertiary center in Northern Taiwan. We analyzed age-related alterations for all echocardiography-derived cardiac structures/functions and the associations with circulating N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). We also explored sex-related differences in these measures. Results In our cohort of 8,410 participants, advanced age was associated with greater LV wall thickness, larger LV total mass (+5.08 g/decade), and greater LV mass index (4.41 g/m2/decade), as well as increased serum NT-proBNP level (+18.89 pg/mL/decade). An accompanying reduction of stress-corrected midwall fractional shortening (–0.1%/decade) with aging was apparent in women after multi-variate adjustment (–0.09%/decade, p = 0.001). Furthermore, women demonstrated greater overall increase in LV wall thickness, LV mass index, and NT-proBNP compared to men (p for interaction: <0.001). All blood pressure components, including systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressures were independently associated with greater wall thickness and LV mass index after adjustment for confounders (all p <0.001). The associations between age and cardiac remodeling or mid-wall functions were further confirmed in a subset of study subjects with repeated follow up by GEE model. Conclusions Significant associations of unfavorable LV remodeling and advanced age in our asymptomatic Asian population were observed, along with sex differences. These data may help explain the incidence of some diverse gender-related cardiovascular diseases, especially heart failure. PMID:27280886

  19. Perception of Speech Sounds in School-Aged Children with Speech Sound Disorders.

    PubMed

    Preston, Jonathan L; Irwin, Julia R; Turcios, Jacqueline

    2015-11-01

    Children with speech sound disorders may perceive speech differently than children with typical speech development. The nature of these speech differences is reviewed with an emphasis on assessing phoneme-specific perception for speech sounds that are produced in error. Category goodness judgment, or the ability to judge accurate and inaccurate tokens of speech sounds, plays an important role in phonological development. The software Speech Assessment and Interactive Learning System, which has been effectively used to assess preschoolers' ability to perform goodness judgments, is explored for school-aged children with residual speech errors (RSEs). However, data suggest that this particular task may not be sensitive to perceptual differences in school-aged children. The need for the development of clinical tools for assessment of speech perception in school-aged children with RSE is highlighted, and clinical suggestions are provided. PMID:26458198

  20. Severe Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Growth, Nutrition, and Adipokines at School Age

    PubMed Central

    Suursalmi, Piia; Korhonen, Päivi; Kopeli, Tarja; Nieminen, Riina; Luukkaala, Tiina; Moilanen, Eeva; Tammela, Outi

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated nutrition and growth in relation to plasma adipokine levels in 21 very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) children with radiographic bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), 19 VLBW controls, and 19 term controls with a median age of 11.3 years. We took anthropometric measurements; assessed plasma levels of adipsin, resistin, adiponectin, and leptin; and analyzed the children’s 3-day food records. Children with BPD had a smaller age-adjusted head circumference and more microcephaly but no other significant growth differences. Daily recommended nutritional intake levels were poorly met but did not differ between the groups. Leptin levels correlated positively with the body mass index standard deviation score in VLBW children. No other associations between adipokine concentrations and growth were found. There were negative correlations between leptin concentrations and fat intake, resistin levels and carbohydrate intake, and adiponectin, adipsin, and leptin levels and energy intake. PMID:27336010

  1. Influence Of Implantation Age On School-Age Language Performance In Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Tobey, Emily A.; Thal, Donna; Niparko, John K.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Wang, Nae-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined specific spoken language abilities of 160 children with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss followed prospectively 4, 5, or 6 years after cochlear implantation. Study sample Ninety-eight children received implants before 2.5 years, and 62 children received implants between 2.5 and 5 years of age. Design Language was assessed using four subtests of the Comprehensive Assessment of Spoken Language (CASL). Standard scores were evaluated by contrasting age of implantation and follow-up test time. Results Children implanted under 2.5 years of age achieved higher standard scores than children with older ages of implantation for expressive vocabulary, expressive syntax, and pragmatic judgments. However, in both groups, some children performed more than two standard deviations below the standardization group mean, while some scored at or well above the mean. Conclusions Younger ages of implantation are associated with higher levels of performance, while later ages of implantation are associated with higher probabilities of continued language delays, particularly within subdomains of grammar and pragmatics. Longitudinal data from this cohort study demonstrate that after 6 years of implant experience, there is large variability in language outcomes associated with modifiers of rates of language learning that differ as children with implants age. PMID:23448124

  2. Tick-borne infections--a growing public health treat to school-age children. Prevention steps that school personnel can take.

    PubMed

    Hamlen, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    School nurses are experts in school health services and frequently front-line providers of care for school-age children presenting with symptoms of physical illness or behavioral, cognitive, learning, and/or psychological problems possibly due to tick-borne infections. School nurses need to know how to protect children on school property and during school sponsored outdoor activities from being bitten by ticks that can transmit diseases. Since infection prevention is a primary objective in health care, this article will empower school nurses with key information about how to accomplish this goal. PMID:22567784

  3. [Hygienic aspects of cellular communication in school age].

    PubMed

    Teksheva, L M; Barsukova, N K; Chumicheva, O A; Khatit, Z Kh

    2014-01-01

    In the article there are presented the materials of research on the spread and usage of mobile phones among children and adolescents of different age groups in the Russian regions, the data of the performed tests of cellular communication devices, as well as the established effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on biological objects. Risk groups of schoolchildren for adverse effect of EMR on health have been determined. PMID:25051743

  4. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related and interpersonal-related impulsivity, as observed by teachers, parents, and the students themselves, are distinct, moderately correlated behavioral tendencies. Each demonstrates differentiated relationships with dimensions of childhood temperament, Big Five personality factors, and outcomes, such as sociometric popularity, report card grades, and classroom conduct. Implications for theoretical conceptions of impulsivity as well as for practical applications (e.g., domain-specific interventions) are discussed. PMID:24118714

  5. No School Left Behind: A Multiple Case Study of High-Performing Third-Grade Reading Programs in Low-Income Rural Schools in Southern Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberger, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 2008 implementation of Response to Intervention (RtI) plans in Illinois, rural schools in southern Illinois with a high percentage of low-income students have been compelled to implement school-wide reforms of their reading programs. Often, limited funding makes it difficult to sustain growth trends in Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).…

  6. Socioemotional Effects of Fathers' Incarceration on Low-Income, Urban, School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, MaryAnn B.; Marani, Jodi E.; Appugliese, Danielle; Woods, Ryan; Siegel, Jane A.; Cabral, Howard J.; Frank, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal was to evaluate whether children of incarcerated fathers are more likely to report or exhibit behavioral symptoms than their equally disadvantaged peers without an incarcerated father. METHODS During an ongoing longitudinal study of intrauterine cocaine exposure involving 102 children (50% male and 89% black) from urban, low-income homes, questions regarding incarceration of the child's father were asked of the child's primary caregiver at each visit during school age. Children were administered the Children's Depression Inventory between the ages of 6 and 11 years, and their primary caregivers completed the Child Behavior Checklist. In addition, the children's teachers completed the Teacher Report Form. Children's Depression Inventory, Child Behavior Checklist, and Teacher Report Form data obtained at the oldest available age after the first report of paternal incarceration were analyzed. RESULTS In bivariate analyses, children whose fathers were in jail had higher Children's Depression Inventory total scores compared with children without incarcerated fathers, indicating more depressive symptoms. This finding was robust in multivariate analyses after adjustment for children's age, gender, prenatal cocaine and alcohol exposure, and school-age violence exposure. Teachers reported higher Teacher Report Form externalizing scores for children whose fathers were in jail, after adjustment for age, gender, prenatal cocaine and marijuana exposure, and school-age violence exposure. CONCLUSIONS Children of incarcerated fathers reported more depressive symptoms and their teachers noted more externalizing behaviors, after controlling for other biopsychosocial risks. Interventions targeted to ameliorate the distress of children with incarcerated fathers should be considered. PMID:17766508

  7. After-School Tutoring in the Context of No Child Left Behind: Effectiveness of Two Programs in the Pittsburgh Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Ron; Hamilton, Laura; Christina, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation has created pressure for districts to improve their students' proficiency levels on state tests. Districts that fail to meet their academic targets for 3 years must use their Title I funds to pay for supplemental education services (SES) that provide tutoring or other academic instruction. Many…

  8. Accountability under Constraint: The Relationship between Collective Bargaining Agreements and California Schools' and Districts' Performance under No Child Left Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strunk, Katharine O.; McEachin, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The authors examine how the collective bargaining agreement (CBA) negotiated between teachers' unions and districts is associated with schools' and districts' performance under accountability pressures in California. They find that CBA restrictiveness is associated with the increased likelihood that districts will be in Program Improvement (PI)…

  9. Left Behind in the Labor Market: Labor Market Problems of the Nation's Out-of-School, Young Adult Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sum, Andrew; Khatiwada, Ishwar; Pond, Nathan; Trub 'skyy, Mykhaylo; Fogg, Neeta; Palma, Sheila

    The problems faced by out-of-school young adults in the United States and the policy implications of those problems were examined. The analysis was based on a review of pertinent publications and statistical data from various government agencies and other sources. The study documented that the past decade has witnessed areas of progress,…

  10. Ensuring that No Child is Left Behind. How are Student Health Risks & Resilience Related to the Academic Progress of Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Thomas L.; Austin, Gregory; Lee-Bayha, June

    2004-01-01

    Public schools have come under enormous pressure in recent years to demonstrate academic gains and to address deeply rooted disparities among students of different races, ethnic groups, and income levels. Clearly, boosting academic achievement should be a top priority. Less evident, however, is the long-term effect of supporting this goal by…

  11. Coercive Family Process and Early-Onset Conduct Problems From Age 2 to School Entry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justin D.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Wilson, Melvin N.; Winter, Charlotte C.; Patterson, Gerald R.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and persistence of conduct problems during early childhood is a robust predictor of behavior problems in school and future maladaptation. In this study we examined the reciprocal influences between observed coercive interactions between children and caregivers, oppositional and aggressive behavior, and growth in parent report of early childhood (ages 2–5) and school-age conduct problems (age 7.5 and 8.5). Participants were drawn from the Early Steps multisite randomized prevention trial that includes an ethnically diverse sample of male and female children and their families (N = 731). A parallel process growth model combining latent trajectory and cross-lagged approaches revealed the amplifying effect of observed coercive caregiver–child interactions on children's noncompliance, whereas child oppositional and aggressive behaviors did not consistently predict increased coercion. The slope and initial levels of child oppositional and aggressive behaviors and the stability of caregiver–child coercion were predictive of teacher-reported oppositional behavior at school age. Families assigned to the Family Check-Up condition had significantly steeper declines in child oppositional and aggressive behavior and moderate reductions in oppositional behavior in school and in coercion at age 3. Results were not moderated by child gender, race/ethnicity, or assignment to the intervention condition. The implications of these findings are discussed with respect to understanding the early development of conduct problems and to designing optimal strategies for reducing problem behavior in early childhood with families most in need. PMID:24690305

  12. Social Studies Classroom Activities for Secondary Schools. Schools in an Aging Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goranson, Donald G., Ed.

    Designed for secondary students, the 20 lessons in this volume promote education for, with, and about older adults and prepare students to participate in the changing world. Lessons 1-3 explore attitudes about aging through word association, confront the aging process, and examine values regarding time. Lessons 4-6 study aging in different times…

  13. School Connectedness in the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children Study: The Role of Student, School, and School Neighborhood Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Douglas R.; Iachan, Ronaldo; Overpeck, Mary; Ross, James G.; Gross, Lori A.

    2006-01-01

    School connectedness includes liking school and positive relations with teachers and peers. School connectedness is associated with a variety of positive health outcomes. The goal of this study was to identify characteristics of students, schools, and school neighborhoods that are related to school connectedness. In the Health Behavior in…

  14. Geography in an Urban Age: Trials of High School Geography Project Materials in New Zealand Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, John; Slater, Frances

    1974-01-01

    The High School Geography Project was used and evaluated by 15-year old students in New Zealand. The program, highly innovative in approaches in teaching Geography, is found to be highly adapted to Australian needs in Geography instruction. (JR)

  15. Associations among Risk Factors, Individual Resources, and Indices of School-Related Asthma Morbidity in Urban, School-Aged Children: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Daphne Koinis; Adams, Sue K.; Murdock, Karla Klein

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual model including examples of risk and resource factors associated with indices of school-related asthma morbidity (eg, missed sleep, participation in activities, school absences) in a group of urban, school-aged children with asthma from ethnic minority backgrounds. Specifically, the current longitudinal study…

  16. Family Background, School-Age Trajectories of Activity Participation, and Academic Achievement at the Start of High School

    PubMed Central

    Crosnoe, Robert; Smith, Chelsea; Leventhal, Tama

    2014-01-01

    Applying latent class and regression techniques to data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n = 997), this study explored the potential academic advantages of time spent in out-of-school activities. Of particular interest was how these potential advantages played out in relation to the timing and duration of activity participation and the family contexts in which it occurred. Participation closer to the start of high school—including consistent participants and latecomers—was associated with higher grades at the transition into high school, especially for youth from low-income families. Sensitivity analyses indicated that this link between school-age activity participation and adolescent academic progress was unlikely to be solely a function of selection. It also tended to be more pronounced among youth from lower-income families, although without varying by other aspects of family status or process. PMID:26279615

  17. Development of Daily Activities in School-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Gorter, Jan Willem; van Schie, Petra; Dallmeijer, Annet; Jongmans, Marian; Lindeman, Eline

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the course of capabilities in self-care, mobility, and social function in school-age children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to investigate associations with CP-, child-, and family-characteristics. A clinic-based sample of children with CP (n = 116; 76 males, 40 females; mean age 6 y 3 mo, SD 12 mo) was…

  18. Cortisol Function Among Early School-aged Homeless Children

    PubMed Central

    Cutuli, J. J.; Wiik, Kristen L.; Herbers, Janette E.; Gunnar, Megan R.; Masten, Ann S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Homelessness represents a context of extreme poverty and risk for child development. This study compared the relative influence of two classes of risk in the context of homelessness. Levels of socioeconomic resource-related risk and negative lifetime events were examined with respect to morning cortisol levels and cortisol response to a set of cognitive tasks. Participants were 66 children between the ages of 4 and 7 years staying in an emergency shelter for families. Adversities largely reflecting family level negative life events predicted higher levels of morning cortisol and differences in initial level and change over the course of the session of cognitive tasks. In contrast, a socioeconomic cumulative risk score was not associated with morning or session-related differences in cortisol. PMID:20022181

  19. Farm to School and Nutrition Education: Positively Affecting Elementary School-Aged Children's Nutrition Knowledge and Consumption Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Ashley; Null, Dawn; Long Roth, Sara; Tragoudas, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Good nutrition is crucial. School-aged children battle social and health issues such as poor nutrition, childhood obesity, and minimal nutrition knowledge. This study was a quasi-experimental design analyzing the effects of the Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH) nutrition curriculum with a Farm to School program to assess nutrition knowledge of 3rd grade students, and to increase fruit and vegetable consumption behavior. Methods Third grade boys and girls (n=65) participated in this study. The intervention consisted of two nutrition education classes and a farm tour. Data were collected at baseline and postintervention. Surveys assessed nutrition knowledge, fruit and vegetable consumption behavior, and awareness of farms and farmers. Chi-squared tests of independence were performed to examine the relation between the baseline and postintervention responses. Results Significant differences were found concerning knowledge of fiber (p<0.001). Knowledge of vitamins and minerals, reported vegetable consumption behavior at school, and farm exposure were also significant (p<0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest that CATCH nutrition education and farm tours can positively affect school-aged children's nutrition knowledge and fruit and vegetable consumption behavior. PMID:23308373

  20. Middle-school-age outcomes in children with very low birthweight.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H G; Klein, N; Minich, N M; Hack, M

    2000-01-01

    Most previous studies of children with birthweight <750 g have focused on early childhood sequelae. To evaluate later outcomes, a regional sample of 60 <750-g birthweight children was compared at middle school age (M = 11 years) to 55 children with birthweight 750-1,499 g and 49 term controls. The groups were matched on age, gender, and demographic variables at the time of an early-school-age assessment (mean age 7 years). The <750-g birthweight group fared less well at middle school age than the term group on measures of cognitive function, achievement, behavior, and academic performance. In many instances, outcomes were less favorable for the <750-g children than for the 750 to 1,499-g group. Children in the <750-g group who were free of neurosensory disorders and global cognitive impairment performed more poorly on several tests than their term counterparts. Group differences in this subsample on tests of motor skills, math, and the ability to copy and recall a complex drawing remained significant even after controlling for IQ. Disparities between the <750-g and term groups increased with age for some measures. Despite favorable outcomes for many children in the <750-g group, this population is at risk for long-term developmental problems. PMID:11194251

  1. Handedness, Birth Order, Reading Problems: Referrals to a School Psychologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altus, Grace T.; Altus, William D.

    To investigate the influence of handedness in the referral of elementary school students to a school psychologist, 120 left-handed referrals were matched with 120 right-handed referrals by sex, full-scale intelligence quotient, and chronological age. Comparison of the groups revealed that twins were more numerous among the left-handed students.…

  2. Lipreading in School-Age Children: The Roles of Age, Hearing Status, and Cognitive Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Hale, Sandra; Spehar, Brent; Myerson, Joel; Sommers, Mitchell S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The study addressed three research questions: Does lipreading improve between the ages of 7 and 14 years? Does hearing loss affect the development of lipreading? How do individual differences in lipreading relate to other abilities? Method: Forty children with normal hearing (NH) and 24 with hearing loss (HL) were tested using 4…

  3. Play Opportunities for School-Age Children, 6 to 14 Years of Age. Advisory Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., Ottawa (Ontario).

    Suggestions for the planning and design of playgrounds to meet the needs of children between 6 to 14 years of age living in medium- and high-density residential areas are offered in this document. The first and second chapters briefly focus on the child's right to play and present an overview of the developmental characteristics of children at…

  4. Multilevel Risk Models for Retrospective Age-of-Onset Data: School Children's First Cigarette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickles, Andrew; Pickering, Kevin; Taylor, Colin; Sutton, Stephen; Yang, Shuying

    2001-01-01

    Describes a random effects discrete time survival model that addresses problems of measurement error and sample design complexities. Demonstrates the effectiveness of the model in an analysis of retrospective report data on the age of onset of smoking from two cross-sectional school-based studies. (JPB)

  5. Developing Physiologic Stress Profiles for School-Age Children Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortega, Aishah Y.; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Physiologic reactivity profiles were generated for 9 school-age children with a history of stuttering. Utilizing salivary sampling, stress biomarkers cortisol and alpha-amylase were measured in response to normal daily stressors. Children with a history of stuttering were characterized as high or low autonomic reactors when compared to…

  6. School Foodservice Employees' Perceptions of Practice: Differences by Generational Age and Hours Worked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohbehn, Catherine; Jun, Jinhyun; Arendt, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study investigated the influences of school foodservice employees' age and average number of hours worked per week on perceived safe food handling practices, barriers, and motivators. Methods: A bilingual survey (English and Spanish) was developed to assess reported food safety practices, barriers, and motivators to…

  7. Exploring the Utility of a School-Age Narrative Microstructure Index: Proportion of Restricted Utterances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerger, Sara; Thorne, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This research attempted to replicate Hoffman's 2009 finding that the proportion of narrative utterances with semantic or syntactic errors (i.e., = 14% "restricted utterances") can differentiate school-age children with typical development from those with language impairment with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 88%.…

  8. Social Skills Expression of Senior High School Age Students in Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akelaitis, Arturas V.

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to reveal the peculiarities of social skills expression of senior high school age students in physical education classes. The independent random sample consisted of 244 (15-16 years old) students and 258 (17-18 years old) students, of which there were 224 boys and 278 girls. L. Bulotaite and V. Gudžinskiene…

  9. Language Learning Strategies, Course Grades, and Age in EFL Secondary School Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tragant, Elsa; Victori, Mia

    2012-01-01

    In studies dealing with language learning strategies in the school context, the variables of proficiency and age are often difficult to isolate since students accumulate more hours of foreign language instruction as they move up from grade to grade. This study aimed to deal with these two variables independently by analysing learning strategy use…

  10. Development of Non-Verbal Intellectual Capacity in School-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, D. W.; Ketelaar, M.; Gorter, J. W.; van Schie, P. E.; Becher, J. G.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are at greater risk for a limited intellectual development than typically developing children. Little information is available which children with CP are most at risk. This study aimed to describe the development of non-verbal intellectual capacity of school-age children with CP and to examine the…

  11. Some Immediate Effects of a Smoking Environment on Children of Elementary School Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luquette, A. J.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate effects of a cigarette smoking environment on children of elementary school age. Physical effects were looked for, as were differences between children from smoking homes and non-smoking homes, and male subjects and female subjects. A total of 103 children were divided into two groups, Group…

  12. Measuring Impulsivity in School-Aged Boys and Examining Its Relationship with ADHD and Odd Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avila, Cesar; Cuenca, Isabel; Felix, Vicente; Parcet, Maria-Antonia; Miranda, Ana

    2004-01-01

    Seven different laboratory measures of impulsivity were administered to a group of 165 school-aged boys. Parents' and teachers' ratings of Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional/Defiant Disorder were also obtained. Factor analyses of impulsivity measures revealed the existence of a strong Inhibitory Control Factor including…

  13. Factors Affecting the Processing of Intensity in School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buss, Emily; Hall, Joseph W., III; Grose, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Thresholds of school-aged children are elevated relative to those of adults for intensity discrimination and amplitude modulation (AM) detection. It is unclear how these findings are related or what role stimulus gating and dynamic envelope cues play in these results. Two experiments assessed the development of sensitivity to intensity…

  14. Obesity-Related Hormones in Low-Income Preschool-Age Children: Implications for School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Alison L.; Lumeng, Carey N.; Delproposto, Jennifer; Florek, Brian; Wendorf, Kristin; Lumeng, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying socioeconomic disparities in school readiness and health outcomes, particularly obesity, among preschool-aged children are complex and poorly understood. Obesity can induce changes in proteins in the circulation that contribute to the negative impact of obesity on health; such changes may relate to cognitive and emotion…

  15. Preliminary Study of Disfluency in School-Aged Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaler Scott, Kathleen; Tetnowski, John A.; Flaitz, James R.; Yaruss, J. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background: In recent years, there has been increased identification of disfluencies in individuals with autism, but limited examination of disfluencies in the school-age range of this population. We currently lack information about whether the disfluencies of children with autism represent concomitant stuttering, normal disfluency, excessive…

  16. The Gifted Rating Scales-School Form: A Validation Study Based on Age, Gender, and Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Steven; Petscher, Yaacov; Kumtepe, Alper

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the internal consistency and validity of a new rating scale to identify gifted students, the Gifted Rating Scales-School Form (GRS-S). The study explored the effect of gender, race/ethnicity, age, and rater familiarity on GRS-S ratings. One hundred twenty-two students in first to eighth grade from elementary and middle schools…

  17. School-Age Care from the Perspective of Social Role Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollhoff, Jim; Ollhoff, Laurie

    Within the literature of social psychology, there exists a body of information that deals with role theory, defined as the expectations persons have at any given time and the norms that govern their behavior. This paper discusses role theory as it applies to school-age child caregivers and as part of the process of professionalism. "Role" is…

  18. Comparison of Measures of Morphosyntactic Complexity in French-Speaking School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mimeau, Catherine; Plourde, Vickie; Ouellet, Andrée-Anne; Dionne, Ginette

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the validity and reliability of different measures of morphosyntactic complexity, including the Morphosyntactic Complexity Scale (MSCS), a novel adaptation of the Developmental Sentence Scoring, in French-speaking school-aged children. Seventy-three Quebec children from kindergarten to Grade 3 completed a definition task and a…

  19. Choosing Assessment Instruments for Depression Outcome Research with School-Age Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Brooke E.; Erford, Bradley T.

    2012-01-01

    Using effect size results from Erford et al.'s (2011) meta-analysis for treatment of depression in school-age youth, the authors analyzed 6 commonly used instruments for practical and technical strengths and weaknesses. Effect size estimates from these 6 instruments were compared to indicate likely results when used in future depression outcome…

  20. Teaching Grammar to School-Aged Children with Specific Language Impairment Using Shape Coding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebbels, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to teaching grammar which has been designed for school-aged children with specific language impairment (SLI). The approach uses shapes, colours and arrows to make the grammatical rules of English explicit. Evidence is presented which supports the use of this approach with older children in the areas of past tense…

  1. Speech Disfluency in School-Age Children's Conversational and Narrative Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Courtney T.; Logan, Kenneth J.; Gillam, Ronald B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to (a) compare the speech fluency of school-age children who do and do not stutter (CWS and CWNS, respectively) within 2 standard diagnostic speaking contexts (conversation and narration) while also controlling for speaking topic, and (b) examine the extent to which children's performance on such discourse tasks is…

  2. A Spoken-Language Intervention for School-Aged Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Andrea; Machalicek, Wendy; Bullard, Lauren; Nelson, Sarah; Mello, Melissa; Tempero-Feigles, Robyn; Castignetti, Nancy; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Using a single case design, a parent-mediated spoken-language intervention was delivered to three mothers and their school-aged sons with fragile X syndrome, the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability. The intervention was embedded in the context of shared storytelling using wordless picture books and targeted three empirically derived…

  3. Maternal Attitudes toward Mother-Child Separation: Working and Nonworking Mothers of School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koplik, Elissa K.; Fisher, Celia B.

    Exploring possible similarities and differences between mothers who work outside the home and mothers who do not, this study provides a preliminary investigation of maternal reactions to mother-child separation when children have reached school age. A total of 41 women working outside the home and 48 mothers staying at home responded to a…

  4. Do Infant Vocabulary Skills Predict School-Age Language and Literacy Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Fiona J.; Reen, Gurpreet; Plunkett, Kim; Nation, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Background: Strong associations between infant vocabulary and school-age language and literacy skills would have important practical and theoretical implications: Preschool assessment of vocabulary skills could be used to identify children at risk of reading and language difficulties, and vocabulary could be viewed as a cognitive foundation for…

  5. Group Therapy for School-Aged Children Who Stutter: A Survey of Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddle, Hilary; James, Sarah; Hardman, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Although group therapy is recommended for school-aged children who stutter (CWS), it is not widely researched. This study aimed to explore this provision, using a postal survey which investigated the current practices of Speech & Language Therapists (SLTs) in the UK. Seventy percent of SLT services provided some group therapy, but the level of…

  6. Work Experiences and Family Functioning among Employed Fathers with Children of School Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnunen, Ulla; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated how 657 fathers' job satisfaction and job stress were related to four domains: individual, parent-child, marital, and child. Results showed that the job affected all four domains. Job stress and job satisfaction were directly related to family functioning. Discusses implications for families with school-age children. (RJM)

  7. Shared Etiology of Phonological Memory and Vocabulary Deficits in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Samuelsson, Stefan; Byrne, Brian; Olson, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to investigate the etiologic basis for the association between deficits in phonological memory (PM) and vocabulary in school-age children. Method: Children with deficits in PM or vocabulary were identified within the International Longitudinal Twin Study (ILTS; Samuelsson et al., 2005). The ILTS includes 1,045…

  8. Elements of Successful Inclusion for School-Age Children with Disabilities in Childcare Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jinnah-Ghelani, Hamida A.; Stoneman, Zolinda

    2009-01-01

    When a school-age child with disabilities is accepted into a childcare setting, it is only the first step. The sustenance of the care option depends on whether the setting makes appropriate adaptations to accommodate the child with disability in the setting. Parents face a host of challenges related to adaptations and accommodations. This study…

  9. Development of Morphosyntactic Accuracy and Grammatical Complexity in Dutch School-Age Children with SLI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwitserlood, Rob; van Weerdenburg, Marjolijn; Verhoeven, Ludo; Wijnen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the development of morphosyntactic accuracy and grammatical complexity in Dutch school-age children with specific language impairment (SLI). Method: Morphosyntactic accuracy, the use of dummy auxiliaries, and complex syntax were assessed using a narrative task that was administered at three points…

  10. Comparative Research on Mixed-Age Groups in Swedish Nursery and Compulsory Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundell, Knut

    1994-01-01

    Reviews recent studies on the effects of mixed-age grouping (MAG) in Swedish nursery and elementary schools. Although studies conducted in the 1970s and 1980s suggested that MAG was beneficial to children's learning and socioemotional development and to teachers' work satisfaction, studies conducted in the 1990s suggest that MAG does not promote…

  11. Overt and Relational Aggression in Russian Nursery-School-Age Children: Parenting Style and Marital Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Craig H.; Nelson, David A.; Robinson, Clyde C.; Olsen, Susanne Frost; McNeilly-Choque, Mary Kay

    1998-01-01

    Maternal and paternal parenting styles and marital interactions linked to childhood aggressive behavior in Western psychological literature were measured in 207 ethnic Russian families of nursery-school-age children. Results corroborated and extended findings from Western samples. Greater marital conflict (for boys only), greater maternal…

  12. Choosing Assessment Instruments for Anxiety Practice and Outcome Research with School-Aged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erford, Bradley T.; Lutz, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Using effect size results from our meta-analysis for the treatment of anxiety in school-aged youth, the practical and technical aspects of five commonly used anxiety instruments were analyzed, and effect size estimates compared to indicate the best choices for use in anxiety outcome research.

  13. School Age Center Connections: Site-Based Management Strategies for Implementation of Quality Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Dahna R.

    This paper describes the outcomes of a practicum that initiated site-based-management strategies to support the consistent implementation of a quality school-age child-care program. Implemented at a multisite child-care center, the program sought to enhance staff members' job satisfaction and maximize their opportunities for professional growth…

  14. Talker Familiarity and Spoken Word Recognition in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Susannah V.

    2015-01-01

    Research with adults has shown that spoken language processing is improved when listeners are familiar with talkers' voices, known as the familiar talker advantage. The current study explored whether this ability extends to school-age children, who are still acquiring language. Children were familiarized with the voices of three German-English…

  15. Cognitive and Behavioral Indicators of ADHD Symptoms Prior to School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnett, Anne Bernard; MacDonald, Beatriz; Pennington, Bruce F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous research on the etiology of ADHD symptoms suggests that neuropsychological differences may be present as early as birth; however, the diagnosis is typically not given until school age. This study aimed to (a) identify early behavioral and cognitive markers of later significant parent and/or teacher ratings of ADHD…

  16. Patterns of Parental Rearing Styles and Child Behaviour Problems among Portuguese School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Ana I. F.; Canavarro, Cristina; Cardoso, Margarida F.; Mendonca, Denisa

    2009-01-01

    The majority of studies investigating the effects of parental behaviour on the child's adjustment have a dimensional approach. We identified the existence of various patterns in parental rearing styles and analysed the relationship between different parenting patterns and behavioural problems in a group of school-aged children. A longitudinal,…

  17. Predicting Treatment Dropout in Parent Training Interventions for Families of School-Aged Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Brian W.; Gerdes, Alyson C.; Haack, Lauren M.; Lawton, Katie E.

    2013-01-01

    Premature treatment dropout is a problem for many families seeking mental health services for their children. Research is currently limited in identifying factors that increase the likelihood of dropout in families of school-aged children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Thus, the goal of the current study was to examine…

  18. National School-Age Child Care Alliance (NSACCA): National Survey Results. Draft Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Fern

    Presenting preliminary results of a National School-Age Child Care Alliance study of child care providers, this report is an initial analysis of 250 out of 427 questionnaires received as of April, 1993, representing practitioners in 40 states and 180 cities. Tables present data from responses to 16 items on the questionnaire soliciting information…

  19. Psychiatric Disorders among Children with Cerebral Palsy at School Starting Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorgaas, H. M.; Hysing, M.; Elgen, I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present population study was to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP), as well as the impact of comorbid conditions. A cohort of children with CP born 2001-2003, and living in the Western Health Region of Norway were evaluated at school starting age. Parents were interviewed with the…

  20. An Exploratory Study of Aggression in School-Age Children: Underlying Factors and Implications for Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priddis, Lynn E.; Landy, Sarah; Moroney, Darren; Kane, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behaviour in school-aged children presents a significant challenge for society. If not managed, it can result in adverse academic, social, emotional, and behavioural outcomes for the child. In addition, it can create stress for families and become a significant burden for the community as these children reach adolescence and adulthood,…

  1. Career Counselling with Secondary School-Aged Youth: Directions for Theory, Research, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    In the midst of an information age and a global economy, people around the world continue to face significant inequities at school and in the workforce. Career counselling thus finds itself in a paradigm shift that increasingly stresses the influences of culture and sociopolitical context. One area in which the profession can advance a social…

  2. Evaluation of the feasibility of international growth standards for school-aged children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of an international growth standard for the screening, surveillance, and monitoring of school-aged children and adolescents has been motivated by two contemporaneous events: the global surge in childhood obesity and the release of a new international growth standard for infants and presc...

  3. Early and Late Talkers: School-Age Language, Literacy and Neurolinguistic Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jonathan L.; Frost, Stephen J.; Mencl, William Einar; Fulbright, Robert K.; Landi, Nicole; Grigorenko, Elena; Jacobsen, Leslie; Pugh, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    Early language development sets the stage for a lifetime of competence in language and literacy. However, the neural mechanisms associated with the relative advantages of early communication success, or the disadvantages of having delayed language development, are not well explored. In this study, 174 elementary school-age children whose parents…

  4. Developing a New Curriculum for School-Age Learners. TESOL Language Curriculum Development Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Kathleen, Ed.; Lopriore, Lucilla, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    These are exciting and challenging times for English language curriculum development for school-age learners. The global reach of English has spurred a rethinking of its role in education and, consequently, a rethinking of how to teach it. The accounts in this volume represent differences in educational systems, language teaching traditions,…

  5. Pragmatic Language Profiles of School-Age Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philofsky, Amy; Fidler, Deborah J.; Hepburn, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and compare the pragmatic language profiles of school-age children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and Williams syndrome (WS) on a standardized measure to determine whether a standard pragmatics tool can differentiate between 2 groups of children with opposing social presentations and pragmatic language difficulties.…

  6. Ambiguous Loss and Posttraumatic Stress in School-Age Children of Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bocknek, Erika London; Sanderson, Jessica; Britner, Preston A., IV

    2009-01-01

    We describe a sample of school-age children of incarcerated parents enrolled in a federally funded mentoring program. A mixed methods approach was applied to discern key themes related to caregiver incarceration. Results demonstrated a high prevalence of posttraumatic stress as well as high rates of internalizing and externalizing behaviors.…

  7. Urban and Rural Air Pollution: A Cross-Age Study of School Students' Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, George; Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Explores ideas about the causes and consequences of urban and rural air pollution of secondary school students aged 11-16 years (n=786) using a questionnaire. Students thought the air in towns and cities was more polluted than the air in the countryside. (Author/SAH)

  8. School-Age Prework Experiences of Young People with a History of Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkin, Kevin; Fraser, Jill; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2012-01-01

    Young people with specific language impairment (SLI) are at risk for poorer outcomes with respect to employment in adulthood, yet little is known of how early school-age prework experiences prepare them for the job market. This study examined whether young people with SLI engage in similar types of early work experiences as their typically…

  9. Inquiry-Based Science and Technology Enrichment Program for Middle School-Aged Female Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of an intensive 1-week Inquiry-Based Science and Technology Enrichment Program (InSTEP) designed for middle school-aged female students. InSTEP uses a guided/open inquiry approach that is deepened and redefined as eight sciences and engineering practices in the Next Generation Science Standards, which aimed at…

  10. School Entry Age and Reading Achievement in the 2006 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggate, Sebastian P.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence regarding the effect of early reading instruction on later reading achievement is unusually sparse, given the emphasis often placed on early and intensive reading instruction. Capitalising on international differences in school entry age (SEA), international reading studies may provide such evidence; however, only one quantitative…

  11. Language Outcomes of School-Aged Internationally Adopted Children: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that, as a group, many internationally adopted children catch up to their peers in terms of their language development by the time they reach their school-age years. Although this appears to be particularly true for children adopted during the first few years of life, it is not true for all internationally adopted…

  12. School-Aged Children of Alcoholics: Theory and Research. Pamphlet Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeannette L.; Bennett, Linda A.

    Despite the research documenting the occurrence of alcoholism in families, little is known about how alcoholism is transmitted from one generation to the next or what causes several members of the same family to abuse alcohol. To date, the most consistent findings among school-aged children are reports of cognitive differences. Health problems,…

  13. The Development of Luminance- and Texture-Defined Form Perception during the School-Aged Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertone, Armando; Hanck, Julie; Guy, Jacalyn; Cornish, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the development of luminance- and texture-defined static form perception in school-aged children. This was done using an adapted Landolt-C technique where C-optotypes were defined by either luminance or texture information, the latter necessitating extra-striate neural processing to be perceived.…

  14. A Narrative Review of Problem-Based Learning with School-Aged Children: Implementation and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerzembek, Gabi; Murphy, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews empirical studies that have evaluated the impact of problem-based learning (PBL) on school-aged pupils, in order to summarise how it has been implemented and to assess its effects on academic and personal development. Following electronic searches of PsychINFO, the British Education Index and the Cochrane review database, six…

  15. Evaluation of the feasibility of international growth standards for school-aged children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of an international growth standard for the screening, surveillance, and monitoring of school-aged children and adolescents has been motivated by 2 contemporaneous events, the global surge in childhood obesity, and the release of a new international growth standard for infants and pr...

  16. Oral Discourse and Reading Comprehension Abilities of African American School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koonce, Nicole M.

    2012-01-01

    The reading underachievement of African American (AA) school-age children has received considerable attention in educational circles. Unfortunately, there are relatively few studies designed to uncover the source or sources of these reading achievement differences, especially in children beyond early elementary grades. Some studies suggest that…

  17. Factors Affecting Sensitivity to Frequency Change in School-Age Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buss, Emily; Taylor, Crystal N.; Leibold, Lori J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-age children are poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to evaluate developmental effects related to memory for pitch and the utilization of temporal fine structure. Method: Listeners were 5.1- to 13.6-year-olds and adults, all with normal hearing. A subgroup of…

  18. Participation and Enjoyment of Leisure Activities in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majnemer, Annette; Shevell, Michael; Law, Mary; Birnbaum, Rena; Chilingaryan, Gevorg; Rosenbaum, Peter; Poulin, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize participation in leisure activities in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and identify determinants of greater involvement. Ninety-five children of school age (9y 7mo [SD 2y 1mo]) with CP were recruited, and participation was evaluated with the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment in a…

  19. An Analysis of Personal Event Narratives Produced by School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Kristina M.; Ward-Lonergan, Jeannene M.

    This study compared and analyzed the language capabilities of 10 school-age children raised in either single parent homes resulting from divorce or in two parent families. More specifically, it compared the context and complexity of oral personal event narratives produced by both groups of children. The study also investigated the usefulness and…

  20. The Effects of Mass Merchandising on Elementary School Age Children's Book Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Gregory A.

    A survey was given to 866 students in the Westfield Public School (New Jersey) to ascertain whether or not elementary age children were strongly influenced by Corporate America in their reading selections. Respondents were in either second, third, or fourth grade. The children were asked three questions about their favorite character and favorite…

  1. Latchkey Children and School-Age Child Care: A Background Briefing. Policy Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Dale B.

    This background briefing paper synthesizes current thinking and practice on the issue of latchkey children and school-age child care (SACC). The paper defines the problem of latchkey children; reviews related literature and programmatic responses to the problem; reports responses of four southern states; and points out implications for policy…

  2. School-Age Child Care: An Examination of Philosophical Priorities. Research in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mick; Wallinga, Charlotte; Toledo, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    School-age child care (SACC) is a relatively new social institution, and effective SACC programs must balance academic, recreational, and enrichment needs of child development. Outcomes of a study in two states to review program operations, staffing, activities, community involvement, and evaluation indicate that programs focus on academics and…

  3. Sleep problems of school-aged children: a complementary view.

    PubMed

    Paavonen, E J; Aronen, E T; Moilanen, I; Piha, J; Räsänen, E; Tamminen, T; Almqvist, F

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this population-based multicentre study was to evaluate the prevalence rates of sleep problems among 8-9-y-old children. The sample consisted of 5813 Finnish children, making up 10% of the age cohort. Both parents and children provided information. Disturbed sleep was reported by 21.7% of parents. Most of the problems were mild; only 0.3% were serious. Dyssomnias were frequent: 11.1% had difficulties with sleep onset, 7.1% with night waking and 2.3% with waking too early. Multiple sleep problems were present in 9.1% of the children. 17.8% of children reported disturbed sleep, 12.7% had problems many nights and 5.1% every night. In 32.0% of cases, either the parent or the child reported disturbed sleep; 7.4% of these reports came from both the parent and the child, 14.1% from the parent only and 10.3% from the child only. The correspondence between informants was poor (kappa = 0.224). Sleeping problems were associated with somatic and psychiatric problems. It is concluded that by restricting questioning to parents only, one-third of all potential cases of sleep problems may go unnoticed. In order to increase the sensitivity of screening children's sleep problems, both parents and children should provide information in epidemiological settings as well as in clinical work. PMID:10709895

  4. Overweight among primary school-age children in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Balkish Mahadir; Mahmud, Siti Zuraidah; Ambak, Rashidah; Sallehuddin, Syafinaz Mohd; Mutalip, Hatta Abdul; Saari, Riyanti; Sahril, Norhafizah; Hamid, Hamizatul Akmal Abdul

    2013-01-01

    This study is a secondary data analysis from the National Health Morbidity Survey III, a population-based study conducted in 2006. A total of 7,749 children between 7 and 12 years old were recruited into the study. This study seeks to report the prevalence of overweight (including obesity) children in Malaysia using international cut-off point and identify its associated key social determinants. The results show that the overall prevalence of overweight children in Malaysia was 19.9%. The urban residents, males, Chinese, those who are wealthy, have overweight or educated guardians showed higher prevalence of overweight. In multivariable analysis, higher likelihood of being overweight was observed among those with advancing age (OR=1.15), urban residents (OR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.01-1.36), the Chinese (OR=1.45, 95% CI: 1.19-1.77), boys (OR=1.23, 95% CI: 1.08-1.41), and those who came from higher income family. In conclusion, one out of five of 7-12 year-old-children in Malaysia were overweight. Locality of residence, ethnicity, gender, guardian education, and overweight guardian were likely to be the predictors of this alarming issue. Societal and public health efforts are needed in order to reduce the burden of disease associated with obesity. PMID:23945411

  5. Linguistic Masking Release in School-Age Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Leibold, Lori J.; Buss, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed if 6- to 8-year-old children benefit from a language mismatch between target and masker speech for sentence recognition in a 2-talker masker. Method English sentence recognition was evaluated for English monolingual children (ages 6–8 years, n = 15) and adults (n = 15) in an English 2-talker and a Spanish 2-talker masker. A regression analysis with subject as a random variable was used to test the fixed effect of listener group and masker language and the interaction of these two effects. Results Thresholds were approximately 5 dB higher for children than for adults in both maskers. However, children and adults benefited to the same degree from a mismatch between the target and masker language with approximately 3 dB lower thresholds in the Spanish than the English masker. Conclusions Results suggest that children are able to take advantage of linguistic differences between English and Spanish speech maskers to the same degree as adults. Yet, overall worse performance for children may indicate general cognitive immaturity compared with adults, perhaps causing children to be less efficient when combining glimpses of degraded speech information into a meaningful sentence. PMID:26974870

  6. School Phobia: Understanding a Complex Behavioural Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitiyo, Morgan; Wheeler, John J.

    2006-01-01

    School phobia affects about 5% of the school-age population. If left untreated, school phobia can have devastating long-term consequences in children challenged by this condition. Various treatment approaches have been used to explore this complex behavioural response, major among them being the psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, pharmacological and…

  7. Functional performance of school children diagnosed with developmental delay up to two years of age

    PubMed Central

    Dornelas, Lílian de Fátima; Magalhães, Lívia de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare the functional performance of students diagnosed with developmental delay (DD) up to two years of age with peers exhibiting typical development. Methods: Cross-sectional study with functional performance assessment of children diagnosed with DD up to two years of age compared to those with typical development at seven to eight years of age. Each group consisted of 45 children, selected by non-random sampling, evaluated for motor skills, quality of home environment, school participation and performance. ANOVA and the Binomial test for two proportions were used to assess differences between groups. Results: The group with DD had lower motor skills when compared to the typical group. While 66.7% of children in the typical group showed adequate school participation, receiving aid in cognitive and behavioral tasks similar to that offered to other children at the same level, only 22.2% of children with DD showed the same performance. Although 53.3% of the children with DD achieved an academic performance expected for the school level, there were limitations in some activities. Only two indicators of family environment, diversity and activities with parents at home, showed statistically significant difference between the groups, with advantage being shown for the typical group. Conclusions: Children with DD have persistent difficulties at school age, with motor deficit, restrictions in school activity performance and low participation in the school context, as well as significantly lower functional performance when compared to children without DD. A systematic monitoring of this population is recommended to identify needs and minimize future problems. PMID:26553573

  8. The sources and manifestations of stress amongst school-aged dyslexics, compared with sibling controls.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Passe, Neil

    2008-11-01

    All school children experience stress at some point in their school careers. This study investigates whether dyslexic children, by way of their educational and social difficulties, experience higher levels of stress at school. The School Situation Survey was used to investigate both the sources and manifestations of stress amongst dyslexic children and non-dyslexic sibling controls. Samples were broken down by gender, age and the size of families. Results suggest significant differences between the groups, with dyslexics in academic years 3-5 experiencing the highest stress levels, specifically in interactions with teachers, worries over academic examinations (SATs) and performance testing, causing emotional (fear, shyness and loneliness) and physiological (nausea, tremors or rapid heart beat) manifestations. Results also suggest that dyslexics in larger families (3-4 sibling families) experience greater stress in interactions with their peers, than those in smaller families (two sibling families)--possibly from unfair sibling comparison. PMID:17910007

  9. Built Environment Features that Promote Cycling in School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Larouche, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Previous research shows that children and youth who cycle to/from school are more active and fitter than those who travel by motorized modes. However, rates of cycling are low in many countries, and a better understanding of the correlates of cycling may inform the development of future interventions. This review summarizes the current literature on the built environment correlates of cycling among school-aged children and youth. While both studies of transportation and recreational cycling were eligible, the majority of the 12 included studies focused on the trip to/from school and consistently indicated that shorter distance between home and school is associated with greater odds of cycling. However, little is known about the correlates of cycling for other purposes. Furthermore, other built environment features have not been studied enough to allow strong conclusions to be drawn. Recommendations for future studies are proposed to address the limitations of current evidence. PMID:26364306

  10. School-Age Children in Immigrant Families: Challenges and Opportunities for America's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Donald J.; Denton, Nancy A.; Macartney, Suzanne E.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: By the year 2030, when the baby boom generation born between 1946 and 1964 will be in the retirement ages, 72% of the elderly will be non-Hispanic Whites, compared with 56% for working-age adults, and 50% for children. As the predominantly White baby boomers reach retirement, they will increasingly depend for economic support…

  11. Does Raising the State Compulsory School Attendance Age Achieve the Intended Outcomes? Summary. REL 2014-005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Philip E.; Duncan, Teresa G.

    2013-01-01

    Maryland raised its compulsory school attendance age from 16 to 18 in two stages: from 16 to 17 at the beginning of the 2014/15 school year and from 17 to 18 at the beginning of the 2016/17 school year (Maryland Senate Bill 362, 2012). The Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) sought technical assistance from the Regional Educational…

  12. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  13. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  14. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  15. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  16. Gender and age differences in self-reported aggression of high school students.

    PubMed

    Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Travlos, Antonios K; Rodafinos, Angelos

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to (a) investigate gender and age differences in physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger, and hostility, and (b) examine the discriminatory power of the Greek version of the Aggression Questionnaire (GAQ) with high school students. The sample of the study consisted of 658 high school students (321 boys and 337 girls), with an age range from 13 to 17 years (M = 15.3, SD = 1.5). The students completed the Aggression Questionnaire adapted to Greek. Regarding gender, the overall correct identification rate in the discriminant analysis showed that 73.3% of the cases were correctly classified. In addition, the results indicated that physical aggression declined with age and that, compared to boys, girls of higher grades apply more indirect forms of aggression, such as anger and hostility. The findings of the study provide important information regarding the expression of aggressive behavior during adolescence. PMID:23262821

  17. The Effects of Age Factor on Learning English: A Case Study of Learning English in Saudi Schools, Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawi, Elsadig Mohamed Khalifa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of age on learning English in Saudi Arabia. It aims at encouraging the learning of English as a foreign language at an early age in KSA. The populations of the study are English language teachers and Saudi students in elementary schools compared with intermediate school students in Dawadmi…

  18. Intensive Behavioral Intervention for School-Aged Children with Autism: Una Breccia nel Muro (UBM)--A Comprehensive Behavioral Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fava, Leonardo; Vicari, Stefano; Valeri, Giovanni; D'Elia, Lidia; Arima, Serena; Strauss, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Although, reviews and outcome research supports empirical evidence for Early Intensive Behavior Intervention in pre-scholars, intensive behavioral service provision for school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are less subject to research studies. In order to provide effective behavioral interventions for school-aged children it…

  19. The Relevance of Media Education in Primary Schools in Hong Kong in the Age of New Media: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, C. K.

    2005-01-01

    In this age of new media, children are exposed to media messages at an early age. What can we do when the mass media exert such a great influence on children? One proposal has been for the introduction of a new school subject: media education. Though media education has not been part of the official curriculum in Hong Kong, some schools, both…

  20. Development of the Conversation Participation Rating Scale: Intervention Planning Implications for Two School-Age Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timler, Geralyn R.; Boone, William J.; Bergmann, Amelia A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: School-age children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have pervasive challenges in social interactions with peers. This study examined the feasibility of eliciting children's perceptions of their conversation participation with peers for the purposes of assessment and intervention planning. Methods: Two school-age children with ASD…