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Sample records for age parental education

  1. Effective Parenting Education through Age-Paced Newsletters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Susan K.; Nelson, Pat Tanner

    2004-01-01

    For more than 20 years, Cooperative Extension University and county faculty throughout the nation have made available an unusually parent-friendly series of educational newsletters. Monthly issues of the newsletters address information by age groups. Through local and state collaborations that often feature the county Extension office, hospitals,…

  2. Parent-Child Educational Centers: A Facility for Early Childhood Education Ages, Infancy to Seven Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Univ., Tempe.

    A Parent-Child Educational Center is a coordinating activity purposing to serve parents along with their children from a child's infancy through the age of seven. Such a center is carried on through the mutual initiative and involvement of parents and professional staff. The center serves parents by (1) providing for the developmental well-being…

  3. Aging Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on aging parents. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include adult children, dementia and Alzheimer's disease in the…

  4. Parental education is related to C-reactive protein among female middle-aged community volunteers.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennifer E; Marsland, Anna L; Flory, Janine D; Muldoon, Matthew F; Cohen, Sheldon; Manuck, Stephen B

    2009-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that socioeconomic attributes of both childhood and adulthood confer risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this study, we examine the association of both parental and individual educational attainment with C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory mediator relevant to cardiovascular pathophysiology, in a mid-life community sample. Subjects were 811 men and women (394 men/417 women; 87% European-American/13% African-American), 30-54 years of age. Plasma concentrations of CRP were determined from blood samples obtained at a single session following an overnight fast. Regression analyses adjusting for age and race showed both parental education and individual education to be associated inversely with CRP in women, but not men. The relationship of parental education with CRP in women persisted on multivariable adjustment for both lifestyle risk factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep, exercise, body mass index) and individual SES. Independent of reported personal educational attainment, mid-life adult women whose parents achieved fewer years of educational attainment exhibit higher levels of circulating CRP than women with higher parental education. This association may help explain the increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular morbidity and mortality conferred by low childhood socioeconomic status.

  5. Education for School-Age Parenting. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carta, Elizabeth

    Techniques are described which were used to develop and establish the Young Parents Program, a pilot project used to develop and expand the homebound instruction function of Norwalk Hospital by providing broadening family functioning type experiences to pregnant girls in the Norwalk, Connecticut, schools. The instructional objectives listed are…

  6. Findings from an Evaluation of a Comprehensive Parent Education Program for School-Age Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Maureen H.; Fuscaldo, Diane P.

    This study evaluates the impact of the Parent Linking Project III (PLP III) on its participants. The PLP III is a comprehensive program for teenage mothers which offers workshops in parenting, mother-child interaction, and vocational awareness, and provides day care services that allow teen mothers to take the opportunity to complete their high…

  7. Changing Attitudes Toward Care of Aging Parents: The Influence of Education, International Travel, and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Compernolle, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Population aging is a key public health issue facing many nations, and is particularly pronounced in many Asian countries. At the same time, attitudes toward filial obligation are also rapidly changing, with a decreasing sense that children are responsible for caring for elderly parents. This investigation blends the family versus nonfamily mode of social organization framework with a life course perspective to provide insight into the processes of ideational change regarding filial responsibility, highlighting the influence of education and international travel. Using data from a longitudinal study in Nepal—the Chitwan Valley Family Study—results demonstrate that education and international travel are associated with a decrease in attitudes toward filial obligation. However, findings further reveal that the impact of education and international travel vary both across the life course and by gender. PMID:25866415

  8. Making It Visible: An Exploration of How Adult Education Participation Informs Parent Involvement in Education for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiffman, Catherine Dunn

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the connections between adult education participation and parent involvement in children's education--connections identified during an exploratory case study of parents transitioning into the workforce in compliance with welfare requirements. Data sources included interviews with parents, adult educators, and elementary…

  9. Bullying in German Primary Schools: Gender Differences, Age Trends and Influence of Parents' Migration and Educational Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Marees, Nandoli; Petermann, Franz

    2010-01-01

    The study discussed herein assessed the prevalence of bullying and analysed possible predictors for bullying in a sample of urban primary school-age children. Factors considered were students' gender and age differences as well as parents' educational level and migration backgrounds. Using a cross-informant approach (self- and teacher-reports),…

  10. Age 26 Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Child-Parent Center Early Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Temple, Judy A.; White, Barry A. B.; Ou, Suh-Ruu; Robertson, Dylan L.

    2011-01-01

    Using data collected up to age 26 in the Chicago Longitudinal Study, this cost-benefit analysis of the Child-Parent Centers (CPC) is the first for a sustained publicly funded early intervention. The program provides services for low-income families beginning at age 3 in 20 school sites. Kindergarten and school-age services are provided up to age 9…

  11. Race- and sex-specific associations of parental education with insulin resistance in middle-aged participants: the CARDIA study.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Teresa; Jacobs, David R; Strassburger, Klaus; Giani, Guido; Seeman, Teresa E; Matthews, Karen; Roseman, Jeffrey M; Rathmann, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    Low childhood socioeconomic status (SES) has been linked with insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in adulthood. Our aim was to examine if maternal and paternal education, as indicators of childhood SES, equally contributed to increased HOMA-IR in later life. Of 5,115 adults from the Coronary Artery Disease Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study aged 18-30 years in 1985-1986, data on 1,370 females and 1,060 males with baseline and 20 year follow-up data were used to estimate associations of maternal and paternal education with HOMA-IR, adjusting for personal education, BMI, lipids, blood pressure, and lifestyle factors. Parental education was determined as high with ≥ 12 years of schooling and classified as both high, only mother high, only father high, both low education. Distinct combinations of maternal and paternal education were associated with HOMA-IR across race and sex groups. Lowest year 20 HOMA-IR in European American (EA) females occurred when both parents were better educated, but was highest when only the father had better education. HOMA-IR was lowest in African American (AA) participants when the mother was better educated but the father had less education, but was highest when both parents were better educated. Parental education was unrelated to HOMA-IR in EA males. Associations of parental education with HOMA-IR are seen in AA females, AA males, and EA females but not in EA males. The distinct combinations of parental education and their associations with HOMA-IR especially in AA participants need to be addressed in further research on health disparities.

  12. Age-26 Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Child-Parent Center Early Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Temple, Judy A.; White, Barry A.; Ou, Suh-Ruu; Robertson, Dylan L.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a cost-benefit analysis of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) early childhood intervention. Using data collected up to age 26 on health and well-being, the study is the first adult economic analysis of a sustained large-scale and publicly-funded intervention. As part of the Chicago Longitudinal Study, a complete cohort of 900 low-income children who enrolled in 20 CPCs beginning at age 3 were compared to 500 well-matched low-income children who participated in the usual educational interventions for the economically disadvantaged in Chicago schools. School-age services were provided up to age 9 (third grade). Findings indicated that the three components of CPC had economic benefits in 2007 dollars that exceeded costs. The preschool program provided a total return to society of $10.83 per dollar invested (net benefits per participant of $83,708). Benefits to the public (other than program participants and families) were $7.20 per dollar invested. The primary sources of benefits were increased earnings and tax revenues, averted criminal justice system and victim costs, and savings for child welfare, special education, and grade retention. The school-age program had a societal return of $3.97 per dollar invested and a $2.11 public return. The extended intervention program (4 to 6 years of participation) had a societal return of $8.24 and public return of $5.21. Estimates were robust across a wide range of discount rates and alternative assumptions, and were consistent with the results of Monte Carlo simulations. Males, 1-year preschool participants, and children from higher risk families had greater economic benefits. Findings provide strong evidence that sustained early childhood programs can contribute to well-being for individuals and society. PMID:21291448

  13. It Matters if They Read: Evaluation of Ten Age-Paced Parent Education Home Learning Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cudaback, Dorothea

    A study examined the readership of state cooperative extension offices' home learning programs--nine series of booklets of information about pregnancy, infant development, and parenting, mailed to parents in ten states to coincide with pregnancy stage and baby's age in months. The reading level of the series varied from sixth to eighth-grade…

  14. Single Parents, Working Mothers and the Educational Achievement of Secondary School Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, David E.; And Others

    This paper presents a replication of previous research which estimated a structural equation model relating elementary school age students' achievement to the number of parents and maternal work. The research presented here focuses on secondary school age students, and provides partial support for previous findings in which elementary school age…

  15. Assessment for Parent Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Robert; Johnson, Aileen

    1978-01-01

    The Parent as a Teacher Inventory (PAAT) was administered to 30 Mexican-American parent pairs to assess child rearing expectations. Scores were correlated to income, family size, parental sex, parental education, and parent accessibility to the child. Consonance of observed behaviors with PAAT responses indicated an acceptable instrument validity.…

  16. IDEA Special Education Mediation. A Guide for Parents of Children & Youth (Ages 3-21)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This information guide was designed to assist in resolving special education disputes, as well as to provide dispute resolution options for parents or school district staff when communications are difficult or there is a dispute that cannot be resolved. Mediation is a voluntary process that (1) brings people together to resolve their…

  17. Parenting Matters: What Works in Parenting Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Eva, Ed.

    Because the expansion of parenting education is likely to continue, it is important to ensure that methods involved in parenting education are effective. This report summarizes research on the effectiveness of parenting education and provides information to help practitioners develop methods of working with parents that are based on sound research…

  18. School-Aged Children Who Are Educated at Home by Their Parents: Is There a Role for Educational Psychologists?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arora, Tiny C. M. J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on home education with reference to issues that may concern educational psychologists. It notes the fast growing number of families (at present, 1% of the UK school population) who have chosen to educate their school-aged children at home. The great majority of home-educated children are reported to be well…

  19. Parent Education: Reaching Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, John M.; And Others

    Most current parent education programs tend to involve parents who are proficient readers, who are capable of thinking abstractly, and who have had sufficient social experience to behave constructively within a group. Yet, there are large numbers of parents whose motivation may be less obvious, who often lack emotional support, and who tend to see…

  20. Confidence in Parenting: Is Parent Education Working?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanberry, J. Phillip; Stanberry, Anne M.

    This study examined parents' feelings of confidence in their parenting ability among 56 individuals enrolled in 5 parent education programs in Mississippi, hypothesizing that there would be significant correlations between personal authority in the family system and a parent's confidence in performing the various roles of parenting. Based on…

  1. Pinterest for Parent Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Routh, Brianna; Langworthy, Sara; Jastram, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    As more parents are using the Internet to answer their questions, Extension needs to provide practical, research-based resources in an accessible format. Pinterest is a platform that can be used by Extension educators to provide continued education and make reputable resources more discoverable for parents. Based on Knowles adult learning theory…

  2. Multicultural Parent Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Robert; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses findings from interviews with immigrant and refugee parents from Vietnam and Central and South America in Alberta, Canada, regarding concerns and educational needs. Reports concerns about children not speaking their native language and greater independence for children in Canada. Describes a multicultural parent education program…

  3. Parenting for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Vivian W.

    Intended to influence parents to play an important role in their child's education, this guide is an educational how-to book written in simple, easy-to-understand language, showing parents how to engage in activities with their children at home that will upgrade academic performance at school. The book covers 77 concepts, each presented as a…

  4. Influences of age, gender, and parents' educational level in knowledge, behavior and preferences regarding noise, from childhood to adolescence.

    PubMed

    Knobel, Keila Alessandra Baraldi; Lima, Maria Cecília Marconi Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to loud sound during leisure activities for long periods of time is an important area to implement preventive health education, especially among young people. The aim was to identify the relations among awareness about the damaging effects of loud levels of sounds, previous exposures do loud sounds, preferences-related to sound levels and knowledge about hearing protection with age, gender, and their parent's educational level among children. Prospective cross-sectional. Seven hundred and forty students (5-16 years old) and 610 parents participated in the study. Chi-square test, Fisher exact test and linear regression. About 86.5% of the children consider that loud sounds damage the ears and 53.7% dislike noisy places. Children were previously exposed to parties and concerts with loud music, Mardi Gras, firecrackers and loud music at home or in the car and loud music with earphones. About 18.4% of the younger children could select the volume of the music, versus 65.3% of the older ones. Children have poor information about hearing protection and do not have hearing protection device. Knowledge about the risks related to exposures to loud sounds and about strategies to protect their hearing increases with age, but preference for loud sounds and exposures to it increases too. Gender and parents' instructional level have little influence on the studied variables. Many of the children's recreational activities are noisy. It is possible that the tendency of increasing preference for loud sounds with age might be a result of a learned behavior. PMID:25387530

  5. Influences of age, gender, and parents' educational level in knowledge, behavior and preferences regarding noise, from childhood to adolescence.

    PubMed

    Knobel, Keila Alessandra Baraldi; Lima, Maria Cecília Marconi Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to loud sound during leisure activities for long periods of time is an important area to implement preventive health education, especially among young people. The aim was to identify the relations among awareness about the damaging effects of loud levels of sounds, previous exposures do loud sounds, preferences-related to sound levels and knowledge about hearing protection with age, gender, and their parent's educational level among children. Prospective cross-sectional. Seven hundred and forty students (5-16 years old) and 610 parents participated in the study. Chi-square test, Fisher exact test and linear regression. About 86.5% of the children consider that loud sounds damage the ears and 53.7% dislike noisy places. Children were previously exposed to parties and concerts with loud music, Mardi Gras, firecrackers and loud music at home or in the car and loud music with earphones. About 18.4% of the younger children could select the volume of the music, versus 65.3% of the older ones. Children have poor information about hearing protection and do not have hearing protection device. Knowledge about the risks related to exposures to loud sounds and about strategies to protect their hearing increases with age, but preference for loud sounds and exposures to it increases too. Gender and parents' instructional level have little influence on the studied variables. Many of the children's recreational activities are noisy. It is possible that the tendency of increasing preference for loud sounds with age might be a result of a learned behavior.

  6. Successful Parenting for School-Age Parents. Teacher's Resource Guide. Student Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    The teacher's guide and student reference book presented here were developed as resources to facilitate school-age parenting education. The materials were organized around the nine essential elements for the Parenting Education for School-Age Parents course in Texas. The teacher's guide contains teaching strategies, teaching aids, paper-and-pencil…

  7. Parent-Infant Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charnley, Lucile; Myre, Gloria

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the development and philosophy of parent-infant education programs provided by Washington State community colleges and vocational technical schools consisting of parent-participation classes and cooperative preschools for 10,000 families. Describes program at Seattle Community College. (BF/JH)

  8. IDEA Special Education Resolution Meetings. A Guide for Parents of Children & Youth (Ages 3-21)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), 2014

    2014-01-01

    A resolution meeting is a dispute resolution process that takes place after a parent files a due process complaint. Resolution meetings offer parents and school districts the opportunity to resolve issues before a due process hearing happens. This publication describes Resolution Meetings generally for Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities…

  9. Adult Children and Aging Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Jane E.

    This book was developed to assist counselors and other caregivers in working with adult children and their aging parents. The first chapter addresses normative developmental issues in later life. This includes the demography of aging, theories of aging, and attitudes toward older persons, along with suggestions for identifying at-risk populations,…

  10. The relationship between parental education and adolescents' soft drink intake from the age of 11-13 years, and possible mediating effects of availability and accessibility.

    PubMed

    Totland, Torunn H; Lien, Nanna; Bergh, Ingunn H; Bjelland, Mona; Gebremariam, Mekdes K; Klepp, Knut-Inge; Andersen, Lene F

    2013-09-14

    The present study examined the prospective relationship between parental education and adolescents' soft drink intake over 20 months, and possible mediating effects of adolescents' availability and accessibility of soft drinks at home. A total of 866 adolescents, with data on two time points in the Norwegian HEalth In Adolescents (HEIA) cohort study (2007-9), were included in the analyses. Data on intake and determinants of soft drinks were collected from adolescents and both parents by questionnaires. Mediation analyses using linear regression investigated the total and direct effects of parental education on adolescents' soft drink intake from the age of 11-13 years. In order to investigate prospective relationships, two models were set up to measure the (1) prediction and (2) change in consumption over 20 months. Possible mediation effects of availability and perceived accessibility at home were further examined in both models. The results showed that a lower level of parental education predicted a higher intake of soft drinks among adolescents after 20 months, and that higher perceived accessibility of soft drinks reported by adolescents and mothers explained 39 % of the total effect. No relationship was observed between parental education and the change in adolescents' intake of soft drinks over 20 months. Interventions aimed at families with low parental education should target the perceived accessibility of soft drinks at home in order to diminish social differences in adolescents' soft drink consumption.

  11. Parenting Education - Parent-Child Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Child Abuse and Neglect Resource Center, Tulsa, OK.

    Part of the series on parenting education for American Indians, this booklet discusses some of the common communication problems parents face with their children as the children grow older. There are various ways of communicating, such as by sounds, by words, by sentences, by touch, by holding and showing affection, by body language, and by using…

  12. Parenting Education - Preparing for Parenthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Child Abuse and Neglect Resource Center, Tulsa, OK.

    The first in a series on parenting education, for American Indians, the booklet looks at preparation for parenthood. Learning to be a good parent begins when one is a child, watching our parents and copying their ways with our own children. The booklet recognizes problems and needs of new parents. Some problems are an unplanned pregnancy,…

  13. Parents as Partners: Parents as Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renwick, Margery, Comp.

    An invitational seminar, which was sponsored in March 1991, by the New Zealand Council for Educational Research, focused on research on the role of parents in early childhood education. Papers presented covered: (1) the preprimary project, a study of children's experiences prior to formal schooling (C. Garden); (2) the role of the state versus the…

  14. Including Parents? Education, Citizenship and Parental Agency. Inclusive Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Carol

    This book explores the themes of citizenship, participation, and collective action in relation to education in Britain. It illustrates ways in which social class, gender, and ethnicity affect parent participation. Chapter one discusses the parent as consumer, partner, and citizen. A focus on parents as citizens in Britain reveals passivity and…

  15. Parental Identity and Its Relation to Parenting and Psychological Functioning in Middle Age

    PubMed Central

    Fadjukoff, Päivi; Pulkkinen, Lea; Lyyra, Anna-Liisa; Kokko, Katja

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objective. This article focuses on identity as a parent in relation to parenting and psychological functioning in middle age. Design. Drawn from the Jyväskylä Longitudinal Study of Personality and Social Development, 162 participants (53% females) with children (age 36), represented the Finnish age-cohort born in 1959. Parental identity was assessed at ages 36, 42, and 50. Results. In both women and men, parental identity achievement increased from age 36 to 42 and remained stable to 50. The level of parental identity achievement was higher in women than in men. Achievement was typical for women and foreclosure for men. Participants’ education, occupational status, and number of offspring were not related to parental identity status. As expected, parental identity achievement was associated with authoritative (indicated by higher nurturance and parental knowledge about the child’s activities) parenting style. No significant associations emerged between parental identity foreclosure and restrictiveness as an indicator of authoritarian parenting style. The diffused men outscored others in parental stress. Achieved parental identity was related to generativity in both genders and to higher psychological and social well-being in men. Conclusions. At present, many parenting programs are targeted to young parents. This study highlighted the importance of a later parenting phase at around age 40, when for many, the children are approaching puberty. Therefore, parenting programs and support should also be designed for middle-aged parents. Specifically men may need additional support for their active consideration and engagement in the fathering role. © Päivi Fadjukoff, Lea Pulkkinen, Anna-Liisa Lyyra, and Katja Kokko This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and

  16. Helping parents with sex education.

    PubMed

    Wakley, Gill

    2011-01-01

    Health visitors, school nurses and other community nurses are sometimes asked for advice by parents and carers on the emerging sexuality of their children. Parents often lack knowledge about sexual development and are confused about whether to talk to their children about sex. They may have been brought up in a family where sex was not mentioned. They are worried that they do not have the skills or the knowledge to help their children. They do not know whether to leave it all to the school or not allow their children to have any information. All the evidence shows that children who have had their questions answered and who know about sex and relationships start sexual activity later, use contraception more reliably and are less likely to cause or have an unwanted pregnancy. Sex education should be part of the ordinary information and moral guidance that parents normally give and should start as early as possible. The type of advice to give to parents and carers is split into age ranges that they might find helpful. Examples of language and the level of information required are given. A list of resources for further guidance is included.

  17. Sustaining Parenting Education in WI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Dave; Eisenmann, Kathleen; Gruenewald, Mary

    2004-01-01

    How can educators ensure that a good parenting program continues to be offered in the community year after year? A project in Wisconsin illustrates one way to create this sustained commitment and funding. This project has worked well, has been fairly easy and inexpensive, and has even led to new opportunities for parenting education. The project…

  18. Parent Education: Implications for Educational Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Myron H.

    Educational psychology departments should offer to interested students throughout the university a parent education course stressing child development and the educational process. As a result of declining enrollments in schools of education, professors of educational psychology need to develop new courses applicable to new student populations.…

  19. Perceptions of Elementary School Children's Parents Regarding Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Christine M.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Glassman, Tavis

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the preferences of parents of elementary school-aged children regarding when sexuality topics should be discussed in school and at home. The survey was mailed to a national random sample of parents of elementary school age children. Overall, 92% of parents believed that sexuality education should be taught in schools.…

  20. Parents "Always" Matter in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    This discussion suggests ways to (1) improve parents' communication with their children; (2) provide students with the keys to freedom through self-discipline; (3) increase parents' involvement in their children's learning in the areas of reading, mathematics, science, social studies, creative arts, and health and physical education; (4) recognize…

  1. Parent Education For The Parental Role In Children's Vocational Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoffner, Sarah M.; Klemer, Richard H.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes how parents affect a child's vocational choice and what parents can do to help children improve their vocational prospects, the opportunities and responsibilities of parents in the socialization processes which lead to the children's vocational choices, and what parent educators can do to help parents be more effective with…

  2. Handbook of Diversity in Parent Education: The Changing Faces of Parenting and Parent Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Marvin J., Ed.; Lee, Steven W., Ed.

    This collection of papers identifies programs designed to educate and meet the needs of diverse parents. The 16 papers are: (1) "American Families in the 1990s and Beyond" (Dennis H. Karpowitz); (2) "Gender Issues in Parenting: Parenting Teenage Girls" (Lauren Ayers); (3) "Teaching about Sexual Diversity: A New Frontier for Parenthood Educators"…

  3. Parenting in a Technological Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedts, Geertrui

    2008-01-01

    Technology is not just a tool but an amalgam of conceptual, institutional, and interactional issues that occupy the space of technical reason. In this space, parents' identity is becoming narrowed according to a limited conception in which the place of "caring" is in danger of being lost. Parents are increasingly required to adopt knowledge on…

  4. Parent Questionnaire on Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vineland School District, NJ.

    This document provides a questionnaire to be used to determine the attitudes and influence of parents who have children in bilingual education programs. Thirty seven questions are listed, covering such factors as family background, language usage at home, and aspirations for the education of the children. Techniques for administering the…

  5. The Florida Parent Education Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. Coll. of Education.

    This paper describes the model for a program of compensatory education designed to intervene directly in the home so that the home situation might lead to better school and life performance. A section on "Rationale and Major Objectives" explains the program emphases: (1) the development of nonprofessionals as parent educators and as effective…

  6. Pilot trial of an age-paced parenting newsletter.

    PubMed

    Keane, Brigid; Waterston, Tony; McConachie, Helen; Towner, Elizabeth; Cook, Margaret; Birks, Eileen

    2005-10-01

    Supporting parents in the first three years of a child's life has the potential to produce successful outcomes. Present government initiatives such as Sure Start focus on this age group. An American educational intervention, in the style of a monthly newsletter, was adapted for use in the UK for parents of young children. Topics were presented in an easy-to-read format and focused on infant emotional development, parent interaction and play. Newsletters, called Baby Express were posted at monthly intervals to the family home providing age-paced information which could meet the specific needs of parents at that stage of their child's life. The aim of the study was to determine the applicability of the newsletter to UK parents and evaluate their satisfaction. Sixty home-based interviews were conducted and 95 per cent of mothers reported reading all or part of the newsletter. Changes in parenting style were spontaneously reported by 28 per cent of mothers. This study found that an aged-paced parenting newsletter was an acceptable and useful method of supporting parents in the early months of a child's life and promotes positive changes in parenting behaviour. PMID:16245675

  7. Pilot trial of an age-paced parenting newsletter.

    PubMed

    Keane, Brigid; Waterston, Tony; McConachie, Helen; Towner, Elizabeth; Cook, Margaret; Birks, Eileen

    2005-10-01

    Supporting parents in the first three years of a child's life has the potential to produce successful outcomes. Present government initiatives such as Sure Start focus on this age group. An American educational intervention, in the style of a monthly newsletter, was adapted for use in the UK for parents of young children. Topics were presented in an easy-to-read format and focused on infant emotional development, parent interaction and play. Newsletters, called Baby Express were posted at monthly intervals to the family home providing age-paced information which could meet the specific needs of parents at that stage of their child's life. The aim of the study was to determine the applicability of the newsletter to UK parents and evaluate their satisfaction. Sixty home-based interviews were conducted and 95 per cent of mothers reported reading all or part of the newsletter. Changes in parenting style were spontaneously reported by 28 per cent of mothers. This study found that an aged-paced parenting newsletter was an acceptable and useful method of supporting parents in the early months of a child's life and promotes positive changes in parenting behaviour.

  8. Parenting and Religious Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Jack D., ED.

    1988-01-01

    Addresses theoretical and practical topics related to the most effective ways that parents can be involved in teaching their children about religion. Features articles by Roberta Nelson, Gloria Durka, Howard Bogot, Kenneth Gangel, Delia Halverson, James and Kathleen McGinnis, J. C. Wynn, and Dorie and Ralph Underwood. (GEA)

  9. Parental Perception of the Education of Their Adolescent Children: Evidence from Greek Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiti, Anna; Mitrosili, Eugenia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to attempt to specify and investigate the determinants of parental intention through data collected from 200 parents of youths aged fifteen years. Results showed that Greek parents guide their children to follow upper secondary education rather than technical education for a number of reasons but mainly: technical…

  10. Parenting Education - Health and Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Child Abuse and Neglect Resource Center, Tulsa, OK.

    The second in a series on parenting education for American Indians, the booklet offers information on health and hygiene for the mother-to-be and the newborn baby. Chapters include care during pregnancy, mother's weight, mother's health, feeding newborns, washing the baby, baby's early diet, and baby's health care. (ERB)

  11. A TENTATIVE PROGRAM FOR COMBINING THE EDUCATION OF PRESCHOOL MEXICAN-AMERICAN CHILDREN WITH PARENT EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCDONALD, CHRISTINA

    AT THE HEART OF THE EDUCATIONAL AND SOCIAL STATUS PROBLEMS OF THE MEXICAN-AMERICAN CHILD IS HIS CRITICAL NEED FOR THE OPPORTUNITY TO COME TO SCHOOL WITH HIS PARENTS AT THE AGE OF 3 TO PARTICIPATE IN A CAREFULLY PLANNED PROGRAM FOR HIS EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, ACCOMPANIED BY A PLAN FOR THE EDUCATION OF HIS PARENTS. DEVELOPMENT OF COMPETENCY IN…

  12. Parental education and child health: evidence from a schooling reform.

    PubMed

    Lindeboom, Maarten; Llena-Nozal, Ana; van der Klaauw, Bas

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of parental education on child health outcomes. To identify the causal effect we explore exogenous variation in parental education induced by a schooling reform in 1947, which raised the minimum school leaving age in the UK. Findings based on data from the National Child Development Study suggest that increasing the school leaving age by 1 year had little effect on the health of their offspring. Schooling did however improve economic opportunities by reducing financial difficulties among households.

  13. 34 CFR 300.520 - Transfer of parental rights at age of majority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transfer of parental rights at age of majority. 300.520... Children § 300.520 Transfer of parental rights at age of majority. (a) General. A State may provide that... consent with respect to the child's educational program. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1415(m))...

  14. Democratic Parenting: Paradoxical Messages in Democratic Parent Education Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oryan, Shlomit; Gastil, John

    2013-01-01

    Some prominent parent education theories in the United States and other Western countries base their educational viewpoint explicitly on democratic values, such as mutual respect, equality and personal freedom. These democratic parenting theories advocate sharing power with children and including them in family decision making. This study presents…

  15. Schools, Schooling, and Children's Support of Their Aging Parents

    PubMed Central

    Brauner-Otto, Sarah R.

    2009-01-01

    Intergenerational transfers play an important role in individuals' lives across the life course. In this paper I pull together theories on intergenerational transfers and social change to inform our understanding of how changes in the educational context influence children's support of their parents. By examining multiple aspects of a couple's educational context, including husbands' and wives' education and exposure to schools, this paper provides new information on the mechanisms through which changes in social context influence children's support of their parents. Using data from a rural Nepalese area I use multilevel logistic regression to estimate the relationship between schooling, exposure to schools, and the likelihood of couples giving to their parents. I find that both schooling and exposure to schools itself have separate, opposite effects on support of aging parents. Higher levels of schooling for husbands was associated with a higher likelihood of having given support to husbands' parents. On the other hand, increased exposure to schools for husbands and wives was associated with a lower likelihood of having given to wives' parents. Findings constitute evidence that multiple motivations for intergenerational support exist simultaneously and are related to social context through different mechanisms. PMID:20161526

  16. IDEA Special Education Written State Complaints. A Guide for Parents of Children & Youth (Ages 3-21)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), 2014

    2014-01-01

    A written state complaint is used to communicate that a public agency (such as your child's school) has not followed the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and to request an investigation of the problem. This publication describes Written State Complaints generally for Part B of the Individuals with…

  17. Parent Involvement in Compensatory Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Research Inst., Menlo Park, CA.

    This report on parent involvement in compensatory education makes recommendations for future involvement based on intervention studies and program experience with parents. Various types of parental roles are discussed (tutors, paid employees, advisors and decision makers). Research evidence on the effectiveness of parent involvement in increasing…

  18. Tobacco Talk: Educating Young Children about Tobacco. Suggestions for Teachers, Parents, and Other Care Providers of Children to Age 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Onofrio, Carol

    This book provides adults with specific suggestions and advice for talking with children about the health and social hazards of tobacco use. The first two chapters provide background information and general principles for talking about tobacco with children up to the age of 10. Each of the following five chapters focuses on one topic about tobacco…

  19. Parent Education Opportunities. Bulletin, 1935, No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombard, Ellen C.

    1935-01-01

    The experiences of parents at home with their children have educational value when the experiences are backed up by understanding of what happens every day, by sound principles in approaching home problems, and by knowledge of good techniques of training children. The purposes of parent education work are to furnish parents with sound principles…

  20. Future Directions in Parent Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaronson, May

    This paper suggests goals for future research programs in parent education. Suggestions include: (1) developing and replicating long-term studies of the effects of parent education, (2) examining the antecedents of adult behavior disorders to plan parenting programs that aim at preventing such disorders, (3) replacing deficit models of parenting…

  1. Their Children's First Educators: Parents' Views about Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kerryann; Brandon, Leisa

    2012-01-01

    In this descriptive focus group study, we investigated parents' views about child sexual abuse prevention education at home and in schools. Focus groups were conducted with a sample of 30 Australian adults who identified as the parent or caregiver of a child/children aged 0-5 years. The study explored (1) parents' "knowledge" about child sexual…

  2. Adult Children's Education and Parents' Functional Limitations in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Yahirun, Jenjira J; Sheehan, Connor M; Hayward, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    This article asks how adult children's education influences older parents' physical health in Mexico, a context where older adults often lack access to institutional resources and rely on kin, primarily children, as a main source of support. Using logistic and negative binomial regression models and data from the first wave of the Mexican Health and Aging Study (N = 9,661), we find that parents whose children all completed high school are less likely to report any functional limitations as well as fewer limitations compared to parents with no children who completed high school. This association remains significant even after accounting for parent and offspring-level characteristics, including parents' income that accounts for children's financial transfers to parents. Future research should aim to understand the mechanisms that explain the association between adult children's education and changes to parents' health over time. PMID:26966254

  3. The Effect of Educational-Spiritual Intervention on The Burnout of The Parents of School Age Children with Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Beheshtipour, Nooshin; Nasirpour, Parisa; Yektatalab, Shahrzad; Karimi, Mehran; Zare, Najaf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Parents of children with cancer experience high levels of stress and discomfort. Religious beliefs are important sources of comfort and support for many cancer patients and their families. The present study aimed to assess the effect of educational-spiritual intervention on burnout of the parents of the children with cancer. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 135 parents of children with cancer were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. Data were collected through SMBQ (Shirom and Melamed Burnout Questionnaire) from both groups, before, immediately after and one month after the intervention. Educational-spiritual programs were held for six weeks, one session every week. The data were analyzed by SPSS using independent t-test, and repeated measure ANOVA. Results: The results showed that the mean burnout score before the intervention in the intervention group was 4.28±0.61 and in the control group it was 4.23±0.50; most of the parents reported moderate to high burnout. But, there was a significant difference between the intervention and control groups immediately after and one month after the intervention (t=10.16, P<0.0001). The mean burnout score in the intervention group was less than the control group. Results also showed that there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of parental burnout in three times of measurements (F=58.62, P<0.0001). Conclusion: This study indicated that educational-spiritual intervention was effective on reduction of the burnout of the parents of the children with cancer. Due to high burnout of most of the parents, offering such a program could be beneficial for them. More studies in this regard are recommended. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014061818144N1 PMID:26793734

  4. Democratic parenting: paradoxical messages in democratic parent education theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oryan, Shlomit; Gastil, John

    2013-06-01

    Some prominent parent education theories in the United States and other Western countries base their educational viewpoint explicitly on democratic values, such as mutual respect, equality and personal freedom. These democratic parenting theories advocate sharing power with children and including them in family decision making. This study presents a textual analysis of two such theories, the Adlerian model of parent education and the Parent Effectiveness Training (PET) model, as they are embodied in two original bestselling textbooks. Through content and argumentation analysis of these influential texts, this study examines the paradoxes inherent in these two theories when they articulate how to implement fully democratic principles within the parent-child relationship. We discover that in spite of their democratic rationale, both books offer communication practices that guide the child to modify misbehaviour, enforce parental power, and manipulate the child to make decisions that follow parental judgment, and thus do not endorse the use of a truly democratic parenting style. We suggest, as an alternative to the democratic parenting style, that parents be introduced to a guardianship management style, in which they do not share authority with children, but seek opportunities for enabling children to make more autonomous decisions and participate in more family decision making.

  5. "Does AIDS Hurt?": Educating Young Children about AIDS. Suggestions for Parents, Teachers, and Other Care Providers of Children to Age 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Marcia; Villarreal, Sylvia

    This document gives parents, teachers, and others basic information and suggested guidelines for teaching children aged 10 and younger about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). These topics concerning AIDS and young children are discussed: (1) talking with young children about AIDS; (2) things to keep in mind when talking with children,…

  6. Patchwork Quilt or Seamless Day? Parent, Teacher and Child Care Staff Views on Early Childhood Education Programs for Kindergarten-Age Children in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Laura C.

    2003-01-01

    Examined parent, teacher, and child care staff views on coordination between part-day school and child care. Found some key differences among the groups in priorities for programs for kindergarten-age children. Devised arguments in favor of small-scale demonstration programs to expand provision of child care services and for rigorous evaluation of…

  7. Parent Education in a Rural State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Linda

    In order to develop baseline information from which strengths and weaknesses of present parent education services could be identified, this study examined parent education in a sparsely populated rural state. The participants, 358 professionals in education and social service, were asked to respond to a mail survey within 2 weeks. No follow-up…

  8. Young Adults’ Provision of Support to Middle-Aged Parents

    PubMed Central

    Birditt, Kira S.; Zarit, Steven H.; Fingerman, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Middle-aged adults often provide support to aging parents, but researchers know little about support that young adults provide middle-aged parents. This study examined support that young adults provide parents and explanations for that support from both offspring’s and parents’ perspectives. Method. Young adults (n = 515, mean age = 22.34) and their parents (n = 364, mean age = 50.09) from the Family Exchanges Study reported support that offspring provide parents. Participants also reported parental personal problems, parental disability status, relationship quality, and support that parents provide offspring. Results. Offspring provided parents with emotional support and listening more often than other forms of support. Offspring reported providing more frequent support than parents reported receiving. We examined factors associated with support using multilevel models. Both offspring and parents reported more frequent support provided to parents when they had higher quality relationships and when parents gave more frequent support to offspring. Offspring (but not parents) reported providing more frequent support to parents when parents were disabled. Discussion. Findings are consistent with solidarity theory, which suggests that high-quality relationships may explain support. The concept of self-enhancement and generativity in middle-aged parents may explain the intergenerational differences in the association between parental disability and support. PMID:24162441

  9. A Training Program to Reduce "Visitation Stress" in Single Parents and Their Latency Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ron

    This practicum was designed to decrease single parent and latency age child stress associated with child and noncustodial parent visitations, and to improve children's school behaviors. A 9-session, 12-week education and training program for single mothers (N=6) and their elementary school age children (N=15), designed to reduce stress by…

  10. Parental Involvement in Education: Possibilities and Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Mir Baiz

    1996-01-01

    Examines parental involvement in school affairs as a means to forge school-community partnerships in education. Identifies fundamental barriers to meaningful parental involvement and suggests possible solutions, such as parent empowerment, administrators' support, home-school interdependency, awareness of current research, reorganized structures,…

  11. Does Parental Employment Affect Children's Educational Attainment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schildberg-Hoerisch, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes whether there exists a causal relationship between parental employment and children's educational attainment. We address potential endogeneity problems due to (i) selection of parents in the labor market by estimating a model on sibling differences and (ii) reverse causality by focusing on parents' employment when children are…

  12. Impact of Parent Education on Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Julie K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prior research has found that parents exert significant influence on their child's educational and career aspirations. Most studies focus on impact of parent influence in the elementary and secondary school years while few examine outcomes in the university setting. Purpose: To determine the intergenerational impact of parent's…

  13. Parental Expectations about Adapted Physical Education Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaapel, Holly; Columna, Luis; Lytle, Rebecca; Bailey, JoEllen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the expectations of parents of children with disabilities regarding adapted physical education services. Participants ("N" = 10) were parents of children with disabilities. Parents participated in one-on-one semistructured interviews. Transcripts were analyzed through a constant comparative…

  14. Recommendations for age-appropriate education of children and adolescents with diabetes and their parents in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Martin, Delphine; Lange, Karin; Sima, Alexandra; Kownatka, Dagmar; Skovlund, Søren; Danne, Thomas; Robert, Jean-Jacques

    2012-09-01

    Education is the keystone of diabetes care, and structured self-management education is the key to a successful outcome. Existing guidelines provide comprehensive guidance on the various aspects of education and offer general and organizational principles of education, detailed curricula at different ages and stages of diabetes, and recommendations on models, methods, and tools to attain educative objectives. The International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes guidelines give the most elaborate and detailed descriptions and recommendations on the practice of education, which other national guidelines address on specific aspects of education and care. The aim of the work package on education developed by Better Control in Paediatric and Adolescent Diabetes in the European Union: Working to Create Centers of Reference (SWEET) project was not to generate new guidelines but to evaluate how the existing guidelines were implemented in some pediatric diabetes reference centers. The SWEET members have completed a questionnaire that elaborates on the many aspects of delivery of education. This survey highlights a profound diversity of practices across centers in Europe, in terms of organization as well as the practices and the content of initial and continuing education. A toolbox is being developed within SWEET to facilitate exchanges on all aspects of education and to establish a process of validation of materials, tools, written structured age-adjusted programs, and evaluation procedures for the education of children and adolescents with diabetes.

  15. Parental Engagement: Beyond Parental Involvement in Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Louis, Kathleen

    This study critically analyzes parents' complex stories of engagement in school and science education. The purpose is not to essentialize parental involvement, but rather to understand the processes of parental involvement and push forward the current discourse on the engagement of low-income minority and immigrant parents in schools and specifically science education. Employing critical grounded theory methods over a four-year span, this study had three areas of focus. First, voices of marginalized parents in the context of various spaces within the school system are examined. Using a qualitative approach, informal, formal, and research spaces were explored along with how minority parents express voice in these various spaces. Findings indicate parents drew on capital to express voice differently in different spaces, essentially authoring new spaces or the type of engagement in existing spaces. Second, the values and beliefs of traditionally marginalized people, the Discourse of mainstream society, and how they can inform a third, more transformative space for parental engagement in science are considered. The voices of low-income, marginalized parents around science and parental engagement (i.e., first space) are contrasted with the tenets of major national science policy documents (i.e., second space). Findings indicate a disparity between the pathways of engagement for low-income parents and policymakers who shape science education. Third, methodological questions of responsibility and assumption in qualitative research are explored. The author's complex struggle to make sense of her positionality, responsibilities, and assumptions as a researcher is chronicled. Findings focused on insider/outsider issues and implications for culturally sensitive research are discussed. Finally, the implications for policy, teaching, and research are discussed.

  16. Autism risk associated with parental age and with increasing difference in age between the parents.

    PubMed

    Sandin, S; Schendel, D; Magnusson, P; Hultman, C; Surén, P; Susser, E; Grønborg, T; Gissler, M; Gunnes, N; Gross, R; Henning, M; Bresnahan, M; Sourander, A; Hornig, M; Carter, K; Francis, R; Parner, E; Leonard, H; Rosanoff, M; Stoltenberg, C; Reichenberg, A

    2016-05-01

    Advancing paternal and maternal age have both been associated with risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the shape of the association remains unclear, and results on the joint associations is lacking. This study tests if advancing paternal and maternal ages are independently associated with ASD risk and estimates the functional form of the associations. In a population-based cohort study from five countries (Denmark, Israel, Norway, Sweden and Western Australia) comprising 5 766 794 children born 1985-2004 and followed up to the end of 2004-2009, the relative risk (RR) of ASD was estimated by using logistic regression and splines. Our analyses included 30 902 cases of ASD. Advancing paternal and maternal age were each associated with increased RR of ASD after adjusting for confounding and the other parent's age (mothers 40-49 years vs 20-29 years, RR=1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.24), P-value<0.001; fathers⩾50 years vs 20-29 years, RR=1.66 (95% CI: 1.49-1.85), P-value<0.001). Younger maternal age was also associated with increased risk for ASD (mothers <20 years vs 20-29 years, RR=1.18 (95% CI: 1.08-1.29), P-value<0.001). There was a joint effect of maternal and paternal age with increasing risk of ASD for couples with increasing differences in parental ages. We did not find any support for a modifying effect by the sex of the offspring. In conclusion, as shown in multiple geographic regions, increases in ASD was not only limited to advancing paternal or maternal age alone but also to differences parental age including younger or older similarly aged parents as well as disparately aged parents.

  17. Factors associated with parent support for condom education and availability.

    PubMed

    AugsJoost, Brett; Jerman, Petra; Deardorff, Julianna; Harley, Kim; Constantine, Norman A

    2014-04-01

    Expanding condom-related knowledge and skills and reducing barriers to condom use have the potential to help reduce pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections among youth. These goals are sometimes addressed through condom education and availability (CEA) programs as part of sexuality education in school. Parents are a key constituency in efforts to implement such programs. A representative statewide sample of households with children (N = 1,093) in California was employed to examine parent support for CEA and the potential influences of demographics (gender, age, and Hispanic ethnicity), sociodemographics (education, religious affiliation, religious service attendance, and political ideology), and condom-related beliefs (belief in condom effectiveness and belief that teens who use condoms during sex are being responsible) on parent support for CEA. The parents in our sample reported a high level of support for CEA (M = 3.23 on a 4-point scale) and believing in a high level of condom effectiveness (M = 3.36 on a 4-point scale). In addition, 84% of the parents agreed that teens who use condoms during sex are being responsible. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that parents who were younger, Hispanic, with a lower educational attainment, without a religious affiliation, less religiously observant, and politically liberal were more supportive of CEA. After controlling for these demographic and sociodemographic factors, condom effectiveness and responsibility beliefs each added independently to the predictability of parent support for CEA. These findings suggest that parent education related to condom effectiveness could help increase support for school-based CEA programs.

  18. The Parents' Guide to Alternatives in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koetzsch, Ronald E.

    Recognizing that parents have a great range of options in choosing and creating an education for their child, this book is designed to help parents make an informed, conscious choice about their child's schooling. Chapters in the first part of the guide provide an overview of American education, the mainstream public sector and alternative…

  19. Educational Optimism among Parents: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Räty, Hannu; Kasanen, Kati

    2016-01-01

    This study explored parents' (N = 351) educational optimism in terms of their trust in the possibilities of school to develop children's intelligence. It was found that educational optimism could be depicted as a bipolar factor with optimism and pessimism on the opposing ends of the same dimension. Optimistic parents indicated more satisfaction…

  20. Helicopters, Lawn Mowers or Down-to-Earth Parents? What Works Best for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Many faculty and staff working in higher education lament the increasing involvement of the parents of their college-aged students. They denigrate such individuals as "helicopter" parents, and when the contact occurs in person as opposed to through the phone or email, they call them "lawn mower" parents. The whole issue of parental involvement is…

  1. Family Influences on Children's Peer Relationships: Parents' Social Networks and Educational Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krappmann, Lothar; Uhlendorff, Harald

    Although children of primary school age increasingly maintain friendships autonomously, they still are influenced by their parents. In particular, parents' behaviors supporting peer activities of their children, parental educational attitudes, and parents' own social relationships are expected to be relevant for children's social integration into…

  2. Educated parent as a key member of rehabilitation team.

    PubMed

    Mikelić, Valentina Matijević; Bartolović, Jelena; Kosicek, Tena; Crnković, Maja

    2011-12-01

    Involvement of children with minor motor impairments in early intervention programs is becoming a positive trend. Rehabilitation of young children is usually performed in family environment with continuous monitoring by a team of experts including a physiatrist, speech therapist, psychologist, and rehabilitator. For this reason, it is important to educate parents in proper procedures designed to encourage the child's global and language development. Parental competence in encouraging the child's language development and providing home learning environment is associated with the level of parental education. We performed a retrospective analysis of data on 50 children aged 1-3 years, hospitalized during 2010 at Department of Pediatric Rehabilitation, University Department of Rheumatology, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital Center in Zagreb. The aim was to determine the percentage of children included in an early intervention program according to the level of parental education and to assess the impact of the program on the children's language development. The results showed a higher percentage of parents to have high school education and a smaller percentage of parents to have university degree. These data indicated the need of educational programs for parents on the procedures of encouraging child development, including language development.

  3. Educated parent as a key member of rehabilitation team.

    PubMed

    Mikelić, Valentina Matijević; Bartolović, Jelena; Kosicek, Tena; Crnković, Maja

    2011-12-01

    Involvement of children with minor motor impairments in early intervention programs is becoming a positive trend. Rehabilitation of young children is usually performed in family environment with continuous monitoring by a team of experts including a physiatrist, speech therapist, psychologist, and rehabilitator. For this reason, it is important to educate parents in proper procedures designed to encourage the child's global and language development. Parental competence in encouraging the child's language development and providing home learning environment is associated with the level of parental education. We performed a retrospective analysis of data on 50 children aged 1-3 years, hospitalized during 2010 at Department of Pediatric Rehabilitation, University Department of Rheumatology, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital Center in Zagreb. The aim was to determine the percentage of children included in an early intervention program according to the level of parental education and to assess the impact of the program on the children's language development. The results showed a higher percentage of parents to have high school education and a smaller percentage of parents to have university degree. These data indicated the need of educational programs for parents on the procedures of encouraging child development, including language development. PMID:22649875

  4. Relationships of Teenage Smoking to Educational Aspirations and Parents' Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Ingrid; Lye, Diane

    Past research has shown that teenagers with less educated parents and teenagers with lower academic aspirations are more likely than their peers to smoke. This study was conducted to provide additional descriptive data concerning the relationships of smoking to parents' education and students' educational aspirations and to provide preliminary…

  5. Parenting Education for Incarcerated Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennon, Suzanne S.; Mackintosh, Virginia H.; Myers, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    A parenting curriculum developed for incarcerated mothers was evaluated using a pretest, posttest, follow-up design with 57 women incarcerated in state prisons. Developmental psychologists delivered a 12-session curriculum focused on parenting issues unique to incarcerated parents. Each class met for 2 hours and followed a prepared curriculum that…

  6. Educational Encouragement, Parenting Styles, Gender and Ethnicity as Predictors of Academic Achievement among Special Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Aqeel; Ahmad, Roslee; Hamdan, Abdul Rahim; Mustaffa, Mohamed Sharif

    2014-01-01

    Current study examines the predictors of academic achievement: role of parenting styles, educational encouragement, gender and ethnicity among special education students. Participants of this study consisted 200 special education students (N = 105 boys and N = 95 girls) age varies 14 to 19 years from one school located at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.…

  7. Parental Involvement in the Migrant Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgway, John; And Others

    Although the Migrant Education Program dates from 1965, parental involvement in it is governed by very recent statutory and regulatory requirements. Current statutory requirements come from the Elementary Secondary Education Amendments (ESEA) of 1978. They concern the establishment of and consultation by State and Local Education Agencies (SEAs…

  8. Assessing Soccer Players and Educating Soccer Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    This article offers suggestions on how to assess the abilities of young soccer athletes and ways to educate parents or guardians on how to maintain an attitude that most benefits and supports the players. The abilities of young athletes on a team vary, and the expectations of both team members and parents are high, thus presenting a major…

  9. Special Education Mediation: A Guide for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), Eugene, OR.

    Designed for parents of students with disabilities living in Oregon, this brochure describes the general mediation process that parents can use to resolve special education services disputes with schools. It begins by discussing what mediation is and the characteristics of a trained mediator. It addresses the requirement for making mediation…

  10. Parental Educational Investments and Aspirations in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kristen Schultz

    2010-01-01

    Previous models of parental educational investments focus on the composition of the sibship (number, gender, ordering, and spacing) and on the social and institutional context in which investment decisions are made. Social-institutional models predict that parents in Japan are likely to underinvest in girls because of their transient status in the…

  11. Problematising Parent-Professional Partnerships in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Nick; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    The value of, and need for, parent-professional partnerships is an unchallenged mantra within policy relating to "special educational needs". In spite of this, partnerships continue to be experienced as problematic by both parents and professionals. This paper brings together the different perspectives of two disability researchers: one a parent…

  12. A Chronology of Parental Choice in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Sister Dale

    2001-01-01

    Traces the history of parental rights in education since the landmark case Pierce vs. the Society of Sisters (1925), when the existence of private schools was validated. States that initiatives promoting parental choice include : (1) tax relief/credits; (2) vouchers or scholarships; (3) public school choice; and (4) home schooling. Provides a…

  13. New Resources for Childbirth Educators and Parents

    PubMed Central

    Shilling, Teri

    2008-01-01

    In this column, reviewers offer perspectives and comments on a variety of new media resources for childbirth educators and for expectant and new parents. From audio CDs on building one's birthing business endeavor to books for expectant parents focusing on breastfeeding, calming babies, cosleeping, and supplementing what is learned in a childbirth class, the marketplace always has new resources to offer.

  14. Hypertension Education: Impact on Parent Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Peter; Portnoy, Barry

    This study sought to determine the effects of a high blood pressure education program for sixth graders on the preventive hypertension health attitudes and behaviors of their parents. Attention was focused on the role of students ("significant others") in affecting parental attitude and behavior changes relating to the three risk factors of…

  15. Watermelons Not War! A Support Book for Parenting in the Nuclear Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloud, Kate; And Others

    The Nuclear Education Project (NEP), a group of five women concerned about parenting in a nuclear age, developed this guide to help parents and others develop a sense of hope and promote a greater involvement in the democratic political process. Chapter I, "The Heart of the Matter," presents sections on answering possible questions children might…

  16. Proximity as a Mediating Influence on the Perceived Aging Parent-Adult Child Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, Joyce McDonough; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined proximity and relationship between aging parents (N=224) and adult children. Found no difference in quality of relationships between parents whose children lived near and those whose children lived over 60 miles away. Significant predictors for proximate group were personal sense of control and education; for distant group, child gender…

  17. Parent Education: A Model for Low-Income Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Rodney K.; Rubovits, James J.

    1982-01-01

    Provides a metamodel with which counselors can design programs for all populations of parents, particularly low-income. Suggests that education programs can provide training in interpersonal skills and family management skills. Describes development and application of the model and how components might be sequenced for training a particular parent…

  18. Homework for Parents and Teens. Family Life Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey-Harris, Nancy

    This document presents techniques for family counselors to use in their existing family life education programs to incorporate parent-children communication into those programs. Twenty-four assignments, divided into junior and senior high age levels, are included as an adjunct to classroom programs which provide structured, at-home activities to…

  19. Adlerian Counseling for Parent Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercy, Fred P.

    The helping professions must aid parents in understanding their children and in providing parents with methods to improve family relationships. Adlerian counseling is presented as one potentially useful method of reaching this goal. The basic principles and democratic philosophy of Adlerian counseling are outlined, and emphasis is placed on the…

  20. Aging Education: A National Imperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Sandra L.; Klein, Diane A.; Couper, Donna

    2005-01-01

    Americans are living longer than ever before. However, many are not prepared for the long life ahead of them. Although lifespan-aging education has been endorsed since the first White House Conference on Aging in 1961, little is happening with aging education in our homes, schools and communities. Americans often reach old age with little or no…

  1. Educators and Parents Working Together to Develop Special Education Parent Support Groups. Statewide Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duganne, Mary Ann; And Others

    This handbook documents the ingredients necessary to create successful school-sponsored special education parent support groups. Common characteristics observed in parent groups are outlined, along with principles of effective group functioning, benefits accruing to parents, and benefits for school systems. Also discussed is the assistance offered…

  2. Parental Involvement in Secondary Education Schools: The Views of Parents in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonopoulou, Katerina; Koutrouba, Konstantina; Babalis, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores Greek parents' views on parental educational involvement and its impact on adolescent scholastic and social development. Specifically, aspects of parental involvement such as the achieved objectives of current parent-school communication, the psychological climate dominating teacher-parent interactions and parents'…

  3. Sensual Sexuality Education with Young Parenting Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubrium, Aline C.; Shafer, Miriam B.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive sexuality education curricula that incorporate sex positive and integrated approaches go beyond a presentation of facts and strategies for prevention to emphasize the promotion of sexual subjectivity and wellbeing. A pilot sensual sexuality education program was planned, implemented and informally evaluated with young parenting women…

  4. Parent Involvement in Education: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henniger, Michael L., Comp.

    This comprehensive bibliography on parent involvement in education includes published and unpublished materials on this topic dating from January 1970 through October 1978. References were gathered from the following sources: "Education Index,""Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature,""Books in Print," and the ERIC data base ("Current Index to…

  5. Sex Education: New Resources Help Parents Talk with Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Virginia

    2002-01-01

    To help parents talk with children about sexual health, the Kaiser Family Foundation and National PTA developed a series of free resources for parents (e.g., the booklet "Talking with Kids: A Parent's Guide to Sex Education") to increase parent involvement and communication around sex education. This paper notes the importance of parents becoming…

  6. Parental Roles in the Education of Mathematically Gifted and Talented Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bicknell, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Parent recognition of mathematical giftedness and involvement in their children's mathematics education is the focus of this case study. Data were collected from the parents of 15 children (aged 10-13 years) identified by their schools in New Zealand as mathematically gifted and talented. Many of the parents identified their child's…

  7. A Guide for Minnesota Parents to the Individualized Education Program (IEP), 2014 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PACER Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Every child is unique and learns in different ways. Some children are identified as needing special education services to support his or her learning at school. Parents can play a major role in shaping the services a child receives. This guidebook has been written for parents, guardians, and surrogate parents of a child (ages 3 to 21 or…

  8. Parental aspirations for their children's educational attainment: relations to ethnicity, parental education, children's academic performance, and parental perceptions of school climate.

    PubMed

    Spera, Christopher; Wentzel, Kathryn R; Matto, Holly C

    2009-09-01

    This study examined parental aspirations for their children's educational attainment in relation to ethnicity (African American, Asian, Caucasian, Hispanic), parental education, children's academic performance, and parental perceptions of the quality and climate of their children's school with a sample of 13,577 middle and high school parents. All parents had relatively high educational aspirations for their children, and within each ethnic subgroup, parental education and children's academic performance were significantly and positively related to parental aspirations. However, moderating effects were found such that Caucasian parents with lower levels of education had significantly lower educational aspirations for their children than did parents of other ethnicities with similar low levels of education. Although the strength of the relationship between parental perceptions of school-related factors and parental aspirations for their children's educational attainment was not strong, it was most predictive of non-Caucasian parental aspirations for their children.

  9. Putting a Human Face on Educational Technology: Intergenerational Bilingual Literacy through Long-Distance between Parents of School-Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayers, Dennis; Brown, Kristin

    An effort to foster intergenerational bilingual literacy by setting up technology-mediated partnerships between geographically distant parents of school children is described. The ethnic and linguistically minority parents who participated were from San Diego; Denver; and Caguas, Puerto Rico. This partnership between distant parents is part of a…

  10. Developing and Instituting a Parenting Course for Parents of Children Ages 3 through 14 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innes, Ruth S.

    A licensed counselor working in a privately owned mental health facility implemented a practicum study designed to improve the parenting skills and quality of family communication in families with children between 3 and 14 years of age. Practicum goals were to: (1) give parents information that would improve their parenting skills; and (2)…

  11. Age of Majority: Preparing Your Child for Making Good Choices. Parent Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Secondary Education and Transition, Minneapolis, MN.

    This brief provides information to parents of students with disabilities on preparing students for reaching the age of majority and assuming responsibility for their education and life choices. It begins by reviewing regulations under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act that give states the authority to elect to transfer educational…

  12. Parent Education and Elementary Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Jackie; Lamb, Wesley A.

    This monograph serves as an overview of theory and technique for parent training, most specifically through the implementation of programs led by the elementary school counselor and the school psychologist. This document explores the history, basic assumptions, goals, training procedures, training of trainers, and references and resources from a…

  13. Semelparous Penna Ageing Model with Parental Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehsenfeld, K. M.; Sá Martins, J. S.; de Oliveira, S. Moss; Bernardes, A. T.

    In this paper we study the importance of parental care for the survival of semelparous species, that reproduce only once in life. We perform our simulations for sexual and asexual reproductions and show that catastrophic senescence (death soon after reproduction) is delayed if parental care is considered.

  14. [Educational program for congenital cardiopathy children's parents].

    PubMed

    Pino Armijo, Paola; Valdés Valenzuela, Carmen Gloria; Fajuri Moyano, Paula; Garrido Villablanca, Olga; Castillo Moya, Andrés

    2014-10-01

    The children with congenital heart disease are faced with a series of procedures in chronological sequence. Throughout this process the infant and their parents require timely information, education and preparation for discharge. However, the information about each of the aspects affected by the disease is usually addressed in isolation by different professionals and not as part of a comprehensive educational program. The educational program should consider the nature of the disease, of the users and educators during their planning and must be implemented by a multidisciplinary team, continuously during hospitalization and follow-up, using various teaching methods available, and incorporating the minimum content described in the literature. The objective of this review is to identify the dimensions and key elements to consider in the design of an educational program for parents of children with congenital heart disease based on the model of Kaufman.

  15. Promising Partnerships: Ways to Involve Parents in Their Children's Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpin, Lisa J.

    2010-01-01

    The research on parent involvement in education indicates that, in most cases, when parents play an active role in their children's education, academic achievement improves. As a result, schools are now mandated to incorporate parent involvement in the educational process. Educators are faced with the challenge of creating ways to engage parents…

  16. Parent Involvement in Education: Toward an Understanding of Parents' Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kellie J.; Minke, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Parent involvement (PI) in education is associated with positive outcomes for students; however, little is known about how parents decide to be involved in children's education. On the basis of the K. V. Hoover-Dempsey and H. M. Sandler (1995, 1997) model of parent decision making, the authors examined the relationship among 4 parent variables…

  17. The Effect of a Parent Education Program on Selected Aspects of Parental Behavior: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shade, Daniel David

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to measure the impact of a specific style of parent education on parental behavior with their children. Six families, chosen by invitation from among parents participating in the Carbon County, Utah parent education programs, participated in the study. A BAB-ABBA single case experimental design was…

  18. Engaging Parents in Reproductive Health Education: Lessons Learned Implementing a Parent Designed, Peer-Led Educational Model for Parents of Preteens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooden, Cherie L.; Anderson, Frances R.

    2012-01-01

    Engaging and supporting parents to provide sexuality education to their children is successful when parents take ownership of the intervention. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the lessons learned from implementing a parent-designed, parent-led sexuality education curriculum for parents of preteens (10-14 year olds). The parents…

  19. Parental education and child health: intracountry evidence.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, S H; Leslie, J; O'Hara, D J

    1982-03-01

    This paper examines a wide range of evidence on the relationship between parental education and child health. Ideally, measures of child nutritional status, morbidity and mortality would have been included, but very few studies on morbidity were found which included education. The data reviewed here indicate that maternal education is closely related to child health measured either by nutritional status or by infant and child mortality. The effect of father's education on infant and child mortality appears to be about one half that of mother's education. The exact mechanisms through which education acts to affect child health are unclear. Better nutrition among the children of the more educated has been well-documented here, but it is unclear to what extent these effects result from improved knowledge and to what extent from higher income. The analysis does suggest that income differences cannot explain all the effect or perhaps even as much as half.

  20. Parent Education: A Comparison of Adlerian and Behavioral Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Fred; Matthes, William A.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of parent education programs based on the Adlerian and behavioral models relative to each other and a control group. Results suggest that parent education programs do have an impact on parents' ideas, but not, apparently, on the behavior of the children of the parents involved. (Author/HMV)

  1. Parental Education Predicts Corticostriatal Functionality in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Manuck, Stephen B.; Sheu, Lei K.; Kuan, Dora C. H.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; Craig, Anna E.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2011-01-01

    Socioeconomic disadvantage experienced in early development predicts ill health in adulthood. However, the neurobiological pathways linking early disadvantage to adult health remain unclear. Lower parental education—a presumptive indicator of early socioeconomic disadvantage—predicts health-impairing adult behaviors, including tobacco and alcohol dependencies. These behaviors depend, in part, on the functionality of corticostriatal brain systems that 1) show developmental plasticity and early vulnerability, 2) process reward-related information, and 3) regulate impulsive decisions and actions. Hence, corticostriatal functionality in adulthood may covary directly with indicators of early socioeconomic disadvantage, particularly lower parental education. Here, we tested the covariation between parental education and corticostriatal activation and connectivity in 76 adults without confounding clinical syndromes. Corticostriatal activation and connectivity were assessed during the processing of stimuli signaling monetary gains (positive feedback [PF]) and losses (negative feedback). After accounting for participants’ own education and other explanatory factors, lower parental education predicted reduced activation in anterior cingulate and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices during PF, along with reduced connectivity between these cortices and orbitofrontal and striatal areas implicated in reward processing and impulse regulation. In speculation, adult alterations in corticostriatal functionality may represent facets of a neurobiological endophenotype linked to socioeconomic conditions of early development. PMID:20810623

  2. Bullying: A Handbook for Educators and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Ian; Duncan, Neil; Besag, Valerie E.

    2009-01-01

    "Bullying: A Handbook for Educators and Parents" offers a comprehensive exploration of the bullying within public schools, drawing upon research conducted in the United States, United Kingdom, Scandinavia, and Canada. It offers insights into the immediate and long-term impact bullying can have upon the lives of students, their families, and…

  3. Black Children. Social, Educational, and Parental Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes, Ed.; McAdoo, John Lewis, Ed.

    The unique experiences and situations that are common to black children and their parents are examined in the 14 papers collected in this volume. The book is organized into five sections, each relecting one of the significant environments within which black children lead their lives: the theoretical, the socioeconomic, the educational, the…

  4. School Education through the Eyes of Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roshchina, Ia. M.; Filippova, T. N.

    2014-01-01

    Data from surveys of parents of students in Russian schools of various types in the years 2006 to 2011 show a high level of desire to invest in their children's education. There has been a high degree of stability in aspirations and investment in spite of the economic problems caused by global recession.

  5. Parenting Education in Australia: A Structural Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, June

    This paper offers critical reflections on parenting education in its social context. The paper is informed by a feminist perspective, and by a structural approach to practice that emphasizes the importance of changing social structures. An introductory section explores the impact of the ideologies of the traditional family, and of motherhood and…

  6. New Resources for Childbirth Educators and Parents

    PubMed Central

    Shilling, Teri

    2008-01-01

    In this column, reviewers offer perspectives and comments on a variety of new media resources for childbirth educators and for expectant and new parents. The topics of DVDs and books reviewed here include fatherhood, labor-support techniques, optimal labor positions, infant massage, breastfeeding, healthy nutrition during the childbearing year, understanding a newborn's cues, personal viewpoints on cesarean birth, and postpartum massage.

  7. Handbook for Instructors. Guide for Parent Instructors in Parent Education Programs. Columbia Basin College Parent Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debban, Barbara, Comp.; And Others

    This handbook is designed to explain the structure and the existing regulations and procedures of the programs affiliated with the Parent Education Program at Columbia Basin College (CBC), Washington. Purpose of the program is to give parents the opportunity to increase their understanding of children. Section I addresses the importance of parent…

  8. The Impact of Parental Death on Middle Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Miriam S.; Moss, Sidney Z.

    1983-01-01

    Examined the impact of the loss of a parent on middle-aged children. A lifelong process of anticipatory orphanhood is suggested as helping to prepare for the impact of a parent's death. Reaction involves the dialectic between the persistence and breaking of the bond and between finitude and personal growth. (JAC)

  9. Effects of a Brief, Prevention-Focused Parenting Education Program for New Mothers.

    PubMed

    Hooge, Sharon L; Benzies, Karen M; Mannion, Cynthia A

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of a parenting program, Baby and You, on parenting knowledge, parenting morale, and social support using a single-group, pre-test, and post-test design with 159 Canadian mothers of infants aged 2 to 9 months old. Baby and You is a prevention-focused parenting program (PFPP) to improve maternal and infant health through education and social support. The 4-week curriculum focuses on infant development and safety, parent-child relationships, maternal self-care, and community resources. We computed repeated-measures ANOVAs separately for scores on Parenting Knowledge Scale, Parenting Moral Index, and Family Support Scale. We found a significant increase between pre-test and post-test on parenting knowledge, but not parenting morale or social support. Parenting morale may be a stable construct that shows little change over time. It may take more than 4 weeks of programming for mothers to identify and integrate new sources of social support.

  10. English Education and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Candida

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that English teachers are in an excellent position to help students learn about the aged and aging because they know literature that treats the joys and pains of later life and they understand how language shapes and reflects cultural attitudes. Proposes objectives and presents samples of activities to be used in an aging unit. (MM)

  11. Sensual sexuality education with young parenting women.

    PubMed

    Gubrium, Aline C; Shafer, Miriam B

    2014-08-01

    Comprehensive sexuality education curricula that incorporate sex positive and integrated approaches go beyond a presentation of facts and strategies for prevention to emphasize the promotion of sexual subjectivity and wellbeing. A pilot sensual sexuality education program was planned, implemented and informally evaluated with young parenting women at an alternative General Educational Development test preparation center. The program prioritized a sex positive framework, including topics such as pleasure, desire and sexual entitlement, and invited participants to explore sexuality through a multisensory orientation. Participants took part in small group discussions and activities that engaged their senses through arts-based methods. Grounded in holism, program topics were integrated with a focus on participants' everyday experiences. The pilot curriculum serves as a promising program for re-positioning young parenting women as sexual subjects, which is key to the promotion of health and wellbeing.

  12. Project Facilitate: An Inservice Education Program for Educators and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Lou Anne; Wortham, Joycelyn Foy; Smith, Cynthia Ruth Blocker; Patterson, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes "Project Facilitate," an inservice education program that provides educators and parents with a comprehensive overview of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD). The program involves the use of four self-instructional content manuals: AD/HD general knowledge base, legal issues and AD/HD, assessment of children with AD/HD, and…

  13. New Resources for Childbirth Educators and Parents

    PubMed Central

    Shilling, Teri

    2009-01-01

    In this column, reviewers offer perspectives and comments on a variety of new media resources for childbirth educators and expectant and new parents. The books, CDs, DVDs, and kits reviewed in this issue's column include the following topics: the birth experiences of mothers who survived childhood sexual abuse; lively teaching techniques and ideas to help energize and enhance childbirth education classes; breastfeeding in the workplace; expectant fathers; perspectives on motherhood; unique, helpful tools for childbirth educators to use in designing their class content, addressing the stages of labor, and discussing planned cesarean birth; exercises for pregnant women on bedrest; and a compilation of presentations featured at Birthing the Future's international symposiums. PMID:20190851

  14. Do Parents' and Teachers' Views of Children's Educational Resilience Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rautiainen, Riitta; Räty, Hannu; Kasanen, Kati

    2015-01-01

    This study set out to examine parents' and teachers' perceptions of children's educational resilience. As expected, the parents attributed greater levels of educational resilience to their children than did the teachers. However, both the parents and teachers assessed the sixth graders' educational resilience as higher than that of the third…

  15. School-Age Parents: Federal Programs and Policies Relevant to Pregnant or Parenting Secondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin A.

    Federal programs and policies that affect pregnant and parenting teenagers, particularly those programs that are of relevance to schools, are briefly described. The main categories of programs and legislation described are: (1) those bearing on teenage parents and education; (2) pre-school programs; (3) day care; (4) welfare; (5) social services;…

  16. Health of Aging Parents and Childless Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendig, Hal; Dykstra, Pearl A.; van Gaalen, Ruben I.; Melkas, Tuula

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews and presents research findings on the relationships between parenthood and health over the life span. Existing research shows lacunae. The links between reproductive behavior and longevity generally focus on family size rather than contrasting parents and nonparents. Studies of marital status differentials in survival…

  17. Parental Spending on School-Age Children: Structural Stratification and Parental Expectation

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lingxin; Yeung, Wei-Jun Jean

    2015-01-01

    As consumption expenditures are increasingly recognized as direct measures of children’s material well-being, they provide new insights into the process of intergenerational transfers from parents to children. Little is known, however, about how parents allocate financial resources to individual children. To fill this gap, we develop a conceptual framework based on stratification theory, human capital theory, and the child-development perspective; exploit unique child-level expenditure data from Child Supplements of the PSID; and employ quantile regression to model the distribution of parental spending on children. Overall, we find strong evidence supporting our hypotheses regarding the effects of socioeconomic status (SES), race, and parental expectation. Our nuanced estimates suggest that (1) parental education, occupation, and family income have differential effects on parental spending, with education being the most influential determinant; (2) net of SES, race continues to be a significant predictor of parental spending on children; and (3) parental expectation plays a crucial role in determining whether parents place a premium on child development in spending and how parents prioritize different categories of spending. PMID:25933638

  18. Perceptions of aging parents in the context of disengagement theory.

    PubMed

    Lahniers, C E

    1975-11-01

    Cumming and Henry's disengagement theory of aging was investigated by instructing 89 sons and daughters of parents in four aged groups to describe their parents in middle and old age. Various personality and social measures were used including bipolar adjective checklists, depression, optimism, and control scales. The results indicated that at least two factors, institutionalization and activity level, exert an effect on the perceived changes in aged parents. Two groups, one institutionalized and the other noninstitutionalized but without formal activities, were described as being disengaged: e.g., withdrawn socially, self-absorbed, as well as powerless, pessimistic, and depressed. The other two groups who were noninstitutionalized and involved in outer-world recreational and vocational activities were not seen as disengaged in any way in old age. The personality variable internal-external control of reinforcement may serve as an antecedent to withdrawal behaviors in the aged.

  19. [Parenting style in Spanish parents with children aged 6 to 14].

    PubMed

    Alonso-Geta, Petra María

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to establish which parenting style of Spanish families is associated with optimum children's outcomes. A random Spanish sample of 1,103 parents of children and teenagers from 6 to 14 years of age, of whom 47% were females, reported on their child-rearing practices. Families were classified into 1 of 4 groups (authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, or neglectful) based on the parents' answers. Socialization outcomes were 6 indicators of interpersonal relationship quality, 9 indicators of psychological adjustment, 7 indicators of personal competence, and 12 indicators of behavior problems. Results showed that indulgent and authoritative parenting styles were associated with better outcomes than authoritarian and neglectful parenting. Overall, our results supported the idea that, in Spain, the optimum parenting style is the indulgent one, as scores in the four sets of socialization outcomes among children and teenagers from indulgent families were always equal to, or even better than, the authoritative parenting style.

  20. [Parenting].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Contributions to this theme issue of a bulletin on infants aged birth to three, point out that becoming a parent is an evolving process and that infants' meanings to their parents shape parenting behavior and the capacity to change. Articles also examine the challenge of how to support parents as they come to, and continue in, the process of…

  1. Importance of patient/parents education in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Gupta, R

    2001-09-01

    Asthma is fairly common in pediatric age group and the suffering due to asthma continues to increase despite excellent treatments available. One of the four major components of asthma management is patient education and is critical to the success of asthma management. Reasons for continued suffering include that our management strategies are not easily understood by the patient/parents without a simple and careful approach towards this step. Eliciting common concerns and fears is the single and foremost strategy to develop a relationship of trust with the patients/parents. Making them understand about the chronic nature of asthma, need for a long-term care approach, what happens during acute attacks and where medications act are some of the important areas you should be educating about in the beginning. Then comes the skill transfer, i.e. giving them skills to monitor asthma including use of peakflowmeter and use of inhalation devices effectively. Joint development of written plans for medications is essential. Development of plans to control of asthma; jointly with them; including learning about warning signs and a plan to manage acute attack at home is also very important and patient/parents should be having an active participation. Finally, educating them how to identify asthma triggers helps as a long-term strategy to keep control over asthma with or without medications. Reminding patient/parents when to come for follow-up and what would be discussed next time are some important tricks of the trade. PMID:11980470

  2. The "Paradox of Empowerment" in Parent Education: A Reflexive Examination of Parents' Pedagogical Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Ching Man; Kwong, Wai Man

    2012-01-01

    In an action research project designed to develop a new paradigm for parent education in alignment with the "strengths perspective," a social constructionist epistemology, and the empowerment discourse, it was found that parents joining two parent groups actually valued and sought expert knowledge. Seeking to empower these parents by adopting a…

  3. Making the Difference with Active Parenting; Forming Educational Partnerships between Parents and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostdam, Ron; Hooge, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Although parental involvement is often a priority on the quality agenda of schools for primary and secondary education, it is still not usual to involve parents as an educational partner in the actual learning process of their child. Rather than adopting an open approach, teachers tend to tell parents what they should do or keep them at a safe…

  4. A Review of Parent Education Programs for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Tia R.; Schmidt, Carla T.; Stichter, Janine P.

    2011-01-01

    Benefits of parent education have been demonstrated for decades. However, there exists a lack of formative evaluation of parent education for parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), limiting the interpretation of ongoing and future research. To understand the current status, key characteristics, and evaluation methods of parent…

  5. Disciplinary practices with children: parental sources of information, attitudes, and educational needs.

    PubMed

    Ateah, Christine A

    2003-01-01

    Although parenting is one of the most important roles undertaken during an individual's lifetime, the amount of information and education that parents receive for this role is variable and often minimal. Parenting behaviors are influenced by a variety of factors and conditions such as knowledge levels, and parenting abilities vary with parents' own childhood experiences, value systems, education levels, and other life experiences. One ongoing parenting issue is the management of and appropriate response to child misbehavior. A review of the topics of discipline and physical punishment are discussed in this article in relation to definitions, practice, and outcomes. A study of parents' attitudes regarding physical punishment and their sources and needs for related parenting education are presented. Findings from this study (N = 170) indicate that parents receive parenting information from a variety of sources, most frequently through discussions with other parents, books on parenting, and their own experiences. The topics identified most frequently by respondents are age-appropriate disciplinary responses and expected child development and behaviors. These areas of information should be made available on a wide basis to parents of young children.

  6. New Resources for Childbirth Educators and Parents

    PubMed Central

    Shilling, Teri; Bingham, Stacie

    2010-01-01

    In this column, reviewers offer perspectives and comments on a variety of new media resources for childbirth educators and for expectant and new parents. The books, CD, and DVDs reviewed in this issue's column address the following topics: natural, safe, and healthy birth practices; doula care; breastfeeding; empowering women to make healthy lifestyle choices during pregnancy; encouraging mothers to bond with their babies before birth; and fathers' and partners' supportive role during labor and birth.

  7. Parents' and Teachers' Ratings of the Social Skills of Elementary-Age Students Who Are Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buhrow, Melissa M.; Hartshorne, Timothy S.; Bradley-Johnson, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    Ratings by 23 parents and 21 regular education teachers of 20 elementary-aged students with blindness on the Social Skills Rating Scale (SSRS) were compared to ratings for the SSRS sighted-norm group. Although no significant differences were found for overall ratings, students with blindness were rated as less academically competent and higher on…

  8. Home fire safety education for parents of newborns.

    PubMed

    Lehna, Carlee; Fahey, Erin; Janes, Erika G; Rengers, Sharon; Williams, Joseph; Scrivener, Drane; Myers, John

    2015-09-01

    In children under 1 year of age, the proportion of unintentional burns increases with infant age and mobility. Infants are not able to avoid burns and are dependent on parental or adult help. Treatment of burns in young children is expensive in terms of the life-long costs. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in home fire safety (HFS) knowledge and practices over time for parents of newborn children and expecting parents. HFS knowledge of 103 parents was assessed at baseline, immediately after watching a DVD on HFS (recall), and at 2-week follow-up (retention). In addition, the United States Fire Administration (USFA)/Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Home Safety Checklist which examines HFS practices in the homes was administered. Seventy percent of the participants were Caucasian, 65% were married, and 81% were first-time parents. HFS knowledge increased significantly from baseline to recall (45±12% vs. 87±17% correct responses, p<0.0001), but declined to 75±18% correct at retention. That is, an individual's baseline scores nearly doubled at recall (42±11% change in baseline score), but only increased by 67% at retention (30±15% change in baseline score). For a subsample of parents who completed the USFA Checklist (n=22), the mean percentage of advocated practices followed was 71±11% (range: 40-89%). Using DVDs was an effective educational modality for increasing HFS knowledge. This addressed an important problem of decreasing burns in infants through increasing parent knowledge and HFS practices using a short, inexpensive DVD. PMID:25816967

  9. New Resources for Childbirth Educators and Parents

    PubMed Central

    Shilling, Teri

    2009-01-01

    In this column, reviewers offer perspectives and comments on a variety of new media resources for childbirth educators and for expectant and new parents. The books and DVDs reviewed in this issue's column address the following topics: new directions for childbirth education classes; pregnancy tips for expectant mothers; empowering women to give birth naturally; midwifery care; breastfeeding; labyrinths and “laborinths” (an alternative approach to preparing for birth); preterm labor; understanding newborns' language cues; and exercise programs during pregnancy and the postnatal period, as well as exercises that strengthen the pelvic floor and help new mothers deal with incontinence. PMID:20514118

  10. Education for an Aging Planet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingman, Stan; Amin, Iftekhar; Clarke, Egerton; Brune, Kendall

    2010-01-01

    As low income societies experience rapid aging of their populations, they face major challenges in developing educational policies to prepare their workforce for the future. We review modest efforts undertaken to assist colleagues in three societies: Mexico, China, and Jamaica. Graduate education in gerontology has an important opportunity to…

  11. Family Resources and Mid-Life Level of Education: A Longitudinal Study of the Mediating Influence of Childhood Parental Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Otter, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on the concept of parental involvement, popular among educators and policy-makers, in investigating differences in level of attained education by family background. The question is if parental involvement in children's schooling at age 14 acts as a mediator between family resources and mid-life level of attained education.…

  12. Introduction: Childhood implications of parental aging.

    PubMed

    Cedars, Marcelle I

    2015-06-01

    Men and women are increasingly delaying childbearing to the late 30s, the 40s and beyond. The implications of this societal change on childhood health and well-being have only recently been a focus of research. There are known increased perinatal risks associated with increasing maternal age, while paternal age seems to have a potentially greater negative impact on childhood health. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the aging of sperm and eggs, and how these changes impact offspring, is a critical next step as we work to help patients build healthy families. PMID:25936233

  13. School Administrators, Parents, and Sex Education: A Resolvable Paradox?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Janet; Seidl, Ann

    1989-01-01

    Polled 42 secondary school administrators regarding educational priorities, perceived barriers to expansion of sex education, and preferred methods of introducing sex education. Administrators perceived parents as major barrier to introduction of more formalized sex education in schools. Administrators also felt that parents were generally…

  14. Locke on Education and the Rights of Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckness, Alex

    2010-01-01

    John Locke is often taken to be a staunch defender of parents' rights in the realm of education. In fact, Locke's pedagogical reasons for preferring home education to school education do not necessarily apply to similar choices in modern contexts. Locke's political argument for defining education as a duty of parents rather than the state does not…

  15. IDEA Special Education Due Process Complaints/Hearing Requests: Including Expedited Hearing Requests. A Guide for Parents of Children & Youth (Ages 3-21)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education (CADRE), 2014

    2014-01-01

    A due process complaint is a written document used to request a due process hearing related to the identification, evaluation, or educational placement of a child with a disability, or the provision of a free, appropriate public education (FAPE) to the child. This publication describes Due Process Complaints/Hearing Requests generally for Part B…

  16. The Take Advantage Now/Parent Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, David

    1987-01-01

    The Take Advantage Now/Parent Education Project (TAN/PEP) is based on the knowledge that college students need their parents' help for academic success. The program was developed at Brooklyn College to offer education, support, and counseling for parents and guardians of entering freshmen who have been accepted in a program known as Search,…

  17. Parenting Education at Medford and Churchill High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Mary Cihak

    1986-01-01

    Nationally, interest in family life and parenting programs has grown amidst concern for "basic education." Parenting education in today's schools may be justified because of increased family stress and deteriorating family support systems. Most parenting and family life courses are offered within home economics departments, have a narrow focus,…

  18. Relationships of teenage smoking to educational aspirations and parents' education.

    PubMed

    Waldron, I; Lye, D

    1990-01-01

    This study analyzes data for white high school seniors from the 1985 Monitoring the Future national survey. Students who had less educated parents or lower educational aspirations were more likely to have tried a cigarette, more likely to have adopted cigarette smoking, and less likely to have quit smoking. These students also had more favorable attitudes toward smoking, and reported greater acceptance of smoking by their friends. In addition, the students with less educated parents or lower educational aspirations appeared to be more rejecting of adult authority and more predisposed to adopt adult behaviors, and these characteristics, in turn, were associated with smoking more. The results of multivariate analyses support the hypothesis that these students have experienced less success in school and are more likely to adopt behaviors characteristic of adults as an alternative source of status and gratification, and this contributes to their higher rates of smoking.

  19. Parenting stress and parent support among mothers with high and low education.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Alison; Sweeting, Helen; Wight, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Current theorizing and evidence suggest that parenting stress might be greater among parents from both low and high socioeconomic positions (SEP) compared with those from intermediate levels because of material hardship among parents of low SEP and employment demands among parents of high SEP. However, little is known about how this socioeconomic variation in stress relates to the support that parents receive. This study explored whether variation in maternal parenting stress in a population sample was associated with support deficits. To obtain a clearer understanding of support deficits among mothers of high and low education, we distinguished subgroups according to mothers' migrant and single-parent status. Participants were 5,865 mothers from the Growing Up in Scotland Study, who were interviewed when their children were 10 months old. Parenting stress was greater among mothers with either high or low education than among mothers with intermediate education, although it was highest for those with low education. Support deficits accounted for around 50% of higher stress among high- and low-educated groups. Less frequent grandparent contact mediated parenting stress among both high- and low-educated mothers, particularly migrants. Aside from this common feature, different aspects of support were relevant for high- compared with low-educated mothers. For high-educated mothers, reliance on formal childcare and less frequent support from friends mediated higher stress. Among low-educated mothers, smaller grandparent and friend networks and barriers to professional parent support mediated higher stress. Implications of differing support deficits are discussed. PMID:26192130

  20. Parenting stress and parent support among mothers with high and low education.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Alison; Sweeting, Helen; Wight, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Current theorizing and evidence suggest that parenting stress might be greater among parents from both low and high socioeconomic positions (SEP) compared with those from intermediate levels because of material hardship among parents of low SEP and employment demands among parents of high SEP. However, little is known about how this socioeconomic variation in stress relates to the support that parents receive. This study explored whether variation in maternal parenting stress in a population sample was associated with support deficits. To obtain a clearer understanding of support deficits among mothers of high and low education, we distinguished subgroups according to mothers' migrant and single-parent status. Participants were 5,865 mothers from the Growing Up in Scotland Study, who were interviewed when their children were 10 months old. Parenting stress was greater among mothers with either high or low education than among mothers with intermediate education, although it was highest for those with low education. Support deficits accounted for around 50% of higher stress among high- and low-educated groups. Less frequent grandparent contact mediated parenting stress among both high- and low-educated mothers, particularly migrants. Aside from this common feature, different aspects of support were relevant for high- compared with low-educated mothers. For high-educated mothers, reliance on formal childcare and less frequent support from friends mediated higher stress. Among low-educated mothers, smaller grandparent and friend networks and barriers to professional parent support mediated higher stress. Implications of differing support deficits are discussed.

  1. Parenting Stress and Parent Support Among Mothers With High and Low Education

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Current theorizing and evidence suggest that parenting stress might be greater among parents from both low and high socioeconomic positions (SEP) compared with those from intermediate levels because of material hardship among parents of low SEP and employment demands among parents of high SEP. However, little is known about how this socioeconomic variation in stress relates to the support that parents receive. This study explored whether variation in maternal parenting stress in a population sample was associated with support deficits. To obtain a clearer understanding of support deficits among mothers of high and low education, we distinguished subgroups according to mothers’ migrant and single-parent status. Participants were 5,865 mothers from the Growing Up in Scotland Study, who were interviewed when their children were 10 months old. Parenting stress was greater among mothers with either high or low education than among mothers with intermediate education, although it was highest for those with low education. Support deficits accounted for around 50% of higher stress among high- and low-educated groups. Less frequent grandparent contact mediated parenting stress among both high- and low-educated mothers, particularly migrants. Aside from this common feature, different aspects of support were relevant for high- compared with low-educated mothers. For high-educated mothers, reliance on formal childcare and less frequent support from friends mediated higher stress. Among low-educated mothers, smaller grandparent and friend networks and barriers to professional parent support mediated higher stress. Implications of differing support deficits are discussed. PMID:26192130

  2. Interactive Toys and Children's Education: Strategies for Educators and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oravec, Jo Ann

    2001-01-01

    Outlines issues surrounding interactive toys and analyzes features of such toys. Describes strategies for educators and parents to mitigate interactive toys' deficiencies and help children interact with them in ways that stimulate imagination and foster development. Asserts that interactive toy use should be limited because only through contact…

  3. Maternal age, investment, and parent-child conflict: a mediational test of the terminal investment hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Schlomer, Gabriel L; Belsky, Jay

    2012-06-01

    Drawing on the evolutionary terminal investment hypothesis and Trivers' (1974) parent-offspring conflict theory, we advance and evaluate a mediational model specifying why and how maternal age, via mating effort and parental investment, affects mother-child conflict. Data from a longitudinal study of 757 families indicate that (a) older maternal age predicts lower mating effort during the child's first 5 years of life, and (b) thereby, higher maternal investment in middle childhood when the child is around 10 years old. (c) Higher maternal investment, in turn, forecasts less child-perceived mother-child conflict in adolescence (age 15). These results proved robust against theoretically relevant covariates (family resources, parity, maternal education, and maternal personality characteristics) and in the context of an autoregressive model. Study limitations are noted and results are discussed in terms of the unique contributions of an evolutionary perspective to the determinants-of-parenting literature.

  4. What Do I Know? Parental Positioning in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Erin

    2010-01-01

    The literature that is meant to guide parental participation in special education often refers to parents as vital team members who are critical in designing the best programs for their children (The Family and Advocates Partnership for Education, 2004; The State Education Department, May 2002). However, a disconnect can occur between the…

  5. Parent and Teacher Opinions of Bilingual Education: Comparisons and Contrasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre, Adalberto, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The study examined the correspondence level between the opinions of 600 Mexican American parents of children in bilingual education classes and 60 Mexican American teachers in bilingual classes. Parents and teachers agreed on rationales for bilingual education programs and disagreed on the operative features of bilingual education in the…

  6. Parental Experiences of Children's Disabilities and Special Education in the United States and Japan: Implications for School Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayama, Misa

    2010-01-01

    Cultural beliefs about disability and related systems of special education affect the experience of children with disabilities and their parents. This article reviews research on the perceptions and experiences of parents who have preschool or elementary school-age children with disabilities in the United States and Japan. Parents' experiences…

  7. The Effects of the SENG Parent Education Model on Parents and Gifted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saranli, Adile Gülsah; Metin, Emine Nilgün

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is investigating effects of the SENG (Social Emotional Needs of Gifted Children) Parent Education Model on gifted children and their parents. The participants of this study were parents of 3rd, 4th and 5th grade gifted children attending Yasemin Karakaya Science and Art Center in Ankara, Turkey and the children…

  8. Educating parents on gastrostomy devices: necessary components to achieve success.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Lisa; Shelley, Anita; Battles, Maureen; Latty, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Often parents leave the hospital without the education needed to care for their child's gastrostomy device. Lack of nurse knowledge and the use of various types of devices contribute to their confusion and inability to adequately educate parents. An enhanced methodology and process to standardize gastrostomy education were designed and implemented. Data results confirmed an improvement in the knowledge and competency of both staff nurses and parents. Empowering staff nurses with knowledge and the necessary resources and tools to confidently educate parents, along with a standardized process, has improved overall outcomes.

  9. Educational attainment of Norwegian men: influence of parental and early individual characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Petter; Gravseth, Hans M; Bjerkedal, Tor

    2009-11-01

    The life course perspective in social inequalities in health research has resulted in an increased interest in status attainment processes. Adult status is commonly measured as occupational class, income level or educational attainment, and the latter was applied in this study. The study objective was to estimate the relative contribution of parental and early individual characteristics on educational attainment. The study population comprised all males born in Norway in 1967-1971, and alive at age 28 years (n=160,914). Data on social and biological variables were compiled from birth onwards in several national registers. Information on educational attainment at age 28 years was derived from Statistics Norway. Mean years of education was 12.62 years (SD 2.24). Educational attainment was strongly associated with general ability score at age 18 years and parental educational attainment. Parental income had more limited influence; all other early factors had only marginal effect. Path analysis results suggest that the direct effect of general ability was of the same size as the combined direct and indirect effect of parental education and income. The results suggest that status attainment in this young male population is mainly dependent on general ability and parental education level.

  10. Evaluation of a sensory-motor education programme for 'parents-to-be'.

    PubMed

    Ferland, F; Piper, M C

    1981-10-01

    A controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate a sensory-motor education programme presented to expectant parents in prenatal classes. Short information sessions on sensory-motor development were provided to experimental parents by an occupational therapist. Statistically significant differences between experimental and control groups were noted in the home environments at 3 months of age, with the experimental families exhibiting more favourable environments. No statistically significant differences in development at 8 months of age between the two groups were observed.

  11. Growth in perceived control across 25 years from the late teens to midlife: the role of personal and parents' education.

    PubMed

    Vargas Lascano, Dayuma I; Galambos, Nancy L; Krahn, Harvey J; Lachman, Margie E

    2015-01-01

    This study examined trajectories of perceived control and their association with parents' education and personal educational experience (educational attainment and years of full-time postsecondary education) in 971 Canadian high school seniors tracked 7 times across 25 years. Latent growth models showed that, on average, perceived control increased from age 18 to age 25 and decreased by age 32, with a further slower decrease by age 43. Parents' education contributed to a growing gap in perceived control, however, such that among individuals with at least 1 university-educated parent, perceived control increased across 25 years, reaching its highest level at age 43. Personal educational attainment (completion of a university degree or not) was not associated with growth in perceived control, but individuals who were higher on perceived control at age 18 were more likely to complete a university degree. Parallel process modeling found that perceived control at age 19 predicted gains through age 32 in years of postsecondary education. Postsecondary enrollment at age 19 did not predict gains in perceived control over time. Parents' education predicted both higher levels of perceived control and enrollment in full-time postsecondary education at age 19. Family socioeconomic status contributes to perceived control early in the transition to adulthood and may lead to diverging trajectories over the next 25 years, and perceived control contributes to subsequent postsecondary educational experience. Further longitudinal research should explore the development and determinants of perceived control across the full life span.

  12. Education in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thierstein, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Education is moving into the digital age. Pedagogies have changed to engage the latest digital technologies. The methods of distribution are now a blend between face-to-face and some other combination of virtual interfaces. The content is moving from traditional text-based learning to text-plus-multimedia. The community is now involved in the…

  13. Parenting children under three years of age in a south Indian setting.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shibi; Vijayakumar, Chellarani; Siva, Rajeshwari; Isaac, Rita

    2007-01-01

    A cross sectional study design to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of mothers regarding parenting of children less than 3 years of age was conducted with 120 mothers from both rural and urban areas of South India. Mothers were interviewed in their homes using a structured questionnaire. The nutritional status of their children was assessed by Anthropometry IAP (Indian Academy of Paediatrics) classification and Waterloo's classification were used to assess their children's nutritional status, and the Thiruvananthapuram Development Screening Chart [TDSC] was used to assess the children's development. The majority of mothers had moderately adequate knowledge regarding parenting. The mother's level of education had a significant association (p < 0.05) with their practice and attitude. The study brought out the association between sociodemographic variables and knowledge, attitude, and practice of mothers and its impact on growth and development of their children. Results provide direction for nurses in developing better life style education and parenting training programs.

  14. How to Help Parents Pack Better Preschool Sack Lunches: Advice from Parents for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweitzer, Sara J.; Briley, Margaret E.; Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Staskel, Deanna M.; Almansour, Fawaz D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This exploratory study obtained parent suggestions about messages and activities to guide parents to pack healthful sack lunches for preschool-aged children. Methods: A facilitator conducted group interviews using a modified nominal group technique with a convenience sample of parents who pack daily lunches for their children.…

  15. TV parenting practices: Is the same scale appropriate for parents of children of different ages?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to use multidimensional polytomous item response modeling (MPIRM) to evaluate the psychometric properties of a television (TV) parenting practices (PP) instrument and to perform differential item functioning (DIF) analysis to test whether item parameter estimates differed across educ...

  16. Parent Education and Cultural Change in American Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Renato; And Others

    Using an ethnographic approach, three Parent Education Programs were studied to describe the social setting in which they took place and to document their impact upon parents. The programs were conceptualized as social service organizations designed to change the parental roles of participants. Each program was observed, interviews were conducted…

  17. Determinants of Parental Expectations for Children's Education and Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usui, Wayne M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Data analyses suggest that family social status, race, sex, and their child's ability influence parents' expectations of educational and occupational attainment for the child. Findings give some support to the notion of crystallization of parental expectations (involving formulation overtime of parental perceptions of the child's ability) for…

  18. Parental Decision Making in an Education Voucher System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, R. Gary

    Parental decisionmaking is the keystone of any voucher model. This paper examines the parental decisionmaking process as it has unfolded in the educational voucher experiment in the Alum Rock school system near San Jose, California. The author assumed at the outset that parents cannot make intelligent choices between schooling alternatives if they…

  19. Barriers to Parental Involvement in Education: An Explanatory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornby, Garry; Lafaele, Rayleen

    2011-01-01

    The issue of parental involvement (PI) in education is notable for the extensive rhetoric supporting it and considerable variation in the reality of its practice. It is proposed that the gap between rhetoric and reality in PI has come about because of the influence of factors at the parent and family, child, parent-teacher and societal levels…

  20. Parents' Attitudes toward Comprehensive and Inclusive Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Christina R.; Tasker, Timothy B.; Horn, Stacey S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Parents are sometimes perceived as barriers to providing comprehensive and inclusive sexuality education to young people. However, little is known about parents' actual attitudes towards providing such broad information to young people. The purpose of this paper is to examine two different approaches to measuring parents' attitudes…

  1. Parental Authority over Education and the Right to Invite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Bryan R.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Bryan R. Warnick explores parents' authority to make educational decisions for their children. In philosophical debates, three types of arguments are typically invoked to justify parents' rights: arguments based on the welfare interests of children, arguments based on the expressive interests of parents, and arguments…

  2. Parental Conceptions of Quality in Greek Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis; Gregoriadis, Athanasios; Tsigilis, Nikolaos; Zachopoulou, Evridiki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the assessments of parents of the quality of early childhood education (ECE) in Greece. Five hundred and fifty three preschoolers' parents participated in this study providing quality and importance ratings based on the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale Parent Questionnaire (ECERSPQ) for the…

  3. Parental Expectations of Adapted Physical Educators: A Hispanic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columna, Luis; Pyfer, Jean; Senne, Terry; Velez, Luisa; Bridenthrall, Nancy; Canabal, Maria Yolanda

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perspectives of Hispanic parents of children with disabilities regarding adapted physical education (APE) professionals in relationship to their child's purposeful play and transition to school programming. Participants (N = 11) were Hispanic parents of children with disabilities. Parents participated…

  4. The Rights of Parents in the Education of their Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schimmel, David; Fischer, Louis

    This book is about the legal rights that parents have in the education of their children from kindergarten through high school. These rights are of two kinds: the rights that parents have on their own, as parents, and the rights they have as agents for their children. Currently, all the constitutional rights that apply to adults in the community…

  5. The Parent Professional Partnership: African American Parents' Participation in the Special Education Process. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Norma N.; And Others

    This report describes a project that sought to ascertain the educational expectations and actual levels of participation by Black, low to low-middle income parents of 36 regular and special education students entering three Baltimore (Maryland) public schools. The parents' initial expectations and the development of these expectations over the…

  6. Preparing for Parents: How Australian Teacher Education Is Addressing the Question of Parent-School Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltmarsh, Sue; Barr, Jenny; Chapman, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Parent-school engagement is widely embraced as a policy and educational ideal, yet to date there are few studies of how teacher education prepares students for this important aspect of their professional lives. In this paper, we consider findings from a recent Australian study that explored how the issue of parent-school relations is currently…

  7. Path Analysis: Health Promotion Information Access of Parent Caretaking Pattern through Parenting Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunarsih, Tri; Murti, Bhisma; Anantanyu, Sapja; Wijaya, Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    Parents often inhibit learning process organized by education, due to their ignorance about how to educate child well. Incapability of dealing with those changes leads to dysfunctional families, and problematic children. This research aimed: to analyzed the health promotion information access pattern of parent caretaking pattern through parenting…

  8. Parents' Perceptions of Private Christian Schools and Why Parents Pay when Public Education Is Free

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Madison Kay

    2010-01-01

    The study conducted in this dissertation identified and examined the factors that influence parents' decision to choose a private or public school for their student. The research examined how parents perceive the benefits of a private Christian education for their children. The search for education effectiveness is a quest that seems to have no…

  9. Testing Age-Paced Parenting Newsletters up to Age 3: Greater Impact on First-Time Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostergren, Carol S.; Riley, David A.

    2012-01-01

    An age-paced newsletter for parents of toddlers was evaluated. Mothers reported the newsletters were as useful as information from doctors or nurses and more useful than other sources of information. We hypothesized and found that first-time mothers reported the newsletters more useful than experienced mothers--reading more of the newsletters and…

  10. Overlooked potential: older-age parents in the era of ART.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nathalie; Knodel, John; Kiry Kim, Sovan; Puch, Sina; Saengtienchai, Chanpen

    2008-11-01

    The advent of widespread ART provision in low- and middle-income countries requires not just medical attention, but also social and psychological support to encourage and monitor strict adherence to drug regimens. Developing innovative approaches to providing this broad support is a major challenge, especially within the financial constraints of resource-limited countries hardest hit by the epidemic. In this study, we examine the role of older-age parents in monitoring ART treatment and caring for their HIV-infected children and grandchildren in Cambodia. Our results are based on 25 open-ended interviews with older-age parents of people with AIDS (PWHA). A high level of co-residence when PWHA become ill and a sense of parental responsibility and emotional attachment facilitate high parental involvement in their children's and grandchildren's illness, care and treatment. Our interviews indicate that parents play an important role in encouraging their children to get tested and to access treatment if they test positive. They consistently monitor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and opportunistic infections and remind PWHA to attend medical appointments and support-group meetings. Parents also provide for the nutrition and hygiene of PWHA essential to the success of ART treatments. We find that despite low levels of education, older parents were able to express clear, correct and detailed knowledge of complicated ART treatment regimens, nutrition and hygiene. Overall, our findings show that older parents play a pivotal role in care and treatment if they are provided with proper resources and training and have the ability to understand the necessity and details of ensuring strict adherence to medications. Based on these results, we suggest that explicitly including older parents in policy and programs for care and treatment would allow Cambodia and other countries to take advantage of this unique and effective but overlooked asset in AIDS care and treatment. PMID

  11. Associations Among Parental Education, Home Environment Quality, Effortful Control, and Preacademic Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Emily C.; Landry, Susan H.; Williams, Jeffrey M.; Barnes, Marcia A.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Valiente, Carlos; Assel, Michael; Taylor, Heather B.; Lonigan, Christopher J.; Phillips, Beth M.; Clancy-Menchetti, Jeanine

    2014-01-01

    This study used a longitudinal design to examine whether effortful control mediated the associations of parental education and home environment quality with preacademic knowledge in toddlers and young preschoolers. The sample consisted of 226 children (2 to 4 years of age at T1) from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds. Parents provided data on parent education and home environment quality. Children completed effortful control, early literacy, and early math assessments. T2 effortful control partially mediated the associations of T1 parental education and T1 home environment quality with T3 emergent literacy after accounting for child age, gender, race/ethnicity, T1 effortful control, and T2 early literacy. T2 effortful control partially mediated the association between T1 parental education and T3 emergent math after accounting for child age, gender, race/ethnicity, T1 effortful control, and T2 early math. Prior to entry into preschool, parental education and home environment quality may shape effortful control which in turn influences preacademic knowledge. PMID:25110382

  12. Parental education and children's respiratory and allergic symptoms in the Pollution and the Young (PATY) study.

    PubMed

    Gehring, U; Pattenden, S; Slachtova, H; Antova, T; Braun-Fahrländer, C; Fabianova, E; Fletcher, T; Galassi, C; Hoek, G; Kuzmin, S V; Luttmann-Gibson, H; Moshammer, H; Rudnai, P; Zlotkowska, R; Heinrich, J

    2006-01-01

    Inequalities in health between socio-economic groups are a major public health concern. The current authors studied associations between parental socio-economic status (SES) and children's respiratory and allergic symptoms in 13 diverse countries, including the Russian Federation, North America (Canada and the USA), and countries across Eastern and Western Europe. Data of 57,000 children aged 6-12 yrs, originating from eight cross-sectional studies, were analysed. SES was defined by parental education. Respiratory and allergic symptoms were defined by parental questionnaire reports. Multiple logistic regressions showed that low parental education was associated with a decreased risk of inhalant allergy and itchy rash in school children. Furthermore, low parental education was associated with an increased prevalence of wheeze and nocturnal dry cough. No clear association was found between parental education and prevalence of doctor-diagnosed asthma and bronchitis. Part of the difference between socio-economic groups with regard to their children's symptoms was explained by established risk factors, such as parental allergy, smoking during pregnancy, pet ownership, crowding, mould/moisture in the home, use of gas for cooking, and air pollution (particulate matter with a diameter of <10 microm). However, differences remained after adjusting for these variables. Children's health was associated with parental education. The association could not fully be explained by established risk factors.

  13. Knowledge regarding hymens and the sex education of parents.

    PubMed

    Brown, Verena W; Lamb, Susan M; Perkins, Amy M; Naim, Diana W; Starling, Suzanne P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain beliefs and knowledge of pediatricians and parents regarding the hymen and to evaluate parental and pediatrician attitudes regarding sex education by pediatricians. Surveys were distributed anonymously to parents and pediatricians. Survey questions included knowledge of the female hymen and questions regarding attitudes toward sexual health education. There was a statistically significant difference in mean knowledge scores between pediatricians and parents regarding the hymen (3.7 versus 1.3; p < 0.0001). Almost two-thirds of pediatricians (63%) felt comfortable providing sexual health education directly to their patients, but only 41% felt comfortable educating parents. Pediatricians and parents demonstrate knowledge gaps about the hymen. PMID:24912068

  14. Parental Strains and Rewards among Mothers: The Role of Education.

    PubMed

    Nomaguchi, Kei M; Brown, Susan L

    2011-06-01

    Using data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (N = 1,198), this study examines the associations between education and parental strains and rewards among mothers of young children. Findings indicate that a college degree or more is related to less parenting anxiety, but more role captivity, and less new life meaning from parenting than lower levels of education. Differences by education are partly explained by variation in levels of progressive parenting values and work commitment, but remain significant. These patterns indicate that education provides greater resources that ease parental anxiety, but also leads to greater perceived demands of having a successful career, which contribute to more role captivity and less new life meaning from parenting. PMID:23136449

  15. Competing Paradigms of Educational Justice: Parent Organizing for Educational Equity in a Neoliberal Reform Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nygreen, Kysa

    2016-01-01

    This article examines a grassroots parent organizing effort in a large, high-poverty, urban school district. Drawing from ethnographic field research at a community-based popular education organization, the study describes how parent organizers worked to educate and mobilize Latina/o immigrant parents on issues of educational justice and equity.…

  16. The Right to Quality Life: A Challenge for Parenting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Josephine

    1981-01-01

    Risks are greater for infants born to mothers who drink, smoke, use drugs, have poor nutrition, lack adequate prenatal care, or who are in adolescence. Parenting education and promoting healthy lifestyles among expectant parents is an essential component of education for responsible sexuality. (JN)

  17. Attitudes of Parents towards Contemporary Female Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khattak, Shamaas Gul

    2012-01-01

    This paper is derived from the author's PhD dissertation (gender issues in higher education of Khyber Pukhtunkhwah (KPK) Pakistan). This study aimed at exploring the attitude of parents towards contemporary women higher education. The population for the study was the students' parents of four colleges of Peshawar, capital city of KPK, although the…

  18. An Earthquake Education Program with Parent Participation for Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulay, Hulya

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the earthquake education program which was prepared for 5 to 6 year old children and to draw attention to the importance of parent participation. The earthquake education program was applied to 93 children and 31 parents in the province of Denizli situated in the first degree seismic zone…

  19. Good Nutrition Promotes Health: Guide for Parent Nutrition Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    The purpose of this manual is to guide users of the nutrition education project produced by Padres Hispanos en Accion por Una Sana Generacion (Hispanic Parents in Action for a Healthy Generation). The project provides nutrition education materials to trainers who provide nutrition counseling to parents of Head Start children. The project has two…

  20. Relationship Education with Adolescent Parents: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toews, Michelle; Yazedjian, Ani

    2009-01-01

    In 1988, the Texas Legislature established a pilot program for pregnant and parenting adolescents (Texas Education Agency, n.d.). This program was developed with the goal of enabling adolescent parents to become self-sufficient, responsible, job-oriented citizens. Although the program is not mandated by the state, Pregnancy, Education, and…

  1. Understanding How Participation in Education Changes Mothers' Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Jessica F.; Morris, Pamela A.

    2015-01-01

    This research explores whether low-income mothers' participation in education influences a constellation of different parenting practices that are related to young children's academic outcomes. Importantly, understanding whether maternal participation in education influences mothers' parenting practices can illuminate a pathway by which increases…

  2. A Review and Critique of 16 Major Parent Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Christina L.

    2012-01-01

    There are many parent education programs available for Extension professionals. How does a busy Extension professional decide which is best for his/her clients? This article provides a practical review and critique of 16 major parenting educational programs using three review criteria--program readiness, strength of scientific base, and empirical…

  3. Parents' Schooling and the Correlation between Education and Frailty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, J. Paul

    1998-01-01

    Investigates whether parents' education or unobserved variables partially explain correlations between education and a measure of frailty in adults, using a Disability Index constructed from data from the 1986 Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Parental schooling is strongly associated with adult schooling. Respondents' schooling is strongly…

  4. Childbirth Education for Parents Experiencing Pregnancy after Perinatal Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Patricia Moyle

    2005-01-01

    Expectant parents who have experienced previous perinatal loss have special concerns, which can be partially addressed by modifying prepared childbirth education courses. This article presents a review of current literature, highlighting the unique needs of expectant parents who have experienced previous pregnancy loss. Modifications to traditional childbirth education courses are suggested, which include addressing parents' grief, managing anxiety, and facilitating communication with health-care providers and others. PMID:17273448

  5. Gift and sacrifice: parental involvement in Latino adolescents' education.

    PubMed

    Ceballo, Rosario; Maurizi, Laura K; Suarez, Gloria A; Aretakis, Maria T

    2014-01-01

    Although myriad studies document the benefits of parental involvement in education on various indicators of children's academic performance, less research examines parental involvement among adolescents in low-income Latino families. Incorporating a multidimensional conceptualization of parental involvement, this study examined the relation between parental involvement and academic outcomes in a sample of 223 low-income, Latino adolescents. Results indicated that three types of parental involvement (gift/sacrifice, future discussions/academic socialization, and school involvement) had significant, positive associations with academic outcomes. Moreover, our results suggest that parents' stories about struggles with poverty and immigration are an important component of parental involvement, contributing to adolescents' desire to succeed academically and "give back" to parents. Additionally, our findings indicated that the positive relations between parental involvement and academic outcomes were stronger for immigrant youth and for those with higher endorsements of the Latino cultural value of respeto (respect).

  6. Parents' Rights and Educational Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marples, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Legitimate parental interests need to be distinguished from any putative rights parents "qua" parents may be said to possess. Parents have no right to insulate their children from conceptions of the good at variance with those of their own. Claims to the right to faith schools, private schools, home-schooling or to withdraw a child from…

  7. Ecologies of Parental Engagement in Urban Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Angela Calabrese; Drake, Corey; Perez, Jose Gustavo; St. Louis, Kathleen; George, Magnia

    2004-01-01

    What we know about parental involvement in schools cuts across two areas: how and why parental involvement is important and the structural barriers that impede parental participation. However, it has been difficult to construct an account of parental involvement, grounded in everyday practice that goes beyond a laundry list of things that good…

  8. Adolescent Sexual Health Education: Parents Benefit Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinaj-Koci, Veronica; Deveaux, Lynette; Wang, Bo; Lunn, Sonya; Marshall, Sharon; Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of parents in adolescent-targeted interventions is intended to benefit the adolescent. Limited research has explored whether parents participating in these programs also benefit directly. We examined the impact of Caribbean Informed Parents and Children Together, the parenting portion of an adolescent-targeted HIV prevention…

  9. Special Educational Rights for Parents of Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copenhaver, John; Taylor, Mae

    This handbook describes parent educational rights mandated under federal rules and regulations of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, including the amendments of 1997 (IDEA), and the Bureau of Indian Affairs/Office of Indian Education Programs special education eligibility document. Each main topic is preceded by a box that contains a…

  10. Child characteristics and parental educational expectations: evidence for transmission with transaction.

    PubMed

    Briley, Daniel A; Harden, K Paige; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2014-12-01

    Parents' expectations for their children's ultimate educational attainment have been hypothesized to play an instrumental role in socializing academically relevant child behaviors, beliefs, and abilities. In addition to social transmission of educationally relevant values from parents to children, parental expectations and child characteristics may transact bidirectionally. We explore this hypothesis using both longitudinal and genetically informative twin data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth and Kindergarten cohorts. Our behavior genetic results indicate that parental expectations partly reflect child genetic variation, even as early as 4 years of age. Two classes of child characteristics were hypothesized to contribute to these child-to-parent effects: behavioral tendencies (approaches toward learning and problem behaviors) and achievement (math and reading). Using behavior genetic models, we find within-twin-pair associations between these child characteristics and parental expectations. Using longitudinal cross-lagged models, we find that initial variation in child characteristics predicts future educational expectations above and beyond previous educational expectations. These results are consistent with transactional frameworks in which parent-to-child and child-to-parent effects co-occur. PMID:25285965

  11. Education in Old Age: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luppi, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The following work outlines an analysis of education initiatives aimed at the elderly. It examines the characteristics of the old aged learner, his/her "educability" and the foundations for an educational approach for this age group. These theoretical assumptions form the basis of this research: an exploratory study into various educational and…

  12. Experiencing an "Inclusive" Education: Parents and Their Children with "Special Educational Needs"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Chrissie

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on the experiences of British parents who have children identified with "special education needs" within mainstream education. Expectations of mainstream education can have a negative affect on parents when a child is unable to maintain his or her education within a mainstream school. In England and Wales, "inclusion" within…

  13. Educated Parents, Educated Children: Toward a Multiple Life Cycles Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sticht, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Given the important intergenerational effects of parents' education level on the achievement of their children, education policies should shift from a focus on one life cycle to a focus on "multiple life cycles". Such a policy would explicitly recognize that adults transfer their educational achievements to the achievement of their children. It…

  14. Parenting clinically anxious versus healthy control children aged 4-12 years.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, C M; van Steensel, F J A; Bögels, S M

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated whether parenting behaviors differed between parents of 68 clinically anxious children and 106 healthy control children aged 4-12 years. The effects of parent gender, child gender and child age on parenting were explored. Mothers and fathers completed a questionnaire to assess parenting behaviors in for children hypothetically anxious situations. Results showed that parents of clinically anxious children reported more anxiety-enhancing parenting (reinforcement of dependency and punishment) as well as more positive parenting (positive reinforcement). For the clinical sample, fathers reported using more modeling/reassurance than mothers, and parents reported using more force with their 4-7-year-olds than with their 8-12-year-olds. No interaction effects were found for child gender with child anxiety status on parenting. Results indicate that for intervention, it is important to measure parenting behaviors, and to take into account father and mother differences and the age of the child. PMID:25819172

  15. Parenting clinically anxious versus healthy control children aged 4-12 years.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, C M; van Steensel, F J A; Bögels, S M

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated whether parenting behaviors differed between parents of 68 clinically anxious children and 106 healthy control children aged 4-12 years. The effects of parent gender, child gender and child age on parenting were explored. Mothers and fathers completed a questionnaire to assess parenting behaviors in for children hypothetically anxious situations. Results showed that parents of clinically anxious children reported more anxiety-enhancing parenting (reinforcement of dependency and punishment) as well as more positive parenting (positive reinforcement). For the clinical sample, fathers reported using more modeling/reassurance than mothers, and parents reported using more force with their 4-7-year-olds than with their 8-12-year-olds. No interaction effects were found for child gender with child anxiety status on parenting. Results indicate that for intervention, it is important to measure parenting behaviors, and to take into account father and mother differences and the age of the child.

  16. Qualitative assessment of home environment across the different educational status of parents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the home environment of preschool children among 6 villages in Ludhiana district in Punjab state, India. The sample included 120 children aged 3-5 years. Eight composite scales were used to measure the home environment: learning stimulation, language stimulation, physical environment, warmth and affection, academic stimulation, role modeling, variety of experience, and acceptance. The sample reflected four educational groups for the father (illiterate, primary, matric, and graduate) and three educational groups for the mother (illiterate, primary, and matric). Findings clearly indicate that graduate level parents provided a more enriched home environment than less educated and illiterate parents. Education was unrelated to warmth and affection or acceptance between parents and children. Educated mothers showed slightly more warmth and affection. The stimulation in the growth of language and learning stimulation was significantly greater among graduate parents. Mothers encouraged their children to speak correctly, whereas illiterate mothers did not realize the importance. The lesser physical environment among lower educated parents supports findings of R.K. Srivastava (1974) on the association between lower scholastic achievement and overcrowding in the home. The study included homes where parents had sufficient financial resources to provide a safe and adequate physical environment but did not do so. PMID:12292798

  17. Qualitative assessment of home environment across the different educational status of parents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the home environment of preschool children among 6 villages in Ludhiana district in Punjab state, India. The sample included 120 children aged 3-5 years. Eight composite scales were used to measure the home environment: learning stimulation, language stimulation, physical environment, warmth and affection, academic stimulation, role modeling, variety of experience, and acceptance. The sample reflected four educational groups for the father (illiterate, primary, matric, and graduate) and three educational groups for the mother (illiterate, primary, and matric). Findings clearly indicate that graduate level parents provided a more enriched home environment than less educated and illiterate parents. Education was unrelated to warmth and affection or acceptance between parents and children. Educated mothers showed slightly more warmth and affection. The stimulation in the growth of language and learning stimulation was significantly greater among graduate parents. Mothers encouraged their children to speak correctly, whereas illiterate mothers did not realize the importance. The lesser physical environment among lower educated parents supports findings of R.K. Srivastava (1974) on the association between lower scholastic achievement and overcrowding in the home. The study included homes where parents had sufficient financial resources to provide a safe and adequate physical environment but did not do so.

  18. Parenting for Social Mobility? Home Learning, Parental Warmth, Class and Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartas, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    Parenting has come to play a pivotal role in breaking intergenerational disadvantage and increasing children's life chances and social mobility through practices such as parental support with their learning and education. Using a UK representative sample from the Millennium Cohort Study, the present study examined the unique and cumulative…

  19. Death education: knowledge, attitudes, and perspectives of Irish parents and teachers.

    PubMed

    McGovern, M; Barry, M M

    2000-06-01

    This article reports on a cross-sectional survey of the knowledge, attitudes and perspectives of Irish parents and school teachers concerning children's grief and the concept of death education. The sample comprised 119 parents and 142 teachers of Irish Primary-school children (5-12 years of age) who completed a self-administered questionnaire. Both parents and teachers reported high levels of understanding of the nature of children's grief and strongly supported the view that death should be discussed with children before they encounter it. Although discussions of death were reported in the classroom and in the home, both teachers and parents, particularly men, reported being uncomfortable talking to children about death. There was general support for inclusion of death education in the school curriculum, with both teachers and parents supporting the need for further teacher training to undertake its delivery. There were few significant differences between the expressed attitudes of parents and teachers. However, teachers were more likely than parents to agree that death education would take away from parental responsibility. The implications of the findings for further work in this area are considered.

  20. Child Characteristics and Parental Educational Expectations: Evidence for Transmission with Transaction

    PubMed Central

    Briley, Daniel A.; Harden, K. Paige; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2014-01-01

    Parents’ expectations for their children’s ultimate educational attainment have been hypothesized to play an instrumental role in socializing academically-relevant child behaviors, beliefs, and abilities. In addition to social transmission of educationally relevant values from parents to children, parental expectations and child characteristics may transact bidirectionally. We explore this hypothesis using both longitudinal and genetically informative twin data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study –Birth and Kindergarten cohorts. Our behavior genetic results indicate that parental expectations partly reflect child genetic variation, even as early as 4 years of age. Two classes of child characteristics were hypothesized to contribute to these child-to-parent effects: behavioral tendencies (approaches toward learning and problem behaviors) and achievement (math and reading). Using behavior genetic models, we find within-twin-pair associations between these child characteristics and parental expectations. Using longitudinal cross-lagged models, we find that initial variation in child characteristics predicts future educational expectations above and beyond previous educational expectations. These results are consistent with transactional frameworks in which parent-to-child and child-to-parent effects co-occur. PMID:25285965

  1. "Set the Pace": Nutrition Education DVD for Head Start Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedze, Pascasie; Orr, Robin A.; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight remains a major public health problem and innovative nutrition education programs are still needed. Thus, the "Set the Pace" is a nutrition education DVD for Head Start parents which provides visual nutrition education and physical activities to incorporate in their daily routines. (Contains 1 table.)

  2. Alternative Education and the Single-Parent Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Hal; And Others

    The impact of providing alternative styles of education to single-parent families was analyzed as part of an experimental program, Southeast Alternatives (SEA), in Minneapolis, Minnesota. SEA is one of 18 experimental schools projects funded by the National Institute of Education to test innovations in educational practice in a long-term…

  3. Parents' Attitudes towards Bilingual Education Policy in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oladejo, James

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the opinions of parents on some critical issues relating to recent educational reforms and their effects on foreign language education in Taiwan, particularly those aspects of the reforms that relate to the learning of English as a foreign language in the country. The paper noted that educational reforms in the country are…

  4. Kentucky's Parent and Child Education (PACE) Program. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Kevin M.

    A lack of education is a major cause of poverty among many Kentucky citizens. In 1986, Kentucky's dropout rate was the second highest of the 50 states. That same year, Kentucky established the Parent and Child Education (PACE) Program in an effort to combat the problems of insufficient education and poverty that tend to be perpetuated from…

  5. Parents' Perspectives in Their Child's Education in Two-Parent Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsosie, Berdina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the research study was to explore the perceptions of Navajo mothers and Navajo fathers in the development and childrearing practices of their children and to what extent each parent was involved in their children by gender and age. The objective of the interviews was to capture the perceptions of each parent as to child development…

  6. Problematising School Space for Indigenous Education: Teachers' and Parents' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lea, Tess; Wegner, Aggie; McRae-Williams, Eva; Chenhall, Richard; Holmes, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This interpretive study explores the relationship between spatial qualities and school-parent engagement in three primary schools which serve low income periurban Indigenous families in north Australia. Drawing from interviews with educators and parents, school-based observations and community fieldwork conducted over the course of two years in…

  7. Parents' Roles and Responsibilities in Indian Education. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Deborah S.

    Written for American Indian parents, this fact sheet offers basic suggestions for building good parent-school relationships and helping children succeed in school. The first issue addressed is the education of children before they start to school, and the emphasis is on developing pride, self-confidence, and a desire to learn and do new things.…

  8. Character-based Sexuality Education: Bringing Parents into the Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lickona, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Working together, schools and families can provide a character-based approach to sexuality education. Schools can give parents a wake-up call, provide historical perspective, share good news, encourage parents to talk with kids, help discuss dangers, identify rewards of waiting, give guidelines, and support chaste lifestyles. (Contains 21…

  9. Parental Perspectives and Challenges in Inclusive Education in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Meng Ee; Poon, Kenneth K.; Kaur, Sarinajit; Ng, Zi Jia

    2015-01-01

    Relatively little work has focused on inclusive education in Singapore. This study examines the experiences and perceptions of parents whose children with disabilities are attending mainstream secondary schools in Singapore. Data was drawn from interviews with 13 parents of children with mild disabilities. Our findings reveal that parental…

  10. Parental Strains and Rewards among Mothers: The Role of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomaguchi, Kei M.; Brown, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (N = 1,198), this study examines the associations between education and parental strains and rewards among mothers of young children. Findings indicate that a college degree or more is related to less parenting anxiety, but more role captivity, and less new life meaning from…

  11. Addressing Parents' Perceptions in the Marginalization of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehy, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    It is no secret that parents can and often do influence events and offerings in schools. Results of parental dispositions are often immediate and of obvious importance, as in the case of exercising the vote to support or deny funding for specific programs. For physical education in particular, there is a widely and uniformly held belief that…

  12. Parental Educational Involvement Conceived as the Arrangement of Contingency Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Robert C.; Moutavelis, Adrianos G.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the utility of a conception of parental educational involvement as the arrangement of contingency operations that normatively change: the frequency of children's school-related behaviour, the reinforcing potency of stimuli produced by studying, and children's tendencies to request parental intervention. A child-report measure…

  13. Gifted and Talented Education (GATE): Student and Parent Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mary Hahn; Balli, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study explored student and parent perspectives on the extent to which gifted and talented programs met the educational needs of gifted students in Grades 4 to 7. Fifty-two interviews were conducted with students and parents from 10 public schools including seven neighborhood schools and three magnet schools. Participant…

  14. Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect through Parent Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reppucci, N. Dickon; Britner, Preston A.; Woolard, Jennifer L.

    In 1993, the Community Research Group (CRG) at the University of Virginia was provided the opportunity to gather systematic information on parent education and family support programs for the prevention of abuse and neglect throughout Virginia. Based on the group's research into 25 distinct parenting programs, this book outlines an empowering…

  15. Parent Educators in Early Intervention: Insights from Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Nicole Megan; Gallagher, Peggy A.

    2014-01-01

    In 1 state's Part C early intervention (EI) program, families are afforded a unique opportunity to connect with parent educators (PEs), parents of children who have received EI services, and who are trained to support EI families and staff with a range of tailored duties. In an effort to continually reflect and improve upon the role of PEs, the…

  16. Parental education as viewed by nurses. An interview study.

    PubMed

    Petersson, K; Håkansson, A; Petersson, C

    1997-01-01

    This interview study of nurses in three health centres in Växjö municipality in Sweden sought to find out how they perceived their work with parental education. The aim was to study the possibilities of and any obstacles to achieving the goals of good parenthood training on equal terms for all people. The results showed areas where further development is needed. It appears to be difficult to achieve the goals. Parents' needs for educational measures differed depending on social, cultural, and gender differences. Young single mothers rarely took part in the parents' groups. They belonged to a minority whose needs and problems differed from those of the majority of parents. Also immigrant parents rarely participated in parents' groups. According to the nurses, this may have been due to cultural differences in child care and difficulties with the Swedish language. To give fathers more scope and opportunity to take part, it was suggested that special fathers' groups should be set up. To sum up, families with specific needs should be given more individual education and guidance by nurses. This study, confined to one geographical area, has only shed light on a few nurses' perceptions of parental education, so the findings merely serve to indicate a trend. More general knowledge would require further research-oriented trial projects with the focus on the parents' perspective.

  17. Parental Perceptions of a Short Conductive Education Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lie, K. G.; Holmes, M.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined perceptions of 15 British parents whose children with physical disabilities attended a three-week conducive education program focused on functional development, pedagogy, and language and social development. A majority of parents reported progress in walking, motivation, and grasp. Progress was least reported in sleeping,…

  18. An Evaluation of the Use of Volunteers as Parent Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of trained volunteers in leading parent education programs. Compared volunteer and professionally led groups in an ongoing extension-sponsored parenting program. Urban/rural comparisons were also made. There were no significant differences between volunteer and professionally led groups on child gains or parent…

  19. Parents' Views on Preschool Care and Education in Local Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devjak, Tatjana; Bercnik, Sanja

    2009-01-01

    In this text, the authors are analyzing preschool care and education in local community. They are focusing on the problem of information transfer between the kindergarten, parents and local community, as well as the model of relationship participation. Cooperation between parents, kindergarten and local community is an important element in the…

  20. Parent-based sleep education for children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Malow, Beth A; Adkins, Karen W; Reynolds, Ann; Weiss, Shelly K; Loh, Alvin; Fawkes, Diane; Katz, Terry; Goldman, Suzanne E; Madduri, Niru; Hundley, Rachel; Clemons, Traci

    2014-01-01

    This study provided sleep education to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to determine whether an individual or group format was more effective in improving sleep and aspects of daytime behavior and family functioning. Eighty children, ages 2-10 years, with ASD and sleep onset delay completed the study. Actigraphy and parent questionnaires were collected at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Mode of education did not affect outcomes. Sleep latency, insomnia subscales on the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, and other outcomes related to child and family functioning improved with treatment. Parent-based sleep education, delivered in relatively few sessions, was associated with improved sleep onset delay in children with ASD. Group versus individualized education did not affect outcome.

  1. [Significance of sex education in the parents-adolescents relationship].

    PubMed

    de Jesus, M C

    1999-01-01

    This study had as reference the phenomenological sociology of Alfred Schütz. This author had as purpose understanding parents and adolescents' behavior towards sexual education. The phenomenological interview, used to gather data from parents and youngsters, allowed the understanding of the types: "parents who educate adolescents for sexual life" and "adolescents who are educated for sexual life". The comparative analyses of these two types showed the need of implementing a dialog about sexual life among parents and teenagers enabling the youngster to have a satisfying and safe sexual initiation. The comprehensive social action theory by Schütz was presented, in this study, as an educational health strategy. According to the author, there is a need of considering the person's inner existential preoccupations in order to understand his/her social behavior towards sexual matters. PMID:12138641

  2. Parenting School-Aged Children and Adolescents. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beekman, Nancy R.

    Research on parenting with particular attention to parental influence on such matters as self-esteem, academic achievement, social support, and parent-child communication is synthesized in this document. Parental concerns are noted and discussed from an historical vantage point and compared with what concerns parents most today. Sources of help…

  3. Priorities for Developmental Areas in Early Childhood Education: A Comparison of Parents' and Teachers' Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackes, Mesut

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine parents' and early childhood teachers' perceptions of the priorities for developmental areas targeted in the Turkish Early Childhood Education Curriculum for children aged 36-72 months. The sample of this study consisted of 1600 parents and 158 early childhood teachers. The study utilized a survey…

  4. Parent Power: A Major Ingredient in the Recipe for Educational Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Education and Outreach Program.

    Educational research has ascertained that parents who are actively involved in their children's learning at home help these children become more successful learners in and out of school. Learning activities requiring more imagination than equipment are presented for four age levels. These reading, writing, math, science, and social studies home…

  5. Parent-Based Sleep Education for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malow, Beth A.; Adkins, Karen W.; Reynolds, Ann; Weiss, Shelly K.; Loh, Alvin; Fawkes, Diane; Katz, Terry; Goldman, Suzanne E.; Madduri, Niru; Hundley, Rachel; Clemons, Traci

    2014-01-01

    This study provided sleep education to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to determine whether an individual or group format was more effective in improving sleep and aspects of daytime behavior and family functioning. Eighty children, ages 2-10 years, with ASD and sleep onset delay completed the study. Actigraphy and parent…

  6. What Parents Don't Know about College Graduation Rates Can Hurt. Education Outlook. No. 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Andrew P.; Schneider, Mark

    2011-01-01

    You would not buy a car without knowing its mileage, or a home without knowing its age and condition. Why would you invest in a college education without knowing graduation rates? Over the next several months, high school seniors across the country will decide where to go to college. Many students and their parents will base the decision on…

  7. New Directions in Facilitating the Teaching Role of Parents in the Sex Education of Their Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henschke, John A.

    A family-oriented sex education course was developed for parents to take together with their children. The program, which is designed for young people between the ages of 9 and 17, is offered in separate sections for the following groups: mothers and their 9- to 12-year-old daughters, mothers and their 13- to 17-year-old daughters, fathers and…

  8. Pathways to Postsecondary Education for Pregnant and Parenting Teens. Working Paper #C418

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Cynthia B.

    2014-01-01

    This report focuses on pathways to postsecondary education (PSE), including high school completion, for pregnant and parenting teens. Although birth rates among teens have declined in the United States over the last 20 years, one in seven adolescent females (14.4 percent) is expected to give birth before age 20 with females of color (24 percent of…

  9. A Handbook for Immigrant Parents: Protect the Educational Rights of Your Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multicultural Education, Training and Advocacy (META), Inc., San Francisco, CA.

    This handbook for immigrant parents outlines the legal rights of immigrant children to educational services. All children in the United States have a right to attend school. Schools may require proof of residency and vaccination before enrollment, but a signed sworn statement attesting to the child's age may be substituted for a birth certificate.…

  10. A Parent's Guide to Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Diane Trister; Phinney, Joanna

    This handbook was originally intended for parents whose children attend programs which use "The Creative Curriculum for Early Childhood" (CCEC), but the informaton is also useful to parents whose children attend early childhood programs using other curriculum models based on child development theories. The purpose of the handbook is to explain…

  11. Exporting a Canadian parenting education program to the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    McLennan, John D; Leon, Tina; Haffey, Sue; Barker, Leslie A S

    2009-01-01

    The framework of a Canadian-developed parent education program, Nobody's Perfect, was used in the development of a new parent education program offered to parents attending a child nutrition rehabilitation program in the Dominican Republic. While key teaching elements of the original program were retained (e.g., encouraging active participation, emphasizing facilitation over didactic teaching, using experiential learning), locally relevant content was inserted (e.g., diarrhea prevention and treatment strategies). A Canadian team trained a group of Dominicans to deliver the new program to parents of children recovering from malnutrition. This paper describes the development, implementation, and resulting parenting program from this effort. This 8-week program may find use in other settings. In addition, the experience gained from this exportation endeavor may be useful for others undertaking similar initiatives. PMID:19261157

  12. Age 21 Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Title I Chicago Child-Parent Centers. Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Temple, Judy A.; Robertson, Dylan L.; Mann, Emily A.

    Researchers conducted the first cost-benefit analysis of a federally-financed, comprehensive early childhood program involving the Title I Chicago Child-Parent Centers, which are located in public schools and provide educational and family support services to low-income children ages 3-9 years. Data came from a cohort of children born in 1980 who…

  13. Parenting Stress, Parental Reactions, and Externalizing Behavior From Ages 4 to 10

    PubMed Central

    Mackler, Jennifer S.; Kelleher, Rachael T.; Shanahan, Lilly; Calkins, Susan D.; Keane, Susan P.; O’Brien, Marion

    2014-01-01

    The association between parenting stress and child externalizing behavior, and the mediating role of parenting, has yielded inconsistent findings; however, the literature has typically been cross-sectional and unidirectional. In the current study the authors examined the longitudinal transactions among parenting stress, perceived negative parental reactions, and child externalizing at 4, 5, 7, and 10 years old. Models examining parent effects (parenting stress to child behavior), child effects (externalizing to parental reactions and stress), indirect effects of parental reactions, and the transactional associations among all variables, were compared. The transactional model best fit the data, and longitudinal reciprocal effects emerged between parenting stress and externalizing behavior. The mediating role of parental reactions was not supported; however, indirect effects suggest that parenting stress both is affected by and affects parent and child behavior. The complex associations among parent and child variables indicate the importance of interventions to improve the parent–child relationship and reducing parenting stress. PMID:26778852

  14. Parental expectations of adapted physical educators: a Hispanic perspective.

    PubMed

    Columna, Luis; Pyfer, Jean; Senne, Terry; Velez, Luisa; Bridenthrall, Nancy; Canabal, Maria Yolanda

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perspectives of Hispanic parents of children with disabilities regarding adapted physical education (APE) professionals in relationship to their child's purposeful play and transition to school programming. Participants (N=11) were Hispanic parents of children with disabilities. Parents participated in one-on-one interviews in their preferred language (Spanish or English). Transcripts were analyzed through a constant comparative analysis. Three themes emerged from the data: (a) qualified APE professionals, (b) challenges for the family, and (c) normalcy. These themes were supported by subthemes. The results indicated that Hispanic families were not as familiar with APE services as Caucasian families were. Parental expectations among Hispanic parents were similar to Caucasian parents, but the preference for modes of communication and information differed.

  15. Parents' attitudes on sexual education--what and when?

    PubMed

    Janković, Suzana; Malatestinić, Giulia; Striehl, Henrietta Bencević

    2013-03-01

    This study aims to detect opinions about what and when should be talked about in sexual education in schools respecting the role of parents. This study was conducted in 23 elementary schools in the town Rijeka, Croatia from March to May 2010. The sample consisted of parents of sixth grade elementary school pupils. There were 1,673 respondents, divided in groups of mothers and fathers. Both groups had answered what is the majority of topics to be talked about in the higher grades of elementary school. In lower elementary school grades children should be taught about the structure and differences of male and female genitalia. Topics that most parents find inappropriate to be talked about in sexual education, are sexual satisfaction and pleasure, masturbation, pornography and prostitution (5.01-7.7%). Results of this study can help in creating sexual education programs in schools where parents are considered of being equal accomplices. PMID:23697245

  16. Parental socialization styles, parents' educational level, and sexist attitudes in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Garaigordobil, Maite; Aliri, Jone

    2012-07-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the differences in the mothers' and fathers' socialization styles depending on their children's sex; whether there are differences in hostile, benevolent, and ambivalent sexism, and neosexism as a function of both parents' socialization styles; and whether the parents' educational level affects their level of sexism and their children's sexism. The sample included 1,455 adolescents and their parents (764 mothers and 648 fathers). The results showed no differences in the socialization style of the father with his children's sexism, but the mother used a more authoritarian style with her daughters. The parents' socialization style had little influence on their children's sexism, although it had a higher impact on the sons' sexism. The father's style had less influence than the mother's on their sons' sexism, and it had no influence on their daughters' sexism. The indulgent style of both parents had the highest relation with a low level of sexism. Moreover, a negative correlation was found between the parents' educational level and their level of sexism, as well as between the mother's educational level and her daughters' sexism. To conclude, the indulgent style and the mother's high educational level promote fewer sexist attitudes.

  17. Opposite differential risks for autism and schizophrenia based on maternal age, paternal age, and parental age differences

    PubMed Central

    Byars, Sean G.; Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Effects of maternal and paternal age on offspring autism and schizophrenia risks have been studied for over three decades, but inconsistent risks have often been found, precluding well-informed speculation on why these age-related risks might exist. Methodology: To help clarify this situation we analysed a massive single population sample from Denmark including the full spectrum of autistic and schizophrenic disorders (eliminating between-study confounding), used up to 30 follow-up years, controlled for over 20 potentially confounding factors and interpret the ultimate causation of the observed risk patterns using generally accepted principles of parent-offspring conflict and life-history theory. Results: We evaluated the effects of paternal age, maternal age and parental age difference on offspring mental disorders and found consistently similar risk patterns for related disorders and markedly different patterns between autistic and schizophrenic disorders. Older fathers and mothers both conferred increased risk for autistic but not schizophrenic disorders, but autism risk was reduced in younger parents and offspring of younger mothers had increased risk for many schizophrenic disorders. Risk for most disorders also increased when parents were more dissimilarly aged. Monotonically increasing autism risk is consistent with mutation accumulation as fathers’ age, but this explanation is invalid for schizophrenic disorders, which were not related to paternal age and were negatively correlated with maternal age. Conclusions and implications: We propose that the observed maternally induced risk patterns ultimately reflect a shifting ancestral life-history trade-off between current and future reproduction, mediated by an initially high but subsequently decreasing tendency to constrain foetal provisioning as women proceed from first to final pregnancy. PMID:27637201

  18. A Parent Education Program for Parents of Chinese American Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Hsu-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of a parent education program on decreasing parenting stress and increasing parental confidence and quality of life in parents of Chinese American children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A pre-, posttest group design was used in this study. A total of nine families of Chinese American…

  19. What Do Parents Want?: An Analysis of Education-Related Comments Made by Parents of Children with Different Genetic Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Deborah J.; Lawson, John E.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of educational desires found parents of children with Down syndrome (n=39) wanted changes in speech therapy and reading services, parents of children with Prader-Willi syndrome (n=25) wanted increases in adaptive physical education services, and parents of children with Williams syndrome (n=26) wanted increases in music services and…

  20. Sexuality Education: A Curriculum for Parent/Child Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jean; And Others

    This document is the fourth volume of a six-volume report on sexuality education. The curriculum described here is a revised and expanded version of the curriculum "Parent-Child Sex Education: A Training Module" (Brown, et al., 1978) and is based primarily on the experiences and evaluation of the Family Guidance Center's (FGC) work in St. Joseph,…

  1. Factors Associated with Parent Support for Condom Education and Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AugsJoost, Brett; Jerman, Petra; Deardorff, Julianna; Harley, Kim; Constantine, Norman A.

    2014-01-01

    Expanding condom-related knowledge and skills and reducing barriers to condom use have the potential to help reduce pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections among youth. These goals are sometimes addressed through condom education and availability (CEA) programs as part of sexuality education in school. Parents are a key constituency in…

  2. Parental Attitudes Regarding School-Based Sexuality Education in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steadman, Mindy; Crookston, Benjamin; Page, Randy; Hall, Cougar

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality education programs can be broadly categorized as either risk-avoidance or risk-reduction approaches. Health educators in Utah public schools must teach a state mandated risk-avoidance curriculum which prohibits the advocacy or encouragement of contraception. Multiple national surveys indicate that parents prefer a risk-reduction approach…

  3. Restructuring the Public School Curriculum To Include Parenting Education Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyree, Carolyn L.; And Others

    Although the current educational climate stresses a back-to-basics approach, there is nonetheless overwhelming evidence of a need for an appropriately structured parenting education program in the public school curriculum. Reasons for this need include the large number of teenage pregnancies and abortions. These lead teens to miss high school…

  4. Rural Cherokee Children with Disabilities: Parental Stories of Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jandura, Collette

    2013-01-01

    Parents of Cherokee children with disabilities encounter educational agencies from their child's birth to adulthood. Living rurally within the Cherokee Nation's jurisdictional boundaries, these indigenous families engage with a myriad of special education agencies and subsequent policies. This qualitative study explores parental…

  5. Parental Involvement in Occupational Education of Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukaš, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    In this study the emphasis of selecting a school and profession is put onto the family role in educational and professional guidance in order to help the students to obtain the necessary information for further education, by the help of their parents, more efficiently and more functionally. The study was conducted in Virovitica and Podravina…

  6. Reimbursing Parents for Unilateral Placements in Private Special Education Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Steven S.

    1986-01-01

    In Burlington School Committee v. Department of Education, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the law does not bar parents from making unilateral placements, but they may be reimbursed only if the private educational program is eventually approved through the appeal set forth in the law. (Author/CL)

  7. Building Parent Trust in the Special Education Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellner, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    If trust is born in strong relationships, then first encounters are critical. Parents of students with disabilities undergo a great deal of stress and come to educational professionals for help with vital specialized tasks, including assessment, placement, progress monitoring, and maintenance of their child's ongoing needs. Special education is a…

  8. Immigrant Parents' Investments in Their Children's Post-Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Robert; Anisef, Paul; Walters, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines relationships between the resources available to immigrant families and the amount parents are willing and able to save for their children's post-secondary education (PSE). We use data from Statistics Canada's 2002 Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning to compare immigrant and native-born PSE saving. The results indicate…

  9. Down Syndrome: Parental Origin, Recombination, and Maternal Age

    PubMed Central

    Vraneković, Jadranka; Božović, Ivana Babić; Grubić, Zorana; Wagner, Jasenka; Pavlinić, Dinko; Dahoun, Sophie; Bena, Frédérique; Čulić, Vida

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess (1) the parental origin of trisomy 21 and the stage in which nondisjunction occurs and (2) the relationship between altered genetic recombination and maternal age as risk factors for trisomy 21. The study included 102 cases with Down syndrome from the Croatian population. Genotyping analyses were performed by polymerase chain reaction using 11 short tandem repeat markers along chromosome 21q. The vast majority of trisomy 21 was of maternal origin (93%), followed by paternal (5%) and mitotic origin (2%). The frequencies of maternal meiotic I (MI) and meiotic II errors were 86% and 14%, respectively. The highest proportion of cases with zero recombination was observed among those with maternal MI derived trisomy 21. A higher proportion of telomeric exchanges were presented in cases with maternal MI errors and cases with young mothers, although these findings were not statistically significant. The present study is the first report examining parental origin and altered genetic recombination as a risk factor for trisomy 21 in a Croatian population. The results support that trisomy 21 has a universal genetic etiology across different human populations. PMID:21861707

  10. Down syndrome: parental origin, recombination, and maternal age.

    PubMed

    Vraneković, Jadranka; Božović, Ivana Babić; Grubić, Zorana; Wagner, Jasenka; Pavlinić, Dinko; Dahoun, Sophie; Bena, Frédérique; Culić, Vida; Brajenović-Milić, Bojana

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess (1) the parental origin of trisomy 21 and the stage in which nondisjunction occurs and (2) the relationship between altered genetic recombination and maternal age as risk factors for trisomy 21. The study included 102 cases with Down syndrome from the Croatian population. Genotyping analyses were performed by polymerase chain reaction using 11 short tandem repeat markers along chromosome 21q. The vast majority of trisomy 21 was of maternal origin (93%), followed by paternal (5%) and mitotic origin (2%). The frequencies of maternal meiotic I (MI) and meiotic II errors were 86% and 14%, respectively. The highest proportion of cases with zero recombination was observed among those with maternal MI derived trisomy 21. A higher proportion of telomeric exchanges were presented in cases with maternal MI errors and cases with young mothers, although these findings were not statistically significant. The present study is the first report examining parental origin and altered genetic recombination as a risk factor for trisomy 21 in a Croatian population. The results support that trisomy 21 has a universal genetic etiology across different human populations. PMID:21861707

  11. Parent Education in Chicago: A Program of the City Colleges of Chicago and the Chicago Board of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocheron, Crystal J.; And Others

    A Parent Education Program was initiated in Chicago in fall 1981 to promote parental interest and involvement in their own and their children's education. The program's rationale, which is supported by studies of parent behavior and child development, is that involved parents will have a positive impact on their children's educational and personal…

  12. Relationship Between the Parenting Styles and Students’ Educational Performance Among Iranian Girl High School Students, A Cross- Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahimpour, Parivash; Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Direkvand-Moghadam, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parenting styles are effective in the educational performance of their child. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the parenting styles and students’ educational performance among Iranian girl high school students. Materials and Methods In a cross–sectional survey, female students in high schools of Ilam (Iran) evaluated during the academic year 2014-15. Multistage cluster random sampling was used to select the participants. Data were collected by two demographic and Baumrind’s parenting styles questionnaire. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was measured as an index of internal identicalness of the questionnaire to verify its reliability. Results: A total 400 students were studied. The Mean±SD of the students’ age were 14±1.08. The students’ school grades were the first year of high school to pre-university course. The Mean±SD of parenting styles were 35.37±5.8, 34.69±6.34 and 19.17±6.64 for permissive parenting style, authoritarian parenting style and authoritative parenting styles, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the score of permissive parenting style (p= 0.001, r= 0.151), authoritarian parenting style (p= 0.001, r= 0.343) and authoritative parenting style (p=0. 001, r= 0.261) with the students’ average score for studying. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that parental influence plays an important role in students’ educational performance. PMID:26813692

  13. Parental Entrepreneurship in Public Education: A Social Force or a Policy Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gofen, Anat; Blomqvist, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Parental involvement in public education is an expression of joint responsibility between parents and the state in which parents are expected to "comply" with current educational policy. Moreover, parents are often perceived as "reactive," whereas the educational administration is seen as proactive, mainly by reducing barriers…

  14. Evaluating Parent Empowerment: A Look at the Potential of Social Justice Evaluation in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Camille Wilson; Christie, Christina A.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to improve our nation's underperforming schools, education reformers are designing programs to educate and empower urban school parents. Parent involvement can be critical to a child's academic success, yet the education community still knows very little about the impact of specific parent programs. We evaluated a parent program that…

  15. A PROGRAM OF PARENTAL EDUCATION IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF TYLER, TEXAS. (M.A. THESIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SPENCER, MYRTLE B.

    A STUDY WAS MADE TO COLLECT INFORMATION AND DETERMINE THE NEEDS AND INTERESTS OF PARENTS IN ESTABLISHING PUBLIC SCHOOL PARENT EDUCATION CLASSES AND TO OFFER SUGGESTIONS, RECOMMEND SOURCES OF INFORMATION, AND GIVE ASSISTANCE IN DEVELOPING PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAMS. DATA ON NEED FOR PARENT EDUCATION IN TYLER, TEXAS WAS OBTAINED THROUGH…

  16. Variations in Perceived Parenting Education Preferences: A Person-Centred Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, YaeBin

    2015-01-01

    Parenting education needs assessment surveys were collected from a large group of the parents or caregivers of 698 0-5-year-old children in southern Nevada. Survey questions addressed parenting education interests, family characteristics, and preferred delivery methods of parenting education. Cluster analysis was used to empirically determine if…

  17. Chronological Age, Cognitions, and Practices in European American Mothers: A Multivariate Study of Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Putnick, Diane L.

    2007-01-01

    The authors studied multiple parenting cognitions and practices in European American mothers (N=262) who ranged from 15 to 47 years of age. All were 1st-time parents of 20-month-old children. Some age effects were 0; others were linear or nonlinear. Nonlinear age effects determined by spline regression showed significant associations to a "knot"…

  18. Social Class Differences in Parent Educational Expectations: The Relationship between Parents' Social Status and Their Expectations for Children's Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chunhua

    2007-01-01

    To achieve the overall goals and purposes of education is closely related to the living environments of students. Different family backgrounds will put children into a situation where they face unfair competition. According to a survey conducted in China's Urumqi and Changchun about parents' awareness of educating their children, this paper will…

  19. American Education: Implications from the Information Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, William E.

    This paper considers the needs of future educational systems in an age of information. Characteristics of such systems are described and analyzed. An information age educational system would stress the big picture, be experimental, emphasize skills and tools of thought and action and extend throughout life. It would have alternative delivery…

  20. Ethnicity, educational level and attitudes contribute to parental intentions about genetic testing for child obesity.

    PubMed

    Kocken, Paul L; Theunissen, Meinou H C; Schönbeck, Yvonne; Henneman, Lidewij; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Detmar, Symone B

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess parental beliefs and intentions about genetic testing for their children in a multi-ethnic population with the aim of acquiring information to guide interventions for obesity prevention and management. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in parents of native Dutch children and children from a large minority population (Turks) selected from Youth Health Care registries. The age range of the children was 5-11 years. Parents with lower levels of education and parents of non-native children were more convinced that overweight has a genetic cause and their intentions to test the genetic predisposition of their child to overweight were firmer. A firmer intention to test the child was associated with the parents' perceptions of their child's susceptibility to being overweight, a positive attitude towards genetic testing, and anticipated regret at not having the child tested while at risk for overweight. Interaction effects were found in ethnic and socio-economic groups. Ethnicity and educational level play a role in parental beliefs about child overweight and genetic testing. Education programmes about obesity risk, genetic testing and the importance of behaviour change should be tailored to the cultural and behavioural factors relevant to ethnic and socio-economic target groups.

  1. The Role of Parental Involvement in the Autonomy Development of Traditional-Age College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullaty, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Increased parental involvement in higher education has led to a rise in the number of parent interactions with university faculty and staff. The purpose of this study was to explore how parental involvement influences the process of college student autonomy development and to examine the implications of this process for college administrators.…

  2. Parents' Role in Adolescents' Educational Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimkute, Laura; Hirvonen, Riikka; Tolvanen, Asko; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the extent to which mothers' and fathers' expectations for their offspring's future education, their level of education, and adolescents' academic achievement predict adolescents' educational expectations. To investigate this, 230 adolescents were examined twice while they were in comprehensive school (in the 7th and 9th…

  3. Measuring Parenting Practices among Parents of Elementary School-Age Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Karen A.; Radey, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to establish the factor structure of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ), an instrument designed to measure parenting practices among parents of elementary school children. Methods: Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) procedures are used to validate the APQ with 790 parents of…

  4. Indian Children/Parents and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkness, Verna J.

    Canadian government welfare agencies are taking Canadian Indian children from their parents in alarming numbers and endangering their cultural and social development. Most of the children are placed in non-native homes, resulting in identity crises leading to alcoholism and other social problems. This is a serious trend. The survival of Indian…

  5. Albinism: Educational Techniques for Parents and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Julia R.; Cates, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of teachers of the visually impaired and adults with albinism or parents of children with albinism (total responses=144) found no use of Braille by the adults or children with albinism, awareness of the condition by almost all teachers, support for mainstreaming by all, and specific teaching suggestions from teachers. (DB)

  6. Rural Children with Asthma: Impact of a Parent and Child Asthma Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Butz, Arlene; Pham, Luu; Lewis, LaPricia; Lewis, Cassis; Hill, Kim; Walker, Jennifer; Winkelstein, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an asthma educational intervention in improving asthma knowledge, self-efficacy, and quality of life in rural families. Children 6 to 12 years of age (62% male, 56% white, and 22% Medicaid) with persistent asthma (61%) were recruited from rural elementary schools and randomized into the control standard asthma education (CON) group or an interactive educational intervention (INT) group geared toward rural families. Parent/caregiver and child asthma knowledge, self-efficacy, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and at 10 months post enrollment. Despite high frequency of symptom reports, only 18% children reported an emergency department visit in the prior 6 months. Significant improvement in asthma knowledge was noted for INT parents and young INT children at follow-up (Parent: CON = 16.3; INT = 17.5, p < 0.001; Young children: CON = 10.8, INT = 12.45, p < 0.001). Child self-efficacy significantly increased in the INT group at follow-up; however, there was no significant difference in parent self-efficacy or parent and child quality of life at follow-up. Asthma symptom reports were significantly lower for the INT group at follow-up. For young rural children, an interactive asthma education intervention was associated with increased asthma knowledge and self-efficacy, decreased symptom reports, but not increased quality of life. PMID:16393717

  7. Educational Rights of Parents under Provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Including the Amendments of 1997 (Special Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. Office of Indian Education Programs.

    This pamphlet describes the educational rights of parents provided under provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, including the amendments of 1997. It discusses rights in the following areas: (1) free appropriate public education; (2) prior notice to parents, including a list of the information required to be in a notice that…

  8. Contact to cat or dog, allergies and parental education.

    PubMed

    Apfelbacher, Christian Joachim; Ollert, Markus; Ring, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Krämer, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Whether or not associations between animal contact and allergy/atopy are homogeneous across social strata has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to estimate the association between animal contact (cat, dog) and allergy/atopy in 6-yr-old school beginners, stratified by parental educational level. A total of 30794, 6-yr old children participated in cross-sectional studies between 1991 and 2000 in Germany. Allergic sensitization to common aeroallergens and symptoms and diagnoses of atopic diseases (asthma, eczema, hay fever) were the dependent variables. Contact with dog/cat were the independent variables. Logistic regression was used to adjust for confounding. Analyses were stratified for parental education. Prevalences of hay fever, eczema, specific sensitization to pollen and house dust mite increased, while the prevalence of contact to cat and dog decreased with parental educational level. Globally significant positive associations between cat contact and sensitization to cat (interaction significant) and between dog contact and wheezing remained significant in the highest and medium/highest educational strata respectively. A globally significant inverse association between cat contact and hay fever remained significant in the highest educational stratum only. The inverse association of contact to dog with eczema was globally significant, but not in the strata. When estimating the associations between animal contact and allergy/atopy in children, effect modification by social status should be considered. Cat contact seems to increase the odds of sensitization to cat only in children whose parents have a high level of education.

  9. Parental age and lifespan influence offspring recruitment: a long-term study in a seabird.

    PubMed

    Torres, Roxana; Drummond, Hugh; Velando, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of wild populations provide compelling evidence that survival and reproduction decrease with age because of senescence, a decline in functional capacities at old ages. However, in the wild, little is known about effects of parental senescence on offspring quality. We used data from a 21-year study to examine the role of parental age on offspring probability of recruitment in a long-lived bird, the blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii). Offspring probability of recruiting into the breeding population varied over the life of parents and effects age were similar in mothers and fathers. Offspring recruitment was high when parents were roughly 6-12 years old and low before and after then. Effects of parental age on offspring recruitment varied with lifespan (parental age at last reproduction) and previous breeding experience. Offspring recruitment from young and old parents with long reproductive lifespans was greater than that of offspring from parents with short lifespans at young and old ages. For parents with little previous breeding experience recruitment of offspring decreased with their hatch date, but experienced parents were no similarly affected. We found evidence of terminal effects on offspring recruitment in young parents but not in older parents, suggesting that senescence is more likely a gradual process of deterioration than a process of terminal illness. Failure to recruit probably reflects mortality during the first years after independence but also during the fledgling transition to full independence. Our results show effects of parental age and quality on offspring viability in a long-lived wild vertebrate and support the idea that wild populations are composed of individuals of different quality, and that this individual heterogeneity can influence the dynamics of age-structured populations.

  10. Parental age and lifespan influence offspring recruitment: a long-term study in a seabird.

    PubMed

    Torres, Roxana; Drummond, Hugh; Velando, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of wild populations provide compelling evidence that survival and reproduction decrease with age because of senescence, a decline in functional capacities at old ages. However, in the wild, little is known about effects of parental senescence on offspring quality. We used data from a 21-year study to examine the role of parental age on offspring probability of recruitment in a long-lived bird, the blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii). Offspring probability of recruiting into the breeding population varied over the life of parents and effects age were similar in mothers and fathers. Offspring recruitment was high when parents were roughly 6-12 years old and low before and after then. Effects of parental age on offspring recruitment varied with lifespan (parental age at last reproduction) and previous breeding experience. Offspring recruitment from young and old parents with long reproductive lifespans was greater than that of offspring from parents with short lifespans at young and old ages. For parents with little previous breeding experience recruitment of offspring decreased with their hatch date, but experienced parents were no similarly affected. We found evidence of terminal effects on offspring recruitment in young parents but not in older parents, suggesting that senescence is more likely a gradual process of deterioration than a process of terminal illness. Failure to recruit probably reflects mortality during the first years after independence but also during the fledgling transition to full independence. Our results show effects of parental age and quality on offspring viability in a long-lived wild vertebrate and support the idea that wild populations are composed of individuals of different quality, and that this individual heterogeneity can influence the dynamics of age-structured populations. PMID:22087271

  11. Parental Age and Lifespan Influence Offspring Recruitment: A Long-Term Study in a Seabird

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Roxana; Drummond, Hugh; Velando, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of wild populations provide compelling evidence that survival and reproduction decrease with age because of senescence, a decline in functional capacities at old ages. However, in the wild, little is known about effects of parental senescence on offspring quality. We used data from a 21-year study to examine the role of parental age on offspring probability of recruitment in a long-lived bird, the blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii). Offspring probability of recruiting into the breeding population varied over the life of parents and effects age were similar in mothers and fathers. Offspring recruitment was high when parents were roughly 6–12 years old and low before and after then. Effects of parental age on offspring recruitment varied with lifespan (parental age at last reproduction) and previous breeding experience. Offspring recruitment from young and old parents with long reproductive lifespans was greater than that of offspring from parents with short lifespans at young and old ages. For parents with little previous breeding experience recruitment of offspring decreased with their hatch date, but experienced parents were no similarly affected. We found evidence of terminal effects on offspring recruitment in young parents but not in older parents, suggesting that senescence is more likely a gradual process of deterioration than a process of terminal illness. Failure to recruit probably reflects mortality during the first years after independence but also during the fledgling transition to full independence. Our results show effects of parental age and quality on offspring viability in a long-lived wild vertebrate and support the idea that wild populations are composed of individuals of different quality, and that this individual heterogeneity can influence the dynamics of age-structured populations. PMID:22087271

  12. Parental Behavior Toward Boys and Girls of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhoff, Eva; And Others

    1961-01-01

    Research on the acquisition of sex roles in the United States has indicated a tendency for parents to treat girls less harshly than boys and for fathers to treat girls with more special warmth than they do boys. Eighteen children and their parents were interviewed and observed in Oslo, Norway, as part of a longitudinal study of parental influence…

  13. The Advocacy Experiences of Parents of Elementary Age, Twice-Exceptional Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besnoy, Kevin D.; Swoszowski, Nicole C.; Newman, Jane L.; Floyd, Amanda; Jones, Parrish; Byrne, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    For many parents, successfully advocating for their twice-exceptional child can be intimidating and overwhelming. Using grounded theory, we conducted a study with parents (n = 8) of elementary age, twice-exceptional children to learn about their advocacy experiences. Findings revealed that parents simultaneously advocated for their child's…

  14. Personal Experience of Aging in the Children of a Parent with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerritsen, Debby; Kuin, Volande; Steverink, Nardi

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether adults with a parent with dementia experience their personal aging differently than adults whose parents do not have dementia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 adults who had a parent with dementia and 25 controls. We found that, although in a general sense the two groups were quite similar in their…

  15. Gifted Students' Perceptions of Parenting Styles: Associations with Cognitive Ability, Sex, Race, and Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Adelson, Jill L.; Callahan, Carolyn M.; Houlihan, Deanna Vogt; Keizer, Benjamin M.

    2013-01-01

    Children whose parents are warm and responsive yet also set limits and have reasonable expectations for their children tend to have better outcomes than their peers whose parents show less warmth and responsiveness, have low expectations, or both. Parenting behavior is related to family race and children's sex, age, and cognitive ability. However,…

  16. Combination of low parental educational attainment and high parental income related to high caries experience in pre-school children in Abu Dhabi.

    PubMed

    Al-Hosani, E; Rugg-Gunn, A

    1998-02-01

    Children aged 2, 4 and 5 years were examined for dental caries using WHO criteria, in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE, in 1996. The children were from the three administrative regions of Abu Dhabi, Al Ain and Western Region. Sampling of health centres and kindergartens was stratified by urban or rural location. Parents completed a questionnaire, and children were classified into high, middle or low groups on the basis of their parents' education and income. All 20 kindergartens and 22 health centres sampled agreed to participate. The participation rate of sampled children was high and complete data were available for 640 children--217 aged 2 years, 204 aged 4 years, and 219 aged 5 years. Similar numbers of boys and girls were included. The prevalence of dental caries was very high--36% to 47% at age 2 years, 71% to 86% at age 4 years and 82% to 94% at age 5 years. The mean dmft at age 5 years was 8.4 in Abu Dhabi, 8.6 in Al Ain and 5.7 in Western Region. Few teeth had been filled. Apart from age, the parents' education and income were found to be statistically significantly related to caries experience (P<0.05), while gender, ethnicity (UAE or non-UAE), region, and urban or rural living, were not related to dental caries experience (P>0.3). While high parental educational attainment was related to lower caries experience, conversely, high parental income was related to higher caries experience. Caries experience was higher than that recorded approximately 6 years previously and is a cause of concern.

  17. Early Childhood Education for Handicapped Children (Ages 3 through 5). Special Education in North Dakota. Guide VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niebergall, Shelby; Oas, Brenda

    This guide is designed primarily for use by personnel involved in North Dakota public school programs for preschool-age handicapped children (ages 3-5). It is also intended to provide parents and personnel in health, human services, and other child service agencies with an understanding of the scope and purpose of educational services for young…

  18. Parental support during young adulthood: Why does assistance decline with age?

    PubMed Central

    Hartnett, Caroline Sten; Furstenberg, Frank; Birditt, Kira; Fingerman, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has found that financial transfers from parents to young adult children decline as children age and that age is one of the strongest predictors of support. Using data collected from young adults (ages 18 to 34) and their parents (ages 40 to 60; N=536 parent-child dyads), we explore the possibility that the relationship between age and financial support is mediated by offspring needs, acquisition of adult roles, or geographical and emotional closeness. We find that age-related declines in offspring’s needs help to explain why financial support falls with age. However, offspring age remains a robust predictor of financial support after controlling for a wide range of factors, suggesting that age norms condition support from parents to offspring. PMID:23976811

  19. Observing Interactions between Children and Adolescents and their Parents: The Effects of Anxiety Disorder and Age.

    PubMed

    Waite, Polly; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-08-01

    Parental behaviors, most notably overcontrol, lack of warmth and expressed anxiety, have been implicated in models of the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders in children and young people. Theories of normative development have proposed that different parental responses are required to support emotional development in childhood and adolescence, yet age has not typically been taken into account in studies of parenting and anxiety disorders. In order to identify whether associations between anxiety disorder status and parenting differ in children and adolescents, we compared observed behaviors of parents of children (7-10 years) and adolescents (13-16 years) with and without anxiety disorders (n = 120), while they undertook a series of mildly anxiety-provoking tasks. Parents of adolescents showed significantly lower levels of expressed anxiety, intrusiveness and warm engagement than parents of children. Furthermore, offspring age moderated the association between anxiety disorder status and parenting behaviors. Specifically, parents of adolescents with anxiety disorders showed higher intrusiveness and lower warm engagement than parents of non-anxious adolescents. A similar relationship between these parenting behaviors and anxiety disorder status was not observed among parents of children. The findings suggest that theoretical accounts of the role of parental behaviors in anxiety disorders in children and adolescents should distinguish between these different developmental periods. Further experimental research to establish causality, however, would be required before committing additional resources to targeting parenting factors within treatment.

  20. Prepping Colleges for Parents: Strategies for Supporting Student Parent Success in Postsecondary Education. Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Almost one in four (3.9 million) students who are enrolled in postsecondary education programs in the United States are also raising a dependent child (Miller, Gault, and Thorman, 2011). These parents are preparing themselves to compete in an American economy in which high skill levels are required to earn a wage sufficient to support a family…

  1. Parent and Educator Perceptions of Parental Involvement and Engagement in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone-Schrag, Meganne D.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of all schools is providing optimum education for every student, yet across the United States that goal is reportedly not met. Parental involvement and engagement are the key explanatory factors in students' academic success, as shown in multiple research projects. However, few researchers have emphasized or developed guidelines on how to…

  2. Education for a New Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodcock, Leonard

    Most would agree that education is a social good and necessity, yet serious inequities and inequalities remain in our educational system. The largest sources of support for public schools are the local school district and the state. The revenues they contribute come from property and sales taxes, both of which are regressive and inequitable. Our…

  3. Distinguishing Disability: Parents, Privilege, and Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong-Dean, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Students in special education programs can have widely divergent experiences. For some, special education amounts to a dumping ground where schools unload their problem students, while for others, it provides access to services and accommodations that drastically improve chances of succeeding in school and beyond. "Distinguishing Disability"…

  4. Parent's Guide to Special Education in Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Children with disabilities have a right to a free appropriate public education (FAPE). Children differ in mental abilities, sensory development, physical traits, emotional or social behaviors, or communication skills. Some may require modification to their school program or special education and related services in order to benefit from their…

  5. Parental age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Bashir, Tufail; Sailer, Christian; Gurumoorthy, Viswanathan; Ramakrishnan, Anantha Maharasi; Dhanapal, Shanmuhapreya; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-05-01

    In humans, it is well known that the parental reproductive age has a strong influence on mutations transmitted to their progeny. Meiotic nondisjunction is known to increase in older mothers, and base substitutions tend to go up with paternal reproductive age. Hence, it is clear that the germinal mutation rates are a function of both maternal and paternal ages in humans. In contrast, it is unknown whether the parental reproductive age has an effect on somatic mutation rates in the progeny, because these are rare and difficult to detect. To address this question, we took advantage of the plant model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), where mutation detector lines allow for an easy quantitation of somatic mutations, to test the effect of parental age on somatic mutation rates in the progeny. Although we found no significant effect of parental age on base substitutions, we found that frameshift mutations and transposition events increased in the progeny of older parents, an effect that is stronger through the maternal line. In contrast, intrachromosomal recombination events in the progeny decrease with the age of the parents in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner. Our results clearly show that parental reproductive age affects somatic mutation rates in the progeny and, thus, that some form of age-dependent information, which affects the frequency of double-strand breaks and possibly other processes involved in maintaining genome integrity, is transmitted through the gametes. PMID:25810093

  6. Gender, Educational Attainment, and the Impact of Parental Migration on Children Left Behind*

    PubMed Central

    Antman, Francisca M.

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of the causal effect of parental migration on children’s educational attainment is complicated by the fact that migrants and non-migrants are likely to differ in unobservable ways that also affect children’s educational outcomes. This paper suggests a novel way of addressing this selection problem by looking within the family to exploit variation in siblings’ ages at the time of parental migration. The basic assumption underlying the analysis is that parental migration will have no effect on the educational outcomes of children who are at least 20 because they have already completed their educations. Their younger siblings, in contrast, may still be in school, and thus will be affected by the parental migration experience. The results point to a statistically significant positive effect of paternal U.S. migration on education for girls, suggesting that pushing a father’s U.S. migration earlier in his daughter’s life can lead to an increase in her educational attainment of up to 1 year relative to delaying migration until after she has turned 20. In contrast, paternal domestic migration has no statistically significant effect on educational attainment for girls or boys, suggesting that father absence does not play a major role in determining children’s educational outcomes. Instead, these results suggest that the marginal dollars from U.S. migrant remittances appear to enable families to further educate their daughters. Thus, policymakers should view international migration as a potential pathway by which families raise educational attainments of girls in particular. JEL: O15; J12; J13; J16; J24; F22

  7. Intergenerational Exchanges of Middle-Aged Adults With Their Parents and Parents-In-Law in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyungmin; Zarit, Steven H.; Fingerman, Karen L.; Han, Gyounghae

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated patterns of support exchanges between Korean adult children and their parents and parents-in-law, gender differences in these patterns, and implications of children’s marital quality for exchange patterns. Data were from a nationally representative sample of married adults (N = 920, age 30–59 years) with at least 1 living parent and 1 living parent-in-law. Latent class analysis was applied to 12 indicators of exchanges (financial, instrumental, emotional support given to and received from parents and parents-in-law). Five classes of exchanges were identified, 3 showing balanced patterns of exchanges with parents and parents-in-law across three types of support and 2 classes with unbalanced patterns (e.g., giving instrumental and financial, but not emotional support). The findings revealed variability in intergenerational exchange patterns, with a mix of patrilineal traditional and balanced patterns. Significant associations of exchange patterns with adult children’s marital quality suggest the importance of balanced exchanges with parents for marriage. PMID:25937670

  8. The influence of the parents' educational level on the development of executive functions.

    PubMed

    Ardila, Alfredo; Rosselli, Monica; Matute, Esmeralda; Guajardo, Soledad

    2005-01-01

    Information about the influence of educational variables on the development of executive functions is limited. The aim of this study was to analyze the relation of the parents' educational level and the type of school the child attended (private or public school) to children's executive functioning test performance. Six hundred twenty-two participants, ages 5 to 14 years (276 boys, 346 girls) were selected from Colombia and Mexico and grouped according to three variables: age (5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, and 13-14 years), gender (boys and girls), and school type (private and public). Eight executive functioning tests taken from the Evaluacion Neuropsicologica Infantil; Matute, Rosselli, Ardila, & Ostrosky, (in press) were individually administered: Semantic Verbal Fluency, Phonemic Verbal Fluency, Semantic Graphic Fluency, Nonsemantic Graphic Fluency, Matrices, Similarities, Card Sorting, and the Mexican Pyramid. There was a significant effect of age on all the test scores and a significant effect of type of school attended on all but Semantic Verbal Fluency and Nonsemantic Graphic Fluency tests. Most children's test scores, particularly verbal test scores, significantly correlated with parents' educational level. Our results suggest that the differences in test scores between the public and private school children depended on some conditions existing outside the school, such as the parents' level of education. Implications of these findings for the understanding of the influence of environmental factors on the development of executive functions are presented.

  9. Associations between maternal older age, family environment and parent and child wellbeing in families using assisted reproductive techniques to conceive.

    PubMed

    Boivin, J; Rice, Frances; Hay, Dale; Harold, Gordon; Lewis, Allyson; van den Bree, Marianne M B; Thapar, Anita

    2009-06-01

    Maternal age effects on parenting and family outcomes are of increasing interest because of the demographic shift toward older maternal age at first birth. Maternal age is also of interest because of the greater use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) to bypass age-related infertility in couples trying to conceive late in the reproductive life cycle of the woman. The aim of the present study was to investigate maternal age effects associated with delayed parenting by comparing families of mothers who gave birth at a younger (<31 years) or older (>38 years) age and to ascertain whether associations were linear associations by comparing these groups to women who had conceived in between these ages (i.e., >31 and <38 years). All children (4-11 year olds) were first-born and conceived using ART. Participants were recruited from one of 20 fertility clinics and mothers (n=642) and fathers (n=439) completed a postal questionnaire about demographic and reproductive characteristics, family environment as well as parent and child wellbeing. Our results demonstrate that parenthood via assisted conception later in the reproductive life cycle is not associated with a negative impact on child wellbeing. Despite maternal age-group differences on demographic (education, income) and reproductive characteristics (bleeding during pregnancy, caesarean rate, breast feeding), and parental warmth and depressive symptoms, child wellbeing was similar across mother age groups. We conclude that the parenting context is different for older mother families (more depressive symptoms in mothers and fathers, less expressed warmth in the couple) but that this difference is not associated with child wellbeing in early and middle childhood. PMID:19346045

  10. Exploring Parental Preferences: Care or Education: What Do Greek Parents Aspire from Day Care Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzou, Konstantina

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood education and care is a multifaceted institution. Based on children's age, a number of different settings operate, which have usually two distinct aims. Kindergartens provide mainly education whereas day care centres provide care. Yet, in recent years, the need to establish programmes which provide both education and care to…

  11. Maternal Chronological Age, Prenatal and Perinatal History, Social Support, and Parenting of Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Putnick, Diane L.; Suwalsky, Joan T. D.; Gini, Motti

    2006-01-01

    The role of maternal chronological age in prenatal and perinatal history, social support, and parenting practices of new mothers (N=335) was examined. Primiparas of 5-month-old infants ranged in age from 13 to 42 years. Age effects were zero, linear, and nonlinear. Nonlinear age effects were significantly associated up to a certain age with little…

  12. Parents' education and child body weight in France: The trajectory of the gradient in the early years.

    PubMed

    Apouey, Bénédicte H; Geoffard, Pierre-Yves

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the relationship between parental education and offspring body weight in France. Using two large datasets spanning the 1991-2010 period, we examine the existence of inequalities in maternal and paternal education and reported child body weight measures, as well as their evolution across childhood. Our empirical specification is flexible and allows this evolution to be non-monotonic. Significant inequalities are observed for both parents' education--maternal (respectively paternal) high education is associated with a 7.20 (resp. 7.10) percentage points decrease in the probability that the child is reported to be overweight or obese, on average for children of all ages. The gradient with respect to parents' education follows an inverted U-shape across childhood, meaning that the association between parental education and child body weight widens from birth to age 8, and narrows afterward. Specifically, maternal high education is correlated with a 5.30 percentage points decrease in the probability that the child is reported to be overweight or obese at age 2, but a 9.62 percentage points decrease at age 8, and a 1.25 percentage point decrease at age 17. The figures for paternal high education are respectively 5.87, 9.11, and 4.52. This pattern seems robust, since it is found in the two datasets, when alternative variables for parental education and reported child body weight are employed, and when controls for potential confounding factors are included. The findings for the trajectory of the income gradient corroborate those of the education gradient. The results may be explained by an equalization in actual body weight across socioeconomic groups during youth, or by changes in reporting styles of height and weight.

  13. Resources for Childbirth Educators and Expectant Parents

    PubMed Central

    Shilling, Teri

    2006-01-01

    In this column, reviewers offer perspectives and comments on Hit the Ground Crawling: The Essential Guide for New Fathers, a book by Greg Bishop; The Simple Guide to Having a Baby, a book by Janet Whalley, Penny Simkin, and Ann Keppler; Preparing for Multiples—The Family Way, a book by Cindy Carter, with Jeanne Green and Debby Amis; Hospital to Home: A Security Blanket for New Parents, a DVD released by Injoy Videos; When Survivors Give Birth: Understanding and Healing the Effects of Early Sexual Abuse on Childbearing Women, a book by Penny Simkin and Phyllis Klaus; and My Pregnancy Journal, a publication by Mindy Mays.

  14. Transgenerational interactions involving parental age and immune status affect female reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Nystrand, M; Dowling, D K

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that the parental phenotype can influence offspring phenotypic expression, independent of the effects of the offspring's own genotype. Nonetheless, the evolutionary implications of such parental effects remain unclear, partly because previous studies have generally overlooked the potential for interactions between parental sources of non-genetic variance to influence patterns of offspring phenotypic expression. We tested for such interactions, subjecting male and female Drosophila melanogaster of two different age classes to an immune activation challenge or a control treatment. Flies were then crossed in all age and immune status combinations, and the reproductive success of their immune- and control-treated daughters measured. We found that daughters produced by two younger parents exhibited reduced reproductive success relative to those of other parental age combinations. Furthermore, immune-challenged daughters exhibited higher reproductive success when produced by immune-challenged relative to control-treated mothers, a pattern consistent with transgenerational immune priming. Finally, a complex interplay between paternal age and parental immune statuses influenced daughter's reproductive success. These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of age- and immune-mediated parental effects, traceable to both parents, and regulated by interactions between parents and between parents and offspring.

  15. Midlife and Aging Parents of Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Impacts of Lifelong Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Floyd, Frank; Song, Jieun; Greenberg, Jan; Hong, Jinkuk

    2011-01-01

    Using population data, this study included parents of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (n = 220) and parents of individuals without disabilities (n = 1,042). Parents of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities were further divided into those who co-resided with their adult child and those whose adult…

  16. Teenage Parent Center of the Single Parent Assistance, Counseling and Education Project. Annual Report FY 86-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlesex County Vocational and Technical High Schools, New Brunswick, NJ.

    The Teenage Parent Center of the Single Parent Assistance, Counseling and Education Project was developed to support, guide, and direct adolescent mothers, pregnant teenagers, and teens at risk of becoming parents through successful completion of a high school diploma or school year in a vocational setting in Middlesex County, New Jersey. The…

  17. Socialization Values and Parenting Practices as Predictors of Parental Involvement in Their Children's Educational Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kikas, Eve; Tulviste, Tiia; Peets, Kätlin

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine associations between parental socialization values (including inconsistency in values), parenting practices, and parental involvement in their children's education. Altogether 242 Estonian mothers and fathers of first-grade children participated in the study. We found that mothers…

  18. A Descriptive Study: Parental Opinion and Teacher-Student Perceptions Regarding Parents' Involvement in Their Children's Education and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Maria A.; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    Using surveys and data from the Dallas Public School District (Texas), this study examined the perceptions of parents, students, and teachers about parents' involvement in their children's education and development. In addition, academic achievement at the two study schools was examined. At one school (School A), 63 of 100 parents surveyed…

  19. The Parents' Parenting Patterns, Education, Jobs, and Assistance to Their Children in Watching Television, and Children's Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purwati; Japar, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this present is to test the effects of the parents' parenting patterns, education, jobs, and assistance to children in watching television on the children's aggressive behavior. This present research employed a quantitative approach with an ex-post factor design. The data were collected from 175 parents of which the children…

  20. Predictors of Parent Involvement and Their Impact on Access of Postsecondary Education Facilitators among White and American Indian Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardhoshi, Gerta; Duncan, Kelly; Schweinle, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This study examined demographic factors as predictors of parent involvement (engagement with school, support of learning, support of child) among parents of children that attended a school implementing a college access program. The authors also examined whether involvement predicted access of postsecondary education facilitators in parents, when…

  1. Psychological Stress and Parenting Behavior among Chinese Families: Findings from a Study on Parent Education for Economically Disadvantaged Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Ching Man

    2011-01-01

    With the recognition of the crucial role of family and with the belief that parents have the greatest influence on a child's life, family and parent education has been widely practiced in Hong Kong and many other countries as measure for poverty alleviation. A study, employed quantitative method of a cross-sectional parent survey (N = 10,386) was…

  2. Guide to Parent Involvement: Parents as Adult Learners. The Family Academy Model of the Family as Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Univ., Washington, DC. Adult Learning Potential Inst.

    This document is the second of a series of four reports developed to provide a comprehensive overview of parent involvement, encompassing the family, parenting needs, and existing resources, in addition to current parent education approaches and practices. This "Family Academy Model" provides one interpretation of how the family functions as…

  3. From parent to child? Transmission of educational attainment within immigrant families: methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Renee Reichl; Soehl, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    One in five U.S. residents under the age of 18 has at least one foreign-born parent. Given the large proportion of immigrants with very low levels of schooling, the strength of the intergenerational transmission of education between immigrant parent and child has important repercussions for the future of social stratification in the United States. We find that the educational transmission process between parent and child is much weaker in immigrant families than in native families and, among immigrants, differs significantly across national origins. We demonstrate how this variation causes a substantial overestimation of the importance of parental education in immigrant families in studies that use aggregate data. We also show that the common practice of "controlling" for family human capital using parental years of schooling is problematic when comparing families from different origin countries and especially when comparing native and immigrant families. We link these findings to analytical and empirical distinctions between group- and individual-level processes in intergenerational transmission.

  4. A perioperative education program for pediatric patients and their parents.

    PubMed

    Adams, Holly A

    2011-04-01

    Preparing pediatric patients for surgery is crucial to positive patient and parent experiences. Through preoperative screening, observation, and postoperative feedback, clinical staff nurses at the Yellowstone Surgery Center (YSC) in Billings, Montana, identified a need to provide increased information to pediatric patients and their parents regarding the surgical process and postoperative expectations for recovery. The director of nursing developed a program for patients that includes preoperative education and a hands-on experience. The YSC Kids program is a customizable program that includes nine initiatives designed specifically for children. The program has been shown to successfully educate pediatric patients and their parents about the entire perioperative process, thus easing their anxiety about an unfamiliar situation.

  5. Sleep Problems in Chinese School-Aged Children with a Parent-Reported History of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shenghui; Jin, Xinming; Yan, Chonghuai; Wu, Shenghu; Jiang, Fan; Shen, Xiaoming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to survey the prevalence of parent-reported ADHD diagnosis and to assess its associations with sleep problems among urban school-aged children in China. Method: A random sample of 20,152 school-aged children participated in a cross-sectional survey in eight cities of China. A parent-administered questionnaire and the…

  6. Distance Education: An Information Age Approach to Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigerell, James

    This study provides an extensive review of the literature on distance education and of representative distance education projects and institutions in the United States and abroad, emphasizing those using telecommunications technologies. The introductory section includes a sketch of the information age and its implications for adult education and…

  7. Teens as Parents of Babies and Toddlers: A Resource Guide for Educators. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birckmayer, Jennifer; Mabb, Katherine; Westendorf, Bonnie-Jo; Wilson, Jerridith

    Providing effective parent education for teen parents can be a challenge for educators. This guide for cooperative extension facilitators provides workshop outlines for teen parents regarding their social world, infant and toddler development, and health and safety. The guide's introduction discusses the challenges of parenting, the Eriksonian…

  8. Together is Best: Families and Schools. Findings of the Parent Education Demonstration Project in Region IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Atlanta, GA.

    The purpose of this first year report of the Region IV Parent Education Demonstration Project (PEDP) is to help other school systems as they plan and conduct parent/child programs. The Region IV PEDP involved 29 local school systems which were conducting 31 parent education programs through various funding sources. These parent programs had as one…

  9. A Strength-Based Approach to Parent Education for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Amanda Mossman

    2011-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous nature of parent education in autism treatment, relatively few studies directly address "how" parent education should be conducted. Given that the literature on parental well-being suggests that treatments that facilitate positive parental adaptation to their child's disability may be beneficial, this study examined the…

  10. Annual Conference on Parent Education Proceedings (4th, Denton, Texas, February 9-10, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Arminta, Ed.; And Others

    The goals of the 2-day interdisciplinary conference covered in these proceedings were to: (1) present a spectrum of program models, curriculum, and knowledge related to parent education, parent involvement, and parenting; (2) provide in-depth training in parent education; and (3) promote interaction and exchange of ideas. Included in the…

  11. Parental job loss and children's educational attainment in black and white middle-class families.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Ariel; Wightman, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We aim to understand why blacks are significantly less likely than whites to perpetuate their middle-class status across generations. To do so, we focus on the potentially different associations between parental job loss and youth's educational attainment in black and white middle-class families.Methods. We use data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), following those children “born” into the survey between 1968 and 1979 and followed through age 21. We conduct multivariate regression analyses to test the association between parental job loss during childhood and youth's educational attainment by age 21.Results. We find that parental job loss is associated with a lesser likelihood of obtaining any postsecondary education for all offspring, but that the association for blacks is almost three times as strong. A substantial share of the differential impact of job loss on black and white middle-class youth is explained by race differences in household wealth, long-run measures of family income, and, especially, parental experience of long-term unemployment.Conclusions. These findings highlight the fragile economic foundation of the black middle class and suggest that intergenerational persistence of class status in this population may be highly dependent on the avoidance of common economic shocks.

  12. Formulation of the Age-Education Index: Measuring Age and Education Effects in Neuropsychological Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Max; Eng, Goi Khia; Rapisarda, Attilio; Subramaniam, Mythily; Kraus, Michael; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Collinson, Simon Lowes

    2013-01-01

    The complex interplay of education, age, and cognitive performance on various neuropsychological tests is examined in the current study. New education indices were formulated and further investigated to reveal how age and education variances work together to account for performance on neuropsychological tests. Participants were 830…

  13. The Use of Reading Materials within a Parent Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abram, Marie J.

    A study was conducted to identify operational procedures that could maximize learning and acceptance of reading materials within a parent education program. A factorial design was used to test how two levels of readability of written material (ninth and fifteenth grade levels) and two levels of reader competency (lower and higher) were related to…

  14. Minority Families Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect through Parenting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Carmen P.

    The main purpose of Avance-San Antonio, Inc. is to strengthen and support families, especially "high risk" Mexican American families, and to help to prevent child abuse and neglect through parenting education services. Avance actively reaches out to the Hispanic population in their own neighborhoods through door-to-door recruiting, flyers, and…

  15. Learning from Each Other? Multicultural Pedagogy, Parental Education and Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunneblad, Johannes; Johansson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Today there is a strong tendency to involve local citizens in community work, and to mobilize social forces in poor urban districts. We will focus on one specific method used to educate and help immigrant parents raise and foster their children. This method is described as part of a wider ambition to integrate and involve immigrants in Swedish…

  16. Talking with Kids: A Parent's Guide to Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National PTA, Chicago, IL.

    This guide is designed to help parents determine what is being taught to their children about sex education in school, offering tips on how to talk to children about these issues. The first section presents pointers from the "Talking with Kids" campaign: start early; initiate conversations; talk about sex and relationships; create an open…

  17. Turning Lightning into Electricity: Organizing Parents for Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Families are the primary clients of public schools, but they are one of many constituencies who have a say in how schools actually operate. In all the technocratic fervor around "education reform"--the broad effort to implement standards and accountability, reform teacher tenure and evaluation, and increase parental choice--it is easy to…

  18. A Bicycle Safety Education Program for Parents of Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohse, Julie L.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined parental perceptions of the benefits and barriers to bicycle helmet use and their level of knowledge about bicycle safety issues. A school-based bicycle safety education program was taught to first- and second-grade students in a rural/suburban school district by a graduate nursing student. Pender's Health Promotion Model was…

  19. Parental Engagement in Early Childhood Education at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jing; Pisani, Lauren; White, Sheida; Soroui, Jaleh

    2012-01-01

    This study uses data from the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy to identify relationships between parents' demographic/socioeconomic backgrounds and their self-reported frequencies of engaging in early childhood education activities. It also examines race/ethnicity-related disparities in the frequency of reading to children and using…

  20. Unequal Advantages: The Intergenerational Effects of Parental Educational Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers argue that expanding college access is one way to increase opportunities for students who would become the first in their families to enroll in a postsecondary institution. This article uses measures of educational attainment in the previous two generations to consider whether parents' own histories of educational…

  1. Parent Teacher Education Connection: Preparing Preservice Teachers for Family Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Amber L.; Harris, Mary; Jacobson, Arminta; Trotti, Judy

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the Parent Teacher Education Curriculum, a Web-based curriculum focused on instructing teachers about best practices in family involvement and assesses its impact on the knowledge and attitudes of preservice teachers related to family involvement. Pre- and post-measures of preservice teacher candidate knowledge of and…

  2. Students, Parents, Educators: An Approach to Conflict of Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magsino, Romulo F.

    1982-01-01

    Attempts by courts in the United States and Canada to define the rights of children, parents, and educators are described, and their shortcomings and contradictions are pointed out. The author suggests another approach based on utilitarian values and pre-suppositions presented in works by John Stuart Mill. (PP)

  3. Putting the Punch in Parent Power. Education Outlook. No. 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.; Lautzenheiser, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    While US parents have historically played supporting roles in schooling, they are becoming increasingly involved in education advocacy and policy. Contemporary school reform requires political muscle to enact controversial changes, meaning entrenched interest groups such as teachers unions have traditionally enjoyed an outsized impact in the realm…

  4. Changing Roles of Parental Economic Resources in Children's Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Yunju; Huang, Jin

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated whether the relationship between parents' economic resources and children's educational attainment had changed over time by comparing two cohorts from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Using probit regressions and Chow tests, they examined multiple measures of economic resources, including income, net worth, liquid…

  5. Age-related parenting stress differences in mothers of children with spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Macias, Michelle M; Saylor, Conway F; Rowe, Brandy P; Bell, Nancy L

    2003-12-01

    This study examined whether ages of child and parent were risk factors for general parenting stress and disability-specific stress in families of children with spina bifida. Parents of 64 children with spina bifida completed the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form, Parents of Children with Disabilities Inventory, and measures of family support and resources. Scores of families with children under 6 years (preschool) versus 6- to 12-yr.-old children (school age) were compared, as were scores of mothers above or below Age 35. Parents of school-aged children reported significantly higher stress on the Concerns for the Child domain of the Parents of Children with Disabilities Inventory. Mothers over 35 tended to report higher stress in the Concerns for the Child and Medical/Legal Concerns domains of the Parents of Children with Disabilities Inventory. No associations with medical severity, socioeconomic status, family resources, or family support were detected. As the children age and disability-related differences become more apparent, the same level of functioning and severity of disability may be associated with additional parenting stress. Older mothers and those with school-age children may need more resources than current social support systems typically provide.

  6. Who Gets What and Why? Help Middle-Aged Adults Provide to Parents and Grown Children

    PubMed Central

    Pitzer, Lindsay M.; Chan, Wai; Birditt, Kira; Franks, Melissa M.; Zarit, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Middle-aged adults engage in support exchanges with generations above and below. This study investigated (a) how support to one generation is associated with support to the other and (b) factors accounting for whether parents or offspring receive more support in a family. Methods. Middle-aged adults aged 40–60 years (N = 633) completed telephone interviews regarding their relationships and support exchanges with each grown child and living parent. Results. Multilevel models revealed that most participants provided more support to the average grown child than to the average parent. Yet, a proportion of the sample reversed this pattern, providing more support to parents. Mediation models revealed that middle-aged adults provided greater support to offspring because they viewed offspring as more important than parents and offspring had greater everyday needs (e.g., being a student, not married). Parental disability accounted for greater support to parents. Discussion. Discussion integrates solidarity theory, developmental stake, and contingency theory. Most middle-aged adults provide more to grown offspring than to parents, consistent with their greater stake in their progeny. Middle-aged adults also respond to crises (i.e., parental disability) and everyday needs (i.e., offspring student status) in providing intergenerational support, in accordance with contingency theory. PMID:20223807

  7. The Nature, Correlates, and Conditions of Parental Advocacy in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Meghan M.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Although parents often advocate for the best educational services for their children with disabilities, few studies examine parents' advocacy activities; identify parent-school relationship, parent, and student correlates of advocacy; or describe the conditions of advocacy. Responding to a national, web-based survey, 1087 parents of students with…

  8. Involvement of Roma Parents in Children's Education in Croatia: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahic, Tea; Vidovic, Vlasta Vizek; Miljevic-Ridicki, Renata

    2011-01-01

    This article compares Roma and mainstream parents' involvement in the education of their children, based on Epstein's six-dimensional model of parent-school partnership. The survey was conducted in Croatia on two sub-samples: 60 Roma parents and 908 mainstream parents. Results suggest that Roma parents show lower interest in participating in…

  9. Exploring the meaning of parental involvement in physical education for students with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    An, Jihoun; Hodge, Samuel R

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to explore the experiences and meaning of parental involvement in physical education from the perspectives of the parents of students with developmental disabilities. The stories of four mothers of elementary aged children (3 boys, 1 girl), two mothers and one couple (mother and father) of secondary-aged youth (1 girl, 2 boys) with developmental disabilities, were gathered by using interviews, photographs, school documents, and the researcher's journal. Bronfenbrenner's (2005) ecological system theory provided a conceptual framework to interpret the findings of this inquiry. Three themes emerged from thematic analysis: being an advocate for my child, understanding the big picture, and collaborative partnerships undeveloped in GPE. The findings lend additional support to the need for establishing collaborative partnerships in physical education between home and school environments (An & Goodwin, 2007; Tekin, 2011).

  10. Family income, parental education and internalizing and externalizing psychopathology among 2-3-year-old Chinese children: the mediator effect of parent-child conflict.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao

    2014-02-01

    Using a sample of 156 Chinese children aged 2-3 years and their parents, this study examined the effects of socio-economic status, specifically family income and parental education, on the children's internalizing and externalizing psychopathology and whether these effects were mediated by mother-child and father-child conflict. Results indicated that family income, maternal education and paternal education all negatively predicted externalizing symptoms. Income also negatively predicted internalizing symptoms among boys but not girls. Maternal education negatively predicted internalizing symptoms among girls but not boys. The effects of income on psychopathology were fully mediated by mother-child and father-child conflict. In contrast, the effects of education were not mediated or only partially mediated by conflict. Findings are discussed in the framework of the family stress model.

  11. [Anti-nicotine education applied in relation of parents of the diseased children on chronic allergic diseases of respiratory system].

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Grzegorz; Gołda, Ryszard; Pyskir, Jerzy; Pasińska, Magdalena; Ludwikowski, Grzegorz; Kuziemski, Arkadiusz; Kopiński, Piotr

    2006-01-01

    The allergies of respiratory system are at children the frequent illnesses. Among favorable them factors, risk on passive smoking tobacco can be also. Passive smoking is defined as risk non-smoking on tobacco smoke in environment. Recent reports represent that smoking in home environment tobacco increase on passive smokers' asthma morbidity, especially children in school age. It in it was report the necessity of leadership of anti-nicotine education was underlined in the face of smoking parents. It bets that she should motivate she better parents to cessation smoking, using authority of doctor and love parental. Acting we decided with these principles to analyze effectiveness two year anti-nicotine education which be applied in the face of all treated smoking parents of children with reason of chronic allergic diseases of respiratory system in out-patients. The study comprised parents of 146 children at the Allergy out-Patients clinic, who were diagnosed and cured in years 2003-2005. Generally were 292 persons. The children be treated with reason of bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. It the data on subject of smoking of tobacco were collected was on basis of interview got from parents during visits at information bureau on beginning the treatment the children, in his track as well as after two years of education. The anti-nicotine education was applied by whole period of observation during routine medical visits. In moment beginning of treatment in studied group the parents' and education children (n = 292) it 79 the parents' couple did not smoke. Smoking parents among remaining 67 steams were. From among them parents 13 children smoked both, only father in 36 cases smoked and mother in remaining 18 parents' couple smoked. 80 parents smoked with generally. 63 persons after two years of anti-nicotine education the nonsmoking committed one from group smoking. 22 persons among them were from among 24 fathers and 17 mothers' peer in which smoked both parents

  12. Maternal chronological age, prenatal and perinatal history, social support, and parenting of infants.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Marc H; Putnick, Diane L; Suwalsky, Joan T D; Gini, Motti

    2006-01-01

    The role of maternal chronological age in prenatal and perinatal history, social support, and parenting practices of new mothers (N=335) was examined. Primiparas of 5-month-old infants ranged in age from 13 to 42 years. Age effects were zero, linear, and nonlinear. Nonlinear age effects were significantly associated up to a certain age with little or no association afterward; by spline regression, estimated points at which the slope of the regression line changed were 25 years for prenatal and perinatal history, 31 years for social supports, and 27 years for parenting practices. Given the expanding age range of first-time parents, these findings underscore the importance of incorporating maternal age as a factor in studies of parenting and child development. PMID:16942495

  13. An interactive parents' guide for feeding preschool-aged children: pilot studies for improvement.

    PubMed

    Reznar, Melissa M; Carlson, John S; Hughes, Sheryl O; Pavangadkar, Amol S; Scott, Marci K; Hoerr, Sharon L

    2014-05-01

    There are few motivational materials to help families with limited resources develop optimal, practical feeding strategies for young children to reduce dietary risk for poor diet and weight status. Formative evaluation strategies consisting of both qualitative and quantitative data helped to refine the parent feeding guide Eat Healthy, Your Children are Watching, A Parent's Guide to Raising a Healthy Eater. An interdisciplinary planning team developed a five-topic, multimedia, interactive guide addressing the strategies most associated with improved diet quality and weight status of children aged 3 to 5 years. Research staff conducted iterative phases of field testing, reformatting, in-depth interviews, and materials testing with Head Start or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education caregivers (N=38) of children aged 3 to 5 years during 2011 and 2012. Convergence of feedback from caregivers' interviews and each booklet's attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction subscale scores were used to determine and affirm areas for improvement. Lower than desired attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction scores (optimal score=5) in 2011 and too much text resulted in revisions and reformatting that improved scores from 3.8 to 4.9 in 2012. The revision of materials to reflect less text, additional white space, checklists of mealtime behaviors, and learning activities for preschool-aged children resulted in dramatically improved materials and greater acceptance by parents, as shown by both quantitative and qualitative evaluations. Formative evaluation procedures involving the use of data-based decision making allowed for the development of intervention materials that met the unique needs of the population served.

  14. Parental Use and Educational Campaigns on Sunbed Use Among Teenagers and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Stanganelli, Ignazio; Naldi, Luigi; Falcini, Fabio; Magi, Serena; Mazzoni, Laura; Medri, Matelda.; Bertoncini, Rita; Calderoni, Ombretta; Agnoletti, Veronica; Nadiani, Luca; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Di Nuzzo, Sergio; Pagliarello, Calogero; Gandini, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of sunbed use among teenagers and the association between familial behavior and the adoption of UV-protective practices in this age group. We also assessed the impact of an educational program on students’ knowledge about the potential risks of sunbed use. The educational intervention focused on: (i) skin effects of UV radiation, (ii) photoaging and photocarcinogenesis, (iii) risk factors for skin cancer, (iv) indoor sun tanning and misleading concepts such as possible protective effect of sunbed use on skin cancer risk, (v) sun protection and relation with skin phototype, and (vi) early diagnosis of melanoma using the ABCDE check list and the ugly duckling sign. We carried out a survey of 3098 students and found a strong association between parental sunbed use and students’ use of the same (P < 0.0001). Students who attended the educational intervention were more aware that sunbed use cannot prevent sunburns (P = 0.03) than those who did not attend, making adjustments for confounding variables. However, sunbed use by parents influenced the desire to use a sunbed more than participation in the educational intervention (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, although our results indicate that educational interventions can improve knowledge of the risk of sunbed use. They also reveal a strong correlation between sunbed use by teenagers and parental behavior that highlights the importance of educational interventions involving families. PMID:26986121

  15. Parental Use and Educational Campaigns on Sunbed Use Among Teenagers and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Stanganelli, Ignazio; Naldi, Luigi; Falcini, Fabio; Magi, Serena; Mazzoni, Laura; Medri, Matelda; Bertoncini, Rita; Calderoni, Ombretta; Agnoletti, Veronica; Nadiani, Luca; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Di Nuzzo, Sergio; Pagliarello, Calogero; Gandini, Sara

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of sunbed use among teenagers and the association between familial behavior and the adoption of UV-protective practices in this age group. We also assessed the impact of an educational program on students' knowledge about the potential risks of sunbed use. The educational intervention focused on: (i) skin effects of UV radiation, (ii) photoaging and photocarcinogenesis, (iii) risk factors for skin cancer, (iv) indoor sun tanning and misleading concepts such as possible protective effect of sunbed use on skin cancer risk, (v) sun protection and relation with skin phototype, and (vi) early diagnosis of melanoma using the ABCDE check list and the ugly duckling sign. We carried out a survey of 3098 students and found a strong association between parental sunbed use and students' use of the same (P < 0.0001). Students who attended the educational intervention were more aware that sunbed use cannot prevent sunburns (P = 0.03) than those who did not attend, making adjustments for confounding variables. However, sunbed use by parents influenced the desire to use a sunbed more than participation in the educational intervention (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, although our results indicate that educational interventions can improve knowledge of the risk of sunbed use. They also reveal a strong correlation between sunbed use by teenagers and parental behavior that highlights the importance of educational interventions involving families.

  16. Parental Use and Educational Campaigns on Sunbed Use Among Teenagers and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Stanganelli, Ignazio; Naldi, Luigi; Falcini, Fabio; Magi, Serena; Mazzoni, Laura; Medri, Matelda; Bertoncini, Rita; Calderoni, Ombretta; Agnoletti, Veronica; Nadiani, Luca; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Di Nuzzo, Sergio; Pagliarello, Calogero; Gandini, Sara

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of sunbed use among teenagers and the association between familial behavior and the adoption of UV-protective practices in this age group. We also assessed the impact of an educational program on students' knowledge about the potential risks of sunbed use. The educational intervention focused on: (i) skin effects of UV radiation, (ii) photoaging and photocarcinogenesis, (iii) risk factors for skin cancer, (iv) indoor sun tanning and misleading concepts such as possible protective effect of sunbed use on skin cancer risk, (v) sun protection and relation with skin phototype, and (vi) early diagnosis of melanoma using the ABCDE check list and the ugly duckling sign. We carried out a survey of 3098 students and found a strong association between parental sunbed use and students' use of the same (P < 0.0001). Students who attended the educational intervention were more aware that sunbed use cannot prevent sunburns (P = 0.03) than those who did not attend, making adjustments for confounding variables. However, sunbed use by parents influenced the desire to use a sunbed more than participation in the educational intervention (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, although our results indicate that educational interventions can improve knowledge of the risk of sunbed use. They also reveal a strong correlation between sunbed use by teenagers and parental behavior that highlights the importance of educational interventions involving families. PMID:26986121

  17. Look! Listen! Learn! Parent Narratives and Grounded Theory Models of Parent Voice, Presence, and Engagement in K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Maria K.; Millen, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Educators' expectations and understandings of parental involvement in our nation's schools are often disconnected from the reality of students' home lives. This qualitative study purports that educators often lose opportunities to more fully understand and serve students, particularly when perceptions of parental involvement and…

  18. Parent Drug Education: A Participatory Action Research Study into Effective Communication about Drugs between Parents and Unrelated Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallick, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Parent drug education is considered a key aspect of drug prevention. Effective communication acts as protective factor for drug misuse in young people. This study is a Participatory Action Research study of "Drugsbridge", a drug education programme that has an emphasis on facilitating intergenerational communication about drugs between parents and…

  19. Parents as Partners in Child Care and Development: Three Programme Strategies on Parent Education in the Philippines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigo, Brenda S.

    This paper describes the implementation of three major parent education programs and their strategies. Following an introduction to the efforts made in the Philippines to empower parents, the paper briefly describes the Programme of Cooperation and the Education for All National Plan of Action. Three case studies, all of which use different parent…

  20. Parenting

    MedlinePlus

    ... parents, people are always ready to offer advice. Parenting tips, parents' survival guides, dos, don'ts, shoulds ... right" way to be a good parent. Good parenting includes Keeping your child safe Showing affection and ...

  1. Spillovers of health education at school on parents' physical activity.

    PubMed

    Berniell, Lucila; de la Mata, Dolores; Valdés, Nieves

    2013-09-01

    This paper exploits state health education (HED) reforms as quasi-natural experiments to estimate the causal impact of HED received by children on their parents' physical activity. We use data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for the period 1999-2005 merged with data on state HED reforms from the National Association of State Boards of Education Health Policy Database and the 2000 and 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study. To identify the spillover effects of HED requirements on parents' behavior, we use several methodologies (triple differences, changes in changes, and difference in differences) in which we allow for different types of treatments. We find a positive effect of HED reforms at the elementary school on the probability of parents doing light physical activity. Introducing major changes in HED increases the probability of fathers engaging in physical activity by between 6.3 and 13.7 percentage points, whereas on average, this probability for mothers does not seem to be affected. We analyze several heterogeneous impacts of the HED reforms to unveil the mechanisms behind these spillovers. We find evidence consistent with hypotheses such as gender specialization of parents in childcare activities or information sharing between children and parents.

  2. Should Parents Get Involved in Educational Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blodget, Alden S.

    2012-01-01

    People tend to do things because that's how they have always done them or because that's the way others have done them. Schools are no different. The rigid factory model of education--a conveyor belt that moves children through a standard curriculum of books and lessons in a strict sequence--assumes that all brains are basically the same. They…

  3. Assessment and Age 16+ Education Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Stephen; Chevalier, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarises our research into the relationship between pupil assessment at age 14 (Key Stage 3) and participation in age 16+ education. We question whether a systematic gap between teacher-based assessment and externally marked tests indicates assessment bias or uncertainty, either in testing procedures or through teachers' perceptions…

  4. Parental Beliefs and Values Related to Family Risk, Educational Intervention, and Child Academic Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Frances A.; And Others

    Primary goals of this study were to determine: (1) whether a child-centered educational preschool program and/or a parent-centered early elementary educational intervention program for disadvantaged children had effects on the child rearing beliefs and values of parents; and (2) whether parents' child rearing beliefs and educational values were…

  5. At the Crossroads: Gypsy and Traveller Parents' Perceptions of Education, Protection and Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Martin; McGhee, Derek; Bhopal, Kalwant

    2010-01-01

    This article uses empirical data gathered during a pilot study funded by a local education authority to consider Gypsy and Traveller parents' perceptions of education. It examines the changing role of education within the lives of Gypsy and Traveller parents and children reflecting changing social circumstances, in particular how many parents now…

  6. Cambio En Las Escuelas: Mexican-American Parent Attitudes toward School Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Brian; Smith, Dennis; Zhang, James J.; Hill, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed Mexican-American (MA) and non-MA parents regarding their attitudes toward school health education and its place in the curriculum. There was widespread support for quality comprehensive school health education. MA parents considered school health education more important than non-MA parents. They also considered health was more important…

  7. Educational Access Is Educational Quality: Indigenous Parents' Perceptions of Schooling in Rural Guatemala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishihara-Brito, Reiko

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings and implications of a qualitative study conducted in Guatemala, which focused on rural, indigenous parents' perceptions of their children's schooling and educational quality. For these parents, the simple fact that their children had improved access to school signifies a satisfactory educational…

  8. Influence of Parental Education and Family Income on Children's Education in Rural Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drajea, Alice J.; O'Sullivan, Carmel

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effect of parents' literacy levels and family income in Uganda on the quality and nature of parents' involvement in their children's primary education. A mixed-methods study with an ethnographic element was employed to explore the views and opinions of 21 participants through a qualitative approach. Methods for data…

  9. Career Education for the Handicapped Child: A Guide to Parent Education Programming. Information Series No. 180.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasa, Stanley F.; And Others

    This paper explores the procedures utilized in developing a program model to assist parents of handicapped students in learning about their roles in enhancing the development of their children's skills and attitudes necessary for the work world. The first section discusses three basic assumptions about parents and their role in education: (1)…

  10. Empowering Parents and Educators to Develop Home-School Partnerships in K-12 Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriwaka, Minako

    2012-01-01

    Research demonstrates that parental involvement can have a positive impact on students' academic, emotional, and social success; however, there are few studies of how to improve parent advocacy and home-school collaboration in special education. The focus of this qualitative case study was to understand perceptions of the special educators…

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Parent Training and Emotion Socialization Program for Families of Hyperactive Preschool-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Sharonne D.; Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Jasmin L.; Wichowski, Kayla; Lugo-Candelas, Claudia I.

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a parent training and emotion socialization program designed specifically for hyperactive preschoolers. Participants were 31 preschool-aged children whose parents were randomly assigned to a parent training (PT) or waitlist (WL) control group. PT parents took part in a 14-week parenting program that…

  12. Mothers' Parenting Behaviors in Families of School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Observational and Questionnaire Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonen, Hannah; van Esch, Lotte; Lambrechts, Greet; Maljaars, Jarymke; Zink, Inge; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Noens, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Although parents of children with ASD face specific challenges in parenting, only a few studies have empirically investigated parenting behaviors among these parents. The current study examined differences in parenting behaviors between mothers of school-aged children with ASD (n = 30) and mothers of typically developing children (n = 39), using…

  13. The Effects of the Parenting Styles on Social Skills of Children Aged 5-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kol, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of the parenting styles on social skills of children aged 5-6. The problem sentence of the research is; Do the parenting styles' have any effects on social skills of children aged 5-6?. The sub-problems of the research are in the form as; Does the social skills of children aged 5-6 differs from…

  14. Science education in a secular age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David E.

    2013-03-01

    A college science education instructor tells his students he rejects evolution. What should we think? The scene unfolds in one of the largest urban centers in the world. If we are surprised, why? Expanding on Federica Raia's (2012) first-hand experience with this scenario, I broaden her discussion by considering the complexity of science education in a secular age. Enjoining Raia within the framework of Charles Taylor's A Secular Age, I task the science education community to consider the broad strokes of science, religious faith, and the complexity of modernity in its evolving, hybridized forms. Building upon anthropological approaches to science education research, I articulate a framework to more fully account for who, globally, is a Creationist, and what this means for our views of ethically responsive science education.

  15. High Educational Aspirations Among Pregnant Adolescents Are Related to Pregnancy Unwantedness and Subsequent Parenting Stress and Inadequacy

    PubMed Central

    East, Patricia L.; Barber, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of theories of maternal identity development, role conflict, and childbearing motivation, the authors tested whether high educational aspirations among pregnant adolescents are related to the unwantedness of the pregnancy and whether pregnancy unwantedness leads to subsequent parenting stress and inadequacy. Longitudinal data from 100 first-time-pregnant, unmarried Latina adolescents (M age = 17.3 years) were analyzed. Results from structural equation path modeling confirmed these associations, with strong educational ambitions related to greater unwantedness of the pregnancy, which led to feeling trapped by parenting at 6 months postpartum, which in turn was related to unaffectionate parenting and feeling inadequate in mothering at 1 year postpartum. The potential long-term negative consequences of high educational aspirations for pregnant adolescents’ adjustment to parenting are discussed. PMID:25641985

  16. X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... a radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images). The radiologist will ...

  17. Perceived parenting style of fathers and adolescents' locus of control in a collectivist culture of Malaysia: the moderating role of fathers' education.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Somayeh; Baharudin, Rozumah; Mounts, Nina S

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the moderating role of father's education on the associations between perceived paternal parenting styles and locus of control among 382 Malaysian adolescents with an average age of 14.27. Data were collected by means of adolescents' self-report using standardized instruments (i.e., parental authority questionnaire and Nowicki-Strickland Internal-External Control Scale for Children). Results revealed that there were significant negative relationships between fathers' authoritative parenting style (r = -.243, p < .001) and authoritarian parenting style (r = -.130, p < .01) with adolescents' internal locus of control. Furthermore, the findings indicated that father's high level of education moderated the relationship between perceived paternal authoritarian parenting and locus of control (b = -0.147, p < .001). The findings underscore the need to include the role of parents' education when assessing the links between parenting styles and adolescents' locus of control.

  18. Perceived parenting style of fathers and adolescents' locus of control in a collectivist culture of Malaysia: the moderating role of fathers' education.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Somayeh; Baharudin, Rozumah; Mounts, Nina S

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the moderating role of father's education on the associations between perceived paternal parenting styles and locus of control among 382 Malaysian adolescents with an average age of 14.27. Data were collected by means of adolescents' self-report using standardized instruments (i.e., parental authority questionnaire and Nowicki-Strickland Internal-External Control Scale for Children). Results revealed that there were significant negative relationships between fathers' authoritative parenting style (r = -.243, p < .001) and authoritarian parenting style (r = -.130, p < .01) with adolescents' internal locus of control. Furthermore, the findings indicated that father's high level of education moderated the relationship between perceived paternal authoritarian parenting and locus of control (b = -0.147, p < .001). The findings underscore the need to include the role of parents' education when assessing the links between parenting styles and adolescents' locus of control. PMID:23991523

  19. Needs Assessment of Parents of Typical Children Ages 4 to 5 Years Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Deon LaMount

    2010-01-01

    Parent education programs have been very successful in meeting the pre-established goals and expectations of their program without the input of parent participants prior to program implementation. Although programs continue to improve, it is important that programs begin to consider the specific needs of their target population. One parent…

  20. Influence of parental consanguineous marriages on age at onset of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Mostafa

    2012-07-30

    The present study was performed to investigate the association between parental consanguineous marriages and age at onset of bipolar disorder (BPD). A total of 195 BPD patients participated in the study. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that relationships between age at onset and cumulative proportion of patients have different patterns with respect to types of parental marriages. Among early onset cases, the age at onset was higher for offspring of consanguineous than unrelated marriages, whereas in late onset cases the age at onset was lower for offspring of consanguineous than unrelated marriages. However, there was no difference between consanguineous and unrelated marriages for intermediate age at onset.

  1. A Link between Generations: Intergenerational Relations and Depression in Aging Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Charlotte Chorn

    1995-01-01

    Examined the relationship between three aspects of intergenerational relations--problem in the life of an adult child, conflict with an adult child, and social support from an adult child--and depression in aging parents. Of the three aspects, only support from an adult child consistently related to parents' depression. (RJM)

  2. Self-Determination among Transition-Age Youth with Autism or Intellectual Disability: Parent Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Erik W.; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Cooney, Molly; Weir, Katherine; Moss, Colleen K.; Machalicek, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined 68 parents' views of the self-determination skills and capacities of their young adult children with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability (ages 19-21 years). Results indicated parents placed a high value on the importance of all seven component skills (i.e., choice-making skills, decision-making skills,…

  3. Parental Loss and Eating-Related Cognitions and Behaviors in College-Age Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beam, Minna R.; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Mathews, Laura

    2004-01-01

    To examine the eating-related cognitions and behaviors of college-age women who had experienced parental death, parental divorce, or neither loss condition, we recruited 48 women from science and social science departments at a state university in the Southeast. All participants completed the Mizes Anorectic Cognitions Scale (MAC) and the Bulimia…

  4. Parental advocacy styles for special education students during the transition to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Roberta S; Fisher, Lucille T; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Chesla, Catherine A

    2013-10-01

    In an ethnographic study of planning for the transition to adulthood, we explored parental advocacy styles in special education settings for youth and young adults with chronic health conditions and developmental disabilities. Of 61 parents, 43 were satisfied with outcomes in negotiations for school services for their children. We identified three parental advocacy styles for these parents: (a) high-profile parents, who insisted on specific, wide-ranging services for their children that often resulted in conflict with educators; (b) strategic parents, who negotiated for selected goals and were willing to compromise, and (c) grateful-gratifier parents, who formed close relationships with educators and trusted them to make appropriate decisions. Eighteen parents were overwhelmed, burned out, or unfocused, and generally dissatisfied with outcomes of educational planning meetings. Professional efforts to enhance parental advocacy can target development of skills and strategies that have worked for successful negotiators.

  5. Parental Advocacy Styles for Special Education Students During the Transition to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Roberta S.; Fisher, Lucille T.; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Chesla, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    In an ethnographic study of planning for the transition to adulthood, we explored parental advocacy styles in special education settings for youth and young adults with chronic health conditions and developmental disabilities. Of 61 parents, 43 were satisfied with outcomes in negotiations for school services for their children. We identified three parental advocacy styles for these parents: (a) high profile parents who insisted on specific, wide-ranging services for their children that often resulted in conflict with educators; (b) strategic parents who negotiated for selected goals and were willing to compromise, and (c) grateful gratifier parents who formed close relationships with educators and trusted them to make appropriate decisions. Eighteen parents were overwhelmed, burned out, or unfocused, and generally dissatisfied with outcomes of educational planning meetings. Professional efforts to enhance parental advocacy can target development of skills and strategies that have worked for successful negotiators. PMID:24062419

  6. Parental advocacy styles for special education students during the transition to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Roberta S; Fisher, Lucille T; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Chesla, Catherine A

    2013-10-01

    In an ethnographic study of planning for the transition to adulthood, we explored parental advocacy styles in special education settings for youth and young adults with chronic health conditions and developmental disabilities. Of 61 parents, 43 were satisfied with outcomes in negotiations for school services for their children. We identified three parental advocacy styles for these parents: (a) high-profile parents, who insisted on specific, wide-ranging services for their children that often resulted in conflict with educators; (b) strategic parents, who negotiated for selected goals and were willing to compromise, and (c) grateful-gratifier parents, who formed close relationships with educators and trusted them to make appropriate decisions. Eighteen parents were overwhelmed, burned out, or unfocused, and generally dissatisfied with outcomes of educational planning meetings. Professional efforts to enhance parental advocacy can target development of skills and strategies that have worked for successful negotiators. PMID:24062419

  7. Financial literacy among Turkish college students: the role of formal education, learning approaches, and parental teaching.

    PubMed

    Akben-Selcuk, Elif; Altiok-Yilmaz, Ayse

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed financial literacy and its correlates among Turkish college students, with special emphasis on the role of formal education, learning approaches, and parental influences. Financial literacy was measured by the College Student Financial Literacy Survey, which assesses knowledge in four areas: general financial management, saving and borrowing, insurance, and investing. 853 Turkish university students were administered the survey (416 men, 437 women; M age = 20.3 yr., SD = 0.6). The mean percentage of correct responses was 45% (SD = 12.8%). Regression results showed that formal finance education in college, a deep approach to learning, and direct financial teaching by parents were significantly associated with higher financial literacy scores.

  8. Parental attitudes about sexual education: cross-cultural differences and covariate controls.

    PubMed

    Abramson, P R; Moriuchi, K D; Waite, M S; Perry, L B

    1983-10-01

    Cross-cultural differences in parental attitudes and experiences of childhood sexual education were examined. Parental attitudes and experiences were isolated for study because of their significance as a vehicle for transmitting culturally prescribed norms. The present study also tested for artifactual differences between cultures, in terms of explaining the differences with concomitant variability. Couples with children ranging in age from 1 to 10 were utilized and were drawn from four subcultures (Mexican-American, N = 22, Black American, N = 20, Caucasian American, N = 27, and Japanese-American, N = 18). The most salient and consistent finding was the pronounced significance of the covariate controls (especially father's education and mother's religiosity). That is, although a few cross-cultural effects remained significant despite the influence of a covariate, most of the findings were biased by a concomitant (i.e., demographic) variable. PMID:6651506

  9. Parents' Developmental Concerns and Age Variance at Diagnosis of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twyman, Kimberly A.; Maxim, Rolanda A.; Leet, Terry L.; Ultmann, Monica H.

    2009-01-01

    Although early recognition of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is important, the age of children at diagnosis is variable. Forty-five participants diagnosed with ASD were divided into groups based on age at diagnosis and compared on age when parents first became concerned about various aspects of their development. Results demonstrated no…

  10. Reconciling Hf-W Model Ages of IVB Parent Body with Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, W.; Breuer, D.; Kleine, T.; Kruijer, T.

    2016-08-01

    We calculated the differentiation of the parent body of IVB iron meteorites comparing its evolution to the metal separation data. Our models are consistent with the separation ages inferred from the Hf-W chronology.

  11. Perceived Parenting Styles and Goal Orientations: A Study of Teacher Education Students in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kwok-wai; Chan, Siu-mui

    2005-01-01

    Two achievement goals and three perceived parenting styles were identified in a sample of Hong Kong teacher education students. Significant correlations exist within the perceived parenting styles and the achievement goals. Parental authoritativeness was significantly and positively related to learning goal, and parental authoritarianism was…

  12. Community Partnerships: Working across Institutions to Support Parent Advocacy and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Jennifer; Ozuna, Sara M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors analyze the evolution of parent advocate education standards that illustrate what parents need to know and do to effectively support their children's learning in 6th-12th grade. Focus groups conducted with parent participants revealed that parents were often unaware of the distinction between helping their child…

  13. Negotiating the Roles of Community Member and Parent: Participation in Education in Rural Paraguay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carolan-Silva, Aliah

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes parents' perceptions of their role in supporting educational opportunities for their children, based on a qualitative study of parents and teachers in a rural community in Paraguay. The parents' views on participation are positioned within the context of the intended goals for parent participation outlined in Paraguayan…

  14. Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning): Level I Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard Community Coll., Cocoa, FL.

    These eight learning modules were prepared for parents participating in Brevard Community College's Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning), which was designed for low socioeconomic parents who are in need of an opportunity to explore effective parenting. First, materials for the BEST-PAL volunteer sponsors…

  15. Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning): Level II Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard Community Coll., Cocoa, FL.

    These eight learning modules were prepared for parents participating in Brevard Community College's Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning), which was designed for low socioeconomic parents who are in need of an opportunity to explore effective parenting. First, materials for the BEST-PAL volunteer sponsors…

  16. Parental Beliefs and Values Related to Family Risk, Educational Intervention, and Child Academic Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Frances A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Studied the relation of child-rearing beliefs and values of parents of children entering kindergarten to children's academic achievements. Examined effects of a child-centered educational preschool program for socioeconomically disadvantaged children on parents' beliefs and values. Parents of children at risk differed from other parents in beliefs…

  17. Parents' barriers and strategies to promote healthy eating among school-age children.

    PubMed

    Nepper, Martha J; Chai, Weiwen

    2016-08-01

    The home environment is considered one of the most important settings in regards to the development of healthy eating habits among children. The primary purpose of this study was to explore parents' barriers and strategies in promoting healthy eating in the home. The secondary objective was to determine whether the barriers and strategies parents had were different between healthy weight and overweight/obese school-age children. Semi-structured individual interviews with 14 parents of healthy weight and 11 parents of overweight/obese children (6-12 years) were conducted in family homes from August 2014 to March 2015. Transcripts were recorded and codes and themes were verified by the research team and one qualitative expert. Themes emerging from both parents of healthy weight and overweight/obese children were: 1) Parents are busy and strapped for time; 2) Cost is a barrier in providing healthy food, but parents are resourceful; 3) Children ask for junk food regularly, but parents have strategies to manage; 4) Picky eaters are a challenge but parents know they have to overcome this barrier; and 5) Early exposure to unhealthy eating influences children's food choices but strategies can help. However, parents of overweight/obese children felt a lack of support from their spouses/partners for healthy eating in the home, which was not expressed among parents of healthy weight children. Additionally, barriers and strategies were similar among parents of children from different age groups [6-9 years vs. 10-12 years (pre-adolescents)]. Our results suggest while parents faced some challenges in promoting healthy eating in the home, they utilized several strategies to overcome these barriers, which are valuable for direct intervention to improve home food environment and manage children's weight. PMID:27090341

  18. Parents' barriers and strategies to promote healthy eating among school-age children.

    PubMed

    Nepper, Martha J; Chai, Weiwen

    2016-08-01

    The home environment is considered one of the most important settings in regards to the development of healthy eating habits among children. The primary purpose of this study was to explore parents' barriers and strategies in promoting healthy eating in the home. The secondary objective was to determine whether the barriers and strategies parents had were different between healthy weight and overweight/obese school-age children. Semi-structured individual interviews with 14 parents of healthy weight and 11 parents of overweight/obese children (6-12 years) were conducted in family homes from August 2014 to March 2015. Transcripts were recorded and codes and themes were verified by the research team and one qualitative expert. Themes emerging from both parents of healthy weight and overweight/obese children were: 1) Parents are busy and strapped for time; 2) Cost is a barrier in providing healthy food, but parents are resourceful; 3) Children ask for junk food regularly, but parents have strategies to manage; 4) Picky eaters are a challenge but parents know they have to overcome this barrier; and 5) Early exposure to unhealthy eating influences children's food choices but strategies can help. However, parents of overweight/obese children felt a lack of support from their spouses/partners for healthy eating in the home, which was not expressed among parents of healthy weight children. Additionally, barriers and strategies were similar among parents of children from different age groups [6-9 years vs. 10-12 years (pre-adolescents)]. Our results suggest while parents faced some challenges in promoting healthy eating in the home, they utilized several strategies to overcome these barriers, which are valuable for direct intervention to improve home food environment and manage children's weight.

  19. Teen-Age Parents and Child Support: Creating Family Ties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bustos, Patrick D.

    1988-01-01

    This report examines the special problems associated with establishing paternity and collecting child support from teenage parents. The report reviews public policy options for legislators and is divided into three major sections: estabilishing paternity, child support enforcement, and state legislative policy and program responses. It notes that…

  20. Effects of Individualized Education Program Meeting Facilitation on Parent and Educator Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Frances Ziehr

    2013-01-01

    For a student with a disability to receive special education services, an IEP team composed of education professionals and the student's parents must reach consensus on eligibility, programming, and placement. Conflict, mistrust, and dissatisfaction contributed to the breakdown in the IEP process. These three factors were examined through a…

  1. Elementary School Parents' Opinions toward Educational Technology and Its Role in Their Children's Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    This study surveyed parents of elementary students in the small Midwestern community of Montpelier, Indiana to elicit their opinions toward the educational technology in their children's school and the role it plays in their education. Montpelier Elementary School (MES) has 223 students from 161 families. A phone survey was done to which about 42%…

  2. Parental Views on the Statutory Assessment and Educational Planning for Children with Special Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Una; McConkey, Roy; Hartop, Brendan

    2005-01-01

    Within the UK educational authorities have a legal duty to undertake an assessment of children who are deemed to have 'special educational needs' and to draw up plans for meeting these needs. The procedures used are currently under review, and as a contribution to this a study of parental views was commissioned in Northern Ireland. Over 1000…

  3. Special Educational Needs and Individualised Education Programmes: Issues of Parent and Pupil Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Jean; Riddell, Sheila; Banks, Pauline; Baynes, Anne; Dyson, Alan; Millward, Alan; Wilson, Alastair

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with 17 key informants and surveys of 278 schools in Scotland explored policy and practices related to parent and student participation in the development and implementation of individualized educational programs (IEPs). While finding such participation desirable, education professionals did not agree on what constitutes participation,…

  4. Being Smart about Gifted Education: A Guidebook for Parents and Educators (2nd Edition)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dona J.; Foster, Joanne F.

    2009-01-01

    Written for both parents and educators who work with children of advanced abilities, the authors present practical strategies to identify and nurture exceptionally high ability in children. They promote the "mastery" (rather than the "mystery") model of gifted education, and challenge several common practices and assumptions. They offer ways to…

  5. Perceived Parenting Style of Fathers and Adolescents' Locus of Control in a Collectivist Culture of Malaysia: The Moderating Role of Fathers' Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Somayeh; Baharudin, Rozumah

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the moderating role of father's education on the associations between perceived paternal parenting styles and locus of control among 382 Malaysian adolescents with an average age of 14.27. Data were collected by means of adolescents' self-report using standardized instruments (i.e., parental authority questionnaire and…

  6. Taiwanese Parents' Beliefs Regarding Young Children's Art Education and the Actual Art Achievements of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Ching-Yuan; Pai, Tzu-Chi

    2014-01-01

    The research goal is to ascertain the current beliefs of the parents of preschool children regarding art education in Taiwan. Background factors on the parents were tested to show the differences between the parents' beliefs regarding art education and the actual art achievements of the children. From there, relationships between the beliefs and…

  7. The Politics of Parental Involvement: How Opportunity Hoarding and Prying Shape Educational Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyken-Segosebe, Dawn; Hinz, Serena E.

    2015-01-01

    As more state legislatures join the debate on school-choice and parent-trigger legislation, their discussions draw attention to an evolving landscape outside school walls where parental action shapes educational opportunity. Parents wield their political, social, economic, and cultural capital to secure the best educational outcomes for their…

  8. Understanding Parental Views of Adolescent Sexuality and Sex Education in Ecuador: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerves, Elena; López, Silvia; Castro, Cecilia; Ortiz, William; Palacios, María; Rober, Peter; Enzlin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Parents' contribution to sex education is increasingly receiving research attention. This growing interest stems from recognition of the influence that parental attitudes may have both on young people's sexual attitudes and behaviour, and on school-based sex education. Studies regarding parental attitudes towards sexuality are, however,…

  9. Preferences Regarding School Sexuality Education among Elementary Schoolchildren's Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; Baksovich, Christine M.; Wielinski, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Background: A comprehensive review of the literature failed to find any studies to assess elementary school parents' preferred philosophical approach to teaching sexuality education and sexuality education topics discussed by parents. All previous research reported parent data for grades K-12 or grades 9-12 only. Methods: A random sample of…

  10. Parental Perceptions of Barriers to Conflict Resolution at the School Level Resulting in Special Education Litigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Berta C. Ortiz

    2009-01-01

    Parent-school relationships are vital to the success of student achievement. Effective parent-school relationships are especially beneficial to students with disabilities. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires parental participation in partnership with the school staff when developing the individual educational programs…

  11. Investigating Kindergarten Parents' Selection of After-School Art Education Settings in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Ching-Yuan; Kuo, Ting-Yin

    2013-01-01

    The research purpose was to investigate kindergarten parents' selection of after-school art education settings in Taiwan. A review of the literature and interviews with parents were conducted to identify several possible factors that would impact on parents' selection of after-school art education settings for their children. Then, the researcher…

  12. Wizards and Witches: Parent Advocates and Contention in Special Education in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nespor, Jan; Hicks, David

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on interviews with parents of children with significant disabilities, as well as administrators and special education consultants, between the early 1990s and 2008 in a mid-Atlantic US state, this paper examines the work of parental advocates as they translate special education policies to negotiate concessions for parents, bring issues…

  13. Down the Rabbit Hole: A Commentary about Research on Parents and Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Jan W.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines what we know about the experience of parents in the special education system--in particular, parents of children with learning disabilities since the passage of PL-94-142. Toward this end, I offer a review of special education literature about parent and professional collaboration, a rationale for relying upon a plurality of…

  14. Raising Reading Readiness in Low-Income Children by Parent Education. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazen, Shelley M.; Haust, Mary

    A study evaluated the effectiveness of a parent education program in increasing school readiness in poor and high-needs children. Participants in the Parents and Children Together program (PACT) of Binghamton, New York, receive home visits from trained and certified parent educators, beginning when a child is born and continuing until he or she is…

  15. Equity Issues in Parental and Community Involvement in Schools: What Teacher Educators Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baquedano-Lopez, Patricia; Alexander, Rebecca Anne; Hernandez, Sera J.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine the literature on parental involvement highlighting the equity issues that it raises in educational practice. They begin with a brief historical overview of approaches to parent involvement and the ways in which "neodeficit" discourses on parents permeate current education reform efforts. Next, they address how…

  16. Parents' Views about Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Education: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Robyn; Walsh, Kerryann

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a systematic review of literature on the topic of parents' views about child sexual abuse prevention education. It describes: i) what parents know about child sexual abuse prevention education; ii) what child sexual abuse prevention messages parents provide to their children and what topics they discuss; iii)…

  17. Child Characteristics and Parental Educational Expectations: Evidence for Transmission with Transaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briley, Daniel A.; Harden, K. Paige; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2014-01-01

    Parents' expectations for their children's ultimate educational attainment have been hypothesized to play an instrumental role in socializing academically relevant child behaviors, beliefs, and abilities. In addition to social transmission of educationally relevant values from parents to children, parental expectations and child…

  18. Parent Involvement in the Special Education Process: A Synopsis of Exemplary Models. CASE Information Dissemination Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Margaret; And Others

    This document describes eight models of local and state special education efforts that are providing viable ways for parents to become more involved in their children's education. The models are designed to develop effective two-way communication and collaboration between parents and teachers, develop methods for parents to actively support their…

  19. Attitudes of Parents and Health Promoters in Greece Concerning Sex Education of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirana, Paraskevi-Sofia; Nakopoulou, Evangelia; Akrita, Ioanna; Papaharitou, Stamatis

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the attitudes and views of Greek parents concerning the provision of sex education to adolescents, as well as the opinion and the involvement of school health promoters in sex education. A questionnaire containing 20 items was constructed and administered to 93 parents of adolescents who participated in parents'…

  20. Knowledge Building: Reinventing Education for the Knowledge Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philip, Donald N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the Knowledge Age and how economic factors are causing educators to rethink and reinvent education. Two key factors in education in the Knowledge Age will be education for an economy of innovation, and the increasing virtualization of education. We present knowledge building pedagogy as a model for education in the Knowledge…

  1. Maternal Attitudes and Parent Education: How Immigrant Mothers Support Their Child's Education despite Their Own Low Levels of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Ana; Rocha, Lisa Oglesby; Barshinger, David

    2007-01-01

    A study of Mexican immigrant mothers of young children in the AVANCE-Dallas early childhood intervention program demonstrates that low-educational parents often exhibit ambitious attitudes about educational achievement for their children. Though they lack an extensive academic background, which places their children at risk for low education,…

  2. Parental educational attainment and sense of control in mid- and late-adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ward, Michael M

    2013-07-01

    Sense of control is greater among children who grow up in households of higher socioeconomic status. It is unclear if this childhood advantage persists throughout life or if schooling and adulthood experiences override any early childhood advantage. Using data from 2 nationally representative samples of primarily middle-aged (National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States, or MIDUS), and older adults (Health and Retirement Study, or HRS), I tested if personal mastery and perceived constraints in adulthood were associated with the educational attainment of the participant's father or mother, adjusting for participant's education level, income, and other demographic characteristics. In both samples, personal mastery was not associated with either parent's education level, but perceived constraints had a graded inverse association with mother's education level. These results indicate that childhood experiences continue to be associated with perceived constraints, even in later life, and may not be completely overridden by adult experiences.

  3. Educational Communication in a Revolutionary Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, I. Keith, Comp.; Williams, Catharine M., Comp.

    As a tribute to Dr. Edgar Dale on his retirement from Ohio State University, the papers in this book refer to "the failures of education,""the impotence of the school,""the need for sweeping change," the existence of a "systems break," and "incipient civil war," all of which are products of an age of revolution which continues today. Educational…

  4. Body mass index in young adults: Associations with parental body size and education in the CARDIA Study.

    PubMed Central

    Greenlund, K J; Liu, K; Dyer, A R; Kiefe, C I; Burke, G L; Yunis, C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Associations of parental education, parental body size, and offspring's education with body mass index and 7-year change in body mass index were examined among participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. METHODS: CARDIA is a study of coronary artery disease risk factors in 5115 Black and White persons aged 18 to 30 at baseline. Analyses of covariance were carried out with body mass index and change in body mass index as the dependent variables, and with parental education, parental body size, and participant education as the major independent variables. RESULTS: Father's body size was positively associated with participant's baseline body mass index among Black men, White men, and White women. Mother's body size was positively associated with baseline body mass index among all race-sex groups, and with change in body mass index among White women. Father's education was inversely associated with baseline body mass index among Black men and White women, and with change among White women. CONCLUSIONS: Parental education may influence body mass index and changes in young adulthood, especially among White women. Such associations may be both genetic and environmental and may be important for obesity prevention efforts. PMID:8604777

  5. Delayed College Entry and the Socioeconomic Gap: Examining the Roles of Student Plans, Family Income, Parental Education, and Parental Occupation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Ryan S.; Lynch, Cassie M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates delayed college entry, including how college enrollment differs based on students' plans while in high school. Results confirm that low-SES students are repeatedly disadvantaged in the college transition, but add complexity concerning the influences of family income, parental education, and parental occupational status.…

  6. Exploring Parental Involvement in Early Years Education in China: Development and Validation of the Chinese Early Parental Involvement Scale (CEPIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Eva Yi Hung; Li, Hui; Rao, Nirmala

    2012-01-01

    This study developed and validated an instrument, the Chinese Early Parental Involvement Scale (CEPIS), that can be widely used in both local and international contexts to assess Chinese parental involvement in early childhood education. The study was carried out in two stages: (1) focus group interviews were conducted with 41 teachers and 35…

  7. Cambio en las escuelas: Mexican-American parent attitudes toward school health education.

    PubMed

    Colwell, B; Smith, D; Zhang, J J; Hill, M

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the attitudes of Mexican-American (MA) parents of children toward school health education programs in South Texas. The Parent Attitude Scale (PAS) was developed and validated by American Cancer Society (ACS) staff and volunteer health educators. The validated survey was used to question randomly selected parents in the McAllen, Texas, school district regarding their attitudes toward school health education. Of 253 parents contacted, 235 (92.9%) parents were interviewed. Mann-Whitney U-Tests indicated that Mexican-American (MA) parents consider school health education to be more important than non-Mexican-American parents do. MA parents, overall, felt that it was more important that their child has good health habits and more important that their child's teacher provide support to them by teaching good health habits than non-MA parents. MA parents also felt that health was more important relative to other subjects at school than non-MA parents. The data indicate strong support for school health education efforts among MA parents in southern Texas. Such support may grow stronger with appropriate parent-recruitment efforts, including those by the ACS. Mexican-American parents may also represent an untapped resource for social and political support for school health programming.

  8. Parents Want Their Children's Data: DQC's 2015 Parent Poll Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Data Quality Campaign (DQC) believes that when parents and educators have the right information to make decisions, students excel. Parents agree, according to a recent survey. DQC's Parent Poll, conducted online by Harris Poll in November 2015, surveyed 1,093 US parents with children ages 5-17 about their attitudes toward data collection and…

  9. Parental perception of oral health status of children in mainstream and special education classrooms.

    PubMed

    Butani, Yogita; Gansky, Stuart A; Weintraub, Jane A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare parental perceptions of oral health status and access to dental services by children in 34 special education and 16 mainstream public elementary school classes in San Mateo County, California. A self-administered parental survey was utilized and included questions about demographics, oral health, and dental utilization. The overall response rate was 58.8%. After adjusting for age and gender of the child, compared to mainstream, parents of students in special education classes were significantly more likely to report their children to have worse oral health (OR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.54, 3.67), be lacking a past year dental visit (OR = 1.96, 95% CI 1.01, 3.84), and have missed school days due to dental reasons (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.55, 4.17). Both groups rated their children's oral health inferior to the overall health rating (p < .001). The authors concluded that disparities exist between the two groups in parental perceptions of their children's oral health status and dental service utilization.

  10. Active Parenting Now: Program Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkin, Michael H.

    Based largely on the theories of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs, this parent education curriculum is a video-based interactive learning experience that teaches a comprehensive model of parenting to parents of children ages 5 to 12 years. The kit provides parents with the skills needed to help their children develop courage, responsibility, and…

  11. Issues and Theoretical Constructs Regarding Parent Education for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Koegel, Lynn K.; Koegel, Robert L.; Ence, Whitney A.

    2013-01-01

    Participation of parents of children with autism is commonplace in most comprehensive intervention programs, yet, there is limited research relating to the best practices in this area. This article provides an overview of parent education programs for young children with autism and details data-driven procedures which are associated with improved parent and child outcomes. In addition, we provide a troubleshooting guide based on the literature for professionals regarding a variety of complex issues which may arise during parent education. PMID:21336525

  12. Associations between parental educational/occupational levels and cognitive performance in Spanish adolescents: the AVENA study.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ruth; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Chillón, Palma; Jiménez-Pavón, David; Esperanza-Díaz, Ligia; Moreno, Luis A; Ortega, Francisco B

    2011-08-01

    We examined the associations between parental educational/occupational levels and cognitive performance in Spanish adolescents. Cognitive performance was measured by a validated Scholar Aptitudes test in 2,162 participants. Parental educational and occupational levels were positively associated with all specific cognitive abilities and the overall score (p<001 to .04). The odds ratios of having a high cognitive performance (top quartile) in adolescents with high parental educational level were 1.6 to 1.7 times higher than for those with a low parental educational level. Similarly, the odds ratios were 1.9 to 2.4 times higher for adolescents with high parental occupational level. These findings suggest an association between parental educational/occupational levels and cognitive performance in Spanish adolescents and support the parents' role in the creation of a stimulating intellectual environment.

  13. Adolescents' Educational Outcomes in a Social Ecology of Parenting, Family, and Community Risks in Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Taylor, Laura K.; Cairns, Ed; Merrilees, Christine E.; Shirlow, Peter; Cummings, E. Mark

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the influence of social ecological risks within the domains of parenting, family environment, and community in the prediction of educational outcomes for 770 adolescents (49% boys, 51% girls, M = 13.6 years, SD = 2.0) living in a setting of protracted political conflict, specifically working class areas of Belfast, Northern Ireland. Controlling for religious community, age, and gender, youths' lower academic achievement was associated with family environments characterized by high conflict and low cohesion. School ehaviour problems were related to greater exposure to community violence, or sectarian and nonsectarian antisocial behaviour. Youths' expectations about educational attainment were undermined by conflict in the family environment and antisocial behaviour in the community, as well as parenting low in warmth and behavioural control. Findings underscore the importance of considering family and community contributions to youths' educational outcomes. Suggestions regarding targeted interventions toward promoting resilience are discussed, such as assessing both child and family functioning, developing multidimensional interventions for parents, and building community partnerships, among others. PMID:26834298

  14. Parent Involvement in Early Childhood Education. (Revised Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerset, Gwen

    This booklet, directed to parents, advocates parent involvement in New Zealand playcenter groups, discusses parental duties in the playcenter, and suggests ways parents can help children to learn. The booklet has three chapters. Chapter I discusses the value of parent involvement from the point of view of the child, the parent, and the community.…

  15. Does parental education have a moderating effect on the genetic and environmental influences of general cognitive ability in early adulthood?

    PubMed

    Grant, Michael D; Kremen, William S; Jacobson, Kristen C; Franz, Carol; Xian, Hong; Eisen, Seth A; Toomey, Rosemary; Murray, Ruth E; Lyons, Michael J

    2010-07-01

    Hereditary influences account for a substantial proportion of the variance in many cognitive abilities. However, there is increasing recognition that the relative importance of genetic and environmental influences may vary across different socioeconomic levels. The overall goal of the present study was to examine whether parental education has a moderating effect on genetic and environmental influences of general cognitive ability in early adulthood (age 19.6 +/- 1.5). Participants were 5,955 male twins from the Vietnam Era Twin (VET) Registry. Significant effects of parental education on mean level of general cognitive ability scores were found, but a model without moderating effects of parental education on genetic or environmental influences on cognitive scores proved to be the best fitting model. Some, but not all, previous studies have found significant moderating effects; however, no consistent pattern emerged that could account for between-study differences regarding moderating effects on genetic and environmental influences.

  16. Differences among Preferred Methods for Furthering Aging Education in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leson, Suzanne M.; Van Dussen, Daniel J.; Ewen, Heidi H.; Emerick, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Workers serving Ohio's aging population will require increased levels of gerontological education. Using data from 55 Ohio counties, this project investigated the educational needs and reasons for seeking education from professionals in aging. Respondents reported interest in attaining aging related education. Preferred delivery methods…

  17. Urban Education: A Comprehensive Guide for Educators, Parents, and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincheloe, Joe L., Ed.; Hayes, Kecia, Ed.; Rose, Karel, Ed.; Anderson, Philip M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining that urban teaching and learning is characterized by many contradictions, this book proposes that there is a wide range of social, cultural, psychological, and pedagogical knowledge urban educators must possess in order to engage in effective and transformative practice. It is necessary for those teaching in urban schools to be…

  18. Age 21 Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Title I Chicago Child-Parent Centers. Discussion Paper No. 1245-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Temple, Judy A.; Robertson, Dylan L.; Mann, Emily A.

    2002-01-01

    We conducted the first cost-benefit analysis of a federally financed, comprehensive early childhood program. The Title I Chicago Child-Parent Centers are located in public schools and provide educational and family support services to low-income children from ages 3 to 9. Using data from a cohort of children born in 1980 who participate in the…

  19. Relationship of Child IQ to Parental IQ and Education in Children with Fetal Antiepileptic Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Cohen, Morris J.; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trial designs need to control for genetic and environmental influences when examining cognitive outcomes in children for whom clinical considerations preclude randomization. However, the contributions of maternal and paternal IQ and education to pediatric cognitive outcomes are uncertain in disease populations. The NEAD Study is an ongoing prospective observational multicenter study in the USA and UK, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Here, we examined the relationship of IQ and education in both parents to child IQ at age 3 years. IQ and education for both parents were statistically correlated to child IQ. However, paternal IQ and education were not significant after accounting for maternal IQ effects. Because maternal IQ and education are independently related to child cognitive outcome, both should be assessed in studies investigating the effects of fetal drug exposures or other environmental factors that could affect the child’s cognitive outcome. PMID:21546316

  20. Parents' Participation in the Sexuality Education of Their Children in Namibia: A Framework and an Educational Programme for Enhanced Action.

    PubMed

    Nghipondoka-Lukolo, Linda Ndeshipandula; Charles, Kimera Lukanga

    2015-08-18

    The purpose of the study was to empower rural parents to participate in the sexuality education of their children. The study was designed to be qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual in nature. It was performed in three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a situational analysis to explore and describe how parents provide sexuality education. Phase 2 consisted of the development of a conceptual framework that facilitated the development of an educational programme. In phase 3 the programme was implemented and evaluated, recommendations were made and conclusions drawn. The main findings revealed two themes: factors influencing parental participation in their children's sexuality education, and the need for parental participation in their children's sexuality education. This article is part of series of three article stems from a study on the topic of sexuality education empowerment programme of rural parents in Namibia. The three articles have the following titles: one: parent's participation in sexuality education of their children: a situational analysis; two: parent's participation in sexuality education of their children: a conceptual framework and an educational programme to enhance action, and three: parent's participation in sexuality education of their children: programme implementation and evaluation. The previous paper dealt with parent's participation in sexuality education of their children: a situational analysis: the results from the in-depth interviews and focus group discussions on sexuality education with children and parents were presented. This paper focuses on describing Phase 2 and 3, namely the process of devising a conceptual framework for the development of an educational programme to empower parents to participate in the sexuality education of their children. Discussions included a description of the conceptual framework, based on the researcher's paradigmatic assumptions, and the focus group and individual in-depth interviews results

  1. Effectiveness of hands-on education for correct child restraint use by parents.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Karen

    2010-07-01

    This study evaluates whether a hands-on educational intervention makes a significant difference in the proper use of a child passenger restraint by a parent. The clinical trial design included a sample of 111 parents who were at least seven months pregnant and who were randomly assigned to one of two groups (56 intervention and 55 control). All participants received a free car seat and a standardized education session on the safety and use of child passenger restraints. The experimental group received an additional component consisting of a hands-on demonstration and return demonstration of correct installation and use in their own vehicle. Follow-up observation for correctness of use was done after birth using a standardized tool. A total of 24 (22%) parents correctly used the car seat; of these, 18 (32%) were in the intervention group and 6 (11%) were in the control group. The intervention group was four times more likely to have correct use than the control group (odds ratio 4.3, p-value=0.0074). The range for the number of errors per person was 0-7, with the majority (70%) having 0-2. The rate of errors was 33% less in the intervention group (ratio of 0.67). There were few serious errors in either group. No secondary variable (age, education, income, or help from others) had a significant effect on the outcome. The hands-on educational intervention made a significant difference in the proper use of a child passenger restraint by a parent. This study demonstrates the value of hands-on teaching for learning how to install and use a child car seat. PMID:20441811

  2. Getting "Foolishly Hot and Bothered"? Parents and Teachers and Sex Education in the 1940s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Hera

    2012-01-01

    The reluctance of parents to provide sex education has been a problem for educators since the first attempts at the modernisation of sex education in the early twentieth century, yet the sexual needs, desires and fears of parents are rarely even mentioned in pedagogical debates. This article examines the intense anxiety and embarrassment felt by…

  3. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Burden of Proof: On Parents or Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act does not specify whether parents or school districts have the burden of proof in special education litigation. It is the position of the National Council on Disability that school districts, not parents, should have the burden of proof in issues about Individualized Education Plans (IEP's),…

  4. "Doug C. v. Hawaii Department of Education": Parental Participation in IEP Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yell, Mitchell L.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Losinski, Mickey

    2015-01-01

    Parental participation is a crucial component of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. When developing students' Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), school-based teams must place a high priority on involving students' parents in a collaborative effort to develop their children's educational programs and determine their placements.…

  5. Beginning of Movement for Re-Education of Parents in Japan in the 1920's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Keiko

    In the late 1920s, in conjunction with a new passion for freedom and concern for human rights, two associations were formed in Japan to promote parents' education and children's welfare. In 1928, following a 2-year study of education in America, Tetsuya Kamimura started the Japan Parents' Re-education Association. The association's members…

  6. A Handbook for Educators: Encouraging Parent Involvement in Low SES Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbee, Marlen Worsham

    2010-01-01

    Parent involvement has been the focus of many educational research studies since the release of "Equality of educational opportunity" (1966), which concluded that parents and home environment determine students' academic success. Since that time, educators have worked toward identifying effective strategies to increase home-school collaboration in…

  7. Your Hands Are (Not) Tied: School-Based Ethics When Parents Revoke Special Education Consent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Rachel; Sharkey, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Parents currently have the unilateral ability to reject special education services. Yet, it is unclear how schools should support students with special education needs in this situation as schools may not challenge a parent's choice to revoke special education assessment consent or the provision of services. Guidelines for school…

  8. The IEP Meeting: Perceptions of Parents of Students Who Receive Special Education Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Wade W.

    2008-01-01

    The author investigated parental perceptions of the individualized education program (IEP) meeting among 51 parents of students who were receiving special education services from 1 family support service agency. Survey questions pertained to the following areas: (a) IEP meeting experiences, (b) knowledge level of special education law, (c)…

  9. Parents as Partners in Reducing Sex-Role Stereotypes in Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Univ., Laramie. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This handbook is intended to assist vocational education teachers and guidance counselors in working with parents to reduce sex-role stereotyping in vocational education and employment. Discussed first are recent developments in the area of ensuring equity in vocational education and parent involvement in career decisions. A list of pertinent…

  10. Help With “Strings Attached”: Offspring Perceptions That Middle-Aged Parents Offer Conflicted Support

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Middle-aged adults often provide beneficial support to grown children. Yet, in some relationships, grown children may feel beholden or intruded upon when they receive parental help. The purpose of this study was to examine such conflicted support in relationships between middle-aged parents and young adults. Methods. Middle-aged parents (aged 40–60, n = 399) and their grown children (n = 592) participated. Parents rated perceptions of providing support and relationship quality with each child. Grown children indicated whether their mothers and fathers provided conflicted support and rated their perceptions of parental support, relationship quality, and other factors. Results. Multilevel models revealed that offspring’s perceptions of conflicted support were associated with (a) parents’ evaluations about providing support (e.g., greater stress and beliefs that grown children should be autonomous), (b) poorer quality relationships, and (c) offspring having more problems. Discussion. Findings suggest that perceptions of conflicted support are embedded in a larger constellation of relationship problems and underlying distress for parents and children. These patterns may reflect lifelong difficulties in the tie or that arise in adulthood. Researchers might seek to understand how dyads experiencing such conflicted support differ from more normative relationships characterized by warmth and well-received support. PMID:23707999

  11. Coping and Psychological Health of Aging Parents of Adult Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Vivian E.; Floyd, Frank J.; Mailick, Marsha R.; Greenberg, Jan S.

    2014-01-01

    Among aging parents (mean age = 65, "N" = 139) of adults with developmental disabilities, we examined the effectiveness of multiple forms of coping with caregiver burden. As expected, accommodative strategies of adapting to stress (secondary engagement), used frequently in later life, buffered the impact of caregiver burden, whereas…

  12. Parent-Child Interaction and Adolescents' Future Orientation: The Effects of Age and Sex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    A number of studies have shown that parent-child interaction influences the manner in which adolescents see their future. In an investigation designed to determine whether this influence varies according to the child's age and sex, 57 Finnish adolescents were interviewed at ages 11 and 15 about their hopes for the future. The internality,…

  13. An analysis of the parental age effect for inv dup (15).

    PubMed Central

    Connor, J M; Gilmore, D H

    1984-01-01

    Parental ages and birth order were analysed in 16 sporadic cases of inv dup (15) using the method of Smith. A significant maternal age effect was apparent (dm = 5.989, SE 1.86; df = 2.02, SE 2.496; db = 0.138, SE 0.46). PMID:6748017

  14. Universal Design in Housing "Comes of Age"...for Parents and Kids Alike

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    Parents of children with special needs are beginning to realize that a home designed for their child who might now use a wheelchair may benefit them as well in the future as they "Age in Place". As the boomers age and Medicare and Medicaid seem to possibly decline in the not so distant future as a source of funding for elderly and special needs…

  15. Support to Aging Parents and Grown Children in Black and White Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fingerman, Karen L.; VanderDrift, Laura E.; Dotterer, Aryn M.; Birditt, Kira S.; Zarit, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Black and White middle-aged adults typically are in a pivot position of providing support to generations above and below. Racial differences in support to each generation in the family remain unclear, however. Different factors may account for racial differences in support of grown children versus aging parents. Design and Methods:…

  16. R.E.A.D.Y.: Read, Educate and Develop Youth. Reading Plan for Michigan: Parent Information for Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers. Learning Begins at Birth. [Kit with Videotape and Audiotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Association for the Education of Young Children, East Lansing.

    Noting the important role that parents can play in preparing their child to learn to read, the Read, Educate and Develop Youth (READY) Reading Plan for Michigan provides kits to parents of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. The kits contain suggestions for age-appropriate activities parents can do with their children to help them learn. In…

  17. Impact of parent-directed education on parental use of pain treatments during routine infant vaccinations: a cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Anna; Parikh, Chaitya; Yoon, Eugene W; Sgro, Michael; Singh, Harvinder; Habtom, Erita; Ilersich, Andrew F; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca; Shah, Vibhuti

    2015-01-01

    Educating parents about ways to minimize pain during routine infant vaccine injections at the point of care may positively impact on pain management practices. The objective of this cluster randomized trial was to determine the impact of educating parents about pain in outpatient pediatric clinics on their use of pain treatments during routine infant vaccinations. Four hospital-based pediatric clinics were randomized to intervention or control groups. Parents of 2- to 4-month-old infants attending the intervention clinics reviewed a pamphlet and a video about vaccination pain management on the day of vaccination, whereas those in the control clinics did not. Parent use of specific pain treatments (breastfeeding, sugar water, topical anesthetics, and/or holding of infants) on the education day and at subsequent routine vaccinations 2 months later was the primary outcome. Altogether, 160 parent-infant dyads (80 per group) participated between November 2012 and February 2014; follow-up data were available for 126 (79%). Demographics did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). On the education day and at follow-up vaccinations, use of pain interventions during vaccinations was higher in the intervention group (80% vs 26% and 68% vs 32%, respectively; P < 0.001 for both analyses). Educating parents about pain management in a hospital outpatient setting leads to higher use of pain interventions during routine infant vaccinations.

  18. Disorganized attachment representation and atypical parenting in young school age children with externalizing disorder.

    PubMed

    Green, Jonathan; Stanley, Charlie; Peters, Sarah

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the relationship of child attachment representation, psychopathology, and maternal atypical parenting in a high risk sample. Sixty-one consecutive clinical referrals with externalizing disorder aged 4 - 9 years were assessed for attachment representations measured with Manchester Child Attachment Story Task (MCAST), atypical parental expressed emotion (EE), maternal mood, and parent and teacher ratings of child behaviour. Disorganized attachment representations were found in 58% of cases, independent of ADHD symptoms. Pervasive disorganization was associated with very high maternal EE. Attachment status, maternal depression, and ADHD diagnosis were independently associated with parent-rated child behaviour problems; teacher ratings were associated with child's age and ADHD status. Disorganized attachment shows a high prevalence and independent associations with attention deficit symptomatology and maternal EE.

  19. Parental perspectives regarding primary-care weight-management strategies for school-age children.

    PubMed

    Turer, Christy Boling; Mehta, Megha; Durante, Richard; Wazni, Fatima; Flores, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    To identify parental perspectives regarding weight-management strategies for school-age children, focus groups were conducted of parents of overweight and obese (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) 6-12-year-old children recruited from primary-care clinics. Questions focused on the role of the primary-care provider, effective components of weight-management strategies and feasibility of specific dietary strategies. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed and analysed using margin coding and grounded theory. Six focus groups were held. The mean age (in years) for parents was 32, and for children, eight; 44% of participants were Latino, 33%, African-American and 23%, white. Parents' recommendations on the primary-care provider's role in weight management included monitoring weight, providing guidance regarding health risks and lifestyle changes, consistent follow-up and using discretion during weight discussions. Weight-management components identified as key included emphasising healthy lifestyles and enjoyment, small changes to routines and parental role modelling. Parents prefer guidance regarding healthy dietary practices rather than specific weight-loss diets, but identified principles that could enhance the acceptability of these diets. For dietary guidance to be feasible, parents recommended easy-to-follow instructions and emphasising servings over counting calories. Effective weight-management strategies identified by parents include primary-care provider engagement in weight management, simple instructions regarding healthy lifestyle changes, parental involvement and deemphasising specific weight-loss diets. These findings may prove useful in developing primary-care weight-management strategies for children that maximise parental acceptance. PMID:24720565

  20. Parental perspectives regarding primary-care weight-management strategies for school-age children.

    PubMed

    Turer, Christy Boling; Mehta, Megha; Durante, Richard; Wazni, Fatima; Flores, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    To identify parental perspectives regarding weight-management strategies for school-age children, focus groups were conducted of parents of overweight and obese (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) 6-12-year-old children recruited from primary-care clinics. Questions focused on the role of the primary-care provider, effective components of weight-management strategies and feasibility of specific dietary strategies. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed and analysed using margin coding and grounded theory. Six focus groups were held. The mean age (in years) for parents was 32, and for children, eight; 44% of participants were Latino, 33%, African-American and 23%, white. Parents' recommendations on the primary-care provider's role in weight management included monitoring weight, providing guidance regarding health risks and lifestyle changes, consistent follow-up and using discretion during weight discussions. Weight-management components identified as key included emphasising healthy lifestyles and enjoyment, small changes to routines and parental role modelling. Parents prefer guidance regarding healthy dietary practices rather than specific weight-loss diets, but identified principles that could enhance the acceptability of these diets. For dietary guidance to be feasible, parents recommended easy-to-follow instructions and emphasising servings over counting calories. Effective weight-management strategies identified by parents include primary-care provider engagement in weight management, simple instructions regarding healthy lifestyle changes, parental involvement and deemphasising specific weight-loss diets. These findings may prove useful in developing primary-care weight-management strategies for children that maximise parental acceptance.

  1. The histories of ordinary chondrite parent bodies - U, Th-He age distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, J.T.; Wang, Sichao Purple Mountain Observatory, Nanjing )

    1991-06-01

    Age patterns observed in meteorite groups reflect the different thermal or impact histories experienced by their parent bodies. To assess the number of ordinary chondrite (OC) parent bodies, rare-gas data in the Schultz and Kruse (1989) data base were used to calculate U, Th-He gas-retention ages. Most H- and LL-chondrite ages are high; about 81 percent are greater than 2.2 Ga. In contrast, most L-chondrite ages are low; about 69 percent are not greater than 2.2 Ga, and about 35 percent are not greater than 0.9 Ga. The latter fraction is substantially lower than the value of 44 percent given by Heymann (1967). The difference is attributed to the preferential inclusion of shocked L chondrites in early studies. Broad age peaks in the H and LL groups near 3.4 Ga probably reflect thermal loss during metamorphism, but in the H distribution there is a hint of minor outgassing 'events' near 1 Ga. The L/LL chondrites have chemical properties intermediate between and unresolvable from L and LL chondrites. The high ages of most L/LL chondrites are evidence against these originating on the L parent body; the L/LL age distribution is consistent with an origin on the LL parent body or on an independent body. 22 refs.

  2. The histories of ordinary chondrite parent bodies - U, Th-He age distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.; Wang, Sichao

    1991-06-01

    Age patterns observed in meteorite groups reflect the different thermal or impact histories experienced by their parent bodies. To assess the number of ordinary chondrite (OC) parent bodies, rare-gas data in the Schultz and Kruse (1989) data base were used to calculate U, Th-He gas-retention ages. Most H- and LL-chondrite ages are high; about 81 percent are greater than 2.2 Ga. In contrast, most L-chondrite ages are low; about 69 percent are not greater than 2.2 Ga, and about 35 percent are not greater than 0.9 Ga. The latter fraction is substantially lower than the value of 44 percent given by Heymann (1967). The difference is attributed to the preferential inclusion of shocked L chondrites in early studies. Broad age peaks in the H and LL groups near 3.4 Ga probably reflect thermal loss during metamorphism, but in the H distribution there is a hint of minor outgassing "events" near 1 Ga. The L/LL chondrites have chemical properties intermediate between and unresolvable from L and LL chondrites. The high ages of most L/LL chondrites are evidence against these originating on the L parent body; the L/LL age distribution is consistent with an origin on the LL parent body or on an independent body.

  3. Parent Involvement in Compensatory Education through Title I ESEA Parent Advisory Committees in Selected School Districts in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallado, Andres Nicolas

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role, practices, and status of Parent Advisory Committees (PAC) as required by Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, and the extent of PAC involvement in the educational decision making process in selected school districts in Texas. The sample consisted of 637 Title I PAC…

  4. Parent Education Workbook for Mainstreamed Students. Teachers Guide. Contemporary Parenting Choices: Materials for Mainstreamed Classrooms. Module 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Home Economics Education.

    The fourth part of a parenthood education curriculum series, the Parent Education Workbook consists of a teachers guide (and 12 student lesson units not replicated in the guide) divided into two parts, the first part focusing on relationships and the second on child care. The units are intended for use by mainstreamed mentally disabled (MD) and…

  5. Promoting Educational Resiliency in Youth with Incarcerated Parents: The Impact of Parental Incarceration, School Characteristics, and Connectedness on School Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Emily B; Loper, Ann B; Meyer, J Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world, and as a result, one of the largest populations of incarcerated parents. Growing evidence suggests that the incarceration of a parent may be associated with a number of risk factors in adolescence, including school drop out. Taking a developmental ecological approach, this study used multilevel modeling to examine the association of parental incarceration on truancy, academic achievement, and lifetime educational attainment using the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health (48.3 % female; 46 % minority status). Individual characteristics, such as school and family connectedness, and school characteristics, such as school size and mental health services, were examined to determine whether they significantly reduced the risk associated with parental incarceration. Our results revealed small but significant risks associated with parental incarceration for all outcomes, above and beyond individual and school level characteristics. Family and school connectedness were identified as potential compensatory factors, regardless of parental incarceration history, for academic achievement and truancy. School connectedness did not reduce the risk associated with parental incarceration when examining highest level of education. This study describes the school related risks associated with parental incarceration, while revealing potential areas for school-based prevention and intervention for adolescents. PMID:26259843

  6. The Relationship between Parental Opinion of School-Based Sex Education, Parent-Child Communication about Sexuality, and Parenting Styles in a Diverse Urban Community College Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Janet

    2009-01-01

    One hundred and ninety-one parents attending an urban, community college were surveyed about what topics schools should teach their children about sexuality education, and how they communicate with their child about sexuality topics. The quantitative data was collected using a "School Sexuality Education Questionnaire" (SSEQ), and the "Parenting…

  7. Family and College Environmental Exposures Mediate the Relationship between Parental Education and Depression among College Students

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanjie; Sun, Hailian; Pan, Hui; He, Jincai; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Sui, Hong; Wang, Wenbo; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Yang, Xiuxian; Yang, Jiarun; Yu, Yunmiao; Ban, Bo; He, Changzhi

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is a major health concern for college students due to its substantial morbidity and mortality. Although low parental education has been identified as a factor in depression in college students, the mechanisms through which parental educational achievement affects students’ depression are not well understood. We tested whether adverse family and college environments mediate the relationship between parental educational level and depression among Chinese college students. Methods A total of 5180 respondents were selected using a cross-sectional survey. We examined the association of parental education, adverse family and college environments with depression in college students using the Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Checklist, Beck Depression Inventory and socio-demographic questionnaires. Results Lower parental educational level is significantly correlated with depression in college students in our sample. Additionally, low family economic status, paternal or maternal unemployment, long periods spent apart from family, family conflicts, having been scolded and beaten by parents, poor or dissatisfying test performance, conflict with friends, heavy course load and failure in selection processes are also associated with parental education. Low family economic status, paternal or maternal unemployment, long periods spent apart from family, family conflicts, poor or dissatisfying test performance, conflict with friends and heavy course load mediated the relationship between parental education and depression in college students. Conclusions Adverse family and college environments could explain the influence of parental educational level on depression in college students. PMID:26991783

  8. Coping and Psychological Health of Aging Parents of Adult Children With Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Vivian E.; Floyd, Frank J.; Mailick, Marsha R.; Greenberg, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    Among aging parents (mean age = 65, N = 139) of adults with developmental disabilities, we examined the effectiveness of multiple forms of coping with caregiver burden. As expected, accommodative strategies of adapting to stress (secondary engagement), used frequently in later life, buffered the impact of caregiver burden, whereas disengagement and distraction strategies exacerbated the effects of burden on depression symptoms. Most effects were similar for mothers and fathers, and all coping strategies, including active strategies to reduce stress (primary engagement), had greater effects for the parents with co-resident children. Vulnerability to caregiver burden was greatest when the aging parents with co-resident children used disengagement and distraction coping, but those who used engagement coping were resilient. PMID:24679353

  9. Inspiring the Next Generation of Innovators: Students, Parents and Educators Speak up about Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris-Berg, Kim

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the findings from Project Tomorrow's 2007 Speak Up Survey, informing international discussions about how to improve science learning in the 21st century through an exploration of student, teacher, parent, and school leader attitudes about science education. Project Tomorrow administered its survey in all 50 United States, the…

  10. Charlotte Mason, Home Education and the Parents' National Educational Union in the Late Nineteenth Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bellaigue, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the work of educationist Charlotte Mason (1842-1923) to explore the practice of home education in the late nineteenth century. Mason's work reflected and responded to the particular circumstances and concerns of her clientele. She provided a way for parents to compensate for the practical deficiencies of contemporary…

  11. The impact of parental educational trajectories on their adult offspring's overweight/obesity status: a study of three generations of Swedish men and women.

    PubMed

    Chaparro, M P; Koupil, Ilona

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of grandparental and parental education and parental educational trajectory on their adult offspring's overweight/obesity. We used register data from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study, based on a representative cohort born in Sweden 1915-1929 (G1). Our sample included 5122 women and 11,204 men who were grandchildren of G1 (G3), their parents (G2), and grandparents. G3's overweight/obesity (BMI≥25 kg/m2) was based on pre-pregnancy weight/height for women before their first birth (average age=26 years), and measured weight/height at conscription for men (average age=18 years). G1's, G2's, and G3's highest educational attainment was obtained from routine registers and classified as low, intermediate, or high based on respective sample distributions. Parental (G2) educational trajectory was defined as change in education between their own and their highest educated parent (G1), classified into 5 categories: always advantaged (AA), upward trajectory (UT), stable-intermediate (SI), downward trajectory (DT), and always disadvantaged (AD). We used hierarchical gender-stratified logistic regression models adjusted for G3's age, education, year of BMI collection, lineage and G2's year of birth and income. Grandparental and parental education were negatively associated with men's odds of overweight/obesity and parental education affected women's overweight/obesity risk. Furthermore, men and women whose parents belonged to the UT, SI, DT, and AD groups had greater odds of overweight/obesity compared to men and women whose parents belonged to the AA group (adjusted for G3's age, year of BMI collection, lineage, and G2's year of birth). These associations were attenuated when further adjusting for parental income and G3's own education. Socioeconomic inequalities can have long-term consequences and impact the health of future generations. For overweight/obesity in concurrent young cohorts, this inequality

  12. The impact of parental educational trajectories on their adult offspring's overweight/obesity status: a study of three generations of Swedish men and women.

    PubMed

    Chaparro, M P; Koupil, Ilona

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of grandparental and parental education and parental educational trajectory on their adult offspring's overweight/obesity. We used register data from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study, based on a representative cohort born in Sweden 1915-1929 (G1). Our sample included 5122 women and 11,204 men who were grandchildren of G1 (G3), their parents (G2), and grandparents. G3's overweight/obesity (BMI≥25 kg/m2) was based on pre-pregnancy weight/height for women before their first birth (average age=26 years), and measured weight/height at conscription for men (average age=18 years). G1's, G2's, and G3's highest educational attainment was obtained from routine registers and classified as low, intermediate, or high based on respective sample distributions. Parental (G2) educational trajectory was defined as change in education between their own and their highest educated parent (G1), classified into 5 categories: always advantaged (AA), upward trajectory (UT), stable-intermediate (SI), downward trajectory (DT), and always disadvantaged (AD). We used hierarchical gender-stratified logistic regression models adjusted for G3's age, education, year of BMI collection, lineage and G2's year of birth and income. Grandparental and parental education were negatively associated with men's odds of overweight/obesity and parental education affected women's overweight/obesity risk. Furthermore, men and women whose parents belonged to the UT, SI, DT, and AD groups had greater odds of overweight/obesity compared to men and women whose parents belonged to the AA group (adjusted for G3's age, year of BMI collection, lineage, and G2's year of birth). These associations were attenuated when further adjusting for parental income and G3's own education. Socioeconomic inequalities can have long-term consequences and impact the health of future generations. For overweight/obesity in concurrent young cohorts, this inequality

  13. Puberty/Adolescence. Growing Pains: Sex Education for Parents. A Newsletter Series. Letter III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polulech, Joan Burgess; Nuttall, Paul

    This document presents the third of five newsletters on sex education for parents. The newsletters were designed to help parents increase their ability to communicate with their adolescents about sexual issues. They explore the origins of the parents' feelings about sex; teach the importance of a healthy self-concept and how to build it in the…

  14. Handbook for Transitional Bilingual Education Parent Advisory Councils. Revised Edition. Part C Research Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dannenberg, Arlene C.

    This handbook on the advisory and decision-making aspects of parent involvement provides information and skill-building activities to help parents establish, maintain, and increase the effectiveness of parent advisory councils (PAC) for bilingual education programs in Massachusetts. Chapter 1 describes the legal background and the basic structures…

  15. Building Evidence for a Prevention-Focused Education Program Targeting Parents of Infants and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Whitney E.; Tomasello, Nicole M.; Nochajski, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    A lack of parenting skills puts young children at greater risk of maltreatment, and impedes healthy child development. Using a combination of a pre-post and post-only design, a prevention-focused parenting education workshop series was assessed to determine its influence on parenting knowledge and self-efficacy. Outcome measures indicated that…

  16. Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning): Volunteer Sponsor's Leader's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard Community Coll., Cocoa, FL.

    This handbook was developed for volunteer group leaders participating in Brevard Community College's Project BEST-PAL (Basic Education Skills Through-Parenting Affective Learning). Project BEST-PAL was developed especially for low socioeconomic parents who are in need of an opportunity to explore effective parenting, with a primary objective being…

  17. Parents' Aspirations for Their Children's Educational and Occupational Prospects in Greece: The Role of Social Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vryonides, Marios; Gouvias, Dionysios

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on parents and the way they perceive and formulate expectations and aspirations about their children's educational and occupational outcomes. Drawing on evidence from a survey among more than 700 parents of primary school pupils this paper demonstrates that interesting patterns in parental aspirations can be observed. These…

  18. Parental Involvement in Selected PISA Countries and Economies. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 73

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgonovi, Francesca; Montt, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Studies have highlighted the beneficial effects of parental involvement in children's educational lives. Few studies, however, analyse parental involvement in a cross-national perspective and few evaluate a wide array of forms of involvement. In 2009, 14 countries and economies implemented the parental questionnaire option in the PISA 2009 cycle.…

  19. A Cost-Savings Analysis of a Statewide Parenting Education Program in Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Erin J.; Corwin, Tyler W.; Hodnett, Rhenda; Faulk, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a cost-savings analysis of the statewide implementation of an evidence-informed parenting education program. Methods: Between the years 2005 and 2008, the state of Louisiana used the Nurturing Parenting Program (NPP) to impart parenting skills to child welfare-involved families. Following these families' outcomes…

  20. Scrutinizing the Balance: Parental Care Versus Educational Responsibilities in a Changing Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Frederik; Driessen, Geert; Sleegers, Peter; Teelken, Christine

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the pedagogical responsibilities of parents and schools, as well as the care provided by socializing agencies and local communities. A review of the literature has been carried out on the tasks of schools and parents and the relations between education, parenting and care in a changing society in eight countries: the…

  1. Parental Perceptions of Life Context Variables for Involvement in Their Young Children's Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekin, Ali Kemal

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover Turkish parents' perceptions of life context variables, including personal knowledge and skills and personal time and energy for involvement activities in their young children's education. The scales used in this study were based on parents' self-report, and included: (1) Parental Perceptions of Personal…

  2. WORKING WITH PARENTS, A GUIDE FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS AND OTHER EDUCATORS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Association of Classroom Teachers.

    THIS GUIDE FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS IS BASED ON THE IDEA THAT EDUCATION IS A RESPONSIBILITY SHARED AMONG SCHOOL, TEACHERS, AND PARENTS. SUGGESTIONS ARE MADE FOR TEACHER FACILITATION OF GOOD STUDENT-PARENT-SCHOOL RELATIONS. AMONG THE PUBLIC RELATIONS PROBLEMS DISCUSSED ARE TEACHER INTRODUCTIONS TO STUDENT AND FAMILY, NOTES TO PARENTS, HOMEWORK,…

  3. Attitudes of Parents towards Inclusive Education: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Boer, Anke; Pijl, Sip Jan; Minnaert, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review literature about parents' attitudes towards inclusive education. Special attention is paid to parents' attitudes and to the effect of these on the social participation of children with special needs in regular schools. A review of the literature resulted in 10 studies showing that the majority of parents hold…

  4. The Most-Asked Questions about Gifted Children: Answers for Parents and Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehrle, Carl C.; And Others

    Intended for both parents and educators, the booklet offers answers to the questions parents ask about their gifted children. The 64 questions are divided into 6 major categories--definitions of giftedness, ways to help parents identify gifted children, schooling for the gifted child, understanding gifted children, help for the gifted child, and…

  5. Parent Education for Dialogic Reading: Online and Face-to-Face Delivery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beschorner, Beth; Hutchison, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the impact of a parent education program and the contextual factors that influenced the experiences of families in the program. Seventeen parents completed a 9-week, face-to-face program and 15 parents completed a similar online program. This study was designed as a multiple case study and utilized multimethods for data…

  6. How To Teach Nutrition to Kids: An Integrated, Creative Approach to Nutrition Education for Children Ages 6-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Connie Liakos

    This book presents nutrition education activities and strategies that are child-tested and teacher-endorsed. It targets educators, nutrition professionals, parents, and other caregivers, offering the tools to teach children ages 6-10 years about nutrition in a meaningful, integrated way. Divided by subject, this resource integrates nutrition into…

  7. I Blame the Mother: Educating Parents and the Gendered Nature of Parenting Orders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    There has been an increasing focus from policymakers, academics and journalists on parents as the source of their child's anti-social behaviour both in and outside of the formal school setting. One intervention proffered is the parenting order. The language of parenting orders and parenting interventions obscures a distinct truth, that parenting…

  8. Effects on Parental Mental Health of an Education and Skills Training Program for Parents of Young Children with Autism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonge, Bruce; Brereton, Avril; Kiomall, Melissa; MacKinnon, Andrew; King, Neville; Rinehart, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of a parent education and behavior management intervention (PEBM) on the mental health and adjustment of parents with preschool children with autism. Method: A randomized, group-comparison design involving a parent education and counseling intervention to control for nonspecific therapist effects and a control…

  9. Parental Involvement in Higher Education: Understanding the Relationship among Students, Parents, and the Institution. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 33, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartman, Katherine Lynk, Ed.; Savage, Marjorie, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This monograph is divided into three main sections: theoretical grounding, student identity, and implications. The first section, theoretical grounding of parental involvement, looks at the reasons parents today are more likely to be involved in their students' lives and then reviews the literature of K-12 education and compares that information…

  10. Informing and educating parents about the risks and outcomes of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Kim, U Olivia; Basir, Mir A

    2014-12-01

    The current process of educating and informing parents of the concerns and outcomes of premature infants is suboptimal, mostly because of modifiable factors. Proven methods to improve the transference of information are underused. In most institutions, the task to inform and educate parents is left to individual providers. Effective parent-clinician communication depends collectively on parents, clinicians, and the health care systems. Efforts must focus on improving communication and not on decreasing information provided to parents. If done successfully, we might find new and worthy allies in the trenches of the NICU.

  11. The needs of aging parents caring for an adult with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Minnes, Patricia; Woodford, Lynn; Carlson, Peter; Johnston, Jane; McColl, Mary Ann

    2010-06-01

    This study focused on issues of concern to and service needs of older parents caring for an adult son or daughter with an acquired brain injury (ABI) in Ontario. Three issues were identified as particularly challenging: diagnosis of the brain injury, parents' feelings about the cause of the brain injury, and planning for long-term accommodation for their family member with a brain injury. The most frequently cited services needed for the person with ABI were social and/or recreational activities, day programs, and residential placement. The most frequently cited services needed by parents were parent education and support groups. The information gathered provides a base for further research in other sectors. Implications of these initial findings for clinical practice and policy and program development are discussed.

  12. A Parent's Guide to Services for Children, from Birth to Three Years of Age, with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This booklet introduces parents to "Tennessee's Early Intervention System" (TEIS). This system is funded through the Tennessee Department of Education. Through TEIS parents can get answers about their baby's growth and development and find the special services their child may need. Parents can also use this system to determine which other services…

  13. Content and Presentation of Content in Parental Education Groups in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Anita; Törnkvist, Lena; Barimani, Mia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated parents' experiences of parental education groups at antenatal and child health care centers, including content, presentation of content, the leader's role, and the importance of other participating parents. Twenty-one interviews with 26 parents from 6 cities across Sweden were analyzed with 3 content analysis approaches. Parents expressed both satisfaction and dissatisfaction with the content, presentation of content, and the leader's role. They reported that social contact with other parents was important, that parenthood topics were covered less frequently than child and childbirth-related topics, and that group activities were less frequent than lectures. When designing future parental education groups, it is important to consider expanding parenthood topics and group activities because this structure is considered to provide support to parents.

  14. Comparison of Parent Education and Functional Assessment-Based Intervention across 24 Months for Young Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPaul, George J.; Kern, Lee; Volpe, Robert; Caskie, Grace I. L.; Sokol, Natalie; Arbolino, Lauren; Van Brakle, John; Pipan, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Preschool-aged children with or at risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) experience significant challenges with behavioral, social, and preacademic skills. Kern et al. (2007) examined 12-month intervention outcomes for 135 children, aged 3-5, with or at risk for ADHD. Two interventions, parent education alone and parent…

  15. Blame, Guilt and the Need for "Labels"; Insights from Parents of Children with Special Educational Needs and Educational Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broomhead, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on home-school relationships and blame has concentrated on the experiences of parents with children with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties (BESD). This has led to the voices of educational practitioners, as well as parents of children with other special educational needs, being neglected. This article, by Karen…

  16. Filicide-suicide ideation among Taiwanese parents with school-aged children: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hsi-Sheng; Chen, Ji-Kang

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the prevalence of filicide-suicide ideation among Taiwanese parents with school-aged children. Multiple risk factors associated with filicide-suicide ideation were assessed, and the potential effect of traditional family values was evaluated. A random sample of 1,564 parents was recruited from 21 elementary schools in a rural area of Taiwan. Potential risk factors, including demographics, family finance, psychological maladjustment, family interaction, and cultural beliefs, were further examined using a hierarchical logistic regression. Overall, 14.6% of the respondents reported having filicide-suicide ideation during the past year. The hierarchical logistic regression analysis showed that demographic factors including age, gender, and ethnicity had no significant effect. Family finances, depression, and conflict with the respondent's spouse were positively associated with filicide-suicide ideation. Finally, the parents' beliefs in traditional family values had a positive effect on filicide-suicide ideation. In other words, filicide-suicide thoughts were more common among those who upheld a strong parental responsibility for care giving and family solidarity. This study revealed a substantial prevalence of filicide-suicide ideation among local parents and identified a number of risk factors associated with those thoughts, namely family financial status, parental depression, and conflict with one's spouse. More importantly, the results highlighted the effect of traditional family values in the process. The potential intention of filicide-suicide as mercy killing and its cultural relevance were discussed. PMID:24439665

  17. Parents and Politics: How Parenthood and Education Policy Shape Civic and Political Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, David John

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between parents and politics. In part one, the effect of having school-aged children on parents' political outcomes is examined. Do the resource constraints associated with child-rearing depress participation, or does the presence of children increase activity? One finds that parents are more active in…

  18. Strengthening Parenting Skills: School Age. Secondary Learning Guide 2. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This competency-based secondary learning guide on strengthening parenting skills is part of a series that are adaptations of guides developed for adult consumer and homemaking education programs. The guides provide students with experiences that help them learn to do the following: make decisions; use creative approaches to solve problems;…

  19. Training maltreating parents in elaborative and emotion-rich reminiscing with their preschool-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Kristin; Comas, Michelle; Nuttall, Amy K.; Thomas, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Objective In the current study, the effects of training maltreating parents and their preschool-aged children in elaborative and emotion-rich reminiscing were examined. Method 44 parent-child dyads were randomly assigned to a training (reminiscing) or wait-list (control) condition. All participating parents had substantiated maltreatment and were involved with the Department of Child Services at the time of enrollment. Children were 3–6 years old (M = 4.88, SD = .99) and living in the custody of the participating parent. Dyads in the reminiscing condition received four, weekly, in-home sessions in elaborative and emotion rich reminiscing. Results At a follow-up assessment, maltreating parents in the reminiscing condition provided more high-elaborative utterances, references to children’s negative emotions, and explanations of children’s emotion during reminiscing than did parents in the control condition. Children in the reminiscing condition had richer memory recall and made more emotion references than did children in the control condition during reminiscing with their mothers, but not with an experimenter. Conclusion The findings suggest that maltreating parents can be taught elaborative and emotion-rich reminiscing skills, with benefits for child cognitive and emotional development. The potential clinical utility of a reminiscing-based training for maltreating families with young children is discussed. PMID:23548682

  20. Psychological and behavioral disease during developmental age: the importance of the alliance with parents

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, Michela; Ramaglioni, Elisabetta; Lai, Jessica; Svanellini, Lorenza; Toldo, Irene; Del Col, Lara; Salviato, Cinzia; Spoto, Andrea; Antonio, Battistella Pier

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study is to analyze the clinician’s alliance with parents during the diagnostic process in relation to therapeutic compliance and clinical evolution of individuals aged 0–11 years. The sample was formed by 84 individuals aged 0 to 11 years (18 < 6 years, 66 aged 6 to 11 years; 62 males and 22 females) who came to the Neuropsychiatric Unit for Children and Adolescents for a consultation regarding psychorelational and behavioral problems. Neuropsychiatric consultation took place in five diagnostic interviews with child and parents, separately. The last session was devoted to communication of psychiatric diagnosis (according to ICD 10) and therapeutic suggestions, if any. The clinician’s relationship with parents and patients’ participation were evaluated in terms of collaboration and quality of interaction, on the basis of pre-established criteria. Data about patients’ therapeutic compliance and clinical outcome were collected during a follow-up visit eight months after the last session. Results suggest that the better the alliance between parents and clinician, the higher the therapeutic compliance and the likelihood of a positive outcome for patients. Our data suggest that good communication with parents benefits child patients, both in terms of response to the parents’ need to report their children’s worrying behavior and as a response to the discomfort expressed by children when they come in for consultation. PMID:19898668