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Sample records for age modified proteins

  1. Morphological remodeling of C. elegans neurons during aging is modified by compromised protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Vayndorf, Elena M; Scerbak, Courtney; Hunter, Skyler; Neuswanger, Jason R; Toth, Marton; Parker, J Alex; Neri, Christian; Driscoll, Monica; Taylor, Barbara E

    Understanding cellular outcomes, such as neuronal remodeling, that are common to both healthy and diseased aging brains is essential to the development of successful brain aging strategies. Here, we used Caenorhabdits elegans to investigate how the expression of proteotoxic triggers, such as polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded huntingtin and silencing of proteostasis regulators, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and protein clearance components, may impact the morphological remodeling of individual neurons as animals age. We examined the effects of disrupted proteostasis on the integrity of neuronal cytoarchitecture by imaging a transgenic C. elegans strain in which touch receptor neurons express the first 57 amino acids of the human huntingtin (Htt) gene with expanded polyQs (128Q) and by using neuron-targeted RNA interference in adult wild-type neurons to knockdown genes encoding proteins involved in proteostasis. We found that proteostatic challenges conferred by polyQ-expanded Htt and knockdown of specific genes involved in protein homeostasis can lead to morphological changes that are restricted to specific domains of specific neurons. The age-associated branching of PLM neurons is suppressed by N-ter polyQ-expanded Htt expression, whereas ALM neurons with polyQ-expanded Htt accumulate extended outgrowths and other soma abnormalities. Furthermore, knockdown of genes important for ubiquitin-mediated degradation, lysosomal function, and autophagy modulated these age-related morphological changes in otherwise normal neurons. Our results show that the expression of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative disease such as Huntington's disease modifies the morphological remodeling that is normally associated with neuronal aging. Our results also show that morphological remodeling of healthy neurons during aging can be regulated by the UPS and other proteostasis pathways. Collectively, our data highlight a model in which morphological remodeling during neuronal

  2. Morphological remodeling of C. elegans neurons during aging is modified by compromised protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Vayndorf, Elena M; Scerbak, Courtney; Hunter, Skyler; Neuswanger, Jason R; Toth, Marton; Parker, J Alex; Neri, Christian; Driscoll, Monica; Taylor, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular outcomes, such as neuronal remodeling, that are common to both healthy and diseased aging brains is essential to the development of successful brain aging strategies. Here, we used Caenorhabdits elegans to investigate how the expression of proteotoxic triggers, such as polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded huntingtin and silencing of proteostasis regulators, such as the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) and protein clearance components, may impact the morphological remodeling of individual neurons as animals age. We examined the effects of disrupted proteostasis on the integrity of neuronal cytoarchitecture by imaging a transgenic C. elegans strain in which touch receptor neurons express the first 57 amino acids of the human huntingtin (Htt) gene with expanded polyQs (128Q) and by using neuron-targeted RNA interference in adult wild-type neurons to knockdown genes encoding proteins involved in proteostasis. We found that proteostatic challenges conferred by polyQ-expanded Htt and knockdown of specific genes involved in protein homeostasis can lead to morphological changes that are restricted to specific domains of specific neurons. The age-associated branching of PLM neurons is suppressed by N-ter polyQ-expanded Htt expression, whereas ALM neurons with polyQ-expanded Htt accumulate extended outgrowths and other soma abnormalities. Furthermore, knockdown of genes important for ubiquitin-mediated degradation, lysosomal function, and autophagy modulated these age-related morphological changes in otherwise normal neurons. Our results show that the expression of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative disease such as Huntington’s disease modifies the morphological remodeling that is normally associated with neuronal aging. Our results also show that morphological remodeling of healthy neurons during aging can be regulated by the UPS and other proteostasis pathways. Collectively, our data highlight a model in which morphological remodeling during

  3. Receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 have distinct physiological functions from embryogenesis to old age.

    PubMed

    Dackor, Ryan; Fritz-Six, Kim; Smithies, Oliver; Caron, Kathleen

    2007-06-22

    RAMPs (receptor activity modifying proteins) impart remarkable effects on G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. First identified through an interaction with the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), these single transmembrane proteins are now known to modulate the in vitro ligand binding affinity, trafficking, and second messenger pathways of numerous GPCRs. Consequently, the receptor-RAMP interface represents an attractive pharmacological target for the treatment of disease. Although the three known mammalian RAMPs differ in their sequences and tissue expression, results from in vitro biochemical and pharmacological studies suggest that they have overlapping effects on the GPCRs with which they interact. Therefore, to determine whether RAMP2 and RAMP3 have distinct functions in vivo, we generated mice with targeted deletions of either the RAMP2 or RAMP3 gene. Strikingly, we found that, although RAMP2 is required for survival, mice that lack RAMP3 appear normal until old age, at which point they have decreased weight. In addition, mice with reduced expression of RAMP2 (but not RAMP3) display remarkable subfertility. Thus, each gene has functions in vivo that cannot be accomplished by the other. Because RAMP2, RAMP3, and CLR transduce the signaling of the two potent vasodilators adrenomedullin and calcitonin gene-related peptide, we tested the effects of our genetic modifications on blood pressure, and no effects were detected. Nevertheless, our studies reveal that RAMP2 and RAMP3 have distinct physiological functions throughout embryogenesis, adulthood, and old age, and the mice we have generated provide novel genetic tools to further explore the utility of the receptor-RAMP interface as a pharmacological target.

  4. Serum metabolites, ghrelin and leptin are modified by age and/or diet in weanling kittens fed either a high- or moderate-protein diet.

    PubMed

    Vester, Brittany M; Belsito, Katherine R; Swanson, Kelly S

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of in utero and postnatal exposure of a high-protein (HP; n=9) or moderate-protein (MP; n=16) diet on growth, and serum metabolite, ghrelin and leptin concentrations during the first 4 months of life in kittens. It was hypothesized that blood indices would be modified due to diet. Blood samples were collected from kittens at 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age. Kittens were weaned at 8 weeks of age onto the same diet as the dam. Body weight was measured weekly from birth and daily food intake for each litter was recorded post-weaning. Serum concentrations of urea nitrogen, total protein and triglycerides were greater (P<0.05) in kittens fed the HP diet. Serum cholesterol concentrations were greater (P <0.05) in MP-fed kittens at 4 weeks of age. Moderate-protein fed kittens tended to have greater (P < 0.10) serum ghrelin concentrations. Leptin concentrations were not affected by diet, but changed over time (P<0.05). Our data indicate that diet and age of kittens affect circulating concentrations of peptides important in appetite regulation. Further research testing the effects of in utero and early postnatal nutrient exposure on feline obesity risk in adulthood is needed.

  5. Prion protein codon 129 polymorphism modifies age at onset of frontotemporal dementia with the C.709-1G>A progranulin mutation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Fermín; Alzualde, Ainhoa; Camblor, Pablo Martínez; Barandiaran, Myriam; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Gabilondo, Alazne; Martí Massó, José F; López de Munain, Adolfo; Indakoetxea, Begoña

    2011-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration because of mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene presents a high variability both in the clinical phenotype and age of onset of disease. Factors that influence this variability remain largely unknown. The aim of our study was to determine whether selected genetic variables modify age at onset of disease in our series of 21 patients with a single splicing mutation (c.709-1G>A) in the PGRN gene, all of whom were of Basque descent. In our analysis, we included the following genetic variables: PGRN rs5848 and rs9897526 polymorphisms, APOE and microtubule-associated protein tau genotypes, and PRNP codon 129 polymorphism. We found no association between PGRN polymorphisms, APOE and microtubule-associated protein tau genotypes, and age at onset of the disease; whereas we report evidence for an association between PRNP codon 129 polymorphism and age at onset of disease in frontotemporal dementia-PGRN(+) patients. MM homozygous carriers presented onset of disease on average 8.5 years earlier than patients who carried at least 1 valine on their PRNP codon 129 (MV or VV). The biological justification for this association remains speculative.

  6. Presence of dopa and amino acid hydroperoxides in proteins modified with advanced glycation end products (AGEs): amino acid oxidation products as a possible source of oxidative stress induced by AGE proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, S; Fu, M X; Baynes, J W; Thorpe, S R; Dean, R T

    1998-01-01

    Glycation and subsequent Maillard or browning reactions of glycated proteins, leading to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), are involved in the chemical modification of proteins during normal aging and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Oxidative conditions accelerate the browning of proteins by glucose, and AGE proteins also induce oxidative stress responses in cells bearing AGE receptors. These observations have led to the hypothesis that glycation-induced pathology results from a cycle of oxidative stress, increased chemical modification of proteins via the Maillard reaction, and further AGE-dependent oxidative stress. Here we show that the preparation of AGE-collagen by incubation with glucose under oxidative conditions in vitro leads not only to glycation and formation of the glycoxidation product Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), but also to the formation of amino acid oxidation products on protein, including m-tyrosine, dityrosine, dopa, and valine and leucine hydroperoxides. The formation of both CML and amino acid oxidation products was prevented by anaerobic, anti-oxidative conditions. Amino acid oxidation products were also formed when glycated collagen, prepared under anti-oxidative conditions, was allowed to incubate under aerobic conditions that led to the formation of CML. These experiments demonstrate that amino acid oxidation products are formed in proteins during glycoxidation reactions and suggest that reactive oxygen species formed by redox cycling of dopa or by the metal-catalysed decomposition of amino acid hydroperoxides, rather than by redox activity or reactive oxygen production by AGEs on protein, might contribute to the induction of oxidative stress by AGE proteins. PMID:9461515

  7. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Susan; Wang, Donghai; Zhong, Zhikai; Yang, Guang

    2008-08-26

    The, present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  8. Prion protein and aging

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Lisa; Legname, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been widely investigated ever since its conformational isoform, the prion (or PrPSc), was identified as the etiological agent of prion disorders. The high homology shared by the PrPC-encoding gene among mammals, its high turnover rate and expression in every tissue strongly suggest that PrPC may possess key physiological functions. Therefore, defining PrPC roles, properties and fate in the physiology of mammalian cells would be fundamental to understand its pathological involvement in prion diseases. Since the incidence of these neurodegenerative disorders is enhanced in aging, understanding PrPC functions in this life phase may be of crucial importance. Indeed, a large body of evidence suggests that PrPC plays a neuroprotective and antioxidant role. Moreover, it has been suggested that PrPC is involved in Alzheimer disease, another neurodegenerative pathology that develops predominantly in the aging population. In prion diseases, PrPC function is likely lost upon protein aggregation occurring in the course of the disease. Additionally, the aging process may alter PrPC biochemical properties, thus influencing its propensity to convert into PrPSc. Both phenomena may contribute to the disease development and progression. In Alzheimer disease, PrPC has a controversial role because its presence seems to mediate β-amyloid toxicity, while its down-regulation correlates with neuronal death. The role of PrPC in aging has been investigated from different perspectives, often leading to contrasting results. The putative protein functions in aging have been studied in relation to memory, behavior and myelin maintenance. In aging mice, PrPC changes in subcellular localization and post-translational modifications have been explored in an attempt to relate them to different protein roles and propensity to convert into PrPSc. Here we provide an overview of the most relevant studies attempting to delineate PrPC functions and fate in aging

  9. Plasma Proteins Modified by Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) Reveal Site-specific Susceptibilities to Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Greifenhagen, Uta; Frolov, Andrej; Blüher, Matthias; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-04-29

    Protein glycation refers to the reversible reaction between aldoses (or ketoses) and amino groups yielding relatively stable Amadori (or Heyns) products. Consecutive oxidative cleavage reactions of these products or the reaction of amino groups with other reactive substances (e.g. α-dicarbonyls) yield advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that can alter the structures and functions of proteins. AGEs have been identified in all organisms, and their contents appear to rise with some diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Here, we report a pilot study using highly sensitive and specific proteomics approach to identify and quantify AGE modification sites in plasma proteins by reversed phase HPLC mass spectrometry in tryptic plasma digests. In total, 19 AGE modification sites corresponding to 11 proteins were identified in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus under poor glycemic control. The modification degrees of 15 modification sites did not differ among cohorts of normoglycemic lean or obese and type 2 diabetes mellitus patients under good and poor glycemic control. The contents of two amide-AGEs in human serum albumin and apolipoprotein A-II were significantly higher in patients with poor glycemic control, although the plasma levels of both proteins were similar among all plasma samples. These two modification sites might be useful to predict long term, AGE-related complications in diabetic patients, such as impaired vision, increased arterial stiffness, or decreased kidney function.

  10. Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 (historical) Modified Protein Improves Vitiligo Symptoms in Mice Altering a key protein involved in the development ... pigmentation loss associated with the skin disorder in mice, according to recent research funded by the NIH’s ...

  11. Taste-modifying protein from miracle fruit.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, K; Beidler, L M

    1968-09-20

    The active principle of miracle fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum) is a basic glycoprotein with a probable molecular weight of 44,000. Application of the protein to the tongue modifies the taste so that one tastes sour substances as sweet.

  12. Protein Requirements during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Ball, Ronald O.; Pencharz, Paul B.; Elango, Rajavel

    2016-01-01

    Protein recommendations for elderly, both men and women, are based on nitrogen balance studies. They are set at 0.66 and 0.8 g/kg/day as the estimated average requirement (EAR) and recommended dietary allowance (RDA), respectively, similar to young adults. This recommendation is based on single linear regression of available nitrogen balance data obtained at test protein intakes close to or below zero balance. Using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) method, we estimated the protein requirement in young adults and in both elderly men and women to be 0.9 and 1.2 g/kg/day as the EAR and RDA, respectively. This suggests that there is no difference in requirement on a gender basis or on a per kg body weight basis between younger and older adults. The requirement estimates however are ~40% higher than the current protein recommendations on a body weight basis. They are also 40% higher than our estimates in young men when calculated on the basis of fat free mass. Thus, current recommendations may need to be re-assessed. Potential rationale for this difference includes a decreased sensitivity to dietary amino acids and increased insulin resistance in the elderly compared with younger individuals. PMID:27529275

  13. Protein oxidation in aging and the removal of oxidized proteins.

    PubMed

    Höhn, Annika; König, Jeannette; Grune, Tilman

    2013-10-30

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated constantly within cells at low concentrations even under physiological conditions. During aging the levels of ROS can increase due to a limited capacity of antioxidant systems and repair mechanisms. Proteins are among the main targets for oxidants due to their high rate constants for several reactions with ROS and their abundance in biological systems. Protein damage has an important influence on cellular viability since most protein damage is non-repairable, and has deleterious consequences on protein structure and function. In addition, damaged and modified proteins can form cross-links and provide a basis for many senescence-associated alterations and may contribute to a range of human pathologies. Two proteolytic systems are responsible to ensure the maintenance of cellular functions: the proteasomal (UPS) and the lysosomal system. Those degrading systems provide a last line of antioxidative protection, removing irreversible damaged proteins and recycling amino acids for the continuous protein synthesis. But during aging, both systems are affected and their proteolytic activity declines significantly. Here we highlight the recent advantages in the understanding of protein oxidation and the fate of these damaged proteins during aging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Posttranslational Protein modifications in biology and Medicine.

  14. Aged Garlic Extract Modifies Human Immunity.

    PubMed

    Percival, Susan S

    2016-02-01

    Garlic contains numerous compounds that have the potential to influence immunity. Immune cells, especially innate immune cells, are responsible for the inflammation necessary to kill pathogens. Two innate lymphocytes, γδ-T and natural killer (NK) cells, appear to be susceptible to diet modification. The purpose of this review was to summarize the influence of aged garlic extract (AGE) on the immune system. The author's laboratory is interested in AGE's effects on cell proliferation and activation and inflammation and to learn whether those changes might affect the occurrence and severity of colds and flu. Healthy human participants (n = 120), between 21 and 50 y of age, were recruited for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel-intervention study to consume 2.56 g AGE/d or placebo supplements for 90 d during the cold and flu season. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated before and after consumption, and γδ-T and NK cell function was assessed by flow cytometry. The effect on cold and flu symptoms was determined by using daily diary records of self-reported illnesses. After 45 d of AGE consumption, γδ-T and NK cells proliferated better and were more activated than cells from the placebo group. After 90 d, although the number of illnesses was not significantly different, the AGE group showed reduced cold and flu severity, with a reduction in the number of symptoms, the number of days participants functioned suboptimally, and the number of work/school days missed. These results suggest that AGE supplementation may enhance immune cell function and may be partly responsible for the reduced severity of colds and flu reported. The results also suggest that the immune system functions well with AGE supplementation, perhaps with less accompanying inflammation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01390116.

  15. Age and Forgetfulness: Can Stereotypes Be Modified?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Xiaohui; Erber, Joan T.; Szuchman, Lenore T.

    1999-01-01

    A script depicting a forgetful young or older person was read by 90 young and 73 older adults. Earlier, one-third read an article about memory declines and aging, one-third read about memory staying constant, and one-third read no articles. Younger subjects who read the decline article attributed memory failures to lack of ability in older…

  16. Protein profile changes during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on protein expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guang-Jian; Wang, Ke; Miao, De-Qiang; Guo, Lei; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that oocyte aging critically affects reproduction and development. By using proteomic tools, in the present study, changes in protein profiles during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on oocyte aging were investigated. By comparing control MII oocytes with aging MII oocytes, we identified 23 proteins that were up-regulated and 3 proteins that were down-regulated during the aging process. In caffeine-treated oocytes, 6 proteins were identified as up-regulated and 12 proteins were identified as down-regulated. A total of 38 differentially expressed proteins grouped into 5 regulation patterns were determined to relate to the aging and anti-aging process. By using the Gene Ontology system, we found that numerous functional gene products involved in metabolism, stress response, reactive oxygen species and cell cycle regulation were differentially expressed during the oocyte aging process, and most of these proteins are for the first time reported in our study, including 2 novel proteins. In addition, several proteins were found to be modified during oocyte aging. These data contribute new information that may be useful for future research on cellular aging and for improvement of oocyte quality.

  17. Investigation of modified cottonseed protein adhesives for wood composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several modified cottonseed protein isolates were studied and compared to corresponding soy protein isolates for their adhesive properties when bonded to wood composites. Modifications included treatments with alkali, guanidine hydrochloride, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and urea. Wood composites...

  18. An intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover.

    PubMed

    Yang, Won Ho; Aziz, Peter V; Heithoff, Douglas M; Mahan, Michael J; Smith, Jeffrey W; Marth, Jamey D

    2015-11-03

    The composition and functions of the secreted proteome are controlled by the life spans of different proteins. However, unlike intracellular protein fate, intrinsic factors determining secreted protein aging and turnover have not been identified and characterized. Almost all secreted proteins are posttranslationally modified with the covalent attachment of N-glycans. We have discovered an intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover linked to the stepwise elimination of saccharides attached to the termini of N-glycans. Endogenous glycosidases, including neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), neuraminidase 3 (Neu3), beta-galactosidase 1 (Glb1), and hexosaminidase B (HexB), possess hydrolytic activities that temporally remodel N-glycan structures, progressively exposing different saccharides with increased protein age. Subsequently, endocytic lectins with distinct binding specificities, including the Ashwell-Morell receptor, integrin αM, and macrophage mannose receptor, are engaged in N-glycan ligand recognition and the turnover of secreted proteins. Glycosidase inhibition and lectin deficiencies increased protein life spans and abundance, and the basal rate of N-glycan remodeling varied among distinct proteins, accounting for differences in their life spans. This intrinsic multifactorial mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover contributes to health and the outcomes of disease.

  19. An intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Won Ho; Aziz, Peter V.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Mahan, Michael J.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Marth, Jamey D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition and functions of the secreted proteome are controlled by the life spans of different proteins. However, unlike intracellular protein fate, intrinsic factors determining secreted protein aging and turnover have not been identified and characterized. Almost all secreted proteins are posttranslationally modified with the covalent attachment of N-glycans. We have discovered an intrinsic mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover linked to the stepwise elimination of saccharides attached to the termini of N-glycans. Endogenous glycosidases, including neuraminidase 1 (Neu1), neuraminidase 3 (Neu3), beta-galactosidase 1 (Glb1), and hexosaminidase B (HexB), possess hydrolytic activities that temporally remodel N-glycan structures, progressively exposing different saccharides with increased protein age. Subsequently, endocytic lectins with distinct binding specificities, including the Ashwell–Morell receptor, integrin αM, and macrophage mannose receptor, are engaged in N-glycan ligand recognition and the turnover of secreted proteins. Glycosidase inhibition and lectin deficiencies increased protein life spans and abundance, and the basal rate of N-glycan remodeling varied among distinct proteins, accounting for differences in their life spans. This intrinsic multifactorial mechanism of secreted protein aging and turnover contributes to health and the outcomes of disease. PMID:26489654

  20. The Protein-Sparing Modified Fast Diet

    PubMed Central

    Bakhach, Marwan; Shah, Vaishal; Harwood, Tara; Lappe, Sara; Bhesania, Natalie; Mansoor, Sana; Alkhouri, Naim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The protein-sparing modified fast (PSMF) is a rigorous way of rapidly losing a large amount of weight. Although adult studies have shown the PSMF to be effective, data in adolescents are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of the PSMF in severely obese adolescents. Methods: 12 subjects who were evaluated in the Obesity Management Program at the Cleveland Clinic from 2011 to 2014 were included. The subjects were initiated on the PSMF after failing other conventional methods of weight loss. Once the goal weight was achieved, subjects were transitioned to the refeeding phase for weight maintenance. Results: Follow-up was scheduled at 3-month (11 patients) and 6-month (6 patients) intervals. At the 6-month follow-up visit, the average weight loss was 11.19 kg (95% confidence interval = -5.4, -27.8, P = .028), with average of 9.8% from baseline. Fifty percent of subjects had >5% weight loss and 20% had >10% weight loss. Four patients were lost to the follow-up (40%). An improvement was noted in total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein. Due to a small sample size these results were not statistically significant. Side effects reported by subjects were mild dehydration due to nausea (2 patients), decreased energy (1 patient), and transient labile mood (1 patient). No life-threatening side effects were reported. Conclusion: Our results show that the PSMF diet can be used as an effective and safe method in the outpatient setting for rapid weight loss in adolescents with severe obesity. PMID:27335996

  1. Stress Proteins in Aging and Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ayesha; Eguchi, Takanori; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are molecular chaperones and have been implicated in longevity and aging in many species. Their major functions include, chaperoning misfolded or newly synthesized polypeptides, protecting cells from proteotoxic stress, and processing of immunogenic agents. These proteins are expressed constitutively and can be induced by stresses such as heat, oxidative stress and many more. The induction of HSP in aging could potentially maintain protein homeostasis and longevity by refolding the damaged proteins which accumulate during aging and are toxic to cells. HSP are shown to increase life span in model organisms such as C. elegans and decrease aging related proteotoxicity. Thus, decrease in HSP in aging is associated with disruption of cellular homeostasis which causes diseases such as cancer, cell senescence and neurodegeneration. HSP levels are decreased with aging in most organs including neurons. Aging also causes attenuation or alteration of many signaling pathways as well as the expression of transcription factors such as heat shock factor (HSF). The alteration in regulation and synthesis of Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) family of transcription factors as well as major antioxidant enzymes [manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase] are also seen in aging. Among many signaling mechanisms involved in altering longevity and aging, the insulin/IGF1 pathway and the Sir2 deacetylase are highly significant. This review inquires into the role of some of these pathways in longevity/aging along with HSP. PMID:23742046

  2. Heat shock proteins and Drosophila aging

    PubMed Central

    Tower, John

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery in Drosophila, the heat shock proteins (Hsps) have been shown to regulate both stress resistance and life span. Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress and the accumulation of abnormal (malfolded) proteins, and these stresses induce Hsp gene expression through the transcription factor HSF. In addition, a subset of Hsps is induced by oxidative stress through the JNK signaling pathway and the transcription factor Foxo. The Hsps counteract the toxicity of abnormal proteins by facilitating protein refolding and turnover, and through other mechanisms including inhibition of apoptosis. The Hsps are up-regulated in tissue-specific patterns during aging, and their expression correlates with, and sometimes predicts, life span, making them ideal biomarkers of aging. The tools available for experimentally manipulating gene function and assaying healthspan in Drosophila provides an unparalleled opportunity to further study the role of Hsps in aging. PMID:20840862

  3. Heat shock proteins and Drosophila aging.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2011-05-01

    Since their discovery in Drosophila, the heat shock proteins (Hsps) have been shown to regulate both stress resistance and life-span. Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress and the accumulation of abnormal (malfolded) proteins, and these stresses induce Hsp gene expression through the transcription factor HSF. In addition, a subset of Hsps is induced by oxidative stress through the JNK signaling pathway and the transcription factor Foxo. The Hsps counteract the toxicity of abnormal proteins by facilitating protein refolding and turnover, and through other mechanisms including inhibition of apoptosis. The Hsps are up-regulated in tissue-specific patterns during aging, and their expression correlates with, and sometimes predicts, life span, making them ideal biomarkers of aging. The tools available for experimentally manipulating gene function and assaying healthspan in Drosophila provides an unparalleled opportunity to further study the role of Hsps in aging.

  4. Modifiable diarrhoea risk factors in Egyptian children aged <5 years.

    PubMed

    Mansour, A M; Mohammady, H El; Shabrawi, M El; Shabaan, S Y; Zekri, M Abou; Nassar, M; Salem, M E; Mostafa, M; Riddle, M S; Klena, J D; Messih, I A Abdel; Levin, S; Young, S Y N

    2013-12-01

    By conducting a case-control study in two university hospitals, we explored the association between modifiable risk behaviours and diarrhoea. Children aged <5 years attending outpatient clinics for diarrhoea were matched by age and sex with controls. Data were collected on family demographics, socioeconomic indicators, and risk behaviour practices. Two rectal swabs and a stool specimen were collected from cases and controls. Samples were cultured for bacterial pathogens using standard techniques and tested by ELISA to detect rotavirus and Cryptosporidium spp. Four hundred cases and controls were enrolled between 2007 and 2009. The strongest independent risk factors for diarrhoea were: presence of another household member with diarrhoea [matched odds ratio (mOR) 4.9, 95% CI 2.8-8.4] in the week preceding the survey, introduction to a new kind of food (mOR 3, 95% CI 1.7-5.4), and the child being cared for outside home (mOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.2). While these risk factors are not identifiable, in some age groups more easily modifiable risk factors were identified including: having no soap for handwashing (mOR 6.3, 95% CI 1.2-33.9) for children aged 7-12 months, and pacifier use (mOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5) in children aged 0-6 months. In total, the findings of this study suggest that community-based interventions to improve practices related to sanitation and hygiene, handwashing and food could be utilized to reduce the burden of diarrhoea in Egyptian children aged <5 years.

  5. Preparation and evaluation of tara-modified proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quebracho, a vegetable tannin, can be used to modify gelatin to produce a product that has been applied effectively as a filler in leather processing, as described in our previous report. In this ongoing study, another vegetable tannin tara is examined for its possible application in protein modifi...

  6. Dietary protein considerations to support active aging.

    PubMed

    Wall, Benjamin T; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-11-01

    Given our rapidly aging world-wide population, the loss of skeletal muscle mass with healthy aging (sarcopenia) represents an important societal and public health concern. Maintaining or adopting an active lifestyle alleviates age-related muscle loss to a certain extent. Over time, even small losses of muscle tissue can hinder the ability to maintain an active lifestyle and, as such, contribute to the development of frailty and metabolic disease. Considerable research focus has addressed the application of dietary protein supplementation to support exercise-induced gains in muscle mass in younger individuals. In contrast, the role of dietary protein in supporting the maintenance (or gain) of skeletal muscle mass in active older persons has received less attention. Older individuals display a blunted muscle protein synthetic response to dietary protein ingestion. However, this reduced anabolic response can largely be overcome when physical activity is performed in close temporal proximity to protein consumption. Moreover, recent evidence has helped elucidate the optimal type and amount of dietary protein that should be ingested by the older adult throughout the day in order to maximize the skeletal muscle adaptive response to physical activity. Evidence demonstrates that when these principles are adhered to, muscle maintenance or hypertrophy over prolonged periods can be further augmented in active older persons. The present review outlines the current understanding of the role that dietary protein occupies in the lifestyle of active older adults as a means to increase skeletal muscle mass, strength and function, and thus support healthier aging.

  7. Protein carbamylation is a hallmark of aging

    PubMed Central

    Gorisse, Laëtitia; Pietrement, Christine; Vuiblet, Vincent; Schmelzer, Christian E. H.; Duca, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent; Fornès, Paul; Jaisson, Stéphane; Gillery, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a progressive process determined by genetic and acquired factors. Among the latter are the chemical reactions referred to as nonenzymatic posttranslational modifications (NEPTMs), such as glycoxidation, which are responsible for protein molecular aging. Carbamylation is a more recently described NEPTM that is caused by the nonenzymatic binding of isocyanate derived from urea dissociation or myeloperoxidase-mediated catabolism of thiocyanate to free amino groups of proteins. This modification is considered an adverse reaction, because it induces alterations of protein and cell properties. It has been shown that carbamylated proteins increase in plasma and tissues during chronic kidney disease and are associated with deleterious clinical outcomes, but nothing is known to date about tissue protein carbamylation during aging. To address this issue, we evaluated homocitrulline rate, the most characteristic carbamylation-derived product (CDP), over time in skin of mammalian species with different life expectancies. Our results show that carbamylation occurs throughout the whole lifespan and leads to tissue accumulation of carbamylated proteins. Because of their remarkably long half-life, matrix proteins, like type I collagen and elastin, are preferential targets. Interestingly, the accumulation rate of CDPs is inversely correlated with longevity, suggesting the occurrence of still unidentified protective mechanisms. In addition, homocitrulline accumulates more intensely than carboxymethyl-lysine, one of the major advanced glycation end products, suggesting the prominent role of carbamylation over glycoxidation reactions in age-related tissue alterations. Thus, protein carbamylation may be considered a hallmark of aging in mammalian species that may significantly contribute in the structural and functional tissue damages encountered during aging. PMID:26712018

  8. Proteasomal degradation of beta-carotene metabolite--modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Sommerburg, Olaf; Karius, Nicole; Siems, Werner; Langhans, Claus-Dieter; Leichsenring, Michael; Breusing, Nicolle; Grune, Tilman

    2009-01-01

    Free radical attack on beta-carotene results in the formation of high amounts of carotene breakdown products (CBPs) having biological activities. As several of the CBPs are reactive aldehydes, it has to be considered that these compounds are able to modify proteins. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate whether CBP-modification of proteins is leading to damaged proteins recognized and degraded by the proteasomal system. We used the model proteins tau and ferritin to test whether CBPs will modify them and whether such modifications lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation. To modify proteins, we used crude CBPs as a mixture obtained after hypochloric acid derived BC degradation, as well as several single compounds, as apo8'-carotenal, retinal, or beta-ionone. The majority of the CBPs found in our reaction mixture are well known metabolites as described earlier after BC degradation using different oxidants. CBPs are able to modify proteins, and in in vitro studies, we were able to demonstrate that the 20S proteasome is able to recognize and degrade CBP-modified proteins preferentially. In testing the proteolytic response of HT22 cells toward CBPs, we could demonstrate an enhanced protein turnover, which is sensitive to lactacystin. Interestingly, the proteasomal activity is resistant to treatment with CBP. On the other hand, we were able to demonstrate that supraphysiological levels of CBPs might lead to the formation of protein-CBP-adducts that are able to inhibit the proteasome. Therefore, the removal of CBP-modified proteins seems to be catalyzed by the proteasomal system and is effective, if the formation of CBPs is not overwhelming and leading to protein aggregates.

  9. Nonenzymatic posttranslational protein modifications in ageing.

    PubMed

    Soskić, Vukić; Groebe, Karlfried; Schrattenholz, André

    2008-04-01

    One of the most fundamental molecular aspects of aging is accumulating oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) as proposed by the free radical theory of aging. These unwanted chemical side products of normal metabolism lead to the formation of altered, less active and potentially toxic species of DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids, and small molecules. Due to gradually accumulating small contributions of irreversible reactions during ageing, uncatalyzed chemical side reactions occur with increasing frequencies and repair functions decline. Eventually key biochemical pathways are impaired by increasingly less efficient cellular stress management. In this review, we describe the chemical nature of nonenzymatic age-related modifications of proteins and provide an overview of related analytical challenges and approaches, with a focus on mass spectrometry. We include the description of a strategy to rapidly exploit the wealth of mass spectrometric information from standard MALDI-TOF peptide fingerprints for the characterisation of age-related oxidative amino acid modifications.

  10. Urea modified cottonseed protein adhesive for wood composite products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cottonseed protein has the potential to be used as renewable and environmentally friendly adhesives in wood products industry. However, the industry application was limited by its low mechanical properties, low water resistance and viscosity. In this work, urea modified cottonseed protein adhesive w...

  11. Analyzing modifiers of protein aggregation in C. elegans by native agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Mats; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of specific aggregation-prone proteins during aging is thought to be involved in several diseases, most notably Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease as well as polyglutamine expansion disorders such as Huntington's disease. Caenorhabditis elegans disease models with transgenic expression of fluorescently tagged aggregation-prone proteins have been used to screen for genetic modifiers of aggregation. To establish the role of modifying factors in the generation of aggregation intermediates, a method has been developed using native agarose gel electrophoresis (NAGE) that enables parallel screening of aggregation patterns of fluorescently labeled aggregation-prone proteins. Together with microscopy-based genetic screens this method can be used to identify modifiers of protein aggregation and characterize their molecular function. Although described here for analyzing aggregates in C. elegans, NAGE can be adjusted for use in other model organisms as well as for cultured cells.

  12. Numerical solution of the Penna model of biological aging with age-modified mutation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdoń-Maksymowicz, M. S.; Maksymowicz, A. Z.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we present results of numerical calculation of the Penna bit-string model of biological aging, modified for the case of a -dependent mutation rate m(a) , where a is the parent’s age. The mutation rate m(a) is the probability per bit of an extra bad mutation introduced in offspring inherited genome. We assume that m(a) increases with age a . As compared with the reference case of the standard Penna model based on a constant mutation rate m , the dynamics of the population growth shows distinct changes in age distribution of the population. Here we concentrate on mortality q(a) , a fraction of items eliminated from the population when we go from age (a) to (a+1) in simulated transition from time (t) to next time (t+1) . The experimentally observed q(a) dependence essentially follows the Gompertz exponential law for a above the minimum reproduction age. Deviation from the Gompertz law is however observed for the very old items, close to the maximal age. This effect may also result from an increase in mutation rate m with age a discussed in this paper. The numerical calculations are based on analytical solution of the Penna model, presented in a series of papers by Coe [J. B. Coe, Y. Mao, and M. E. Cates, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 288103 (2002)]. Results of the numerical calculations are supported by the data obtained from computer simulation based on the solution by Coe

  13. The heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: relationship to OmpA proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E

    1991-01-01

    The outer membrane of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans contains a 29-kDa protein which exhibits heat modifiability on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and represents a major target for immunoglobulin G antibody in sera of periodontitis patients colonized by this organism. In the present study, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 29-kDa outer membrane protein was determined and compared with reported sequences for other known proteins. The heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to exhibit significant N-terminal homology with the OmpA proteins of other gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this protein reacted with antiserum raised against the purified OmpA protein of Escherichia coli K-12. Whether the heat-modifiable OMP of A. actinomycetemcomitans also shares functional properties of OmpA proteins, particularly with respect to bacteriophage receptor activity, is presently under investigation. Images PMID:2050416

  14. Chitinase modifying proteins from phylogenetically distinct lineages of Brassica pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitinase modifying proteins (CMPs) are secreted fungal proteases that truncate specific plant class IV chitinases by cleaving peptide bonds in their amino termini. We recently identified a CMP from the Zea mays (maize) pathogen Fusarium verticillioides and found that it is a member of the fungalysi...

  15. Presence of hypochlorite-modified proteins in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hazell, L J; Arnold, L; Flowers, D; Waeg, G; Malle, E; Stocker, R

    1996-01-01

    Oxidation of LDL may contribute to atherogenesis, though the nature of the in vivo oxidant(s) remains obscure. Myeloperoxidase, the enzyme responsible for hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite (HOCl) production in vivo, is present in active form in human atherosclerotic lesions, and HOCl aggregates and transforms LDL into a high-uptake form for macrophages in vitro. Here we demonstrate HOCl-modified proteins in human lesions using an mAb raised against HOCl-modified LDL that recognizes HOCl-oxidized proteins but does not cross-react with Cu2+-, malondialdehyde-, or 4-hydroxynonenal-modified LDL. This antibody detected significantly more material in advanced atherosclerotic lesions than normal arteries, even though azide and methionine were included during sample work-up to inhibit myeloperoxidase and to scavenge HOCl. The epitope(s) recognized was predominantly cell associated and present in monocyte/macrophages, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells. The intima and cholesterol clefts stained more heavily than the center of the thickened vessels; adventitial staining was apparent in some cases. Immunostaining was also detected in a very early lesion from an accident victim, beside healthy areas that were unreactive. LDL oxidized by HOCl in vitro, but not native LDL, effectively competed with the epitopes in lesions for antibody binding. Density centrifugation of plaque homogenates and Western blot analysis showed that, in the apo B-containing lipoprotein fraction, the mAb recognized protein(s) of molecular mass greater than apo B, similar to those produced during oxidation of LDL with HOCl in vitro. Three major proteins were recognized by the anti-HOCl-modified protein antibody but not by an anti-apo B antibody in the apo B-free fraction. Together, these results demonstrate HOCl-oxidized proteins in human atherosclerotic lesions, implicating this oxidant in LDL modification in vivo. PMID:8617887

  16. Effect of ageing on rheological properties of storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yu, Jianying; Wu, Shaopeng

    2010-10-15

    Oxidative ageing as an inevitable process in practical road paving has a great effect on the properties of polymer-modified asphalts (PMAs). In this article, the effect of short-term and long-term oxidative ageing on the rheological, physical properties and the morphology of the styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS)- and storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts was studied, respectively. The analysis on the rheological and physical properties of the PMAs before and after ageing showed the two major effects of ageing. On one hand, ageing prompted the degradation of polymer and increased the viscous behaviour of the modified binders, on the other, ageing changed the asphalt compositions and improved the elastic behaviour of the modified binders. The final performance of the aged binders depended on the combined effect. After ageing, the storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts showed an obvious viscous behaviour compare with the SBS-modified asphalts and this led to an improved low-temperature creep property. The rutting resistance of the SBS-modified asphalts declined by the addition of sulfur due to the structural instability of the SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts. The rheological properties of the modified binders before and after ageing also depended strongly on the structural characteristics of SBS. The observation by using optical microscopy showed the compatibility between asphalt and SBS was improved with further ageing, especially for the storage-stable SBS/sulfur-modified asphalts.

  17. Protein-modified nanocrystalline diamond thin films for biosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtl, Andreas; Schmich, Evelyn; Garrido, Jose A.; Hernando, Jorge; Catharino, Silvia C. R.; Walter, Stefan; Feulner, Peter; Kromka, Alexander; Steinmüller, Doris; Stutzmann, Martin

    2004-10-01

    Diamond exhibits several special properties, for example good biocompatibility and a large electrochemical potential window, that make it particularly suitable for biofunctionalization and biosensing. Here we show that proteins can be attached covalently to nanocrystalline diamond thin films. Moreover, we show that, although the biomolecules are immobilized at the surface, they are still fully functional and active. Hydrogen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond films were modified by using a photochemical process to generate a surface layer of amino groups, to which proteins were covalently attached. We used green fluorescent protein to reveal the successful coupling directly. After functionalization of nanocrystalline diamond electrodes with the enzyme catalase, a direct electron transfer between the enzyme's redox centre and the diamond electrode was detected. Moreover, the modified electrode was found to be sensitive to hydrogen peroxide. Because of its dual role as a substrate for biofunctionalization and as an electrode, nanocrystalline diamond is a very promising candidate for future biosensor applications.

  18. Serotonin signaling mediates protein valuation and aging

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Jennifer; Pak, Gloria; Malec, Paige A; Lyu, Yang; Allison, David B; Kennedy, Robert T; Pletcher, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Research into how protein restriction improves organismal health and lengthens lifespan has largely focused on cell-autonomous processes. In certain instances, however, nutrient effects on lifespan are independent of consumption, leading us to test the hypothesis that central, cell non-autonomous processes are important protein restriction regulators. We characterized a transient feeding preference for dietary protein after modest starvation in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and identified tryptophan hydroxylase (Trh), serotonin receptor 2a (5HT2a), and the solute carrier 7-family amino acid transporter, JhI-21, as required for this preference through their role in establishing protein value. Disruption of any one of these genes increased lifespan up to 90% independent of food intake suggesting the perceived value of dietary protein is a critical determinant of its effect on lifespan. Evolutionarily conserved neuromodulatory systems that define neural states of nutrient demand and reward are therefore sufficient to control aging and physiology independent of food consumption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16843.001 PMID:27572262

  19. Competitive Protein Adsorption on Polysaccharide and Hyaluronate Modified Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ombelli, Michela; Costello, Lauren; Postle, Corinne; Anantharaman, Vinod; Meng, Qing Cheng; Composto, Russell J.; Eckmann, David M.

    2011-01-01

    We measured adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) onto six distinct bare and dextran- and hyaluronate-modified silicon surfaces created using two dextran grafting densities and three hyaluronic acid (HA) sodium salts derived from human umbilical cord, rooster comb and streptococcus zooepidemicus. Film thickness and surface morphology depended on HA molecular weight and concentration. BSA coverage was enhanced on surfaces upon competitive adsorption of BSA:Fg mixtures. Dextranization differentially reduced protein adsorption onto surfaces based on oxidation state. Hyaluronization was demonstrated to provide the greatest resistance to protein coverage, equivalent to that of the most resistant dextranized surface. Resistance to protein adsorption was independent of the type of hyaluronic acid utilized. With changing bulk protein concentration from 20 to 40 µg ml−1 for each species, Fg coverage on silicon increased by 4×, whereas both BSA and Fg adsorption on dextran and HA were far less dependent of protein bulk concentration. PMID:21623481

  20. Prion protein accumulation in lipid rafts of mouse aging brain.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrP(C). In old mice, this change favors PrP(C) accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrP(C) translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrP(C) compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrP(C) in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases.

  1. Prion Protein Accumulation in Lipid Rafts of Mouse Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G.; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrPC. In old mice, this change favors PrPC accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrPC translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrPC compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrPC in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases. PMID:24040215

  2. Identification of Proteins that Modify Cataract of the Eye Lens

    PubMed Central

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Tang, Yajun; Ackermann, Renate; Pleissner, Klaus-Peter; Schmid, Monika; Stein, Robert; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Kumar, Nalin M.; Jungblut, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of a nuclear cataract in the eye lens due to disruption of theα3Cx46 connexin gene, Gja3, is dependent on strain background in a mouse model, implicating factors that modify the pathology. The differences upon cataractogenesis in the urea soluble proteins of the lens of two mouse strains, C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ, were analyzed by a comparative proteomics approach. Determination of the complete proteome of an organ offers the opportunity to characterize at a molecular level, differences in gene expression and post-translational modifications occurring during pathology and between individuals. The abundance of 63 protein species was altered between the strains. A unique aspect of this study is the identification of chaperonin subunit 6A, mortalin, ERp29 and syntaxin binding protein 6 in the eye lens. DNA polymorphisms resulting in non-conservative amino acid changes that led to altered physicochemical properties of the proteins were detected for mortalin, chaperonin subunit 6A, annexin A1 and possibly gamma N crystallin. The results show HSP27/25 and/or ERp29 are the likely major modifying factors for cataractogenesis. Extension of the results suggests that small heat shock proteins have a major role for influencing cataract formation in humans. PMID:19003866

  3. Identification of proteins that modify cataract of mouse eye lens.

    PubMed

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Tang, Yajun; Ackermann, Renate; Pleissner, Klaus-Peter; Schmid, Monika; Stein, Robert; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Kumar, Nalin M; Jungblut, Peter R

    2008-12-01

    The occurrence of a nuclear cataract in the eye lens due to disruption of the alpha3Cx46 connexin gene, Gja3, is dependent on strain background in a mouse model, implicating factors that modify the pathology. The differences upon cataractogenesis in the urea soluble proteins of the lens of two mouse strains, C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ, were analyzed by a comparative proteomics approach. Determination of the complete proteome of an organ offers the opportunity to characterize at a molecular level, differences in gene expression and PTMs occurring during pathology and between individuals. The abundance of 63 protein species was altered between the strains. A unique aspect of this study is the identification of chaperonin subunit 6A, mortalin, ERp29, and syntaxin-binding protein 6 in the eye lens. DNA polymorphisms resulting in nonconservative amino acid changes that led to altered physicochemical properties of the proteins were detected for mortalin, chaperonin subunit 6A, annexin A1, and possibly gamma-N crystallin. The results show HSP27/25 and/or ERp29 are the likely major modifying factors for cataractogenesis. Extension of the results suggests that small heat-shock proteins have a major role for influencing cataract formation in humans.

  4. The importance of lipid modified proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A

    2015-01-01

    Membranes have long been known to act as more than physical barriers within and between plant cells. Trafficking of membrane proteins, signalling from and across membranes, organisation of membranes and transport through membranes are all essential processes for plant cellular function. These processes rely on a myriad array of proteins regulated in a variety of manners and are frequently required to be directly associated with membranes. For integral membrane proteins, the mode of membrane association is readily apparent, but many peripherally associated membrane proteins are outwardly soluble proteins. In these cases the proteins are frequently modified by the addition of lipids allowing direct interaction with the hydrophobic core of membranes. These modifications include N-myristoylation, S-acylation (palmitoylation), prenylation and GPI anchors but until recently little was truly known about their function in plants. New data suggest that these modifications are able to act as more than just membrane anchors, and dynamic S-acylation in particular is emerging as a means of regulating protein function in a similar manner to phosphorylation. This review discusses how these modifications occur, their impact on protein function, how they are regulated, recent advances in the field and technical approaches for studying these modifications.

  5. Mitochondrial proteases and protein quality control in ageing and longevity.

    PubMed

    Hamon, Marie-Paule; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Friguet, Bertrand

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria have been implicated in the ageing process and the lifespan modulation of model organisms. Mitochondria are the main providers of energy in eukaryotic cells but also represent both a major source of reactive oxygen species and targets for protein oxidative damage. Since protein damage can impair mitochondrial function, mitochondrial proteases are critically important for protein maintenance and elimination of oxidized protein. In the mitochondrial matrix, protein quality control is mainly achieved by the Lon and Clp proteases which are also key players in damaged mitochondrial proteins degradation. Accumulation of damaged macromolecules resulting from oxidative stress and failure of protein maintenance constitutes a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing and is believed to participate to the age-related decline of cellular function. Hence, age-related impairment of mitochondrial protein quality control may therefore contribute to the age-associated build-up of oxidized protein and alterations of mitochondrial redox and protein homeostasis.

  6. Preparation of Modified Films with Protein from Grouper Fish

    PubMed Central

    Tecante, A.; Granados-Navarrete, S.; Martínez-García, C.

    2016-01-01

    A protein concentrate (PC) was obtained from Grouper fish skin and it was used to prepare films with different amounts of sorbitol and glycerol as plasticizers. The best performing films regarding resistance were then modified with various concentrations of CaCl2, CaSO4 (calcium salts), and glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) with the purpose of improving their mechanical and barrier properties. These films were characterized by determining their mechanical properties and permeability to water vapor and oxygen. Formulations with 5% (w/v) protein and 75% sorbitol and 4% (w/v) protein with a mixture of 15% glycerol and 15% sorbitol produced adequate films. Calcium salts and GDL increased the tensile fracture stress but reduced the fracture strain and decreased water vapor permeability compared with control films. The films prepared represent an attractive alternative for being used as food packaging materials. PMID:27597950

  7. Exopolysaccharides modify functional properties of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Deep, G; Hassan, A N; Metzger, L

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this research was to produce whey protein concentrate (WPC) with modified functionality using exopolysaccharide- (EPS) producing cultures. Two different EPS-producing cultures, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris JFR and Streptococcus thermophilus, producing EPS1 and EPS2 respectively, were used in this study. One EPS-nonproducing commercial cheese culture (DVS 850; Chr. Hansen, Milwaukee, WI) was used as the control. Reconstituted sweet whey powder was used in this study to eliminate variations from fresh whey. Cultures grown overnight in reconstituted WPC (10% wt/vol) were added, directly or after overnight cooling (cooled EPS), at 2% (wt/vol) to 6% (wt/wt) solution of reconstituted whey. Whey was then high-temperature, short-time pasteurized at 75 °C for 35s and ultrafiltered to a volume reduction factor of 5. Ultrafiltered whey (retentate) was spray dried at inlet and outlet air temperatures of 200 and 90 °C, respectively, to obtain WPC. In general, the solubility of WPC was higher at pH 7 than at pH 3. Whey protein concentrate containing EPS2 exhibited higher protein solubility than did WPC containing no EPS. Also, the presence of EPS in WPC decreased protein denaturation. The emulsifying ability of WPC containing EPS was higher than that in control. Addition of EPS to WPC significantly enhanced its gelling ability. Foam overrun and hydrophobicity of WPC were not affected by addition of EPS. In conclusion, data obtained from this study show that EPS modify WPC functionality. The extent of modification depends on the type of EPS. Cooling of culture containing EPS before its addition to whey further reduced WPC protein denaturation and increased its solubility at pH 7 and gel hardness.

  8. Differential Measurements of Oxidatively Modified Proteins in Colorectal Adenopolyps

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabi, Sharifeh; Wallace, Lashanale; Cohen, Shakeria; Yao, Xuebiao; Aikhionbare, Felix O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adenopolyps patients have a three-fold higher risk of colon cancer over the general population, which increases to six-fold if the polyps are multiple and with lower survival among African American population. Currently, 6% of CRC can be ascribed to mutations in particular genes. Moreover, the optimal management of patients with colorectal adenopolyps depends on the accuracy of appropriate staging strategies because patients with similar colorectal adenocarcinoma architecture display heterogeneity in the course and outcome of the disease. Oxidative stress, due to an imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant capacities as well as a disruption of redox signaling, causes a wide range of damage to DNA, proteins, and lipids which promote tumor formation. Objective/Method This study applied spectrophotometric, dinitrophenylhydrazone (DNPH) assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and western blot analyses to assess the levels of oxidatively modified proteins in 41 pairs of primary colorectal tissues including normal/surrounding, adenopolyps (tubular, tubulovillous, villous, polypvillous) and carcinoma. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student’s t-tests were utilized for the resulting data set. Results Our data showed that the levels of reactive protein carbonyl groups significantly increased as colorectal adenopolyps progresses to malignancy. No significant differences were found in the levels of carbonyl proteins between gender samples analyzed. For African American patients, there were, relative to Caucasians, 10% higher levels of reactive carbonyls in proteins of tubulovillous tissue samples (P < 0.05) and over 36% higher in levels in adenocarcinomas (P < 0.05). In normal tissues and tubular, there were no significant differences between the two groups in levels of protein carbonyls. Differences in the levels of protein carbonyl expression within individual patient samples with different number of tumor cells were notably

  9. Age-Dependent Changes in the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome by Slow Off-Rate Modified Aptamer Array

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Geoffrey S.; Nelson, Sally K.; Keeney, Tracy R.; Stewart, Alex; Williams, Stephen; Kraemer, Stephan; Peskind, Elaine R.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    An important precondition for the successful development of diagnostic assays of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of age-related neurodegenerative diseases is an understanding of the dynamic nature of the CSF proteome during the normal aging process. In this study, a novel proteomic technology was used to quantify hundreds of proteins simultaneously in the CSF from 90 cognitively normal adults 21 to 85 years of age. SomaLogic's highly multiplexed proteomic platform can measure more than 800 proteins simultaneously from small volumes of biological fluids using novel slow off-rate modified aptamer (SOMAmer) protein affinity reagents with sensitivity, specificity, and dynamic ranges that meet or exceed those of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In the first application of this technology to CSF, we detected 248 proteins that possessed signals greater than twofold over background. Several novel correlations between detected protein concentrations and age were discovered that indicate that both inflammation and response to injury in the central nervous system may increase with age. Applying this powerful proteomic approach to CSF provides potential new insight into the aging of the human central nervous system that may have utility in discovering new disease-related changes in the CSF proteome. PMID:22122984

  10. Aging induces cardiac diastolic dysfunction, oxidative stress, accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts and protein modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Yan; Du, Min; Dolence, E Kurt; Fang, Cindy X; Mayer, Gabriele E; Ceylan-Isik, Asli F; LaCour, Karissa H; Yang, Xiaoping; Wilbert, Christopher J; Sreejayan, Nair; Ren, Jun

    2005-04-01

    Evidence suggests that aging, per se, is a major risk factor for cardiac dysfunction. Oxidative modification of cardiac proteins by non-enzymatic glycation, i.e. advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), has been implicated as a causal factor in the aging process. This study was designed to examine the role of aging on cardiomyocyte contractile function, cardiac protein oxidation and oxidative modification. Mechanical properties were evaluated in ventricular myocytes from young (2-month) and aged (24-26-month) mice using a MyoCam system. The mechanical indices evaluated were peak shortening (PS), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90) and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (+/- dL/dt). Oxidative stress and protein damage were evaluated by glutathione and glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio and protein carbonyl content, respectively. Activation of NAD(P)H oxidase was determined by immunoblotting. Aged myocytes displayed a larger cell cross-sectional area, prolonged TR90, and normal PS, +/- dL/dt and TPS compared with young myocytes. Aged myocytes were less tolerant of high stimulus frequency (from 0.1 to 5 Hz) compared with young myocytes. Oxidative stress and protein oxidative damage were both elevated in the aging group associated with significantly enhanced p47phox but not gp91phox expression. In addition, level of cardiac AGEs was approximately 2.5-fold higher in aged hearts than young ones determined by AGEs-ELISA. A group of proteins with a molecular range between 50 and 75 kDa with pI of 4-7 was distinctively modified in aged heart using one- or two-dimension SDS gel electrophoresis analysis. These data demonstrate cardiac diastolic dysfunction and reduced stress tolerance in aged cardiac myocytes, which may be associated with enhanced cardiac oxidative damage, level of AGEs and protein modification by AGEs.

  11. Morphine Withdrawal Modifies Prion Protein Expression in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Vincenzo; Martellucci, Stefano; Santilli, Francesca; Manganelli, Valeria; Garofalo, Tina; Candelise, Niccolò; Caruso, Alessandra; Sorice, Maurizio; Scaccianoce, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus is a vulnerable brain structure susceptible to damage during aging and chronic stress. Repeated exposure to opioids may alter the brain so that it functions normally when the drugs are present, thus, a prolonged withdrawal might lead to homeostatic changes headed for the restoration of the physiological state. Abuse of morphine may lead to Reacting Oxygen Species-induced neurodegeneration and apoptosis. It has been proposed that during morphine withdrawal, stress responses might be responsible, at least in part, for long-term changes of hippocampal plasticity. Since prion protein is involved in both, Reacting Oxygen Species mediated stress responses and synaptic plasticity, in this work we investigate the effect of opiate withdrawal in rats after morphine treatment. We hypothesize that stressful stimuli induced by opiate withdrawal, and the subsequent long-term homeostatic changes in hippocampal plasticity, might modulate the Prion protein expression. Our results indicate that abstinence from the opiate induced a time-dependent and region-specific modification in Prion protein content, indeed during morphine withdrawal a selective unbalance of hippocampal Prion Protein is observable. Moreover, Prion protein overexpression in hippocampal tissue seems to generate a dimeric structure of Prion protein and α-cleavage at the hydrophobic domain. Stress factors or toxic insults can induce cytosolic dimerization of Prion Protein through the hydrophobic domain, which in turn, it stimulates the α-cleavage and the production of neuroprotective Prion protein fragments. We speculate that this might be the mechanism by which stressful stimuli induced by opiate withdrawal and the subsequent long-term homeostatic changes in hippocampal plasticity, modulate the expression and the dynamics of Prion protein. PMID:28081197

  12. Protein binding properties of surface-modified porous polyethylene membranes.

    PubMed

    Greene, George; Radhakrishna, Harish; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2005-10-01

    In this study, we quantified the adsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein onto several polyelectrolyte-modified sintered porous polyethylene (PPE) membranes. The polymer surfaces had both cationic and anionic charges obtained via the adsorption of polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyacrylic acid (PAA), respectively, onto plasma-activated PPE. The amount of IgG adsorption was determined by measuring the gamma radiation emitted by [125I]-IgG radio labeled protein. By studying the impact of pH and ionic strength on IgG adsorption, we attempted to characterize the role and nature of the electrostatic interactions involved in the adsorption process to better understand how these interactions were influenced by the charge and structure of immobilized polyelectrolyte complexes at modified membrane surfaces. We were able to show that surface modification of PPE membranes with adsorbed PEI monolayers and PEI-PAA bilayers can greatly improve the IgG binding ability of the membrane under optimized conditions. We also showed that the observed improvement in the IgG binding is derived from electrostatic interactions between IgG and the polyelectrolyte surface. In addition, we found that the greatest IgG adsorption occurred when the IgG and the surface possessed predominantly opposite charges, rather than when the surface possessed the greatest electrostatic charge. Finally, we have found that the molecular weight of the terminating polyelectrolyte has a noticeable effect upon the electrostatic interactions between IgG and the PEI-PAA bilayer-modified PPE surfaces.

  13. Justification of sexual reproduction by modified Penna model of ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá Martins, J. S.; Stauffer, D.

    2001-05-01

    We generalize the standard Penna bit-string model of biological ageing by assuming that each deleterious mutation diminishes the survival probability in every time interval by a small percentage. This effect is added to the usual lethal but age-dependent effect of the same mutation. We then find strong advantages or disadvantages of sexual reproduction (with males and females) compared to asexual cloning, depending on parameters.

  14. Why and How We Age, and Is That Process Modifiable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arking, R.

    Aging is an almost-universal biological process that is better understood in terms of an evolutionary explanation than in terms of a medical or adaptationist explanation. The major advances in human longevity which took place in developed countries during the past century arose from decreases in external (e.g., environmental) sources of mortality, and not from any effect on the aging process. Laboratory studies show that the aging process is under genetic control, can be manipulated, and can be expressed in three different phenotypes. The adult lifespan consists of the health span (ages 20-55 yrs) and the senescent span (ages 55+), with a relatively short but variable transition phase between the two. The most socially desirable phenotype would be that where the transition phase is delayed and the health span extended with little effect on the senescent span. The genetic, nutritional, cell-signaling and pharmecutical interventions inducing this phenotype are discussed. The genetic architecture of senescence is discussed and its stochastic nature made clear. The social and ethical consequences of pharmecutical intervention into the aging process are briefly discussed.

  15. Protein synthesis as an integral quality control mechanism during ageing.

    PubMed

    Charmpilas, Nikolaos; Daskalaki, Ioanna; Papandreou, Margarita Elena; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2015-09-01

    Ageing is manifested as functional and structural deterioration that affects cell and tissue physiology. mRNA translation is a central cellular process, supplying cells with newly synthesized proteins. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in protein synthesis are not merely a corollary but rather a critical factor for the progression of ageing. Here, we survey protein synthesis regulatory mechanisms and focus on the pre-translational regulation of the process exerted by non-coding RNA species, RNA binding proteins and alterations of intrinsic RNA properties. In addition, we discuss the tight relationship between mRNA translation and two central pathways that modulate ageing, namely the insulin/IGF-1 and TOR signalling cascades. A thorough understanding of the complex interplay between protein synthesis regulation and ageing will provide critical insights into the pathogenesis of age-related disorders, associated with impaired proteostasis and protein quality control.

  16. Brown pigment formation in heated sugar-protein mixed suspensions containing unmodified and peptically modified whey protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Rongsirikul, Narumol; Hongsprabhas, Parichat

    2016-01-01

    Commercial whey protein concentrate (WPC) was modified by heating the acidified protein suspensions (pH 2.0) at 80 °C for 30 min and treating with pepsin at 37 °C for 60 min. Prior to spray-drying, such modification did not change the molecular weights (MWs) of whey proteins determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). After spray-drying the modified whey protein concentrate with trehalose excipient (MWPC-TH), it was found that the α-lactalbumin (α-La) was the major protein that was further hydrolyzed the most. The reconstituted MWPC-TH contained β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) as the major protein and small molecular weight (MW) peptides of less than 6.5 kDa. The reconstituted MWPC-TH had higher NH2 group, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), lower exposed aromatic ring and thiol (SH) contents than did the commercial WPC. Kinetic studies revealed that the addition of MWPC-TH in fructose-glycine solution was able to reduce brown pigment formation in the mixtures heated at 80 to 95 °C by increasing the activation energy (Ea) of brown pigment formation due to the retardation of fluoresced advanced glycation end product (AGEs) formation. The addition of MWPC to reducing sugar-glycine/commercial WPC was also able to lower brown pigment formation in the sterilized (121 °C, 15 min) mixed suspensions containing 0.1 M reducing sugar and 0.5-1.0 % glycine and/or commercial (P < 0.05). It was demonstrated that the modification investigated in this study selectively hydrolyzed α-La and retained β-Lg for the production of antibrowning whey protein concentrate.

  17. The presence of antibodies to oxidative modified proteins in serum from polycystic ovary syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, J R; Iborra, A; Ulcova-Gallova, Z; Badia, R; Martínez, P

    2006-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5–10% of women of reproductive age. Free radicals, as a product of oxidative stress, impair cells and tissue properties related to human fertility. These free radicals, together with the oxidized molecules, may have a cytotoxic or deleterious effects on sperm and oocytes, on early embryo development or on the endometrium. Aldehyde-modified proteins are highly immunogenic and circulating autoantibodies to new epitopes, such as malondialdehyde (MDA), may affect the reproductive system. Autoantibodies or elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in serum are often associated with inflammatory response. The purpose of this work is to investigate whether PCOS women show increased levels of oxidized proteins (protein–MDA) and anti-endometrial antibodies (AEA) in their sera, compared with control patients, and to determine whether AEA specificity is related to oxidized protein derivatives. Sera from 31 women [10 patients with PCOS (PCOS group) and 21 women with male factor of infertility (control group)] were chosen from patients attending for infertility. Anti-endometrial antibodies were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with an endometrial cell line (RL-95). Antibodies against MDA modified human serum albumin (HSA–MDA) were also determined by ELISA. Oxidized proteins (protein–MDA) in serum were determined by a colorimetric assay. Patients with PCOS have significantly higher levels of AEA and anti-HSA–MDA, as well as oxidized proteins (protein–MDA) in serum than control patients. For the first time, we describe an autoimmune response in PCOS patients, in terms of AEA. The evidence of protein–MDA in the serum of these patients, together with the increased antibody reactivity to MDA-modified proteins (HSA–MDA) in vitro, supports the conclusion that oxidative stress may be one of the important causes for abnormal endometrial environment with poor embryo receptivity in PCOS patients. PMID:16634794

  18. Structure and Age Jointly Influence Rates of Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; Bostick, David; Albà, M. Mar; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2012-01-01

    What factors determine a protein's rate of evolution are actively debated. Especially unclear is the relative role of intrinsic factors of present-day proteins versus historical factors such as protein age. Here we study the interplay of structural properties and evolutionary age, as determinants of protein evolutionary rate. We use a large set of one-to-one orthologs between human and mouse proteins, with mapped PDB structures. We report that previously observed structural correlations also hold within each age group – including relationships between solvent accessibility, designabililty, and evolutionary rates. However, age also plays a crucial role: age modulates the relationship between solvent accessibility and rate. Additionally, younger proteins, despite being less designable, tend to evolve faster than older proteins. We show that previously reported relationships between age and rate cannot be explained by structural biases among age groups. Finally, we introduce a knowledge-based potential function to study the stability of proteins through large-scale computation. We find that older proteins are more stable for their native structure, and more robust to mutations, than younger ones. Our results underscore that several determinants, both intrinsic and historical, can interact to determine rates of protein evolution. PMID:22693443

  19. Age-induced protein modifications and increased proteolysis in potato seed-tubers

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, G.N.M.; Knowles, N.R.; Houtz, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term aging of potato (Solanum tuberosum) seed-tubers resulted in a loss of patatin and a cysteine-proteinase inhibitor, potato multicystatin (PMC), as well as in increase in the activities of 84-, 95-, and 125-kD proteinases. Highly active, additional proteinases appeared in the oldest tubers. Over 90% of the total proteolytic activity in aged tubers was sensitive to trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido (4-guanidino) butane or leupeptin, whereas pepstatin was the most effective inhibitor of proteinases in young tubers. Proteinases in aged tubers were also inhibited by crude extracts or purified PMC from young tubers, suggesting that the loss of PMC was responsible for the age-induced increase in proteinase activity. Nonenzymatic oxidation, glycation, and deamidation of proteins were enhanced by aging. Aged tubers developed daughter tubers that contained 3-fold more protein than mother tubers, with a polypeptide profile consistent with that of young tubers. Although PMC and patatin were absent from the older mother tubers, both proteins were expressed in the daughter tubers, indicating that aging did not compromise the efficacy of genes encoding PMC and patatin. Unlike the mother tubers, proteinase activity in daughter tubers was undetectable. Their results indicate that tuber aging nonenzymatically modifies proteins, which enhances their susceptibility to breakdown; the authors also identify a role for PMC in regulating protein turnover in potato tubers.

  20. Fluoride release and uptake by aged resin-modified glass ionomers and a polyacid-modified resin composite.

    PubMed

    Ylp, H K; Smales, R J

    1999-08-01

    Little has been reported of the relationship of fluoride release and weight loss, and the effects of use of different fluoride agents on restorations, for the new generation of glass ionomer cements. The objectives of this study were to compare fluoride release of fresh and aged specimens of a polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract), and of three resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji II LC, Photac-Fil, Vitremer); and to correlate fluoride release and weight loss of aged specimens after recharging with three different fluoride agents. All materials showed high initial fluoride release immediately after uptake when using the agents. However, the levels of fluoride release dropped rapidly soon afterwards. Although initial fluoride release was significantly different between Dyract and the three resin-modified glass ionomers, when different fluoride agents were used on aged specimens after recharging, no significant differences were found after the first few hours. Linear regression analyses also showed no correlation between cumulative fluoride release and weight loss. Possible beneficial oral health effects may only be expected by frequent exposure of these materials to fluoride agents.

  1. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis.

  2. Young age as a modifying factor in sports concussion management: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Foley, Cassidy; Gregory, Andrew; Solomon, Gary

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Concussion in Sport Group (CISG) published its third consensus statement and introduced 10 'modifying' factors that were presumed clinically to influence the investigation and management of concussions in sports. Young age was listed as one of the modifying factors. In some cases, these modifiers were thought to be predictive of prolonged or persistent symptoms. These same modifying factors were retained in the fourth iteration of the CISG consensus statement (2013), although mention was made of possible limitations of their efficacy. The CISG statements provided several empirical references regarding young age as a modifying factor. We reviewed the published sports concussion literature with the purpose of determining empirical studies that support or refute the inclusion of young age as a modifier of concussive injury in sports. We performed a systematic review of the PubMed database utilizing the keywords concussion, sports, mild traumatic brain injury, youth, adolescents, and children. English language studies were extracted by the authors and summarized for review. Multiple empirical studies were found indicating that younger athletes may take longer to recover from a sports-related concussion (SRC) than their older peers. However, studies did not indicate that younger athletes were at more risk for prolonged recovery (>4 wk). Empirical evidence supports the inclusion of young age as a modifying factor in sports concussion. However, the difference in recovery time seems relatively small (a few days) and young age does not predict prolonged recovery (>4 wk). The findings support the inclusion of young age as a specific modifier in the treatment of SRC and have implications for the clinical management of this common injury.

  3. Protein Oxidation in Aging: Does It Play a Role in Aging Progression?

    PubMed Central

    Reeg, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A constant accumulation of oxidized proteins takes place during aging. Oxidation of proteins leads to a partial unfolding and, therefore, to aggregation. Protein aggregates impair the activity of cellular proteolytic systems (proteasomes, lysosomes), resulting in further accumulation of oxidized proteins. In addition, the accumulation of highly crosslinked protein aggregates leads to further oxidant formation, damage to macromolecules, and, finally, to apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, protein oxidation seems to play a role in the development of various age-related diseases, for example, neurodegenerative diseases. Recent Advances: The highly oxidized lipofuscin accumulates during aging. Lipofuscin formation might cause impaired lysosomal and proteasomal degradation, metal ion accumulation, increased reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptosis. Critical Issues: It is still unclear to which extent protein oxidation is involved in the progression of aging and in the development of some age-related diseases. Future Directions: An extensive knowledge of the effects of protein oxidation on the aging process and its contribution to the development of age-related diseases could enable further strategies to reduce age-related impairments. Strategies aimed at lowering aggregate formation might be a straightforward intervention to reduce age-related malfunctions of organs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 239–255. PMID:25178482

  4. Anorexia of aging: a modifiable risk factor for frailty.

    PubMed

    Martone, Anna Maria; Onder, Graziano; Vetrano, Davide Liborio; Ortolani, Elena; Tosato, Matteo; Marzetti, Emanuele; Landi, Francesco

    2013-10-14

    Anorexia of aging, defined as a loss of appetite and/or reduced food intake, affects a significant number of elderly people and is far more prevalent among frail individuals. Anorexia recognizes a multifactorial origin characterized by various combinations of medical, environmental and social factors. Given the interconnection between weight loss, sarcopenia and frailty, anorexia is a powerful, independent predictor of poor quality of life, morbidity and mortality in older persons. One of the most important goals in the management of older, frail people is to optimize their nutritional status. To achieve this objective it is important to identify subjects at risk of anorexia and to provide multi-stimulus interventions that ensure an adequate amount of food to limit and/or reverse weight loss and functional decline. Here, we provide a brief overview on the relevance of anorexia in the context of sarcopenia and frailty. Major pathways supposedly involved in the pathogenesis of anorexia are also illustrated. Finally, the importance of treating anorexia to achieve health benefits in frail elders is highlighted.

  5. Enhancing recombinant protein solubility with ubiquitin-like small archeal modifying protein fusion partners.

    PubMed

    Varga, Sándor; Pathare, Ganesh Ramnath; Baka, Erzsébet; Boicu, Marius; Kriszt, Balázs; Székács, András; Zinzula, Luca; Kukolya, József; Nagy, István

    2015-11-01

    A variety of protein expression tags with different biochemical properties has been used to enhance the yield and solubility of recombinant proteins. Ubiquitin, SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) and prokaryotic ubiquitin like MoaD (molybdopterin synthase, small subunit) fusion tags are getting more popular because of their small size. In this paper we report on the use of ubiquitin-like small archaeal modifier proteins (SAMPs) as fusion tags since they proved to increase expression yield, stability and solubility in our experiments. Equally important, they did not co-purify with proteins of the expression host and there was information that their specific JAB1/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme (JAMM) protease can recognize the C-terminal VSGG sequence when SAMPs fused, either branched or linearly to target proteins, and cleave it specifically. SAMPs and JAMM proteases from Haloferax volcanii, Thermoplasma acidophilum, Methanococcoides burtonii and Nitrosopumilus maritimus were selected, cloned, expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and tested as fusion tags and cleaving proteases, respectively. Investigated SAMPs enhanced protein expression and solubility on a wide scale. T. acidophilum SAMPs Ta0895 and Ta01019 were the best performing tags and their effect was comparable to the widely used maltose binding protein (MBP) and N utilization substance protein A (NusA) tags. Moreover, H. volcanii SAMP Hvo_2619 contribution was mediocre, whereas M. burtonii Mbur_1415 could not be expressed. Out of four investigated JAMM proteases, only Hvo_2505 could cleave fusion tags. Interestingly, it was found active not only on its own partner substrate Hvo_2619, but it also cleaved off Ta0895.

  6. Oxidative modification of proteins: age-related changes.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Bulbul; Chakravarti, Deb N

    2007-01-01

    Aging is a complex biological phenomenon which involves progressive loss of different physiological functions of various tissues of living organisms. It is the inevitable fate of life and is a major risk factor for death and different pathological disorders. Based on a wide variety of studies performed in humans as well as in various animal models and microbial systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to play a key role in the aging process. The production of ROS is influenced by cellular metabolic activities as well as environmental factors. ROS can react with all major biological macromolecules such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. Since, in general, proteins are the key molecules that play the ultimate role in various structural and functional aspects of living organisms, this review will focus on the age-related oxidative modifications of proteins as well as on mechanism for removal or repair of the oxidized proteins. The topics covered include protein oxidation as a marker of oxidative stress, experimental evidence indicating the role of ROS in protein oxidation, protein carbonyl content, enzymatic degradation of oxidized proteins, and effects of caloric restriction on protein oxidation in the context of aging. Finally, we will discuss different strategies which have been or can be undertaken to slow down the oxidative damage of proteins and the aging process.

  7. Dielectric properties and aging effects of manganese modified lead iron tungstate relaxor ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, L.; Vilarinho, P.M.; Baptista, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    Mn-doped samples were used to study the effects of Mn dopant on the dielectric properties of PFW ceramics, especially on its aging behavior, since they could add some knowledge on the role of lattice defects on the aging mechanisms of this relaxor ferroelectric. Mn doping does not cause marked changes in the maximum of permittivity ({var_epsilon}{sub rmax}), transition temperature (T{sub 0}), and diffuseness coefficient ({delta}) under the solubility limit, whereas the resistivity increases significantly with increasing the Mn content. Mn-modified PFW ceramics exhibit evident aging behavior and its level increases with the increase in Mn content. The aging shows strong dependence on the frequency and has a log-linear function of aging time. Probable lattice defects in the ceramics are discussed and it is suggested that the acceptor Mn ions are dominantly compensated by oxygen vacancies, providing reorientable dipole pairs which are responsible for the aging process of Mn-modified PFW ceramics.

  8. Iron promotes protein insolubility and aging in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Klang, Ida M.; Schilling, Birgit; Sorensen, Dylan J.; Sahu, Alexandria K.; Kapahi, Pankaj; Andersen, Julie K.; Swoboda, Peter; Killilea, David W.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Lithgow, Gordon J.

    2014-01-01

    Many late-onset proteotoxic diseases are accompanied by a disruption in homeostasis of metals (metallostasis) including iron, copper and zinc. Although aging is the most prominent risk factor for these disorders, the impact of aging on metallostasis and its role in proteotoxic disease remain poorly understood. Moreover, it is not clear whether a loss of metallostasis influences normal aging. We have investigated the role of metallostasis in longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that calcium, copper, iron, and manganese levels increase as a function of age, while potassium and phosphorus levels tend to decrease. Increased dietary iron significantly accelerated the age-related accumulation of insoluble protein, a molecular pathology of aging. Proteomic analysis revealed widespread effects of dietary iron in multiple organelles and tissues. Pharmacological interventions to block accumulation of specific metals attenuated many models of proteotoxicity and extended normal lifespan. Collectively, these results suggest that a loss of metallostasis with aging contributes to age-related protein aggregation. PMID:25554795

  9. The Role of Mitochondrial Non-Enzymatic Protein Acylation in Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Shin Yee; Ng, Li Theng; Ng, Li Fang; Inoue, Takao; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.; Hagen, Thilo; Gruber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, various large-scale proteomic studies have demonstrated that mitochondrial proteins are highly acylated, most commonly by addition of acetyl and succinyl groups. These acyl modifications may be enzyme catalysed but can also be driven non-enzymatically. The latter mechanism is promoted in mitochondria due to the nature of the mitochondrial microenvironment, which is alkaline and contains high concentrations of acyl-CoA species. Protein acylation may modify enzyme activity, typically inhibiting it. We posited that organismal ageing might be accompanied by an accumulation of acylated proteins, especially in mitochondria, and that this might compromise mitochondrial function and contribute to ageing. In this study, we used R. norvegicus, C. elegans and D. melanogaster to compare the acylation status of mitochondrial proteins between young and old animals. We observed a specific age-dependent increase in protein succinylation in worms and flies but not in rat. Rats have two substrate-specific mitochondrial deacylases, SIRT3 and SIRT5 while both flies and worms lack these enzymes. We propose that accumulation of mitochondrial protein acylation contributes to age-dependent mitochondrial functional decline and that SIRT3 and SIRT5 enzymes may promote longevity through regulation of mitochondrial protein acylation during ageing. PMID:28033361

  10. Antifreeze Proteins Modify the Freezing Process In Planta12

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Marilyn; Lumb, Chelsey; Wiseman, Steven B.; Wisniewski, Michael; Johnson, Robert W.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.

    2005-01-01

    During cold acclimation, winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Musketeer) plants accumulate antifreeze proteins (AFPs) in the apoplast of leaves and crowns. The goal of this study was to determine whether these AFPs influence survival at subzero temperatures by modifying the freezing process or by acting as cryoprotectants. In order to inhibit the growth of ice, AFPs must be mobile so that they can bind to specific sites on the ice crystal lattice. Guttate obtained from cold-acclimated winter rye leaves exhibited antifreeze activity, indicating that the AFPs are free in solution. Infrared video thermography was used to observe freezing in winter rye leaves. In the absence of an ice nucleator, AFPs had no effect on the supercooling temperature of the leaves. However, in the presence of an ice nucleator, AFPs lowered the temperature at which the leaves froze by 0.3°C to 1.2°C. In vitro studies showed that apoplastic proteins extracted from cold-acclimated winter rye leaves inhibited the recrystallization of ice and also slowed the rate of migration of ice through solution-saturated filter paper. When we examined the possible role of winter rye AFPs in cryoprotection, we found that lactate dehydrogenase activity was higher after freezing in the presence of AFPs compared with buffer, but the same effect was obtained by adding bovine serum albumin. AFPs had no effect on unstacked thylakoid volume after freezing, but did inhibit stacking of the thylakoids, thus indicating a loss of thylakoid function. We conclude that rye AFPs have no specific cryoprotective activity; rather, they interact directly with ice in planta and reduce freezing injury by slowing the growth and recrystallization of ice. PMID:15805474

  11. Hyper-Rayleigh scattering of protein-modified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun Xiu; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xin; Tang, Zu Ming; Lu, Zu Hong

    2003-09-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of protein-modified gold nanoparticles has been studied by the hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS) technique. HRS signals from the nanoparticles coated with goat-anti-human IgG have been obtained when pumped with a laser pulse with a wavelength of 1064 nm. The HRS signals of gold nanoparticles with IgG were larger than those of bare gold nanoparticles. This can be explained by a noncentrosymmetric effect. It was also found that the HRS signals from the IgG-coated gold nanoparticles could be greatly increased when the antigen was added due to gold nanoparticle aggregation. Our experiment found that the HRS method could produce a measurable signal with 10 microg/ml antigen added, while the colorimetric method using UV spectrum detection required 100 microg/ml of added antigen. The results show that the HRS measurement of immunogold nanoparticles could become a potential immunoassay in determining small levels of antigen in aqueous samples.

  12. mTOR's role in ageing: protein synthesis or autophagy?

    PubMed

    Hands, Sarah L; Proud, Christopher G; Wyttenbach, Andreas

    2009-07-20

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate ageing are currently under scrutiny because ageing is linked to many human diseases. The nutrient sensing TOR pathway is emerging as a key regulator of ageing. TOR signaling is complex affecting several crucial cellular functions and two such functions, which show clear effects on ageing, are protein synthesis and autophagy. In this article we discuss the relative importance of both these processes in ageing, identify how TOR regulates translation and autophagy and speculate on links between the TOR signaling network and ageing pathways.

  13. Modulation at Age of Onset in Tunisian Huntington Disease Patients: Implication of New Modifier Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hmida-Ben Brahim, Dorra; Chourabi, Marwa; Ben Amor, Sana; Harrabi, Imed; Trabelsi, Saoussen; Haddaji-Mastouri, Marwa; Gribaa, Moez; Sassi, Sihem; Gahbiche, Fatma Ezzahra; Lamouchi, Turkia; Mougou-Zereli, Soumaya; Ben Ammou, Sofiane; Saad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder. The causative mutation is an expansion of more than 36 CAG repeats in the first exon of IT15 gene. Many studies have shown that the IT15 interacts with several modifier genes to regulate the age at onset (AO) of HD. Our study aims to investigate the implication of CAG expansion and 9 modifiers in the age at onset variance of 15 HD Tunisian patients and to establish the correlation between these modifiers genes and the AO of this disease. Despite the small number of studied patients, this report consists of the first North African study in Huntington disease patients. Our results approve a specific effect of modifiers genes in each population. PMID:25254119

  14. Evaluation of Thermal Oxidative Aging Effect on the Rheological Performance of Modified Asphalt Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng

    Modified asphalt binder, which is combined by base binder and additive modifier, has been implemented in pavement industry for more than 30 years. Recently, the oxidative aging mechanism of asphalt binder has been studied for several decades, and appreciable finding results of asphalt binder aging mechanism were achieved from the chemistry and rheological performance aspects. However, most of these studies were conducted with neat binders, the research of aging mechanism of modified asphalt binder was limited. Nowadays, it is still highly necessary to clarify how the asphalt binder aging happens with the modified asphalt binder, what is the effect of the different modifiers (additives) on the binder aging process, how the rheological performance changes under the thermal oxidative aging conditions and so on. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of isothermal oxidative aging conditions on the rheological performance change of the modified and controlled asphalt binders. There were totally 14 different sorts of asphalt binders had been aged in the PAV pans in the air-force drafted ovens at 50°C, 60°C and 85°C for 0.5 day to 240 days. The Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) were used to perform the experiments. The analysis of rheological indices (Low shear viscosity-LSV, Crossover modulus-G*c, Glover-Rowe Parameter-G-R, DSR function-DSR Fn) as a function of carbonyl area (CA) was conducted. With the SBS modification, both of the hardening susceptibility of the rheological index-LSV and G-R decreases compared with the corresponding base binder. The TR increased the hardening susceptibility of all the rheological indexes. While for the G*c, SBS increases the slope of the most modified asphalt binders except A and B_TR_X series binders. The multiple linear regression statistical analysis results indicate that the oxidative aging conditions play an important role on the CA, and rheological performance

  15. Identification of genetic modifiers of age-at-onset for familial Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hill-Burns, Erin M.; Ross, Owen A.; Wissemann, William T.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Zareparsi, Sepideh; Siuda, Joanna; Lynch, Timothy; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Silburn, Peter A.; Mellick, George D.; Ritz, Beate; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Factor, Stewart A.; Breheny, Patrick J.; Payami, Haydeh

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the most common cause of neurodegenerative movement disorder and the second most common cause of dementia. Genes are thought to have a stronger effect on age-at-onset of PD than on risk, yet there has been a phenomenal success in identifying risk loci but not age-at-onset modifiers. We conducted a genome-wide study for age-at-onset. We analysed familial and non-familial PD separately, per prior evidence for strong genetic effect on age-at-onset in familial PD. GWAS was conducted in 431 unrelated PD individuals with at least one affected relative (familial PD) and 1544 non-familial PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC); an additional 737 familial PD and 2363 non-familial PD were used for replication. In familial PD, two signals were detected and replicated robustly: one mapped to LHFPL2 on 5q14.1 (PNGRC = 3E-8, PReplication = 2E-5, PNGRC + Replication = 1E-11), the second mapped to TPM1 on 15q22.2 (PNGRC = 8E-9, PReplication = 2E-4, PNGRC + Replication = 9E-11). The variants that were associated with accelerated onset had low frequencies (<0.02). The LHFPL2 variant was associated with earlier onset by 12.33 [95% CI: 6.2; 18.45] years in NGRC, 8.03 [2.95; 13.11] years in replication, and 9.79 [5.88; 13.70] years in the combined data. The TPM1 variant was associated with earlier onset by 15.30 [8.10; 22.49] years in NGRC, 9.29 [1.79; 16.79] years in replication, and 12.42 [7.23; 17.61] years in the combined data. Neither LHFPL2 nor TPM1 was associated with age-at-onset in non-familial PD. LHFPL2 (function unknown) is overexpressed in brain tumours. TPM1 encodes a highly conserved protein that regulates muscle contraction, and is a tumour-suppressor gene. PMID:27402877

  16. Serum protein mediators of dementia and aging proper

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Donald R.; Al-Rubaye, Safa; Bishnoi, Ram; Palmer, Raymond F.

    2016-01-01

    The latent variable “δ” (for “dementia”) appears to be uniquely responsible for the dementing aspects of cognitive impairment. Age, depressive symptoms, gender and the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele are independently associated with δ. In this analysis, we explore serum proteins as potential mediators of age's specific association with δ in a large, ethnically diverse longitudinal cohort, the Texas Alzheimer's Research and Care Consortium (TARCC). 22 serum proteins were recognized as partial mediators of age's association with δ. These include Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGF-BP2), which we had previously associated with age-specific cognitive change, and both Pancreatic Polypeptide (PP) and von Willebrand Factor (vWF), previously associated with δ. Nine other δ-related proteins were not confirmed by this ethnicity adjusted analysis. Our findings suggest that age's association with the disabling fraction of cognitive performance is partially mediated by serum proteins, somatomedins and hormones. Those proteins may offer targets for the specific treatment of age-related effects on dementia severity and conversion risk. PMID:27922822

  17. Evaluation of dental age in protein energy malnutrition children

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Patil, Kavitha; Munoli, Karishma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of dental age is very essential for a dental practitioner in planning treatment and it is a supplementary source of information for Pediatrician, Orthopedician and Endocrinologist. There are few studies in the literature about the comparison of dental with chronological age in protein energy malnutrition children (PEM). Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate and compare dental age and chronological age in PEM children. Aims and Objective: To determine and compare dental age and chronological age in PEM children. Methods: A total of 100 PEM children within the age range of 6–12 years were selected. Chronological age was recorded using date of birth. Dental age was assessed by Demirjian's method using orthopantomogram. Comparison of two ages was done using the unpaired Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: Dental age was retarded compared to chronological age, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The correlations between two ages were positive in both sexes. Conclusion: Dental age was delayed in our sample of 100 PEM children. Dental age can be considered as variable for diagnosing growth retardation in PEM children. Further studies are required to support our findings. PMID:26538919

  18. Safety assessment of a modified acetolactate synthase protein (GM-HRA) used as a selectable marker in genetically modified soybeans.

    PubMed

    Mathesius, C A; Barnett, J F; Cressman, R F; Ding, J; Carpenter, C; Ladics, G S; Schmidt, J; Layton, R J; Zhang, J X Q; Appenzeller, L M; Carlson, G; Ballou, S; Delaney, B

    2009-12-01

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) enzymes have been isolated from numerous organisms including soybeans (Glycine max; GM-ALS) and catalyze the first common step in biosynthesis of branched chain amino acids. Expression of an ALS protein (GM-HRA) with two amino acid changes relative to native GM-ALS protein in genetically modified soybeans confers tolerance to herbicidal active ingredients and can be used as a selectable transformation marker. The safety assessment of the GM-HRA protein is discussed. Bioinformatics comparison of the amino acid sequence did not identify similarities to known allergenic or toxic proteins. In vitro studies demonstrated rapid degradation in simulated gastric fluid (<30s) and intestinal fluid (<1min). The enzymatic activity was completely inactivated at 50 degrees C for 15 min demonstrating heat lability. The protein expressed in planta is not glycosylated and genetically modified soybeans expressing the GM-HRA protein produced similar protein/allergen profiles as its non-transgenic parental isoline. No adverse effects were observed in mice following acute oral exposure at a dose of at least 436 mg/kg of body weight or in a 28-day repeated dose dietary toxicity study at doses up to 1247 mg/kg of body weight/day. The results demonstrate GM-HRA protein safety when used in agricultural biotechnology.

  19. Investigation of aging processes of graphite tubes modified with iridium and rhodium used for atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulska, Ewa; Piaścik, Marek; Katskov, Dmitri; Darangwa, Nicholas; Grotti, Marco

    2007-11-01

    UV spectrometry (187-380 nm) with charge coupled device (CCD) detection was used to study the evolution of absorption spectra during the vaporization of various species in the pyrocoated graphite furnace, with electrodeposited Ir and Rh as modifiers. In order to mimic a typical matrix composition, various salts of aluminum, manganese, copper, magnesium, sodium, and lead were used in microgram amounts. Changes in spectra and vapor release rate, along with aging of the tubes in the repetitive temperature cycles, were observed. Compared to the unmodified pyrocoated tubes, the presence of Ir or Rh causes a significant reduction in the vaporization efficiency, especially for microgram amounts of copper and aluminum introduced as nitrates, and manganese introduced as a sulfate. The vaporization efficiency, for magnesium and sodium as chlorides, and for lead as a sulfate, remained unchanged. Interestingly, the aging of the tubes was accompanied by partial restoration of the spectral characteristics for unmodified tubes. For example, with unmodified pyrocoated tubes, the vaporization spectrum, appearing as a consequence of the decomposition of aluminum nitrate, consisted of Al2O bands overlapped by Al atomic lines. In the freshly modified tubes, intensities of those lines and bands were substantially reduced, and in this case, the dominance of AlO molecules was observed. The efficiency of vaporization of aluminum species increased in the aged modified tubes. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the modified surfaces for the new and aged tubes indicated that aging of the tubes is accompanied by the destruction of the pyrocoating, formation of pyrographite shells around the areas where the modifier was electrodeposited, and finally, complete substitution of the metal on the graphite surface by pyrographite debris.

  20. Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and Modifies Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Responses to Insulin in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han; Ge, Ming; Portman, Michael A.

    2010-07-02

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.

  1. A genome scan for modifiers of age at onset in Huntington disease: The HD MAPS study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Liang; Hayden, Michael R; Almqvist, Elisabeth W; Brinkman, Ryan R; Durr, Alexandra; Dodé, Catherine; Morrison, Patrick J; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ross, Christopher A; Margolis, Russell L; Rosenblatt, Adam; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Cabrero, David Mayo; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina; Nance, Martha; Trent, Ronald J A; McCusker, Elizabeth; Jones, Randi; Paulsen, Jane S; Harrison, Madeline; Zanko, Andrea; Abramson, Ruth K; Russ, Ana L; Knowlton, Beth; Djoussé, Luc; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S; Tariot, Suzanne; Gusella, Michael F; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Atwood, Larry D; Cupples, L Adrienne; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Cha, Jang-Ho J; Hersch, Steven M; Koroshetz, Walter J; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Myers, Richard H

    2003-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat within the coding region of a novel gene on 4p16.3. Although the variation in age at onset is partly explained by the size of the expanded repeat, the unexplained variation in age at onset is strongly heritable (h2=0.56), which suggests that other genes modify the age at onset of HD. To identify these modifier loci, we performed a 10-cM density genomewide scan in 629 affected sibling pairs (295 pedigrees and 695 individuals), using ages at onset adjusted for the expanded and normal CAG repeat sizes. Because all those studied were HD affected, estimates of allele sharing identical by descent at and around the HD locus were adjusted by a positionally weighted method to correct for the increased allele sharing at 4p. Suggestive evidence for linkage was found at 4p16 (LOD=1.93), 6p21-23 (LOD=2.29), and 6q24-26 (LOD=2.28), which may be useful for investigation of genes that modify age at onset of HD.

  2. A Genome Scan for Modifiers of Age at Onset in Huntington Disease: The HD MAPS Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Liang; Hayden, Michael R.; Almqvist, Elisabeth W.; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Durr, Alexandra; Dodé, Catherine; Morrison, Patrick J.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russell L.; Rosenblatt, Adam; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Cabrero, David Mayo; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina; Nance, Martha; Trent, Ronald J. A.; McCusker, Elizabeth; Jones, Randi; Paulsen, Jane S.; Harrison, Madeline; Zanko, Andrea; Abramson, Ruth K.; Russ, Ana L.; Knowlton, Beth; Djoussé, Luc; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S.; Tariot, Suzanne; Gusella, Michael F.; Wheeler, Vanessa C.; Atwood, Larry D.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Cha, Jang-Ho J.; Hersch, Steven M.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Gusella, James F.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Myers, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat within the coding region of a novel gene on 4p16.3. Although the variation in age at onset is partly explained by the size of the expanded repeat, the unexplained variation in age at onset is strongly heritable (h2=0.56), which suggests that other genes modify the age at onset of HD. To identify these modifier loci, we performed a 10-cM density genomewide scan in 629 affected sibling pairs (295 pedigrees and 695 individuals), using ages at onset adjusted for the expanded and normal CAG repeat sizes. Because all those studied were HD affected, estimates of allele sharing identical by descent at and around the HD locus were adjusted by a positionally weighted method to correct for the increased allele sharing at 4p. Suggestive evidence for linkage was found at 4p16 (LOD=1.93), 6p21–23 (LOD=2.29), and 6q24–26 (LOD=2.28), which may be useful for investigation of genes that modify age at onset of HD. PMID:12900792

  3. Preparation and ageing-resistant properties of polyester composites modified with functional nanoscale additives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated ageing-resistant properties of carboxyl-terminated polyester (polyethylene glycol terephthalate) composites modified with nanoscale titanium dioxide particles (nano-TiO2). The nano-TiO2 was pretreated by a dry coating method, with aluminate coupling agent as a functional grafting additive. The agglomeration resistance was evaluated, which exhibited significant improvement for the modified nanoparticles. Then, the effects of the modified nano-TiO2 on the crosslinking and ageing-resistant properties of the composites were studied. With a real-time Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) measurement, the nano-TiO2 displayed promoting effect on the crosslinking of polyester resin with triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) as crosslinking agent. Moreover, the gloss retention, colour aberration and the surface morphologies of the composites during accelerated UV ageing (1500 hours) were investigated. The results demonstrated much less degree of ageing degradation for the nanocomposites, indicating an important role of the nano-TiO2 in improving the ageing-resistant properties of synthetic polymer composites. PMID:24872802

  4. Modifiable risk factors in periodontitis: at the intersection of aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Mark A

    2014-02-01

    Chronic inflammation is a prominent feature of aging and of common age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, cancer and periodontitis. This volume examines modifiable risk factors for periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Oral bacterial communities and viral infections, particularly with cytomegalovirus and other herpesviruses, elicit distinct immune responses and are central in the initiation of periodontal diseases. Risk of disease is dynamic and changes in response to complex interactions of genetic, environmental and stochastic factors over the lifespan. Many modifiable risk factors, such as smoking and excess caloric intake, contribute to increases in systemic markers of inflammation and can modify gene regulation through a variety of biologic mechanisms (e.g. epigenetic modifications). Periodontitis and other common chronic inflammatory diseases share multiple modifiable risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, psychological stress and depression, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis. Interventions that target modifiable risk factors have the potential to improve risk profiles for periodontitis as well as for other common chronic diseases.

  5. Ethanol Metabolism Modifies Hepatic Protein Acylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Green, Michelle F.; Petersen, Dennis R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein acetylation increases in response to chronic ethanol ingestion in mice, and is thought to reduce mitochondrial function and contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 regulates the acetylation status of several mitochondrial proteins, including those involved in ethanol metabolism. The newly discovered desuccinylase activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT5 suggests that protein succinylation could be an important post-translational modification regulating mitochondrial metabolism. To assess the possible role of protein succinylation in ethanol metabolism, we surveyed hepatic sub-cellular protein fractions from mice fed a control or ethanol-supplemented diet for succinyl-lysine, as well as acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-lysine post-translational modifications. We found mitochondrial protein propionylation increases, similar to mitochondrial protein acetylation. In contrast, mitochondrial protein succinylation is reduced. These mitochondrial protein modifications appear to be primarily driven by ethanol metabolism, and not by changes in mitochondrial sirtuin levels. Similar trends in acyl modifications were observed in the nucleus. However, comparatively fewer acyl modifications were observed in the cytoplasmic or the microsomal compartments, and were generally unchanged by ethanol metabolism. Using a mass spectrometry proteomics approach, we identified several candidate acetylated, propionylated, and succinylated proteins, which were enriched using antibodies against each modification. Additionally, we identified several acetyl and propionyl lysine residues on the same sites for a number of proteins and supports the idea of the overlapping nature of lysine-specific acylation. Thus, we show that novel post-translational modifications are present in hepatic mitochondrial, nuclear, cytoplasmic, and microsomal compartments and ethanol ingestion, and its associated metabolism, induce specific

  6. Expanding the chemical toolbox for the synthesis of large and uniquely modified proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondalapati, Somasekhar; Jbara, Muhammad; Brik, Ashraf

    2016-05-01

    Methods to prepare proteins that include a specific modification at a desired position are essential for understanding their cellular functions and physical properties in living systems. Chemical protein synthesis, which relies on the chemoselective ligation of unprotected peptides, enables the preparation of modified proteins that are not easily fabricated by other methods. In contrast to recombinant approaches, chemical synthesis can be used to prepare protein analogues such as D-proteins, which are useful in protein structure determination and the discovery of novel therapeutics. Post-translationally modifying proteins is another example where chemical protein synthesis proved itself as a powerful approach for preparing samples with high homogeneity and in workable quantities. In this Review, we discuss the basic principles of the field, focusing on novel chemoselective peptide ligation approaches such as native chemical ligation and the recent advances based on this method with a proven record of success in the synthesis of highly important protein targets.

  7. Stress responses during ageing: molecular pathways regulating protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kyriakakis, Emmanouil; Princz, Andrea; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2015-01-01

    The ageing process is characterized by deterioration of physiological function accompanied by frailty and ageing-associated diseases. The most broadly and well-studied pathways influencing ageing are the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling pathway and the dietary restriction pathway. Recent studies in diverse organisms have also delineated emerging pathways, which collectively or independently contribute to ageing. Among them the proteostatic-stress-response networks, inextricably affect normal ageing by maintaining or restoring protein homeostasis to preserve proper cellular and organismal function. In this chapter, we survey the involvement of heat stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the regulation of longevity, placing emphasis on the cross talk between different response mechanisms and their systemic effects. We further discuss novel insights relevant to the molecular pathways mediating these stress responses that may facilitate the development of innovative interventions targeting age-related pathologies such as diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Spatial memory training modifies the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor tyrosine kinase receptors in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Silhol, M; Arancibia, S; Maurice, T; Tapia-Arancibia, L

    2007-05-25

    Aging leads to alterations in the function of the hippocampus, a brain structure largely involved in learning processes. This study aimed at examining the basal levels and the impact of a learning-associated task on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), on BDNF full-length catalytic receptor (TrkB.FL) and on the truncated forms (TrkB.T1 and TrkB.T2) receptor expression (mRNA and protein) in the hippocampus of young (2-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) Wistar rats. Spatial memory was evaluated using a water-maze procedure involving visible and invisible platform location learning. Aged rats showed higher latencies during the first two training days but rapidly exhibited learning performances similar to patterns observed with young rats. Real-time PCR measurements showed that aged rats had significantly higher levels of trkB.FL mRNAs than young rats under basal conditions. In situ hybridization analysis indicated that the highest level of trkB.FL mRNA (mRNA encoding for TrkB.FL receptor) was noted in the dentate gyrus, and in the CA2 and CA3 hippocampal layers. In contrast, there was no marked difference in trkB.T1 signal in any hippocampal region. Training induced a significant reduction in trkB.FL mRNA levels solely in aged rats. In contrast, in young and aged rats, trkB.T2 mRNA levels were significantly increased after training. Measurements of proteins revealed that learning significantly increased TrkB.FL content in aged rats. Untrained aged rats presented higher levels of BDNF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor (proBDNF) proteins than young rats. Training strongly increased precursor BDNF metabolism in young and aged rats, resulting in increased levels of proBDNF in the two groups but in old rats the mature BDNF level did not change. This study shows that Wistar rats present age-related differences in the levels of BDNF and TrkB isoforms and that spatial learning differentially modifies some of these parameters in the hippocampus.

  9. Gender and iron genes may modify associations between brain iron and memory in healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Bartzokis, George; Lu, Po H; Tingus, Kathleen; Peters, Douglas G; Amar, Chetan P; Tishler, Todd A; Finn, J Paul; Villablanca, Pablo; Altshuler, Lori L; Mintz, Jim; Neely, Elizabeth; Connor, James R

    2011-06-01

    Brain iron increases with age and is abnormally elevated early in the disease process in several neurodegenerative disorders that impact memory including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Higher brain iron levels are associated with male gender and presence of highly prevalent allelic variants in genes encoding for iron metabolism proteins (hemochromatosis H63D (HFE H63D) and transferrin C2 (TfC2)). In this study, we examined whether in healthy older individuals memory performance is associated with increased brain iron, and whether gender and gene variant carrier (IRON+) vs noncarrier (IRON-) status (for HFE H63D/TfC2) modify the associations. Tissue iron deposited in ferritin molecules can be measured in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging utilizing the field-dependent relaxation rate increase (FDRI) method. FDRI was assessed in hippocampus, basal ganglia, and white matter, and IRON+ vs IRON- status was determined in a cohort of 63 healthy older individuals. Three cognitive domains were assessed: verbal memory (delayed recall), working memory/attention, and processing speed. Independent of gene status, worse verbal-memory performance was associated with higher hippocampal iron in men (r=-0.50, p=0.003) but not in women. Independent of gender, worse verbal working memory performance was associated with higher basal ganglia iron in IRON- group (r=-0.49, p=0.005) but not in the IRON+ group. Between-group interactions (p=0.006) were noted for both of these associations. No significant associations with white matter or processing speed were observed. The results suggest that in specific subgroups of healthy older individuals, higher accumulations of iron in vulnerable gray matter regions may adversely impact memory functions and could represent a risk factor for accelerated cognitive decline. Combining genetic and MRI biomarkers may provide opportunities to design primary prevention clinical trials that target high-risk groups.

  10. ASK1 and MAP2K6 as modifiers of age at onset in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Arning, Larissa; Monté, Didier; Hansen, Wiebke; Wieczorek, Stefan; Jagiello, Peter; Akkad, Denis A; Andrich, Jürgen; Kraus, Peter H; Saft, Carsten; Epplen, Jörg T

    2008-04-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease associated with abnormal expansions of a stretch of perfect CAG repeats in the HD gene. The number of repeat units is predictive for the age at onset (AO) of neurological symptoms. Part of the remaining variation in AO is attributed to modifier genes. In this study, genes involved in apoptosis were investigated as candidates for modulating AO in HD. A panel of 304 candidate genes was screened for allelic associations with motor AO via linked micro-satellite markers by pooling the DNAs of HD individuals from opposite ends of the AO distribution. After genotyping promising markers from the pooling experiment individually, markers revealed consolidated evidence for association in a candidate region comprising the genes MAP3K5 (ASK1)/PEX7 at 6q23.3 and in the gene MAP2K6 at 17q24.3. Fine-mapping of these candidate regions in a cohort of 250 Caucasian HD patients using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers delimitated the precise locations of association. Certain variations in an ASK1-PEX7 haplotype block explain 2.6% of additional variance in AO in our HD cohort. In males, 4.9% additional variance could be attributed to MAP2K6 genotype variations. Altogether, ASK1-PEX7 haplotypes and MAP2K2 genotype variations explain 6.3% additional variance in AO for HD. We hypothesise that sequence variations of ASK1 and MAP2K6 lead to partially sex-specific changes in the levels and/or phosphorylation states of p38 and p38-regulated proteins that might contribute to the observed delaying effects in the AO of HD.

  11. A modified gelatin zymography technique incorporating total protein normalization.

    PubMed

    Raykin, Julia; Snider, Eric; Bheri, Sruti; Mulvihill, John; Ethier, C Ross

    2017-03-15

    Gelatinase zymography is a commonly used laboratory procedure; however, variability in sample loading and concentration reduce the accuracy of quantitative results obtained from this technique. To facilitate normalization of gelatinase activity by loaded protein amount, we developed a protocol using the trihalocompound 2,2,2-trichloroethanol to allow for gelatin zymography and total protein labeling within the same gel. We showed that detected protein levels increased linearly with loading, and describe a loading concentration range over which normalized gelatinase activity was constant. We conclude that in-gel total protein detection is feasible in gelatin zymography and greatly improves comparison of gelatinase activity between samples.

  12. Treatment of hides with tara-modified protein products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In prior research, we demonstrated that gelatin could be modified with quebracho to produce products whose physicochemical properties would enable them to be used effectively as fillers in leather processing, and that leather resulting from this treatment had improved subjective properties with litt...

  13. A gene encoding a protein modified by the phytohormone indoleacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Alexander; Park, Seijin; Slovin, Janet P.; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Momonoki, Yoshie S.; Cohen, Jerry D.

    2002-01-01

    We show that the expression of an indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-modified protein from bean seed, IAP1, is correlated to the developmental period of rapid growth during seed development. Moreover, this protein undergoes rapid degradation during germination. The gene for IAP1, the most abundant protein covalently modified by IAA (iap1, GenBank accession no. AF293023) was isolated and cloned from bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds. The 957-bp sequence encodes a 35-kDa polypeptide. IAA-modified proteins represent a distinct class of conjugated phytohormones and appear in bean to be the major form of auxin in seeds. IAA proteins also are found at other stages of development in bean plants. Our immunological and analytical data suggest that auxin modification of a small class of proteins may be a feature common to many plants. PMID:11830675

  14. Protein carbonylation and heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle: relationships to age and sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Beltran Valls, Maria R; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Narici, Marco V; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E; Caporossi, Daniela; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into "old" and "old sarcopenic") were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r (2) = -.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r (2) = -.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se.

  15. LC-MS display of the total modified amino acids in cataract lens proteins and in lens proteins glycated by ascorbic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Rongzhu; Feng, Qi; Ortwerth, Beryl J

    2006-05-01

    We previously reported chromatographic evidence supporting the similarity of yellow chromophores isolated from aged human lens proteins, early brunescent cataract lens proteins and calf lens proteins ascorbylated in vitro [Cheng, R. et al. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1537, 14-26, 2001]. In this paper, new evidence supporting the chemical identity of the modified amino acids in these protein populations were collected by using a newly developed two-dimensional LC-MS mapping technique supported by tandem mass analysis of the major species. The pooled water-insoluble proteins from aged normal human lenses, early stage brunescent cataract lenses and calf lens proteins reacted with or without 20 mM ascorbic acid in air for 4 weeks were digested with a battery of proteolytic enzymes under argon to release the modified amino acids. Aliquots equivalent to 2.0 g of digested protein were subjected to size-exclusion chromatography on a Bio-Gel P-2 column and four major A330nm-absorbing peaks were collected. Peaks 1, 2 and 3, which contained most of the modified amino acids were concentrated and subjected to RP-HPLC/ESI-MS, and the mass elution maps were determined. The samples were again analyzed and those peaks with a 10(4) - 10(6) response factor were subjected to MS/MS analysis to identify the daughter ions of each modification. Mass spectrometric maps of peaks 1, 2 and 3 from cataract lenses showed 58, 40 and 55 mass values, respectively, ranging from 150 to 600 Da. Similar analyses of the peaks from digests of the ascorbylated calf lens proteins gave 81, 70 and 67 mass values, respectively, of which 100 were identical to the peaks in the cataract lens proteins. A total of 40 of the major species from each digest were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and 36 were shown to be identical. Calf lens proteins incubated without ascorbic acid showed several similar mass values, but the response factors were 100 to 1000-fold less for every modification. Based upon these data, we conclude

  16. Characteristics and safety assessment of intractable proteins in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Dean F; Bannon, Gary A; Delaney, Bryan F; Graser, Gerson; Hefford, Mary; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Lee, Thomas C; Madduri, Krishna M; Pariza, Michael; Privalle, Laura S; Ranjan, Rakesh; Saab-Rincon, Gloria; Schafer, Barry W; Thelen, Jay J; Zhang, John X Q; Harper, Marc S

    2014-07-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops may contain newly expressed proteins that are described as "intractable". Safety assessment of these proteins may require some adaptations to the current assessment procedures. Intractable proteins are defined here as those proteins with properties that make it extremely difficult or impossible with current methods to express in heterologous systems; isolate, purify, or concentrate; quantify (due to low levels); demonstrate biological activity; or prove equivalency with plant proteins. Five classes of intractable proteins are discussed here: (1) membrane proteins, (2) signaling proteins, (3) transcription factors, (4) N-glycosylated proteins, and (5) resistance proteins (R-proteins, plant pathogen recognition proteins that activate innate immune responses). While the basic tiered weight-of-evidence approach for assessing the safety of GM crops proposed by the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) in 2008 is applicable to intractable proteins, new or modified methods may be required. For example, the first two steps in Tier I (hazard identification) analysis, gathering of applicable history of safe use (HOSU) information and bioinformatics analysis, do not require protein isolation. The extremely low level of expression of most intractable proteins should be taken into account while assessing safety of the intractable protein in GM crops. If Tier II (hazard characterization) analyses requiring animal feeding are judged to be necessary, alternatives to feeding high doses of pure protein may be needed. These alternatives are discussed here.

  17. Membrane stiffness is modified by integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Philip W; Hélie, Jean; Duncan, Anna; Chavent, Matthieu; Koldsø, Heidi; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-20

    The ease with which a cell membrane can bend and deform is important for a wide range of biological functions. Peripheral proteins that induce curvature in membranes (e.g. BAR domains) have been studied for a number of years. Little is known, however, about the effect of integral membrane proteins on the stiffness of a membrane (characterised by the bending rigidity, Kc). We demonstrate by computer simulation that adding integral membrane proteins at physiological densities alters the stiffness of the membrane. First we establish that the coarse-grained MARTINI forcefield is able to accurately reproduce the bending rigidity of a small patch of 1500 phosphatidyl choline lipids by comparing the calculated value to both experiment and an atomistic simulation of the same system. This enables us to simulate the dynamics of large (ca. 50 000 lipids) patches of membrane using the MARTINI coarse-grained description. We find that altering the lipid composition changes the bending rigidity. Adding integral membrane proteins to lipid bilayers also changes the bending rigidity, whilst adding a simple peripheral membrane protein has no effect. Our results suggest that integral membrane proteins can have different effects, and in the case of the bacterial outer membrane protein, BtuB, the greater the density of protein, the larger the reduction in stiffness.

  18. Simultaneous detection of changes in protein expression and oxidative modification as function of age and APOE genotype in human APOE-targeted replacement mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background The purpose of this study was to improve the current method for detecting differentially-oxidized (carbonyl-modified) proteins by 2D-DIGE, while at the same time determining changes in total protein expression. Protein oxidation is a widely accepted model of aging and...

  19. Method For Determining And Modifying Protein/Peptide Solubilty

    SciTech Connect

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2005-03-15

    A solubility reporter for measuring a protein's solubility in vivo or in vitro is described. The reporter, which can be used in a single living cell, gives a specific signal suitable for determining whether the cell bears a soluble version of the protein of interest. A pool of random mutants of an arbitrary protein, generated using error-prone in vitro recombination, may also be screened for more soluble versions using the reporter, and these versions may be recombined to yield variants having further-enhanced solubility. The method of the present invention includes "irrational" (random mutagenesis) methods, which do not require a priori knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. Multiple sequences of mutation/genetic recombination and selection for improved solubility are demonstrated to yield versions of the protein which display enhanced solubility.

  20. A conserved NAD(+) binding pocket that regulates protein-protein interactions during aging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Bonkowski, Michael S; Moniot, Sébastien; Zhang, Dapeng; Hubbard, Basil P; Ling, Alvin J Y; Rajman, Luis A; Qin, Bo; Lou, Zhenkun; Gorbunova, Vera; Aravind, L; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A

    2017-03-24

    DNA repair is essential for life, yet its efficiency declines with age for reasons that are unclear. Numerous proteins possess Nudix homology domains (NHDs) that have no known function. We show that NHDs are NAD(+) (oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) binding domains that regulate protein-protein interactions. The binding of NAD(+) to the NHD domain of DBC1 (deleted in breast cancer 1) prevents it from inhibiting PARP1 [poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase], a critical DNA repair protein. As mice age and NAD(+) concentrations decline, DBC1 is increasingly bound to PARP1, causing DNA damage to accumulate, a process rapidly reversed by restoring the abundance of NAD(+) Thus, NAD(+) directly regulates protein-protein interactions, the modulation of which may protect against cancer, radiation, and aging.

  1. Aging Is Accompanied by a Blunted Muscle Protein Synthetic Response to Protein Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Benjamin Toby; Gorissen, Stefan H.; Pennings, Bart; Koopman, René; Groen, Bart B. L.; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass with aging (sarcopenia) forms a global health concern. It has been suggested that an impaired capacity to increase muscle protein synthesis rates in response to protein intake is a key contributor to sarcopenia. We assessed whether differences in post-absorptive and/or post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates exist between large cohorts of healthy young and older men. Procedures We performed a cross-sectional, retrospective study comparing in vivo post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis rates determined with stable isotope methodologies between 34 healthy young (22±1 y) and 72 older (75±1 y) men, and post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates between 35 healthy young (22±1 y) and 40 older (74±1 y) men. Findings Post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis rates did not differ significantly between the young and older group. Post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates were 16% lower in the older subjects when compared with the young. Muscle protein synthesis rates were >3 fold more responsive to dietary protein ingestion in the young. Irrespective of age, there was a strong negative correlation between post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis rates and the increase in muscle protein synthesis rate following protein ingestion. Conclusions Aging is associated with the development of muscle anabolic inflexibility which represents a key physiological mechanism underpinning sarcopenia. PMID:26536130

  2. Sonochemical synthesis of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles for protein immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shou-Cang; Ng, Wai Kiong; Chia, Leonard; Dong, Yuan-Cai; Tan, Reginald B.H.

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles were synthesized by rapid sonochemical co-condensation to achieve high capability for protein immobilization. Highlights: {yields} Amino-modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles were synthesized by rapid co-condensation. {yields} Strong positive charge was created by aminopropyl-modification. {yields} Capability for immobilization of negatively charged protein was enhanced. {yields} Electrostatic interaction between proteins and surface contributed to the enhanced adsorption. -- Abstract: 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane modified monodispersed silica nanoparticles were synthesized by a rapid sonochemical co-condensation synthesis procedure. The chemical nature of surface organic modifier on the obtained modified silica nanoparticle was characterized by {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si MAS Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)- differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Due to the strengthened positive surface charge of the silica nanoparticles by the modification with aminopropyl groups, the capability for bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption was significantly increased as compared with bare silica nanoparticles. 80 mg/g BSA was adsorbed on modified silica nanoparticles, whereas only 20 mg/g BSA could be loaded on pure silica nanoparticles. The enhanced positive surface charge repelled proteins with net positive charge and the modified silica nanoparticles exhibited negligible adsorption of lysozyme, thus a selective adsorption of proteins could be achieved.

  3. Air Pollution modifies the association between successful and pathological aging throughout the frailty condition.

    PubMed

    Fougère, Bertrand; Vellas, Bruno; Billet, Sylvain; Martin, Perrine J; Gallucci, Maurizio; Cesari, Matteo

    2015-11-01

    The rapid growth in the number of older adults has many implications for public health, including the need to better understand the risks posed by environmental exposures. Aging leads to a decline and deterioration of functional properties at the cellular, tissue and organ level. This loss of functional properties yields to a loss of homeostasis and decreased adaptability to internal and external stress. Frailty is a geriatric syndrome characterized by weakness, weight loss, and low activity that is associated with adverse health outcomes. Frailty manifests as an age-related, biological vulnerability to stressors and decreased physiological reserves. Ambient air pollution exposure affects human health, and elderly people appear to be particularly susceptible to its adverse effects. The aim of this paper is to discuss the role of air pollution in the modulation of several biological mechanisms involved in aging. Evidence is presented on how air pollution can modify the bidirectional association between successful and pathological aging throughout the frailty conditions.

  4. An allosteric role for receptor activity-modifying proteins in defining GPCR pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    J Gingell, Joseph; Simms, John; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Watkins, Harriet A; Pioszak, Augen A; Sexton, Patrick M; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are allosteric proteins that control transmission of external signals to regulate cellular response. Although agonist binding promotes canonical G protein signalling transmitted through conformational changes, G protein-coupled receptors also interact with other proteins. These include other G protein-coupled receptors, other receptors and channels, regulatory proteins and receptor-modifying proteins, notably receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). RAMPs have at least 11 G protein-coupled receptor partners, including many class B G protein-coupled receptors. Prototypic is the calcitonin receptor, with altered ligand specificity when co-expressed with RAMPs. To gain molecular insight into the consequences of this protein–protein interaction, we combined molecular modelling with mutagenesis of the calcitonin receptor extracellular domain, assessed in ligand binding and functional assays. Although some calcitonin receptor residues are universally important for peptide interactions (calcitonin, amylin and calcitonin gene-related peptide) in calcitonin receptor alone or with receptor activity-modifying protein, others have RAMP-dependent effects, whereby mutations decreased amylin/calcitonin gene-related peptide potency substantially only when RAMP was present. Remarkably, the key residues were completely conserved between calcitonin receptor and AMY receptors, and between subtypes of AMY receptor that have different ligand preferences. Mutations at the interface between calcitonin receptor and RAMP affected ligand pharmacology in a RAMP-dependent manner, suggesting that RAMP may allosterically influence the calcitonin receptor conformation. Supporting this, molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the calcitonin receptor extracellular N-terminal domain is more flexible in the presence of receptor activity-modifying protein 1. Thus, RAMPs may act in an allosteric manner to generate a spectrum of unique calcitonin receptor

  5. Using Synthetically Modified Proteins to Make New Materials

    PubMed Central

    Witus, Leah S.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The uniquely diverse structures and functions of proteins offer many exciting opportunities for creating new materials with advanced properties. Exploiting these capabilities requires a set of versatile chemical reactions that can attach nonnatural groups to specific locations on protein surfaces. Over the years, we and others have developed a series of new techniques for protein bioconjugation, with a particular emphasis on achieving high site selectivity and yield. Using these reactions, we have been able to prepare a number of new materials with functions that depend on both the natural and the synthetic components. In this Account, we discuss our progress in protein bioconjugation over the past decade, focusing on three distinct projects. We first consider our work to harness sunlight artificially by mimicking features of the photosynthetic apparatus, with its beautifully integrated system of chromophores, electron transfer groups, and catalytic centers. Central to these photosystems are light-harvesting antennae having hundreds of precisely aligned chromophores with positions that are dictated by the proteins within the arrays. Our approach to generating similar arrangements involves the self-assembly of tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins bearing synthetic chromophore groups. These systems offer efficient light collection, are easy to prepare, and can be used to build complex photocatalytic systems through the modification of multiple sites on the protein surfaces. We then discuss protein-based carriers that can deliver drugs and imaging agents to diseased tissues. The nanoscale agents we have built for this purpose are based on the hollow protein shell of bacteriophage MS2. These 27 nm capsids have 32 pores, which allow the entry of relatively large organic molecules into the protein shell without requiring disassembly. Our group has developed a series of chemical strategies that can install dyes, radiolabels, MRI contrast agents, and anti

  6. Organic and genetically modified soybean diets: consequences in growth and in hematological indicators of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Daleprane, Julio Beltrame; Feijó, Tatiana Silveira; Boaventura, Gilson Teles

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protein quality of organic and genetically modified soy by feeding specific diets to rats. Three groups of Wistar rats (n=10) were used, and each group was named according to the food that they ate. There was an organic soy group (OG), a genetically modified soy group (GG), and a control group (CG). All animals received water and diet ad libitum for 455 days. At the end of this period, the weight of the GG group was the same as that of the OG, and both were higher than CG. Protein intake was similar for the OG and GG, which were significantly lower (p<0.0005) than the CG. The growth rate (GR) of the rats, albumin levels, and total levels of serum protein were comparable for all groups. Hematocrit (p<0.04) and hemoglobin (p<0.03) for the OG and GG were less than the CG. Although the OG and GG demonstrated reduced hematocrit and hemoglobin, both types of soy were utilized in a way similar to casein. This result suggests that the protein quality of soy is parallel to the standard protein casein in terms of growth promotion but not hematological indicators.

  7. A comprehensive analytical strategy to identify malondialdehyde-modified proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Weißer, Juliane; Ctortecka, Claudia; Busch, Clara J; Austin, Shane R; Nowikovsky, Karin; Uchida, Koji; Binder, Christoph J; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2017-03-01

    Mass spectrometric-based proteomics is a powerful tool to analyse post-translationally modified proteins. Carbonylation modifications that result from oxidative lipid breakdown are a class of post-translational modifications that are poorly charac-terised with respect to protein targets and function. This is partly due to the lack of dedicated mass spectrometry-based technologies to facilitate the analysis of these modifications. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to identify malondialdehyde-modified proteins and peptides. Malondialdehyde is amongst the most abundant of the lipid peroxidation products; and malondialdehyde-derived adducts on proteins have been implicated in cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and other clinical conditions. Our integrated approach targets three levels of the overall proteomic workflow: (i) sample preparation, by employing a targeted enrichment strategy; (ii) high-performance liquid chromatography, by using a gradient optimised for the separation of the modified peptides; and (iii) tandem mass spectrometry, by improving the spectral quality of very low-abundance peptides. By applying the optimised procedure to a whole cell lysate spiked with a low amount of malondialdehyde-modified proteins, we were able to identify up to 350 different modified peptides and localise the modification to a specific lysine residue. This methodology allows the comprehensive analysis of malondialdehyde-modified proteins.

  8. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Castro, Nathan J; Condon, Brian; Costable, Carmen; Goheen, Steven C

    2012-05-01

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatographic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressings is adsorption and accumulation of proteins like albumin at the solid-liquid interface of the biological fluid and wound dressing fiber. To better understand the effect of fiber charge and molecular modifications in cellulose-containing fibers on the binding of serum albumin as observed in protease sequestrant dressings, albumin binding to modified cotton fibers was compared with traditional and chromatographic isotherms. Modified cotton including carboxymethylated, citrate-crosslinked, dialdehyde and phosphorylated cotton, which sequester elastase and collagenase, were compared for their albumin binding isotherms. Albumin isotherms on citrate-cellulose, cross-linked cotton demonstrated a two-fold increased binding affinity over untreated cotton. A comparison of albumin binding between traditional, solution isotherms and chromatographic isotherms on modified cellulose yielded similar equilibrium constants. Application of the binding affinity of albumin obtained in the in vitro protein isotherm to the in vivo wound dressing uptake of the protein is discussed. The chromatographic approach to assessment of albumin isotherms on modified cellulose offers a more rapid approach to evaluating protein binding on modified cellulose over traditional solution approaches.

  9. Individually modifiable risk factors to ameliorate cognitive aging: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lehert, Philippe; Villaseca, Paulina; Hogervorst, Eef; Maki, Pauline M.; Henderson, Victor W.

    2016-01-01

    A number of health and lifestyle factors are thought to contribute to cognitive decline associated with age but cannot be easily modified by the individual patient. We identified 12 individually-modifiable interventions that can be implemented during midlife or later with the potential to ameliorate cognitive aging. For 10 of these, we used PubMed databases for a systematic review of long-duration (at least six months), randomized controlled trials in midlife and older adults without dementia or mild cognitive impairment with objective measures of neuropsychological performance. Using network meta-analysis, we performed a quantitative synthesis for global cognition (primary outcome) and episodic memory (secondary outcome). Of 1038 publications identified by our search strategy, 24 eligible trials were included in the network meta-analysis. Results suggested that the Mediterranean diet supplemented by olive oil and tai chi exercise may improve global cognition, and the Mediterranean diet plus olive oil and soy isoflavone supplements may improve memory. Effect sizes were no more than small (standardized mean differences 0.11 to 0.22). Cognitive training may have cognitive benefit as well. Most individually modifiable risk factors have not yet been adequately studied. We conclude that some interventions that can be self-initiated by healthy midlife and older adults may ameliorate cognitive aging. PMID:26361790

  10. Individually modifiable risk factors to ameliorate cognitive aging: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lehert, P; Villaseca, P; Hogervorst, E; Maki, P M; Henderson, V W

    2015-10-01

    A number of health and lifestyle factors are thought to contribute to cognitive decline associated with age but cannot be easily modified by the individual patient. We identified 12 individually modifiable interventions that can be implemented during midlife or later with the potential to ameliorate cognitive aging. For ten of these, we used PubMed databases for a systematic review of long-duration (at least 6 months), randomized, controlled trials in midlife and older adults without dementia or mild cognitive impairment with objective measures of neuropsychological performance. Using network meta-analysis, we performed a quantitative synthesis for global cognition (primary outcome) and episodic memory (secondary outcome). Of 1038 publications identified by our search strategy, 24 eligible trials were included in the network meta-analysis. Results suggested that the Mediterranean diet supplemented by olive oil and tai chi exercise may improve global cognition, and the Mediterranean diet plus olive oil and soy isoflavone supplements may improve memory. Effect sizes were no more than small (standardized mean differences 0.11-0.22). Cognitive training may have cognitive benefit as well. Most individually modifiable risk factors have not yet been adequately studied. We conclude that some interventions that can be self-initiated by healthy midlife and older adults may ameliorate cognitive aging.

  11. Proteome-wide enrichment of proteins modified by lysine methylation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott M; Moore, Kaitlyn E; Green, Erin M; Martín, Glòria Mas; Gozani, Or

    2015-01-01

    We present a protocol for using the triple malignant brain tumor domains of L3MBTL1 (3×MBT), which bind to mono- and di-methylated lysine with minimal sequence specificity, in order to enrich for such methylated lysine from cell lysates. Cells in culture are grown with amino acids containing light or heavy stable isotopic labels. Methylated proteins are enriched by incubating cell lysates with 3×MBT, or with the binding-null D355N mutant as a negative control. Quantitative liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are then used to identify proteins that are specifically enriched by 3×MBT pull-down. The addition of a third isotopic label allows the comparison of protein lysine methylation between different biological conditions. Unlike most approaches, our strategy does not require a prior hypothesis of candidate methylated proteins, and it recognizes a wider range of methylated proteins than any available method using antibodies. Cells are prepared by growing in isotopic labeling medium for about 7 d; the process of enriching methylated proteins takes 3 d and analysis by LC-MS/MS takes another 1–2 d. PMID:24309976

  12. Protein kinase A signaling as an anti-aging target.

    PubMed

    Enns, Linda C; Ladiges, Warren

    2010-07-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a multi-unit protein kinase that mediates signal transduction of G-protein-coupled receptors through its activation by adenyl cyclase (AC)-mediated cAMP. The vital importance of PKA signaling to cellular function is reflected in the widespread expression of PKA subunit genes. As one of its many functions, PKA plays a key role in the regulation of metabolism and triglyceride storage. The PKA pathway has become of great interest to the study of aging, since mutations that cause a reduction in PKA signaling have been shown to extend lifespan in yeast, and to both delay the incidence and severity of age-related disease, and to promote leanness and longevity, in mice. There is increasing interest in the potential for the inhibition or redistribution of adiposity to attenuate aging, since obesity is associated with impaired function of most organ systems, and is a strong risk factor for shortened life span. Its association with coronary heart disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, cancer, sleep apnea and osteoarthritis is leading to its accession as a major cause of global ill health. Therefore, gene signaling pathways such as PKA that promote adiposity are potential inhibitory targets for aging intervention. Since numerous plant compounds have been found that both prevent adipogenesis and inhibit PKA signaling, a focused investigation into their effects on biological systems and the corresponding molecular mechanisms would be of high relevance to the discovery of novel and non-toxic compounds that promote healthy aging.

  13. Altered prion protein glycosylation in the aging mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Goh, Angeline Xi-Hua; Li, Chaoyang; Sy, Man-Sun; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2007-02-01

    The normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein with two highly conserved potential N-linked glycosylation sites. All prion diseases, whether inherited, infectious or sporadic, are believed to share the same pathogenic mechanism that is based on the conversion of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to the pathogenic scrapie prion protein (PrP(Sc)). However, the clinical and histopathological presentations of prion diseases are heterogeneous, depending not only on the strains of PrP(Sc) but also on the mechanism of diseases, such as age-related sporadic vs. infectious prion diseases. Accumulated evidence suggests that N-linked glycans on PrP(C) are important in disease phenotype. A better understanding of the nature of the N-linked glycans on PrP(C) during the normal aging process may provide new insights into the roles that N-linked glycans play in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. By using a panel of 19 lectins in an antibody-lectin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we found that the lectin binding profiles of PrP(C) alter significantly during aging. There is an increasing prevalence of complex oligosaccharides on the aging PrP(C), which are features of PrP(Sc). Taken together, this study suggests a link between the glycosylation patterns on PrP(C) during aging and PrP(Sc).

  14. Evaluation of small ligand-protein interaction by ligation reaction with DNA-modified ligand.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Rie; Mie, Masayasu; Funabashi, Hisakage; Kobatake, Eiry

    2010-01-01

    A method for the evaluation of interactions between protein and ligand using DNA-modified ligands, including signal enhancement of the DNA ligation reactions, is described. For proof of principle, a DNA probe modified by biotin was used. Two DNA probes were prepared with complementary sticky-ends. While one DNA probe was modified at the 5'-end of the sticky-end, the other was not modified. The probes could be ligated together by T4 DNA ligase along the strand without biotin modification. However, in the presence of streptavidin or anti-biotin Fab, the ligation reaction joining the two probes could not occur on either strand.

  15. Protein- and Peptide-Modified Synthetic Polymeric Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Ohm D.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview on biohybrid approaches of integrating the structural and functional features of proteins and peptides with synthetic polymers and the resulting unique properties in such hybrids, with a focus on bioresponsive/bioactive systems with biomaterials applications. The review is divided in two broad sections. First, we describe several examples of biohybrids produced by combining versatile synthetic polymers with proteins/enzymes and drugs that have resulted in (1) hybrid materials based on responsive polymers, (2) responsive hydrogels based on enzyme-catalyzed reactions, protein–protein interactions and protein–drug sensing, and (3) dynamic hydrogels based on conformational changes of a protein. Next, we present hybrids produced by combining synthetic polymers with peptides, classified based on the properties of the peptide domain: (1) peptides with different conformations, such as α-helical, coiled-coil, and β-sheet; (2) peptides derived from structural protein domains such as silk, elastin, titin, and collagen; and (3) peptides with other biofunctional properties such as cell-binding domains and enzyme-recognized degradation domains. PMID:20091878

  16. Molecular Design of Bisphosphonate-Modified Proteins for Efficient Bone Targeting In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sano, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Makiya; Hanzawa, Keiko; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2015-01-01

    To establish a rational molecular design for bisphosphonate (BP)-modified proteins for efficient bone targeting, a pharmacokinetic study was performed using a series of alendronate (ALN), a nitrogen-containing BP, modified proteins with various molecular weights and varying degrees of modification. Four proteins with different molecular weight—yeast glutathione reductase (GR; MW: 112,000 Da), bovine serum albumin (BSA; MW: 67,000 Da), recombinant human superoxide dismutase (SOD; MW: 32,000 Da), and chicken egg white lysozyme (LZM; MW: 14,000 Da)—were modified with ALN to obtain ALN-modified proteins. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the tissue distribution of the ALN-modified and unmodified proteins was performed after radiolabeling them with indium-111 (111In) by using a bifunctional chelating agent. Calculation of tissue uptake clearances revealed that the bone uptake clearances of 111In-ALN-modified proteins were proportional to the degree of ALN modification. 111In-GR-ALN and BSA-ALN, the two high-molecular-weight proteins, efficiently accumulated in bones, regardless of the degree of ALN modification. Approximately 36 and 34% of the dose, respectively, was calculated to be delivered to the bones. In contrast, the maximum amounts taken up by bone were 18 and 13% of the dose for 111In-SOD-ALN(32) and LZM-ALN(9), respectively, because of their high renal clearance. 111In-SOD modified with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and ALN (111In-PEG-SOD-ALN) was efficiently delivered to the bone. Approximately 36% of the dose was estimated to be delivered to the bones. In an experimental bone metastasis mouse model, treatment with PEG-SOD-ALN significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in the bone of the mice. These results indicate that the combination of PEG and ALN modification is a promising approach for efficient bone targeting of proteins with a high total-body clearance. PMID:26287482

  17. Systemic delivery of recombinant proteins by genetically modified myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, E.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1991-12-06

    The ability to stably deliver recombinant proteins to the systemic circulation would facilitate the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited diseases. To explore the feasibility of the use of genetically engineered myoblasts as a recombinant protein delivery system, stable transfectants of the murine C2C12 myoblast cell line were produced that synthesize and secrete high levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in vitro. Mice injected with hGH-transfected myoblasts had significant levels of hGH in both muscle and serum that were stable for at least 3 weeks after injection. Histological examination of muscles injected with {beta}-galactosidase-expressing C2C12 myoblasts demonstrated that many of the injected cells had fused to form multinucleated myotubes. Thus, genetically engineered myoblasts can be used for the stable delivery of recombinant proteins into the circulation.

  18. Whey protein coating efficiency on surfactant-modified hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yu D; Krochta, John M

    2005-06-15

    Whey protein oxygen-barrier coatings on peanuts are not effective, due to incomplete peanut-surface coverage, as well as some cracking and flaking of the coating. Addition of sorbitan laurate (Span 20) in the whey protein coating solution up to the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of 0.05% (w/w) significantly improved coating coverage to 88% of the peanut surface. Increasing the Span 20 concentration in the coating solution to 3 times the cmc (0.15% w/w) produced a substantial increase in peanut surface energy (>70 dyn/cm), indicating adsorption of the surfactant to the peanut surface. With this level of Span 20, the whey protein coating coverage on peanuts increased to 95%. These results suggest that a concentration of surfactant above the cmc in the coating solution is required for formation of self-assembled structures of surfactant molecules on peanut surfaces, which significantly increases the hydrophilicity, and thus coatability, of peanut surfaces.

  19. Assay of methylglyoxal-derived protein and nucleotide AGEs.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Shaheen, Fozia; Anwar, Attia; Masania, Jinit; Thornalley, Paul J

    2014-04-01

    Glyoxalase- and methylglyoxal-related research has required the development of quantitative and reliable techniques for the measurement of methylglyoxal-derived glycation adducts of protein and DNA. There are also other glycation adducts, oxidation adducts and nitration adducts of proteins and oxidation adducts of DNA. Proteolysis of protein releases glycation, oxidation and nitration free adducts (glycated, oxidized and nitrated amino acids) in plasma and nuclease digestion of DNA releases glycated and oxidized nucleosides into plasma and other body fluids for excretion in urine. The gold standard method for quantifying these adducts is stable isotopic dilution analysis LC-MS/MS. Protein and DNA adduct residues are determined by assay of enzymatic hydrolysates of protein and DNA extracts prepared using cocktails of proteases and nucleases respectively. Free adducts are determined by analysis of ultrafiltrates of plasma, urine and other physiological fluids. Protein damage markers (13 glycation adducts, five oxidation adducts and 3-nitrotyrosine) and DNA damage markers (three glycation adducts and one oxidation adduct) are quantified using 25 μg of protein, 10 μg of DNA or 5 μl of physiological fluid. Protein and nucleotide AGE (advanced glycation end-product) assay protocols resistant to interferences is described.

  20. Polyethyleneimine-modified graphene oxide nanocomposites for effective protein functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yejing; Jiang, Bo; Yang, Kaiguang; Sui, Zhigang; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-08-01

    A facile method to prepare a biocompatible graphene oxide (GO)-based substrate for protein immobilization was developed to overcome the drawbacks of GO, such as the strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions which could potentially alter the conformation and biological activity of proteins. The GO was coated with hydrophilic branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI), while Concanavalin A (Con A) as a model lectin protein was employed to fabricate the functionalized composites to evaluate the feasibility of this strategy. The composites exhibit an extremely high binding capacity for glycoproteins (i.e. IgG 538.3 mg g-1), which are superior to other immobilized materials. Moreover, they can work well in 500-fold non-glycoprotein interference and even in complex biological samples. All these data suggest that the GO@BPEI composites will have great potential as scaffolds for proteins fully exerting their biofunctions.A facile method to prepare a biocompatible graphene oxide (GO)-based substrate for protein immobilization was developed to overcome the drawbacks of GO, such as the strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions which could potentially alter the conformation and biological activity of proteins. The GO was coated with hydrophilic branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI), while Concanavalin A (Con A) as a model lectin protein was employed to fabricate the functionalized composites to evaluate the feasibility of this strategy. The composites exhibit an extremely high binding capacity for glycoproteins (i.e. IgG 538.3 mg g-1), which are superior to other immobilized materials. Moreover, they can work well in 500-fold non-glycoprotein interference and even in complex biological samples. All these data suggest that the GO@BPEI composites will have great potential as scaffolds for proteins fully exerting their biofunctions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Cell viability assay, enrichment of standard glycoprotein, pretreatment and analysis of real

  1. Modifiability of fluid intelligence in aging: a short-term longitudinal training approach.

    PubMed

    Plemons, J K; Willis, S L; Baltes, P B

    1978-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine to what degree fluid intelligence can be modified in aged subjects. The effectiveness of a cognitive training program designed to enhance one primary component of fluid intelligence, Figural Relations, was assessed by comparing the posttraining performances of 15 experimental and 15 control subjects (mean age: 69; age range 59-85) using a transfer paradigm and three posttraining assessments conducted approximately 1 week, 1 mo, and 6 mo following training. The post-training performance of the two groups was compared on three near (fluid intelligence) and one far (crystallized intelligence) transfer measures. A hierarchical pattern was predicted with the magnitude of training effects ordering themselves in descending order from near to far transfer measures. The training program was successful in enhancing performance on the fluid-nearest measure on all three posttests and for the next fluid-near measure on the first posttest. In addition, significant retest effects resulted which, however, were neither task-specific nor hierarchically ordered, but general and therefore indicative of ability-extraneous factors, such as test sophistication. The findings contribute to a position implying that intellectual performance in old age is more modifiable through short-term behavioral intervention than traditionally assumed.

  2. AGES AND METALLICITIES OF CLUSTER GALAXIES IN A779 USING MODIFIED STROeMGREN PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Sreedhar, Yuvraj Harsha; Rakos, Karl D.; Hensler, Gerhard; Zeilinger, Werner W.; Odell, Andrew P.

    2012-03-01

    In the quest for the formation and evolution of galaxy clusters, Rakos and co-workers introduced a spectrophotometric method using modified Stroemgren photometry, but with the considerable debate toward the project's abilities, we re-introduce the system by testing for the repeatability of the modified Stroemgren colors and compare them with the Stroemgren colors, and check for the reproducibility of the ages and metallicities (using the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) technique and the GALEV models) for the six common galaxies in all three A779 data sets. As a result, a fair agreement between two filter systems was found to produce similar colors (with a precision of 0.09 mag in (uz - vz), 0.02 mag in (bz - yz), and 0.03 mag in (vz - vz)) and the generated ages and metallicities are also similar (with an uncertainty of 0.36 Gyr and 0.04 dex from PCA and 0.44 Gyr and 0.2 dex using the GALEV models). We infer that the technique is able to relieve the age-metallicity degeneracy by separating the age effects from the metallicity effects, but it is still unable to completely eliminate it. We further extend this paper to re-study the evolution of galaxies in the low mass, dynamically poor A779 cluster (as it was not elaborately analyzed by Rakos and co-workers in their previous work) by correlating the luminosity (mass), density, and radial distance with the estimated age, metallicity, and the star formation history. Our results distinctly show the bimodality of the young, low-mass, metal-poor population with a mean age of 6.7 Gyr ({+-} 0.5 Gyr) and the old, high-mass, metal-rich galaxies with a mean age of 9 Gyr ({+-} 0.5 Gyr). The method also observes the color evolution of the blue cluster galaxies to red (Butcher-Oemler phenomenon), and the downsizing phenomenon. Our analysis shows that modified Stroemgren photometry is very well suited for studying low- and intermediate-z clusters, as it is capable of observing deeper with better spatial resolution at

  3. Sexually dimorphic effect of aging on skeletal muscle protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there appear to be no differences in muscle protein turnover in young and middle aged men and women, we have reported significant differences in the rate of muscle protein synthesis between older adult men and women. This suggests that aging may affect muscle protein turnover differently in men and women. Methods We measured the skeletal muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) by using stable isotope-labeled tracer methods during basal postabsorptive conditions and during a hyperaminoacidemic-hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in eight young men (25–45 y), ten young women (25–45 y), ten old men (65–85 y) and ten old women (65–85 y). Results The basal muscle protein FSR was not different in young and old men (0.040 ± 0.004 and 0.043 ± 0.005%·h-1, respectively) and combined insulin, glucose and amino acid infusion significantly increased the muscle protein FSR both in young (to 0.063 ± 0.006%·h-1) and old (to 0.051 ± 0.008%·h-1) men but the increase (0.023 ± 0.004 vs. 0.009 ± 0.004%·h-1, respectively) was ~60% less in the old men (P = 0.03). In contrast, the basal muscle protein FSR was ~30% greater in old than young women (0.060 ± 0.003 vs. 0.046 ± 0.004%·h-1, respectively; P < 0.05) and combined insulin, glucose and amino acid infusion significantly increased the muscle protein FSR in young (P < 0.01) but not in old women (P = 0.10) so that the FSR was not different between young and old women during the clamp (0.074 ± 0.006%·h-1 vs. 0.072 ± 0.006%·h-1, respectively). Conclusions There is sexual dimorphism in the age-related changes in muscle protein synthesis and thus the metabolic processes responsible for the age-related decline in muscle mass. PMID:22620287

  4. Effect of Phthalic Anhydride Modified Soy Protein on Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phthalic anhydride (PA) modified soy protein isolates (SPI), both hydrolyzed and un-hydrolyzed, are investigated as reinforcement fillers in styrene-butadiene (SB) composites. The modification of SPI by PA increases the number of carboxylic acid functional groups on the protein surface and therefor...

  5. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatogrpahic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressin...

  6. Effect of microfluidized and stearic acid modified soy protein in natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microfluidized and stearic acid modified soy protein aggregates were used to reinforced natural rubber. The size of soy protein particles was reduced with a microfluidizing and ball milling process. Filler size reduction with longer ball milling time tends to increase tensile strength of the rubber ...

  7. Modification of recombinant maize ChitA chitinase by fungal chitinase-modifying proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In commercial maize, there are at least two different alleles of the chiA gene that encode alloforms of ChitA chitinase, a protein that is abundant in developing seed. Both known alloforms are modified by Bz-cmp, a protein secreted by the fungal pathogen Bipolaris zeicola. One alloform (ChitA-B73) i...

  8. Formation of separating layers under conditions of the thermal aging of sorbents modified by fluorinated polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, E. Yu.; Shundrina, I. K.; Gerasimov, E. Yu.; Vaganova, T. A.

    2014-03-01

    Thermogravimetry, elemental analysis, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, high-resolution electron microscopy, and gas chromatography are used to study the effect of the content of perfluorinated polyimide when used as a stationary phase for modifying Chromosorb P NAW diatomite supports and aluminum oxide, and the effect of thermal aging conditions on changes in their texture and chromatographic characteristics. It is shown that Chromosorb P NAW + 5 wt % of polyimide (PI) adsorbent thermally aged at 700°C in a flow of inert gas exhibits properties of carbon molecular sieves, while aluminum oxide impregnated with 10 wt % of PI and thermally aged at 250°C allows us to selectively separate permanent and organic gases, as well separate saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons.

  9. Biocontainment of genetically modified organisms by synthetic protein design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.; Mee, Michael T.; Takeuchi, Ryo; Kuznetsov, Gleb; Norville, Julie E.; Gregg, Christopher J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Church, George M.

    2015-02-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly deployed at large scales and in open environments. Genetic biocontainment strategies are needed to prevent unintended proliferation of GMOs in natural ecosystems. Existing biocontainment methods are insufficient because they impose evolutionary pressure on the organism to eject the safeguard by spontaneous mutagenesis or horizontal gene transfer, or because they can be circumvented by environmentally available compounds. Here we computationally redesign essential enzymes in the first organism possessing an altered genetic code (Escherichia coli strain C321.ΔA) to confer metabolic dependence on non-standard amino acids for survival. The resulting GMOs cannot metabolically bypass their biocontainment mechanisms using known environmental compounds, and they exhibit unprecedented resistance to evolutionary escape through mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer. This work provides a foundation for safer GMOs that are isolated from natural ecosystems by a reliance on synthetic metabolites.

  10. Biocontainment of genetically modified organisms by synthetic protein design.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Daniel J; Lajoie, Marc J; Mee, Michael T; Takeuchi, Ryo; Kuznetsov, Gleb; Norville, Julie E; Gregg, Christopher J; Stoddard, Barry L; Church, George M

    2015-02-05

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly deployed at large scales and in open environments. Genetic biocontainment strategies are needed to prevent unintended proliferation of GMOs in natural ecosystems. Existing biocontainment methods are insufficient because they impose evolutionary pressure on the organism to eject the safeguard by spontaneous mutagenesis or horizontal gene transfer, or because they can be circumvented by environmentally available compounds. Here we computationally redesign essential enzymes in the first organism possessing an altered genetic code (Escherichia coli strain C321.ΔA) to confer metabolic dependence on non-standard amino acids for survival. The resulting GMOs cannot metabolically bypass their biocontainment mechanisms using known environmental compounds, and they exhibit unprecedented resistance to evolutionary escape through mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer. This work provides a foundation for safer GMOs that are isolated from natural ecosystems by a reliance on synthetic metabolites.

  11. Biocontainment of genetically modified organisms by synthetic protein design

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.; Mee, Michael T.; Takeuchi, Ryo; Kuznetsov, Gleb; Norville, Julie E.; Gregg, Christopher J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Church, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly deployed at large scales and in open environments. Genetic biocontainment strategies are needed to prevent unintended proliferation of GMOs in natural ecosystems. Existing biocontainment methods are insufficient either because they impose evolutionary pressure on the organism to eject the safeguard, because they can be circumvented by environmentally available compounds, or because they can be overcome by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Here we computationally redesign essential enzymes in the first organism possessing an altered genetic code to confer metabolic dependence on nonstandard amino acids for survival. The resulting GMOs cannot metabolically circumvent their biocontainment mechanisms using environmentally available compounds, and they exhibit unprecedented resistance to evolutionary escape via mutagenesis and HGT. This work provides a foundation for safer GMOs that are isolated from natural ecosystems by reliance on synthetic metabolites. PMID:25607366

  12. Biocontainment of genetically modified organisms by synthetic protein design

    DOE PAGES

    Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.; Mee, Michael T.; ...

    2015-01-21

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly deployed at large scales and in open environments. Genetic biocontainment strategies are needed to prevent unintended proliferation of GMOs in natural ecosystems. Existing biocontainment methods are insufficient because they impose evolutionary pressure on the organism to eject the safeguard by spontaneous mutagenesis or horizontal gene transfer, or because they can be circumvented by environmentally available compounds. In this paper, we computationally redesign essential enzymes in the first organism possessing an altered genetic code (Escherichia coli strain C321.ΔA) to confer metabolic dependence on non-standard amino acids for survival. The resulting GMOs cannot metabolically bypass theirmore » biocontainment mechanisms using known environmental compounds, and they exhibit unprecedented resistance to evolutionary escape through mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer. Finally, this work provides a foundation for safer GMOs that are isolated from natural ecosystems by a reliance on synthetic metabolites.« less

  13. Biocontainment of genetically modified organisms by synthetic protein design

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, Daniel J.; Lajoie, Marc J.; Mee, Michael T.; Takeuchi, Ryo; Kuznetsov, Gleb; Norville, Julie E.; Gregg, Christopher J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Church, George M.

    2015-01-21

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are increasingly deployed at large scales and in open environments. Genetic biocontainment strategies are needed to prevent unintended proliferation of GMOs in natural ecosystems. Existing biocontainment methods are insufficient because they impose evolutionary pressure on the organism to eject the safeguard by spontaneous mutagenesis or horizontal gene transfer, or because they can be circumvented by environmentally available compounds. In this paper, we computationally redesign essential enzymes in the first organism possessing an altered genetic code (Escherichia coli strain C321.ΔA) to confer metabolic dependence on non-standard amino acids for survival. The resulting GMOs cannot metabolically bypass their biocontainment mechanisms using known environmental compounds, and they exhibit unprecedented resistance to evolutionary escape through mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer. Finally, this work provides a foundation for safer GMOs that are isolated from natural ecosystems by a reliance on synthetic metabolites.

  14. Functional expression of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin, in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hyeon-Jin; Cui, Min-Long; Ma, Biao; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-23

    Taste-modifying proteins are a natural alternative to artificial sweeteners and flavor enhancers and have been used in some cultures for centuries. The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of being able to modify a sour taste into a sweet taste. Here, we report the use of a plant expression system for the production of miraculin. A synthetic gene encoding miraculin was placed under the control of constitutive promoters and transferred to lettuce. Expression of this gene in transgenic lettuce resulted in the accumulation of significant amounts of miraculin protein in the leaves. The miraculin expressed in transgenic lettuce possessed sweetness-inducing activity. These results demonstrate that the production of miraculin in edible plants can be a good alternative strategy to enhance the availability of this protein.

  15. Electron transfer dissociation of modified peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuping; Dong, Jia; Vachet, Richard W

    2011-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is the method of choice for sequencing peptides and proteins and is the preferred choice for characterizing post-translational modifications (PTMs). The most commonly used dissociation method to characterize peptides (i.e. collision-induced dissociation (CID)), however, has some limitations when it comes to analyzing many PTMs. Because CID chemistry is influenced by amino acid side-chains, some modifications can alter or inhibit dissociation along the peptide backbone, thereby limiting sequence information and hindering identification of the modification site. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has emerged as an alternate dissociation technique that, in most cases, overcomes these limitations of CID because it is less affected by side chain chemistry. Here, we review recent applications of ETD for characterizing peptide and protein PTMs with a particular emphasis on the advantages of ETD over CID, the ways in which ETD and CID have been used in a complementary manner, and how peptide modifications can still influence ETD dissociation pathways.

  16. Normal tear protein profiles and age-related changes.

    PubMed Central

    McGill, J I; Liakos, G M; Goulding, N; Seal, D V

    1984-01-01

    The specific and non-specific tear proteins have been analysed by means of the ELISA technique to establish the normal and age-related values. There is a linear and related decline of lysozyme and lactoferrin with age, and a similar but unrelated reduction in tear volume. IgA levels gradually decline, while caeruloplasmin and IgG both increase after the fifth decade. The results suggest that tear IgG and caeruloplasmin are probably transudates from the serum, that IgA is secreted independently of tear volume, and that lysozyme and lactoferrin are secreted at the same site but independently of tear volume. PMID:6712908

  17. Applicability of the modified universal calibration of gel permeation chromatography on proteins.

    PubMed

    Dondos, Anastasios

    2006-09-15

    The modified universal calibration of gel permeation chromatography (GPC) has been applied in the case of native proteins. Plotting log([eta]M/Phi) versus elution volume, instead of log[eta]M versus elution volume used till now, we obtain unique curves with different proteins and non-proteonic polymers ([eta]: intrinsic viscosity, M: molecular mass, Phi: Flory's parameter). The values of Flory's parameter Phi are calculated for each protein using an indirect method based on GPC.

  18. Common SIRT1 variants modify the effect of abdominal adipose tissue on aging-related lung function decline.

    PubMed

    Curjuric, Ivan; Imboden, Medea; Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier; Gerbase, Margaret W; Haun, Margot; Keidel, Dirk; Kumar, Ashish; Pons, Marco; Rochat, Thierry; Schikowski, Tamara; Schindler, Christian; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kronenberg, Florian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M

    2016-06-01

    Lung function is an independent predictor of mortality and serves as an aging marker in never smokers. The protein sirtuin-1 of gene SIRT1 has profound anti-inflammatory effects and regulates metabolic pathways. Its suggested longevity effects on lower organisms remain poorly studied in humans. In 1132 never smokers of the population-based SAPALDIA cohort, we investigated associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs730821, rs10997868, rs10823116) of SIRT1 and aging-related lung function decline over 11 years in terms of change in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio, and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75 % of FVC (FEF25-75) using multiple linear regression models. Interactions between the SIRT1 SNPs and adiposity parameters (body mass index (BMI), its change and weight gain) were tested by including multiplicative interaction terms into the models. SIRT1 polymorphisms exhibited no main effects, but modified the association between obesity measures and FEV1/FVC and FEF25-75 decline (p = 0.009-0.046). Per risk allele, FEV1/FVC decline was accelerated up to -0.5 % (95 % CI -1.0 to 0 %) and -0.7 % (-1.3 to -0.2 %) over interquartile range increases in BMI (2.4 kg/m(2)) or weight (6.5 kg), respectively. For FEF25-75 decline, corresponding estimates were -57 mL/s (-117 to 4 mL/s) and -76 mL/s (-1429 to -9 mL/s). Interactions were not present in participants with genetically lowered C-reactive protein concentrations. Genetic variation in SIRT1 might therefore affect lung function and human longevity by modifying subclinical inflammation arising from abdominal adipose tissue.

  19. Protein intake and urinary excretion of protein-derived metabolites in aging female vegetarians and nonvegetarians.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, M E; Beauchene, R E

    1991-08-01

    Relationships among age, protein intake, and urinary excretion of protein-derived metabolites were studied in 125 vegetarian and nonvegetarian women ages 40-92. There were 63 women in the vegetarian (AV) group and 62 women in the nonvegetarian (NV) group. Average daily intakes of energy and total animal and vegetable protein were calculated from 7-day dietary records. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were analyzed for total nitrogen, urea, creatinine, hydroxyproline, and inorganic sulfate. Energy intakes for the two groups were similar. AVs consumed less total and animal protein and more vegetable protein than NVs, even though both groups consumed more than the RDA for protein. No significant differences existed between the groups in the urinary excretion of total nitrogen, urea nitrogen, hydroxyproline, or inorganic sulfate. Energy and protein intakes and total nitrogen excretion were lower in older AVs than in younger AVs, while those of NVs increased between 40 and 55 years of age, and decreased among the older NV women. The relationship between these variables and age in NVs was more accurately described by polynomial rather than linear regression models.

  20. Gadd45 proteins: Relevance to aging, longevity and age-related pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Moskalev, Alexey A.; Smit-McBride, Zeljka; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail V.; Plyusnina, Ekaterina N.; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Budovsky, Arie; Tacutu, Robi; Fraifeld, Vadim E.

    2013-01-01

    The Gadd45 proteins have been intensively studied, in view of their important role in key cellular processes. Indeed, the Gadd45 proteins stand at the crossroad of the cell fates by controlling the balance between cell (DNA) repair, eliminating (apoptosis) or preventing the expansion of potentially dangerous cells (cell cycle arrest, cellular senescence), and maintaining the stem cell pool. However, the biogerontological aspects have not thus far received sufficient attention. Here we analyzed the pathways and modes of action by which Gadd45 members are involved in aging, longevity and age-related diseases. Because of their pleiotropic action, a decreased inducibility of Gadd45 members may have far-reaching consequences including genome instability, accumulation of DNA damage, and disorders in cellular homeostasis – all of which may eventually contribute to the aging process and age-related disorders (promotion of tumorigenesis, immune disorders, insulin resistance and reduced responsiveness to stress). Most recently, the dGadd45 gene has been identified as a longevity regulator in Drosophila. Although further wide-scale research is warranted, it is becoming increasingly clear that Gadd45s are highly relevant to aging, age-related diseases (ARDs) and to the control of life span, suggesting them as potential therapeutic targets in ARDs and pro-longevity interventions. PMID:21986581

  1. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  2. [Protein profile and vitamin A in children of school age in Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Yapi, H F; Ahiboh, H; Ago, K; Aké, M; Monnet, D

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this transverse prospective study was to determine blood nutritional, immunity and inflammatory proteins change in vitamin A deficiency in children of school-age (262 children, aged 7 to 15 years). Blood vitamin A has been determined by HPLC with UV detection. Proteins have been measured by radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini. Results showed that 96 children (36.6%) presented a vitamin A deficiency (vitamin A < 200 microg/L with a retinol binding protein/transthyretin molar ratio = 0.29 +/- 0.06) while 166 (63.3%) children presented normal blood concentrations of vitamin A (vitamin A > or = 200 microg/L with a Retinol Binding Protein/Transthyretin molar ratio = 0.40 +/- 0.08). This study showed that the retinol binding protein and the immunoglobulin A are lower in children with vitamin A deficiency. On the other hand, an isolated increase of alpha-1 glycoprotein acid has been observed in boys with vitamin A deficiency. The vitamin A deficiency observed in this survey is due to a micronutrients deficiency in the diet which is essentially based on glucides. The positive correlation between vitamin A and immunoglobulin A concentrations might be the result of the vitamin A inductive effect during immunoglobulins A synthesis. The isolated increasing of alpha-1 glycoprotein acid in boys with vitamin A deficiency has been assigned to the ecosensitiveness of the unfavourable environment. We therefore concluded that, in Ivorian primary-school-aged children with vitamin A deficiency, nutritional, immunity and inflammatory proteins which are modified are respectively retinol binding protein, immunoglobulin A and alpha-1 glycoprotein acid.

  3. Precipitation and mechanical properties of Nb-modified ferritic stainless steel during isothermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Haitao Bi Hongyun; Li Xin; Xu Zhou

    2009-03-15

    The influence of isothermal aging on precipitation behavior and mechanical properties of Nb-modified ferritic stainless steel was investigated using Thermo-calc software, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was observed that TiN, NbC and Fe{sub 2}Nb formed in the investigated steel and the experimental results agreed well with the results calculated by Thermo-calc software. During isothermal aging at 800 deg. C, the coarsening rate of Fe{sub 2}Nb is greater than that of NbC, and the calculated average sizes of NbC and Fe{sub 2}Nb of the aged specimen agreed with the experimental results. In addition, the tensile strength and micro-hardness of the ferritic stainless steel increased with increased aging time from 24 h to 48 h. But aging at 800 deg. C for 96 h caused the coarsening of the precipitation, which led to a decrease of tensile strength and micro-hardness.

  4. Modifiable maternal exposures and offspring blood pressure: a review of epidemiological studies of maternal age, diet, and smoking.

    PubMed

    Brion, Marie-Jo A; Leary, Sam D; Lawlor, Debbie A; Smith, George Davey; Ness, Andy R

    2008-06-01

    Prenatal programming of adult disease is well established in animals. In humans the impact of common in utero exposures on long-term offspring health is less clear. We reviewed epidemiology studies of modifiable maternal exposures and offspring blood pressure (BP). Three maternal exposures were identified for review and meta-analyzed where possible: smoking during pregnancy, diet, and age at childbirth. Meta-analysis suggested there was a modest association between higher offspring BP and prenatal exposure to smoke (confounder-adjusted beta = 0.62 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval: 0.19-1.05, I = 16.4%). However, the level of confounder adjustment varied between studies, which in some studies attenuated the association to the null. There was no strong evidence that any component of maternal diet during pregnancy (maternal protein, energy, calcium, and various other nutrients) influences offspring BP. The results of studies of maternal age varied and there was strong evidence of heterogeneity in the pooled analysis. The association with maternal age, if present, was modest (confounder-adjusted beta = 0.09 mm Hg/y, 95% confidence interval: -0.03 to 0.21, I = 89.8%). In sum, there is little empirical evidence that the maternal exposures reviewed program offspring BP. Other components of offspring health may be more susceptible to effects of programming in utero.

  5. Turnover of whole body proteins and myofibrillar proteins in middle-aged active men

    SciTech Connect

    Zackin, M.; Meredith, C.; Frontera, W.; Evans, W.

    1986-03-05

    Endurance-trained older men have a higher proportion of lean tissue and greater muscle cell oxidative capacity, reversing age-related trends and suggesting major changes in protein metabolism. In this study, protein turnover was determined in 6 middle-aged (52+/-1 yr) men who were well trained (VO/sub 2/ max 55.2+/-5.0 ml O/sub 2//kg.min) and lean (body fat 18.9+/-2.8%, muscle mass 36.6+/-0.6%). The maintained habitual exercise while consuming 0.6, 0.9 or 1.2 g protein/kg.day for 10-day periods. N flux was measured from /sup 15/N in urea after oral /sup 15/N-glycine administration. Myofibrillar protein breakdown was estimated from urinary 3-methyl-histidine. Dietary protein had no effect on turnover rates, even when N balance was negative. Whole body protein synthesis was 3.60+/-0.12 g/kg.day and breakdown was 3.40+/-0.14 g/kg.day for all N intakes. Whole body protein flux, synthesis and breakdown were similar to values reported for sedentary young (SY) or sedentary old (SO) men on comparable diets. 3-me-his (3.67+/-0.14 ..mu..mol/kg.day) was similar to values reported for SY but higher (p<0.01) than for SO. Myofibrillar protein breakdown per unit muscle mass (185+/-7 ..mu..mol 3-me-his/g creatinine) was higher (p<0.01) than for SY or SO. In active middle-aged men, myofibrillar proteins may account for a greater proportion of whole body protein turnover, despite an age-related reduction in muscle mass.

  6. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Cameron J; McGregor, Robin A; D'Souza, Randall F; Thorstensen, Eric B; Markworth, James F; Fanning, Aaron C; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-10-21

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring (13)C₆ phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein.

  7. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  8. Modified forelimb grip strength test detects aging-associated physiological decline in skeletal muscle function in male mice.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Hikari; Yamamoto, Koichi; Nozato, Satoko; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Imaizumi, Yuki; Hongyo, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Serina; Takeda, Masao; Oguro, Ryosuke; Takami, Yoichi; Itoh, Norihisa; Takeya, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Ken; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2017-02-08

    The conventional forelimb grip strength test is a widely used method to assess skeletal muscle function in rodents; in this study, we modified this method to improve its variability and consistency. The modified test had lower variability among trials and days than the conventional test in young C57BL6 mice, especially by improving the variabilities in male. The modified test was more sensitive than the conventional test to detect a difference in motor function between female and male mice, or between young and old male mice. When the modified test was performed on male mice during the aging process, reduction of grip strength manifested between 18 and 24 months of age at the group level and at the individual level. The modified test was similar to the conventional test in detecting skeletal muscle dysfunction in young male dystrophic mice. Thus, the modified forelimb grip strength test, with its improved validity and reliability may be an ideal substitute for the conventional method.

  9. Maltodextrin-modified magnetic microspheres for selective enrichment of maltose binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Ma, Chongjun; Sun, Yangfei; Pan, Miaorong; Li, Li; Hu, Xiaojian; Yang, Wuli

    2014-03-12

    In this work, maltodextrin-modified magnetic microspheres Fe3O4@SiO2-Maltodextrin (Fe3O4@SiO2-MD) with uniform size and fine morphology were synthesized through a facile and low-cost method. As the maltodextrins on the surface of microspheres were combined with maltose binding proteins (MBP), the magnetic microspheres could be applied to enriching standard MBP fused proteins. Then, the application of Fe3O4@SiO2-MD in one-step purification and immobilization of MBP fused proteins was demonstrated. For the model protein we examined, Fe3O4@SiO2-MD showed excellent binding selectivity and capacity against other Escherichia coli proteins in the crude cell lysate. Additionally, the maltodextrin-modified magnetic microspheres can be recycled for several times without significant loss of binding capacity.

  10. Improvement on the modified Lowry method against interference of divalent cations in soluble protein measurement.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue-Xiao; Xiao, Kang; Liang, Peng; Ma, Yi-Wei; Huang, Xia

    2013-05-01

    This paper systematically investigated the interference of calcium and magnesium in protein measurement with a modified Lowry method first proposed by Frølund et al. (Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 43:755-761, 1995). This interference has in the past been largely ignored resulting in variable and unreliable results when applied to natural water matrices. We discovered significant formation of calcium and magnesium precipitates that lead to a decline in light absorbance at 750 nm during protein determination. Underestimation of protein concentration (sometimes even yielding negative concentrations) and low experiment reproducibility were demonstrated at high concentrations of divalent cations (e.g., [Ca(2+)] over 1 mmol L(-1)). To eliminate interference from calcium and magnesium, two pretreatment strategies were established based on cation exchange and dialysis. These pretreatments were convenient and were found to be highly effective in removing calcium and magnesium in protein samples. By using the modified Lowry method with these pretreatments, proteins in standard solutions and in wastewater samples were successfully quantified with good reliability and reproducibility. In addition, we demonstrated that simultaneous quantification of humic substances with the modified Lowry method was not affected by the two pretreatments. These approaches are expected to be applicable to protein and humic substance determination in different research fields, in cases where the modified Lowry method is sensitive to divalent cation concentrations.

  11. Phospho1 deficiency transiently modifies bone architecture yet produces consistent modification in osteocyte differentiation and vascular porosity with ageing

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, B.; Carriero, A.; Staines, K.A.; Chang, Y.-M.; Houston, D.A.; Oldknow, K.J.; Millan, J.L.; Kazeruni, Bassir N.; Salmon, P.; Shefelbine, S.; Farquharson, C.; Pitsillides, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    PHOSPHO1 is one of principal proteins involved in initiating bone matrix mineralisation. Recent studies have found that Phospho1 KO mice (Phospho1-R74X) display multiple skeletal abnormalities with spontaneous fractures, bowed long bones, osteomalacia and scoliosis. These analyses have however been limited to young mice and it remains unclear whether the role of PHOSPHO1 is conserved in the mature murine skeleton where bone turnover is limited. In this study, we have used ex-vivo computerised tomography to examine the effect of Phospho1 deletion on tibial bone architecture in mice at a range of ages (5, 7, 16 and 34 weeks of age) to establish whether its role is conserved during skeletal growth and maturation. Matrix mineralisation has also been reported to influence terminal osteoblast differentiation into osteocytes and we have also explored whether hypomineralised bones in Phospho1 KO mice exhibit modified osteocyte lacunar and vascular porosity. Our data reveal that Phospho1 deficiency generates age-related defects in trabecular architecture and compromised cortical microarchitecture with greater porosity accompanied by marked alterations in osteocyte shape, significant increases in osteocytic lacuna and vessel number. Our in vitro studies examining the behaviour of osteoblast derived from Phospho1 KO and wild-type mice reveal reduced levels of matrix mineralisation and modified osteocytogenic programming in cells deficient in PHOSPHO1. Together our data suggest that deficiency in PHOSPHO1 exerts modifications in bone architecture that are transient and depend upon age, yet produces consistent modification in lacunar and vascular porosity. It is possible that the inhibitory role of PHOSPHO1 on osteocyte differentiation leads to these age-related changes in bone architecture. It is also intriguing to note that this apparent acceleration in osteocyte differentiation evident in the hypomineralised bones of Phospho1 KO mice suggests an uncoupling of the interplay

  12. Brain aging and its modifiers: insights from in vivo neuromorphometry and susceptibility weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Raz, Naftali; Rodrigue, Karen M; Haacke, E Mark

    2007-02-01

    Aging is marked by individual differences and differential vulnerability of cognitive operations and their neural substrates. Cross-sectional studies of brain volume reveal greater age-related shrinkage of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the hippocampus than in the entorhinal and primary visual cortex. Longitudinal studies of regional brain shrinkage indicate that when individual differences are controlled, larger and broader shrinkage estimates are evident, with most polymodal cortices affected to the same extent. The mechanisms of age-related shrinkage are unclear. Vascular risk factors may exacerbate brain aging and account for some of the observed declines as both the PFC and the hippocampus show elevated vulnerability to hypertension. MRI techniques that are sensitive to small vessels function, tissue oxygenation, and perfusion may be especially well suited to study brain aging and its vascular modifiers. We present an example of one such technique, susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), that allows direct measurement of T2* values that reflect deoxy- to oxyhemoglobin fraction in blood vessels and iron deposits in cerebral tissue. The T2* shortening is associated with advanced age, but the effect is significantly stronger in the PFC and the hippocampus than the entorhinal and visual cortices. Moreover, T2* is shorter in hypertensive participants than in their matched normotensive counterparts, and the difference is especially prominent in the hippocampus, thus mirroring the findings of the neuromorphometric studies. Future research on brain aging would benefit from combining structural and metabolic techniques in a longitudinal design, as such studies will allow examination of leading-trailing effects of those factors.

  13. Positive Lysosomal Modulation As a Unique Strategy to Treat Age-Related Protein Accumulation Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Meagan L.; Butler, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lysosomes are involved in degrading and recycling cellular ingredients, and their disruption with age may contribute to amyloidogenesis, paired helical filaments (PHFs), and α-synuclein and mutant huntingtin aggregation. Lysosomal cathepsins are upregulated by accumulating proteins and more so by the modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK). Such positive modulators of the lysosomal system have been studied in the well-characterized hippocampal slice model of protein accumulation that exhibits the pathogenic cascade of tau aggregation, tubulin breakdown, microtubule destabilization, transport failure, and synaptic decline. Active cathepsins were upregulated by PADK; Rab proteins were modified as well, indicating enhanced trafficking, whereas lysosome-associated membrane protein and proteasome markers were unchanged. Lysosomal modulation reduced the pre-existing PHF deposits, restored tubulin structure and transport, and recovered synaptic components. Further proof-of-principle studies used Alzheimer disease mouse models. It was recently reported that systemic PADK administration caused dramatic increases in cathepsin B protein and activity levels, whereas neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, α-secretase, and β-secretase were unaffected by PADK. In the transgenic models, PADK treatment resulted in clearance of intracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide and concomitant reduction of extracellular deposits. Production of the less pathogenic Aβ1–38 peptide corresponded with decreased levels of Aβ1–42, supporting the lysosome's antiamyloidogenic role through intracellular truncation. Amelioration of synaptic and behavioral deficits also indicates a neuroprotective function of the lysosomal system, identifying lysosomal modulation as an avenue for disease-modifying therapies. From the in vitro and in vivo findings, unique lysosomal modulators represent a minimally invasive, pharmacologically controlled strategy against protein accumulation disorders

  14. Identification of a chitinase modifying protein from Fusarium verticillioides: truncation of a host resistance protein by a fungalysin metalloprotease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chitinase modifying proteins (cmps) are proteases, secreted by fungal pathogens, which truncate the plant class IV chitinases ChitA and ChitB during maize ear rot. Cmp activity has been characterized for Bipolaris zeicola and Stenocarpella maydis, but the identities of the proteases are not known. H...

  15. Physicochemical properties of protein-modified silver nanoparticles in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hangyue

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the physicochemical properties of silver nanoparticles stabilized with casein protein in seawater. UV?vis spectrometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to measure the stability of silver nanoparticles in seawater samples. The obtained results show an increased aggregation tendency of silver nanoparticles in seawater, which could be attributed its relatively high cation concentration that could neutralize the negatively charges adsorbed on the surface of silver nanoparticles and reduce the electrostatic repulsion forces between nanoparticles. Similarly, due to the surface charge screening process, the zeta potential of silver nanoparticles in seawater decreased. This observation further supported the aggregation behavior of silver nanoparticles. This study also investigated the dissolution of silver nanoparticles in seawater. Result shows that the silver nanoparticle dissolution in DI water is lower than in seawater, which is attributed to the high Cl? concentration present in seawater. As Cl? can react with silver and form soluble AgCl complex, dissolution of silver nanoparticles was enhanced. Finally, this study demonstrated that silver nanoparticles are destabilized in seawater condition. These results may be helpful in understanding the environmental risk of discharged silver nanoparticles in seawater conditions.

  16. Protein conformational modifications and kinetics of water-protein interactions in milk protein concentrate powder upon aging: effect on solubility.

    PubMed

    Haque, Enamul; Bhandari, Bhesh R; Gidley, Michael J; Deeth, Hilton C; Møller, Sandie M; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2010-07-14

    Protein conformational modifications and water-protein interactions are two major factors believed to induce instability of protein and eventually affect the solubility of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powder. To test these hypotheses, MPC was stored at different water activities (a(w) 0.0-0.85) and temperatures (25 and 45 degrees C) for up to 12 weeks. Samples were examined periodically to determine solubility, change in protein conformation by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA), and water status (interaction of water with the protein molecule/surface) by measuring the transverse relaxation time (T(2)) with proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). The solubility of MPC decreased significantly with aging, and this process was enhanced by increasing water activity (a(w)) and storage temperature. Minor changes in protein secondary structure were observed with FTIR, which indicated some degree of unfolding of protein molecules. PCA of the FTIR data was able to discriminate samples according to moisture content and storage period. Partial least-squares (PLS) analysis showed some correlation between FTIR spectral feature and solubility. The NMR T(2) results indicated the presence of three distinct populations of water molecules, and the proton signal intensity and T(2) values of proton fractions varied with storage conditions (humidity, temperature) and aging. Results suggest that protein/protein interactions may be initiated by unfolding of protein molecules that eventually affects solubility.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of the Pmo1 and Pmo2 salivary proteins detected by the modified protein staining method.

    PubMed

    Minaguchi, K; Suzuki, K

    1988-07-01

    Two polymorphic proteins, Pmo1 and Pmo2, were found in human parotid saliva by modifying the protein staining method of Sung & Smithies (1969). The inheritance of each polymorphism was controlled by a dominant allele at an autosomal locus. This hypothesis was supported by studies in 50 families including 103 children. The gene frequencies were Pmo1+ = 0.308, Pmo1- = 0.692, Pmo2+ = 0.026, Pmo2- = 0.974. The Pmo1 and Pmo2 proteins reacted immunologically with antisera prepared to salivary proline-rich proteins (Pr and Gl). The isoelectric point was in excess of 8.58. These results showed that the Pmo1 and Pmo2 proteins belong to the basic proline-rich proteins in human parotid saliva.

  18. Dietary Protein to Maintain Muscle Mass in Aging: A Case for Per-meal Protein Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C H; Oikawa, S Y; Phillips, S M

    2016-01-01

    It is well accepted that daily protein intake is an important dietary consideration to limit and treat age-related declines in muscle mass, strength, and function. Furthermore, we propose that there is a growing appreciation for the need to consider protein intake on a per-meal basis rather than simply focusing on the total daily protein intake. The existence of a saturable dose-response relationship between muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and the quantity of protein consumed in a single meal/bolus provides the rationale for promoting an even/balanced pattern of daily protein intake. We hypothesize that a balanced/even protein intake pattern with the ingestion a quantity of protein shown to optimally stimulate MPS at each meal may be an effective strategy to alleviate sarcopenic muscle loss. In this review we examine the available evidence supporting the influence of dietary protein intake pattern on muscle protein turnover, muscle mass, and muscle function. We present several practical considerations that, it is proposed, should be taken into account when translating a per-meal protein recommendation into dietary advice for older adults.

  19. Age hardening and creep resistance of cast Al–Cu alloy modified by praseodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Zhihao; Qiu, Feng; Wu, Xiaoxue; Liu, Yingying; Jiang, Qichuan

    2013-12-15

    The effects of praseodymium on age hardening behavior and creep resistance of cast Al–Cu alloy were investigated. The results indicated that praseodymium facilitated the formation of the θ′ precipitates during the age process and improved the hardness of the Al–Cu alloy. Besides, praseodymium resulted in the formation of the Al{sub 11}Pr{sub 3} phase in the grain boundaries and among the dendrites of the modified alloy. Because of the good thermal stability of Al{sub 11}Pr{sub 3} phase, it inhibits grain boundary migration and dislocation movement during the creep process, which contributes to the improvement in the creep resistance of the modified alloy at elevated temperatures. - Highlights: • Pr addition enhances the hardness and creep resistance of the Al–Cu alloy. • Pr addition facilitates the formation of the θ′ precipitates. • Pr addition results in the formation of the Al11Pr3 phase in the Al–Cu alloy.

  20. A modified paper-binding procedure for the assay of nucleus-associated protein phosphokinases.

    PubMed

    Goueli, S A; Slungaard, R; Wilson, M J; Ahmed, K

    1980-05-01

    Previously existing paper-binding assay procedures gave results with large variations when employed for the measurement of nucleus-associated protein phosphokinase activities. However, a modified method, utilizing the binding of 32P-labeled phosphoprotein substrates to paper and employing washing procedures in 20% trichloroacetic acid at 60 degrees to 70 degrees C, gave highly reproducible results. This modified procedure was satisfactory with either chromatin or a nonhistone protein fraction derived therefrom as a source of enzyme, and dephosphophosvitin, lysine-rich histones, or casein as phosphoprotein substrates.

  1. Is physical activity able to modify oxidative damage in cardiovascular aging?

    PubMed

    Corbi, Graziamaria; Conti, Valeria; Russomanno, Giusy; Rengo, Giuseppe; Vitulli, Piergiusto; Ciccarelli, Anna Linda; Filippelli, Amelia; Ferrara, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process resulting in damage of molecules, cells, and tissues. It has been demonstrated that the expression and activity of antioxidant systems (SOD, HSPs) are modified in aging, with reduced cell ability to counteract the oxidant molecules, and consequent weak resistance to ROS accumulation. An important mechanism involved is represented by sirtuins, the activity of which is reduced by aging. Physical activity increases the expression and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, with consequent reduction of ROS. Positive effects of physical exercise in terms of antioxidant activity could be ascribable to a greater expression and activity of SOD enzymes, HSPs and SIRT1 activity. The antioxidant effects could increase, decrease, or not change in relation to the exercise protocol. Therefore, some authors by using a new approach based on the in vivo/vitro technique demonstrated that the highest survival and proliferation and the lowest senescence were obtained by performing an aerobic training. Therefore, the in vivo/vitro technique described could represent a good tool to better understand how the exercise training mediates its effects on aging-related diseases, as elderly with heart failure that represents a special population in which the exercise plays an important role in the improvement of cardiovascular function, quality of life, and survival.

  2. Circulating Heat Shock Protein 70 in Health, Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat shock proteins (Hsp) are ubiquitously synthesised in virtually all species and it is hypothesised that they might have beneficial health effects. Recent studies have identified circulating Hsp as an important mediator in inflammation - the effects of low-grade inflammation in the aging process are overwhelming. While much is known about intracellular Hsp70, scant data exist on circulating Hsp70 in the aging context. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of age and disease on circulating Hsp70 and, in particular, to evaluate the association between circulating Hsp70 and inflammatory parameters. Results Serum Hsp70, Interleukin (IL) -10, IL-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) alpha concentrations were determined in 90 hospitalised geriatric patients (aged 83 ± 6 years) and in 200 community-dwelling control subjects (100 elderly, aged 74 ± 5 years, and 100 young, aged 23 ± 3 years). In the community-dwelling elderly, serum Hsp70 and IL-10 concentrations were significantly lower and IL-6 was significantly higher when compared to healthy young control subjects. Elderly patients presenting inflammation (CRP serum levels ≥5 mg/L) showed significantly (p = 0.007) higher Hsp70 values; and Hsp70 correlated positively (p < 0.001) with IL-6 and CRP, but not with TNF-alpha or IL-10. A significant association was also noted between Hsp70 levels and the degree of dependency and cognitive decline in geriatric patients. Conclusions The present data provide new evidence that serum concentration of Hsp70 decreases with age in a normal population. Our study also shows that higher levels of Hsp70 are associated with inflammation and frailty in elderly patients. PMID:21443787

  3. The V471A Polymorphism in Autophagy-Related Gene ATG7 Modifies Age at Onset Specifically in Italian Huntington Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Silke; Walter, Carolin; Riess, Olaf; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Nielsen, Jørgen E.; Craufurd, David; Nguyen, Huu Phuc

    2013-01-01

    The cause of Huntington disease (HD) is a polyglutamine repeat expansion of more than 36 units in the huntingtin protein, which is inversely correlated with the age at onset of the disease. However, additional genetic factors are believed to modify the course and the age at onset of HD. Recently, we identified the V471A polymorphism in the autophagy-related gene ATG7, a key component of the autophagy pathway that plays an important role in HD pathogenesis, to be associated with the age at onset in a large group of European Huntington disease patients. To confirm this association in a second independent patient cohort, we analysed the ATG7 V471A polymorphism in additional 1,464 European HD patients of the “REGISTRY” cohort from the European Huntington Disease Network (EHDN). In the entire REGISTRY cohort we could not confirm a modifying effect of the ATG7 V471A polymorphism. However, analysing a modifying effect of ATG7 in these REGISTRY patients and in patients of our previous HD cohort according to their ethnic origin, we identified a significant effect of the ATG7 V471A polymorphism on the HD age at onset only in the Italian population (327 patients). In these Italian patients, the polymorphism is associated with a 6-years earlier disease onset and thus seems to have an aggravating effect. We could specify the role of ATG7 as a genetic modifier for HD particularly in the Italian population. This result affirms the modifying influence of the autophagic pathway on the course of HD, but also suggests population-specific modifying mechanisms in HD pathogenesis. PMID:23894380

  4. The V471A polymorphism in autophagy-related gene ATG7 modifies age at onset specifically in Italian Huntington disease patients.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Silke; Walter, Carolin; Riess, Olaf; Roos, Raymund A C; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Craufurd, David; Nguyen, Huu Phuc

    2013-01-01

    The cause of Huntington disease (HD) is a polyglutamine repeat expansion of more than 36 units in the huntingtin protein, which is inversely correlated with the age at onset of the disease. However, additional genetic factors are believed to modify the course and the age at onset of HD. Recently, we identified the V471A polymorphism in the autophagy-related gene ATG7, a key component of the autophagy pathway that plays an important role in HD pathogenesis, to be associated with the age at onset in a large group of European Huntington disease patients. To confirm this association in a second independent patient cohort, we analysed the ATG7 V471A polymorphism in additional 1,464 European HD patients of the "REGISTRY" cohort from the European Huntington Disease Network (EHDN). In the entire REGISTRY cohort we could not confirm a modifying effect of the ATG7 V471A polymorphism. However, analysing a modifying effect of ATG7 in these REGISTRY patients and in patients of our previous HD cohort according to their ethnic origin, we identified a significant effect of the ATG7 V471A polymorphism on the HD age at onset only in the Italian population (327 patients). In these Italian patients, the polymorphism is associated with a 6-years earlier disease onset and thus seems to have an aggravating effect. We could specify the role of ATG7 as a genetic modifier for HD particularly in the Italian population. This result affirms the modifying influence of the autophagic pathway on the course of HD, but also suggests population-specific modifying mechanisms in HD pathogenesis.

  5. Age-at-Onset in Late Onset Alzheimer Disease is Modified by Multiple Genetic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Naj, Adam C.; Jun, Gyungah; Reitz, Christiane; Kunkle, Brian W.; Perry, William; Park, YoSon; Beecham, Gary W.; Rajbhandary, Ruchita A.; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Wang, Li-San; Kauwe, John S.K.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Myers, Amanda J.; Bird, Thomas D.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Crane, Paul K.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Barmada, Michael M.; Demirci, F. Yesim; Cruchaga, Carlos; Kramer, Patricia; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Hardy, John; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Larson, Eric B.; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Evans, Denis; Schneider, Julie A.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Saykin, Andrew J.; Reiman, Eric M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Bennett, David A.; Morris, John C.; Montine, Thomas J.; Goate, Alison M.; Blacker, Deborah; Tsuang, Debby W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kukull, Walter A.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Martin, Eden R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance As APOE locus variants contribute to both risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease and differences in age-at-onset, it is important to know if other established late-onset Alzheimer disease risk loci also affect age-at-onset in cases. Objectives To investigate the effects of known Alzheimer disease risk loci in modifying age-at-onset, and to estimate their cumulative effect on age-at-onset variation, using data from genome-wide association studies in the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC). Design, Setting and Participants The ADGC comprises 14 case-control, prospective, and family-based datasets with data on 9,162 Caucasian participants with Alzheimer’s occurring after age 60 who also had complete age-at-onset information, gathered between 1989 and 2011 at multiple sites by participating studies. Data on genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) most significantly associated with risk at ten confirmed LOAD loci were examined in linear modeling of AAO, and individual dataset results were combined using a random effects, inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis approach to determine if they contribute to variation in age-at-onset. Aggregate effects of all risk loci on AAO were examined in a burden analysis using genotype scores weighted by risk effect sizes. Main Outcomes and Measures Age at disease onset abstracted from medical records among participants with late-onset Alzheimer disease diagnosed per standard criteria. Results Analysis confirmed association of APOE with age-at-onset (rs6857, P=3.30×10−96), with associations in CR1 (rs6701713, P=7.17×10−4), BIN1 (rs7561528, P=4.78×10−4), and PICALM (rs561655, P=2.23×10−3) reaching statistical significance (P<0.005). Risk alleles individually reduced age-at-onset by 3-6 months. Burden analyses demonstrated that APOE contributes to 3.9% of variation in age-at-onset (R2=0.220) over baseline (R2=0.189) whereas the other nine loci together contribute to 1.1% of

  6. Does erectile tissue angioarchitecture modify with aging? An immunohistological and morphometric approach.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carla; Vendeira, Pedro

    2008-04-01

    angioarchitecture was modified with aging. The decrease in SMCs and the considerable enlargement of vascular lumens may limit the basic function of penile vascular tree in the elderly.

  7. The Genetic Modifiers of Motor Onset Age (GeM MOA) website: genome-wide association analysis for genetic modifiers of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Kevin; Harold, Denise; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Orth, Michael; Myers, Richard H.; Kwak, Seung; Wheeler, Vanessa C.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.; Lee, Jong-Min

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited disease caused by a CAG expansion mutation in HTT. The age at onset of clinical symptoms is determined primarily by the length of this CAG expansion but is also influenced by other genetic and/or environmental factors. OBJECTIVE Recently, through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) aimed at discovering genetic modifiers, we identified loci associated with age at onset of motor signs that are significant at the genome-wide level. However, many additional HD modifiers may exist but may not have achieved statistical significance due to limited power. METHODS In order to disseminate broadly the entire GWAS results and make them available to complement alternative approaches, we have developed the internet website "GeM MOA" where genetic association results can be searched by gene name, SNP ID, or genomic coordinates of a region of interest. RESULTS Users of the Genetic Modifiers of Motor Onset Age (GeM MOA) site can therefore examine support for association between any gene region and age at onset of HD motor signs. GeM MOA's interactive interface also allows users to navigate the surrounding region and to obtain association p-values for individual SNPs. CONCLUSIONS Our website conveys a comprehensive view of the genetic landscape of modifiers of HD from the existing GWAS, and will provide the means to evaluate the potential influence of genes of interest on the onset of HD. GeM MOA is freely available at https://www.hdinhd.org/. PMID:26444025

  8. Detection and Analysis of Proteins Modified by O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Zachara, Natasha E.; Vosseller, Keith; Hart, Gerald W.

    2012-01-01

    O-GlcNAc is a common post-translational modification of nuclear, mitochondrial and cytoplasmic proteins, that is implicated in the etiology of type II diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as cardioprotection. This unit covers simple and comprehensive techniques for identifying proteins modified by O-GlcNAc, studying the enzymes that add and remove O-GlcNAc, and mapping O-GlcNAc modification sites. PMID:21732316

  9. Detection and Analysis of Proteins Modified by O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Zachara, Natasha E.; Vosseller, Keith; Hart, Gerald W.

    2012-01-01

    O-GlcNAc is a common post-translational modification of nuclear, mitochondrial and cytoplasmic proteins, that is implicated in the etiology of type II diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as cardioprotection. This unit covers simple and comprehensive techniques for identifying proteins modified by O-GlcNAc, studying the enzymes that add and remove O-GlcNAc, and mapping O-GlcNAc modification sites. PMID:22045558

  10. Chemical and Biological Tools for the Preparation of Modified Histone Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Cecil J.; Yu, Ruixuan R.; Gardner, Miranda L.; Shimko, John C.; Ottesen, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex and dynamic system in which the DNA double helix is organized and protected by interactions with histone proteins. This system is regulated through, a large network of dynamic post-translational modifications (PTMs) exists to ensure proper gene transcription, DNA repair, and other processes involving DNA. Homogenous protein samples with precisely characterized modification sites are necessary to better understand the functions of modified histone proteins. Here, we discuss sets of chemical and biological tools that have been developed for the preparation of modified histones, with a focus on the appropriate choice of tool for a given target. We start with genetic approaches for the creation of modified histones, including the incorporation of genetic mimics of histone modifications, chemical installation of modification analogs, and the use of the expanded genetic code to incorporate modified amino acids. Additionally, we will cover the chemical ligation techniques that have been invaluable in the generation of complex modified histones that are indistinguishable from the natural counterparts. Finally, we will end with a prospectus on future directions of synthetic chromatin in living systems. PMID:25863817

  11. Aging of a New Niobium-Modified MAR-M247 Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldan, Renato; Azevedo e Silva, Paulo Ricardo Soares; Nunes, Carlos Angelo; Coelho, Gilberto Carvalho

    2013-08-01

    MAR-M247 is a nickel-based superalloy that contains 3 wt.% Ta (weight percent of tantalum). Considering the chemical similarity between tantalum and niobium (Nb) and the lower cost of Nb, a modified MAR-M247 superalloy was produced with total replacement of Ta by Nb in this work. The samples were previously solutioned at 1260°C for 8 h and then aged at different times (between 5 and 80 h) and temperatures (between 780 and 980°C). The microstructures of the aged samples were characterized with a scanning electron microscope (SEM and FEG-SEM, both with EDS). Simulations of the MC carbide and γ' fraction and the Ta and Nb content in both MC carbide and γ' phase were performed with Thermo-Calc software (TT_Ni8 database) and simulations of the γ' growth rate and γ' mean diameter were performed with JMatPro software. MC carbide with high Hf content was observed in all the aged samples, in agreement with thermodynamic simulation results. The equilibrium γ' fraction decreases from 67 mol.% at 780°C to 52 mol.% at 980°C. Good agreement between the calculated and experimentally determined γ' particle size was also found. The growth rate of γ' at 980°C is about 8 times higher than that at 780°C and 3 times higher than that at 880°C. The hardness values do not change considerably after aging at 780 and 880°C. However, these values decrease significantly after aging at 980°C.

  12. Lung remodeling in aging surfactant protein D deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Arkenau, Martina; Knudsen, Lars; Wedekind, Dirk; Ochs, Matthias

    2017-02-07

    Pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of lipids and proteins at the air-liquid interface of alveoli, prevents the lungs from collapsing due to surface tension. One constituent is surfactant-associated protein-D (SP-D), a protein involved in surfactant homeostasis and innate immunity. Mice deficient in SP-D (SP-D (-/-)) has been described as developing a characteristic phenotype which affects the surfactant system (including changes in the intra-cellular and intra-alveolar surfactant pool, alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages), lung architecture and its inflammatory state (development of an emphysema-like pathology, inflammatory cell infiltration). Furthermore, it has been described that these mice develop sub-pleural fibrosis and a thickening of alveolar septal walls. The aim of the present study was to systematically investigate the long term progression of this phenotype with special focus on parenchymal remodeling, whether there are progressive emphysematous changes and whether there is progressive septal wall thickening which might indicate the development of pulmonary fibrosis. By means of design-based stereology and light microscopy, lungs of wild type (wt) and SP-D (-/-) mice of four age groups (3, 6, 12 and ∼18 months) were investigated. The data do not suggest a relevant spontaneous pro-fibrotic remodeling or a destructive process in the aging SP-D (-/-) mice. We demonstrated neither a significant destructive emphysema nor significant thickening of alveolar septal walls, but the data suggest an increase in the number weighted mean alveolar volume in aging SP-D (-/-) mice without loss of alveoli or alveolar epithelial surface area per lung. This increase may reflect over-distension due to altered mechanical properties of alveoli. In the light of our findings and data from the literature, the question arises as to whether a lack of SP-D promotes structural changes in the lung which have been described as being associated with aging lungs

  13. Protein aggregates are associated with replicative aging without compromising protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Saarikangas, Juha; Barral, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of cellular lineages is facilitated by asymmetric segregation of fate determinants between dividing cells. In budding yeast, various aging factors segregate to the aging (mother)-lineage, with poorly understood consequences. In this study, we show that yeast mother cells form a protein aggregate during early replicative aging that is maintained as a single, asymmetrically inherited deposit over the remaining lifespan. Surprisingly, deposit formation was not associated with stress or general decline in proteostasis. Rather, the deposit-containing cells displayed enhanced degradation of cytosolic proteasome substrates and unimpaired clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates. Deposit formation was dependent on Hsp42, which collected non-random client proteins of the Hsp104/Hsp70-refolding machinery, including the prion Sup35. Importantly, loss of Hsp42 resulted in symmetric inheritance of its constituents and prolonged the lifespan of the mother cell. Together, these data suggest that protein aggregation is an early aging-associated differentiation event in yeast, having a two-faceted role in organismal fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06197.001 PMID:26544680

  14. Effect of Fillers Prepared from Enzymatically Modified Proteins on Mechanical Properties of Leather

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an environment where petroleum feedstuffs are becoming increasingly too expensive for a good cost-effective return, utilization of renewable resources makes economic sense, particularly when these substrates are waste proteins. We have thus proposed the application of enzymatically modified wast...

  15. Maize Seed Chitinase is Modified by a Protein Secreted by Bipolaris zeicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants contain defense mechanisms that prevent infection by most fungi. Some specialized fungi have the ability to overcome plant defenses. The Zea mays (maize) seed chitinase ChitA has been previously reported as an antifungal protein. Here we report that ChitA is converted to a modified form by...

  16. Identification of SUMO-2/3-modified proteins associated with mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Srikumar, Tharan; Lee, Christine; Osula, Omoruyi; Subramonian, Divya; Zhang, Xiang-Dong; Cotter, Robert J; Raught, Brian; Matunis, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Sumoylation is essential for progression through mitosis, but the specific protein targets and functions remain poorly understood. In this study, we used chromosome spreads to more precisely define the localization of SUMO-2/3 (small ubiquitin-related modifier) to the inner centromere and protein scaffold of mitotic chromosomes. We also developed methods to immunopurify proteins modified by endogenous, untagged SUMO-2/3 from mitotic chromosomes. Using these methods, we identified 149 chromosome-associated SUMO-2/3 substrates by nLC-ESI-MS/MS. Approximately one-third of the identified proteins have reported functions in mitosis. Consistent with SUMO-2/3 immunolocalization, we identified known centromere- and kinetochore-associated proteins, as well as chromosome scaffold associated proteins. Notably, >30 proteins involved in chromatin modification or remodeling were identified. Our results provide insights into the roles of sumoylation as a regulator of chromatin structure and other diverse processes in mitosis. Furthermore, our purification and fractionation methodologies represent an important compliment to existing approaches to identify sumoylated proteins using exogenously expressed and tagged SUMOs.

  17. Proteomic analysis of 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine modified proteins in RTT fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Carlo; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Cervellati, Franco; Sticozzi, Claudia; Mirasole, Cristiana; Guerranti, Roberto; Trentini, Alessandro; Zolla, Lello; Savelli, Vinno; Hayek, Joussef; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive developmental disorder, primarily affecting girls with a prevalence of 1 in every 10,000 births. A clear etiological factor present in more than 90% of classical RTT cases is the mutation of the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Recent work from our group was able to shown a systemic oxidative stress (OxS) in these patients that correlates with the gravity of the clinical features. Using freshly isolated skin fibroblasts from RTT patients and healthy subjects, we have performed a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in order to evidence the oxidative modifications of proteins with special focus on the formation of protein adducts with 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE PAs)-a major secondary product of lipid peroxidation- and Nitrotyrosine, a marker derived from the biochemical interaction of nitric oxide (NO) or nitric oxide-derived secondary products with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Then, oxidatively modified spots were identified by mass spectrometry, LC-ESI-CID-MS/MS. Our results showed that 15 protein spots presented 4-HNE PAs and/or nitrotyrosine adducts in fibroblasts proteome from RTT patients compared to healthy control cells. Post-translationally modified proteins were related to several functional categories, in particular to cytoskeleton structure and protein folding. In addition, clear upregulated expression of the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) with high nitrite levels were observed in RTT fibroblasts, justifying the increased nitrotyrosine protein modifications. The present work describes not only the proteomic profile in RTT fibroblasts, but also identifies the modified proteins by 4-HNE and nitrotyrosine. Of note, for the first time, it appears that a dysregulation of NO pathway can be associated to RTT pathophysiology. In conclusion, the evidence of a wide range of proteins able to forms adducts with 4-HNE, Nitrotyrosine or with both confirms the possible alteration of several aspects of cellular functions

  18. De novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3b interacts with NEDD8-modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Meir; Greenway, Melanie; Liao, Gangling; Ambinder, Richard F; Hayward, S Diane

    2010-11-19

    DNA methylation and histone modifications play an important role in transcription regulation. In cancer cells, many promoters become aberrantly methylated through the activity of the de novo DNA methyltransferases DNMT3a and DNMT3b and acquire repressive chromatin marks. NEDD8 is a ubiquitin-like protein modifier that is conjugated to target proteins, such as cullins, to regulate their activity, and cullin 4A (CUL4A) in its NEDD8-modified form is essential for repressive chromatin formation. We found that DNMT3b associates with NEDD8-modified proteins. Whereas DNMT3b interacts directly in vitro with NEDD8, conjugation of NEDD8 to target proteins enhances this interaction in vivo. DNMT3b immunoprecipitated two major bands of endogenously NEDDylated proteins at the size of NEDDylated cullins, and indeed DNMT3b interacted with CUL1, CUL2, CUL3, CUL4A, and CUL5. Moreover, DNMT3b preferentially immunoprecipitated the NEDDylated form of endogenous CUL4A. NEDD8 enhanced DNMT3b-dependent DNA methylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggest that DNMT3b recruits CUL4A and NEDD8 to chromatin, whereas deletion of Dnmt3b reduces the association of CUL4A and NEDD8 at a repressed promoter in a cancer cell line.

  19. A Novel Genetic Screen Identifies Modifiers of Age-Dependent Amyloid β Toxicity in the Drosophila Brain

    PubMed Central

    Belfiori-Carrasco, Lautaro F.; Marcora, María S.; Bocai, Nadia I.; Ceriani, M. Fernanda; Morelli, Laura; Castaño, Eduardo M.

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients begins many years before clinical onset. Such process has been proposed to be pathogenic through the toxicity of Aβ soluble oligomers leading to synaptic dysfunction, phospho-tau aggregation and neuronal loss. Yet, a massive accumulation of Aβ can be found in approximately 30% of aged individuals with preserved cognitive function. Therefore, within the frame of the “amyloid hypothesis”, compensatory mechanisms and/or additional neurotoxic or protective factors need to be considered and investigated. Here we describe a modifier genetic screen in Drosophila designed to identify genes that modulate toxicity of Aβ42 in the CNS. The expression of Aβ42 led to its accumulation in the brain and a moderate impairment of negative geotaxis at 18 days post-eclosion (d.p.e) as compared with genetic or parental controls. These flies were mated with a collection of lines carrying chromosomal deletions and negative geotaxis was assessed at 5 and 18 d.p.e. Our screen is the first to take into account all of the following features, relevant to sporadic AD: (1) pan-neuronal expression of wild-type Aβ42; (2) a quantifiable complex behavior; (3) Aβ neurotoxicity associated with progressive accumulation of the peptide; and (4) improvement or worsening of climbing ability only evident in aged animals. One hundred and ninety-nine deficiency (Df) lines accounting for ~6300 genes were analyzed. Six lines, including the deletion of 52 Drosophila genes with human orthologs, significantly modified Aβ42 neurotoxicity in 18-day-old flies. So far, we have validated CG11796 and identified CG17249 as a strong candidate (whose human orthologs are HPD and PRCC, respectively) by using RNAi or mutant hemizygous lines. PRCC encodes proline-rich protein PRCC (ppPRCC) of unknown function associated with papillary renal cell carcinoma. HPD encodes 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), a key

  20. Development of Polyclonal Antibodies for the Detection of Styrene Oxide Modified Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Chung, Jouku; Gee, Shirley; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zheng, Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Styrene is widely used as one of the most important industrial materials for the production of synthetic rubbers, plastic, insulation, fiberglass, and automobile parts. Inhaled styrene has been reported to produce respiratory toxicity in humans and animals. Styrene oxide, a reactive metabolite of styrene formed via cytochrome P450 enzymes, has been reported to form covalent bonds with proteins, such as albumin and hemoglobin. Among all of the amino acids, cysteine is the most reactive amino acid to be modified by electrophilic species. The purpose of this study is to develop polyclonal antibodies for the detection of styrene oxide cysteinyl protein adducts. Two immunogens were designed, synthesized, and used to induce polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Immune responses were observed from the raised antibodies by antiserum dilution tests. Competitive ELISA demonstrated that the resulting antibodies specifically recognized the styrene oxide-derived N-acetylcysteine adduct. Western blot results showed that the antibodies recognize styrene oxide-modified albumin. The binding was found to depend on the amount of protein adducts blotted and hapten loading in protein adducts. No cross reaction was observed from the native protein. Competitive Western blots further indicated that these antibodies specifically recognized styrene oxide cysteinyl–protein adducts. Immunoblots revealed the presence of several bands at a molecular weight ranging from 50 to 80 kDa in rat nasal mucosa treated with styrene. In conclusion, we successfully raised polyclonal antibodies to detect styrene oxide-derived protein/cysteine adducts. PMID:17266334

  1. Pattern of normal age-related regional differences in white matter microstructure is modified by vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Kristen M; Raz, Naftali

    2009-11-10

    Even successful aging is associated with regional brain shrinkage and deterioration of the cerebral white matter. Aging also brings about an increase in vascular risk, and vascular impairment may be a potential mechanism behind the observed patterns of aging. The goals of this study were to characterize the normal age differences in white matter integrity in several brain regions across the adult life span and to assess the modifying effect of vascular risk on the observed pattern of regional white matter integrity. We estimated fractional anisotropy and diffusivity of white matter in nine cerebral regions of interest in 77 healthy adults (19-84 years old). There was a widespread reduction of white matter anisotropy with age, and prefrontal and occipital regions evidenced the greatest age-related differences. Diffusivity increased with age, and the magnitude of age differences increased beginning with the middle of the fifth decade. Vascular risk factors modified age differences in white matter integrity. Clinically diagnosed and treated arterial hypertension was associated with reduced white matter anisotropy and increased diffusivity beyond the effects of age. In the normotensive participants, elevation of arterial pulse pressure (a surrogate of arterial stiffness) was linked to deterioration of the white matter integrity in the frontal regions. Although the causal role of vascular risk in brain aging is unclear, the observed pattern of effects suggests that vascular risk may drive the expansion of age-related white matter damage from anterior to posterior regions.

  2. Estimating Modifying Effect of Age on Genetic and Environmental Variance Components in Twin Models

    PubMed Central

    He, Liang; Sillanpää, Mikko J.; Silventoinen, Karri; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pitkäniemi, Janne

    2016-01-01

    more insights into age-specific heritability of BMI and evidence of G × E interactions. These findings highlight the fundamental importance and implication of the proposed models in facilitating twin studies to investigate the heritability specific to age and other modifying factors. PMID:26868768

  3. Molecular ageing of alpha- and Beta-synucleins: protein damage and repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Cass, Simon; Wayne, Declan; Bolt, Edward L; Ray, David E; Carter, Wayne G

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal α-synuclein aggregates are hallmarks of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Alpha synuclein and β-synucleins are susceptible to post-translational modification as isoaspartate protein damage, which is regulated in vivo by the action of the repair enzyme protein L-isoaspartyl O-methyltransferase (PIMT). We aged in vitro native α-synuclein, the α-synuclein familial mutants A30P and A53T that give rise to Parkinsonian phenotypes, and β-synuclein, at physiological pH and temperature for a time course of up to 20 days. Resolution of native α-synuclein and β-synuclein by two dimensional techniques showed the accumulation of a number of post-translationally modified forms of both proteins. The levels of isoaspartate formed over the 20 day time course were quantified by exogenous methylation with PIMT using S-Adenosyl-L-[(3)H-methyl]methionine as a methyl donor, and liquid scintillation counting of liberated (3)H-methanol. All α-synuclein proteins accumulated isoaspartate at ∼1% of molecules/day, ∼20 times faster than for β-synuclein. This disparity between rates of isoaspartate was confirmed by exogenous methylation of synucleins by PIMT, protein resolution by one-dimensional denaturing gel electrophoresis, and visualisation of (3)H-methyl esters by autoradiography. Protein silver staining and autoradiography also revealed that α-synucleins accumulated stable oligomers that were resistant to denaturing conditions, and which also contained isoaspartate. Co-incubation of approximately equimolar β-synuclein with α-synuclein resulted in a significant reduction of isoaspartate formed in all α-synucleins after 20 days of ageing. Co-incubated α- and β-synucleins, or α, or β synucleins alone, were resolved by non-denaturing size exclusion chromatography and all formed oligomers of ∼57.5 kDa; consistent with tetramerization. Direct association of α-synuclein with β-synuclein in column fractions or from in vitro ageing co-incubations was

  4. A quantitative immunopolymerase chain reaction method for detection of vegetative insecticidal protein in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2011-10-12

    Vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip) is being employed for transgenic expression in selected crops such as cotton, brinjal, and corn. For regulatory compliance, there is a need for a sensitive and reliable detection method, which can distinguish between approved and nonapproved genetically modified (GM) events and quantify GM contents as well. A quantitative immunopolymerase chain reaction (IPCR) method has been developed for the detection and quantification of Vip protein in GM crops. The developed assay displayed a detection limit of 1 ng/mL (1 ppb) and linear quantification range between 10 and 1000 ng/mL of Vip-S protein. The sensitivity of the assay was found to be 10 times higher than an analogous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Vip-S protein. The results suggest that IPCR has the potential to become a standard method to quantify GM proteins.

  5. Complete amino acid sequence and structure characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Hitotsuya, H; Nakajo, S; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1989-04-25

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying sour taste into sweet taste. The complete amino acid sequence of miraculin purified from miracle fruits by a newly developed method (Theerasilp, S., and Kurihara, Y. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11536-11539) was determined by an automatic Edman degradation method. Miraculin was a single polypeptide with 191 amino acid residues. The calculated molecular weight based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content (13.9%) was 24,600. Asn-42 and Asn-186 were linked N-glycosidically to carbohydrate chains. High homology was found between the amino acid sequences of miraculin and soybean trypsin inhibitor.

  6. [The effect of modified nano-diamonds of detonation synthesis on the protein fractions of human blood].

    PubMed

    Botvich, Iu A; Olkhovskiĭ, I A; Baron, I I; Puzyr', A P; Baron, A V; Bondar', V S

    2013-11-01

    It is established that the modified nano-diamonds of detonation synthesis are able to bind serum proteins of human blood. The relative selectivity is established concerning the effect of modified nano-diamonds of detonation synthesis on beta2- and gamma-globulin fractions of serum. The evidence of concentration dependence of effect of modified nano-diamonds of detonation synthesis from serum proteins is established. The study results make it possible to consider modified nano-diamonds of detonation synthesis as a potential sorbent in technologies of hemodialysis, plasmapheresis, isolation of blood proteins and as a foundation for development of new systems of laboratory diagnostic.

  7. Disruption of Protein Kinase A in Mice Enhances Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Enns, Linda C.; Morton, John F.; Treuting, Piper R.; Emond, Mary J.; Wolf, Norman S.; McKnight, G. S.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Ladiges, Warren C.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations that cause a reduction in protein kinase A (PKA) activity have been shown to extend lifespan in yeast. Loss of function of mammalian RIIβ, a regulatory subunit of PKA expressed in brain and adipose tissue, results in mice that are lean and insulin sensitive. It was therefore hypothesized that RIIB null (RIIβ−/−) mice would express anti-aging phenotypes. We conducted lifespan studies using 40 mutant and 40 wild type (WT) littermates of equal gender numbers and found that both the median and maximum lifespans were significantly increased in mutant males compared to WT littermates. The median lifespan was increased from 884 days to 1005 days (p = 0.006 as determined by the log rank test) and the 80% lifespan (defined here as 80% deaths) was increased from 941 days to 1073 days (p = 0.004 as determined by the Wang-Allison test). There was no difference in either median or 80% lifespan in female genotypes. WT mice of both genders became increasingly obese with age, while mutant mice maintained their lean phenotype into old age. Adiposity was found to correlate with lifespan for males only. 50% of male mice between 30 and 35 g, corresponding to about 5% body fat, for either genotype lived over 1000 days. No male mouse outside of this weight range achieved this lifespan. During their last month of life, WT mice began losing weight (a total of 8% and 15% of body weight was lost for males and females, respectively), but RIIβ−/− male mice maintained their lean body mass to end of life. This attenuation of decline was not seen in female mutant mice. Old male mutant mice were insulin sensitive throughout their life. Both genders showed modestly lower blood glucose levels in old mutants compared to WT. Male mutants were also resistant to age-induced fatty liver. Pathological assessment of tissues from end of life male mutant mice showed a decrease in tumor incidence, decreased severity of renal lesions, and a trend towards a decrease in age

  8. PIP3-binding proteins promote age-dependent protein aggregation and limit survival in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Balasubramaniam, Meenakshisundaram; Johnson, Jay; Alla, Ramani; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2016-08-02

    Class-I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3KI) converts phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3). PIP3 comprises two fatty-acid chains that embed in lipid-bilayer membranes, joined by glycerol to inositol triphosphate. Proteins with domains that specifically bind that head-group (e.g. pleckstrin-homology [PH] domains) are thus tethered to the inner plasma-membrane surface where they have an enhanced likelihood of interaction with other PIP3-bound proteins, in particular other components of their signaling pathways. Null alleles of the C. elegans age-1 gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of PI3KI, lack any detectable class-I PI3K activity and so cannot form PIP3. These mutant worms survive almost 10-fold longer than the longest-lived normal control, and are highly resistant to a variety of stresses including oxidative and electrophilic challenges. Traits associated with age-1 mutation are widely believed to be mediated through AKT-1, which requires PIP3 for both tethering and activation. Active AKT complex phosphorylates and thereby inactivates the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor. However, extensive evidence indicates that pleiotropic effects of age-1-null mutations, including extreme longevity, cannot be explained by insulin like-receptor/AKT/FOXO signaling alone, suggesting involvement of other PIP3-binding proteins. We used ligand-affinity capture to identify membrane-bound proteins downstream of PI3KI that preferentially bind PIP3. Computer modeling supports a subset of candidate proteins predicted to directly bind PIP3 in preference to PIP2, and functional testing by RNAi knockdown confirmed candidates that partially mediate the stress-survival, aggregation-reducing and longevity benefits of PI3KI disruption. PIP3-specific candidate sets are highly enriched for proteins previously reported to affect translation, stress responses, lifespan, proteostasis, and lipid transport.

  9. Redox proteomics identification of oxidatively modified myocardial proteins in human heart failure: implications for protein function.

    PubMed

    Brioschi, Maura; Polvani, Gianluca; Fratto, Pasquale; Parolari, Alessandro; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Tremoli, Elena; Banfi, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress in a failing heart may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify the oxidised proteins in the myocardium of HF patients and analyse the consequences of oxidation on protein function. The carbonylated proteins in left ventricular tissue from failing (n = 14) and non-failing human hearts (n = 13) were measured by immunoassay and identified by proteomics. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were incubated in the presence of stimuli relevant for HF in order to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of protein carbonylation, and its consequences on protein function. The levels of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher in the HF patients than in the controls (p<0.01). We identified two proteins that mainly underwent carbonylation: M-type creatine kinase (M-CK), whose activity is impaired, and, to a lesser extent, α-cardiac actin. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II and norepinephrine led to ROS generation and M-CK carbonylation with loss of its enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that protein carbonylation is increased in the myocardium during HF and that these oxidative changes may help to explain the decreased CK activity and consequent defects in energy metabolism observed in HF.

  10. Redox Proteomics Identification of Oxidatively Modified Myocardial Proteins in Human Heart Failure: Implications for Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Brioschi, Maura; Polvani, Gianluca; Fratto, Pasquale; Parolari, Alessandro; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Tremoli, Elena; Banfi, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress in a failing heart may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify the oxidised proteins in the myocardium of HF patients and analyse the consequences of oxidation on protein function. The carbonylated proteins in left ventricular tissue from failing (n = 14) and non-failing human hearts (n = 13) were measured by immunoassay and identified by proteomics. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were incubated in the presence of stimuli relevant for HF in order to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of protein carbonylation, and its consequences on protein function. The levels of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher in the HF patients than in the controls (p<0.01). We identified two proteins that mainly underwent carbonylation: M-type creatine kinase (M-CK), whose activity is impaired, and, to a lesser extent, α-cardiac actin. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II and norepinephrine led to ROS generation and M-CK carbonylation with loss of its enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that protein carbonylation is increased in the myocardium during HF and that these oxidative changes may help to explain the decreased CK activity and consequent defects in energy metabolism observed in HF. PMID:22606238

  11. Accumulation of isolevuglandin-modified protein in normal and fibrotic lung

    PubMed Central

    Mont, Stacey; Davies, Sean S.; Roberts second, L. Jackson; Mernaugh, Raymond L.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Segal, Brahm H.; Zackert, William; Kropski, Jonathan A.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Sekhar, Konjeti R.; Galligan, James J.; Massion, Pierre P.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Travis, Elizabeth L.; Freeman, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein lysine modification by γ-ketoaldehyde isomers derived from arachidonic acid, termed isolevuglandins (IsoLGs), is emerging as a mechanistic link between pathogenic reactive oxygen species and disease progression. However, the questions of whether covalent modification of proteins by IsoLGs are subject to genetic regulation and the identity of IsoLG-modified proteins remain unclear. Herein we show that Nrf2 and Nox2 are key regulators of IsoLG modification in pulmonary tissue and report on the identity of proteins analyzed by LC-MS following immunoaffinity purification of IsoLG-modified proteins. Gene ontology analysis revealed that proteins in numerous cellular pathways are susceptible to IsoLG modification. Although cells tolerate basal levels of modification, exceeding them induces apoptosis. We found prominent modification in a murine model of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, two diseases considered to be promoted by gene-regulated oxidant stress. Based on these results we hypothesize that IsoLG modification is a hitherto unrecognized sequelae that contributes to radiation-induced pulmonary injury and IPF. PMID:27118599

  12. Potential allergenicity research of Cry1C protein from genetically modified rice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Sishuo; He, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Ran, Wenjun; Liang, Lixing; Dai, Yunqing; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-07-01

    With the development of genetically modified crops, there has been a growing interest in available approaches to assess the potential allergenicity of novel gene products. We were not sure whether Cry1C could induce allergy. We examined the protein with three other proteins to determine the potential allergenicity of Cry1C protein from genetically modified rice. Female Brown Norway (BN) rats received 0.1 mg peanut agglutinin (PNA), 1mg potato acid phosphatase (PAP), 1mg ovalbumin (OVA) or 5 mg purified Cry1C protein dissolved in 1 mL water by daily gavage for 42 days to test potential allergenicity. Ten days after the last gavage, rats were orally challenged with antigens, and physiologic and immunologic responses were studied. In contrast to sensitization with PNA, PAP and OVA Cry1C protein did not induce antigen-specific IgG2a in BN rats. Cytokine expression, serum IgE and histamine levels and the number of eosinophils and mast cells in the blood of Cry1C group rats were comparable to the control group rats, which were treated with water alone. As Cry1C did not show any allergenicity, we make the following conclusion that the protein could be safety used in rice or other plants.

  13. Controlled release of NELL-1 protein from chitosan/hydroxyapatite-modified TCP particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulong; Dong, Rui; Park, Yujin; Bohner, Marc; Zhang, Xinli; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia; Wu, Benjamin M

    2016-09-10

    NEL-like molecule-1 (NELL-1) is a novel osteogenic protein that showing high specificity to osteochondral cells. It was widely used in bone regeneration research by loading onto carriers such as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) particles. However, there has been little research on protein controlled release from this material and its potential application. In this study, TCP was first modified with a hydroxyapatite coating followed by a chitosan coating to prepare chitosan/hydroxyapatite-coated TCP particles (Chi/HA-TCP). The preparation was characterized by SEM, EDX, FTIR, XRD, FM and Zeta potential measurements. The NELL-1 loaded Chi/HA-TCP particles and the release kinetics were investigated in vitro. It was observed that the Chi/HA-TCP particles prepared with the 0.3% (wt/wt) chitosan solution were able to successfully control the release of NELL-1 and maintain a slow, steady release for up to 28 days. Furthermore, more than 78% of the loaded protein's bioactivity was preserved in Chi/HA-TCP particles over the period of the investigation, which was significantly higher than that of the protein released from hydroxyapatite coated TCP (HA-TCP) particles. Collectively, this study suggests that the osteogenic protein NELL-1 showed a sustained release pattern after being encapsulated into the modified Chi/HA-TCP particles, and the NELL-1 integrated composite of Chi/HA-TCP showed a potential to function as a protein delivery carrier and as an improved bone matrix for use in bone regeneration research.

  14. Principal Component Analysis Reveals Age-Related and Muscle-Type-Related Differences in Protein Carbonyl Profiles of Muscle Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Juan; Navratil, Marian; Thompson, LaDora V.; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl-modified proteins are considered markers of oxidative damage caused by oxidative stress, aging, and disease. Here we use a previously developed capillary electrophoretic method for detecting femtomole (10−15 mole) carbonyl levels in mitochondrial proteins that are size separated and profiled. For protein labeling, carbonyls were tagged with Alexa 488 hydrazine and amine groups in proteins with 3-(2-furoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde. Total mitochondrial protein carbonyl levels were statistically higher in fast- than in slow-twitch muscle of young Fischer 344 rats, and statistically higher in old than in young slow-twitch muscle. Even when some statistical comparisons of the total protein carbonyl levels would not reveal differences, principal component analysis (PCA) classified the carbonyl profiles into four distinct sample groups of different age and muscle types. In addition, PCA was used to predict that most age-related or muscle-type-related changes in carbonyl levels occur in proteins with a molecular weight between 9.8 and 11.7 kD. PMID:19126840

  15. Age-related variations of protein carbonyls in human saliva and plasma: is saliva protein carbonyls an alternative biomarker of aging?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Yanyi; Liu, Hongchen; Che, Yuwei; Xu, Yingying; E, Lingling

    2015-06-01

    Free radical hypothesis which is one of the most acknowledged aging theories was developed into oxidative stress hypothesis. Protein carbonylation is by far one of the most widely used markers of protein oxidation. We studied the role of age and gender in protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma among 273 Chinese healthy subjects (137 females and 136 males aged between 20 and 79) and discussed the correlation between protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma. Protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma were, respectively, 2.391 ± 0.639 and 0.838 ± 0.274 nmol/mg. Variations of saliva and plasma different age groups all reached significant differences in both male and female (all p < 0.05) while both saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were found to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.6582 and r = 0.5176, all p < 0.001). Gender was discovered to be unrelated to saliva and plasma protein carbonyl levels (all p > 0.05). Saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were positively related (r = 0.4405, p < 0.001). Surprisingly, saliva and plasma protein carbonyls/ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) ratios were proved to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.7796 and r = 0.6938, all p < 0.001) while saliva protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio and plasma protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio were also correlated (r = 0.5573, p < 0.001). We concluded that saliva protein carbonyls seem to be an alternative biomarker of aging while the mechanisms of protein carbonylation and oxidative stress and the relationship between saliva protein carbonyls and diseases need to be further investigated.

  16. Stimulation of tentoxin synthesis by aged-culture filtrates and continued synthesis in the presence of protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sheu, J T; Talburt, D E

    1986-02-01

    Tentoxin, a cyclic tetrapeptide produced by Alternaria alternata (Fries) Keissler, induces chlorosis in certain seedling plants. It can be extracted from culture filtrates of the fungus. Tentoxin production is stimulated and increased by using a mixture of aged culture filtrates and modified Richards solution. Aged culture filtrates can be obtained from 3-week-old or older cultures of A. alternata in modified Richards solution or Pratts solution. A mixture of aged culture filtrate and fresh medium in the ratio 2:3 gives the maximal enhancement of tentoxin production. This growth system provided us with a model for studying the effects of protein synthesis inhibitors on tentoxin production. Two antibiotics which inhibit protein synthesis at the ribosomal level were tested on growth, protein synthesis, and tentoxin production in A. alternata cultures. Cycloheximide at concentrations of 500 mug/ml or emetine at concentrations of 250 mug/ml did not inhibit tentoxin synthesis, although they stopped mycelial growth and protein synthesis of the fungus at the logarithmic growth stage in the enhancement medium. These results led us to conclude that tentoxin, like certain other bioactive cyclic peptides, is synthesized by a nonribosomal peptide synthesis mechanism.

  17. Alterations in human muscle protein metabolism with aging: Protein and exercise as countermeasures to offset sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Breen, Leigh; Phillips, Stuart M

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with a reduction in skeletal muscle mass-sarcopenia-the etiology of which is multifactorial. One mechanism is that aging has, as one of its hallmarks, a reduced sensitivity of skeletal muscle to the normally potent anabolic effects of protein feeding and resistance exercise, and to the anticatabolic effects of insulin, the combination of which has been termed "anabolic resistance." However, this reduced sensitivity of skeletal muscle to anabolic stimuli may, in some cases, be overcome by providing a greater quantity of the nutrition and/or exercise stimulus. Daily habitual physical activity appears to be a primary determinant of anabolic resistance as we have recently shown that as little as 14 days of reduced ambulatory activity was sufficient to induce anabolic resistance in the elderly by attenuating the postprandial increase in muscle protein synthesis (MPS). The etiology of anabolic resistance is complex and may include alterations in amino acid uptake/utilization, cell signaling status, muscle blood flow, and microvascular perfusion (impacting amino acid delivery and availability). Further, there appears to be sexual dimorphism with advancing age in the response of MPS to amino acid/insulin provision. Maintenance of physical activity during aging is of fundamental importance for skeletal muscle to allow it to appropriately respond to the anabolic effects of nutrition.

  18. Retention of Proteins and Metalloproteins in Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatography with Etched Chemically Modified Columns

    PubMed Central

    Pesek, Joseph J.; Matyska, Maria T.; Salgotra, Vasudha

    2010-01-01

    Etched chemically modified capillaries with two different bonded groups (pentyl and octadecyl) are compared for their migration behavior of several common proteins and metalloproteins as well as metalloproteinases. Migration times, efficiency and peak shape are evaluated over the pH range of 2.1 to 8.1 to determine any effects of the bonded group on the electrochromatographic behavior of these compounds. One goal was to determine if the relative hydrophobicity of the stationary phase has a significant effect on proteins in the open tubular format of capillary electrochromatography as it does in HPLC. Reproducibility of the migration times is also investigated. PMID:18850653

  19. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Nirasawa, S; Nakaya, K; Kurihara, Y

    1995-08-19

    A cDNA clone encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin (MIR), was isolated and sequenced. The encoded precursor to MIR was composed of 220 amino acid (aa) residues, including a possible signal sequence of 29 aa. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA encoding MIR was already expressed in fruits of Richadella dulcifica at 3 weeks after pollination and was present specifically in the pulp.

  20. Computational allergenicity prediction of transgenic proteins expressed in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Misra, Amita; Subash, Swarna; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2011-09-01

    Development of genetically modified (GM) crops is on increase to improve food quality, increase harvest yields, and reduce the dependency on chemical pesticides. Before their release in marketplace, they should be scrutinized for their safety. Several guidelines of different regulatory agencies like ILSI, WHO Codex, OECD, and so on for allergenicity evaluation of transgenics are available and sequence homology analysis is the first test to determine the allergenic potential of inserted proteins. Therefore, to test and validate, 312 allergenic, 100 non-allergenic, and 48 inserted proteins were assessed for sequence similarity using 8-mer, 80-mer, and full FASTA search. On performing sequence homology studies, ~94% the allergenic proteins gave exact matches for 8-mer and 80-mer homology. However, 20 allergenic proteins showed non-allergenic behavior. Out of 100 non-allergenic proteins, seven qualified as allergens. None of the inserted proteins demonstrated allergenic behavior. In order to improve the predictability, proteins showing anomalous behavior were tested by Algpred and ADFS separately. Use of Algpred and ADFS softwares reduced the tendency of false prediction to a great extent (74-78%). In conclusion, routine sequence homology needs to be coupled with some other bioinformatic method like ADFS/Algpred to reduce false allergenicity prediction of novel proteins.

  1. Predicting Cell Association of Surface-Modified Nanoparticles Using Protein Corona Structure - Activity Relationships (PCSAR).

    PubMed

    Kamath, Padmaja; Fernandez, Alberto; Giralt, Francesc; Rallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are likely to interact in real-case application scenarios with mixtures of proteins and biomolecules that will absorb onto their surface forming the so-called protein corona. Information related to the composition of the protein corona and net cell association was collected from literature for a library of surface-modified gold and silver nanoparticles. For each protein in the corona, sequence information was extracted and used to calculate physicochemical properties and statistical descriptors. Data cleaning and preprocessing techniques including statistical analysis and feature selection methods were applied to remove highly correlated, redundant and non-significant features. A weighting technique was applied to construct specific signatures that represent the corona composition for each nanoparticle. Using this basic set of protein descriptors, a new Protein Corona Structure-Activity Relationship (PCSAR) that relates net cell association with the physicochemical descriptors of the proteins that form the corona was developed and validated. The features that resulted from the feature selection were in line with already published literature, and the computational model constructed on these features had a good accuracy (R(2)LOO=0.76 and R(2)LMO(25%)=0.72) and stability, with the advantage that the fingerprints based on physicochemical descriptors were independent of the specific proteins that form the corona.

  2. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase Modifier Subunit (Gclm) Null Mice Have Increased Ovarian Oxidative Stress and Accelerated Age-Related Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jinhwan; Nakamura, Brooke N.; Mohar, Isaac; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the one of the most abundant intracellular antioxidants. Mice lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, have decreased GSH. Our prior work showed that GSH plays antiapoptotic roles in ovarian follicles. We hypothesized that Gclm−/− mice have accelerated ovarian aging due to ovarian oxidative stress. We found significantly decreased ovarian GSH concentrations and oxidized GSH/oxidized glutathione redox potential in Gclm−/− vs Gclm+/+ ovaries. Prepubertal Gclm−/− and Gclm+/+ mice had similar numbers of ovarian follicles, and as expected, the total number of ovarian follicles declined with age in both genotypes. However, the rate of decline in follicles was significantly more rapid in Gclm−/− mice, and this was driven by accelerated declines in primordial follicles, which constitute the ovarian reserve. We found significantly increased 4-hydroxynonenal immunostaining (oxidative lipid damage marker) and significantly increased nitrotyrosine immunostaining (oxidative protein damage marker) in prepubertal and adult Gclm−/− ovaries compared with controls. The percentage of small ovarian follicles with increased granulosa cell proliferation was significantly higher in prepubertal and 2-month-old Gclm−/− vs Gclm+/+ ovaries, indicating accelerated recruitment of primordial follicles into the growing pool. The percentages of growing follicles with apoptotic granulosa cells were increased in young adult ovaries. Our results demonstrate increased ovarian oxidative stress and oxidative damage in young Gclm−/− mice, associated with an accelerated decline in ovarian follicles that appears to be mediated by increased recruitment of follicles into the growing pool, followed by apoptosis at later stages of follicular development. PMID:26083875

  3. Laponite as a rheology modifier of alginate solutions: Physical gelation and aging evolution.

    PubMed

    Dávila, José Luis; d'Ávila, Marcos Akira

    2017-02-10

    The rheological behavior of alginate and Laponite/alginate solutions was studied. It was observed that the Cross viscosity model successfully describes the steady-state shear behavior of this polysaccharide. The scaling behavior analyzed for the entangled regime is in good agreement with polyelectrolyte solutions (Ge∼cp(3/2)), with interactions generated between the alginate and the charged surfaces of the Laponite platelets. Therefore, the effect of Laponite as a rheology modifier is influenced by the alginate concentration. Higher alginate concentrations hindered the formation of the house of cards microstructure. Frequency sweep tests were performed to analyze the transition from solid-like to liquid-like behavior in a solid-like dominated domain. Soft physical gels were obtained at low alginate concentrations. The gel point was determined (1.65wt.% of alginate and 2wt.% of Laponite) through the Kramers-Krönig damping factor, and time sweep tests revealed the evolution of the storage (G') and loss modulus (G″) as functions of the waiting time (tw). The growing elasticity revealed that Laponite/alginate solutions undergo aging.

  4. Applicability of Demirjian’s Method and Modified Cameriere’s Methods for Dental Age Assessment in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pratyusha, K; Radhakrishna, Ambati Naga; Saujanya, Kaniti; Raviteja, Narra Venkata Krishna; Chandrasekhar, Shalini

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Tooth development is extensively used for age estimation as a part of forensic science. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of Demirjian’s, Cameriere’s and modified Cameriere’s population-specific regression equation methods in the dental age estimation of West Godavari children. Materials and Methods The study included orthopantomograms (OPG) of 60 children of West Godavari district with age group between 9 to 14 years on whom all the three methods were used for age estimation. The OPG were traced with the help of a tracing paper and lead pencil and the appropriate dimensions were measured. Age estimation was done based on canine calcification stage as per Demirjian’s method and measurements of the seven permanent left mandibular teeth using Cameriere’s formula and modified population-specific regression equation obtained for the South Indian population from Cameriere’s formula. The resultant data were subjected to statistical analysis by student’s paired t-test. Results The estimated age was closer to the chronological age when the modified Cameriere’s population-specific regression equation was used (p=0.68); whereas, the difference was more in Demirjian’s method (p=0.008) followed by Cameriere’s method (p<0.001). Conclusion The method using modified Cameriere’s population-specific regression equation exhibited a least significant difference in chronological and dental age assessment in children of West Godavari district as compared to the other two methods.

  5. Modified forelimb grip strength test detects aging-associated physiological decline in skeletal muscle function in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Hikari; Yamamoto, Koichi; Nozato, Satoko; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Imaizumi, Yuki; Hongyo, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Serina; Takeda, Masao; Oguro, Ryosuke; Takami, Yoichi; Itoh, Norihisa; Takeya, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Ken; Fukada, So-ichiro; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    The conventional forelimb grip strength test is a widely used method to assess skeletal muscle function in rodents; in this study, we modified this method to improve its variability and consistency. The modified test had lower variability among trials and days than the conventional test in young C57BL6 mice, especially by improving the variabilities in male. The modified test was more sensitive than the conventional test to detect a difference in motor function between female and male mice, or between young and old male mice. When the modified test was performed on male mice during the aging process, reduction of grip strength manifested between 18 and 24 months of age at the group level and at the individual level. The modified test was similar to the conventional test in detecting skeletal muscle dysfunction in young male dystrophic mice. Thus, the modified forelimb grip strength test, with its improved validity and reliability may be an ideal substitute for the conventional method. PMID:28176863

  6. Miraculin, a taste-modifying protein is secreted into intercellular spaces in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminari; Sun, Hyeon-Jin; Yano, Megumu; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2010-02-15

    A taste-modifying protein, miraculin, is highly accumulated in ripe fruit of miracle fruit (Richadella dulcifica) and the content can reach up to 10% of the total soluble protein in these fruits. Although speculated for decades that miraculin is secreted into intercellular spaces in miracle fruit, no evidence exists of its cellular localization. To study the cellular localization of miraculin in plant cells, using miracle fruit and transgenic tomato that constitutively express miraculin, immunoelectron microscopy, imaging GFP fusion proteins, and immunological detection of secreted proteins in culture medium of transgenic tomato were carried out. Immunoelectron microscopy showed the specific accumulation of miraculin in the intercellular layers of both miracle fruit and transgenic tomato. Imaging GFP fusion protein demonstrated that the miraculin-GFP fusion protein was accumulated in the intercellular spaces of tomato epidermal cells. Immunological detection of secreted proteins in culture medium of transgenic tomato indicated that miraculin was secreted from the roots of transgenic tomato expressing miraculin. This study firstly showed the evidences of the intercellular localization of miraculin, and provided a new insight of biological roles of miraculin in plants.

  7. Effects of aging and life-prolonging diet on thyroid regulation of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gromakova, I A; Konovalenko, O A

    2004-03-01

    The effect of thyroxin on the intensity of protein synthesis in rats of different age was studied during natural aging and in rats maintained on a low-caloric diet inhibiting aging. The intensity of protein synthesis decreased and the reaction to hormonal stimulus was absent in animals fed life-prolonging diet.

  8. Protein oxidative modification in the aging organism and the role of the ubiquitin proteasomal system.

    PubMed

    Kastle, Marc; Grune, Tilman

    2011-12-01

    Living in an oxygen containing environment is automatically connected to oxidative stress. Beside lipids and nucleic acids, especially proteins are very susceptible for oxidative modifications. These oxidative modifications comprise alterations of single amino acids, like the formation of protein carbonyls and methionine sulfoxide, or the aggregation of whole proteins. Due to the ongoing accumulation of protein aggregates during the aging process, the cellular protein quality control system becomes more and more overwhelmed. One essential element of the protein quality control machinery is the ubiquitin proteasomal system which plays therefore a crucial part in the aging process, too. Ubiquitination of proteins is a three step mechanism to tag proteins with a polyubiquitin chain for the proteasome. The proteasome is a regulated, barrel-shaped multi-enzyme complex which is responsible for the degradation of proteins. Although there is no drastic loss of all proteasomal subunits during the aging process, there is a functional decline of the proteasome activity in aging organisms. Impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system leads to increasing protein aggregation and cellular death. A lot of age related diseases are closely connected to an inhibition of the proteasome and the formation of large protein aggregates. Especially skin aging, atherosclerosis, age-dependent macula degeneration, cataract formation and several neurodegenerative diseases are directly connected to the decline of proteasome function. This review outlines the connections between aging, oxidative stress and protein oxidation, as well as the influence on the ubiquitin proteasomal system and several associated diseases.

  9. CE separation of proteins and yeasts dynamically modified by PEG pyrenebutanoate with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Růzicka, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2007-07-01

    The optimized protocols of the bioanalytes separation, proteins and yeasts, dynamically modified by the nonionogenic tenside PEG pyrenebutanoate, were applied in CZE and CIEF with the acidic gradient in pH range 2-5.5, both with fluorescence detection. PEG pyrenebutanoate was used as a buffer additive for a dynamic modification of proteins and/or yeast samples. The narrow peaks of modified analytes were detected. The values of the pI's of the labeled proteins were calculated using new fluorescent pI markers in CIEF and they were found to be comparable with pI's of the native compounds. As an example of the possible use of the suggested CIEF technique, the mixed cultures of yeasts, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida kefyr, Candida krusei, Candida lusitaniae, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida zeylanoides, Geotrichum candidum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Trichosporon asahii and Yarrowia lipolytica, were reproducibly focused and separated with high sensitivity. Using UV excitation for the on-column fluorometric detection, the minimum detectable amounts of analytes, femtograms of proteins and down to ten cells injected on the separation capillary, were estimated.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1006 Is a Persulfide-Modified Protein That Is Critical for Molybdenum Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tombline, Gregory; Schwingel, Johanna M.; Lapek, John D.; Friedman, Alan E.; Darrah, Thomas; Maguire, Michael; Van Alst, Nadine E.; Filiatrault, Melanie J.; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    2013-01-01

    A companion manuscript revealed that deletion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pae) PA1006 gene caused pleiotropic defects in metabolism including a loss of all nitrate reductase activities, biofilm maturation, and virulence. Herein, several complementary approaches indicate that PA1006 protein serves as a persulfide-modified protein that is critical for molybdenum homeostasis in Pae. Mutation of a highly conserved Cys22 to Ala or Ser resulted in a loss of PA1006 activity. Yeast-two-hybrid and a green-fluorescent protein fragment complementation assay (GFP-PFCA) in Pae itself revealed that PA1006 interacts with Pae PA3667/CsdA and PA3814/IscS Cys desulfurase enzymes. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) “top-down” analysis of PA1006 purified from Pae revealed that conserved Cys22 is post-translationally modified in vivo in the form a persulfide. Inductively-coupled-plasma (ICP)-MS analysis of ΔPA1006 mutant extracts revealed that the mutant cells contain significantly reduced levels of molybdenum compared to wild-type. GFP-PFCA also revealed that PA1006 interacts with several molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) biosynthesis proteins as well as nitrate reductase maturation factor NarJ and component NarH. These data indicate that a loss of PA1006 protein’s persulfide sulfur and a reduced availability of molybdenum contribute to the phenotype of a ΔPA1006 mutant. PMID:23409003

  11. Unique motifs and hydrophobic interactions shape the binding of modified DNA ligands to protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Douglas R.; Gelinas, Amy D.; Zhang, Chi; Rohloff, John C.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; O’Connell, Daniel; Waugh, Sheela M.; Wolk, Steven K.; Mayfield, Wesley S.; Burgin, Alex B.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Stewart, Lance J.; Gold, Larry; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale C.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of aptamers from nucleic acid libraries by in vitro evolution represents a powerful method of identifying high-affinity ligands for a broad range of molecular targets. Nevertheless, a sizeable fraction of proteins remain difficult targets due to inherently limited chemical diversity of nucleic acids. We have exploited synthetic nucleotide modifications that confer protein-like diversity on a nucleic acid scaffold, resulting in a new generation of binding reagents called SOMAmers (Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers). Here we report a unique crystal structure of a SOMAmer bound to its target, platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-BB). The SOMAmer folds into a compact structure and exhibits a hydrophobic binding surface that mimics the interface between PDGF-BB and its receptor, contrasting sharply with mainly polar interactions seen in traditional protein-binding aptamers. The modified nucleotides circumvent the intrinsic diversity constraints of natural nucleic acids, thereby greatly expanding the structural vocabulary of nucleic acid ligands and considerably broadening the range of accessible protein targets. PMID:23139410

  12. Roles for the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in protein quality control and signaling in the retina: implications in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation of damaged or postsynthetically modified proteins and dysregulation of inflammatory responses and angiogenesis in the retina/RPE are thought be etiologically related to formation of drusen and choroidal neovascularization (CNV), hallmarks of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). T...

  13. Molecular mechanisms of the action of miraculin, a taste-modifying protein.

    PubMed

    Misaka, Takumi

    2013-03-01

    Miraculin (MCL) is a homodimeric protein isolated from the fruits of Richadella dulcifica, a shrub native to West Africa. Although it is flat in taste at neutral pH, MCL has taste-modifying activity in which sour stimuli produce a sweet perception. Once MCL enters the mouth, strong sweetness can be detected for more than 1 h each time we taste a sour solution. While the human sweet taste receptor (hT1R2-hT1R3) has been identified, the molecular mechanisms underlying the taste-modifying activity of MCL remain unclear. Recently, experimental evidence has been published demonstrating the successful quantitative evaluation of the acid-induced sweetness of MCL using a cell-based assay system. The results strongly suggested that MCL binds hT1R2-hT1R3 as an antagonist at neutral pH and functionally changes into an agonist at acidic pH. Since sweet-tasting proteins may be used as low-calorie sweeteners because they contain almost no calories, it is expected that MCL will be used in the near future as a new low-calorie sweetener or to modify the taste of sour fruits.

  14. Intraneuronal protein aggregation as a trigger for inflammation and neurodegeneration in the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Currais, Antonio; Fischer, Wolfgang; Maher, Pamela; Schubert, David

    2017-01-01

    Age is, by far, the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet few AD drug candidates have been generated that target pathways specifically associated with the aging process itself. Two ubiquitous features of the aging brain are the intracellular accumulation of aggregated proteins and inflammation. As intraneuronal amyloid protein is detected before markers of inflammation, we argue that old, age-associated, aggregated proteins in neurons can induce inflammation, resulting in multiple forms of brain toxicities. The consequence is the increased risk of old, age-associated, neurodegenerative diseases. As most of these diseases are associated with the accumulation of aggregated proteins, it is possible that any therapeutic that reduces intracellular protein aggregation will benefit all.-Currais, A., Fischer, W., Maher, P., Schubert, D. Intraneuronal protein aggregation as a trigger for inflammation and neurodegeneration in the aging brain.

  15. An activity in rat tissues that modifies nitrotyrosine-containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Wada, Kouichirou; Bian, Ka; Balabanli, Barbaros; Davis, Karen; Martin, Emil; Behbod, Fariba; Lee, Yu-Chen; Murad, Ferid

    1998-01-01

    Homogenates from rat spleen and lung could modify nitrotyrosine-containing BSA. With incubation, nitrotyrosine-containing BSA lost its epitope to a monoclonal antibody that selectively recognized nitrotyrosine-containing proteins. In the presence of protease inhibitors, the loss of the nitrotyrosine epitope occurred without protein degradation and hydrolysis. This activity was found in supernatant but not particulate fractions of spleen homogenates. The factor was heat labile, was sensitive to trypsin treatment, and was retained after passage through a membrane with a 10-kDa retention. The activity was time- and protein-concentration dependent. The activity increased about 2-fold in spleen extracts with endotoxin (bacterial lipopolysaccharide) treatment of animals, suggesting that the activity is inducible or regulatable. Other nitrotyrosine-containing proteins also served as substrates, while free nitrotyrosine and some endogenous nitrotyrosine-containing proteins in tissue extracts were poor substrates. Although the product and possible cofactors for this reaction have not yet been identified, this activity may be a “nitrotyrosine denitrase” that reverses protein nitration and, thus, decreases peroxynitrite toxicity. This activity was not observed in homogenates from rat liver or kidney, suggesting that there may also be some tissue specificity for the apparent denitrase activity. PMID:9751709

  16. Age-related changes in the synthesis and phosphorylation of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.A.; Heydari, A.; Richardson, A.

    1986-03-01

    It is well documented that the protein synthetic activity of liver tissue decreases significantly with age. However, very little information is available on the effect of age on the synthesis or phosphorylation of individual proteins. Hepatocytes were isolated from 5- to 30-month-old male Fischer F344 rats, and proteins were labeled with either (/sup 3/H)-valine or (/sup 32/P)-phosphate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to monitor the synthesis and phosphorylation of a wide variety of proteins. A dramatic increase or decrease in the synthesis of approximately 2 to 3% of the proteins was observed. Most of the proteins whose synthesis increased with age were found to be plasma proteins, e.g., acute phase proteins, synthesized by the liver. In general, the synthesis of most proteins decreased 20 to 40% with age. The phosphorylation of most proteins (over 200) did not appear to change with age. However the phosphorylation of two acidic proteins (molecular weights of 148 Kd and 130 Kd and pIs of 5.4 and 5.36, respectively) decreased with age while the phosphorylation of a basic protein (molecular weight of 57 Kd and pI of 8.09) increased with age.

  17. Quantification of protein expression changes in the aging left ventricle of Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jennifer E; Bradshaw, Amy D; Schwacke, John H; Baicu, Catalin F; Zile, Michael R; Schey, Kevin L

    2009-09-01

    As the heart ages, electrophysiological and biochemical changes can occur, and the ventricle in many cases loses distensibility, impairing diastolic function. How the proteomic signature of the aged ventricle is unique in comparison to young hearts is still under active investigation. We have undertaken a quantitative proteomics study of aging left ventricles (LVs) utilizing the isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ) methodology. Differential protein expression was observed for 117 proteins including proteins involved in cell signaling, the immune response, structural proteins, and proteins mediating responses to oxidative stress. For many of these proteins, this is the first report of an association with the aged myocardium. Additionally, two proteins of unknown function were identified. This work serves as the basis for making future comparisons of the aged left ventricle proteome to that of left ventricles obtained from other models of disease and heart failure.

  18. ML3 is a NEDD8- and ubiquitin-modified protein.

    PubMed

    Hakenjos, Jana P; Bejai, Sarosh; Ranftl, Quirin; Behringer, Carina; Vlot, A Corina; Absmanner, Birgit; Hammes, Ulrich; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Kuster, Bernhard; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2013-09-01

    NEDD8 (NEURAL PRECURSOR CELL-EXPRESSED, DEVELOPMENTALLY DOWN-REGULATED PROTEIN8) is an evolutionarily conserved 8-kD protein that is closely related to ubiquitin and that can be conjugated like ubiquitin to specific lysine residues of target proteins in eukaryotes. In contrast to ubiquitin, for which a broad range of substrate proteins are known, only a very limited number of NEDD8 target proteins have been identified to date. Best understood, and also evolutionarily conserved, is the NEDD8 modification (neddylation) of cullins, core subunits of the cullin-RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases that promote the polyubiquitylation of degradation targets in eukaryotes. Here, we show that Myeloid differentiation factor-2-related lipid-recognition domain protein ML3 is an NEDD8- as well as ubiquitin-modified protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and examine the functional role of ML3 in the plant cell. Our analysis indicates that ML3 resides in the vacuole as well as in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) bodies. ER bodies are Brassicales-specific ER-derived organelles and, similar to other ER body proteins, ML3 orthologs can only be identified in this order of flowering plants. ML3 gene expression is promoted by wounding as well as by the phytohormone jasmonic acid and repressed by ethylene, signals that are known to induce and repress ER body formation, respectively. Furthermore, ML3 protein abundance is dependent on NAI1, a master regulator of ER body formation in Arabidopsis. The regulation of ML3 expression and the localization of ML3 in ER bodies and the vacuole is in agreement with a demonstrated importance of ML3 in the defense to herbivore attack. Here, we extend the spectrum of ML3 biological functions by demonstrating a role in the response to microbial pathogens.

  19. The influence of thermal aging on the microstructure and fatigue properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gieseke, B.G.; Brinkman, C.R.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1992-12-31

    Results of elevated-temperature low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue tests are for one heat of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in the normalized and tempered condition, after pre-aging 50,000 h at 538 and 593C, and after pre-aging for 75,000 h at 538C. These data show that pre-aging reduces the low cycle fatigue and creepfatigue lives in comparison to unaged material. The magnitude of these reductions are discussed along with the impact of pre-aging on the creep-fatigue damage diagrams. The effect of environment on creep-fatigue life of unaged modified 9Cr-1Mo steels is also addressed. Transmission electron microscopy explains changes in mechanical properties due to thermal aging. In the unaged alloy, TEM shows that dynamic recovery/recrystallization is occurring after significant strain-induced dislocation hardening around a stationary and stable array of as-tempered carbides during creep-fatigue. In contrast creep-fatigue testing of the pre-aged alloy produced a much coarser cellular subgrain structure and dislocation recovery without recrystallization. Aging causes as-tempered carbide dissolution and/or reprecipitation together with additional precipitation of Laves (Fe{sub 2}Mo) phase, which removes some of the precipitate-strengthening effects, and depletes solid-solution hardening effects on the dislocation networks and subgrain boundary structures.

  20. Widespread Protein Aggregation as an Inherent Part of Aging in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    David, Della C.; Ollikainen, Noah; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Cary, Michael P.; Burlingame, Alma L.; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant protein aggregation is a hallmark of many age-related diseases, yet little is known about whether proteins aggregate with age in a non-disease setting. Using a systematic proteomics approach, we identified several hundred proteins that become more insoluble with age in the multicellular organism Caenorhabditis elegans. These proteins are predicted to be significantly enriched in β-sheets, which promote disease protein aggregation. Strikingly, these insoluble proteins are highly over-represented in aggregates found in human neurodegeneration. We examined several of these proteins in vivo and confirmed their propensity to aggregate with age. Different proteins aggregated in different tissues and cellular compartments. Protein insolubility and aggregation were significantly delayed or even halted by reduced insulin/IGF-1-signaling, which also slows aging. We found a significant overlap between proteins that become insoluble and proteins that influence lifespan and/or polyglutamine-repeat aggregation. Moreover, overexpressing one aggregating protein enhanced polyglutamine-repeat pathology. Together our findings indicate that widespread protein insolubility and aggregation is an inherent part of aging and that it may influence both lifespan and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:20711477

  1. AuNPs modified, disposable, ITO based biosensor: Early diagnosis of heat shock protein 70.

    PubMed

    Sonuç Karaboğa, Münteha Nur; Şimşek, Çiğdem Sayıklı; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2016-10-15

    This paper describes a novel, simple, and disposable immunosensor based on indium-tin oxide (ITO) sheets modified with gold nanoparticles to sensitively analyze heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), a potential biomarker that could be evaluated in diagnosis of some carcinomas. Disposable ITO coated Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) electrodes were used and modified with gold nanoparticles in order to construct the biosensors. Optimization and characterization steps were analyzed by electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Surface morphology of the biosensor was also identified by electrochemical methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). To interpret binding characterization of HSP70 to anti-HSP70 single frequency impedance method was successfully operated. Moreover, the proposed HSP70 immunosensor acquired good stability, repeatability, and reproducibility. Ultimately, proposed biosensor was introduced to real human serum samples to determine HSP70 sensitively and accurately.

  2. Pepsin immobilization on an aldehyde-modified polymethacrylate monolith and its application for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenjuan; Yamauchi, Mika; Hasegawa, Urara; Noda, Masanori; Fukui, Kiichi; van der Vlies, André J; Uchiyama, Susumu; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Polymer-based monoliths with interconnected porous structure have attracted much attention as a high-performance stationary phase for online digestion liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) system. In this study, a poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate) (PGM) monolith prepared via thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) was used as a solid support to covalently immobilize pepsin. The PGM monolith was modified with aminoacetal to yield an aldehyde-bearing (PGM-CHO) monolith. Pepsin was immobilized onto the PGM-CHO monolith via reductive amination. The immobilized pepsin showed better pH and thermal stability compared with free pepsin. Furthermore, the PGM-CHO monolith modified with pepsin was applied for online protein digestion followed by LC-MS and LC-MS/MS analyses. As a result, a larger number of peptides are reproducibly identified compared to those by polystyrene/divinylbenzene particle (POROS)-based online pepsin column.

  3. Favorable Influence of Hydrophobic Surfaces on Protein Structure in Porous Organically-modified Silica Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Menaa, Bouzid; Herrero, Mar; Rives, Vicente; Lavrenko, Mayya; Eggers, Daryl K.

    2008-01-01

    Organically-modified siloxanes were used as host materials to examine the influence of surface chemistry on protein conformation in a crowded environment. The sol-gel materials were prepared from tetramethoxysilane and a series of monosubstituted alkoxysilanes, RSi(OR′)3, featuring alkyl groups of increasing chain length in the R-position. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy in the far-UV region, apomyoglobin was found to transit from an unfolded state to a native-like helical state as the content of the hydrophobic precursor increased from 0–15%. At a fixed molar content of 5% RSi(OR’)3, the helical structure of apomyoglobin increased with the chain length of the R-group, i.e. methyl < ethyl < n-propyl < n-butyl < n-hexyl. This trend also was observed for the tertiary structure of ribonuclease A, suggesting that protein folding and biological activity are sensitive to the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance of neighboring surfaces. The observed changes in protein structure did not correlate with total surface area or the average pore size of the modified glasses, but scanning electron microscopy images revealed an interesting relationship between surface morphology and alkyl chain length. The unexpected benefit of incorporating a low content of hydrophobic groups into a hydrophilic surface may lead to materials with improved biocompatibility for use in biosensors and implanted devices. PMID:18359512

  4. Aldehyde-modified proteins as mediators of early inflammation in atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Antoniak, Derrick T; Duryee, Michael J; Mikuls, Ted R; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Anderson, Daniel R

    2015-12-01

    Inflammation is widely accepted to play a major role in atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, the exact mechanism(s) by which inflammation exerts its pathogenic effect remains poorly understood. A number of oxidatively modified proteins have been associated with cardiovascular disease. Recently, attention has been given to the oxidative compound of malondialdehyde and acetaldehyde, two reactive aldehydes known to covalently bind and adduct macromolecules. These products have been shown to form stable malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) adducts that are reactive and induce immune responses. These adducts have been found in inflamed and diseased cardiovascular tissue of patients. Antibodies to these adducted proteins are measurable in the serum of diseased patients. The isotypes involved in the immune response to MAA (i.e., IgM, IgG, and IgA) are predictive of atherosclerotic disease progression and cardiovascular events such as an acute myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass grafting. Therefore, it is the purpose of this article to review the past and current knowledge of aldehyde-modified proteins and their role in cardiovascular disease.

  5. Solution behavior of synthetic silk peptides and modified recombinant silk proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, C. Wong Po; Bini, E.; Huang, J.; Lee, S. Y.; Kaplan, D. L.

    2006-02-01

    Spider dragline silk from Nephila clavipes possesses impressive mechanical properties derived in part from repetitive primary sequence containing polyalanine regions that self-assemble into crystalline β-sheets. In the present study, we have sought to understand more details of redox responses related to conformational transitions of modified silk peptides and a recombinant protein containing encoded methionine triggers. Regardless of the position of the methionine trigger relative to the polyalanine domain, chemical oxidation was rapid and slight increases in the α-helical structure and decreases in the β-sheet and random coil content were observed by CD and FTIR in the assembled silk-like peptides and the recombinant protein. CD results indicated that the decrease in β-sheet and random coil conformations, coupled with the increase in helical content during oxidation, occurred during the first 30 min of the reaction. No further conformational changes occurred after this time and the response was independent of methionine trigger location relative to the penta-alanine domain. These results were confirmed with fluorescence studies. The design, processing and utility of these modified redox triggered silk-like peptides and proteins suggest a range of potential utility, from biomaterials to engineered surface coatings with chemically alterable secondary structure and, thus, properties.

  6. Protein adsorption from flowing solutions on pure and maleic acid copolymer modified glass particles.

    PubMed

    Klose, Theresia; Welzel, Petra B; Werner, Carsten

    2006-08-01

    The adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) and lysozyme (LSZ) on pure as well as maleic acid (MA) copolymer coated spherical soda lime glass particles was investigated under flowing conditions. Coating the glass particles with two different maleic acid copolymers alters the properties of the particle surface concerning its charge and hydrophobicity in a well-defined gradation. Frontal chromatography was used to determine the surface concentration of the adsorbed proteins and to establish adsorption isotherms. The introduced methodology was demonstrated to provide a powerful means to study protein adsorption at solid/liquid interfaces. Investigations with virginal and protein-preadsorbed glass particles revealed that even under streaming conditions HSA is irreversibly adsorbed, whereas LSZ partially desorbs. For LSZ and HSA the adsorbed amounts and the isotherms strongly depend on the surface "history", i.e. the presence or absence of preadsorbed protein layers, and the kind of surface modification of the glass. Compared to the soda lime glass surface the adsorption of HSA was strongly increased on surfaces modified with a hydrophobic maleic acid copolymer indicating a strong hydrophobic protein-surface interaction. By coating the surface with a hydrophilic and more negatively charged maleic acid copolymer the adsorption of HSA to that surface was lower and comparable to the adsorption onto plain glass due to the electrostatic repulsion between HSA and the modified surface. In contrast the affinity to any of the investigated particle surfaces was generally higher for LSZ than for HSA which can be mainly attributed to the electrostatic attraction between LZS and the surface. The adsorbed amount of LSZ on the copolymer coated particle surfaces was much higher than on the pure soda lime glass particles indicating superposed hydrophobic interactions in the case of the hydrophobic MA copolymer layer and an increased density of anionic sites as well as interactions of

  7. Absolute quantitation of isoforms of post-translationally modified proteins in transgenic organism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaojun; Shu, Yiwei; Peng, Changchao; Zhu, Lin; Guo, Guangyu; Li, Ning

    2012-08-01

    Post-translational modification isoforms of a protein are known to play versatile biological functions in diverse cellular processes. To measure the molar amount of each post-translational modification isoform (P(isf)) of a target protein present in the total protein extract using mass spectrometry, a quantitative proteomic protocol, absolute quantitation of isoforms of post-translationally modified proteins (AQUIP), was developed. A recombinant ERF110 gene overexpression transgenic Arabidopsis plant was used as the model organism for demonstration of the proof of concept. Both Ser-62-independent (14)N-coded synthetic peptide standards and (15)N-coded ERF110 protein standard isolated from the heavy nitrogen-labeled transgenic plants were employed simultaneously to determine the concentration of all isoforms (T(isf)) of ERF110 in the whole plant cell lysate, whereas a pair of Ser-62-dependent synthetic peptide standards were used to quantitate the Ser-62 phosphosite occupancy (R(aqu)). The P(isf) was finally determined by integrating the two empirically measured variables using the following equation: P(isf) = T(isf) · R(aqu). The absolute amount of Ser-62-phosphorylated isoform of ERF110 determined using AQUIP was substantiated with a stable isotope labeling in Arabidopsis-based relative and accurate quantitative proteomic approach. The biological role of the Ser-62-phosphorylated isoform was demonstrated in transgenic plants.

  8. Use of a mutant OGA for detecting O-GlcNAc modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Chalkley, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    In the previous issue of Biochemical Journal Mariappa et al. [(2015) Biochem J. 470,: 255-262] demonstrate a new method for visualizing O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modified proteins by making use of a catalytically dead version of the enzyme that normally removes this modification. They show their approach has broader specificity than current antibody-based techniques and higher specificity than lectin and chemical biology-based labelling approaches. This commentary discusses methods for O-GlcNAc detection and the significance of this work for characterizing this common, but currently poorly understood regulatory modification.

  9. Application of the Protein Semisynthesis Strategy to the Generation of Modified Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Matthew; Muir, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Histone proteins are subject to a host of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) that modulate chromatin structure and function. Such control is achieved by the direct alteration of the intrinsic physical properties of the chromatin fiber or by regulating the recruitment and activity of a host of trans-acting nuclear factors. The sheer number of histone PTMs presents a formidable barrier to understanding the molecular mechanisms at the heart of epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic genomes. One aspect of this multifarious problem, namely how to access homogeneously modified chromatin for biochemical studies, is well suited to the sensibilities of the organic chemist. Indeed, recent years have witnessed a critical role for synthetic protein chemistry methods in generating the raw materials needed for studying how histone PTMs regulate chromatin biochemistry. This review focuses on what is arguably the most powerful, and widely employed, of these chemical strategies, namely histone semisynthesis via the chemical ligation of peptide fragments. PMID:25784050

  10. The activity of the Drosophila Vestigial protein is modified by Scalloped-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pimmett, Virginia L; Deng, Hua; Haskins, Julie A; Mercier, Rebecca J; LaPointe, Paul; Simmonds, Andrew J

    2017-03-18

    The Drosophila vestigial gene is required for proliferation and differentiation of the adult wing and for differentiation of larval and adult muscle identity. Vestigial is part of a multi-protein transcription factor complex, which includes Scalloped, a TEAD-class DNA binding protein. Binding Scalloped is necessary for translocation of Vestigial into the nucleus. We show that Vestigial is extensively post-translationally modified and at least one of these modifications is required for proper function during development. We have shown that there is p38-dependent phosphorylation of Serine 215 in the carboxyl-terminal region of Vestigial. Phosphorylation of Serine 215 occurs in the nucleus and requires the presence of Scalloped. Comparison of a phosphomimetic and non-phosphorylatable mutant forms of Vestigial shows differences in the ability to rescue the wing and muscle phenotypes associated with a null vestigial allele.

  11. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  12. Patagonfibrase modifies protein expression of tissue factor and protein disulfide isomerase in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Peichoto, María Elisa; Santoro, Marcelo Larami

    2016-09-01

    Patagonfibrase is a hemorrhagic metalloproteinase isolated from the venom of the South American rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and is an important contributor to local lesions inflicted by this species. The tissue factor (TF)-factor VIIa complex, besides triggering the coagulation cascade, has been demonstrated to be involved in inflammatory events. Our aim was to determine whether patagonfibrase affects the expression of TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme that controls TF biological activity, at the site of patagonfibrase injection, and thus if they may play a role in hemostatic and inflammatory events induced by snake venoms. Patagonfibrase (60 μg/kg) was administered s.c. to rats, and after 3 h blood was collected to evaluate hemostasis parameters, and skin fragments close to the site of injection were taken to assess TF and PDI expression. Patagonfibrase did not alter blood cell counts, plasma fibrinogen levels, or levels of TF activity in plasma. However, by semiquantitative Western blotting, patagonfibrase increased TF expression by 2-fold, and decreased PDI expression by 3-fold in skin samples. In agreement, by immunohistochemical analyses, prominent TF expression was observed in the subcutaneous tissue. Thus, patagonfibrase affects the local expression of TF and PDI without inducing any systemic hemostatic disturbance, although that they may be involved in the local inflammatory events induced by hemorrhagic metalloproteinases. Once antivenom therapy is not totally effective to treat the local injury induced by snake venoms, modulation of the activity and expression of TF and/or PDI might become a strategy for treating snake envenomation.

  13. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol regulates the p53 post-translational modifiers Murine double minute 2 and the Small Ubiquitin MOdifier protein in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gowran, Aoife; Murphy, Carrie E; Campbell, Veronica A

    2009-11-03

    The phytocannabinoid Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in cannabis, activates a number of signalling cascades including p53. This study examines the role of Delta(9)-THC in regulating the p53 post-translational modifier proteins, Murine double minute (Mdm2) and Small Ubquitin-like MOdifier protein 1 (SUMO-1) in cortical neurons. Delta(9)-THC increased both Mdm2 and SUMO-1 protein expression and induced the deSUMOylation of p53 in a cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1))-receptor dependent manner. We demonstrate that Delta(9)-THC decreased the SUMOylation of the CB(1) receptor. The data reveal a novel role for cannabinoid receptor activation in modulating the SUMO regulatory system.

  14. Carboxymethylchitosan covalently modified capillary column for open tubular capillary electrochromatography of basic proteins and opium alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sunying; Tan, Jingjing; Chen, Qinhua; Lin, Xucong; Lü, Haixia; Xie, Zenghong

    2010-12-24

    A novel open tubular (OT) column covalently modified with hydrophilic polysaccharide, carboxymethylchitosan (CMC) as stationary phase has been developed, and employed for the separations of basic proteins and opium alkaloids by capillary electrochromatography (CEC). With the procedures including the silanization of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTS) and the combination of glutaraldehyde with amino-silylated silica surface and CMC, CMC was covalently bonded on the capillary inner wall and exhibited a remarkable tolerance and chemical stability against 0.1 mol/L HCl, 0.1 mol/L NaOH or some organic solvents. By varying the pH values of running buffer, a cathodic or anodic EOF could be gained in CMC modified column. With anodic EOF mode (pH<4.3), favorable separations of basic proteins (trypsin, ribonuclease A, lysozyme and cytochrome C) were successfully achieved with high column efficiencies ranging from 97,000 to 182,000 plates/m, and the undesired adsorptions of basic proteins on the inter-wall of capillary could be avoided. Good repeatability was gained with RSD of the migration time less than 1.3% for run-to-run (n=5) and less than 3.2% for day-to-day (n=3), RSD of peak area was less than 5.6% for run-to-run (n=5) and less than 8.8% for day-to-day (n=3). With cathodic EOF mode (pH>4.3), four opium alkaloids were also baseline separated in phosphate buffer (50 mmol/L, pH 6.0) with column efficiencies ranging from 92,000 to 132,000 plates/m. CMC-bonded OT capillary column might be used as an alternative medium for the further analysis of basic proteins and alkaline analytes.

  15. Ion-Ion Reactions with Fixed-Charge Modified Proteins to Produce Ions in a Single, Very High Charge State.

    PubMed

    Frey, Brian L; Krusemark, Casey J; Ledvina, Aaron R; Coon, Joshua J; Belshaw, Peter J; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-10-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of denatured proteins produces a mass spectrum with a broad distribution of multiply charged ions. Attaching fixed positive charges, specifically quaternary ammonium groups, to proteins at their carboxylic acid groups generates substantially higher charge states compared to the corresponding unmodified proteins in positive-mode ESI. Ion-ion reactions of these modified proteins with reagent anions leads to charge reduction by proton transfer. These proton transfer reactions cannot remove charge from the quaternary ammonium groups, which do not have a proton to transfer to the anion. Thus, one might expect charge reduction to stop at a single charge state equal to the number of fixed charges on the modified protein. However, ion-ion reactions yield charge states lower than this number of fixed charges due to anion attachment (adduction) to the proteins. Charge reduction via ion-molecule reactions involving gas-phase bases also give adducts on the modified protein ions in low charge states. Such adducts are avoided by keeping the ions in charge states well above the number of fixed charges. In the present work protein ions were selectively "parked" within an ion trap mass spectrometer in a high charge state by mild radiofrequency excitation that dramatically slows their ion-ion reaction rate-a technique termed "ion parking". The combination of ion parking with the fixed-charge modified proteins permits generation of a large population of ions in a single, very high charge state.

  16. Ion-Ion Reactions with Fixed-Charge Modified Proteins to Produce Ions in a Single, Very High Charge State

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Brian L.; Krusemark, Casey J.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Coon, Joshua J.; Belshaw, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of denatured proteins produces a mass spectrum with a broad distribution of multiply charged ions. Attaching fixed positive charges, specifically quaternary ammonium groups, to proteins at their carboxylic acid groups generates substantially higher charge states compared to the corresponding unmodified proteins in positive-mode ESI. Ion-ion reactions of these modified proteins with reagent anions leads to charge reduction by proton transfer. These proton transfer reactions cannot remove charge from the quaternary ammonium groups, which do not have a proton to transfer to the anion. Thus, one might expect charge reduction to stop at a single charge state equal to the number of fixed charges on the modified protein. However, ion-ion reactions yield charge states lower than this number of fixed charges due to anion attachment (adduction) to the proteins. Charge reduction via ion-molecule reactions involving gas-phase bases also give adducts on the modified protein ions in low charge states. Such adducts are avoided by keeping the ions in charge states well above the number of fixed charges. In the present work protein ions were selectively “parked” within an ion trap mass spectrometer in a high charge state by mild radiofrequency excitation that dramatically slows their ion-ion reaction rate—a technique termed “ion parking”. The combination of ion parking with the fixed-charge modified proteins permits generation of a large population of ions in a single, very high charge state. PMID:19802328

  17. Age- and diabetes-induced regulation of oxidative protein modification in rat brain and peripheral tissues: consequences of treatment with antioxidant pyridoindole.

    PubMed

    Sakul, Arzu; Cumaoğlu, Ahmet; Aydin, Elif; Ari, Nuray; Dilsiz, Nihat; Karasu, Cimen

    2013-05-01

    The increased glyco- and lipo-oxidation events are considered one of the major factors in the accumulation of non-functional damaged proteins, and the antioxidants may inhibit extensive protein modification and nitrosylated protein levels, enhancing the oxidative damage at the cellular levels in aging and diabetes. Because of its central role in the pathogenesis of age-dependent and diabetes-mediated functional decline, we compared the levels of oxidatively modified protein markers, namely AGEs (Advanced Glycation End-protein adducts), 4-HNE (4-hydroxy-nonenal-histidine) and 3-NT (3-nitrotyrosine), in different tissues of young and old rats. Separately, these three oxidative stress parameters were explored in old rats subjected to experimentally induced diabetes and following a long-term treatment with a novel synthetic pyridoindole antioxidant derived from stobadine-SMe1EC2 (2-ethoxycarbonyl-8-methoxy-2,3,4,4a,5,9b-hexahydro-1H-pyrido[4,3-b]indolinium dichloride). Diabetes induced by streptozotocin injection in rats aged 13-15 months, and SMe1EC2 treatment was applied during 4months to aged diabetic rats. AGEs and 4-HNE levels were significantly elevated in brain, ventricle and kidney, but not in lens and liver of aged rats when compared with young rats. Diabetes propagated ageing-induced increase in AGEs and 4-HNE in brain, ventricle and kidney, and raised significantly lens and liver AGEs and 4-HNE levels in aged rats. In aged diabetic rats, SMe1EC2 protected only the kidney against increase in AGEs, and inhibited significantly 4-HNE levels in brain, kidney, liver and lens that were observed more pronounced in lens. 3-NT was significantly increased in brain of aged rats and in kidney, lens and ventricle of aged diabetic rats, while SMe1EC2 has no protective effect on 3-NT increase. Results demonstrate that (1) the responsiveness of different tissue proteins to glyco-lipo-oxidative and nitrosative stress in the course of normal aging was miscellaneous. (2

  18. The zinc finger protein ZPR1 is a potential modifier of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saif; Wang, Yi; Shaik, Gouse M.; Burghes, Arthur H.; Gangwani, Laxman

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by mutation of the Survival Motor Neurons 1 (SMN1) gene and is characterized by degeneration of spinal motor neurons. The severity of SMA is primarily influenced by the copy number of the SMN2 gene. Additional modifier genes that lie outside the SMA locus exist and one gene that could modify SMA is the Zinc Finger Protein (ZPR1) gene. To test the significance of ZPR1 downregulation in SMA, we examined the effect of reduced ZPR1 expression in mice with mild and severe SMA. We report that the reduced ZPR1 expression causes increase in the loss of motor neurons, hypermyelination in phrenic nerves, increase in respiratory distress and disease severity and reduces the lifespan of SMA mice. The deficiency of SMN-containing sub-nuclear bodies correlates with the severity of SMA. ZPR1 is required for the accumulation of SMN in sub-nuclear bodies. Further, we report that ZPR1 overexpression increases levels of SMN and promotes accumulation of SMN in sub-nuclear bodies in SMA patient fibroblasts. ZPR1 stimulates neurite growth and rescues axonal growth defects in SMN-deficient spinal cord neurons from SMA mice. These data suggest that the severity of disease correlates negatively with ZPR1 levels and ZPR1 may be a protective modifier of SMA. PMID:22422766

  19. Age-related changes in the hippocampus (loss of synaptophysin and glial-synaptic interaction) are modified by systemic treatment with an NCAM-derived peptide, FGL.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Bunmi; Rezaie, Payam; Gabbott, Paul L; Davies, Heather; Colyer, Frances; Cowley, Thelma R; Lynch, Marina; Stewart, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    Altered synaptic morphology, progressive loss of synapses and glial (astrocyte and microglial) cell activation are considered as characteristic hallmarks of aging. Recent evidence suggests that there is a concomitant age-related decrease in expression of the presynaptic protein, synaptophysin, and the neuronal glycoprotein CD200, which, by interacting with its receptor, plays a role in maintaining microglia in a quiescent state. These age-related changes may be indicative of reduced neuroglial support of synapses. FG Loop (FGL) peptide synthesized from the second fibronectin type III module of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), has previously been shown to attenuate age-related glial cell activation, and to 'restore' cognitive function in aged rats. The mechanisms by which FGL exerts these neuroprotective effects remain unclear, but could involve regulation of CD200, modifying glial-synaptic interactions (affecting neuroglial 'support' at synapses), or impacting directly on synaptic function. Light and electron microscopic (EM) analyses were undertaken to investigate whether systemic treatment with FGL (i) alters CD200, synaptophysin (presynaptic) and PSD-95 (postsynaptic) immunohistochemical expression levels, (ii) affects synaptic number, or (iii) exerts any effects on glial-synaptic interactions within young (4 month-old) and aged (22 month-old) rat hippocampus. Treatment with FGL attenuated the age-related loss of synaptophysin immunoreactivity (-ir) within CA3 and hilus (with no major effect on PSD-95-ir), and of CD200-ir specifically in the CA3 region. Ultrastructural morphometric analyses showed that FGL treatment (i) prevented age-related loss in astrocyte-synaptic contacts, (ii) reduced microglia-synaptic contacts in the CA3 stratum radiatum, but (iii) had no effect on the mean number of synapses in this region. These data suggest that FGL mediates its neuroprotective effects by regulating glial-synaptic interaction.

  20. Enhancement of natural killer cell activity of aged mice by modified arabinoxylan rice bran (MGN-3/Biobran).

    PubMed

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Abedi, Sarah

    2004-12-01

    The present study is aimed to examine the possibility of enhancement of natural killer (NK) cell activity in aged C57BL/6 and C3H mice using MGN-3, a modified arabinoxylan from rice bran. Intraperitoneal injection of MGN-3 (10 mg kg(-1) per day) caused a remarkable increase in the peritoneal NK activity as early as 2 days (35.2 lytic units), and the level remained elevated through day 14. The control aged mice had a level of 5.8 lytic units. Enhancement in NK activity was associated with an increase in both the binding capacity of NK cells to tumour targets and in the granular content as measured by BLT-esterase activity. Treatment did not alter the percentage of peritoneal NK cells. Data showed that peritoneal macrophages inhibit NK activity. In conclusion, MGN-3 enhances murine NK activity of aged mice and may be useful for enhancing NK function in aged humans.

  1. Heterologous Protein Secretion in Lactobacilli with Modified pSIP Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Karlskås, Ingrid Lea; Maudal, Kristina; Axelsson, Lars; Rud, Ida; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Mathiesen, Geir

    2014-01-01

    We describe new variants of the modular pSIP-vectors for inducible gene expression and protein secretion in lactobacilli. The basic functionality of the pSIP system was tested in Lactobacillus strains representing 14 species using pSIP411, which harbors the broad-host-range Lactococcus lactis SH71rep replicon and a β-glucuronidase encoding reporter gene. In 10 species, the inducible gene expression system was functional. Based on these results, three pSIP vectors with different signal peptides were modified by replacing their narrow-host-range L. plantarum 256rep replicon with SH71rep and transformed into strains of five different species of Lactobacillus. All recombinant strains secreted the target protein NucA, albeit with varying production levels and secretion efficiencies. The Lp_3050 derived signal peptide generally resulted in the highest levels of secreted NucA. These modified pSIP vectors are useful tools for engineering a wide variety of Lactobacillus species. PMID:24614815

  2. Variants within the SP110 nuclear body protein modify risk of canine degenerative myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ivansson, Emma L.; Kozyrev, Sergey V.; Murén, Eva; Körberg, Izabella Baranowska; Swofford, Ross; Koltookian, Michele; Tonomura, Noriko; Zeng, Rong; Kolicheski, Ana L.; Hansen, Liz; Katz, Martin L.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Johnson, Gary S.; Coates, Joan R.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a naturally occurring neurodegenerative disease with similarities to some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Most dogs that develop DM are homozygous for a common superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1) mutation. However, not all dogs homozygous for this mutation develop disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi (PWC) breed comparing DM-affected and -unaffected dogs homozygous for the SOD1 mutation. The analysis revealed a modifier locus on canine chromosome 25. A haplotype within the SP110 nuclear body protein (SP110) was present in 40% of affected compared with 4% of unaffected dogs (P = 1.5 × 10−5), and was associated with increased probability of developing DM (P = 4.8 × 10−6) and earlier onset of disease (P = 1.7 × 10−5). SP110 is a nuclear body protein involved in the regulation of gene transcription. Our findings suggest that variations in SP110-mediated gene transcription may underlie, at least in part, the variability in risk for developing DM among PWCs that are homozygous for the disease-related SOD1 mutation. Further studies are warranted to clarify the effect of this modifier across dog breeds. PMID:27185954

  3. Molecular Mechanism for Age-Related Memory Loss: The Histone-Binding Protein RbAp48

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Elias; Jones, Sidonie; Kosmidis, Stylianos; Close, Maggie; Kim, Carla; Kovalerchik, Olga; Small, Scott A.; Kandel, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    To distinguish age-related memory loss more explicitly from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), we have explored its molecular underpinning in the dentate gyrus (DG), a subregion of the hippocampal formation thought to be targeted by aging. We carried out a gene expression study in human postmortem tissue harvested from both DG and entorhinal cortex (EC), a neighboring subregion unaffected by aging and known to be the site of onset of AD. Using expression in the EC for normalization, we identified 17 genes that manifested reliable age-related changes in the DG. The most significant change was an age-related decline in RbAp48, a histone-binding protein that modifies histone acetylation. To test whether the RbAp48 decline could be responsible for age-related memory loss, we turned to mice and found that, consistent with humans, RbAp48 was less abundant in the DG of old than in young mice. We next generated a transgenic mouse that expressed a dominant-negative inhibitor of RbAp48 in the adult forebrain. Inhibition of RbAp48 in young mice caused hippocampus-dependent memory deficits similar to those associated with aging, as measured by novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies showed that within the hippocampal formation, dysfunction was selectively observed in the DG, and this corresponded to a regionally selective decrease in histone acetylation. Up-regulation of RbAp48 in the DG of aged wild-type mice ameliorated age-related hippocampus-based memory loss and age-related abnormalities in histone acetylation. Together, these findings show that the DG is a hippocampal subregion targeted by aging, and identify molecular mechanisms of cognitive aging that could serve as valid targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23986399

  4. Could age modify the effect of genetic variants in IL6 and TNF-α genes in multiple myeloma?

    PubMed

    Martino, Alessandro; Buda, Gabriele; Maggini, Valentina; Lapi, Francesco; Lupia, Antonella; Di Bello, Domenica; Orciuolo, Enrico; Galimberti, Sara; Barale, Roberto; Petrini, Mario; Rossi, Anna Maria

    2012-05-01

    Cytokines play a central role in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis thus genetic variations within cytokines coding genes could influence MM susceptibility and therapy outcome. We investigated the impact of 8 SNPs in these genes in 202 MM cases and 235 controls also evaluating their impact on therapy outcome in a subset of 91 patients. Despite the overall negative findings, we found a significant age-modified effect of IL6 and TNF-α SNPs, on MM risk and therapy outcome, respectively. Therefore, this observation suggests that genetic variation in inflammation-related genes could be an important mediator of the complex interplay between ageing and cancer.

  5. The ionic liquid isopropylammonium formate as a mobile phase modifier to improve protein stability during reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ling; Danielson, Neil D

    2013-12-01

    The room temperature ionic liquid isopropylammonium formate (IPAF) is studied as a reversed phase HPLC mobile phase modifier for separation of native proteins using a polymeric column and the protein stability is compared to that using acetonitrile (MeCN) as the standard organic mobile phase modifier. A variety of important proteins with different numbers of subunits are investigated, including non-subunit proteins: albumin, and amyloglucosidase (AMY); a two subunit protein: thyroglobulin (THY); and four subunit proteins: glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A significant enhancement in protein stability is observed in the chromatograms upon using IPAF as a mobile phase modifier. The first sharper peak at about 2min represented protein in primarily the native form and a second broader peak more retained at about 5-6min represented substantially denatured or possibly aggregated protein. The investigated proteins (except LDH) could maintain the native form within up to 50% IPAF, while a mobile phase, with as low as 10% MeCN, induced protein denaturation. The assay for pyruvate using LDH has further shown that enzymatic activity can be maintained up to 30% IPAF in water in contrast to no activity using 30% MeCN.

  6. Computational prediction of methylation types of covalently modified lysine and arginine residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wankun; Wang, Yongbo; Ma, Lili; Zhang, Ying; Ullah, Shahid; Xue, Yu

    2016-05-30

    Protein methylation is an essential posttranslational modification (PTM) mostly occurs at lysine and arginine residues, and regulates a variety of cellular processes. Owing to the rapid progresses in the large-scale identification of methylation sites, the available data set was dramatically expanded, and more attention has been paid on the identification of specific methylation types of modification residues. Here, we briefly summarized the current progresses in computational prediction of methylation sites, which provided an accurate, rapid and efficient approach in contrast with labor-intensive experiments. We collected 5421 methyllysines and methylarginines in 2592 proteins from the literature, and classified most of the sites into different types. Data analyses demonstrated that different types of methylated proteins were preferentially involved in different biological processes and pathways, whereas a unique sequence preference was observed for each type of methylation sites. Thus, we developed a predictor of GPS-MSP, which can predict mono-, di- and tri-methylation types for specific lysines, and mono-, symmetric di- and asymmetrical di-methylation types for specific arginines. We critically evaluated the performance of GPS-MSP, and compared it with other existing tools. The satisfying results exhibited that the classification of methylation sites into different types for training can considerably improve the prediction accuracy. Taken together, we anticipate that our study provides a new lead for future computational analysis of protein methylation, and the prediction of methylation types of covalently modified lysine and arginine residues can generate more useful information for further experimental manipulation.

  7. Evolution of the microstructure of unmodified and polymer modified asphalt binders with aging in an accelerated weathering tester.

    PubMed

    Menapace, Ilaria; Masad, Eyad

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents findings on the evolution of the surface microstructure of two asphalt binders, one unmodified and one polymer modified, directly exposed to aging agents with increasing durations. The aging is performed using an accelerated weathering tester, where ultraviolet radiation, oxygen and an increased temperature are applied to the asphalt binder surface. Ultraviolet and dark cycles, which simulated the succession of day and night, alternated during the aging process, and also the temperature varied, which corresponded to typical summer day and night temperatures registered in the state of Qatar. Direct aging of an exposed binder surface is more effective in showing microstructural modifications than previously applied protocols, which involved the heat treatment of binders previously aged with standardized methods. With the new protocol, any molecular rearrangements in the binder surface after aging induced by the heat treatment is prevented. Optical photos show the rippling and degradation of the binder surface due to aging. Microstructure images obtained by means of atomic force microscopy show gradual alteration of the surface due to aging. The original relatively flat microstructure was substituted with a profoundly different microstructure, which significantly protrudes from the surface, and is characterized by various shapes, such as rods, round structures and finally 'flower' or 'leaf' structures.

  8. A Mutation in DAOA Modifies the Age of Onset in PSEN1 E280A Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Jorge I.; Rivera, Dora; Mastronardi, Claudio A.; Patel, Hardip R.; Tobón, Carlos; Villegas, Andrés; Cai, Yeping; Easteal, Simon; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported age of onset (AOO) modifier genes in the world's largest pedigree segregating early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), caused by the p.Glu280Ala (E280A) mutation in the PSEN1 gene. Here we report the results of a targeted analysis of functional exonic variants in those AOO modifier genes in sixty individuals with PSEN1 E280A AD who were whole-exome genotyped for ~250,000 variants. Standard quality control, filtering, and annotation for functional variants were applied, and common functional variants located in those previously reported as AOO modifier loci were selected. Multiloci linear mixed-effects models were used to test the association between these variants and AOO. An exonic missense mutation in the G72 (DAOA) gene (rs2391191, P = 1.94 × 10−4, PFDR = 9.34 × 10−3) was found to modify AOO in PSEN1 E280A AD. Nominal associations of missense mutations in the CLUAP1 (rs9790, P = 7.63 × 10−3, PFDR = 0.1832) and EXOC2 (rs17136239, P = 0.0325, PFDR = 0.391) genes were also found. Previous studies have linked polymorphisms in the DAOA gene with the occurrence of neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, apathy, aggression, delusions, hallucinations, and psychosis in AD. Our findings strongly suggest that this new conspicuous functional AOO modifier within the G72 (DAOA) gene could be pivotal for understanding the genetic basis of AD. PMID:26949549

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Age Specific Variation in the Abundance of Human Female Parotid Salivary Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ambatipudi, Kiran S.; Lu, Bingwen; Hagen, Fred K; Melvin, James E.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Human saliva is a protein-rich, easily accessible source of potential local and systemic biomarkers to monitor changes that occur under pathological conditions; however little is known about the changes in abundance associated with normal aging. In this study, we performed a comprehensive proteomic profiling of pooled saliva collected from the parotid glands of healthy female subjects, divided into two age groups 1 and 2 (20–30 and 55–65 years old, respectively). Hydrophobic charge interaction chromatography was used to separate high from low abundant proteins prior to characterization of the parotid saliva using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Collectively, 532 proteins were identified in the two age groups. Of these proteins, 266 were identified exclusively in one age group, while 266 proteins were common to both groups. The majority of the proteins identified in the two age groups belonged to the defense and immune response category. Of note, several defense related proteins (e.g. lysozyme, lactoferrin and histatin-1) were significantly more abundant in group 2 as determined by G-test. Selected representative mass spectrometric findings were validated by western blot analysis. Our study reports the first quantitative analysis of differentially regulated proteins in ductal saliva collected from young and older female subjects. This study supports the use of high-throughput proteomics as a robust discovery tool. Such results provide a foundation for future studies to identify specific salivary proteins which may be linked to age-related diseases specific to women. PMID:19764810

  10. Grow-ING, Age-ING and Die-ING: ING proteins link cancer, senescence and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Michael; Berardi, Philip; Gong Wei; Riabowol, Karl . E-mail: karl@ucalgary.ca

    2006-04-15

    The INhibitor of Growth (ING) family of plant homeodomain (PHD) proteins induce apoptosis and regulate gene expression through stress-inducible binding of phospholipids with subsequent nuclear and nucleolar localization. Relocalization occurs concomitantly with interaction with a subset of nuclear proteins, including PCNA, p53 and several regulators of acetylation such as the p300/CBP and PCAF histone acetyltransferases (HATs), as well as the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and hSir2. These interactions alter the localized state of chromatin compaction, subsequently affecting the expression of subsets of genes, including those associated with the stress response (Hsp70), apoptosis (Bax, MDM2) and cell cycle regulation (p21{sup WAF1}, cyclin B) in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. The expression levels and subcellular localization of ING proteins are altered in a significant number of human cancer types, while the expression of ING isoforms changes during cellular aging, suggesting that ING proteins may play a role in linking cellular transformation and replicative senescence. The variety of functions attributed to ING proteins suggest that this tumor suppressor serves to link the disparate processes of cell cycle regulation, cell suicide and cellular aging through epigenetic regulation of gene expression. This review examines recent findings in the ING field with a focus on the functions of protein-protein interactions involving ING family members and the mechanisms by which these interactions facilitate the various roles that ING proteins play in tumorigenesis, apoptosis and senescence.

  11. Characterization of the mycoplasma membrane proteins. VI. Composition and disposition of proteins in membranes from aging Mycoplasma hominis cultures.

    PubMed

    Amar, A; Rottem, S; Kahane, I; Razin, S

    1976-03-05

    Membranes of Mycoplasma hominis cells from cultures progressing from the mid to the end of the logarithmic phase of growth became richer in protein, poorer in phospholipids and cholesterol, heavier in density, and more viscous as determined by EPR. The membrane-bound ATPase activity declined steeply. Electrophoretic analysis failed to show marked changes in membrane protein composition on aging, apart from an increase in the staining intensity of one protein band (Mr approximately 130 000) concomitant with a decrease in the staining intensity of several minor protein bands of high molecular weight. To test for possible changes in the disposition of the various membrane proteins on aging of cultures, a comparison was made of the susceptibility of membrane proteins of intact cells and isolated membranes to trypsinization and lactoperoxidase-mediated iodination. The iodination values and the percent of membrane protein released by trypsinization of intact cells were similar in cells from cultures of different ages, indicating no significant changes in the organization of the proteins on the outer surface. On the other hand, trypsinization and iodination of isolated membranes were found to be most markedly affected by the culture age, indicating significant changes in the organization of the proteins on the inner membrane surface. Thus, the iodination values of isolated membranes decreased by almost two fold, while the percentage of protein released from the membrane by trypsin increased from 28% to 50% during the experimental period. It is suggested that aging in M. hominis cultures is accompanied by a continuous increase in the packing density of the protein molecules on the inner surface of the cell membrane.

  12. Saliva proteins of vector Culicoides modify structure and infectivity of bluetongue virus particles.

    PubMed

    Darpel, Karin E; Langner, Kathrin F A; Nimtz, Manfred; Anthony, Simon J; Brownlie, Joe; Takamatsu, Haru-Hisa; Mellor, Philip S; Mertens, Peter P C

    2011-03-14

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) are related orbiviruses, transmitted between their ruminant hosts primarily by certain haematophagous midge vectors (Culicoides spp.). The larger of the BTV outer-capsid proteins, 'VP2', can be cleaved by proteases (including trypsin or chymotrypsin), forming infectious subviral particles (ISVP) which have enhanced infectivity for adult Culicoides, or KC cells (a cell-line derived from C. sonorensis). We demonstrate that VP2 present on purified virus particles from 3 different BTV strains can also be cleaved by treatment with saliva from adult Culicoides. The saliva proteins from C. sonorensis (a competent BTV vector), cleaved BTV-VP2 more efficiently than those from C. nubeculosus (a less competent/non-vector species). Electrophoresis and mass spectrometry identified a trypsin-like protease in C. sonorensis saliva, which was significantly reduced or absent from C. nubeculosus saliva. Incubating purified BTV-1 with C. sonorensis saliva proteins also increased their infectivity for KC cells ∼10 fold, while infectivity for BHK cells was reduced by 2-6 fold. Treatment of an 'eastern' strain of EHDV-2 with saliva proteins of either C. sonorensis or C. nubeculosus cleaved VP2, but a 'western' strain of EHDV-2 remained unmodified. These results indicate that temperature, strain of virus and protein composition of Culicoides saliva (particularly its protease content which is dependent upon vector species), can all play a significant role in the efficiency of VP2 cleavage, influencing virus infectivity. Saliva of several other arthropod species has previously been shown to increase transmission, infectivity and virulence of certain arboviruses, by modulating and/or suppressing the mammalian immune response. The findings presented here, however, demonstrate a novel mechanism by which proteases in Culicoides saliva can also directly modify the orbivirus particle structure, leading to increased

  13. Integrative Transcriptome Profiling of Cognitive Aging and Its Preservation through Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, C. Sehwan; Valomon, Amandine; Welzl, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Environmental enrichment has been reported to delay or restore age-related cognitive deficits, however, a mechanism to account for the cause and progression of normal cognitive decline and its preservation by environmental enrichment is lacking. Using genome-wide SAGE-Seq, we provide a global assessment of differentially expressed genes altered with age and environmental enrichment in the hippocampus. Qualitative and quantitative proteomics in naïve young and aged mice was used to further identify phosphorylated proteins differentially expressed with age. We found that increased expression of endogenous protein phosphatase-1 inhibitors in aged mice may be characteristic of long-term environmental enrichment and improved cognitive status. As such, hippocampus-dependent performances in spatial, recognition, and associative memories, which are sensitive to aging, were preserved by environmental enrichment and accompanied by decreased protein phosphatase activity. Age-associated phosphorylated proteins were also found to correspond to the functional categories of age-associated genes identified through transcriptome analysis. Together, this study provides a comprehensive map of the transcriptome and proteome in the aging brain, and elucidates endogenous protein phosphatase-1 inhibition as a potential means through which environmental enrichment may ameliorate age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:26102285

  14. Spectroscopic detection of fluorescent protein marker gene activity in genetically modified plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, O. W.; Chong, Jenny P. C.; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This work focuses on developing a portable fibre optic fluorescence analyser for rapid identification of genetically modified plants tagged with a fluorescent marker gene. Independent transgenic tobacco plant lines expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene were regenerated following Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. Molecular characterisation of these plant lines was carried out at the DNA level by PCR screening to confirm their transgenic status. Conventional transgene expression analysis was then carried out at the RNA level by RT-PCR and at the protein level by Western blotting using anti-GFP rabbit antiserum. The amount of plant-expressed EGFP on a Western blot was quantified against known amounts of purified EGFP by scanning densitometry. The expression level of EGFP in transformed plants was found to range from 0.1 - 0.6% of total extractable protein. A comparison between conventional western analysis of transformants and direct spectroscopic quantification using the fibre optic fluorescence analyser was made. The results showed that spectroscopic measurements of fluorescence emission from strong EGFP expressors correlated positively with Western blot data. However, the fluorescence analyser was also able to identify weakly expressing plant transformants below the detection limit of colorimetric Western blotting.

  15. A Genetically Modified Protein-Based Hydrogel for 3D Culture of AD293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiao; Wang, Jingyu; Diao, Wentao; Wang, Ling; Long, Jiafu; Zhou, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels have strong application prospects for drug delivery, tissue engineering and cell therapy because of their excellent biocompatibility and abundant availability as scaffolds for drugs and cells. In this study, we created hybrid hydrogels based on a genetically modified tax interactive protein-1 (TIP1) by introducing two or four cysteine residues in the primary structure of TIP1. The introduced cysteine residues were crosslinked with a four-armed poly (ethylene glycol) having their arm ends capped with maleimide residues (4-armed-PEG-Mal) to form hydrogels. In one form of the genetically modification, we incorporated a peptide sequence ‘GRGDSP’ to introduce bioactivity to the protein, and the resultant hydrogel could provide an excellent environment for a three dimensional cell culture of AD293 cells. The AD293 cells continued to divide and displayed a polyhedron or spindle-shape during the 3-day culture period. Besides, AD293 cells could be easily separated from the cell-gel constructs for future large-scale culture after being cultured for 3 days and treating hydrogel with trypsinase. This work significantly expands the toolbox of recombinant proteins for hydrogel formation, and we believe that our hydrogel will be of considerable interest to those working in cell therapy and controlled drug delivery. PMID:25233088

  16. Double emulsions stabilized by a charged complex of modified pectin and whey protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Rachel; Aserin, Abraham; Wicker, Louis; Garti, Nissim

    2009-08-01

    Double emulsions based on naturally occurring stabilizers for food applications were studied. Two charged biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and enzymatic modified pectins, interacted in aqueous solution to form a charge-charge complex that was utilized as a hydrophilic polymeric steric stabilizer improving the double emulsion stability. The main factors that influence the interaction between protein and pectin were investigated in relation to double emulsion stability: creaming, coalescence, and water transport between aqueous phases. The pH determined the size of the complex formed. Thus at pH 6, where a soluble complex was obtained between some molecular positively charged patches on the protein and negatively charged fractions of the hydrocolloids, the double emulsion was the most stable. With the smallest droplet size (ca. 15 microm), the lowest creaming, highest yield, and minimized water transport were obtained. The best concentration and ratio to form the soluble complex are 4 wt% WPI and 0.5 wt% pectin (for 30 wt% of the W/O inner phase). The influence of the charge distribution (degree of order of the carboxylic groups) of the pectin on the associated complex was also investigated, and it was found that the more "ordered" pectin (U63) formed the most stable double emulsion against water transport.

  17. Extracellular Release and Signaling by Heat Shock Protein 27: Role in Modifying Vascular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batulan, Zarah; Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Li, Yumei; Koumbadinga, Geremy; Alvarez-Olmedo, Daiana Gisela; Shi, Chunhua; O’Brien, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is traditionally viewed as an intracellular chaperone protein with anti-apoptotic properties. However, recent data indicate that a number of heat shock proteins, including HSP27, are also found in the extracellular space where they may signal via membrane receptors to alter gene transcription and cellular function. Therefore, there is increasing interest in better understanding how HSP27 is released from cells, its levels and composition in the extracellular space, and the cognate cell membrane receptors involved in effecting cell signaling. In this paper, the knowledge to date, as well as some emerging paradigms about the extracellular function of HSP27 is presented. Of particular interest is the role of HSP27 in attenuating atherogenesis by modifying lipid uptake and inflammation in the plaque. Moreover, the abundance of HSP27 in serum is an emerging new biomarker for ischemic events. Finally, HSP27 replacement therapy may represent a novel therapeutic opportunity for chronic inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:27507972

  18. Protein Intake and Muscle Health in Old Age: From Biological Plausibility to Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Francesco; Calvani, Riccardo; Tosato, Matteo; Martone, Anna Maria; Ortolani, Elena; Savera, Giulia; D’Angelo, Emanuela; Sisto, Alex; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The provision of sufficient amounts of dietary proteins is central to muscle health as it ensures the supply of essential amino acids and stimulates protein synthesis. Older persons, in particular, are at high risk of insufficient protein ingestion. Furthermore, the current recommended dietary allowance for protein (0.8 g/kg/day) might be inadequate for maintaining muscle health in older adults, probably as a consequence of “anabolic resistance” in aged muscle. Older individuals therefore need to ingest a greater quantity of protein to maintain muscle function. The quality of protein ingested is also essential to promoting muscle health. Given the role of leucine as the master dietary regulator of muscle protein turnover, the ingestion of protein sources enriched with this essential amino acid, or its metabolite β-hydroxy β-methylbutyrate, is thought to offer the greatest benefit in terms of preservation of muscle mass and function in old age. PMID:27187465

  19. Determination of disulfide array and subunit structure of taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Igeta, H; Tamura, Y; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1991-09-20

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin (Theerasilp, S. et al. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 6655-6659) has seven cysteine residues in a molecule composed of 191 amino acid residues. The formation of three intrachain disulfide bridges at Cys-47-Cys-92, Cys-148-Cys-159 and Cys-152-Cys-155 and one interchain disulfide bridge at Cys-138 was determined by amino acid sequencing and composition analysis of cystine-containing peptides isolated by HPLC. The presence of an interchain disulfide bridge was also supported by the fact that the cystine peptide containing Cys-138 showed a negative color test for the free sulfhydryl group and a positive test after reduction with dithiothreitol. The molecular mass of non-reduced miraculin (43 kDa) in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was nearly twice the calculated molecular mass based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content of reduced miraculin (25 kDa). The molecular mass of native miraculin determined by low-angle laser light scattering was 90 kDa. Application of a crude extract of miraculin to a Sephadex G-75 column indicated that the taste-modifying activity appears at 52 kDa. It was concluded that native miraculin in pure form is a tetramer of the 25 kDa-peptide and native miraculin in crude state or denatured, non-reduced miraculin in pure form is a dimer of the peptide. Both tetramer miraculin and native dimer miraculin in crude state had the taste-modifying activity.

  20. Expression of domains for protein-protein interaction of nucleotide excision repair proteins modifies cancer cell sensitivity to platinum derivatives and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Jordheim, Lars Petter; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Matera, Eva-Laure; Bouledrak, Karima; Dumontet, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is involved in the repair of DNA damage caused by platinum derivatives and has been shown to decrease the cytotoxic activity of these drugs. Because protein-protein interactions are essential for NER activity, we transfected human cancer cell lines (A549 and HCT116) with plasmids coding the amino acid sequences corresponding to the interacting domains between excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA), as well as ERCC1 and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group F (XPF), all NER proteins. Using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and annexin V staining, we showed that transfected A549 cells were sensitized 1.2-2.2-fold to carboplatin and that transfected HCT116 cells were sensitized 1.4-5.4-fold to oxaliplatin in vitro. In addition, transfected cells exhibited modified in vivo sensitivity to the same drugs. Finally, in particular cell models of the interaction between ERCC1 and XPF, DNA repair was decreased, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of the histone 2AX after exposure to mitomycin C, and genomic instability was increased, as determined by comparative genomic hybridization studies. The results indicate that the interacting peptides act as dominant negatives and decrease NER activity through inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  1. Protein determination using graphene oxide-aptamer modified gold nanoparticles in combination with Tween 80.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Li, Qin; Li, Raoqi; Deng, Zebin; Brady, Brendan; Xia, Ni; Chen, Guimin; Zhou, Yang; Xia, Hengchuan; Chen, Keping; Shi, Haixia

    2016-10-19

    Recently, graphene oxide (GO) has shown superiority for disease detection arising from its unique physical and chemical properties. However, proteins adsorbed on the surface of GO prevent sensitivity improvement in fluorescence-based detection methods. In this paper, a label-free method based on aptamer modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) combined with Tween 80 was shown to solve this problem using the detection of thrombin as an example. An aptamer was designed and bound to thrombin by changing its conformation. Tween 80 was used for rapid and reproducible synthesis of stable DNA-functionalized GNPs and prevented the thrombin from nonspecific binding to GO. Thrombin was detected with a limit of 0.68 pM by taking advantage of the efficient cross-linking effect of aptamer-GNPs to GO. The sensor was validated by determining thrombin concentration in human blood serum samples. The results indicate that this method has promising analytical application in medical diagnostic.

  2. Imaging murine NALT following intranasal immunization with flagellin-modified circumsporozoite protein malaria vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nacer, Adéla; Carapau, Daniel; Mitchell, Robert; Meltzer, Abby; Shaw, Alan; Frevert, Ute; Nardin, Elizabeth H

    2013-01-01

    Intranasal (IN) immunization with a Plasmodium circumsporozoite (CS) protein conjugated to flagellin, a TLR5 agonist, was found to elicit antibody mediated protective immunity in our previous murine studies. To better understand IN elicited immune responses, we examined the nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) in immunized mice and the interaction of flagellin-modified CS with murine dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. NALT of immunized mice contained a predominance of germinal center (GC) B cells and increased numbers of CD11c+ DC localized beneath the epithelium and within the GC T cell area. We detected microfold (M) cells distributed throughout the NALT epithelial cell layer and DC dendrites extending into the nasal cavity which could potentially function in luminal CS antigen uptake. Flagellin-modified CS taken up by DC in vitro was initially localized within intracellular vesicles followed by a cytosolic distribution. Vaccine modifications to enhance delivery to the NALT and specifically target NALT APC populations will advance development of an efficacious needle-free vaccine for the 40% of the world's population at risk of malaria. PMID:23820750

  3. Complete purification and characterization of the taste-modifying protein, miraculin, from miracle fruit.

    PubMed

    Theerasilp, S; Kurihara, Y

    1988-08-15

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, has the unusual property of modifying a sour taste into a sweet taste. Previous attempts to isolate miraculin from deeply colored alkaline extracts of the miracle fruit were unsuccessful. We found that miraculin is extracted with 0.5 M NaCl solution. The extracted solution is colorless and shows the strong sweet-inducing activity. Miraculin was purified from the extracted solution by ammonium sulfate fractionation, CM-Sepharose ion-exchange chromatography, and concanavalin A-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The purified miraculin thus obtained gave a single sharp peak in reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography, indicating that it is highly pure. The sample also gave a single band having molecular weight 28,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This value was much lower than the values reported previously (40,000-48,000). The amino acid composition of the purified miraculin was determined. Sequence analysis of the purified miraculin indicated that it is composed of a pure single polypeptide and identified 20 amino-terminal amino acids. The purified miraculin contained as much as 13.9% of sugars, which consisted of glucosamine, mannose, galactose, xylose, and fucose in a molar ratio of 3.03:3.00:0.69:0.96:2.12.

  4. Protein-modified shear mode film bulk acoustic resonator for bio-sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingjing; Liu, Weihui; Xu, Yan; Chen, Da; Li, Dehua; Zhang, Luyin

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present a shear mode film bulk acoustic biosensor based on micro-electromechanical technology. The film bulk acoustic biosensor is a diaphragmatic structure consisting of a lateral field excited ZnO piezoelectric film piezoelectric stack built on an Si3N4 membrane. The device works at near 1.6 GHz with Q factors of 579 in water and 428 in glycerol. A frequency shift of 5.4 MHz and a small decline in the amplitude are found for the measurements in glycerol compared with those in water because of the viscous damping derived from the adjacent glycerol. For bio-sensing demonstration, the resonator was modified with biotin molecule to detect protein-ligand interactions in real-time and in situ. The resonant frequency of the biotin-modified device drops rapidly and gradually reaches equilibrium when exposed to the streptavidin solution due to the biotin-streptavidin interaction. The proposed film bulk acoustic biosensor shows promising applications for disease diagnostics, prognosis, and drug discovery.

  5. Does age modify the association between physical work demands and deterioration of self-rated general health?

    PubMed

    Burr, Hermann; Pohrt, Anne; Rugulies, Reiner; Holtermann, Andreas; Hasselhorn, Hans Martin

    2017-03-02

    Objective Due to the growing proportion of older employees in the work force in several countries, the importance of age in the association between work and health is becoming increasingly relevant. Few studies have investigated whether age modifies the association of physical work demands with health. We hypothesized that the association of demanding body postures with deteriorated self-rated health (SRH) is stronger among older employees than among younger employees. Method We analyzed three 5-year cohorts in the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study comprising 8318 observations from 5204 employees (follow-up participation rate 83%) with good baseline SRH. Physical work demands were assessed as demanding body postures. Age was divided into tertiles; young (18-32 years), middle-aged (33-43 years) and old (44-59 among men and 44-54 years among women). Poor SRH ("fairly good", "poor", and "very poor") was measured with a single item. Log binomial regressions were stratified by gender. Effect modification (ie, interaction) was defined as deviation from additivity and examined by calculating the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). The reference group was employees aged 18-32 years with low physical exposure. Results When predicting deterioration of SRH, an interaction between demanding body postures and age was found among men [RERI: 0.75, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.16-1.34, regarding the age group 44-59 years] and among women (RERI: 0.84, 95% CI 0.19-1.34, for the age group 33-43 years; and 1.17, 95% CI 0.42-1.93, for the age group 44-54 years). Conclusion The study findings suggest that demanding body postures have a stronger impact on health among older compared to younger employees.

  6. Using Modified Sample Entropy to Characterize Aging-Associated Microvascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous microvascular function can be assessed by skin blood flow (SBF) response to thermal stimuli. Usually, the activities of the regulatory mechanisms are quantified by means of spectral analysis of the response. However, spectral measures are unable to characterize the nonlinear dynamics of SBF signal. Sample entropy (SampEn) is a commonly used nonlinear measure of the degree of regularity of time series. However, SampEn value depends on the relationship between the frequency of the studied dynamics and sampling rate. Hence, when time series data are oversampled, SampEn may give misleading results. We modified the definition of SampEn by including a lag between successive data points of the vectors to be compared to address the oversampled issue. The lag could be chosen as the first minimum of the auto mutual information function of the time series. We tested the performance of modified SampEn using simulated signals and SBF data in the young and old groups. The results indicated that modified SampEn yields consistent results for different sampling rates in simulated data, but SampEn cannot. Blood flow data showed a higher degree of regularity during the maximal vasodilation period as compared to the baseline in both groups and a higher degree of regularity in the older group as compared to the young group. Furthermore, our results showed that during the second peak the more regular behavior of blood flow oscillations (BFO) is mainly attributed to enhanced cardiac oscillations. This study suggests that the modified SampEn approach may be useful for assessing microvascular function. PMID:27148065

  7. Soluble Milk Protein Supplementation with Moderate Physical Activity Improves Locomotion Function in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lafoux, Aude; Baudry, Charlotte; Bonhomme, Cécile; Le Ruyet, Pascale; Huchet, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a loss of muscle mass and functional capacity. Present study was designed to compare the impact of specific dairy proteins on muscular function with or without a low-intensity physical activity program on a treadmill in an aged rat model. We investigated the effects of nutritional supplementation, five days a week over a 2-month period with a slow digestible protein, casein or fast digestible proteins, whey or soluble milk protein, on strength and locomotor parameters in sedentary or active aged Wistar RjHan rats (17–19 months of age). An extensive gait analysis was performed before and after protein supplementation. After two months of protein administration and activity program, muscle force was evaluated using a grip test, spontaneous activity using an open-field and muscular mass by specific muscle sampling. When aged rats were supplemented with proteins without exercise, only minor effects of different diets on muscle mass and locomotion were observed: higher muscle mass in the casein group and improvement of stride frequencies with soluble milk protein. By contrast, supplementation with soluble milk protein just after physical activity was more effective at improving overall skeletal muscle function in old rats compared to casein. For active old rats supplemented with soluble milk protein, an increase in locomotor activity in the open field and an enhancement of static and dynamic gait parameters compared to active groups supplemented with casein or whey were observed without any differences in muscle mass and forelimb strength. These results suggest that consumption of soluble milk protein as a bolus immediately after a low intensity physical activity may be a suitable nutritional intervention to prevent decline in locomotion in aged rats and strengthen the interest to analyze the longitudinal aspect of locomotion in aged rodents. PMID:27973615

  8. The maternal-age-associated risk of congenital heart disease is modifiable.

    PubMed

    Schulkey, Claire E; Regmi, Suk D; Magnan, Rachel A; Danzo, Megan T; Luther, Herman; Hutchinson, Alayna K; Panzer, Adam A; Grady, Mary M; Wilson, David B; Jay, Patrick Y

    2015-04-09

    Maternal age is a risk factor for congenital heart disease even in the absence of any chromosomal abnormality in the newborn. Whether the basis of this risk resides with the mother or oocyte is unknown. The impact of maternal age on congenital heart disease can be modelled in mouse pups that harbour a mutation of the cardiac transcription factor gene Nkx2-5 (ref. 8). Here, reciprocal ovarian transplants between young and old mothers establish a maternal basis for the age-associated risk in mice. A high-fat diet does not accelerate the effect of maternal ageing, so hyperglycaemia and obesity do not simply explain the mechanism. The age-associated risk varies with the mother's strain background, making it a quantitative genetic trait. Most remarkably, voluntary exercise, whether begun by mothers at a young age or later in life, can mitigate the risk when they are older. Thus, even when the offspring carry a causal mutation, an intervention aimed at the mother can meaningfully reduce their risk of congenital heart disease.

  9. Solid-phase N-terminal peptide enrichment study by optimizing trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine modified proteins by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Yang, Jonathon; Zhukova, Daria; Nguen, Hamilton; Bruce, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proteolytic cleavages generate active precursor proteins by creating new N-termini in the proteins. A number of strategies recently published regarding the enrichment of original or newly formed N-terminal peptides using guanidination of lysine residues and amine reactive reagents. For effective enrichment of N-terminal peptides, the efficiency of trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine (guanidinated) modified proteins must be understood and simple and versatile solid-phase N-terminal capture strategies should be developed. Methods We present here a mass spectrometry-based study to evaluate and optimize the trypsin proteolysis on a guanidinated modified protein. Trypsin proteolysis was studied using different amount of trypsin to modified protein ratios. To capture the original N-termini, after guanidination of proteins, original N-termini were acetylated and the proteins were digested with trypsin. The newly formed N-terminal tryptic peptides were captured with a new amine reactive acid-cleavable solid-phase reagent. The original N-terminal peptides were then collected from the supernatant of the solution. Results We demonstrated a detailed study of the efficiency of enzyme trypsin on homoarginine modified proteins. We observed that the rate of hydrolysis of homoarginine residues compared to their lysine/arginine counter parts were slower but generally cleaved after an overnight digestion period depending on the protein to protease concentration ratios. Selectivity of the solid-phase N-terminal reagent was studied by enrichment of original N-terminal peptides from two standard proteins, ubiquitin and RNaseS. Conclusion We found enzyme trypsin is active in guanidinated form of protein depending on enzyme to protein concentrations, time and the proximity of arginine residues in the sequence. The novel solid-phase capture reagent also successfully enriched N-terminal peptides from the standard protein mixtures. We believe this trypsin proteolysis study on

  10. The Association of Smoking and Surgery in Inflammatory Bowel Disease is Modified by Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Frolkis, Alexandra D; de Bruyn, Jennifer; Jette, Nathalie; Lowerison, Mark; Engbers, Jordan; Ghali, William; Lewis, James D; Vallerand, Isabelle; Patten, Scott; Eksteen, Bertus; Barnabe, Cheryl; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Wiebe, Samuel; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We assessed the association of smoking at diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on the need for an intestinal resection. Methods: The Health Improvement Network was used to identify an inception cohort of Crohn's disease (n=1519) and ulcerative colitis (n=3600) patients from 1999–2009. Poisson regression explored temporal trends for the proportion of newly diagnosed IBD patients who never smoked before their diagnosis and the risk of surgery within 3 years of diagnosis. Cox proportional hazard models assessed the association between smoking and surgery, and effect modification was explored for age at diagnosis. Results: The rate of never smokers increased by 3% per year for newly diagnosed Crohn's disease patients (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.03; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.05), but not for ulcerative colitis. The rate of surgery decreased among Crohn's disease patients aged 17–40 years (IRR 0.96; 95% CI: 0.93–0.98), but not for ulcerative colitis. Smoking at diagnosis increased the risk of surgery for Crohn's disease patients diagnosed after the age of 40 (hazard ratio (HR) 2.99; 95% CI: 1.52–5.92), but not for those diagnosed before age 40. Ulcerative colitis patients diagnosed between the ages of 17 and 40 years and who quit smoking before their diagnosis were more likely to undergo a colectomy (ex-smoker vs. never smoker: HR 1.66; 95% CI: 1.04–2.66). The age-specific findings were consistent across sensitivity analyses for Crohn's disease, but not ulcerative colitis. Conclusions: In this study, the association of smoking and surgical resection was dependent on the age at diagnosis of IBD. PMID:27101004

  11. Age- and Hypertension-Associated Protein Aggregates in Mouse Heart Have Similar Proteomic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Mercanti, Federico; Wang, Xianwei; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Tackett, Alan J; Prayaga, Sastry V S; Romeo, Francesco; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are largely defined by protein aggregates in affected tissues. Aggregates contain some shared components as well as proteins thought to be specific for each disease. Aggregation has not previously been reported in the normal, aging heart or the hypertensive heart. Detergent-insoluble protein aggregates were isolated from mouse heart and characterized on 2-dimensional gels. Their levels increased markedly and significantly with aging and after sustained angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Of the aggregate components identified by high-resolution proteomics, half changed in abundance with age (392/787) or with sustained hypertension (459/824), whereas 30% (273/901) changed concordantly in both, each P<0.05. One fifth of these proteins were previously associated with age-progressive neurodegenerative or cardiovascular diseases, or both (eg, ApoE, ApoJ, ApoAIV, clusterin, complement C3, and others involved in stress-response and protein-homeostasis pathways). Because fibrosis is a characteristic of both aged and hypertensive hearts, we posited that aging of fibroblasts may contribute to the aggregates observed in cardiac tissue. Indeed, as cardiac myofibroblasts "senesced" (approached their replicative limit) in vitro, they accrued aggregates with many of the same constituent proteins observed in vivo during natural aging or sustained hypertension. In summary, we have shown for the first time that compact (detergent-insoluble) protein aggregates accumulate during natural aging, chronic hypertension, and in vitro myofibroblast senescence, sharing many common proteins. Thus, aggregates that arise from disparate causes (aging, hypertension, and replicative senescence) may have common underlying mechanisms of accrual.

  12. Development of an innovative immunoassay for CP4EPSPS and Cry1AB genetically modified protein detection and quantification.

    PubMed

    Ermolli, M; Prospero, A; Balla, B; Querci, M; Mazzeo, A; Van Den Eede, G

    2006-09-01

    An innovative immunoassay, called enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA) Reverse, based on a new conformation of the solid phase, was developed. The solid support was expressly designed to be immersed directly in liquid samples to detect the presence of protein targets. Its application is proposed in those cases where a large number of samples have to be screened simultaneously or when the simultaneous detection of different proteins is required. As a first application, a quantitative immunoassay for Cry1AB protein in genetically modified maize was optimized. The method was tested using genetically modified organism concentrations from 0.1 to 2.0%. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation of the method were determined as 0.0056 and 0.0168 (expressed as the percentage of genetically modified organisms content), respectively. A qualitative multiplex assay to assess the presence of two genetically modified proteins simultaneously was also established for the case of the Cry1AB and the CP4EPSPS (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) present in genetically modified maize and soy, respectively.

  13. Modified gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric method for determination of daminozide in high protein food products.

    PubMed

    Faughnan, K T; Woodruff, M A

    1991-01-01

    A modified version of the Conditt and Baumgardner gas chromatographic/mass spectroscopic (GC/MS) method for determination of daminozide in peanut butter and raw peanuts is described. Daminozide in the food product is hydrolyzed to unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) by sodium hydroxide digestion. The generated UDMH is distilled from the food matrix and captured by reaction with salicylaldehyde in a condensation trap. Resulting high pH distillates generated by peanuts and peanut products are adjusted back to a pH of 5-6 through addition of glacial acetic acid. After thermal incubation and extraction into methylene chloride, salicylaldehyde dimethylhydrazone is separated from interferences by capillary GC and quantitated by MS using the selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Quantitation of daminozide is based on the ratio of the salicylaldehyde dimethylhydrazone molecular ion (m/z 164) to the molecular ion (m/z 153) of the internal standard, 4-nitroanisole. Confirmation of daminozide identity is determined by relative intensity of the m/z 164 ion to the m/z 120 (C7H4ON) ion. Improved m/z 164 ion intensity and reduction of neighboring interferences due to acetic acid treatment permitted a daminozide detection limit of 0.005 ppm in a 50 g sample and an associated 0.02 ppm limit of quantitation. This modification is specific for high protein samples that generate high pH distillates such as peanuts and peanut products and is not specifically intended for analysis of low protein samples.

  14. Capillary isoelectric focusing of proteins and microorganisms in dynamically modified fused silica with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Růzicka, Filip; Horký, Jaroslav; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2006-09-01

    We suggest a method for the reproducible and efficient capillary isoelectric focusing of proteins and microorganisms in the pH gradient 3-10. The method involves the segmental injection of the simple ampholytes, the solution of the selected electrolytes, and the sample mixture of bioanalytes and carrier ampholytes to the fused silica capillaries dynamically modified by poly(ethylene glycol), PEG 4000, which is added to the catholyte, the anolyte and injected solutions. In order to receive the reproducible results, the capillaries were rinsed by the mixture of acetone/ethanol between analyses. For the tracing of the pH gradients the low-molecular-mass pI markers were used. The simple proteins and the mixed cultures of microorganisms, Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCM 8191, Escherichia coli CCM 3954, Candida albicans CCM 8180, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae CCM 6187, Enterococcus faecalis CCM 4224, Staphylococcus epidermidis CCM 4418 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, were focused and separated by the method suggested. The minimum detectable number of microbial cells was 5x10(2) to 1x10(3) with on-column UV detection at 280 nm.

  15. Synthesis, characterization, and protein labeling of difunctional magnetic nanoparticles modified with thiazole orange dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Xuening; Zhu, Huifang; Zhou, Jianguo; Yu, Lu

    2014-03-01

    A dual functional nanoparticle was designed and synthesized by encapsulating magnetic core inside silica particles and subsequently a thiazole orange (TO) dye derivative was modified on the surface of the nanoparticles. The obtained particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, Uv-Vis spectrophotometer, fluorescence spectrophotometer, transmission electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, etc. The size of preliminary magnetic particles is ca. 7 nm, but after coating a silica layer and dye, the size of particles is increased to ca. 60 nm. The hydrodynamic diameter, water dispersibility, and zeta potential were also determined. The hydrodynamic diameter of particles with silica and dye is 65.2 and 70.5 nm, respectively, with positive zeta potential (25.1, 38.5 mV). Furthermore magnetic properties of the particles were measured and the experimental results suggested that it could meet the requirement of application as magnetic resonance imaging agent. Finally to verify the availability of the particles as fluorescent labeling, protein labeling experiment was performed using bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein and the results showed that the dual functional particle has higher affinity with BSA than TO molecule itself.

  16. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri uses a plant natriuretic peptide-like protein to modify host homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gottig, Natalia; Garavaglia, Betiana S; Daurelio, Lucas D; Valentine, Alex; Gehring, Chris; Orellano, Elena G; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2008-11-25

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) are a class of extracellular, systemically mobile molecules that elicit a number of plant responses important in homeostasis and growth. The bacterial citrus pathogen, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, also contains a gene encoding a PNP-like protein, XacPNP, that shares significant sequence similarity and identical domain organization with plant PNPs but has no homologues in other bacteria. We have expressed and purified XacPNP and demonstrated that the bacterial protein alters physiological responses including stomatal opening in plants. Although XacPNP is not expressed under standard nutrient rich culture conditions, it is strongly induced under conditions that mimic the nutrient poor intercellular apoplastic environment of leaves, as well as in infected tissue, suggesting that XacPNP transcription can respond to the host environment. To characterize the role of XacPNP during bacterial infection, we constructed a XacPNP deletion mutant. The lesions caused by this mutant were more necrotic than those observed with the wild-type, and bacterial cell death occurred earlier in the mutant. Moreover, when we expressed XacPNP in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, the transgenic bacteria caused less necrotic lesions in the host than the wild-type. In conclusion, we present evidence that a plant-like bacterial PNP can enable a plant pathogen to modify host responses to create conditions favorable to its own survival.

  17. Selective nanopatterning using citrate-stabilized Au nanoparticles and cystein-modified amphiphilic protein.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Päivi; Kivioja, Jani; Paananen, Arja; Kainlauri, Markku; Kontturi, Kyösti; Ahopelto, Jouni; Linder, Markus B

    2009-05-05

    We present an approach where biomolecular self-assembly is used in combination with lithography to produce patterns of metallic nanoparticles on a silicon substrate. This is achieved through a two-step method, resulting in attachment of nanoparticles on desired sites on the sample surfaces, which allowed a detailed characterization. First, a genetically modified hydrophobin protein, NCysHFBI, was attached by self-assembly on a hydrophobic surface or a surface patterned with hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains. The next step was to label the protein layers with 17.8 nm gold nanoparticles, to allow microscopic characterization of the films. Kinetics and extent of attachment of nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the attachment of citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles was strongly dependent on the electrostatic properties of the capping ligand layer and the density of nanoparticles in the monolayer could be controlled via pH. The resulting nanoparticle assemblies followed the original pattern created by optical lithography in high accuracy. We demonstrate that combining bottom-up and top-down nanotechnological approaches in a good balance can provide very effective ways to produce nanoscale components providing a functional interface between electronics and the biological world.

  18. Leaf Treatments with a Protein-Based Resistance Inducer Partially Modify Phyllosphere Microbial Communities of Grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, Martina; Perazzolli, Michele; Antonielli, Livio; Nesler, Andrea; Torboli, Esmeralda; Bianchedi, Pier L.; Pindo, Massimo; Puopolo, Gerardo; Pertot, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Protein derivatives and carbohydrates can stimulate plant growth, increase stress tolerance, and activate plant defense mechanisms. However, these molecules can also act as a nutritional substrate for microbial communities living on the plant phyllosphere and possibly affect their biocontrol activity against pathogens. We investigated the mechanisms of action of a protein derivative (nutrient broth, NB) against grapevine downy mildew, specifically focusing on the effects of foliar treatments on plant defense stimulation and on the composition and biocontrol features of the phyllosphere microbial populations. NB reduced downy mildew symptoms and induced the expression of defense-related genes in greenhouse- and in vitro-grown plants, indicating the activation of grapevine resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, NB increased the number of culturable phyllosphere bacteria and altered the composition of bacterial and fungal populations on leaves of greenhouse-grown plants. Although, NB-induced changes on microbial populations were affected by the structure of indigenous communities originally residing on grapevine leaves, degrees of disease reduction and defense gene modulation were consistent among the experiments. Thus, modifications in the structure of phyllosphere populations caused by NB application could partially contribute to downy mildew control by competition for space or other biocontrol strategies. Particularly, changes in the abundance of phyllosphere microorganisms may provide a contribution to resistance induction, partially affecting the hormone-mediated signaling pathways involved. Modifying phyllosphere populations by increasing natural biocontrol agents with the application of selected nutritional factors can open new opportunities in terms of sustainable plant protection strategies. PMID:27486468

  19. Translationally controlled tumor protein supplemented chitosan modified glass ionomer cement promotes osteoblast proliferation and function.

    PubMed

    Sangsuwan, Jiraporn; Wanichpakorn, Supreya; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) supplemented in a novel glass ionomer cement (BIO-GIC) on normal human osteoblasts (NHost cells). BIO-GIC was a glass ionomer cement (GIC) modified by adding chitosan and albumin to promote the release of TCTP. NHost cells were seeded on specimens of GIC, GIC+TCTP, BIO-GIC and BIO-GIC+TCTP. Cell proliferation was determined by BrdU assay. It was found that BIO-GIC+TCTP had significantly higher proliferation of cells than other specimens. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteopontin (OPN) gene expressions assessed by quantitative real time PCR and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were used to determine cell differentiation. Bone cell function was investigated by calcium deposition using alizarin assay. Both BMP-2 and OPN gene expressions of cells cultured on specimens with added TCTP increased gradually up-regulation after day 1 and reached the highest on day 3 then down-regulation on day 7. The ALP activity of cells cultured on BIO-GIC+TCTP for 7 days and calcium content after 14 days were significantly higher than other groups. BIO-GIC+TCTP can promote osteoblast cells proliferation, differentiation and function.

  20. KRIT1 protein depletion modifies endothelial cell behavior via increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Peter V; Kuebel, Julia M; Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2014-11-21

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1(+/-) mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1.

  1. Aging modifies the effect of GCH1 RS11158026 on DAT uptake and Parkinson's disease clinical severity.

    PubMed

    Webb, Joseph; Willette, Auriel A

    2017-02-01

    Novel single nucleotide polymorphisms within Parkinson's disease (PD) can predict disease risk, but their influence on clinical, cognitive, and neurobiological indices remains unexplored. We investigated differences between functional polymorphisms at RS11158026 coding for guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase-1 (GCH1), an essential enzyme for dopamine production in nigrostriatal cells. Among newly diagnosed, untreated PD subjects and age-matched controls from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative, T allele carriers showed higher PD risk (odds ratio = 1.23, p = 0.048), earlier age of onset by 5 years (p = 0.003), and lower striatal dopamine reuptake transporter uptake (p = 0.003). Carriers also had increased cerebrospinal fluid α-synuclein (p = 0.016), worse motor function (p = 0.041), anxiety (p = 0.038), and executive function (p < 0.001). Strikingly, these effects were only in younger T carriers (<50 years), where aging quells the effects of these genetic factors. This suggests GCH1 variants affect early PD risk through altered dopamine uptake, and aging alters how genetic factors contribute to disease development. Future studies should investigate how aging modifies genotypes' contributions on PD risk and sequelae.

  2. Development of Cy5.5-Labeled Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles for Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Amanda

    Therapeutic proteins are often highly susceptible to enzymatic degradation, thus restricting their in vivo stability. To overcome this limitation, delivery systems designed to promote uptake and reduce degradation kinetics have undergone a rapid shift from macro-scale systems to nanomaterial based carriers. Many of these nanomaterials, however, elicit immune responses and may have cytotoxic effects both in vitro and in vivo. The naturally derived polysaccharide chitosan has emerged as a promising biodegradable material and has been utilized for many biomedical applications; nevertheless, its function is often constrained by poor solubility. Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. Therefore, the goal of this research was to investigate the resistance of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan against enzyme-catalyzed degradation using an in vivo simulated system containing lysozyme. To synthesize the nanoparticles, hydrophobic cholanic acid was first covalently conjugated to glycol chitosan using of N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Conjugates were purified by dialysis, lyophilized, and ultra-sonicated to form nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the binding of 5beta-cholanic acid to the glycol chitosan. Particle size and stability over time were determined with dynamic light scattering (DLS), and particle morphology was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average diameter of the nanoparticles was approximately 200 nm, which remained stable at 4°C for up to 10 days. Additionally, a near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye

  3. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.505 Section 174.505... thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  4. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.505 Section 174.505... thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  5. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.505 Section 174.505... thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  6. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.505 Section 174.505... thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  7. Regulation of the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of viral and cellular proteins by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-related modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao E.; Pernet, Olivier; Lee, Benhur

    2013-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of many cellular proteins is regulated by nuclear import/export signals as well as post-translational modifications such as covalent conjugation of ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs). Ubiquitination and SUMOylation are rapid and reversible ways to modulate the intracellular localisation and function of substrate proteins. These pathways have been co-opted by some viruses, which depend on the host cell machinery to transport their proteins in and out of the nucleus. In this review, we will summarise our current knowledge on the ubiquitin/SUMO-regulated nuclear/subnuclear trafficking of cellular proteins and describe examples of viral exploitation of these pathways. PMID:22188262

  8. Reproductive Aging Drives Protein Accumulation in the Uterus and Limits Lifespan in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Stephanie M.; Hinkson, Izumi V.; Elias, Joshua E.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans is characterized by widespread physiological and molecular changes, but the mechanisms that determine the rate at which these changes occur are not well understood. In this study, we identify a novel link between reproductive aging and somatic aging in C. elegans. By measuring global age-related changes in the proteome, we identify a previously uncharacterized group of secreted proteins in the adult uterus that dramatically increase in abundance with age. This accumulation is blunted in animals with an extended reproductive period and accelerated in sterile animals lacking a germline. Uterine proteins are not removed in old post-reproductive animals or in young vulvaless worms, indicating that egg-laying is necessary for their rapid removal in wild-type young animals. Together, these results suggest that age-induced infertility contributes to extracellular protein accumulation in the uterus with age. Finally, we show that knocking down multiple age-increased proteins simultaneously extends lifespan. These results provide a mechanistic example of how the cessation of reproduction contributes to detrimental changes in the soma, and demonstrate how the timing of reproductive decline can influence the rate of aging. PMID:26656270

  9. Production of modified C-reactive protein in U937-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ciubotaru, Irina; Potempa, Lawrence A; Wander, Rosemary C

    2005-11-01

    Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) has been proposed to be a strong independent predictor for cardiovascular disease. This circulating form of CRP (native CRP or nCRP) is well described. Recently, the existence of a conformationally distinct isoform of CRP (modified CRP or mCRP) has been reported. The relevance of each CRP isoform to atherosclerotic disease is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the natural expression of CRP in undifferentiated, differentiated, and stimulated macrophages, cells known to contribute to atherogenesis in vivo, and to determine whether transcribed CRP was expressed as nCRP or mCRP. Macrophages were generated from U937 monocytes using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Differentiated macrophages were further stimulated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In undifferentiated, differentiated, and stimulated cells, CRP expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and CRP protein production was measured by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry (cellular CRP) or high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (secreted CRP). CRP transcript was minimally expressed in undifferentiated cells. Expression increased markedly in macrophages during differentiation and was not affected by LPS at 24 hrs. Cellular CRP protein increased in a time-dependent manner after LPS stimulation, and this induction was mediated via interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1beta. A small amount of secreted CRP was detected in the media of differentiated cells, but it was not significantly increased after LPS stimulation. Using specific monoclonal antibodies, our data indicate that cellular CRP is directly translated as the mCRP rather than the nCRP isomer. These results indicate that U937-derived macrophages are a good cell model to further study the production of mCRP under conditions relevant for the atherogenic process.

  10. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Abbas, Ahmed; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-26

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet's performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis.

  11. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Abbas, Ahmed; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet's performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis. PMID:25619991

  12. Functional Analyses of Human DNA Repair Proteins Important for Aging and Genomic Stability Using Yeast Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Monika; Brosh, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Model systems have been extremely useful for studying various theories of aging. Studies of yeast have been particularly helpful to explore the molecular mechanisms and pathways that affect aging at the cellular level in the simple eukaryote. Although genetic analysis has been useful to interrogate the aging process, there has been both interest and debate over how functionally conserved the mechanisms of aging are between yeast and higher eukaryotes, especially mammalian cells. One area of interest has been the importance of genomic stability for age-related processes, and the potential conservation of proteins and pathways between yeast and human. Translational genetics have been employed to examine the functional roles of mammalian proteins using yeast as a pliable model system. In the current review recent advancements made in this area are discussed, highlighting work which shows that the cellular functions of human proteins in DNA repair and maintenance of genomic stability can be elucidated by genetic rescue experiments performed in yeast. PMID:22349084

  13. Executive Control in a Modified Antisaccade Task: Effects of Aging and Bilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bialystok, Ellen; Craik, Fergus I. M.; Ryan, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Two studies are reported that assess differences associated with aging and bilingualism in an executive control task. Previous work has suggested that bilinguals have an advantage over monolinguals in nonlinguistic tasks involving executive control; the major purpose of the present article is to ascertain which aspects of control are sensitive…

  14. Age modifies effect of body size on fecundity in Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecundity of mosquitoes can vary with many factors, and can have a strong effect on population growth. This study reports the effects of body size, blood meal size and age on reproductive output of nulliparous Culex quinquefasciatus, a vector of arboviruses and other pathogens. Mated adult female m...

  15. Creatine plays a direct role as a protein modifier in the formation of a novel advanced glycation end product.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kiminori; Nagai, Ryoji; Horiuchi, Seikoh

    2002-10-01

    Pentosidine, a cross-link structure between lysine and arginine residues, is one of the major advanced glycation end products (AGE). It is formed by the reaction of ribose with lysine and arginine. The pentosidine concentration produced by in vitro incubation of plasma obtained from uremic patients was reported to be higher than in normal plasma, indicating that uremic plasma contains an enhancer(s) for pentosidine formation [Miyata, T., Ueda, Y., Yamada, Y., Izuhara, Y., Wada, T., Jadoul, M., Saito, A., Kurokawa, K., and Strihou, C.Y. (1998) J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 9, 2349-2356]. Since our preliminary study using a monoclonal anti-pentosidine antibody identified creatine as the most effective enhancer, the purpose of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which creatine contributes to pentosidine formation. Lysine was incubated with ribose in the presence of creatine and analyzed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. A novel fluorescent peak (lambda(ex/em) = 335/385 nm) was detected at 8 min, under conditions at which the authentic pentosidine (lysine was incubated with ribose in the presence of arginine under identical conditions) eluted at 12 min. Structural analyses of this compound revealed a pentosidine-like structure in which the arginine residue was replaced by creatine. This novel AGE-structure, named here creatine-derived pentosidine (C-pentosidine), was detected in the plasma of patients on hemodialysis. These results indicate that creatine increases the formation of C-pentosidine but not authentic pentosidine. This study indicates that creatine plays a direct role as a protein modifier in C-pentosidine formation, although the clinical significance of C-pentosidine is still unknown.

  16. Quantitative analysis of modified proteins and their positional isomers by tandem mass spectrometry: human histone H4.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, James J; Mizzen, Craig A; Kelleher, Neil L

    2006-07-01

    Here we show that fragment ion abundances from dissociation of ions created from mixtures of multiply modified histone H4 (11 kDa) or of N-terminal synthetic peptides (2 kDa) correspond to their respective intact ion abundances measured by Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Isomeric mixtures of modified forms of the same protein are resolved and quantitated with a precision of protein ions created by electrospray greatly easing many of the systematic biases that more strongly affect small peptides (e.g., differences in ionization efficiency and ion m/z values). The ion fragmentation methods validated here are directly extensible to intact human proteins to derive quantitative information on the highly related and often isomeric protein forms created by combinatorial arrays of posttranslational modifications.

  17. Altered MCM Protein Levels and Autophagic Flux in Aged and Systemic Sclerosis Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Dumit, Verónica I.; Küttner, Victoria; Käppler, Jakob; Piera-Velazquez, Sonsoles; Jimenez, Sergio A.; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Uitto, Jouni; Dengjel, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a common risk factor of many disorders. With age, the level of insoluble extracellular matrix increases leading to increased stiffness of a number of tissues. Matrix accumulation can also be observed in fibrotic disorders, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc). Although the intrinsic aging process in skin is phenotypically distinct from SSc, here we demonstrate similar behavior of aged and SSc skin fibroblasts in culture. We have used quantitative proteomics to characterize the phenotype of dermal fibroblasts from healthy subjects of various ages and from patients with SSc. Our results demonstrate that proteins involved in DNA and RNA processing decrease with age and in SSc, while those involved in mitochondrial and other metabolic processes behave the opposite. Specifically, mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase proteins are less abundant with age and SSc, and they exhibit an altered subcellular distribution. We observed that lower levels of MCM7 correlate with reduced cell proliferation, lower autophagic capacity and higher intracellular protein expression phenotypes of aged and SSc cells. Additionally, we show that SSc fibroblasts exhibit higher levels of senescence than their healthy counterparts, suggesting further similarities between the fibrotic disorder and the aging process. Hence, at the molecular level, SSc fibroblasts exhibit intrinsic characteristics of fibroblasts from aged skin. PMID:24496236

  18. Factors affecting protein transfer into surfactant-isooctane solution: a case study of extraction behavior of chemically modified cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Ono, T; Goto, M

    1998-01-01

    The extraction mechanism of proteins by surfactant molecules in an organic solvent has been investigated using a chemically modified protein. We conducted guanidylation on lysine residues of cytochrome c by replacing their amino groups with homoarginine to enhance the protein-surfactant interaction. Results have shown that guanidylated cytochrome c readily forms a hydrophobic complex with dioleyl phosphoric acid (DOLPA) through hydrogen bonding between the phosphate moiety and the guanidinium groups. Although improved protein-surfactant interaction activated the formation of a hydrophobic complex at the interface, it could not improve the protein transfer in isooctane. It has been established that the protein extraction mechanism using surfactant molecules is mainly governed by two processes: formation of an interfacial complex at the oil-water interface and the subsequent solubilization of the complex into the organic phase. In addition, a kinetic study demonstrated that guanidylation of lysine accelerated the initial extraction rate of cytochrome c. This fact implies that the protein transferability from aqueous phase into organic phase depends on the protein-surfactant interaction which can be modified by protein surface engineering.

  19. Modified spectral count index (mSCI) for estimation of protein abundance by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro): a new proteomic technological parameter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aihua; Zhang, Jiyang; Wang, Chunping; Yang, Dong; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2009-11-01

    Peptides Count (SC) was widely used for protein abundance estimation in proteomics. On the basis of that, Mann and co-workers corrected the SC by dividing spectrum counts by the number of observable peptides per protein and named it PAI. Here we present modified spectral count index (mSCI) for protein abundance estimation, which was defined as the number of observed peptides divided by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro). RIPpro was derived from 6788 mRNA and protein expression data (collected from human liver samples) and related to proteins' three physical and chemical properties (MW/pI/Hp). For 46 proteins in mouse neuro2a cells, mSCI shows a linear relationship with the actual protein concentration, similar or better than PAI abundance. Also, multiple linear regressions were performed to quantitative assess several factors' impact on the mRNA/protein abundance correlation. Our results shown that the primary factor affecting protein levels was mRNA abundance (32-37%), followed by variability in protein measurement, MW and protein turnover (7-12%,7-9% and 2-3%, respectively). Interestingly, we found that the concordance between mRNA transcripts and protein expression was not consistent among all protein functional categories. This correlation was lower for signaling proteins as compared to metabolism genes. It was determined that RIPpro was the primary factor affecting signaling protein abundance (23% on average), followed by mRNA abundance (17%). In contrast, only 5% (on average) of the variability of metabolic protein abundance was explained by RIPpro, much lower than mRNA abundance (40%). These results provide the impetus for further investigation of the biological significance of mechanisms regulating the mRNA/protein abundance correlation and provide additional insight into the relative importance of the technological parameter (RIPpro) in mRNA/protein correlation research.

  20. Protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase in plants. Phylogenetic distribution and the accumulation of substrate proteins in aged barley seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Mudgett, M B; Lowenson, J D; Clarke, S

    1997-01-01

    Protein L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferases (MTs; EC 2.1.1.77) can initiate the conversion of detrimental L-isoaspartyl residues in spontaneously damaged proteins to normal L-aspartyl residues. We detected this enzyme in 45 species from 23 families representing most of the divisions of the plant kingdom. MT activity is often localized in seeds, suggesting that it has a role in their maturation, quiescence, and germination. The relationship among MT activity, the accumulation of abnormal protein L-isoaspartyl residues, and seed viability was explored in barley (Hordeum vulgare cultivar Himalaya) seeds, which contain high levels of MT. Natural aging of barley seeds for 17 years resulted in a significant reduction in MT activity and in seed viability, coupled with increased levels of "unrepaired" L-isoaspartyl residues. In seeds heated to accelerate aging, we found no reduction of MT activity, but we did observe decreased seed viability and the accumulation of isoaspartyl residues. Among populations of accelerated aged seed, those possessing the highest levels of L-isoaspartyl-containing proteins had the lowest germination percentages. These results suggest that the MT present in seeds cannot efficiently repair all spontaneously damaged proteins containing altered aspartyl residues, and their accumulation during aging may contribute to the loss of seed viability. PMID:9414558

  1. Protein intake and risk of hip fractures in postmenopausal women and men age 50 and older.

    PubMed

    Fung, T T; Meyer, H E; Willett, W C; Feskanich, D

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we followed postmenopausal women and men aged 50 and above for up to 32 years and found no evidence that higher protein intake increased the risk of hip fracture. Protein intake from specific sources was inversely associated with risk, but these associations appeared to differ by gender.

  2. Common variants modify the age of onset for basal cell carcinomas in Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Binnaz; Byers, Helen J; Smith, Miriam J; Lear, John; Oudit, Deemesh; Bholah, Zaynab; Roberts, Stephen A; Newman, William G; Evans, D Gareth

    2015-05-01

    Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by multiple early-onset basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and jaw keratocysts. Through association studies in cohorts of sporadic BCC, nine genetic variants have previously been identified to increase the risk of BCC. The nine SNPs were genotyped by Taqman allelic discrimination in 125 individuals with Gorlin syndrome. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional-Hazard regression analysis were applied to determine the association between genotypes and age of first BCC in individuals with Gorlin syndrome. The p.(Arg151Cys) variant in MC1R (rs1805007) was associated with an earlier median age of onset of BCC of 27 years (95% CI: 20-34) compared with 34 years (95% CI: 30-40) for wild-type individuals (hazard ratio (HR)=1.64, 95% CI: 1.04-2.58, P=0.034). The risk allele of the variant at the chromosome 5p15 locus encompassing TERT-CLPTM1L (rs401681) was also associated with an earlier median onset of BCC, 31 years (95% CI: 28-37) compared with 41 years (95% CI: 32-48, HR=1.44, 95% CI: 1.08-1.93, P=0.014). In individuals with a risk allele at either rs1805007 or rs401681 the median time to BCC was 31 years of age (95% CI: 28-34) compared with 44 years of age (95% CI: 38-53) in wild-type individuals (HR=2.48, 95% CI: 1.47-4.17, P=0.0002). Our findings may have implications for future personalized risk estimates and BCC screening strategies in individuals with Gorlin syndrome.

  3. ALTERATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF RED BLOOD CELLS MEMBRANES PROTEINS OF DIFFERENT AGE AND SEX VOLUNTEERS.

    PubMed

    Pruidze, N; Khetsuriani, R; Sujashvili, R; Ioramashvili, I; Arabuli, M; Sanikidze, T

    2015-01-01

    Considering the age and sex-dependent trend in the manifestation of various diseases, as well as an important pathogenic role of circulatory disorders, we decided to study the age-dependent changes in the physical properties of RBCs membrane proteins (their electric charge and molecular weight) in healthy people of different sex (males and females) and age. Blood of 56 healthy volunteers (Tbilisi, Georgia) of different sex and gender was studied (the patients were divided in 8 groups (7 patients in each groups): 1 - 18-25 years old male, 2 - 18-25 years old female, 3 - 25-44 years old male, 4 - 25-44 years old female, 5 - 44-60 years old male, 6 - 44-60 years old female; 7 - 60-80 years old male, 8 - 70-80 years old female). In groups 6 and 8 were women in menopause was determined according 12 months of amenorrhea. Individuals often consume alcohol addicts, pregnant women and patients with chronic diseases were excluded from the study. The study protocol was approved by Ethical Committee of the Tbilisi State Medical University. RBCs membrane proteins have been extracted from human heparinized blood and their mobility was studied by electrophoretic method. The electrophoretic mobility of RBCs membrane proteins decreases with age of healthy volunteers, that indicates decrease of total charge of proteins, depending on the electrically charged amino acids content. In female patients the electrophoretic mobility of the RBCs membrane proteins especially intensively decreases in period of menopause. Increase of molecular weight of proteins (100-200 kDa) from RBCs' membranes of alder age group was manifested. Intensively decrease electrophoretic mobility of erythrocytes membrane proteins from female patients in period of menopause indicates on estrogen related mechanism of the regulation of membrane protein conformation and composition in females. Increased content of high molecular weight proteins in the RBCs membranes from patients of older age groups may be caused to

  4. A sustainable slashing industry using biodegradable sizes from modified soy protein to replace petro-based poly(vinyl alcohol).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Zhao, Yuzhu; Xu, Helan; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-02-17

    Biodegradable sizing agents from triethanolamine (TEA) modified soy protein could substitute poly(vinyl alcohol)(PVA) sizes for high-speed weaving of polyester and polyester/cotton yarns to substantially decrease environmental pollution and impel sustainability of textile industry. Nonbiodegradable PVA sizes are widely used and mainly contribute to high chemical oxygen demand (COD) in textile effluents. It has not been possible to effectively degrade, reuse or replace PVA sizes so far. Soy protein with good biodegradability showed potential as warp sizes in our previous studies. However, soy protein sizes lacked film flexibility and adhesion for required high-speed weaving. Additives with multiple hydroxyl groups, nonlinear molecule, and electric charge could physically modify secondary structure of soy protein and lead to about 23.6% and 43.3% improvement in size adhesion and ability of hair coverage comparing to unmodified soy protein. Industrial weaving results showed TEA-soy protein had relative weaving efficiency 3% and 10% higher than PVA and chemically modified starch sizes on polyester/cotton fabrics, and had relative weaving efficiency similar to PVA on polyester fabrics, although with 3- 6% lower add-on. In addition, TEA-soy sizes had a BOD5/COD ratio of 0.44, much higher than 0.03 for PVA, indicating that TEA-soy sizes were easily biodegradable in activated sludge.

  5. Evidence for a modifier of onset age in Huntington disease linked to the HD gene in 4p16

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Knowlton, Beth; Hayden, Michael R.; Almqvist, Elisabeth W.; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russel L.; Rosenblatt, Adam; Durr, Alexandra; Dode, Catherine; Morrison, Patrick J.; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina; Trent, Ronald J. A.; McCusker, Elizabeth; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Mayo Cabrero, David; Jones, Randi; Zanko, Andrea; Nance, Martha; Abramson, Ruth K.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Paulsen, Jane S.; Harrison, Madaline B.; Yang, Qiong; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Gusella, James F.; MacDonald, Marcy E.

    2007-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the HD gene on chromosome 4p16.3. A recent genome scan for genetic modifiers of age at onset of motor symptoms (AO) in HD suggests that one modifier may reside in the region close to the HD gene itself. We used data from 535 HD participants of the New England Huntington cohort and the HD MAPS cohort to assess whether AO was influenced by any of the three markers in the 4p16 region: MSX1 (Drosophila homeo box homologue 1, formerly known as homeo box 7, HOX7), Δ2642 (within the HD coding sequence), and BJ56 (D4S127). Suggestive evidence for an association was seen between MSX1 alleles and AO, after adjustment for normal CAG repeat, expanded repeat, and their product term (model P value 0.079). Of the variance of AO that was not accounted for by HD and normal CAG repeats, 0.8% could be attributed to the MSX1 genotype. Individuals with MSX1 genotype 3/3 tended to have younger AO. No association was found between Δ2642 (P=0.44) and BJ56 (P=0.73) and AO. This study supports previous studies suggesting that there may be a significant genetic modifier for AO in HD in the 4p16 region. Furthermore, the modifier may be present on both HD and normal chromosomes bearing the 3 allele of the MSX1 marker. PMID:15029481

  6. Ageing and chronic intermittent hypoxia mimicking sleep apnea do not modify local brain tissue stiffness in healthy mice.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Ignasi; Menal, Maria José; Torres, Marta; Gozal, David; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Colell, Anna; Montserrat, Josep M; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac

    2017-03-06

    Recent evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of Alzheimer´s disease (AD), with the latter promoting alterations in brain tissue stiffness, a feature of ageing. Here, we assessed the effects of age and intermittent hypoxia (IH) on brain tissue stiffness in a mouse model of OSA. Two-month-old and 18-month-old mice (N=10 each) were subjected to IH (20% O2 40s - 6% O2 20s) for 8 weeks (6h/day). Corresponding control groups for each age were kept under normoxic conditions in room air (RA). After sacrifice, the brain was excised and 200-micron coronal slices were cut with a vibratome. Local stiffness of the cortex and hippocampus were assessed in brain slices placed in an Atomic Force Microscope. For both brain regions, the Young's modulus (E) in each animal was computed as the average values from 9 force-indentation curves. Cortex E mean (±SE) values were 442±122Pa (RA) and 455±120 (IH) for young mice and 433±44 (RA) and 405±101 (IH) for old mice. Hippocampal E values were 376±62 (RA) and 474±94 (IH) for young mice and 486±93 (RA) and 521±210 (IH) for old mice. For both cortex and hippocampus, 2-way ANOVA indicated no statistically significant effects of age or challenge (IH vs. RA) on E values. Thus, neither chronic IH mimicking OSA nor ageing up to late middle age appear to modify local brain tissue stiffness in otherwise healthy mice.

  7. From miracle fruit to transgenic tomato: mass production of the taste-modifying protein miraculin in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Kato, Kazuhisa; Duhita, Narendra; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    The utility of plants as biofactories has progressed in recent years. Some recombinant plant-derived pharmaceutical products have already reached the marketplace. However, with the exception of drugs and vaccines, a strong effort has not yet been made to bring recombinant products to market, as cost-effectiveness is critically important for commercialization. Sweet-tasting proteins and taste-modifying proteins have a great deal of potential in industry as substitutes for sugars and as artificial sweeteners. The taste-modifying protein, miraculin, functions to change the perception of a sour taste to a sweet one. This taste-modifying function can potentially be used not only as a low-calorie sweetener but also as a new seasoning that could be the basis of a new dietary lifestyle. However, miraculin is far from inexpensive, and its potential as a marketable product has not yet been fully developed. For the last several years, biotechnological production of this taste-modifying protein has progressed extensively. In this review, the characteristics of miraculin and recent advances in its production using transgenic plants are summarized, focusing on such topics as the suitability of plant species as expression hosts, the cultivation method for transgenic plants, the method of purifying miraculin and future advances required to achieve industrial use.

  8. Effect of processing methods on the mechanical properties of natural rubber filled with stearic acid modified soy protein particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber was reinforced with stearic acid modified soy protein particles prepared with a microfluidizing and ball milling process. Longer ball milling time tends to increase tensile strength of the rubber composites. Elastic modulus of the composites increased with the increasing filler concen...

  9. Aggregate structure and effect of phthalic anhydride modified soy protein on the mechanical properties of styrene-butadiene copolymer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aggregate structure of phthalic anhydride (PA) modified soy protein isolate (SPI) was investigated by estimating its fractal dimension from the equilibrated dynamic strain sweep experiments. The estimated fractal dimensions of the filler aggregates were less than 2, indicating that these partic...

  10. A highly efficient modified human serum albumin signal peptide to secrete proteins in cells derived from different mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Attallah, Carolina; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Kratje, Ricardo; Oggero, Marcos

    2017-01-10

    Signal peptides (SPs) are key elements in the production of recombinant proteins; however, little information is available concerning different SP in mammalian cells other than CHO. In order to study the efficiency of different SPs to direct the traffic along the secretory pathway of the green fluorescence protein (GFP) and a scFv-Fc fusion protein; CHO-K1, HEK293 and NS0 cell lines were transfected in a transient and stable way. SP of human azurocidin (AZ), modified human albumin (mSA), modified Cricetulus griseus Ig kappa chain V III region MOPC 63 like (mIgκ C) and modified human Ig kappa chain V III region VG (mIgκ H) were evaluated. The efficiency of SPs to translocate a propeptide across the ER membrane was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry for the GFP inside the secretory pathway, and by antigen-specific indirect ELISA for the scFv-Fc outside the cell. The mSA SP was successful in directing the secretion of the active proteins in these different types of mammalian cells, regardless of the transgene copy number. The goal of this work was to demonstrate that a modified version of SA SP might be used in different mammalian cells employing the same expression vector.

  11. Cerebrovascular expression of proteins related to inflammation, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity is altered with aging

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most neurodegenerative diseases are age-related disorders; however, how aging predisposes the brain to disease has not been adequately addressed. The objective of this study is to determine whether expression of proteins in the cerebromicrovasculature related to inflammation, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity is altered with aging. Methods Brain microvessels are isolated from Fischer 344 rats at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months of age. Levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 RNA are determined by RT-PCR and release of cytokines into the media by ELISA. Vessel conditioned media are also screened by ELISA for IL-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α, (TNFα), and interferon γ (IFNγ). Immunofluorescent analysis of brain sections for IL-1β and IL-6 is performed. Results Expression of IL-1β and IL-6, both at RNA and protein levels, significantly (p < 0.01) decreases with age. Levels of MCP-1, TNFα, IL-1α, and IFNγ are significantly (p < 0.05-0.01) lower in 24 month old rats compared to 6 month old animals. Immunofluorescent analysis of brain vessels also shows a decline in IL-1β and IL-6 in aged rats. An increase in oxidative stress, assessed by increased carbonyl formation, as well as a decrease in the antioxidant protein manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is evident in vessels of aged animals. Finally, addition of microvessel conditioned media from aged rats to neuronal cultures evokes significant (p < 0.001) neurotoxicity. Conclusions These data demonstrate that cerebrovascular expression of proteins related to inflammation, oxidative stress and neurotoxicity is altered with aging and suggest that the microvasculature may contribute to functional changes in the aging brain. PMID:20937133

  12. Testing the protein error theory of ageing: a reply to Baird, Samis, Massie and Zimmerman.

    PubMed

    Holliday, R

    1975-01-01

    A major prediction of Orgel's theory is that the misincorporation of amino acids into proteins will increase with age. This has not yet been tested experimentally. Indirect methods have been used to search for the presence of altered proteins in ageing cells or organisms, but these would not necessarily detect a low level of mistakes, nor do they distinquish between errors in synthesis and post-synthetic changes. Nevertheless, some experimental results have been obtained from genetic and biochemical studies with fungi and fibroblasts which confirm certain predictions of the protein error theory.

  13. Fluidization characteristics of and protein adsorption on fluoride-modified porous zirconium oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C M; Morris, J; Robichaud, M; Annen, M J; McCormick, A V; Flickinger, M C

    1997-08-01

    Porous zirconia particles of specific gravity approximately 3.2 g/ml, mean particle sizes of approximately 50 microns, and terminal settling velocity of approximately 2.8 mm/s in water, were synthesized using an oil emulsion method from 1000 A colloids and were evaluated for their potential use in expanded bed protein adsorption. Expanded beds of particles were stable even for small volume, shallow beds (settled bed: 10 ml, height to diameter ratio < 1.0) and even for fluidization velocities common to much larger particles (210 cm/h for a three-fold bed expansion). When the surface of these particles was modified by fluoride adsorption, the total bed capacity for bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption was 42 +/- 2 mg BSA/ml of settled bed volume at linear velocities of 109-210 cm/h. Residence time distribution studies of several solutes under non-binding conditions were performed to assess the degree of liquid mixing and channeling in the expanded bed as a function of fluidization velocity. Liquid mixing and channeling were also studied as a function of distributor design. With these very dense particles, the degree of channeling and mixing did not worsen with the degree of expansion. Elution of adsorbed BSA while the bed was expanded (by a step increase in ionic strength) was rapid resulting in a narrow peak at high fluidization velocities without resorting to settling of the bed. The dynamic binding capacity of BSA at 5% breakthrough (protein effluent concentration equal to 5% of the inlet concentration) was the same for a two-fold expanded bed as for a settled bed (22 +/- 2 mg BSA/ml of settled bed volume), though it decreased for higher bed expansions. BSA binding was reproducible following repeated cleaning of the adsorbent with 0.25 M sodium hydroxide.

  14. The role of methylglyoxal-modified proteins in gastric ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Takagi, T; Naito, Y; Oya-Ito, T; Yoshikawa, T

    2012-01-01

    Methylglyoxal is a reactive dicarbonyl compound produced from cellular glycolytic intermediates that reacts nonenzymatically with proteins to form products such as argpyrimidine at arginine residues. Abnormal accumulation of methylglyoxal and methylglyoxal-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) occurs under hyperglycemic conditions and has been implicated in endothelium dysfunction, arterial stiffening, and microvascular complications in diabetes. However, the role of methylglyoxal in the healing process of diabetic gastric ulcers has not been fully investigated. Recently, methylglyoxal modification of peroxiredoxin-VI was found to be associated with delayed healing of diabetic gastric ulcers. Thus, inhibition of methylglyoxal modification might have therapeutic potential for the treatment of such ulcers. In this review, we present what is currently known regarding the role of methylglyoxal in the healing of diabetic gastric ulcers.

  15. Physical growth and bone age of survivors of protein energy malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Alvear, J; Artaza, C; Vial, M; Guerrero, S; Muzzo, S

    1986-01-01

    Early postnatal malnutrition produces delay in growth and developmental processes, and children from a low socioeconomical level where undernutrition is prevalent are shorter than those from higher socioeconomic levels. We examined the effects of severe and early protein energy malnutrition on growth and bone maturation. We studied 40 preschool children who had been admitted to hospital in infancy with protein energy malnutrition and 38 children from the same socioeconomic level, paired for age and sex, who had never been malnourished. Growth measurements were made over a period of 4-6 years, and bone age was determined in a subgroup through wrist roentgenograms. Results showed a correlation between protein energy malnutrition, birth weight of infants, and mother's height and head circumference. The group with protein energy malnutrition showed a significant delay in stature after four years, especially the girls (p less than 0.001). Weight:height ratio was reduced in boys compared with controls but not in girls. Both groups showed a delay in bone maturation, but there were no significant differences between them. We found a positive correlation between bone age and arm fat area in control boys and between bone age and height for age in boys with protein energy malnutrition. The finding that rehabilitated children were shorter than the control group but had similar bone age at follow up suggests that genetic or prenatal factors were important in their later poor growth, and this suggestion is supported by their smaller birth size and the smaller size of their mothers. PMID:3083790

  16. Protein biogenesis machinery is a driver of replicative aging in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Georges E; Meinema, Anne C; González, Javier; Wolters, Justina C; Schmidt, Alexander; Guryev, Victor; Bischoff, Rainer; Wit, Ernst C; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M; Heinemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    An integrated account of the molecular changes occurring during the process of cellular aging is crucial towards understanding the underlying mechanisms. Here, using novel culturing and computational methods as well as latest analytical techniques, we mapped the proteome and transcriptome during the replicative lifespan of budding yeast. With age, we found primarily proteins involved in protein biogenesis to increase relative to their transcript levels. Exploiting the dynamic nature of our data, we reconstructed high-level directional networks, where we found the same protein biogenesis-related genes to have the strongest ability to predict the behavior of other genes in the system. We identified metabolic shifts and the loss of stoichiometry in protein complexes as being consequences of aging. We propose a model whereby the uncoupling of protein levels of biogenesis-related genes from their transcript levels is causal for the changes occurring in aging yeast. Our model explains why targeting protein synthesis, or repairing the downstream consequences, can serve as interventions in aging. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08527.001 PMID:26422514

  17. Vitamin D–Binding Protein Modifies the Vitamin D–Bone Mineral Density Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Powe, Camille E; Ricciardi, Catherine; Berg, Anders H; Erdenesanaa, Delger; Collerone, Gina; Ankers, Elizabeth; Wenger, Julia; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Thadhani, Ravi; Bhan, Ishir

    2011-01-01

    Studies examining the relationship between total circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and bone mineral density (BMD) have yielded mixed results. Vitamin D–binding protein (DBP), the major carrier protein for 25(OH)D, may alter the biologic activity of circulating vitamin D. We hypothesized that free and bioavailable 25(OH)D, calculated from total 25(OH)D, DBP, and serum albumin levels, would be more strongly associated with BMD than levels of total 25(OH)D. We measured total 25(OH)D, DBP, and serum albumin levels in 49 healthy young adults enrolled in the Metabolic Abnormalities in College-Aged Students (MACS) study. Lumbar spine BMD was measured in all subjects using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Clinical, diet, and laboratory information also was gathered at this time. We determined free and bioavailable (free + albumin-bound) 25(OH)D using previously validated formulas and examined their associations with BMD. BMD was not associated with total 25(OH)D levels (r = 0.172, p = .236). In contrast, free and bioavailable 25(OH)D levels were positively correlated with BMD (r = 0.413, p = .003 for free, r = 0.441, p = .002 for bioavailable). Bioavailable 25(OH)D levels remained independently associated with BMD in multivariate regression models adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and race (p = .03). It is concluded that free and bioavailable 25(OH)D are more strongly correlated with BMD than total 25(OH)D. These findings have important implications for vitamin D supplementation in vitamin D–deficient states. Future studies should continue to explore the relationship between free and bioavailable 25(OH)D and health outcomes. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:21416506

  18. A Prognostic Model for Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Importance of the Modified Nottingham Prognostic Index and Age

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jeanny; Eom, Keun-Yong; Koo, Tae Ryool; Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won; Kim, Yu Jung; Park, So Yeon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Considering the distinctive biology of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), this study aimed to identify TNBC-specific prognostic factors and determine the prognostic value of the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) and its variant indices. Methods A total of 233 patients with newly diagnosed stage I to III TNBC from 2003 to 2012 were reviewed. We retrospectively analyzed the patients' demographics, clinicopathologic parameters, treatment, and survival outcomes. The NPI was calculated as follows: tumor size (cm)×0.2+node status+Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade. The modified NPI (MNPI) was obtained by adding the modified SBR grade rather than the SBR grade. Results The median follow-up was 67.8 months. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 81.4% and 89.9%, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that the MNPI was the most significant and common prognostic factor of DFS (p=0.001) and OS (p=0.019). Young age (≤35 years) was also correlated with poor DFS (p=0.006). A recursive partitioning for establishing the prognostic model for DFS was performed based on the results of multivariate analysis. Patients with a low MNPI (≤6.5) were stratified into the low-risk group (p<0.001), and patients with a high MNPI (>6.5) were subdivided into the intermediate (>35 years) and high-risk (≤35 years) groups. Age was not a prognostic factor in patients with a low MNPI, whereas in patients with a high MNPI, it was the second key factor in subdividing patients according to prognosis (p=0.023). Conclusion The MNPI could be used to stratify patients with stage I to III TNBC according to prognosis. It was the most important prognosticator for both DFS and OS. The prognostic significance of young age for DFS differed by MNPI. PMID:28382096

  19. Levels of complement components, immunoglobulins and acute phase proteins in plasma during aging in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oyeyinka, G O; Salimonu, L S

    1999-01-01

    Plasma samples from Nigerians aged 6-95 years were examined for their content of complement components (C3, C4, factor B-Bf), immuloglobins (IgG, IgA, IgM IgD) and acute phase proteins (transferrin, albumin, C-reactive protein--CRP, alpha-2-macroglobulin). Albumin, was estimated colorimetrically and the other components by the single radial immunodiffusion techniques. No significant age-related changes in mean values of the four immunobulins and the four acute phase proteins could be demonstrated. Also, the mean values for C3 and Bf did not change significantly with age but C4 values rose significantly with increasing age (r -0.232: P < 0.01).

  20. Structural study of asparagine-linked oligosaccharide moiety of taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Hitotsuya, H; Hanzawa, H; Arata, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1990-05-15

    The structures of the N-linked oligosaccharides of miraculin, which is a taste modifying glycoprotein isolated from miracle fruits, berries of Richadella dulcifica, are reported. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharides were released from the protein by glycopeptidase (almond) digestion. The reducing ends of the oligosaccharide chains thus obtained were aminated with a fluorescent reagent, 2-aminopyridine, and the mixture of pyridylamino derivatives of the oligosaccharides was separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on an ODS-silica column. More than five kinds of oligosaccharide fractions were separated by the one chromatographic run. The structure of each oligosaccharide thus isolated was analyzed by a combination of sequential exoglycosidase digestion and another kind of HPLC with an amidesilica column. Furthermore, high resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) measurements were carried out. It was found that 1) five oligosaccharides obtained are a series of compounds with xylose-containing common structural core, Xyl beta 1----2 (Man alpha 1----6) Man beta 1----4-GlcNAc beta 1----4 (Fuca1----3)GlcNAc, 2) a variety of oligosaccharide structures are significant for two glycosylation sites, Asn-42 and Asn-186, and 3) two new oligosaccharides, B and D, with unusual structures containing monoantennary complex-type were characterized. (formula; see text)

  1. Modulation of immune function by a modified bovine whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Cross, M L; Gill, H S

    1999-08-01

    The commercial preparation of dairy foodstuffs generates large volumes of by-products, many of which have as yet undocumented effects on mammalian immune function. In the present report, a modified whey protein concentrate (mWPC), derived as a by-product from the commercial manufacture of cheese, was tested for its ability to modulate murine immune function in vitro. The mWPC suppressed T and B lymphocyte proliferative responses to mitogens in a dose-dependent fashion. The mWPC also suppressed alloantigen-induced lymphocyte proliferation during a mixed leucocyte reaction, but showed no suppressive effect against IL-2-sustained proliferation of mitogen-activated T cell blasts. Other indices of lymphocyte activation, such as cytokine secretion and the formation of activated (CD25+) T cell blasts, were suppressed by the mWPC, suggesting that the mode of suppression may be to inhibit the lymphocyte activation process. Enzymatic digestion by pepsin and pancreatin, under physiologically realistic conditions in vitro, ablated the immunomodulatory function of the mWPC. These results are discussed in relation to the potential development of complex-mixture dairy products into health-modulating products.

  2. Human protein aging: modification and crosslinking through dehydroalanine and dehydrobutyrine intermediates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Lyons, Brian; Truscott, Roger J W; Schey, Kevin L

    2014-04-01

    Nonenzymatic post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is a fundamental molecular process of aging. The combination of various modifications and their accumulation with age not only affects function, but leads to crosslinking and protein aggregation. In this study, aged human lens proteins were examined using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry and a blind PTM search strategy. Multiple thioether modifications of Ser and Thr residues by glutathione (GSH) and its metabolites were unambiguously identified. Thirty-four of 36 sites identified on 15 proteins were found on known phosphorylation sites, supporting a mechanism involving dehydroalanine (DHA) and dehydrobutyrine (DHB) formation through β-elimination of phosphoric acid from phosphoserine and phosphothreonine with subsequent nucleophilic attack by GSH. In vitro incubations of phosphopeptides demonstrated that this process can occur spontaneously under physiological conditions. Evidence that this mechanism can also lead to protein-protein crosslinks within cells is provided where five crosslinked peptides were detected in a human cataractous lens. Nondisulfide crosslinks were identified for the first time in lens tissue between βB2- & βB2-, βA4- & βA3-, γS- & βB1-, and βA4- & βA4-crystallins and provide detailed structural information on in vivo crystallin complexes. These data suggest that phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues represent susceptible sites for spontaneous breakdown in long-lived proteins and that DHA- and DHB-mediated protein crosslinking may be the source of the long-sought after nondisulfide protein aggregates believed to scatter light in cataractous lenses. Furthermore, this mechanism may be a common aging process that occurs in long-lived proteins of other tissues leading to protein aggregation diseases.

  3. An autoantibody against N(ε)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL): possible involvement in the removal of CEL-modified proteins by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mera, Katsumi; Nagai, Ryoji; Takeo, Kazuhiro; Izumi, Miyoko; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2011-04-08

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to play a significant role in the development of diabetic complications. In this study, we measured the levels of autoantibodies against several AGE structures in healthy human plasma and investigated the physiological role of the autoantibodies. A high titer of the autoantibody against N(ε)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) was detected in human plasma compared with other AGE structures such as CML and pentosidine. The purified human anti-CEL autoantibody reacted with CEL-modified human serum albumin (CEL-HSA), but not CML-HSA. A rabbit polyclonal anti-CEL antibody, used as a model autoantibody against CEL, accelerated the uptake of CEL-HSA by macrophages, but did not enhance the uptake of native HSA. Furthermore, when (125)I-labeled CEL-HSA was injected into the tail vein of mice, accumulation of (125)I-CEL-HSA in the liver was accelerated by co-injection of the rabbit anti-CEL antibody. These results demonstrate that the autoantibody against CEL in plasma may play a role in the macrophage uptake of CEL-modified proteins.

  4. Physical Stability of Octenyl Succinate-Modified Polysaccharides and Whey Proteins for Potential Use as Bioactive Carriers in Food Systems.

    PubMed

    Puerta-Gomez, Alex F; Castell-Perez, M Elena

    2015-06-01

    The high cost and potential toxicity of biodegradable polymers like poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) has increased the interest in natural and modified biopolymers as bioactive carriers. This study characterized the physical stability (water sorption and state transition behavior) of selected starch and proteins: octenyl succinate-modified depolymerized waxy corn starch (DWxCn), waxy rice starch (DWxRc), phytoglycogen, whey protein concentrate (80%, WPC), whey protein isolate (WPI), and α-lactalbumin (α-L) to determine their potential as carriers of bioactive compounds under different environmental conditions. After enzyme modification and particle size characterization, glass transition temperature and moisture isotherms were used to characterize the systems. DWxCn and DWxRc had increased water sorption compared to native starch. The level of octenyl succinate anhydrate (OSA) modification (3% and 7%) did not reduce the water sorption of the DWxCn and phytoglycogen samples. The Guggenheim-Andersen-de Boer model indicated that native waxy corn had significantly (P < 0.05) higher water monolayer capacity followed by 3%-OSA-modified DWxCn, WPI, 3%-OSA-modified DWxRc, α-L, and native phytoglycogen. WPC had significantly lower water monolayer capacity. All Tg values matched with the solid-like appearance of the biopolymers. Native polysaccharides and whey proteins had higher glass transition temperature (Tg) values. On the other hand, depolymerized waxy starches at 7%-OSA modification had a "melted" appearance when exposed to environments with high relative humidity (above 70%) after 10 days at 23 °C. The use of depolymerized and OSA-modified polysaccharides blended with proteins created more stable blends of biopolymers. Hence, this biopolymer would be suitable for materials exposed to high humidity environments in food applications.

  5. Improved mucoadhesion and cell uptake of chitosan and chitosan oligosaccharide surface-modified polymer nanoparticles for mucosal delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Dyawanapelly, Sathish; Koli, Uday; Dharamdasani, Vimisha; Jain, Ratnesh; Dandekar, Prajakta

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of the present study was to compare mucoadhesion and cellular uptake efficiency of chitosan (CS) and chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) surface-modified polymer nanoparticles (NPs) for mucosal delivery of proteins. We have developed poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs, surface-modified COS-PLGA NPs and CS-PLGA NPs, by using double emulsion solvent evaporation method, for encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein. Surface modification of NPs was confirmed using physicochemical characterization methods such as particle size and zeta potential, SEM, TEM and FTIR analysis. Both surface-modified PLGA NPs displayed a slow release of protein compared to PLGA NPs. Furthermore, we have explored the mucoadhesive property of COS as a material for modifying the surface of polymeric NPs. During in vitro mucoadhesion test, positively charged COS-PLGA NPs and CS-PLGA NPs exhibited enhanced mucoadhesion, compared to negatively charged PLGA NPs. This interaction was anticipated to improve the cell interaction and uptake of NPs, which is an important requirement for mucosal delivery of proteins. All nanoformulations were found to be safe for cellular delivery when evaluated in A549 cells. Moreover, intracellular uptake behaviour of FITC-BSA loaded NPs was extensively investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. As we hypothesized, positively charged COS-PLGA NPs and CS-PLGA NPs displayed enhanced intracellular uptake compared to negatively charged PLGA NPs. Our results demonstrated that CS- and COS-modified polymer NPs could be promising carriers for proteins, drugs and nucleic acids via nasal, oral, buccal, ocular and vaginal mucosal routes.

  6. Age-dependent decline of nogo-a protein in the mouse cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anita; Thakur, M K

    2014-11-01

    Nogo-A, a myelin-associated neurite growth inhibitory protein, is implicated in synaptic plasticity. It binds to its receptor namely the Nogo-66 receptor1 (NgR1) and regulates filamentous (F) actin dynamics via small GTPases of the Rho family, RhoA kinase (ROCK), LimK and cofilin. These proteins are associated with the structural plasticity, one of the components of synaptic plasticity, which is known to decline with normal aging. So, the level of Nogo-A and its receptor NgR1 are likely to vary during normal brain aging. However, it is not clearly understood how the levels of Nogo-A and its receptor NgR1 change in the cerebrum during aging. Several studies show an age- and gender-dependent decline in synaptic plasticity. Therefore, the present study was planned to analyze the relative changes in the mRNA and protein levels of Nogo-A and NgR1 in both male and female mice cerebrum during normal aging. Western blot analysis has shown decrease in Nogo-A protein level during aging in both male and female mice cerebrum. This was further confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis. RT-PCR analysis of Nogo-A mRNA showed no significant difference in the above-mentioned groups. This was also supported by in situ hybridization. NgR1 protein and its mRNA expression levels showed no significant alteration with aging in the cerebrum of both male and female mice. Taken together, we speculate that the downregulation of Nogo-A protein might have a role in the altered synaptic plasticity during aging.

  7. Age-related changes of protein- and RNA-synthetic processes in experimental hyper- and hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Gromakova, I A; Zilberman, S T; Konovalenko, O A

    2001-07-01

    The rate of liver and plasma protein synthesis and the activity of liver RNA polymerases 1 and 2 were investigated in rats of various age under experimental hyper- and hypothyroidism. The rate of plasma protein synthesis decreased with age more dramatically than that of liver proteins. Hyper- and hypothyroidism exerted opposite effects on protein synthesis in rats: stimulation and inhibition, respectively. The manifestation of these effects was age related. The thyroid status of animals also influenced the balance of protein synthesis. Thyroxin administration caused preferential incorporation of a label into blood plasma proteins. Changes of thyroid status of old animals insignificantly affected the absolute values of the label incorporation into proteins and the ratio of the label incorporation into local and secreted liver proteins. Age-related decrease of total hepatic nuclear RNA-polymerase activity was due to reduction of the template-bound functionally active forms of RNA-polymerases 1 and 2. Administration of thyroxin caused initial redistribution of the enzyme activity between template-bound and free fractions accompanied by the increase of template bound RNA-polymerases. Prolonged hormonal stimulus also caused an increase of free RNA-polymerases, which reflects the increased synthesis of these enzymes. Mecrazolyl administration reduced the activity of RNA-polymerase 1 and 2. All age groups were characterized by preferential reduction of the bound form. RNA-polymerase 2 activity decreased to a greater extent than that of RNA-polymerase 1. The data suggest age-determined reactions of the body to altered thyroid status.

  8. Protein adsorption capability on polyurethane and modified-polyurethane membrane for periodontal guided tissue regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Khan, Abdul Samad; Roohpour, Nima; Glogauer, Michael; Rehman, Ihtesham U

    2016-11-01

    Periodontal disease if left untreated can result in creation of defects within the alveolar ridge. Barrier membranes are frequently used with or without bone replacement graft materials for achieving periodontal guided tissue regeneration (GTR). Surface properties of barrier membranes play a vital role in their functionality and clinical success. In this study polyetherurethane (PEU) membranes were synthesized by using 4,4'-methylene-diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), polytetramethylene oxide (PTMO) and 1,4-butane diol (BDO) as a chain extender via solution polymerization. Hydroxyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) due to having inherent surface orientation towards air was used for surface modification of PEU on one side of the membranes. This resulting membranes had one surface being PEU and the other being PDMS coated PEU. The prepared membranes were treated with solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in de-ionized water at 37°C at a pH of 7.2. The surface protein adsorptive potential of PEU membranes was observed using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and Confocal Raman spectroscopy. The contact angle measurement, tensile strength and modulus of prepared membranes were also evaluated. PEU membrane (89.86±1.62°) exhibited less hydrophobic behavior than PEU-PDMS (105.87±3.16°). The ultimate tensile strength and elastic modulus of PEU (27±1MPa and 14±2MPa) and PEU-PDMS (8±1MPa and 26±1MPa) membranes was in required range. The spectral analysis revealed adsorption of BSA proteins on the surface of non PDMS coated PEU surface. The PDMS modified PEU membranes demonstrated a lack of BSA adsorption. The non PDMS coated side of the membrane which adsorbs proteins could potentially be used facing towards the defect attracting growth factors for periodontal tissue regeneration. Whereas, the PDMS coated side could serve as an occlusive barrier for preventing gingival epithelial cells from

  9. Direct analysis of in-gel proteins by carbon nanotubes-modified paper spray ambient mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Feifei; Yang, Yuhan; Ouyang, Jin; Na, Na

    2015-02-07

    The in situ and direct extraction, desorption and ionization of in-gel intact proteins after electrophoresis has been achieved by carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-modified paper spray mass spectrometry at ambient conditions. Characteristics of CNTs (including larger surface area, smaller pore diameter and enhanced conductivity) were endowed to the porous filter paper substrate by uniformly dispersing the CNTs on the filter paper. Upon applying electric potential to the CNTs-modified paper, the in-gel proteins were extracted from the gel and subsequently migrated to the tip of the filter paper by electrophoresis-like behavior for paper spray ionization, which was monitored by extracted ion chronograms. The characterizations of modified filter papers and CNTs nanoparticles further confirmed the role of CNTs in in-gel protein extraction, protein migration as well as spray ionization at the paper tip. Under optimized conditions, a mixture of cytochrome c, lysozyme and myoglobin was successfully separated by native electrophoresis and subsequently analysed by the present method, showing a limit of detection of 10 ng per gel band. The present strategy offers a new pathway for the direct detection of in-gel intact proteins at ambient conditions without any pre-treatment (e.g. digestion, chemical extraction and desalting), which exhibits potential applications in top-down proteomics.

  10. Mortality Benefits of Antibiotic Computerised Decision Support System: Modifying Effects of Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Angela L. P.; Lye, David C.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic computerised decision support systems (CDSSs) are shown to improve antibiotic prescribing, but evidence of beneficial patient outcomes is limited. We conducted a prospective cohort study in a 1500-bed tertiary-care hospital in Singapore, to evaluate the effectiveness of the hospital’s antibiotic CDSS on patients’ clinical outcomes, and the modification of these effects by patient factors. To account for clustering, we used multilevel logistic regression models. One-quarter of 1886 eligible inpatients received CDSS-recommended antibiotics. Receipt of antibiotics according to CDSS’s recommendations seemed to halve mortality risk of patients (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.26-1.10, P = 0.09). Patients aged ≤65 years had greater mortality benefit (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.20-1.00, P = 0.05) than patients that were older than 65 (OR 1.28, 95% CI 0.91-1.82, P = 0.16). No effect was observed on incidence of Clostridium difficile (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.34-3.01), and multidrug-resistant organism (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.42-2.71) infections. No increase in infection-related readmission (OR 1.16, 95% CI 0.48-2.79) was found in survivors. Receipt of CDSS-recommended antibiotics reduced mortality risk in patients aged 65 years or younger and did not increase the risk in older patients. Physicians should be informed of the benefits to increase their acceptance of CDSS recommendations.

  11. The Modified Femoral Neck-Shaft Angle: Age- and Sex-Dependent Reference Values and Reliability Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jostmeier, Janine; Haneder, Stefan; Dargel, Jens; Eysel, Peer; Lechler, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Background. The femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) is of high importance for the diagnostics and treatment of various conditions of the hip. However, rotational effects limit its precision and applicability using plain radiographs. This study introduces a novel method to measure the femoral NSA: the modified NSA (mNSA), possibly being less susceptible against rotational effects compared to the conventional NSA. Patients and Methods. The method of measurement is described and its applicability was tested in 400 pelvis computed tomography scans (800 hips). Age- and gender-dependent reference values are given and intra- and interrater reliability are analyzed. Results. The mean age of all 400 patients (800 hips) was 54.32 years (18–100, SD 22.05 years). The mean mNSA was 147.0° and the 95% confidence interval was 146.7°–147.4°. Differences of the mNSA between sexes, age groups, and sides were nonsignificant. The absolute difference between NSA and mNSA was 16.3° (range 3–31°; SD 4.4°); the correlation was high (0.738; p < 0.001). Overall, the intra- and interrater reliability were excellent for the mNSA. Interpretation. We introduced a novel concept for the analysis of the neck-shaft angle. The high reliability of the measurement has been proven and its robustness to hip rotation was demonstrated. PMID:28070521

  12. The Modified Femoral Neck-Shaft Angle: Age- and Sex-Dependent Reference Values and Reliability Analysis.

    PubMed

    Boese, Christoph Kolja; Frink, Michael; Jostmeier, Janine; Haneder, Stefan; Dargel, Jens; Eysel, Peer; Lechler, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Background. The femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) is of high importance for the diagnostics and treatment of various conditions of the hip. However, rotational effects limit its precision and applicability using plain radiographs. This study introduces a novel method to measure the femoral NSA: the modified NSA (mNSA), possibly being less susceptible against rotational effects compared to the conventional NSA. Patients and Methods. The method of measurement is described and its applicability was tested in 400 pelvis computed tomography scans (800 hips). Age- and gender-dependent reference values are given and intra- and interrater reliability are analyzed. Results. The mean age of all 400 patients (800 hips) was 54.32 years (18-100, SD 22.05 years). The mean mNSA was 147.0° and the 95% confidence interval was 146.7°-147.4°. Differences of the mNSA between sexes, age groups, and sides were nonsignificant. The absolute difference between NSA and mNSA was 16.3° (range 3-31°; SD 4.4°); the correlation was high (0.738; p < 0.001). Overall, the intra- and interrater reliability were excellent for the mNSA. Interpretation. We introduced a novel concept for the analysis of the neck-shaft angle. The high reliability of the measurement has been proven and its robustness to hip rotation was demonstrated.

  13. Polyethylenimine modified poly(ethylene terephthalate) capillary channeled-polymer fibers for anion exchange chromatography of proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuwei; Jin, Yi; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2015-09-04

    Native poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers have been previously studied as stationary phases for reversed phase and affinity protein separations. In this study, surface modified PET C-CP fibers were evaluated for the anion exchange separation of proteins. The native PET C-CP fibers were aminated using polyethylenimine (PEI) followed by a 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BUDGE) cross-linking step. Subsequent PEI/BUDGE treatments can be employed to further develop the polyamine layer on the fiber surfaces. The PEI densities of the modified fibers were quantified through the ninhydrin reaction, yielding values of 0.43-0.89μmolg(-1). The surface modification impact on column permeability was found to be 0.66×10(-11) to 1.33×10(-11)m(2), depending on the modification time and conditions. The dynamic binding capacities of the modified fiber media were determined to be 1.99-8.54mgmL(-1) bed volume, at linear velocities of 88-438cmmin(-1) using bovine serum albumin as the model protein. It was found that increasing the mobile phase linear velocity (up to 438cmmin(-1)) had no effect on the separation quality for a synthetic protein mixture, reflecting the lack of van Deemter C-term effects for the C-CP fiber phase. The low-cost, easy modification method and the capability of fast protein separation illustrate great potential in the use of PEI/BUDGE-modified PET C-CP fibers for high-throughput protein separation and downstream processing.

  14. Human protein aging: modification and crosslinking through dehydroalanine and dehydrobutyrine intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Lyons, Brian; Truscott, Roger J W; Schey, Kevin L

    2014-01-01

    Nonenzymatic post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is a fundamental molecular process of aging. The combination of various modifications and their accumulation with age not only affects function, but leads to crosslinking and protein aggregation. In this study, aged human lens proteins were examined using HPLC–tandem mass spectrometry and a blind PTM search strategy. Multiple thioether modifications of Ser and Thr residues by glutathione (GSH) and its metabolites were unambiguously identified. Thirty-four of 36 sites identified on 15 proteins were found on known phosphorylation sites, supporting a mechanism involving dehydroalanine (DHA) and dehydrobutyrine (DHB) formation through β-elimination of phosphoric acid from phosphoserine and phosphothreonine with subsequent nucleophilic attack by GSH. In vitro incubations of phosphopeptides demonstrated that this process can occur spontaneously under physiological conditions. Evidence that this mechanism can also lead to protein–protein crosslinks within cells is provided where five crosslinked peptides were detected in a human cataractous lens. Nondisulfide crosslinks were identified for the first time in lens tissue between βB2- & βB2-, βA4- & βA3-, γS- & βB1-, and βA4- & βA4-crystallins and provide detailed structural information on in vivo crystallin complexes. These data suggest that phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues represent susceptible sites for spontaneous breakdown in long-lived proteins and that DHA- and DHB-mediated protein crosslinking may be the source of the long-sought after nondisulfide protein aggregates believed to scatter light in cataractous lenses. Furthermore, this mechanism may be a common aging process that occurs in long-lived proteins of other tissues leading to protein aggregation diseases. PMID:24134651

  15. Molecular characterization of a lipid-modified virulence-associated protein of Rhodococcus equi and its potential in protective immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, C; Prescott, J F; Patterson, M C; Nicholson, V M

    1995-01-01

    Virulent strains of Rhodococcus equi produce plasmid-mediated 15- and 17-kDa proteins, which are thermoregulated and apparently surface-expressed. We demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) that R. equi produce three antigenically-related virulence-associated proteins, a diffuse 18-22-kDa, a 17.5-kDa and a 15-kDa protein. Phase partitioning of whole cells of R. equi strain 103 with Triton X-114 (TX-114) and labelling with [3H]-labelled palmitic acid showed that the two higher molecular weight proteins are hydrophobic and lipid modified. The 15-kDa protein did not partition into TX-114 and was not lipid modified. Cloning and expression of a fragment of the R. equi virulence plasmid in Escherichia coli showed that the three proteins were expressed from a single gene. Sequence analysis of this gene (designated vapA) revealed a 570-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 189 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 19,175 Da. The mature, nonlipid modified protein had a calculated mass of 16,246 Da. The 17.5- and 18-22-kDa forms of the protein are therefore due to lipid modification. No significant sequence homology of the vapA gene with other reported nucleotide sequences were found. Opsonization of virulent R. equi with an IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb103) to the VapA protein significantly enhanced uptake in the murine macrophage cell line IC-21. Intraperitoneal injection of mice with Mab103 enhanced initial clearance from the liver of mice challenged intravenously with R. equi. Immunization of mice with the lipid-modified VapA purified by SDS-PAGE fractionation or with acetone precipitated VapA protein following TX-114 extraction resulted in significantly enhanced clearance from the liver and spleen following intravenous challenge. The VapA protein of R. equi appears therefore to be a protective immunogen. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:7704843

  16. Design and evaluation of solid lipid nanoparticles modified with peptide ligand for oral delivery of protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Chen, Chunhui; Guo, Han; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Xi; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Zhou; Li, Lian; Huang, Yuan

    2014-10-01

    Designing feasible and effective peptide ligand modified solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to improve oral bioavailability of protein drugs and evaluating the influence of mucus remains important. In the present work, two kinds of peptide ligand modified SLNs loaded with salmon calcitonin (sCT), namely, sCT CSK-SLNs and sCT IRQ-SLNs, were prepared by coupling the peptide ligand CSKSSDYQC (CSK) which was reported to show affinity with goblet cells, or IRQRRRR (IRQ), a cell penetrating peptide, to polyoxyethylene (40) stearate (SA-PEG2000). Compared with unmodified SLNs, CSK or IRQ modified SLNs with better drug protection ability could facilitate the internalization of drug on Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-cultured cells and permeation in excised rat duodenum mucosa. The internalization mechanism of two kinds of peptide ligand modified SLNs was mainly active transport via both clathrin- and caveolae-dependent endocytosis. Although mucus was an impediment to the transport of SLNs, the peptide ligand modified SLNs still showed improved drug absorption. The absolute bioavailability of sCT CSK-SLNs (12.41 ± 3.65%) and sCT IRQ-SLNs (10.05 ± 5.10%) raised to 2.45-fold and 1.98-fold compared with unmodified SLNs (5.07 ± 0.54%), implying the feasibility and effectiveness of CSK and IRQ peptide modification for the enhancement of the oral bioavailability of protein drugs. In summary, the nanoparticles modified with CSK or IRQ peptide ligand could be the potential carriers for the transport of protein drugs across intestinal barriers.

  17. Using nonlinear ultrasound measurements to track thermal aging in modified 9%Cr ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Daniel; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Ruiz, Alberto; Joo, Young-Sang

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates early thermal aging in 9%Cr ferritic martensitic (FM) steel, which is caused by the formation of second phases during high temperature exposure. This study employs a recently developed nonlinear ultrasonic technique to explore the sensitivity of the nonlinearity parameter. Experimental results show that the nonlinearity parameter is sensitive to certain changes in material's properties such as thermal embrittlement and hardness changes; therefore, it can be used as an indicator of the thermal damage. The specimens investigated are heat treated for different holding times ranging from 200h to 3000h at 650°C. Nonlinear ultrasonic experiments are conducted for each specimen using a wedge transducer to generate and an air-coupled transducer to detect Raleigh surface waves. The amplitudes of the first and second order harmonics are measured at different propagation distances and these amplitudes are used to obtain the relative nonlinearity parameter for each specimen with a different holding time. The nonlinear ultrasonic results are compared with independent mechanical measurements and metallographic images. This research proposes the nonlinear ultrasonic technique as a nondestructive evaluation tool not only to detect thermal damage in early stages, and also to qualitatively assess the stage of thermal damage.

  18. Identification of a protein with antioxidant activity that is important for the protection against beer ageing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming J; Clarke, Frank M; Rogers, Peter J; Young, Paul; Sales, Narelle; O'Doherty, Patrick J; Higgins, Vincent J

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out with fresh Australian lager beer which was sampled directly off the production line, the same samples aged for 12 weeks at 30 °C, and the vintage beer which was kept at 20 °C for 5 years. Characteristic Australian lager flavour was maintained in the fresh and vintage beers but was lost in the aged beer. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and free thiol group labelling analyses of beer proteins found that this flavour stability correlated with the presence of an unknown 10 kilodaltons (kDa) protein with a higher level of free thiols. The protein was purified by size-exclusion chromatography, then peptide sequencing and database matching identified it as the barley lipid transfer protein (LTP1). Further characterisation using diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based antioxidant screening assay demonstrated that the LTP1 protein was active in DPPH reduction and antioxidant activity. The absence of free thiol in the aged beer indicates that the thiol functional groups within the LTP1 protein were saturated and suggests that it is important in the flavour stability of beer by maintaining reduction capacity during the ageing process.

  19. Identification of a Protein with Antioxidant Activity that is Important for the Protection against Beer Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming J.; Clarke, Frank M.; Rogers, Peter J.; Young, Paul; Sales, Narelle; O’Doherty, Patrick J.; Higgins, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out with fresh Australian lager beer which was sampled directly off the production line, the same samples aged for 12 weeks at 30 °C, and the vintage beer which was kept at 20 °C for 5 years. Characteristic Australian lager flavour was maintained in the fresh and vintage beers but was lost in the aged beer. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and free thiol group labelling analyses of beer proteins found that this flavour stability correlated with the presence of an unknown 10 kilodaltons (kDa) protein with a higher level of free thiols. The protein was purified by size-exclusion chromatography, then peptide sequencing and database matching identified it as the barley lipid transfer protein (LTP1). Further characterisation using diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based antioxidant screening assay demonstrated that the LTP1 protein was active in DPPH reduction and antioxidant activity. The absence of free thiol in the aged beer indicates that the thiol functional groups within the LTP1 protein were saturated and suggests that it is important in the flavour stability of beer by maintaining reduction capacity during the ageing process. PMID:22016646

  20. Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies Caused by a Founder Splice Site Mutation, c.828+3A>T, in PRPH2 and Protein Haplotypes in trans as Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Suma P.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Birch, David G.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Conneely, Karen N.; Bowne, Sara J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We determined the phenotypic variation, disease progression, and potential modifiers of autosomal dominant retinal dystrophies caused by a splice site founder mutation, c.828+3A>T, in the PRPH2 gene. Methods A total of 62 individuals (19 families) harboring the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation, had phenotype analysis by fundus appearance, electrophysiology, and visual fields. The PRPH2 haplotypes in trans were sequenced for potential modifying variants and generalized estimating equations (GEE) used for statistical analysis. Results Several distinct phenotypes caused by the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation were observed and fell into two clinical categories: Group I (N = 44) with mild pattern dystrophies (PD) and Group II (N = 18) with more severe cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and central areolar chorioretinal dystrophy (CACD). The PRPH2 Gln304-Lys310-Asp338 protein haplotype in trans was found in Group I only (29.6% vs. 0%), whereas the Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype was predominant in Group II (94.4% vs. 70.4%). Generalized estimating equations analysis for PD versus the CRD/CACD/RP phenotypes in individuals over 43 years alone with the PRPH2 haplotypes in trans and age as predictors, adjusted for correlation within families, confirmed a significant effect of haplotype on severity (P = 0.03) with an estimated odds ratio of 7.16 (95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.8, 18.4]). Conclusions The PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation results in multiple distinct phenotypes likely modified by protein haplotypes in trans; the odds of having the CACD/RP-like phenotype (versus the PD phenotype) are 7.16 times greater with a Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype in trans. Further functional studies of the modifying haplotypes in trans and PRPH2 splice variants may offer therapeutic targets. PMID:26842753

  1. Effects of dietary protein on glomerular mesangial area and basement membrane thickness in aged uninephrectomized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, R A; Steffens, W L; Brown, C A; Brown, S A; Ard, M; Finco, D R

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of diets containing 18% or 34% protein on glomerular mesangial area (GMA) and basement membrane thickness (GBMT) in uninephrectomized aged dogs. A secondary objective was to determine the combined effects of aging and uninephrectomy on GMA and GBMT in dogs. Ten clinically healthy, pure-bred dogs were unilaterally nephrectomized at about 8 y of age. After 2 mo, 5 dogs were fed an 18% protein diet and 5 dogs were fed a 34% protein diet for 48 mo. At month 48, the dogs were euthanized and the remaining kidney was collected. Samples of kidney from both times of collection were used to measure GMA and GBMT using electron microscopy. The effects of diet on GMA and GBMT were analyzed (student's t-test) using necropsy/nephrectomy score ratios. The effects of time-nephrectomy were determined by comparing nephrectomy values for GMA and GBMT with necropsy values (paired t-test). Dogs fed 34% dietary protein did not have a significant increase in GMA and GBM thickness when compared to dogs fed the 18% protein diet. A significant increase in GMA and GBMT occurred with time-nephrectomy (P = 0.011 and 0.018, respectively). Although dietary protein intake was not a significant factor in causing structural changes to glomeruli in uninephrectomized aged dogs, the power to detect a difference was low. However, significant effects of aging and nephrectomy were detected despite the low power of the study. These results suggest that the increases in GMA and GBMT that occur over time are not markedly influenced by dietary protein intake. However, subtle protein effects cannot be eliminated as a possibility based on this study. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:11346257

  2. Dynamic strain ageing in prior cold worked 15Cr 15Ni titanium modified stainless steel (Alloy D9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, K. G.; Ray, S. K.; Sasikala, G.

    2006-09-01

    Dynamic strain ageing (DSA) behavior of a 20% prior cold worked titanium modified austenitic stainless steel (Alloy D9) was investigated in the temperature range 300-1023 K at a constant (nominal) strain rate of 1.33 × 10 -3 s -1. Serrated plastic flow was observed in a narrow temperature region of 773-873 K. Anomalies characteristic of DSA were observed in the variations of strength, ductility, and strain hardening parameters with temperature. Specifically, the difference between ultimate tensile stress and yield stress indicated that a single DSA mechanism is operative over the range of observations. Plastic strain energy density for uniform deformation showed a peak in the DSA temperature range, suggesting that in this material, DSA should enhance the ductile fracture resistance.

  3. Cryptic residual GALT activity is a potential modifier of scholastic outcome in school age children with classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Emily L; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Taddeo, Elles; Gleason, Tyler J; Epstein, Michael P; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2013-11-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disorder that results from profound deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Although early diagnosis and rigorous dietary restriction of galactose prevent or resolve the potentially lethal acute symptoms, patients are at markedly increased risk of long-term complications including significant cognitive, speech, and behavioral difficulties, among other problems. The mechanisms that underlie these long-term complications remain unclear, as do the factors that modify their severity. Here we explored the scholastic and behavioral outcomes experienced by a cohort of 54 school age children with classic galactosemia. Data collected included survey responses from parents and teachers, school records including standardized test scores, and GALT genotype data used to estimate predicted residual GALT activity based on a yeast expression system. As expected, many but not all of the children in our study demonstrated speech, scholastic, and behavioral difficulties. Perhaps most striking, we found that predicted cryptic residual GALT activity, often below the threshold of detection of clinical assays, appeared to modify scholastic outcome. These data raise the intriguing possibility that cryptic GALT activity might also influence the severity of other long-term complications in classic galactosemia.

  4. A proteomic study of protein variation between osteopenic and age-matched control bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Christopher D; Dangott, Lawrence J; Rahm, Mark D; Hitt, Kirby D; Stewart, Donald S; Wayne Sampson, H

    2012-05-01

    The focus of this study was to identify changes in protein expression within the bone tissue environment between osteopenic and control bone tissue of human femoral neck patients with osteoarthritis. Femoral necks were compared from osteopenic patients and age-matched controls. A new method of bone protein extraction was developed to provide a swift, clear view of the bone proteome. Relative changes in protein expression between control and osteopenic samples were quantified using difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technology after affinity chromatographic depletion of albumin and IgG. The proteins that were determined to be differentially expressed were identified using standard liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and database searching techniques. In order to rule out blood contamination, blood from age-matched osteoporotic, osteopenic and controls were analyzed in a similar manner. Image analysis of the DIGE gels indicated that 145 spots in the osteopenic bone samples changed at least ± 1.5-fold from the control samples (P < 0.05). Three of the proteins were identified by LC/MS/MS. Of the proteins that increased in the osteopenic femurs, two were especially significant: carbonic anhydrase I and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. Apolipoprotein A-I was the most prominent protein that significantly decreased in the osteopenic femurs. The blood samples revealed no significant differences between groups for any of these proteins. In conclusion, carbonic anhydrase I, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 and apolipoprotein A-I appeared to be the most significant variations of proteins in patients with osteopenia and osteoarthritis.

  5. The Caenorhabditis elegans Protein FIC-1 Is an AMPylase That Covalently Modifies Heat-Shock 70 Family Proteins, Translation Elongation Factors and Histones

    PubMed Central

    Truttmann, Matthias C.; Guo, Xuanzong; Engert, Christoph; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein AMPylation by Fic domain-containing proteins (Fic proteins) is an ancient and conserved post-translational modification of mostly unexplored significance. Here we characterize the Caenorhabditis elegans Fic protein FIC-1 in vitro and in vivo. FIC-1 is an AMPylase that localizes to the nuclear surface and modifies core histones H2 and H3 as well as heat shock protein 70 family members and translation elongation factors. The three-dimensional structure of FIC-1 is similar to that of its human ortholog, HYPE, with 38% sequence identity. We identify a link between FIC-1-mediated AMPylation and susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, establishing a connection between AMPylation and innate immunity in C. elegans. PMID:27138431

  6. Why is there a modifying effect of gestational age on risk factors for cerebral palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, C; Yudkin, P; Sellers, S; Impey, L; Doyle, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate risk factors for cerebral palsy in relation to gestational age. Design: Three case-control studies within a geographically defined cohort. Setting: The former Oxfordshire Health Authority. Participants: A total of 235 singleton children with cerebral palsy not of postnatal origin, born between 1984 and 1993, identified from the Oxford Register of Early Childhood Impairment; 646 controls matched for gestation in three bands: ⩽32 weeks; 33–36 weeks; ⩾37 weeks. Results: Markers of intrapartum hypoxia and infection were associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy in term and preterm infants. The odds ratio (OR) for hypoxia was 12.2 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 119) at ⩽32 weeks and 146 (7.4 to 3651) at ⩾37 weeks. Corresponding ORs for neonatal sepsis were 3.1 (1.8 to 5.4) and 10.6 (2.1 to 51.9). In contrast, pre-eclampsia carried an increased risk of cerebral palsy at ⩾37 weeks (OR 5.1 (2.2 to 12.0)) but a decreased risk at ⩽32 weeks (OR 0.4 (0.2 to 1.0)). However, all infants ⩽32 weeks with maternal pre-eclampsia were delivered electively, and their risk of cerebral palsy was no lower than that of other electively delivered ⩽32 week infants (OR 0.9 (0.3 to 2.7)). Nearly 60% of ⩽32 week controls were delivered after spontaneous preterm labour, itself an abnormal event. Conclusion: Inflammatory processes, including pre-eclampsia, are important in the aetiology of cerebral palsy. The apparent reduced risk of cerebral palsy associated with pre-eclampsia in very preterm infants is driven by the characteristics of the gestation matched control group. Use of the term "protective" in this context should be abandoned. PMID:15724038

  7. Physical exercise as a preventive or disease-modifying treatment of dementia and brain aging.

    PubMed

    Ahlskog, J Eric; Geda, Yonas E; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C

    2011-09-01

    A rapidly growing literature strongly suggests that exercise, specifically aerobic exercise, may attenuate cognitive impairment and reduce dementia risk. We used PubMed (keywords exercise and cognition) and manuscript bibliographies to examine the published evidence of a cognitive neuroprotective effect of exercise. Meta-analyses of prospective studies documented a significantly reduced risk of dementia associated with midlife exercise; similarly, midlife exercise significantly reduced later risks of mild cognitive impairment in several studies. Among patients with dementia or mild cognitive impairment, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) documented better cognitive scores after 6 to 12 months of exercise compared with sedentary controls. Meta-analyses of RCTs of aerobic exercise in healthy adults were also associated with significantly improved cognitive scores. One year of aerobic exercise in a large RCT of seniors was associated with significantly larger hippocampal volumes and better spatial memory; other RCTs in seniors documented attenuation of age-related gray matter volume loss with aerobic exercise. Cross-sectional studies similarly reported significantly larger hippocampal or gray matter volumes among physically fit seniors compared with unfit seniors. Brain cognitive networks studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging display improved connectivity after 6 to 12 months of exercise. Animal studies indicate that exercise facilitates neuroplasticity via a variety of biomechanisms, with improved learning outcomes. Induction of brain neurotrophic factors by exercise has been confirmed in multiple animal studies, with indirect evidence for this process in humans. Besides a brain neuroprotective effect, physical exercise may also attenuate cognitive decline via mitigation of cerebrovascular risk, including the contribution of small vessel disease to dementia. Exercise should not be overlooked as an important therapeutic strategy.

  8. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) inhibits agglomeration and macrophage uptake of toxic amine modified nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Zofi; Kendall, Michaela; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Whitwell, Harry; Elgy, Christine; Ding, Ping; Mahajan, Sumeet; Morgan, Cliff; Griffiths, Mark; Clark, Howard; Madsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The lung provides the main route for nanomaterial exposure. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an important respiratory innate immune molecule with the ability to bind or opsonise pathogens to enhance phagocytic removal from the airways. We hypothesised that SP-A, like surfactant protein D, may interact with inhaled nanoparticulates, and that this interaction will be affected by nanoparticle (NP) surface characteristics. In this study, we characterise the interaction of SP-A with unmodified (U-PS) and amine-modified (A-PS) polystyrene particles of varying size and zeta potential using dynamic light scatter analysis. SP-A associated with both 100 nm U-PS and A-PS in a calcium-independent manner. SP-A induced significant calcium-dependent agglomeration of 100 nm U-PS NPs but resulted in calcium-independent inhibition of A-PS self agglomeration. SP-A enhanced uptake of 100 nm U-PS into macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner but in contrast inhibited A-PS uptake. Reduced association of A-PS particles in RAW264.7 cells following pre-incubation of SP-A was also observed with coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Consistent with these findings, alveolar macrophages (AMs) from SP-A−/− mice were more efficient at uptake of 100 nm A-PS compared with wild type C57Bl/6 macrophages. No difference in uptake was observed with 500 nm U-PS or A-PS particles. Pre-incubation with SP-A resulted in a significant decrease in uptake of 100 nm A-PS in macrophages isolated from both groups of mice. In contrast, increased uptake by AMs of U-PS was observed after pre-incubation with SP-A. Thus we have demonstrated that SP-A promotes uptake of non-toxic U-PS particles but inhibits the clearance of potentially toxic A-PS particles by blocking uptake into macrophages. PMID:25676620

  9. TaBoo SeArch Algorithm with a Modified Inverse Histogram for Reproducing Biologically Relevant Rare Events of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ryuhei; Takano, Yu; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2016-05-10

    The TaBoo SeArch (TBSA) algorithm [ Harada et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2015 , 36 , 763 - 772 and Harada et al. Chem. Phys. Lett. 2015 , 630 , 68 - 75 ] was recently proposed as an enhanced conformational sampling method for reproducing biologically relevant rare events of a given protein. In TBSA, an inverse histogram of the original distribution, mapped onto a set of reaction coordinates, is constructed from trajectories obtained by multiple short-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Rarely occurring states of a given protein are statistically selected as new initial states based on the inverse histogram, and resampling is performed by restarting the MD simulations from the new initial states to promote the conformational transition. In this process, the definition of the inverse histogram, which characterizes the rarely occurring states, is crucial for the efficiency of TBSA. In this study, we propose a simple modification of the inverse histogram to further accelerate the convergence of TBSA. As demonstrations of the modified TBSA, we applied it to (a) hydrogen bonding rearrangements of Met-enkephalin, (b) large-amplitude domain motions of Glutamine-Binding Protein, and (c) folding processes of the B domain of Staphylococcus aureus Protein A. All demonstrations numerically proved that the modified TBSA reproduced these biologically relevant rare events with nanosecond-order simulation times, although a set of microsecond-order, canonical MD simulations failed to reproduce the rare events, indicating the high efficiency of the modified TBSA.

  10. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Lan, Minbo

    2016-02-01

    An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU-PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm2, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  11. Protein adsorption and transport in dextran-modified ion-exchange media. II. Intraparticle uptake and column breakthrough.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Brian D; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2011-07-22

    Protein transport behavior was compared for the traditional SP Sepharose Fast Flow and the dextran-modified SP Sepharose XL and Capto S resins. Examination of the dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) revealed a fundamental difference in the balance between transport and equilibrium capacity limitations when comparing the two resin classes, as reflected by differences in the locations of the maximum DBCs as a function of salt. In order to quantitatively compare transport behavior, confocal microscopy and batch uptake experiments were used to obtain estimates of intraparticle protein diffusivities. For the traditional particle, such diffusivity estimates could be used to predict column breakthrough behavior accurately. However, for the dextran-modified media, neither the pore- nor the homogeneous-diffusion model was adequate, as experimental dynamic binding capacities were consistently lower than predicted. In examining the shapes of breakthrough curves, it was apparent that the model predictions failed to capture two features observed for the dextran-modified media, but never seen for the traditional resin. Comparison of estimated effective pore diffusivities from confocal microscopy and batch uptake experiments revealed a discrepancy that led to the hypothesis that protein uptake in the dextran-modified resins could occur with a shrinking-core-like sharp uptake front, but with incomplete saturation. The reason for the incomplete saturation is speculated to be that protein initially fills the dextran layer with inefficient packing, but can rearrange over time to accommodate more protein. A conceptual model was developed to account for the partial shrinking-core uptake to test whether the physical intuition led to predictions consistent with experimental behavior. The model could correctly reproduce the two unique features of the breakthrough curves and, in sample applications, parameters found from the fit of one breakthrough curve could be used to adequately match

  12. Age-related changes in nucleic acids and protein in Callosobruchus maculatus Fabr. (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Sharma, S P; Jit, I; Rai, N

    1984-01-01

    The mean life span of Callosobruchus maculatus male is 7 days and female is 5 days at 30 +/- 1 degrees C. Age-related study on C. maculatus shows that RNA and protein contents gradually decline with age in male bruchids, whereas in females initially these increase up to the second day of post-emergent life and subsequently decrease. DNA increases up to the third day in males and the fourth day in females representing post-emergent growth, and then declines sharply on the sixth day. The RNA and protein contents per unit DNA decrease steadily in males; however, in females both are highest during the first 2 days, which synchronizes the egg-laying peak. These observations have been found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.01) and suggest that aging is accompanied by a decrease in both RNA and protein synthesis potential.

  13. Vitamin E prevents oxidative modification of brain and lymphocyte band 3 proteins during aging.

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, J E; Cover, C; Gustafson, M R; Kay, M B

    1996-01-01

    Antioxidants may play an important role in preventing free radical damage associated with aging by interfering directly in the generation of radicals or by scavenging them. We investigated the effects of a high vitamin E and/or a high beta-carotene diet on aging of the anion transporter, band 3, in lymphocytes and brain. The band 3 proteins function as anion transporters, acid base regulators, C02 transporters, and structural proteins that provide a framework for membrane lipids and that link the plasma membrane to the cytoskeleton. Senescent cell antigen (SCA), which terminates the life of cells, is a degradation product of band 3. This study was conducted as a double-blind study in which eight groups of middle-aged or old mice received either high levels of beta-carotene and/or vitamin E or standard levels of these supplements in their diets. Anion transport kinetic assays were performed on isolated splenic lymphocytes. Immunoreactivity of an antibody that recognizes aging changes in old band 3 preceding generation of SCA was used to quantitate aged band 3 in brain tissue. Results indicate that vitamin E prevented the observed age-related decline in anion transport by lymphocytes and the generation of aged band 3 leading to SCA formation. beta-Carotene had no significant effect on the results of either assay. Since increased aged band 3 and decreased anion transport are initial steps in band 3 aging, which culminates in the generation of SCA and cellular removal, vitamin E prevents or delays aging of band 3-related proteins in lymphocytes and brain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8643622

  14. Are ancient proteins responsible for the age-related decline in health and fitness?

    PubMed

    Truscott, Roger John Willis

    2010-02-01

    There are a number of sites in the body where proteins are present for decades and sometimes for all of our lives. Over a period of many years, such proteins are subject to two types of modifications. The first results from the intrinsic instability of certain amino acid residues and leads to deamidation, racemization, and truncation. The second type can be traced to relentless covalent modification of such ancient proteins by reactive biochemicals produced during cellular metabolism.The accumulation of both types of posttranslational modifications over time may have important consequences for the properties of tissues that contain such proteins. It is proposed that the age-related decline in function of organs such as the eye, heart, brain, and lung, as well as skeletal components, comes about, in part, from the posttranslational modification of these long-lived proteins. Examples are provided in which this may be an important factor in the etiology of age-related conditions. As the properties of these proteins alter inexorably over time, the molecular changes contribute to a gradual decline in the function of individual organs and also tissues such as joints. This cumulative degeneration of old proteins at multiple sites in the body may also constrain the ultimate life span of the individual. The human lens may be particularly useful for discovering which reactive metabolites in the body are of most importance for posttranslational modification of long-lived proteins.

  15. Quantitative proteomic analysis of age-related subventricular zone proteins associated with neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianli; Dong, Chuanming; Sun, Lixin; Zhu, Liang; Sun, Chenxi; Ma, Rongjie; Ning, ke; Lu, Bing; Zhang, Jinfu; Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in the function of adult tissues which can lead to neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known about the correlation between protein changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and neurodegenerative diseases with age. In the present study, neural stem cells (NSCs) were derived from the SVZ on postnatal 7 d, 1 m, and 12 m-old mice. With age, NSCs exhibited increased SA-β-gal activity and decreased proliferation and pool size in the SVZ zone, and were associated with elevated inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Furthermore, quantitative proteomics and ingenuity pathway analysis were used to evaluate the significant age-related alterations in proteins and their functions. Some downregulated proteins such as DPYSL2, TPI1, ALDH, and UCHL1 were found to play critical roles in the neurological disease and PSMA1, PSMA3, PSMC2, PSMD11, and UCHL1 in protein homeostasis. Taken together, we have provided valuable insight into the cellular and molecular processes that underlie aging-associated declines in SVZ neurogenesis for the early detection of differences in gene expression and the potential risk of neurological disease, which is beneficial in the prevention of the diseases. PMID:27857231

  16. Protein intake and exercise for optimal muscle function with aging: recommendations from the ESPEN Expert Group.

    PubMed

    Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Bauer, Jürgen M; Barazzoni, Rocco; Biolo, Gianni; Boirie, Yves; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Cederholm, Tommy; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso; Krznariç, Zeljko; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Singer, Pierre; Teta, Daniel; Tipton, Kevin; Calder, Philip C

    2014-12-01

    The aging process is associated with gradual and progressive loss of muscle mass along with lowered strength and physical endurance. This condition, sarcopenia, has been widely observed with aging in sedentary adults. Regular aerobic and resistance exercise programs have been shown to counteract most aspects of sarcopenia. In addition, good nutrition, especially adequate protein and energy intake, can help limit and treat age-related declines in muscle mass, strength, and functional abilities. Protein nutrition in combination with exercise is considered optimal for maintaining muscle function. With the goal of providing recommendations for health care professionals to help older adults sustain muscle strength and function into older age, the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) hosted a Workshop on Protein Requirements in the Elderly, held in Dubrovnik on November 24 and 25, 2013. Based on the evidence presented and discussed, the following recommendations are made (a) for healthy older people, the diet should provide at least 1.0-1.2 g protein/kg body weight/day, (b) for older people who are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition because they have acute or chronic illness, the diet should provide 1.2-1.5 g protein/kg body weight/day, with even higher intake for individuals with severe illness or injury, and (c) daily physical activity or exercise (resistance training, aerobic exercise) should be undertaken by all older people, for as long as possible.

  17. Spatial protein quality control and the evolution of lineage-specific ageing

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Propagation of a species requires periodic cell renewal to avoid clonal extinction. Sexual reproduction and the separation of germ cells from the soma provide a mechanism for such renewal, but are accompanied by an apparently mandatory ageing of the soma. Data obtained during the last decade suggest that a division of labour exists also between cells of vegetatively reproducing unicellular organisms, leading to the establishment of a soma-like and germ-like lineage with distinct fitness and longevity characteristics. This division of labour in both bacteria and yeast entails segregation of damaged and aggregated proteins such that the germ-like lineage is kept free of damage to the detriment of the soma-like lineage. In yeast, this spatial protein quality control (SQC) encompasses a CCT-chaperonin-dependent translocation and merging of cytotoxic protein aggregates. This process is regulated by Sir2, a protein deacetylase that modulates the rate of ageing in organisms ranging from yeast to worms and flies. Recent data also demonstrate that SQC is intimately integrated with the machinery establishing proper cell polarity and that this machinery is required for generating a soma-like and germ-like lineage in yeast. Deciphering the details of the SQC network may increase our understanding of the development of age-related protein folding disorders and shed light on the selective forces that paved the way for polarity and lineage-specific ageing to evolve. PMID:21115532

  18. Protein intake and exercise for optimal muscle function with aging: Recommendations from the ESPEN Expert Group

    PubMed Central

    Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.; Bauer, Jurgen M.; Barazzoni, Rocco; Biolo, Gianni; Boirie, Yves; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Cederholm, Tommy; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso; Krznaric, Zeljko; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Singer, Pierre; Teta, Daniel; Tipton, Kevin; Calder, Philip C.

    2014-01-01

    The aging process is associated with gradual and progressive loss of muscle mass along with lowered strength and physical endurance. This condition, sarcopenia, has been widely observed with aging in sedentary adults. Regular aerobic and resistance exercise programs have been shown to counteract most aspects of sarcopenia. In addition, good nutrition, especially adequate protein and energy intake, can help limit and treat age-related declines in muscle mass, strength, and functional abilities. Protein nutrition in combination with exercise is considered optimal for maintaining muscle function. With the goal of providing recommendations for health care professionals to help older adults sustain muscle strength and function into older age, the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) hosted a Workshop on Protein Requirements in the Elderly, held in Dubrovnik on November 24 and 25, 2013. Based on the evidence presented and discussed, the following recommendations are made: (1) for healthy older people, the diet should provide at least 1.0 to 1.2 g protein/kg body weight/day (2) for older people who are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition because they have acute or chronic illness, the diet should provide 1.2 to 1.5 g protein/kg body weight/day, with even higher intake for individuals with severe illness or injury, and (3) daily physical activity or exercise (resistance training, aerobic exercise) should be undertaken by all older people, for as long as possible. PMID:24814383

  19. Protein-Modified-Paramagnetic-Particles as a Tool for Detection of Silver(I) Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizek, R.; Krizkova, S.; Adam, V.; Huska, D.; Hubalek, J.; Trnkova, L.

    2009-04-01

    incorporated mixed with carbon paste were stable. Even after 14 days we did not determine change in the peak height higher than 5 %. Further linkage of MT with polyclonal chicken antibodies incorporated in carbon paste electrode was determined by SWV. Two signals were observed in voltammograms, cysMT corresponding to -SH moieties of MT and Wa corresponding to tryptophan residues of chicken antibodies. We optimized time of interaction (300 s) and concentration of MT (125 µg/ml) to suggest silver(I) ions biosensor. Biosensor (MT-antibody-modified CPE) prepared under the optimized conditions was utilized for silver(I) ions detection. The detection limit (3 S/N) for silver(I) ions were estimated as 100 nM. The proposed biosensor was tested by detection of silver(I) ions spiked in various water samples (from very pure distilled water to rainwater). Recoveries varied from 74 to 104 %. MT, low molecular mass proteins rich cysteine, play important role in the processes of heavy metals ions metabolism. Due to their unique physico-chemical properties they are able to bind heavy metals with high affinity. We used this feature to suggest simple biosensor based on immobilization of MT on the surface of carbon paste electrode via chicken antibodies against MT. The suggested biosensor was further successfully employed to detect silver(I) ions. The main advantage of the biosensor is that it can be easily miniaturized, whereas carbon nanostructures with immobilized MT should be used as working electrodes. Acknowledgements Financial support from INCHEMBIOL MSMT 0021622412 and GA CR 526/07/0674 is highly acknowledged.

  20. The Role of Histone Protein Modifications and Mutations in Histone Modifiers in Pediatric B-Cell Progenitor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Janczar, Szymon; Janczar, Karolina; Pastorczak, Agata; Harb, Hani; Paige, Adam J. W.; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Danilewicz, Marian; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    While cancer has been long recognized as a disease of the genome, the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in neoplasia was acknowledged more recently. The most active epigenetic marks are DNA methylation and histone protein modifications and they are involved in basic biological phenomena in every cell. Their role in tumorigenesis is stressed by recent unbiased large-scale studies providing evidence that several epigenetic modifiers are recurrently mutated or frequently dysregulated in multiple cancers. The interest in epigenetic marks is especially due to the fact that they are potentially reversible and thus druggable. In B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) there is a relative paucity of reports on the role of histone protein modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation) as compared to acute myeloid leukemia, T-cell ALL, or other hematologic cancers, and in this setting chromatin modifications are relatively less well studied and reviewed than DNA methylation. In this paper, we discuss the biomarker associations and evidence for a driver role of dysregulated global and loci-specific histone marks, as well as mutations in epigenetic modifiers in BCP-ALL. Examples of chromatin modifiers recurrently mutated/disrupted in BCP-ALL and associated with disease outcomes include MLL1, CREBBP, NSD2, and SETD2. Altered histone marks and histone modifiers and readers may play a particular role in disease chemoresistance and relapse. We also suggest that epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation may have parallel roles in leukemogenesis. PMID:28054944

  1. Exploring Genetic Factors Involved in Huntington Disease Age of Onset: E2F2 as a New Potential Modifier Gene

    PubMed Central

    Valcárcel-Ocete, Leire; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Iriondo, Mikel; Fullaondo, Asier; García-Barcina, María; Fernández-García, José Manuel; Lezcano-García, Elena; Losada-Domingo, José María; Ruiz-Ojeda, Javier; Álvarez de Arcaya, Amaia; Pérez-Ramos, José María; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Nielsen, Jørgen E.; Saft, Carsten; Zubiaga, Ana M.; Aguirre, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Age of onset (AO) of Huntington disease (HD) is mainly determined by the length of the CAG repeat expansion (CAGexp) in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Additional genetic variation has been suggested to contribute to AO, although the mechanism by which it could affect AO is presently unknown. The aim of this study is to explore the contribution of candidate genetic factors to HD AO in order to gain insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disorder. For that purpose, two AO definitions were used: the earliest age with unequivocal signs of HD (earliest AO or eAO), and the first motor symptoms age (motor AO or mAO). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed between genetic variation within 20 candidate genes and eAO or mAO, using DNA and clinical information of 253 HD patients from REGISTRY project. Gene expression analyses were carried out by RT-qPCR with an independent sample of 35 HD patients from Basque Country Hospitals. We found suggestive association signals between HD eAO and/or mAO and genetic variation within the E2F2, ATF7IP, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, LINC01559, HIP1 and GRIK2 genes. Among them, the most significant was the association between eAO and rs2742976, mapping to the promoter region of E2F2 transcription factor. Furthermore, rs2742976 T allele patient carriers exhibited significantly lower lymphocyte E2F2 gene expression, suggesting a possible implication of E2F2-dependent transcriptional activity in HD pathogenesis. Thus, E2F2 emerges as a new potential HD AO modifier factor. PMID:26148071

  2. Mucosal Immunogenicity of Genetically Modified Lactobacillus acidophilus Expressing an HIV-1 Epitope within the Surface Layer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kajikawa, Akinobu; Zhang, Lin; LaVoy, Alora; Bumgardner, Sara; Klaenhammer, Todd R.; Dean, Gregg A.

    2015-01-01

    Surface layer proteins of probiotic lactobacilli are theoretically efficient epitope-displaying scaffolds for oral vaccine delivery due to their high expression levels and surface localization. In this study, we constructed genetically modified Lactobacillus acidophilus strains expressing the membrane proximal external region (MPER) from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) within the context of the major S-layer protein, SlpA. Intragastric immunization of mice with the recombinants induced MPER-specific and S-layer protein-specific antibodies in serum and mucosal secretions. Moreover, analysis of systemic SlpA-specific cytokines revealed that the responses appeared to be Th1 and Th17 dominant. These findings demonstrated the potential use of the Lactobacillus S-layer protein for development of oral vaccines targeting specific peptides. PMID:26509697

  3. Grafting of bovine serum albumin proteins on plasma-modified polymers for potential application in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasálková, Nikola Slepičková; Slepička, Petr; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hodačová, Petra; Kučková, Štěpánka; Švorčík, Václav

    2014-04-01

    In this work, an influence of bovine serum albumin proteins grafting on the surface properties of plasma-treated polyethylene and poly- l-lactic acid was studied. The interaction of the vascular smooth muscle cells with the modified polymer surface was determined. The surface properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nano-LC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry, electrokinetic analysis, and goniometry. One of the motivations for this work is the idea that by the interaction of the cell with substrate surface, the proteins will form an interlayer between the cell and the substrate. It was proven that when interacting with the plasma-treated high-density polyethylene and poly- l-lactic acid, the bovine serum albumin protein is grafted on the polymer surface. Since the proteins are bonded to the substrate surface, they can stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation.

  4. Grafting of bovine serum albumin proteins on plasma-modified polymers for potential application in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kasálková, Nikola Slepičková; Slepička, Petr; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hodačová, Petra; Kučková, Stěpánka; Svorčík, Václav

    2014-04-04

    In this work, an influence of bovine serum albumin proteins grafting on the surface properties of plasma-treated polyethylene and poly-l-lactic acid was studied. The interaction of the vascular smooth muscle cells with the modified polymer surface was determined. The surface properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nano-LC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry, electrokinetic analysis, and goniometry. One of the motivations for this work is the idea that by the interaction of the cell with substrate surface, the proteins will form an interlayer between the cell and the substrate. It was proven that when interacting with the plasma-treated high-density polyethylene and poly-l-lactic acid, the bovine serum albumin protein is grafted on the polymer surface. Since the proteins are bonded to the substrate surface, they can stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation.

  5. Solid-phase extraction based on ground methacrylate monolith modified with gold nanoparticles for isolation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Barberán, María; Lerma-García, María Jesús; Simó-Alfonso, Ernesto Francisco; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel

    2016-04-21

    In this study, a novel polymeric material functionalized with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was prepared as solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent for isolation of proteins. The sorbent was synthesized from a powdered poly(glycidyl-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith, and modified with ammonia, followed by immobilization of AuNPs on the pore surface of the material. To evaluate the performance of this SPE support, proteins were selected as test solutes, being the extraction conditions and other parameters (loading capacity and regenerative ability of sorbent) established. The results indicated that this sorbent could be employed to selectively capture proteins according to their pI, on the basis of the strong affinity of these biomacromolecules towards to AuNPs surface. The applicability of this sorbent was demonstrated by isolating protein species of interest (bovine serum albumin, cytochrome c and lectins in European mistletoe leaves), followed by SDS-PAGE analysis.

  6. Increased myogenic repressor Id mRNA and protein levels in hindlimb muscles of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Alway, Stephen E; Degens, Hans; Lowe, Dawn A; Krishnamurthy, Gururaj

    2002-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if levels of repressors to myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) differ between muscles from young adult and aged animals. Total RNA from plantaris, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles of Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats aged 9 mo (young adult, n = 10) and 37 mo (aged, n = 10) was reverse transcribed and then amplified by PCR. To obtain a semiquantitative measure of the mRNA levels, PCR signals were normalized to cyclophilin or 18S signals from the corresponding reverse transcription product. Normalization to cyclophilin and 18S gave similar results. The mRNA levels of MyoD and myogenin were approximately 275-650% (P < 0.001) and approximately 500-1,100% (P < 0.001) greater, respectively, in muscles from aged compared with young adults. In contrast, the protein levels were lower in plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles and similar in the soleus muscle of aged vs. young adult rats. Id repressor mRNA levels were approximately 300-900% greater in fast and slow muscles of aged animals (P < or = 0.02), and Mist 1 mRNA was approximately 50% greater in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles (P < 0.01). The mRNA level of Twist mRNA was not significantly affected by aging. Id-1, Id-2, and Id-3 protein levels were approximately 17-740% greater (P < 0.05) in hindlimb muscles of aged rats compared with young adult rats. The elevated levels of Id mRNA and protein suggest that MRF repressors may play a role in gene regulation of fast and slow muscles in aged rats.

  7. Detection of Cry1Ab protein in gastrointestinal contents but not visceral organs of genetically modified Bt11-fed calves.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, E H; Shimada, N; Murata, H; Mikami, O; Sultana, P; Miyazaki, S; Yoshioka, M; Yamanaka, N; Hirai, N; Nakajima, Y

    2003-03-01

    The fate of insecticidal Cry1Ab protein was examined in the gastrointestinal (GI) contents and visceral organs of calves fed insect-resistant genetically modified maize Bt11. Twelve cross-breed (Japanese black x Holstein) calves were fed either Bt11 or non-genetically modified isoline maize for 90 d. Peripheral blood, rumen juice and feces were collected fortnightly, and GI contents and visceral organs were collected at slaughter at the end of the experiment. Samples were checked for Cry1Ab protein by immunological methods, and visceral organs were examined pathologically. Trace amounts of Cry1Ab protein were detected in the GI contents but not in the liver, spleen, kidney, muscle or mesenteric lymph nodes. No lesions were observed pathologically. Cry1Ab protein in the feces was degraded quickly at atmospheric temperature. These results suggested that only a trace amount of Cry1Ab protein survived passage through the GI tract but was not transferred to liver, spleen, kidney, lymph nodes or muscles.

  8. Cholesterol removal from adult skeletal muscle impairs excitation–contraction coupling and aging reduces caveolin-3 and alters the expression of other triadic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Genaro; Llanos, Paola; Hidalgo, Jorge; Bolaños, Pura; Caputo, Carlo; Riquelme, Alexander; Sánchez, Gina; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol and caveolin are integral membrane components that modulate the function/location of many cellular proteins. Skeletal muscle fibers, which have unusually high cholesterol levels in transverse tubules, express the caveolin-3 isoform but its association with transverse tubules remains contentious. Cholesterol removal impairs excitation–contraction (E–C) coupling in amphibian and mammalian fetal skeletal muscle fibers. Here, we show that treating single muscle fibers from adult mice with the cholesterol removing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased fiber cholesterol by 26%, altered the location pattern of caveolin-3 and of the voltage dependent calcium channel Cav1.1, and suppressed or reduced electrically evoked Ca2+ transients without affecting membrane integrity or causing sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium depletion. We found that transverse tubules from adult muscle and triad fractions that contain ~10% attached transverse tubules, but not SR membranes, contained caveolin-3 and Cav1.1; both proteins partitioned into detergent-resistant membrane fractions highly enriched in cholesterol. Aging entails significant deterioration of skeletal muscle function. We found that triad fractions from aged rats had similar cholesterol and RyR1 protein levels compared to triads from young rats, but had lower caveolin-3 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and increased Na+/K+-ATPase protein levels. Both triad fractions had comparable NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity and protein content of NOX2 subunits (p47phox and gp91phox), implying that NOX activity does not increase during aging. These findings show that partial cholesterol removal impairs E–C coupling and alters caveolin-3 and Cav1.1 location pattern, and that aging reduces caveolin-3 protein content and modifies the expression of other triadic proteins. We discuss the possible implications of these findings for skeletal muscle function in young and aged animals. PMID:25914646

  9. Construction of an S-layer protein exhibiting modified self-assembling properties and enhanced metal binding capacities.

    PubMed

    Pollmann, Katrin; Matys, Sabine

    2007-07-01

    The functional S-layer protein gene slfB of the uranium mining waste pile isolate Bacillus sphaericus JG-A12 was cloned as a polymerase chain reaction product into the expression vector pET Lic/Ek 30 and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli Bl21(DE3). The addition of His tags to the N and C termini enabled the purification of the recombinant protein by Ni-chelating chromatography. The Ni binding capacity of the His-tagged recombinant S-layer protein was compared with that of the wild-type S layer. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analyses demonstrate a significantly enhanced Ni binding capability of the recombinant protein. In addition, the self-assembling properties of the purified modified S-layer proteins were studied by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Whereas the wild-type S-layer proteins re-assembled into regular cylindric structures, the recombinant S-layer proteins reassembled into regular sheets that formed globular agglomerating structures. The nanoporous structure of the protein meshwork, together with its enhanced Ni binding capacity, makes the recombinant S-layer attractive as a novel self-assembling biological template for the fabrication of metal nanoclusters and construction of nanomaterials that are of technical interest.

  10. Compartmentalization of ER-Bound Chaperone Confines Protein Deposit Formation to the Aging Yeast Cell.

    PubMed

    Saarikangas, Juha; Caudron, Fabrice; Prasad, Rupali; Moreno, David F; Bolognesi, Alessio; Aldea, Martí; Barral, Yves

    2017-03-20

    In order to produce rejuvenated daughters, dividing budding yeast cells confine aging factors, including protein aggregates, to the aging mother cell. The asymmetric inheritance of these protein deposits is mediated by organelle and cytoskeletal attachment and by cell geometry. Yet it remains unclear how deposit formation is restricted to the aging lineage. Here, we show that selective membrane anchoring and the compartmentalization of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane confine protein deposit formation to aging cells during division. Supporting the idea that the age-dependent deposit forms through coalescence of smaller aggregates, two deposits rapidly merged when placed in the same cell by cell-cell fusion. The deposits localized to the ER membrane, primarily to the nuclear envelope (NE). Strikingly, weakening the diffusion barriers that separate the ER membrane into mother and bud compartments caused premature formation of deposits in the daughter cells. Detachment of the Hsp40 protein Ydj1 from the ER membrane elicited a similar phenotype, suggesting that the diffusion barriers and farnesylated Ydj1 functioned together to confine protein deposit formation to mother cells during division. Accordingly, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements in dividing cells indicated that a slow-diffusing, possibly client-bound Ydj1 fraction was asymmetrically enriched in the mother compartment. This asymmetric distribution depended on Ydj1 farnesylation and intact diffusion barriers. Taking these findings together, we propose that ER-anchored Ydj1 binds deposit precursors and prevents them from spreading into daughter cells during division by subjecting them to the ER diffusion barriers. This ensures that the coalescence of precursors into a single deposit is restricted to the aging lineage.

  11. Subproteomic analysis of basic proteins in aged skeletal muscle following offgel pre-fractionation.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Joan; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-04-01

    The progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass is a serious pathophysiological problem in the elderly, which warrants detailed biochemical studies into the underlying mechanism of age-related fiber degeneration. Over the last few years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has identified a considerable number of new biomarkers of muscle aging in humans and animal models of sarcopenia. However, interpretation of the proteomic findings is often complicated by technical and biological limitations. Although gel electrophoresis-based approaches represent a highly sensitive analytical way for the large-scale and high-throughput survey of global changes in skeletal muscle proteins during aging, often the presence of components with an isoelectric point in the basic range is underestimated. We, therefore, carried out a comparative subproteomic study of young versus aged rat muscle focusing on potential changes in muscle proteins with an alkaline isoelectric point, using a combination of offgel electrophoresis and two-dimensional (2D) slab gel electrophoresis. Offgel electrophoresis was successfully applied as a prefractionation step to enrich basic protein species from crude tissue extracts representing young adult versus senescent muscle specimens. Proteomics has demonstrated alterations in a small cohort of basic proteins during muscle aging. The mass spectrometric identification of altered proteins and immunoblotting revealed a decrease in the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and a concomitant increase in mitochondrial creatine kinase (CK) and ubiquinol cytochrome‑c reductase. This agrees with the idea of a glycolytic-to-oxidative shift during muscle aging, which is indicative of an overall fast-to-slow transition process in senescent rat muscle. Thus, alterations in the abundance of metabolic enzymes appear to play a central role in the molecular pathogenesis of age‑dependent muscle wasting.

  12. An autoantibody against N{sup {epsilon}}-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL): Possible involvement in the removal of CEL-modified proteins by macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mera, Katsumi; Nagai, Ryoji; Takeo, Kazuhiro; Izumi, Miyoko; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} A higher amount of autoantibody against CEL than that of other AGEs was observed in human plasma. {yields} The purified human anti-CEL autoantibody specifically reacted with CEL. {yields} Anti-CEL antibody accelerated the uptake of {sup 125}I-CEL-HSA by macrophage in vitro. {yields} Endocytic uptake of {sup 125}I-CEL-HSA by mice liver was accelerated in the presence of anti-CEL antibody. -- Abstract: Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to play a significant role in the development of diabetic complications. In this study, we measured the levels of autoantibodies against several AGE structures in healthy human plasma and investigated the physiological role of the autoantibodies. A high titer of the autoantibody against N{sup {epsilon}}-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) was detected in human plasma compared with other AGE structures such as CML and pentosidine. The purified human anti-CEL autoantibody reacted with CEL-modified human serum albumin (CEL-HSA), but not CML-HSA. A rabbit polyclonal anti-CEL antibody, used as a model autoantibody against CEL, accelerated the uptake of CEL-HSA by macrophages, but did not enhance the uptake of native HSA. Furthermore, when {sup 125}I-labeled CEL-HSA was injected into the tail vein of mice, accumulation of {sup 125}I-CEL-HSA in the liver was accelerated by co-injection of the rabbit anti-CEL antibody. These results demonstrate that the autoantibody against CEL in plasma may play a role in the macrophage uptake of CEL-modified proteins.

  13. Alterations in the sarcoplasmic protein fraction of beef muscle with postmortem aging and hydrodynamic pressure processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis were utilized to detect differences in the sarcoplasmic protein profiles of beef strip loins subjected to aging and hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP) treatments. At 48 h postmortem, stri...

  14. C-reactive protein and genetic variants and cognitive decline in old age: The PROSPER Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of chronic inflammation, have been associated with cognitive impairment in old age. However, it is unknown whether CRP is causally linked to cognitive decline. Within the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) tri...

  15. LIFESTYLE DETERMINANTS OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN MIDDLE-AGED, URBAN CHINESE MEN

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Raquel; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cai, Hui; Elasy, Tom; Cai, Qiuyin; Zhang, Xianglan; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae; Li, Honglan; Xu, Wang Hong; Yang, Gong; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), common in aging populations, are associated with higher risk for chronic diseases, including diabetes and coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between lifestyle factors and high CRP among middleaged men living in Shanghai, China. PMID:21111583

  16. Degradation of Cry1Ab protein from genetically modified maize (MON810) in relation to total dietary feed proteins in dairy cow digestion.

    PubMed

    Paul, Vijay; Guertler, Patrick; Wiedemann, Steffi; Meyer, Heinrich H D

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the relative degradation and fragmentation pattern of the recombinant Cry1Ab protein from genetically modified (GM) maize MON810 throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of dairy cows, a 25 months GM maize feeding study was conducted on 36 lactating Bavarian Fleckvieh cows allocated into two groups (18 cows per group) fed diets containing either GM maize MON810 or nearly isogenic non-GM maize as the respective diet components. All cows were fed a partial total mixed ration (pTMR). During the feeding trial, 8 feed (4 transgenic (T) and 4 non-transgenic (NT) pTMR) and 42 feces (26 T and 18 NT) samples from the subset of cows fed T and NT diets, and at the end of the feeding trial, digesta contents of rumen, abomasum, small intestine, large intestine and cecum were collected after the slaughter of six cows of each feeding group. Samples were analyzed for Cry1Ab protein and total protein using Cry1Ab specific ELISA and bicinchoninic acid assay, respectively. Immunoblot analyses were performed to evaluate the integrity of Cry1Ab protein in feed, digesta and feces samples. A decrease to 44% in Cry1Ab protein concentration from T pTMR to the voided feces (9.40 versus 4.18 mug/g of total proteins) was recorded. Concentrations of Cry1Ab protein in GIT digesta of cows fed T diets varied between the lowest 0.38 mug/g of total proteins in abomasum to the highest 3.84 mug/g of total proteins in rumen. Immunoblot analysis revealed the extensive degradation of recombinant Cry1Ab protein into a smaller fragment of around 34 kDa in GIT. The results of the present study indicate that the recombinant Cry1Ab protein from MON810 is increasingly degraded into a small fragment during dairy cow digestion.

  17. Long-Term Estrogen Receptor Beta Agonist Treatment Modifies the Hippocampal Transcriptome in Middle-Aged Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sárvári, Miklós; Kalló, Imre; Hrabovszky, Erik; Solymosi, Norbert; Rodolosse, Annie; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) robustly activates transcription of a broad array of genes in the hippocampal formation of middle-aged ovariectomized rats via estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled ER). Selective ERβ agonists also influence hippocampal functions, although their downstream molecular targets and mechanisms are not known. In this study, we explored the effects of long-term treatment with ERβ agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN, 0.05 mg/kg/day, sc.) on the hippocampal transcriptome in ovariectomized, middle-aged (13 month) rats. Isolated hippocampal formations were analyzed by Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. Four hundred ninety-seven genes fulfilled the absolute fold change higher than 2 (FC > 2) selection criterion. Among them 370 genes were activated. Pathway analysis identified terms including glutamatergic and cholinergic synapse, RNA transport, endocytosis, thyroid hormone signaling, RNA degradation, retrograde endocannabinoid signaling, and mRNA surveillance. PCR studies showed transcriptional regulation of 58 genes encoding growth factors (Igf2, Igfb2, Igf1r, Fgf1, Mdk, Ntf3, Bdnf), transcription factors (Otx2, Msx1), potassium channels (Kcne2), neuropeptides (Cck, Pdyn), peptide receptors (Crhr2, Oprm1, Gnrhr, Galr2, Sstr1, Sstr3), neurotransmitter receptors (Htr1a, Htr2c, Htr2a, Gria2, Gria3, Grm5, Gabra1, Chrm5, Adrb1), and vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (Slc32a1, Slc17a7). Protein-protein interaction analysis revealed networking of clusters associated with the regulation of growth/troph factor signaling, transcription, translation, neurotransmitter and neurohormone signaling mechanisms and potassium channels. Collectively, the results reveal the contribution of ERβ-mediated processes to the regulation of transcription, translation, neurogenesis, neuromodulation, and neuroprotection in the hippocampal formation of ovariectomized, middle-aged rats and elucidate regulatory channels responsible for

  18. Ethylene glycol assisted preparation of Ti(4+)-modified polydopamine coated magnetic particles with rough surface for capture of phosphorylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiangdong; Ding, Chun; Yao, Xin; Jia, Li

    2016-07-27

    The reversible protein phosphorylation is very important in regulating almost all aspects of cell life, while the enrichment of phosphorylated proteins still remains a technical challenge. In this work, polydopamine (PDA) modified magnetic particles with rough surface (rPDA@Fe3O4) were synthesized by introduction of ethylene glycol in aqueous solution. The PDA coating possessing a wealth of catechol hydroxyl groups could serve as an active medium to immobilize titanium ions through the metal-catechol chelation, which makes the fabrication of titanium ions modified rPDA@Fe3O4 particles (Ti(4+)-rPDA@Fe3O4) simple and very convenient. The spherical Ti(4+)-rPDA@Fe3O4 particles have a surface area of 37.7 m(2) g(-1) and superparamagnetism with a saturation magnetization value of 38.4 emu g(-1). The amount of Ti element in the particle was measured to be 3.93%. And the particles demonstrated good water dispersibility. The particles were used as adsorbents for capture of phosphorylated proteins and they demonstrated affinity and specificity for phosphorylated proteins due to the specific binding sites (Ti(4+)). Factors affecting the adsorption of phosphorylated proteins on Ti(4+)-rPDA@Fe3O4 particles were investigated. The adsorption capacity of Ti(4+)-rPDA@Fe3O4 particles for κ-casein was 1105.6 mg g(-1). Furthermore, the particles were successfully applied to isolate phosphorylated proteins in milk samples, which demonstrated that Ti(4+)-rPDA@Fe3O4 particles had potential application in selective separation of phosphorylated proteins.

  19. Engineering functional protein interfaces for immunologically modified field effect transistor (ImmunoFET) by molecular genetic means.

    PubMed

    Eteshola, Edward; Keener, Matthew T; Elias, Mark; Shapiro, John; Brillson, Leonard J; Bhushan, Bharat; Lee, Stephen Craig

    2008-01-06

    The attachment and interactions of analyte receptor biomolecules at solid-liquid interfaces are critical to development of hybrid biological-synthetic sensor devices across all size regimes. We use protein engineering approaches to engineer the sensing interface of biochemically modified field effect transistor sensors (BioFET). To date, we have deposited analyte receptor proteins on FET sensing channels by direct adsorption, used self-assembled monolayers to tether receptor proteins to planar FET SiO2 sensing gates and demonstrated interface biochemical function and electrical function of the corresponding sensors. We have also used phage display to identify short peptides that recognize thermally grown SiO2. Our interest in these peptides is as affinity domains that can be inserted as translational fusions into receptor proteins (antibody fragments or other molecules) to drive oriented interaction with FET sensing surfaces. We have also identified single-chain fragment variables (scFvs, antibody fragments) that recognize an analyte of interest as potential sensor receptors. In addition, we have developed a protein engineering technology (scanning circular permutagenesis) that allows us to alter protein topography to manipulate the position of functional domains of the protein relative to the BioFET sensing surface.

  20. Insights into the evolution of Archaea and eukaryotic protein modifier systems revealed by the genome of a novel archaeal group

    PubMed Central

    Nunoura, Takuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kakuta, Jungo; Nishi, Shinro; Sugahara, Junichi; Kazama, Hiromi; Chee, Gab-Joo; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Akio; Atomi, Haruyuki; Takai, Ken; Takami, Hideto

    2011-01-01

    The domain Archaea has historically been divided into two phyla, the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Although regarded as members of the Crenarchaeota based on small subunit rRNA phylogeny, environmental genomics and efforts for cultivation have recently revealed two novel phyla/divisions in the Archaea; the ‘Thaumarchaeota’ and ‘Korarchaeota’. Here, we show the genome sequence of Candidatus ‘Caldiarchaeum subterraneum’ that represents an uncultivated crenarchaeotic group. A composite genome was reconstructed from a metagenomic library previously prepared from a microbial mat at a geothermal water stream of a sub-surface gold mine. The genome was found to be clearly distinct from those of the known phyla/divisions, Crenarchaeota (hyperthermophiles), Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Korarchaeota. The unique traits suggest that this crenarchaeotic group can be considered as a novel archaeal phylum/division. Moreover, C. subterraneum harbors an ubiquitin-like protein modifier system consisting of Ub, E1, E2 and small Zn RING finger family protein with structural motifs specific to eukaryotic system proteins, a system clearly distinct from the prokaryote-type system recently identified in Haloferax and Mycobacterium. The presence of such a eukaryote-type system is unprecedented in prokaryotes, and indicates that a prototype of the eukaryotic protein modifier system is present in the Archaea. PMID:21169198

  1. Insights into the evolution of Archaea and eukaryotic protein modifier systems revealed by the genome of a novel archaeal group.

    PubMed

    Nunoura, Takuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kakuta, Jungo; Nishi, Shinro; Sugahara, Junichi; Kazama, Hiromi; Chee, Gab-Joo; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Akio; Atomi, Haruyuki; Takai, Ken; Takami, Hideto

    2011-04-01

    The domain Archaea has historically been divided into two phyla, the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Although regarded as members of the Crenarchaeota based on small subunit rRNA phylogeny, environmental genomics and efforts for cultivation have recently revealed two novel phyla/divisions in the Archaea; the 'Thaumarchaeota' and 'Korarchaeota'. Here, we show the genome sequence of Candidatus 'Caldiarchaeum subterraneum' that represents an uncultivated crenarchaeotic group. A composite genome was reconstructed from a metagenomic library previously prepared from a microbial mat at a geothermal water stream of a sub-surface gold mine. The genome was found to be clearly distinct from those of the known phyla/divisions, Crenarchaeota (hyperthermophiles), Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Korarchaeota. The unique traits suggest that this crenarchaeotic group can be considered as a novel archaeal phylum/division. Moreover, C. subterraneum harbors an ubiquitin-like protein modifier system consisting of Ub, E1, E2 and small Zn RING finger family protein with structural motifs specific to eukaryotic system proteins, a system clearly distinct from the prokaryote-type system recently identified in Haloferax and Mycobacterium. The presence of such a eukaryote-type system is unprecedented in prokaryotes, and indicates that a prototype of the eukaryotic protein modifier system is present in the Archaea.

  2. Effects of protein and carbohydrate meals on mood and performance: interactions with sex and age.

    PubMed

    Spring, B; Maller, O; Wurtman, J; Digman, L; Cozolino, L

    Normal adult subjects (n = 184) consumed a high-protein or high-carbohydrate meal. Two hours later their mood and performance were tested. The effects of meal composition on mood were different for men and women, and for older and younger subjects. Females, but not males, reported greater sleepiness after a carbohydrate as opposed to a protein meal. Male subjects, but not females, reported greater calmness after a carbohydrate as opposed to a protein meal. Older subjects responded differently to meals depending upon the time of day when these were consumed. When meals were eaten for breakfast (but not for lunch) individuals 40 yr of age or older felt more tense and less calm after a protein than after a carbohydrate meal. Although older subjects reported subjective discomfort after a morning protein meal, they displayed objective performance impairments after a carbohydrate lunch. Subjects 40 yr of age or older were impaired on a test of sustained selective attention (dichotic shadowing) after consuming a high-carbohydrate lunch. The shadowing impairment after carbohydrate consumption was as pronounced without distraction as with distraction and resulted mostly from increased omission errors. Our findings suggest negative effects on concentration when older subjects consume a high-carbohydrate, low-protein lunch. These negative effects of carbohydrate consumption appear to arise predominantly from lapses of attention rather than from intrusion of distractors.

  3. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    SciTech Connect

    Wise K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-12-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface /sup 125/I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with (/sup 35/S) methionine, /sup 14/C-amino acids, or (/sup 3/H) palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11.

  4. Dietary Protein Modifies the Effect of the MC4R Genotype on 2-Year Changes in Appetite and Food Craving: The POUNDS Lost Trial.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yan; Hruby, Adela; Williamson, Donald A; Bray, George A; Shen, Yiru; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu

    2017-03-01

    Background: The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of appetite and eating behavior. Variants in the MC4R gene have been related to appetite and obesity.Objective: We aimed to examine whether weight-loss diets modified the effect of the "obesity-predisposing" MC4R genotype on appetite-related measures in a randomized controlled trial.Methods: A total of 811 overweight and obese subjects [25 ≤ body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)) ≤ 40] aged 30-70 y were included in the 2-y POUNDS Lost (Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies) trial. We genotyped MC4R rs7227255 in 735 overweight adults and assessed appetite-related characteristics, including craving, fullness, hunger, and prospective consumption, as well as a composite appetite score. We examined the effects of the genotype-by-weight-loss diet intervention interaction on appetite variables by using general linear models in both the whole population and in white participants only.Results: We found that dietary protein intake (low compared with high: 15% of energy compared with 25% of energy, respectively) significantly modified MC4R genetic effects on changes in appetite score and craving (P-interaction = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively) at 2 y, after adjustment for age, sex, ethnicity, baseline BMI, weight change, and baseline perspective phenotype. The obesity-predisposing A allele was associated with a greater increase in overall appetite score (β = 0.10, P = 0.05) and craving (β = 0.13, P = 0.008) compared with the non-A allele among participants who consumed a high-protein diet. MC4R genotype did not modify the effects of fat or carbohydrate intakes on appetite measures. Similar interaction patterns were observed in whites.Conclusion: Our data suggest that individuals with the MC4R rs7227255 A allele rather than the non-A allele might experience greater increases in appetite and food craving when consuming a high-protein weight-loss diet. This trial was registered at

  5. Mechanical properties and microstructural evolution of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel after long-term aging for 50,000 h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Chan-Bock; Hahn, Do-Hee

    2009-08-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructural evolution of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel have been studied to investigate steel property changes after long-term isothermal aging at 600 °C for 50,000 h. The microhardness and strength were maintained constantly after aging but the impact energy was dramatically reduced by 62 % during the aging period. From the viewpoint of microstructural evolution after the aging process, Cr-enrichment and Fe-depletion took place within the M23C6-type precipitates in the as-aged steel and V-depletion also happened within the VX-type precipitates after aging. In addition, the precipitates of the M2Mo-type Laves phase and the segregation of the impurity atoms would be formed during the long-term aging period. It was considered that the sharp reduction of the impact energy could be related to the formation of the Laves phases and the impurity segregation after aging at 600 °C. The phase stability was also verified by the specific heat results up to 950 °C from a DSC test. It was concluded from this study that the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel would keep its microstructural stability at 600 °C during the long-term aging period of 50,000 h, which was equivalent to the in-service life of the SFR fuel cladding.

  6. Dynamic and static strain aging effects in Fe-modified L1[sub 2] Al[sub 3]Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.L.; Pope, D.P.; Vitek, V. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    Serrations have been observed in the stress-strain curves of Fe-modified L1[sub 2] Al[sub 3] Ti-based alloys at intermediate temperatures and related to dynamic interactions between mobile dislocations and solute atoms, i.e. dynamic strain aging effects. Serrations appear only at intermediate, not at high or low temperatures, because of the following reasons: at high temperatures the diffusivity of the solute atoms is high enough that the solute atoms and dislocations move together, thereby requiring no break-away of the dislocations. At low temperatures the diffusivity of the solute atoms is so low that no dynamic interaction can occur, but a static interaction is observed, instead. Thus the entire range of yielding phenomena can be consistently explained in terms of interactions between solute atoms and mobile dislocations and requires no assumptions about changes in the nature of dislocation cores. The solutes giving rise to this effect are likely of substitutional type but have not been identified.

  7. Physical, Heritable and Age-Related Factors as Modifiers of Radiation Cancer Risk in Patched Heterozygous Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pazzaglia, Simonetta Pasquali, Emanuela M.Sc.; Tanori, Mirella; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Di Majo, Vincenzo; Rebessi, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To address the tumorigenic potential of exposure to low/intermediate doses of ionizing radiation and to identify biological factors influencing tumor response in a mouse model highly susceptible to radiogenic cancer. Methods and Materials: Newborn Ptc1 heterozygous mice were exposed to X-ray doses of 100, 250, and 500 mGy, and tumor development was monitored for their lifetime. Additional groups were irradiated with the same doses and sacrificed at fixed times for determination of short-term endpoints, such as apoptosis and early preneoplastic lesions in cerebellum. Finally, groups of Ptc1 heterozygous mice were bred on the C57BL/6 background to study the influence of common variant genes on radiation response. Results: We have identified a significant effect of low-intermediate doses of radiation (250 and 500 mGy) in shortening mean survival and inducing early and more progressed stages of tumor development in the cerebellum of Ptc1{sup +/-} mice. In addition, we show that age at exposure and heritable factors are potent modifiers of radiation-related cancer risk. Conclusions: The Ptc1 knockout mouse model offers a highly sensitive system that may potentially help to improve understanding and quantification of risk at low doses, such as doses experienced in occupational and medical exposures, and clarify the complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors underlying cancer susceptibility.

  8. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Montefiori, David C; LaBranche, Celia C; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background.  In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods.  The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results.  Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions.  The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques.

  9. Strong, but Age-Dependent, Protection Elicited by a Deoxyribonucleic Acid/Modified Vaccinia Ankara Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Kannanganat, Sunil; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Nabi, Rafiq; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Wrammert, Jens; Keele, Brandon F.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Santra, Sampa; Basu, Rahul; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L.; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background. In this study, we analyzed the protective efficacy of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) macaque 239 (SIVmac239) analogue of the clinically tested GOVX-B11 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) human immunodeficiency virus vaccine. Methods. The tested vaccine used a DNA immunogen mutated to mimic the human vaccine and a regimen with DNA deliveries at weeks 0 and 8 and MVA deliveries at weeks 16 and 32. Twelve weekly rectal challenges with 0.3 animal infectious doses of SIV sootey mangabey E660 (SIVsmE660) were administered starting at 6 months after the last immunization. Results. Over the first 6 rectal exposures to SIVsmE660, <10-year-old tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5)α-permissive rhesus macaques showed an 80% reduction in per-exposure risk of infection as opposed to a 46% reduction in animals over 10 years old; and, over the 12 challenges, they showed a 72% as opposed to a 10% reduction. Analyses of elicited immune responses suggested that higher antibody responses in the younger animals had played a role in protection. Conclusions. The simian analogue of the GOVX-B11 HIV provided strong protection against repeated rectal challenges in young adult macaques. PMID:27006959

  10. Evaluation of alkyne-modified isoprenoids as chemical reporters of protein prenylation.

    PubMed

    DeGraw, Amanda J; Palsuledesai, Charuta; Ochocki, Joshua D; Dozier, Jonathan K; Lenevich, Stepan; Rashidian, Mohammad; Distefano, Mark D

    2010-12-01

    Protein prenyltransferases catalyze the attachment of C15 (farnesyl) and C20 (geranylgeranyl) groups to proteins at specific sequences localized at or near the C-termini of specific proteins. Determination of the specific protein prenyltransferase substrates affected by the inhibition of these enzymes is critical for enhancing knowledge of the mechanism of such potential drugs. Here, we investigate the utility of alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogs for chemical proteomics experiments by showing that these compounds readily penetrate mammalian cells in culture and become incorporated into proteins that are normally prenylated. Derivatization via Cu(I) catalyzed click reaction with a fluorescent azide reagent allows the proteins to be visualized and their relative levels to be analyzed. Simultaneous treatment of cells with these probes and inhibitors of prenylation reveals decreases in the levels of some but not all of the labeled proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoretic separation of these labeled proteins followed by mass spectrometric analysis allowed several labeled proteins to be unambiguously identified. Docking experiments and density functional theory calculations suggest that the substrate specificity of protein farnesyl transferase may vary depending on whether azide- or alkyne-based isoprenoid analogs is employed. These results demonstrate the utility of alkyne-containing analogs for chemical proteomic applications.

  11. Ageing and protein aggregation-mediated disorders: from invertebrates to mammals.

    PubMed

    Dillin, Andrew; Cohen, Ehud

    2011-01-12

    Late onset is a common hallmark character of numerous disorders including human neurodegenerative maladies such as Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Why these diseases manifest in aged individuals and why distinct disorders share strikingly similar emergence patterns were until recently unsolved enigmas. During the past decade, invertebrate-based studies indicated that the insulin/IGF signalling pathway (IIS) mechanistically links neurodegenerative-associated toxic protein aggregation and ageing; yet, until recently it was unclear whether this link is conserved from invertebrates to mammals. Recent studies performed in Alzheimer's mouse models indicated that ageing alteration by IIS reduction slows the progression of Alzheimer's-like disease, protects the brain and mitigates the behavioural, pathological and biochemical impairments associated with the disease. Here, we review these novel studies and discuss the potential of ageing alteration as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of late onset neurodegeneration.

  12. Protein and Amino Acid Restriction, Aging and Disease: from yeast to humans

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Suarez, Jorge A.; Longo, Valter D.

    2014-01-01

    Many of the effects of dietary restriction (DR) on longevity and health span in model organisms have been linked to reduced protein and amino acid (AA) intake and the stimulation of specific nutrient signaling pathways. Studies in yeast have shown that addition of serine, threonine, and valine in media promotes cellular sensitization and aging by activating different but connected pathways. Protein or essential AA restriction extends both lifespan and healthspan in rodent models. In humans, protein restriction (PR) has been associated with reduced cancer, diabetes, and overall mortality. Thus, interventions aimed at lowering the intake of proteins or specific AAs can be beneficial and have the potential to be widely adopted and effective in optimizing healthspan. PMID:25153840

  13. Protein and amino acid restriction, aging and disease: from yeast to humans.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Suarez, Jorge A; Longo, Valter D

    2014-11-01

    Many of the effects of dietary restriction (DR) on longevity and health span in model organisms have been linked to reduced protein and amino acid (AA) intake and the stimulation of specific nutrient signaling pathways. Studies in yeast have shown that addition of serine, threonine, and valine in media promotes cellular sensitization and aging by activating different but connected pathways. Protein or essential AA restriction extends both lifespan and healthspan in rodent models. In humans, protein restriction (PR) has been associated with reduced cancer, diabetes, and overall mortality. Thus, interventions aimed at lowering the intake of proteins or specific AAs can be beneficial and have the potential to be widely adopted and effective in optimizing healthspan.

  14. Evaluation of a modified early warning system for acute medical admissions and comparison with C-reactive protein/albumin ratio as a predictor of patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Emily; Cairns, Eleanor; Hamilton, Jennifer; Kelly, Clive

    2009-02-01

    The modified early warning score (MEWS) was developed as a track and trigger tool for the prompt identification of seriously ill patients on an acute medical ward. This paper examines its value in the setting of an acute medical admissions unit (MAU) and compares it to biochemical markers of acute and chronic disease. Three hundred unselected acute admissions to the MAU of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead, were assessed. Correlations between MEWS score and C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin separately were assessed, and then the relationship between MEWS and the CRP/albumin ratio across the age spectrum was examined. The findings demonstrated a strong correlation between the MEWS score and CRP/albumin ratio (r=0.88, p<0.001) across the whole age spectrum. Length of stay correlated poorly with MEWS (r=0.08) and CRP/albumin ratio (r=0.15). Overall mortality was 5% and was predicted by both tools, with a MEWS score of >4 (relative risk (RR)=7.8) outperforming a CRP/albumin of >2 (RR=2.6). MEWS remains the gold standard for assessing outcome in acute medical admissions, but does have limitations in the elderly (those aged over 70 years). A raised CRP/albumin ratio was less sensitive for overall mortality than MEWS. It did, however, appear to be of greater value in the elderly, especially in those with acute exacerbations of chronic disease. Neither test accurately predicted length of stay.

  15. Epidemic spreading model to characterize misfolded proteins propagation in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Sotero, Roberto C; Toussaint, Paule J; Evans, Alan C

    2014-11-01

    Misfolded proteins (MP) are a key component in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders. For example, misfolded Amyloid-ß (Aß) and tau proteins are two neuropathogenic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Mechanisms underlying intra-brain MP propagation/deposition remain essentially uncharacterized. Here, is introduced an epidemic spreading model (ESM) for MP dynamics that considers propagation-like interactions between MP agents and the brain's clearance response across the structural connectome. The ESM reproduces advanced Aß deposition patterns in the human brain (explaining 46∼56% of the variance in regional Aß loads, in 733 subjects from the ADNI database). Furthermore, this model strongly supports a) the leading role of Aß clearance deficiency and early Aß onset age during Alzheimer's disease progression, b) that effective anatomical distance from Aß outbreak region explains regional Aß arrival time and Aß deposition likelihood, c) the multi-factorial impact of APOE e4 genotype, gender and educational level on lifetime intra-brain Aß propagation, and d) the modulatory impact of Aß propagation history on tau proteins concentrations, supporting the hypothesis of an interrelated pathway between Aß pathophysiology and tauopathy. To our knowledge, the ESM is the first computational model highlighting the direct link between structural brain networks, production/clearance of pathogenic proteins and associated intercellular transfer mechanisms, individual genetic/demographic properties and clinical states in health and disease. In sum, the proposed ESM constitutes a promising framework to clarify intra-brain region to region transference mechanisms associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Aging results in an unusual expression of Drosophila heat shock proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.E.; Walton, J.K.; Dubitsky, R.; Bensch, K.G. )

    1988-06-01

    The authors used high-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to evaluate the effect of aging on the heat shock response in Drosophila melanogaster. Although the aging process is not well understood at the molecular level, recent observations suggest that quantitative changes in gene expression occur as these fruit flies approach senescence. Such genetic alterations are in accord with our present data, which clearly show marked differences in the synthesis of heat shock proteins between young and old fruit flies. In 10-day-old flies, a heat shock of 20 min results in the expression of 14 new proteins as detectable by two-dimensional electrophoresis of ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled polypeptides, whereas identical treatment of 45-day-old flies leads to the expression of at least 50 new or highly up-regulated proteins. In addition, there is also a concomitant increase in the rate of synthesis of a number of the normal proteins in the older animals. Microdensitometric determinations of the low molecular weight heat shock polypeptides on autoradiographs of five age groups revealed that their maximum expression occurs at 47 days for a population of flies with a mean life span of 33.7 days. Moreover, a heat shock effect similar to that observed in senescent flies occurs in young flies fed canavanine, an arginine analogue, before heat shock.

  17. Microbial production of amino acid-modified spider dragline silk protein with intensively improved mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibo; Zhou, Fengli; Jiang, Xinglin; Cao, Mingle; Wang, Shilu; Zou, Huibin; Cao, Yujin; Xian, Mo; Liu, Huizhou

    2016-08-17

    Spider dragline silk is a remarkably strong fiber with impressive mechanical properties, which were thought to result from the specific structures of the underlying proteins and their molecular size. In this study, silk protein 11R26 from the dragline silk protein of Nephila clavipes was used to analyze the potential effects of the special amino acids on the function of 11R26. Three protein derivatives, ZF4, ZF5, and ZF6, were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis, based on the sequence of 11R26, and among these derivatives, serine was replaced with cysteine, isoleucine, and arginine, respectively. After these were expressed and purified, the mechanical performance of the fibers derived from the four proteins was tested. Both hardness and average elastic modulus of ZF4 fiber increased 2.2 times compared with those of 11R26. The number of disulfide bonds in ZF4 protein was 4.67 times that of 11R26, which implied that disulfide bonds outside the poly-Ala region affect the mechanical properties of spider silk more efficiently. The results indicated that the mechanical performances of spider silk proteins with small molecular size can be enhanced by modification of the amino acids residues. Our research not only has shown the feasibility of large-scale production of spider silk proteins but also provides valuable information for protein rational design.

  18. Purification of prenylated proteins by affinity chromatography on cyclodextrin-modified agarose

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jinhwa A.; Wollack, James W.; Hovlid, Marisa L.; Okesli, Ayse; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.; Distefano, Mark D.; Taton, T. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although protein prenylation is widely studied, there are few good methods for isolating prenylated proteins from their non-prenylated relatives. We report that crosslinked agarose (e.g., Sepharose) chromatography media that has been chemically functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) is extremely effective in affinity chromatography of prenylated proteins. In this study, a variety of proteins with C-terminal prenylation target (“CAAX box”) sequences were enzymatically prenylated in vitro with natural and non-natural prenyl diphosphate substrates. The prenylated protein products could then be isolated from starting materials by gravity chromatography or fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a β-CD-Sepharose column. One particular prenylation reaction—farnesylation of a mCherry-CAAX fusion construct—was studied in detail. In this case, purified farnesylated product was unambiguously identified by electrospray mass spectrometry. In addition, when mCherry-CAAX was prenylated with a non-natural, functional isoprenoid substrate, the functional group was maintained by chromatography on β-CD-Sepharose, such that the resulting protein could be selectively bound at its C terminus to complementary functionality on a solid substrate. Finally, β-CD-Sepharose FPLC was used to isolate prenylated mCherry-CAAX from crude HeLa cell lysate, as a model for purifying prenylated proteins from cell extracts. We propose that this method could be generally useful to the community of researchers studying protein prenylation. PMID:18834849

  19. Evaluation of alkyne-modified isoprenoids as chemical reporters of protein prenylation

    PubMed Central

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Palsuledesai, Charuta; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Dozier, Jonathan K.; Lenevich, Stepan; Rashidian, Mohammad; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Protein prenyltransferases catalyze the attachment of C15 (farnesyl) and C20 (geranylgeranyl) groups to proteins at specific sequences localized at or near the C-termini of specific proteins. Determination of the specific protein prenyltransferase substrates affected by the inhibition of these enzymes is critical for enhancing knowledge of the mechanism of such potential drugs. Here we investigate the utility of alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogues for chemical proteomics experiments by showing that these compounds readily penetrate mammalian cells in culture and become incorporated into proteins that are normally prenylated. Derivatization via Cu(I) catalyzed Click reaction with a fluorescent azide reagent allows the proteins to be visualized and their relative levels to be analyzed. Simultaneous treatment of cells with these probes and inhibitors of prenylation reveals decreases in the levels of some but not all of the labeled proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoretic separation of these labeled proteins followed by mass spectrometric analysis allowed several labeled proteins to be unambiguously identified. Docking experiments and DFT calculations suggest that the substrate specificity of PFTase may vary depending on whether azide- or alkyne-based isoprenoid analogues are employed. These results demonstrate the utility of alkyne-containing analogues for chemical proteomic applications. PMID:21040496

  20. Biochemistry of plant class IV chitinases and fungal chitinase-modifying proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant class IV chitinases have 2 domains, a small (3 kDa) amino-terminal domain with homology to carbohydrate binding peptides, and a larger (25 kDa) catalytic domain. The biological function of these chitinases is not known. But it is known that some pathogenic fungi secrete chitinase modifying pro...

  1. Cell separation by immunoaffinity partitioning with polyethylene glycol-modified Protein A in aqueous polymer two-phase systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton

    1988-01-01

    Previous work has shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-bound antibodies can be used as affinity ligands in PEG-dextran two-phase systems to provide selective partitioning of cells to the PEG-rich phase. In the present work it is shown that immunoaffinity partitioning can be simplified by use of PEG-modified Protein A which complexes with unmodified antibody and cells and shifts their partitioning into the PEG-rich phase, thus eliminating the need to prepare a PEG-modified antibody for each cell type. In addition, the paper provides a more rigorous test of the original technique with PEG-bound antibodies by showing that it is effective at shifting the partitioning of either cell type of a mixture of two cell populations.

  2. Ageing of solid-state protein films: Behavior of azurin at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, P. P.; Bramanti, A.; Maruccio, G.; Mercato, L. L. del; Cingolani, R.; Rinaldi, R.

    2005-03-01

    We report on the folding properties of the protein azurin, deposited onto SiO 2 surfaces and subsequently dehydrated. The molecular films have been maintained at ambient conditions through several days, and the ageing effects have been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental results show a modest initial conformational rearrangement, followed by long-term stability. Interestingly, upon rehydration of the biomolecular films at the end of the investigated period (approximately one month), azurin returns to exhibit a native-like conformation. This study indicates a rather surprising resilience of proteins to ambient conditions and sheds a somewhat unexpected positive light on reliability in biomolecular electronics.

  3. Expression of PAT and NPT II proteins during the developmental stages of a genetically modified pepper developed in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Si Myung; Kim, Jae Kwang; Ryu, Tae Hun; Suh, Seok Cheol; Cho, Hyun Suk

    2010-10-27

    Estimation of the protein levels introduced in a biotechnology-derived product is conducted as part of an overall safety assessment. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyze phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPT II) protein expression in a genetically modified (GM) pepper plant developed in Korea. PAT and NPT II expression levels, based on both dry weight and fresh weight, were variable among different plant generations and plant sections from isolated genetically modified organism (GMO) fields at four developmental stages. PAT expression was highest in leaves at anthesis (11.44 μg/gdw and 2.17 μg/gfw) and lowest in roots (0.12 μg/gdw and 0.01 μg/gfw). NPT II expression was also highest in leaves at anthesis (17.31 μg/gdw and 3.41 μg/gfw) and lowest in red pepper (0.65 μg/gdw and 0.12 μg/gfw). In pollen, PAT expression was 0.59-0.62 μg/gdw, while NPT II was not detected. Both PAT and NPT II showed a general pattern of decreased expression with progression of the growing season. As expected, PAT and NPT II protein expression was not detectable in control pepper plants.

  4. Histone modifying proteins Gcn5 and Hda1 affect flocculation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during high-gravity fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dietvorst, Judith; Brandt, Anders

    2010-02-01

    The performance of yeast is often limited by the constantly changing environmental conditions present during high-gravity fermentation. Poor yeast performance contributes to incomplete and slow utilization of the main fermentable sugars which can lead to flavour problems in beer production. The expression of the FLO and MAL genes, which are important for the performance of yeast during industrial fermentations, is affected by complex proteins associated with Set1 (COMPASS) resulting in the induction of flocculation and improved maltose fermentation capacity during the early stages of high-gravity fermentation. In this study, we investigated a possible role for other histone modifying proteins. To this end, we tested a number of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases and we report that flocculation is induced in absence of the histone deacetylase Hda1 or the histone acetyltransferase Gcn5 during high-gravity fermentation. The absence of Gcn5 protein also improved utilization of high concentrations of maltose. Deletion of SIR2 encoding the HDA of the silent informator regulator complex, did not affect flocculation under high-gravity fermentation conditions. Despite the obvious roles for Hda1 and Gcn5 in flocculation, this work indicates that COMPASS mediated silencing is the most important amongst the histone modifying components to control the expression of the FLO genes during high-gravity fermentation.

  5. Effects of vacuum and modified atmosphere on textural parameters and structural proteins of cultured meagre (Argyrosomus regius) fillets.

    PubMed

    Sáez, María I; Martínez, Tomás F; Cárdenas, Salvador; Suárez, María D

    2015-09-01

    The influence of two preservation strategies (vacuum package and modified atmosphere package) on the post-mortem changes of textural parameters, pH, water holding capacity, sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins, and collagen content of meagre (Argyrosomus regius) fillets was studied. Fillets were stored in a cold room in aerobic (control, C), vacuum (V) and modified atmosphere (MA) package. Samples were withdrawn at six sampling points throughout 15-day storage, and post-mortem changes were assessed. The textural parameters were significantly enhanced in V and MA compared to C. Both V and MA treatments reduced the intensity of a group of myofibrillar protein fractions (140-195 kDa) and increased insoluble collagen compared to C. Consequently, the post-mortem flesh softening in C was attributed to increased proteolysis in both intracellular and extracellular structural proteins. The preservation of the textural and biochemical characteristics of meagre fillets subjected to V and MA treatments makes these two treatments highly recommendable for the commercialization of meagre fillets.

  6. Proteomic approach to identify champagne wine proteins as modified by Botrytis cinerea infection.

    PubMed

    Cilindre, Clara; Jégou, Sandrine; Hovasse, Agnès; Schaeffer, Christine; Castro, Antonio J; Clément, Christophe; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Jeandet, Philippe; Marchal, Richard

    2008-03-01

    The presence of the fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea, in the vineyard causes reductions in both quality and quantity of grapes and wine. Because proteins are involved in the foam stabilization of sparkling wines, we have undertaken, for the first time, a thorough proteomic analysis of two champagne base wines prepared with either healthy or botrytized Chardonnay grapes, using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) coupled with immunodetection and tandem mass spectrometry. Most of the identified proteins were from grape origin: invertase and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The disappearance of numerous grape proteins was observed in the botrytized wine, suggesting that they were probably degraded or even repressed or the result of a differential expression of grape proteins upon fungal infection. On the other hand, two pectinolytic enzymes secreted by B. cinerea were found in the botrytized wine.

  7. Identification of proteins associated with RNA polymerase III using a modified tandem chromatin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Thuy-Trinh; Saguez, Cyril; Conesa, Christine; Lefebvre, Olivier; Acker, Joël

    2015-02-01

    To identify the proteins associated with the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) machinery in exponentially growing yeast cells, we developed our own tandem chromatin affinity purification procedure (TChAP) after in vivo cross-link, allowing a reproducible and good recovery of the protein bait and its associated partners. In contrast to TFIIIA that could only be purified as a free protein, this protocol allows us to capture free Pol III together with Pol III bound on its target genes. Transcription factors, elongation factors, RNA-associated proteins and proteins involved in Pol III biogenesis were identified by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the presence of all the TFIIIB subunits found associated with Pol III together with the absence of TFIIIC and chromatin factors including histones suggest that DNA-bound Pol III purified using TChAP is mainly engaged in transcription reinitiation.

  8. Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-directed G Protein Signaling Specificity for the Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide Family of Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Cathryn; Winfield, Ian; Harris, Matthew; Hodgson, Rose; Shah, Archna; Dowell, Simon J.; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Woodlock, David A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Poyner, David R.; Watkins, Harriet A.; Ladds, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is formed through the association of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and one of three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). Binding of one of the three peptide ligands, CGRP, adrenomedullin (AM), and intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 (AM2), is well known to result in a Gαs-mediated increase in cAMP. Here we used modified yeast strains that couple receptor activation to cell growth, via chimeric yeast/Gα subunits, and HEK-293 cells to characterize the effect of different RAMP and ligand combinations on this pathway. We not only demonstrate functional couplings to both Gαs and Gαq but also identify a Gαi component to CLR signaling in both yeast and HEK-293 cells, which is absent in HEK-293S cells. We show that the CGRP family of receptors displays both ligand- and RAMP-dependent signaling bias among the Gαs, Gαi, and Gαq/11 pathways. The results are discussed in the context of RAMP interactions probed through molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations of the RAMP-GPCR-G protein complexes. This study further highlights the importance of RAMPs to CLR pharmacology and to bias in general, as well as identifying the importance of choosing an appropriate model system for the study of GPCR pharmacology. PMID:27566546

  9. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.505 Bacillus... of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  10. Degradation of Cry1Ab protein from genetically modified maize in the bovine gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Bodo; Wiedemann, Steffi; Einspanier, Ralf; Mayer, Johann; Albrecht, Christiane

    2005-03-09

    Immunoblotting assays using commercial antibodies were established to investigate the unexpected persistence of the immunoactive Cry1Ab protein in the bovine gastrointestinal tract (GIT) previously suggested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples of two different feeding experiments in cattle were analyzed with both ELISA and immunoblotting methods. Whereas results obtained by ELISA suggested that the concentration of the Cry1Ab protein increased during the GIT passage, the immunoblotting assays revealed a significant degradation of the protein in the bovine GIT. Samples showing a positive signal in the ELISA consisted of fragmented Cry1Ab protein of approximately 17 and 34 kDa size. Two independent sets of gastrointestinal samples revealed the apparent discrepancy between the results obtained by ELISA and immunoblotting, suggesting that the antibody used in the ELISA reacts with fragmented yet immunoactive epitopes of the Cry1Ab protein. It was concluded that Cry1Ab protein is degraded during digestion in cattle. To avoid misinterpretation, samples tested positive for Cry1Ab protein by ELISA should be reassessed by another technique.

  11. Spectroscopy detection of green and red fluorescent proteins in genetically modified plants using a fiber optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Oi Wah; Asundi, Anand K.; Chen, Jun-Wei; Chew, Yiwen; Yu, Shangjuan; Yeo, Gare H.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, fiber optic spectroscopy is developed to detect and quantify recombinant green (EGFP) and red (DsRED) fluorescent proteins in vitro and in vivo. The bacterial expression vectors carrying the coding regions of EGFP and DsRED were introduced into Escherichia coli host cells and fluorescent proteins were produced following induction with IPTG. Soluble EGFP and DsRED proteins were isolated from lysed bacterial cells and serially diluted for quantitative analysis by fiber optic spectroscopy. Fluorescence at the appropriate emission wavelengths could be detected up to 64X dilution for EGFP and 40X dilution for DsRED. To determine the capability of spectroscopy detection in vivo, transgenic potato hairy roots expressing EGFP and DsRED were regenerated. This was achieved by cloning the EGFP and DsRED genes into the plant binary vector, pTMV35S, to create the recombinant vectors pGLOWGreen and pGLOWRed. These latter binary vectors were introduced into Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain A4T. Infection of potato cells with transformed agrobacteria was used to insert the fluorescent protein genes into the potato genome. Genetically modified potato cells were then regenerated into hairy roots. A panel of transformed hairy roots expressing varying levels of fluorescent proteins was selected by fluorescence microscopy. We are now assessing the capability of spectroscopic detection system for in vivo quantification of green and red fluorescence levels in transformed roots.

  12. A shotgun proteomic study of the protein corona associated with cholesterol and atheronal-B surface-modified quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Prapainop, Kanlaya; Wentworth, Paul

    2011-04-01

    As part of ongoing research in our group, we are keen to monitor the protein binding and movement of sterols and oxysterols in biological systems in real time. However, prior to performing these in vivo studies, we have herein studied how sterol and oxysterol surface modification of quantum dots affects their associated protein coronas. Thus, we have synthesized and analyzed cholesterol and atheronal-B surface-modified quantum dots (termed QD-chol and QD-ath-B, respectively). The fluorescence properties and aggregation propensities of QD-chol and QD-ath-B are unchanged relative to amino-functionalized quantum dots (QD-NH(2)) in aqueous buffers. Shotgun proteomic analyses of the protein coronas reveal that QD-ath-B and QD-chol are bound significantly higher to LDL, vLDL and HDL particles than QD-NH(2). Thus, almost all the component proteins of the HDL and LDL proteomes are elevated in the protein coronas around the QD-chol and QD-ath-B nanomaterials. In addition, the reduced positive surface charge of the QD-chol and QD-ath-B materials, relative to QD-NH(2), means that hydrophobic antibody light chain fragments and β-2-glycoprotein (apo H) bind them preferentially to QD-NH(2).

  13. IN-MACA-MCC: Integrated Multiple Attractor Cellular Automata with Modified Clonal Classifier for Human Protein Coding and Promoter Prediction.

    PubMed

    Pokkuluri, Kiran Sree; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu; Nedunuri, S S S N Usha Devi

    2014-01-01

    Protein coding and promoter region predictions are very important challenges of bioinformatics (Attwood and Teresa, 2000). The identification of these regions plays a crucial role in understanding the genes. Many novel computational and mathematical methods are introduced as well as existing methods that are getting refined for predicting both of the regions separately; still there is a scope for improvement. We propose a classifier that is built with MACA (multiple attractor cellular automata) and MCC (modified clonal classifier) to predict both regions with a single classifier. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with Fickett and Tung (1992) datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 54, 108, and 162. This classifier is trained and tested with MMCRI datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 252 and 354. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with promoter sequences from DBTSS (Yamashita et al., 2006) dataset and nonpromoters from EID (Saxonov et al., 2000) and UTRdb (Pesole et al., 2002) datasets. The proposed model can predict both regions with an average accuracy of 90.5% for promoter and 89.6% for protein coding region predictions. The specificity and sensitivity values of promoter and protein coding region predictions are 0.89 and 0.92, respectively.

  14. Overexpression of the transcription factor Yap1 modifies intracellular redox conditions and enhances recombinant protein secretion

    PubMed Central

    Delic, Marizela; Graf, Alexandra B.; Koellensperger, Gunda; Haberhauer-Troyer, Christina; Hann, Stephan; Mattanovich, Diethard; Gasser, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative folding of secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a redox active process, which also impacts the redox conditions in the cytosol. As the transcription factor Yap1 is involved in the transcriptional response to oxidative stress, we investigate its role upon the production of secretory proteins, using the yeast Pichia pastoris as model, and report a novel important role of Yap1 during oxidative protein folding. Yap1 is needed for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by increased oxidative protein folding. Constitutive co-overexpression of PpYAP1 leads to increased levels of secreted recombinant protein, while a lowered Yap1 function leads to accumulation of ROS and strong flocculation. Transcriptional analysis revealed that more than 150 genes were affected by overexpression of YAP1, in particular genes coding for antioxidant enzymes or involved in oxidation-reduction processes. By monitoring intracellular redox conditions within the cytosol and the ER using redox-sensitive roGFP1 variants, we could show that overexpression of YAP1 restores cellular redox conditions of protein-secreting P. pastoris by reoxidizing the cytosolic redox state to the levels of the wild type. These alterations are also reflected by increased levels of oxidized intracellular glutathione (GSSG) in the YAP1 co-overexpressing strain. Taken together, these data indicate a strong impact of intracellular redox balance on the secretion of (recombinant) proteins without affecting protein folding per se. Re-establishing suitable redox conditions by tuning the antioxidant capacity of the cell reduces metabolic load and cell stress caused by high oxidative protein folding load, thereby increasing the secretion capacity. PMID:28357216

  15. Determination of protein-ligand interactions using accelerator mass spectrometry: modified crosslinking assay.

    PubMed

    Hah, Sang Soo

    2009-05-01

    A highly sensitive detection method for the determination of protein-ligand interactions has been developed. Radiocarbon-labeled 17beta-estradiol was incubated with estrogen receptor-alpha; as a selective binding partner, and covalently attached using crosslinking agents, to form covalently linked protein-ligand complexes. After separation using a denaturing gel, the (14)C content in the sliced gels was identified by accelerator mass spectrometry. The obtained data demonstrated specific binding of the small molecule to its binding partner. In theory, this method can be applied to most protein-ligand interaction studies.

  16. Age-dependent modifications of the human salivary secretory protein complex.

    PubMed

    Cabras, Tiziana; Pisano, Elisabetta; Boi, Roberto; Olianas, Alessandra; Manconi, Barbara; Inzitari, Rosanna; Fanali, Chiara; Giardina, Bruno; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene

    2009-08-01

    Physiological variability of the naturally occurring, human salivary secretory peptidome was studied as a function of age. The qualitative and quantitative changes occurring in the secretion of proteins/peptides specific to the oral cavity (i.e., basic salivary proline-rich proteins, salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins, statherin, proline-rich peptide P-B, salivary cystatins, and histatins) were investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry in 67 subjects aged between 3 and 44 years. Subjects were divided into five age groups: group A, 8 donors, 3-5 years; group B, 11 donors, 6-9 years; group C, 20 donors, 10-12 years; group D, 15 donors, 13-17 years; group E, 13 donors, 24-44 years. Basic salivary proline-rich proteins, almost undetectable in the 3-5 and 6-9 years groups, reached salivary levels comparable to that of adults (24-44 years) around puberty. Levels of peptide P-D, basic peptide P-F, peptide P-H, peptide P-J (a new basic salivary proline-rich protein characterized in this study), and basic proline-rich peptide IB-1 were significantly higher in the 10-12-year-old group than in the 3-5-year-old group, whereas the increase of proline-rich peptide II-2 was significant only after the age of 12 years. The concentration of salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins, histatin-3 1/24, histatin-3 1/25, and monophosphorylated and diphosphorylated cystatin S showed a minimum in the 6-9-year-old group. Finally, the histatin-1 concentration was significantly higher in the youngest subjects (3-5 years) than in the other groups.

  17. Separation of macromolecular proteins and removal of humic acid by cellulose acetate modified UF membranes.

    PubMed

    Kanagaraj, P; Nagendran, A; Rana, D; Matsuura, T

    2016-08-01

    Surface modifying macromolecules (SMMs) were synthesized with various polyurethane pre polymers end-capped with different groups and blended into the casting solution of cellulose acetate (CA) to prepare surface modified ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for water filtration applications. The surface modification of the CA membranes was confirmed by the FTIR and static contact angle (SCA) measurements. The membranes so prepared had the typical characteristics of UF membranes as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Membrane properties were studied in terms of membrane compaction, percentage water content (%WC), pure water flux (PWF), membrane hydraulic resistance (Rm), molecular weight cut-off (MWCO), average pore size and porosity. The result showed that PWF, %WC, MWCO and pore size increased whereas the Rm decreased by the addition of SMMs. The significant effect of SMMs on the fouling by humic acid (HA) was also observed. It was found that the cSMM-3 membrane, in which SMM was synthesized with diethylene glycol (DEG) and hydroxyl benzene sulfonate (HBS) was blended, had the highest flux recovery ratio FRR (84.6%), as well as the lowest irreversible fouling (15.4%), confirming their improved antifouling properties. Thus, the SMM modified CA membranes had proven, to play an important role in the water treatment by UF.

  18. Aging, Protein Aggregation, Chaperones, and Neurodegenerative Disorders: Mechanisms of Coupling and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Late onset is a key unifying feature of human neurodegenerative maladies such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and prion disorders. While sporadic cases typically emerge during the patient’s seventh decade of life or later, mutation-linked, familial cases manifest during the fifth or sixth decade. This common temporal emergence pattern raises the prospect that slowing aging may prevent the accumulation of toxic protein aggregates that lead to the development of these disorders, postpone the onset of these maladies, and alleviate their symptoms once emerged. Invertebrate-based studies indicated that reducing the activity of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS), a prominent aging regulatory pathway, protects from neurodegeneration-linked toxic protein aggregation. The validity of this approach has been tested and confirmed in mammals as reducing the activity of the IGF-1 signaling pathway-protected Alzheimer’s model mice from the behavioral and biochemical impairments associated with the disease. Here I review the recent advances in the field, describe the known mechanistic links between toxic protein aggregation and the aging process, and delineate the future therapeutic potential of IIS reduction as a treatment for various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23908845

  19. Protein and DNA oxidation in different anatomic regions of rat brain in a mimetic ageing model.

    PubMed

    Yanar, Karolin; Aydın, Seval; Cakatay, Ufuk; Mengi, Murat; Buyukpınarbaşılı, Nur; Atukeren, Pınar; Sitar, Mustafa E; Sönmez, Aslı; Uslu, Ezel

    2011-12-01

    It has been reported that d-galactose administration causes an increase in oxidative and osmotic stresses in several tissues of rodents. In this study, we established a brain ageing model by using d-galactose and investigated the concentrations of oxidative stress markers on the hippocampus, parietal and frontal lobes of male Sprague-Dawley rats. A mimetic ageing model was established by injecting d-galactose (60 mg/kg/day/i.p.) in the experimental group for 42 days. At the end of this period, we tested spatial memory using the Morris water maze test. To investigate the magnitude of oxidative damage in proteins, lipids and DNA, we studied the concentrations of various oxidative stress parameters in the hippocampus, parietal and frontal lobes of the brain. Glial and neuronal cell oxidative damage was observed in each of the three anatomic regions. It was found that protein carbonyl groups and advanced oxidation product concentrations in the d-galactose applied group were significantly high in each of the three brain lobes compared with the control group. Thiol concentration was found to be decreased in the parietal lobe. A concurrent increase in lipid hydroperoxides was also observed in this lobe. On the other hand, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration was significantly increased in the hippocampal lobe of rats in the experimental group when compared with the controls. The results obtained from the mimetic ageing model rats showed that various anatomical regions of brain have different susceptibility to oxidative damage of proteins, lipids and DNA.

  20. Aging, protein aggregation, chaperones, and neurodegenerative disorders: mechanisms of coupling and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ehud

    2012-10-01

    Late onset is a key unifying feature of human neurodegenerative maladies such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and prion disorders. While sporadic cases typically emerge during the patient's seventh decade of life or later, mutation-linked, familial cases manifest during the fifth or sixth decade. This common temporal emergence pattern raises the prospect that slowing aging may prevent the accumulation of toxic protein aggregates that lead to the development of these disorders, postpone the onset of these maladies, and alleviate their symptoms once emerged. Invertebrate-based studies indicated that reducing the activity of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS), a prominent aging regulatory pathway, protects from neurodegeneration-linked toxic protein aggregation. The validity of this approach has been tested and confirmed in mammals as reducing the activity of the IGF-1 signaling pathway-protected Alzheimer's model mice from the behavioral and biochemical impairments associated with the disease. Here I review the recent advances in the field, describe the known mechanistic links between toxic protein aggregation and the aging process, and delineate the future therapeutic potential of IIS reduction as a treatment for various neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. X-box-binding protein 1-modified neural stem cells for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Si, Lihui; Xu, Tianmin; Wang, Fengzhang; Liu, Qun; Cui, Manhua

    2012-04-05

    X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells were transplanted into the right lateral ventricles of rats with rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease. The survival capacities and differentiation rates of cells expressing the dopaminergic marker tyrosine hydroxylase were higher in X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells compared to non-transfected cells. Moreover, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels in the substantia nigra were significantly increased, α-synuclein expression was decreased, and neurological behaviors were significantly ameliorated in rats following transplantation of X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells. These results indicate that transplantation of X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells can promote stem cell survival and differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, increase dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels, reduce α-synuclein aggregation in the substantia nigra, and improve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in rats.

  2. Covalently modified silicon and diamond surfaces: resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption and optimization for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lasseter, Tami L; Clare, Brian H; Abbott, Nicholas L; Hamers, Robert J

    2004-08-25

    We report the direct covalent functionalization of silicon and diamond surfaces with short ethylene glycol (EG) oligomers via photochemical reaction of the hydrogen-terminated surfaces with terminal vinyl groups of the oligomers, and the use of these monolayers to control protein binding at surfaces. Photochemical modification of Si(111) and polycrystalline diamond surfaces produces EG monolayers linked via Si-C bond formation (silicon) or C-C bond formation (diamond). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the monolayer composition. Measurements using fluorescently labeled proteins show that the EG-functionalized surfaces effectively resist nonspecific adsorption of proteins. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of mixed monolayers on silicon and diamond and apply these surfaces to control specific versus nonspecific binding to optimize a model protein sensing assay.

  3. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc−/− tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc−/− tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  4. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fractures using the modified dynamic hip screw with autogenous bone and bone morphogenetic protein-2 composite materials grafting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dasheng; Zuo, Shenjia; Li, Lin; Wang, Lei; Lian, Kejian

    2015-01-01

    Background: The neglected femoral neck fracture is one where there has been a delay of more than 30 days to seek medical help from the time of the original injury. Salvage procedures, such as osteotomy and other treatment options such as vascularized and nonvascularized bone grafts have high failure rates and arthroplasty procedures are not ideal, given the patient's young age and higher levels of activity. We designed a hollow bone graft dynamic hip screw (Hb-DHS) (modified DHS, Hb-DHS) for use in neglected femoral neck fractures. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of the modified dynamic hip screw (DHS) with autogenous bone and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) composite materials grafting for the treatment of the neglected femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out in twenty patients of neglected femoral neck fractures treated with the modified DHS with autogenous bone and BMP-2 composite materials grafting between July 2007 and February 2010. There were 14 men and 6 women with a mean age of 29.6 years (range 19–42 years). The mean time from injury to surgery was 9.7 weeks (range 6–16 weeks). The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, fracture healing time, Harris scoring for hip function and complications were recorded to evaluate treatment effects. Results: The mean operation time was 75.8 min (range 55–100 min) with mean intraoperative blood loss volume of 105 mL (range 70–220 mL). The mean time to union was 17 weeks (range 12–24 weeks). One patient did not achieve union, and two patients had avascular necrosis of the femoral head. This patient with nonunion underwent intertrochanteric osteotomy. In patients with avascular necrosis one required total hip arthroplasty, the other did not require intervention at the last followup. A total of 14 patients (70%) had excellent results, 2 (10%) had good, 1 (5%) had moderate and 3 (15%) had poor results. Conclusion: The modified DHS with autogenous

  5. A Modular Approach To Study Protein Adsorption on Surface Modified Hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Ozhukil Kollath, Vinayaraj; Van den Broeck, Freya; Fehér, Krisztina; Martins, José C; Luyten, Jan; Traina, Karl; Mullens, Steven; Cloots, Rudi

    2015-07-13

    Biocompatible inorganic nano- and microcarriers can be suitable candidates for protein delivery. This study demonstrates facile methods of functionalization by using nanoscale linker molecules to change the protein adsorption capacity of hydroxyapatite (HA) powder. The adsorption capacity of bovine serum albumin as a model protein has been studied with respect to the surface modifications. The selected linker molecules (lysine, arginine, and phosphoserine) can influence the adsorption capacity by changing the electrostatic nature of the HA surface. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of linker-molecule interactions with the HA surface have been performed by using NMR spectroscopy, zeta-potential measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyses. Additionally, correlations to theoretical isotherm models have been calculated with respect to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Lysine and arginine increased the protein adsorption, whereas phosphoserine reduced the protein adsorption. The results show that the adsorption capacity can be controlled with different functionalization, depending on the protein-carrier selections under consideration. The scientific knowledge acquired from this study can be applied in various biotechnological applications that involve biomolecule-inorganic material interfaces.

  6. Pepsin degradation of Cry1A(b) protein purified from genetically modified maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    de Luis, Ruth; Lavilla, María; Sánchez, Lourdes; Calvo, Miguel; Pérez, María D

    2010-02-24

    The aim of this work was to study the in vitro digestion of Cry1A(b) protein by pepsin. To perform this work, a protein fraction purified from transgenic maize by immunoadsorption was employed. The undigested fraction showed several bands of molecular weight ranging between 14 and 70 kDa when assayed by SDS-PAGE. These bands were identified as corresponding to Cry1A(b) protein by immunochemical techniques and mass spectrometry. The rate of degradation of the purified fraction by pepsin estimated by ELISA was found to be about 75% within 30 min, and the protein concentration remained constant up to 4 h. In all treated samples, the full-length protein and fragments present in Cry1A(b) fraction were absent and peptides of less than 8.5 kDa were mainly found by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry. These peptides did not react with antiserum against Cry1A(b) protein by Western blotting. These results suggest that Cry1A(b) fraction purified from transgenic maize is rapidly and extensively degraded by pepsin, giving peptides of low molecular mass.

  7. Endothelial cell palmitoylproteomics identifies novel lipid modified targets and potential substrates for protein acyl transferases

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Ethan P.; Derakhshan, Behrad; Lam, TuKiet T.; Davalos, Alberto; Sessa, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Protein S-palmitoylation is the post-translational attachment of a saturated 16-carbon palmitic acid to a cysteine side chain via a thioester bond. Palmitoylation can affect protein localization, trafficking, stability, and function. The extent and roles of palmitoylation in endothelial cell (EC) biology is not well understood, in part due to technological limits on palmitoylprotein detection. Objective To develop a method using acyl-biotinyl exchange (ABE) technology coupled with mass spectrometry to globally isolate and identify palmitoylproteins in EC. Methods and Results More than 150 putative palmitoyl proteins were identified in EC using ABE and mass spectrometry. Among the novel palmitoylproteins identified is superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), an intensively studied enzyme that protects all cells from oxidative damage. Mutation of cysteine 6 prevents palmitoylation, leads to reduction in SOD1 activity in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits nuclear localization, thereby supporting a functional role for SOD1 palmitoylation. Moreover, we used ABE to search for substrates of particular protein acyl transferases in EC. We found that palmitoylation of the cell adhesion protein PECAM1 is dependent on the protein acyl transferase ZDHHC21. We show that knockdown of ZDHHC21 leads to reduced levels of PECAM1 at the cell surface. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the utility of EC palmitoylproteomics to reveal new insights into the role of this important post-translational lipid modification in EC biology. PMID:22496122

  8. Global proteomic analysis of prenylated proteins in Plasmodium falciparum using an alkyne-modified isoprenoid analogue

    PubMed Central

    Suazo, Kiall F.; Schaber, Chad; Palsuledesai, Charuta C.; Odom John, Audrey R.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum infection remains a serious threat to health worldwide and new therapeutic targets are highly desirable. Small molecule inhibitors of prenyl transferases, enzymes that catalyze the post-translational isoprenyl modifications of proteins, exhibit potent antimalarial activity. The antimalarial actions of prenyltransferase inhibitors indicate that protein prenylation is required for malaria parasite development. In this study, we used a chemical biology strategy to experimentally characterize the entire complement of prenylated proteins in the human malaria parasite. In contrast to the expansive mammalian and fungal prenylomes, we find that P. falciparum possesses a restricted set of prenylated proteins. The prenylome of P. falciparum is dominated by Rab GTPases, in addition to a small number of prenylated proteins that also appear to function primarily in membrane trafficking. Overall, we found robust experimental evidence for a total of only thirteen prenylated proteins in P. falciparum, with suggestive evidence for an additional two probable prenyltransferase substrates. Our work contributes to an increasingly complete picture of essential, post-translational hydrophobic modifications in blood-stage P. falciparum. PMID:27924931

  9. Global proteomic analysis of prenylated proteins in Plasmodium falciparum using an alkyne-modified isoprenoid analogue.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Kiall F; Schaber, Chad; Palsuledesai, Charuta C; Odom John, Audrey R; Distefano, Mark D

    2016-12-07

    Severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum infection remains a serious threat to health worldwide and new therapeutic targets are highly desirable. Small molecule inhibitors of prenyl transferases, enzymes that catalyze the post-translational isoprenyl modifications of proteins, exhibit potent antimalarial activity. The antimalarial actions of prenyltransferase inhibitors indicate that protein prenylation is required for malaria parasite development. In this study, we used a chemical biology strategy to experimentally characterize the entire complement of prenylated proteins in the human malaria parasite. In contrast to the expansive mammalian and fungal prenylomes, we find that P. falciparum possesses a restricted set of prenylated proteins. The prenylome of P. falciparum is dominated by Rab GTPases, in addition to a small number of prenylated proteins that also appear to function primarily in membrane trafficking. Overall, we found robust experimental evidence for a total of only thirteen prenylated proteins in P. falciparum, with suggestive evidence for an additional two probable prenyltransferase substrates. Our work contributes to an increasingly complete picture of essential, post-translational hydrophobic modifications in blood-stage P. falciparum.

  10. The role of the anti-ageing protein Klotho in vascular physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Mencke, Rik; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2017-05-01

    Klotho is an anti-ageing protein that functions in many pathways that govern ageing, like regulation of phosphate homeostasis, insulin signaling, and Wnt signaling. Klotho expression levels and levels in blood decline during ageing. The vascular phenotype of Klotho deficiency features medial calcification, intima hyperplasia, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening, hypertension, and impaired angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, with characteristics similar to aged human arteries. Klotho-deficient phenotypes can be prevented and rescued by Klotho gene expression or protein supplementation. High phosphate levels are likely to be directly pathogenic and are a prerequisite for medial calcification, but more important determinants are pathways that regulate cellular senescence, suggesting that deficiency of Klotho renders cells susceptible to phosphate toxicity. Overexpression of Klotho is shown to ameliorate medial calcification, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension. Endogenous vascular Klotho expression is a controversial subject and, currently, no compelling evidence exists that supports the existence of vascular membrane-bound Klotho expression, as expressed in kidney. In vitro, Klotho has been shown to decrease oxidative stress and apoptosis in both SMCs and ECs, to reduce SMC calcification, to maintain the contractile SMC phenotype, and to prevent μ-calpain overactivation in ECs. Klotho has many protective effects with regard to the vasculature and constitutes a very promising therapeutic target. The purpose of this review is to explore the etiology of the vascular phenotype of Klotho deficiency and the therapeutic potential of Klotho in vascular disease.

  11. Specific protein changes contribute to the differential muscle mass loss during ageing.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, Daniele; Vasso, Michele; De Palma, Sara; Fania, Chiara; Torretta, Enrica; Cammarata, Francesco P; Magnaghi, Valerio; Procacci, Patrizia; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2016-02-01

    In the skeletal muscle, the ageing process is characterized by a loss of muscle mass and strength, coupled with a decline of mitochondrial function and a decrease of satellite cells. This profile is more pronounced in hindlimb than in forelimb muscles, both in humans and in rodents. Utilizing light and electron microscopy, myosin heavy chain isoform distribution, proteomic analysis by 2D-DIGE, MALDI-TOF MS and quantitative immunoblotting, this study analyzes the protein levels and the nuclear localization of specific molecules, which can contribute to a preferential muscle loss. Our results identify the molecular changes in the hindlimb (gastrocnemius) and forelimb (triceps) muscles during ageing in rats (3- and 22-month-old). Specifically, the oxidative metabolism contributes to tissue homeostasis in triceps, whereas respiratory chain disruption and oxidative-stress-induced damage imbalance the homeostasis in gastrocnemius muscle. High levels of dihydrolipoyllysine-residue acetyltransferase (Dlat) and ATP synthase subunit alpha (Atp5a1) are detected in triceps and gastrocnemius, respectively. Interestingly, in triceps, both molecules are increased in the nucleus in aged rats and are associated to an increased protein acetylation and myoglobin availability. Furthermore, autophagy is retained in triceps whereas an enhanced fusion, decrement of mitophagy and of regenerative potential is observed in aged gastrocnemius muscle.

  12. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the cytosol to induce T cell immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yichen; Friedman, Rachel; Kushner, Nicholas; Doling, Amy; Thomas, Lawrence; Touzjian, Neal; Starnbach, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2000-07-01

    Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliver foreign proteins to the cytosol for antigen presentation to CD8 T cells. Vaccination with modified toxins carrying 8-9 amino acid peptide epitopes induces protective immunity in mice. To evaluate whether large protein antigens can be used with this system, recombinant constructs encoding several HIV antigens up to 500 amino acids were produced. These candidate HIV vaccines are safe in animals and induce CD8 T cells in mice. Constructs encoding gag p24 and nef stimulate gag-specific CD4 proliferation and a secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in HIV-infected donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. These results lay the foundation for future clinical vaccine studies.

  13. Absorption-mode Fourier transform mass spectrometry: the effects of apodization and phasing on modified protein spectra.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yulin; Li, Huilin; Wills, Rebecca H; Perez-Hurtado, Pilar; Yu, Xiang; Kilgour, David P A; Barrow, Mark P; Lin, Cheng; O'Connor, Peter B

    2013-06-01

    The method of phasing broadband Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectra allows plotting the spectra in the absorption-mode; this new approach significantly improves the quality of the data at no extra cost. Herein, an internal calibration method for calculating the phase function has been developed and successfully applied to the top-down spectra of modified proteins, where the peak intensities vary by 100×. The result shows that the use of absorption-mode spectra allows more peaks to be discerned within the recorded data, and this can reveal much greater information about the protein and modifications under investigation. In addition, noise and harmonic peaks can be assigned immediately in the absorption-mode.

  14. Homeodomain-Interacting Protein Kinase (HPK-1) regulates stress responses and ageing in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Slavica; Wood, Mallory; Llamosas, Estelle; Thaivalappil, Priya; Lee, Karen; Liao, Bing Mana; Chew, Yee Lian; Rhodes, Aaron; Yucel, Duygu; Crossley, Merlin; Nicholas, Hannah R

    2016-01-01

    Proteins of the Homeodomain-Interacting Protein Kinase (HIPK) family regulate an array of processes in mammalian systems, such as the DNA damage response, cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a single HIPK homologue called HPK-1. Previous studies have implicated HPK-1 in longevity control and suggested that this protein may be regulated in a stress-dependent manner. Here we set out to expand these observations by investigating the role of HPK-1 in longevity and in the response to heat and oxidative stress. We find that levels of HPK-1 are regulated by heat stress, and that HPK-1 contributes to survival following heat or oxidative stress. Additionally, we show that HPK-1 is required for normal longevity, with loss of HPK-1 function leading to a faster decline of physiological processes that reflect premature ageing. Through microarray analysis, we have found that HPK-1-regulated genes include those encoding proteins that serve important functions in stress responses such as Phase I and Phase II detoxification enzymes. Consistent with a role in longevity assurance, HPK-1 also regulates the expression of age-regulated genes. Lastly, we show that HPK-1 functions in the same pathway as DAF-16 to regulate longevity and reveal a new role for HPK-1 in development. PMID:26791749

  15. An OGA-Resistant Probe Allows Specific Visualization and Accurate Identification of O-GlcNAc-Modified Proteins in Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Jiajia; Wen, Liuqing; Zhu, He; Li, Shanshan; Huang, Kenneth; Jiang, Kuan; Li, Xu; Ma, Cheng; Qu, Jingyao; Parameswaran, Aishwarya; Song, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Peng George

    2016-11-18

    O-linked β-N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is an essential and ubiquitous post-translational modification present in nucleic and cytoplasmic proteins of multicellular eukaryotes. The metabolic chemical probes such as GlcNAc or GalNAc analogues bearing ketone or azide handles, in conjunction with bioorthogonal reactions, provide a powerful approach for detecting and identifying this modification. However, these chemical probes either enter multiple glycosylation pathways or have low labeling efficiency. Therefore, selective and potent probes are needed to assess this modification. We report here the development of a novel probe, 1,3,6-tri-O-acetyl-2-azidoacetamido-2,4-dideoxy-d-glucopyranose (Ac34dGlcNAz), that can be processed by the GalNAc salvage pathway and transferred by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) to O-GlcNAc proteins. Due to the absence of a hydroxyl group at C4, this probe is less incorporated into α/β 4-GlcNAc or GalNAc containing glycoconjugates. Furthermore, the O-4dGlcNAz modification was resistant to the hydrolysis of O-GlcNAcase (OGA), which greatly enhanced the efficiency of incorporation for O-GlcNAcylation. Combined with a click reaction, Ac34dGlcNAz allowed the selective visualization of O-GlcNAc in cells and accurate identification of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins with LC-MS/MS. This probe represents a more potent and selective tool in tracking, capturing, and identifying O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in cells and cell lysates.

  16. Redox proteomics analysis of HNE-modified proteins in Down syndrome brain: clues for understanding the development of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Pupo, Gilda; Tramutola, Antonella; Giorgi, Alessandra; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Coccia, Raffaella; Head, Elizabeth; Butterfield, D Allan; Perluigi, Marzia

    2014-06-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, due to partial or complete triplication of chromosome 21. DS subjects are characterized by a number of abnormalities including premature aging and development of Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology after approximately 40 years of age. Several studies show that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the development of neurodegeneration in the DS population. Increased lipid peroxidation is one of the main events causing redox imbalance within cells through the formation of toxic aldehydes that easily react with DNA, lipids, and proteins. In this study we used a redox proteomics approach to identify specific targets of 4-hydroxynonenal modifications in the frontal cortex from DS cases with and without AD pathology. We suggest that a group of identified proteins followed a specific pattern of oxidation in DS vs young controls, probably indicating characteristic features of the DS phenotype; a second group of identified proteins showed increased oxidation in DS/AD vs DS, thus possibly playing a role in the development of AD. The third group of comparison, DS/AD vs old controls, identified proteins that may be considered specific markers of AD pathology. All the identified proteins are involved in important biological functions including intracellular quality control systems, cytoskeleton network, energy metabolism, and antioxidant response. Our results demonstrate that oxidative damage is an early event in DS, as well as dysfunctions of protein-degradation systems and cellular protective pathways, suggesting that DS subjects are more vulnerable to oxidative damage accumulation that might contribute to AD development. Further, considering that the majority of proteins have been already demonstrated to be oxidized in AD brain, our results strongly support similarities with AD in DS.

  17. Modified water solubility of milk protein concentrate powders through the application of static high pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Udabage, Punsandani; Puvanenthiran, Amirtha; Yoo, Jin Ah; Versteeg, Cornelis; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2012-02-01

    The effects of high pressure (HP) treatment (100-400 MPa at 10-60 °C) on the solubility of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powders were tested. The solubility, measured at 20 °C, of fresh MPC powders made with no HP treatment was 66%. It decreased by 10% when stored for 6 weeks at ambient temperature (~20 °C) and continued to decrease to less than 50% of its initial solubility after 12 months of storage. Of the combinations of pressure and heat used, a pressure of 200 MPa at 40 °C applied to the concentrate before spray drying was found to be the most beneficial for improved solubility of MPC powders. This combination of pressure/heat improved the initial cold water solubility to 85%. The solubility was maintained at this level after 6 weeks storage at ambient temperature and 85% of the initial solubility was preserved after 12 months. The improved solubility of MPC powders on manufacture and on storage are attributed to an altered surface composition arising from an increased concentration of non-micellar casein in the milk due to HP treatment prior to drying. The improved solubility of high protein powders (95% protein) made from blends of sodium caseinate and whey protein isolate compared with MPC powders (~85% protein) made from ultrafiltered/diafiltered milk confirmed the detrimental role of micellar casein on solubility. The results suggest that increasing the non-micellar casein content by HP treatment of milk or use of blends of sodium caseinate and whey proteins are strategies that may be used to obtain high protein milk powders with enhanced solubility.

  18. RNF38 encodes a nuclear ubiquitin protein ligase that modifies p53

    SciTech Connect

    Sheren, Jamie E.; Kassenbrock, C. Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •RNF38 is shown to be a nuclear protein with a bipartite nuclear localization signal. •RNF38 protein is purified and shown to have ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity. •We show that RNF38 binds p53 and can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro. •Overexpression of RNF38 increases p53 ubiquitination in HEK293T cells. •Overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells alters p53 localization. -- Abstract: The RNF38 gene encodes a RING finger protein of unknown function. Here we demonstrate that RNF38 is a functional ubiquitin protein ligase (E3). We show that RNF38 isoform 1 is localized to the nucleus by a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS). We confirm that RNF38 is a binding partner of p53 and demonstrate that RNF38 can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells results in relocalization of p53 to discrete foci associated with PML nuclear bodies. These results suggest RNF38 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that may play a role in regulating p53.

  19. Chemically modified diamond-like carbon (DLC) for protein enrichment and profiling by MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Najam-ul-Haq, M; Rainer, M; Huck, C W; Ashiq, M N; Bonn, G K

    2012-08-01

    The development of new high throughput methods based on different materials with chemical modifications for protein profiling of complex mixtures leads towards biomarkers; used particularly for early diagnosis of a disease. In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) is developed and optimized for serum protein profiling by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). This study is carried out in connection with a material-based approach, termed as material-enhanced laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. DLC is selected as carrier surface which provides large surface to volume ratio and offers high sensitivity. DLC has a dual role of working as MALDI target while acting as an interface for protein profiling by specifically binding peptides and proteins out of serum samples. Serum constituents are bound through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) functionality, created through glycidyl methacrylate polymerization under ultraviolet light followed by further derivatization with iminodiacetic acid and copper ion loading. Scanning electron microscopy highlights the morphological characteristics of DLC surface. It could be demonstrated that IMAC functionalized DLC coatings represent a powerful material in trapping biomolecules for their further analysis by MALDI-MS resulting in improved sensitivity, specificity and capacity in comparison to other protein-profiling methods.

  20. Functional Properties of Pea (Pisum sativum, L.) Protein Isolates Modified with Chymosin

    PubMed Central

    Barać, Miroljub; Čabrilo, Slavica; Pešić, Mirjana; Stanojević, Slađana; Pavlićević, Milica; Maćej, Ognjen; Ristić, Nikola

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of limited hydrolysis on functional properties, as well as on protein composition of laboratory-prepared pea protein isolates, were investigated. Pea protein isolates were hydrolyzed for either 15, 30 and 60 min with recombined chymosin (Maxiren). The effect of enzymatic action on solubility, emulsifying and foaming properties at different pH values (3.0; 5.0; 7.0 and 8.0) was monitored. Chymosin can be a very useful agent for improvement of functional properties of isolates. Action of this enzyme caused a low degree of hydrolysis (3.9–4.7%), but improved significantly functional properties of pea protein isolates (PPI), especially at lower pH values (3.0–5.0). At these pH values all hydrolysates had better solubility, emulsifying activity and foaming stability, while longer-treated samples (60 min) formed more stable emulsions at higher pH values (7.0, 8.0) than initial isolates. Also, regardless of pH value, all hydrolysates showed improved foaming ability. A moderate positive correlation between solubility and emulsifying activity index (EAI) (0.74) and negative correlation between solubility and foam stability (−0.60) as well as between foam stability (FS) and EAI (−0.77) were observed. Detected enhancement in functional properties was a result of partial hydrolysis of insoluble protein complexes. PMID:22272078

  1. Selective cleavage of thioether linkage in proteins modified with 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, K; Stadtman, E R

    1992-01-01

    The peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids leads to numerous products, including 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). That 4-hydroxy-2-alkenal compounds react with sulfhydryl groups of proteins to form thioether adducts possessing a carbonyl function has been established [Schauenstein, E. & Esterbauer, H. (1979) Ciba Found. Symp. 67, 225-244]. Taking advantage of the fact that Raney nickel catalyzes cleavage of thioether bonds, we have developed a procedure to quantitate the amount of HNE moiety bound to protein by means of a thioether linkage. Adducts of HNE with N-acetylcysteine and glutathione were prepared, labeled with NaB[3H]H4, and then treated with Raney nickel. The 3H-labeled product was recovered in 85-90% yield from both HNE-N-acetylcysteine and HNE-glutathione adducts in a solvent [10% (vol/vol) methanol/chloroform]-estractable form. Treatment of proteins with HNE led to the disappearance of protein sulfhydryl groups. However, less than 10% of the labeled adducts obtained after subsequent reduction with NaB[3H]H4 could be released in a solvent-extractable form upon treatment with Raney nickel. This and the observation that HNE reacts with proteins lacking a sulfhydryl group attests to the fact that HNE can react with amino acid residues other than cysteinyl residues. Images PMID:1608970

  2. Protein, cell and bacterial fouling resistance of polypeptoid-modified surfaces: effect of side-chain chemistry†

    PubMed Central

    Statz, Andrea R.; Barron, Annelise E.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2011-01-01

    Peptidomimetic polymers consisting of poly-N-substituted glycine oligomers (polypeptoids) conjugated to biomimetic adhesive polypeptides were investigated as antifouling surface coatings. The polymers were immobilized onto TiO2 surfaces via an anchoring peptide consisting of alternating residues of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and lysine. Three polypeptoid side-chain compositions were investigated for antifouling performance and stability toward enzymatic degradation. Ellipsometry and XPS analysis confirmed that purified polymers adsorbed strongly to TiO2 surfaces, and the immobilized polymers were resistant to enzymatic degradation as demonstrated by mass spectrometry. All polypeptoid-modified surfaces exhibited significant reductions in adsorption of lysozyme, fibrinogen and serum proteins, and were resistant to 3T3 fibroblast cell attachment for up to seven days. Long-term in vitro cell attachment studies conducted for six weeks revealed the importance of polypeptoid side-chain composition, with a methoxyethyl side chain providing superior long-term fouling resistance compared to hydroxyethyl and hydroxypropyl side chains. Finally, attachment of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria for up to four days under continuous-flow conditions was significantly reduced on the polypeptoid-modified surfaces compared to unmodified TiO2 surfaces. The results reveal the influence of polypeptoid side-chain chemistry on short-term and long-term protein, cell and bacterial fouling resistance. PMID:21472038

  3. Impact of PEG and PEG-b-PAGE modified PLGA on nanoparticle formation, protein loading and release.

    PubMed

    Rietscher, René; Czaplewska, Justyna A; Majdanski, Tobias C; Gottschaldt, Michael; Schubert, Ulrich S; Schneider, Marc; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-03-16

    The effect of modifying the well-established pharmaceutical polymer PLGA by different PEG-containing block-copolymers on the preparation of ovalbumin (OVA) loaded PLGA nanoparticles (NPs) was studied. The used polymers contained poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and poly(allyl glycidyl ether) (PAGE) as building blocks. The double emulsion technique yielded spherical NPs in the size range from 170 to 220 nm (PDI<0.15) for all the differently modified polymers, allowing to directly compare protein loading of and release. PEGylation is usually believed to increase the hydrophilic character of produced particles, favoring encapsulation of hydrophilic substances. However, in this study simple PEGylation of PLGA had only a slight effect on protein release. In contrast, incorporating a PAGE block between the PEG and PLGA units, also eventually enabling active targeting introducing a reactive group, led to a significantly higher loading (+25%) and release rate (+100%), compared to PLGA and PEG-b-PLGA NPs.

  4. In-situ Optical Waveguides for Monitoring and Modifying Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Ursula; Osterberg, Ulf

    2004-01-01

    The use of electric fields in the growth of protein crystals was investigated, both theoretically and experimentally. We used dc, ac and optical fields to change the spatial distribution of proteins. Dc fields had only local effects, due to the conductivity of the growth solution. We found that for low frequency fields, movement of the buffer and salt ions dominated, and that for high frequency ac fields, &electrophoretic effects could be useful for relocating growing protein crystals. The most promising result was that for optical fields, a large gradient in the field could be used to capture a crystal, and observe growth in-situ. This concept could be developed into an experimental setup compatible with automated x-ray diffraction measurements in microgravity.

  5. Generation of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 Proteins of Bluetongue Virus.

    PubMed

    Marín-López, Alejandro; Ortego, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) is employed widely as an experimental vaccine vector for its lack of replication in mammalian cells and high expression level of foreign/heterologous genes. Recombinant MVAs (rMVAs) are used as platforms for protein production as well as vectors to generate vaccines against a high number of infectious diseases and other pathologies. The portrait of the virus combines desirable elements such as high-level biological safety, the ability to activate appropriate innate immune mediators upon vaccination, and the capacity to deliver substantial amounts of heterologous antigens. Recombinant MVAs encoding proteins of bluetongue virus (BTV), an Orbivirus that infects domestic and wild ruminants transmitted by biting midges of the Culicoides species, are excellent vaccine candidates against this virus. In this chapter we describe the methods for the generation of rMVAs encoding VP2, NS1, and VP7 proteins of bluetongue virus as a model example for orbiviruses. The protocols included cover the cloning of VP2, NS1, and VP7 BTV-4 genes in a transfer plasmid, the construction of recombinant MVAs, the titration of virus working stocks and the protein expression analysis by immunofluorescence and radiolabeling of rMVA infected cells as well as virus purification.

  6. Quantitative analysis of polyethylene glycol (PEG) in PEG-modified proteins/cytokines by aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Delgado, C; Malik, F; Selisko, B; Fisher, D; Francis, G E

    1994-12-01

    Covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to proteins produces conjugates with altered/improved physicochemical and biological properties which depend upon the number of PEG chains linked. Quantification of the attached PEG is however not a trivial issue. The partition coefficient, K, of the PEG-protein conjugate in PEG/dextran two-phase systems provides a quantitative measure for the degree of modification. A linear relationship between log K and the number of PEG chains was observed in fractionated PEG-modified-granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor conjugates having 1 to 3 substitutions. Furthermore, in mixtures of PEG-bovine-serum-albumin conjugates with increasing degrees of modification, a linear relationship was found between log K and n, the average substitution. The increment in log K per PEG chain added is protein specific and this suggests that the interactions between the PEG-protein conjugate and the polymers in the phase system are more complex than just a simple affinity of the PEG for the PEG-rich top phase. Increasing the polymer concentration in the phase system produces larger increments in log K per PEG molecule attached and the proportionality between log K and number of PEG molecules is only compromised for conjugates with high degree of substitution when partitioned in biphasic systems of high concentration of polymers.

  7. Ubiquitin promoter-terminator cassette promotes genetically stable expression of the taste-modifying protein miraculin in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Shohael, Abdullah Mohammad; Kim, You-Wang; Yano, Megumu; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Lettuce is a commercially important leafy vegetable that is cultivated worldwide, and it is also a target crop for plant factories. In this study, lettuce was selected as an alternative platform for recombinant miraculin production because of its fast growth, agronomic value, and wide availability. The taste-modifying protein miraculin is a glycoprotein extracted from the red berries of the West African native shrub Richadella dulcifica. Because of its limited natural availability, many attempts have been made to produce this protein in suitable alternative hosts. We produced transgenic lettuce with miraculin gene driven either by the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette from lettuce or a 35S promoter/nos terminator cassette. Miraculin gene expression and miraculin accumulation in both cassettes were compared by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression level of the miraculin gene and protein in transgenic lettuce was higher and more genetically stable in the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette than in the 35S promoter/nos terminator cassette. These results demonstrated that the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette is an efficient platform for the genetically stable expression of the miraculin protein in lettuce and hence this platform is of benefit for recombinant miraculin production on a commercial scale.

  8. Detection of genetically modified organisms in foods by protein- and DNA-based techniques: bridging the methods.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Gert J; van Biert, Ria; Bleeker-Marcelis, Henriette; Van Boeijen, Ineke; Adan, Abdi Jama; Jhakrie, Soeniei; Hessing, Martin

    2002-01-01

    According to European Commission (EC) Regulation 1139/98, foods and food ingredients that are to be delivered to the final consumer in which either protein or DNA resulting from genetic modification is present, shall be subject to additional specific labeling requirements. Since 1994, genetically altered tomatoes, squash, potatoes, canola, cotton, and soy have been on the market. Recently, insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant maize varieties have been introduced. Soy and maize are 2 of the most important vegetable crops in the world. During the past 4 years, both protein- and DNA-based methods have been developed and applied for detection of transgenic soy and maize, and their derivatives. For protein-based detection, specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies have been developed; for immunochemical detection, Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays are the most prominent examples. For detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) at the level of DNA, polymerase chain reaction-based methods are mainly used. For these reactions, highly specific primer sets are needed. This study compares the principally different methods. Specificity of methods and the possible risks of false-positive or false-negative results are considered in relation to sampling, matrix effects, and food processing procedures. In addition, quantitative aspects of protein- and DNA-based GM detection methods are presented and discussed. This is especially relevant as EC regulation 49/2000, which defines a threshold for an unintentional comingling of 1%, came into force on April 10, 2000.

  9. An all-aqueous route to polymer brush-modified membranes with remarkable permeabilites and protein capture rates

    PubMed Central

    Anuraj, Nishotha; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Geiger, James H.; Baker, Gregory L.; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2011-01-01

    Microporous membranes are attractive for protein purification because convection rapidly brings proteins to binding sites. However, the low binding capacity of such membranes limits their applications. This work reports a rapid, aqueous procedure to create highly permeable, polymer brush-modified membranes that bind large amounts of protein. The synthetic method includes a 10-min adsorption of a macroinitiator in a hydroxylated nylon membrane and a subsequent 5-min aqueous atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl succinate from the immobilized initiator to form poly(acid) brushes. This procedure likely leads to more swollen, less dense brushes than polymerization from silane initiators, and thus requires less polymer to achieve the same binding capacity. The hydraulic permeability of the poly(acid) membranes is 4-fold higher than that of similar membranes prepared by growing brushes from immobilized silane initiators. These brush-containing nylon membranes bind 120 mg/cm3 of lysozyme using solution residence times as short as 35 ms, and when functionalized with nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-Ni2+ complexes, they capture 85 mg/cm3 of histidine6-tagged (His-tagged) Ubiquitin. Additionally the NTA-Ni2+-functionalized membranes isolate His-tagged myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase directly from cell extracts and show >90% recovery of His-tagged proteins. PMID:22287817

  10. Carbon nanotube-modified sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for molecular weight determination of proteins.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Meera; Debgupta, Joyashish; Kakade, Bhalchandra; Ansary, Abu A; Islam Khan, M; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K

    2011-02-15

    The effect of incorporating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the gel matrix on the electrophoretic mobility of proteins based on their molecular weight differences was investigated using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE