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Sample records for age possibly reflecting

  1. Photoplethysmogram reflection index and aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qawqzeh, Yousef K.; Reaz, M. B. I.; Maskon, O.; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Ali, M. A. M.

    2011-10-01

    This study conducted to investigate and study the effect of aging on Photoplethysmogram (PPG) signal and the effects of aging on the calculations of reflection index (RI). The results showed that PPG is highly affected by aging which noteworthy to be observed by the variations of PPG contour. Since we advance in age, PPG becomes more rounded which in turn make PPG inflection point and dicrotic notch less pronounced. As a conclusion, RI may provide a window to small and medium arteries compliance and it can be a measure of small and medium arteries stiffness. When small and medium arteries start stiffening, early detection of atherosclerosis in sub-clinical settings can be investigated and detected.

  2. Reflection, dialogue, and the possibilities of space.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Arno K; Naidu, Thirusha

    2015-03-01

    To educate physicians who are capable of delivering ethical, socially responsible, patient-centered care, there have been calls for identifying curricular space for reflection on the human and societal dimensions of medicine. These appeals, however, beg the question: What does it mean to devote space in an otherwise busy curriculum for these types of reflection? This Perspective is an attempt to understand the nature of this educational space in terms of its purpose, uses, dynamics, and limitations, and the underlying components that allow reflection and transformation to occur. Reflections on psychosocial themes often take the form of dialogues, which differ from the discussions commonly encountered in clinical settings because they require the engagement of the participants' whole selves--life experiences, backgrounds, personal values, beliefs, and perspectives--in the exchanges. Dialogues allow for the inclusion of affective and experiential dimensions in addition to intellectual/cognitive domains in learning, and for an emphasis on discovering new perspectives, insights, and questions instead of limiting participants solely to an instrumental search for solutions. Although these reflections may vary greatly in their form and settings, the reflective space requires three qualities: safety and confidentiality, an intentional designation of a time apart from the distractions of daily life for reflection and dialogue, and an awareness of the transitional nature--the liminality--of a critically important period of professional identity development. In this open space of reflection and dialogue, one's identity as a humanistic physician takes form. PMID:25426737

  3. The Malleability of Possible Selves and Expectations regarding Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardach, Shoshana H.; Gayer, Christopher C.; Clinkinbeard, Tiffanie; Zanjani, Faika; Watkins, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Many people are apprehensive about old age and their future years. This pilot study sought to improve participants' sense of possibility in, and expectations for, old age. Students and middle-aged volunteers completed a survey including the Expectations Regarding Aging 38-item questionnaire (ERA-38) and a possible-selves questionnaire before and…

  4. Near-earth asteroids - Possible sources from reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, L. A.; Gaffey, M. J.; Mccord, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    The diversity of reflectance spectra noted among near-earth asteroids that were compared with selected asteroids, planets and satellites to determine possible source regions is indicative of different mineralogical composition and, accordingly, of more than one source region. Spectral signatures that are similar to those of main belt asteroids support models deriving some of these asteroids from the 5:2 Kirkwood gap and the Flora family, by way of gravitational perturbations. The differences in composition found between near-earth asteroids and planetary and satellite surfaces are in keeping with theoretical arguments that such bodies should not be sources. While some near-earth asteroids furnish portions of the earth's meteorite flux, other sources must also contribute.

  5. Opening to Possibility: Reflectivity and Reflexivity in Our Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeff, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary explores how teachers can create a culture of tolerance by promoting reflectivity and reflexivity, and considers classroom processes and activities for doing so. "Reflectivity" is considered to be the use of personal values, experiences, and habits to make meaning and is a central tenet of inquiry approaches: to build…

  6. Reflection and Phenomenography: Towards Theoretical and Educational Development Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, C.; Marshall, D.

    2003-01-01

    Explores links between the characterization of learning stemming from the phenomenographic research orientation and D. Schon's reflection-in-action. Makes the case that parallels between these points of view open up new ways of viewing Shon's work that facilitate theoretical development for the phenomenographic view of learning. (SLD)

  7. Monitoring bruise age using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurdy, John W.; Duffy, Susan; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    The ability to determine the age of a bruise of unknown age mechanism is important in matters of domestic and child abuse and forensics. While physicians are asked to make clinical judgment on the age of a bruise using color and tenderness, studies have shown that a physicians estimate is highly inaccurate and in cases no better than chance alone. We present here the temporal progression of reflection spectrum collected from accidentally inflicted contusions in adult and child study participants with a synopsis of the observed phenomena. Reflection spectra collected using a portable fiber optic reflection spectrometer can track the increase in extravasated hemoglobin from trauma caused blood vessel rupture and subsequent removal of this hemoglobin occurring concurrent with an increase in the absorption attributed to the breakdown product bilirubin. We hypothesize that this time dependent pattern can be used to determine the age of an unknown bruise in an individual provided rate constant information for the patient can be determined in a controlled calibration bruise. Using reflection spectra to estimate bruise age can provide a rapid and noninvasive method to improve the ability of physicians in dating the age of a contusion.

  8. Reflections about possible nutritional supplements in infant milk formula.

    PubMed

    Böhles, H; Gebhardt, B; Beeg, T

    1998-06-01

    The composition of infant milk formula intends to mirror breast milk as close as possible. However, there are a variety of substances, like amino acids, fatty acids, polyamines, nucleotides, oligosaccharides, functional proteins, hormones, vitamins, and minerals, which are attributed effects in special situations. A concept is proposed to develop problem oriented "supplementation packages" for infant milk formula. PMID:9698641

  9. Teachers' Reflections on Education in a Global Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callis, Laura Kyser; Osborn, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This article presents profiles of and reflections by teachers with international experience, including the authors, who offer insights on education in a global age. The respondents who were colleagues of the authors were interviewed to learn about their K-12 education, insights into and analysis of their experiences teaching abroad, and thoughts…

  10. Present and Possible Therapies for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in the elderly population worldwide and is defined as a chronic, progressive disorder characterized by changes occurring within the macula reflective of the ageing process. At present, the prevalence of AMD is currently rising and is estimated to increase by a third by 2020. Although our understanding of the several components underpinning the pathogenesis of this condition has increased significantly, the treatment options for this condition remain substantially limited. In this review, we outline the existing arsenal of therapies available for AMD and discuss the additional role of further novel therapies currently under investigation for this debilitating disease. PMID:25097787

  11. Possibilities and Limits of Self-Reflection in the Teaching Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengtsson, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the possibilities of self-reflection for the teaching profession by relating the problem the philosophy of Rene Descartes, Immanuel Kant, and Edmund Husserl. Explains that in philosophy reflection has always played a major role, while it has not always had a major role in education. Concludes that it is possible to learn from mistakes…

  12. Defining the Flora Family: Reflectance Properties and Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykhuis, Melissa J.; Molnar, Lawrence A.; Van Kooten, Samuel J; Greenberg, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The Flora family resides in the densely populated inner main belt, bounded in semimajor axis by the ν6 secular resonance and the Jupiter 3:1 mean motion resonance. The presence of several large families that overlap dynamically with the Floras (e.g. the Vesta, Baptistina, and Nysa-Polana families), and the removal of a significant fraction of Floras via the nearby ν6 resonance have historically complicated the Flora family's distinction in both proper orbital elements and reflectance properties. Here we use orbital information from AstDyS, color information from SDSS, and albedo information from WISE, to obtain the characteristic orbital and reflectance properties of the Floras, by sampling the core of the family in multidimensional phase space. We find the characteristic Flora SDSS colors to be a* = 0.127 ± 0.012 and i-z = -0.038 ± 0.008; the characteristic Flora albedo is pV = 0.295 ± 0.006. These properties allow us to select a high-purity sample of Floras with similar orbital and reflectance properties as required for a detailed dynamical study. We then use the young Karin family, for which we have an age determined via direct backward integration of members' orbits, to calibrate the Yarkovsky drift rates for the Flora family without having to estimate the Floras' material properties. The size-dependent dispersion of the Flora members in semimajor axis (the "V" plot) then yields an age for the family of 940+160-120 My. We discuss the effects on our age estimate of two independent processes that both introduce obliquity variations among the family members on short (My) timescales: 1) the capture of Flora members in spin-orbit resonance, and 2) YORP-driven obliquity variation through YORP cycles. Accounting for these effects does not significantly change the age determination.

  13. Possible systematic decreases in the age of globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X.; Schramm, D. N.; Dearborn, D. S.P.; Truran, J. W.

    1994-03-01

    The ages of globular clusters inferred from observations depends sensitively on assumptions like the initial helium abundance and the mass loss rate. A high helium abundance (e.g., Y\\approx0.28) or a mass loss rate of \\sim10^{-11}M_\\odot yr^{-1} near the main sequence turn-off region lowers the current age estimate from 14 Gyr to about 10--12 Gyr, significantly relaxing the constraints on the Hubble constant, allowing values as high as 60km/sec/Mpc for a universe with the critical density and 90km/sec/Mpc for a baryon-only universe. Possible mechanisms for the helium enhancement in globular clusters are discussed, as are arguments for an instability strip induced mass loss near the turn-off. Ages lower than 10 Gyr are not possible even with the operation of both of these mechanisms unless the initial helium abundance in globular clusters is >0.30, which would conflict with indirect measurements of helium abundances in globular clusters.

  14. Defining the Flora Family: Orbital properties, reflectance properties and age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykhuis, Melissa J.; Molnar, Lawrence; Van Kooten, Samuel J.; Greenberg, Richard

    2014-11-01

    The Flora family resides in the densely populated inner main belt, bounded in semimajor axis by the ν6 secular resonance and the Jupiter 3:1 mean motion resonance. The presence of several large families that overlap dynamically with the Floras (e.g., the Vesta, Baptistina, and Nysa-Polana families), and the removal of a significant fraction of Floras via the nearby ν6 resonance complicates the Flora family's distinction in both proper orbital elements and reflectance properties. Here we use orbital information from the Asteroids Dynamic Site (AstDyS), color information from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and albedo information from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to obtain the median orbital and reflectance properties of the Floras by sampling the core of the family in multidimensional phase space. We find the median Flora SDSS colors to be a∗ = 0.126 ± 0.007 and i -z =-0.037±0.007 ; the median Flora albedo is pV = 0.291 ± 0.012. These properties allow us to define ranges for the Flora family in orbital and reflectance properties, as required for a detailed dynamical study. We use the young Karin family, for which we have an age determined via direct backward integration of members' orbits, to calibrate the Yarkovsky drift rates for the Flora family without having to estimate the Floras' material properties. The size-dependent dispersion of the Flora members in semimajor axis (the "V" plot) then yields an age for the family of 950-170+200 My, with the uncertainty dominated by the uncertainty in the material properties of the family members (e.g., density and surface thermal properties). We discuss the effects on our age estimate of two independent processes that both introduce obliquity variations among the family members on short (My) timescales: (1) the capture of Flora members in spin-orbit resonance, and (2) YORP-driven obliquity variation through YORP cycles. Accounting for these effects does not significantly change this age

  15. Reflections in computer modeling of rooms: Current approaches and possible extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, U. Peter

    2005-09-01

    Computer modeling of rooms is most commonly done by some calculation technique that is based on decomposing the sound field into separate reflection components. In a first step, a list of possible reflection paths is found and in a second step, an impulse response is constructed from the list of reflections. Alternatively, the list of reflections is used for generating a simpler echogram, the energy decay as function of time. A number of geometrical acoustics-based methods can handle specular reflections, diffuse reflections, edge diffraction, curved surfaces, and locally/non-locally reacting surfaces to various degrees. This presentation gives an overview of how reflections are handled in the image source method and variants of the ray-tracing methods, which are dominating today in commercial software, as well as in the radiosity method and edge diffraction methods. The use of the recently standardized scattering and diffusion coefficients of surfaces is discussed. Possibilities for combining edge diffraction, surface scattering, and impedance boundaries are demonstrated for an example surface. Finally, the number of reflection paths becomes prohibitively high when all such combinations are included as demonstrated for a simple concert hall model. [Work supported by the Acoustic Research Centre through NFR, Norway.

  16. The accumulation of deficits with age and possible invariants of aging.

    PubMed

    Mitnitski, Arnold B; Mogilner, Alexander J; MacKnight, Chris; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2002-06-28

    This paper extends a method of apprising health status to a broad range of ages from adolescence to old age. The "frailty index" is based on the accumulation of deficits (symptoms, signs, disease classifications) as analyzed in the National Population Health Survey, a representative Canadian population sample (n = 81,859). The accumulation of deficits has both an age-independent (background) component and an age-dependent (exponential) component, akin to the well-known Gompertz-Makeham model for the risk of mortality. While women accumulate more deficits than men of the same age, on average, their rate of accumulation is lower, so the difference in the level of deficits between men and women decreases with age. Two possible invariants of the process of accumulation of deficits were found: (1) the age at which the average proportion of deficits coincides for men and women is 94 years, which closely matches the species-specific lifespan in humans (95 +/- 2); (2) the value of the frailty index (proportion of deficits), which corresponds to that age (0.18). The similarity between mortality kinetics and the accumulation of deficits (frailty kinetics), and the coincidence of the time parameters in the frailty and mortality models make it possible to express mortality risk in terms of accumulated deficits. This provides a simple and accessible tool that might have potential in a number of biomedical applications. PMID:12806172

  17. Possible Origin of High-Amplitude Reflection Packages (HARPs) in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Hutchinson, Deborah; Shimeld, John; Chian, Deping; Hart, Patrick; Jackson, Ruth; Saltus, Richard; Mosher, David

    2013-04-01

    The Canada Basin (CB) of the Arctic Ocean is a semi-enclosed ocean basin surrounded by the Alaskan and Canadian margins to the south and east, the Alpha-Mendeleev Large Igneous Province (AMLIP) to the north and the subsided continental Chukchi Borderland (ChB) to the west. During 2007-2011, US-Canada expeditions collected ~15,000 km multichannel seismic data and sonobuoy reflection and refraction seismic data with average spacing of ~80 km mostly over the CB and AMLIP. High-amplitude reflective packages (HARPs) underlie the mostly flat-lying sediments of CB. Although HARPs are discontinuous in the central CB, they become more continuous toward ChB and AMLIP. HARPs are often the most reflective events in the seismic section, exceeding even the seafloor reflection. Only rarely are reflections seen beneath HARPs. Where best developed, HARPs are ~100-300 ms TWTT, consisting of several high-amplitude wavelets with a pronounced narrow frequency band within the limits of ~10-30 Hz. This character of HARPs is consistent with patterns produced by constructive interference of thin beds (Widess, 1973). Forward modeling of sonobuoy data, synthetic tests, and frequency analysis of the tuning effect suggest that HARPs are composed of a series of alternating high- and low-velocity layers. The high-velocity layers are ~100-200 m thick with P-velocities of ~3.5-4.5 km/s. The low-velocity layers are about half as thick with velocities of ~2-3 km/s. A broad range of possible interpretations of rock composition exists from these velocities, e.g. sandstone and interbedded shale (Prince Patrick Island, Harrison and Brent, 2005); or tholeiitic basalts flows and sediments (Voring volcanic margin, Olanke and Eldholm, 1994); or sills and sediments (Newfoundland margin, Peron-Pinvidic et all, 2010). HARP can be associated with several origins. In the central and southern CB, where oceanic spreading is interpreted, HARPs are discontinuous among high-relief, but otherwise low

  18. Reflections on the challenges and possibilities of journal publication in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Catherine; Siry, Christina; Mueller, Michael

    2015-12-01

    In this editorial we reflect on the intersections between the review and publishing policies of Cultural Studies of Science Education (CSSE) and the challenges and possibilities in global science education publishing. In particular we discuss the tensions associated with open or closed review policies, the hegemony of English as a language of publication, and reflect on some of the common challenges experienced by editors and authors from different contexts. We draw on the paper set in this issue consisting of five papers focused on publishing in various contexts, and elaborate several central questions for the field of science education and the dissemination of knowledges.

  19. Becoming a Reflective Practitioner in the Age of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on Zeichner's levels of reflection (Liston and Zeichner 1996), this study uses a fine-grain analysis of portfolio entries to describe the reflective practice of a cohort of preservice secondary education teachers as they student teach, participate in a student teaching seminar, and prepare the Vermont Licensure Portfolio. The paper raises…

  20. Spaceflight and ageing: reflecting on Caenorhabditis elegans in space.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yoko; Honda, Shuji; Narici, Marco; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-01

    The prospect of space travel continues to capture the imagination. Several competing companies are now promising flights for the general population. Previously, it was recognized that many of the physiological changes that occur with spaceflight are similar to those seen with normal ageing. This led to the notion that spaceflight can be used as a model of accelerated ageing and raised concerns about the safety of individuals engaging in space travel. Paradoxically, however, space travel has been recently shown to be beneficial to some aspects of muscle health in the tiny worm Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans is a commonly used laboratory animal for studying ageing. C. elegans displays age-related decline of some biological processes observed in ageing humans, and about 35% of C. elegans' genes have human homologs. Space flown worms were found to have decreased expression of a number of genes that increase lifespan when expressed at lower levels. These changes were accompanied by decreased accumulation of toxic protein aggregates in ageing worms' muscles. Thus, in addition to spaceflight producing physiological changes that are similar to accelerated ageing, it also appears to produce some changes similar to delayed ageing. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that in addition to the previously well-appreciated mechanotransduction changes, neural and endocrine signals are altered in response to spaceflight and that these may have both negative (e.g. less muscle protein) and some positive consequences (e.g. healthier muscles), at least for invertebrates, with respect to health in space. Given that changes in circulating hormones are well documented with age and in astronauts, our view is that further research into the relationship between metabolic control, ageing, and adaptation to the environment should be productive in advancing our understanding of the physiology of both spaceflight and ageing. PMID:24217152

  1. Movement Planning Reflects Skill Level and Age Changes in Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yu-ping; Keen, Rachel; Rosander, Kerstin; Von Hofsten, Claes

    2010-01-01

    Kinematic measures of children's reaching were found to reflect stable differences in skill level for planning for future actions. Thirty-five toddlers (18-21 months) were engaged in building block towers (precise task) and in placing blocks into an open container (imprecise task). Sixteen children were retested on the same tasks a year later.…

  2. Possible spinel absorption bands in S-asteroid visible reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Vilas, F.; Sunshine, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Minor absorption bands in the 0.55 to 0.7 micron wavelength range of reflectance spectra of 10 S asteroids have been found and compared with those of spinel-group minerals using the modified Gaussian model. Most of these S asteroids are consistently shown to have two absorption bands around 0.6 and 0.67 micron. Of the spinel-group minerals examined in this study, the 0.6 and 0.67 micron bands are most consistent with those seen in chromite. Recently, the existence of spinels has also been detected from the absorption-band features around 1 and 2 micron of two S-asteroid reflectance spectra, and chromite has been found in a primitive achondrite as its major phase. These new findings suggest a possible common existence of spinel-group minerals in the solar system.

  3. Aging and immune function: a possible role for growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Gelato, M C

    1996-01-01

    Elderly individuals have four to five times the case rate of cancer, tuberculosis and herpes zoster and six to seven times the fatality rate from pneumonia compared to young adults. This may be causally related to two changes that occur with aging, i.e. decreased growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) production and decreased immune function. Data from our laboratory as well as others have shown that, based on either GH secretory dynamics or IGF-1 levels, approximately 40% of adults aged 60 and older are GH deficient. In the same population of subjects, immune function decreases such that there is a decline in cell-mediated and humoral immune responsiveness. Some of these immune deficits have been shown to be reversed in humans and primates by GH and/or IGF-1 treatment. This paper will review some of these data. PMID:8742118

  4. The Possibility of Public Education in an Instrumentalist Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2011-01-01

    In our increasingly instrumentalist culture, debates over the privatization of schooling may be beside the point. Whether we hatch some new plan for chartering or funding schools, or retain the traditional model of government-run schools, the ongoing instrumentalization of education threatens the very possibility of public education. Indeed, in…

  5. Effects of diffuse and specular reflections on the perceived age of facial skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce-Lopera, Carlos; Igarashi, Takanori; Nakao, Keisuke; Okajima, Katsunori

    2012-05-01

    Age perception is a better biomarker of skin aging than chronological age. However, the optical cues that determine the perception of human skin age are difficult to assess given the complex interactions between light and the multi layered structure of the skin. The aim of the present study is to clarify the independent contribution of both diffuse and specular reflection components to the skin age perception. First, according to our results, subjects were able to estimate the age of skin only by using the diffuse reflection component. Moreover, we showed that inclusion of the specular reflection component added on average 5 years to their age estimation. Second, by artificially manipulating the specular component, we concluded that the luminance distribution affects the perceived age of the skin.

  6. Reflections on the role of senescence during development and aging.

    PubMed

    Triana-Martínez, F; Pedraza-Vázquez, G; Maciel-Barón, L A; Königsberg, M

    2016-05-15

    New and stimulating results have challenged the concept that cellular senescence might not be synonymous with aging. It is indisputable that during aging, senescent cell accumulation has an impact on organismal health. Nevertheless, senescent cells are now known to display physiological roles during embryonic development, during wound healing repair and as a cellular response to stress. The fact that senescence has been found in cells that did not attain their maximal round of replications, nor have metabolic alterations or DNA damage, also challenges the paradigm that senescence is cellular aging, and it is in favor of the idea that cellular senescence is a phenomenon that has a function by itself. Therefore, in order to understand this phenomenon it is important to analyze the relationship between senescence and other cellular responses that have many features in common, such as apoptosis, cancer and autophagy, particularly highlighting their role during development and adulthood. PMID:27059850

  7. The problem of calibration: A possible way to overcome the drawbacks of age models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, B.; Heitzig, J.; Rehfeld, K.; Marwan, N.; Kurths, J.

    2012-04-01

    Constructing a meaningful age model from a set of radiocarbon age-depth measurements made on a palaeoclimatic archive is the crucial backbone of all proxy-based research carried out thereafter. Significant progress in the development of Monte Carlo based interpolation techniques and Bayesian methods has been made recently, targeting the uncertainties of radiocarbon dating, which then reflect meaningfully as time domain errors in the proxy vs. time relationship. However, one primary limitation of these approaches is the debatable assumption of Gaussianity of the errors in calibrated ages as calibration often results in highly irregular and non-trivial probability distributions of the age for every measurement. Here, we present a method that circumvents this limitation by focussing on the construction of the proxy vs. time relationship rather than emphasising on the estimation of an age-depth relation as the intermediary step. Our method is based on a simple analysis of the involved probabilistic uncertainties and the use of (preferably non-parametric) regression methods that give an estimate of the uncertainty of regression at every point as well. With the appropriate use of Bayes' Theorem we then provide a regression-based estimator for the proxy measurements and compute the respective distribution parameters (such as mean and variance) that quantify the uncertainties of the proxy in the time domain. We verify this method with the help of an artificial data set involving the accumulation history of a simulated core and noisy radiocarbon dating and proxy measurements made on it. To our best knowledge, this is the first method that manages to overcome the fundamental problem of irregular distributions induced by calibration of radiocarbon ages. We feel that this approach shall enable us to look at the problem of dating uncertainties in a new light and open up newer possibilities for studying not only speleothem proxies but, more generally, from other palaeoclimatic

  8. Reflecting on Self-Relevant Experiences: Adult Age Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Cora; Pasupathi, Monisha

    2010-01-01

    A broad array of research findings suggest that older adults, as compared with younger adults, have a more positive sense of self and possibly a clearer and more consistent sense of self. Further, older adults report lower motivation to construct or maintain a sense of self. In the present study, we examined whether such differences in self-views…

  9. Melodic Contour Identification Reflects the Cognitive Threshold of Aging.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eunju; Ryu, Hokyoung

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive decline is a natural phenomenon of aging. Although there exists a consensus that sensitivity to acoustic features of music is associated with such decline, no solid evidence has yet shown that structural elements and contexts of music explain this loss of cognitive performance. This study examined the extent and the type of cognitive decline that is related to the contour identification task (CIT) using tones with different pitches (i.e., melodic contours). Both younger and older adult groups participated in the CIT given in three listening conditions (i.e., focused, selective, and alternating). Behavioral data (accuracy and response times) and hemodynamic reactions were measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Our findings showed cognitive declines in the older adult group but with a subtle difference from the younger adult group. The accuracy of the melodic CITs given in the target-like distraction task (CIT2) was significantly lower than that in the environmental noise (CIT1) condition in the older adult group, indicating that CIT2 may be a benchmark test for age-specific cognitive decline. The fNIRS findings also agreed with this interpretation, revealing significant increases in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) concentration in the younger (p < 0.05 for Δpre - on task; p < 0.01 for Δon - post task) rather than the older adult group (n.s for Δpre - on task; n.s for Δon - post task). We further concluded that the oxyHb difference was present in the brain regions near the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Taken together, these findings suggest that CIT2 (i.e., the melodic contour task in the target-like distraction) is an optimized task that could indicate the degree and type of age-related cognitive decline. PMID:27378907

  10. Melodic Contour Identification Reflects the Cognitive Threshold of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Eunju; Ryu, Hokyoung

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive decline is a natural phenomenon of aging. Although there exists a consensus that sensitivity to acoustic features of music is associated with such decline, no solid evidence has yet shown that structural elements and contexts of music explain this loss of cognitive performance. This study examined the extent and the type of cognitive decline that is related to the contour identification task (CIT) using tones with different pitches (i.e., melodic contours). Both younger and older adult groups participated in the CIT given in three listening conditions (i.e., focused, selective, and alternating). Behavioral data (accuracy and response times) and hemodynamic reactions were measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Our findings showed cognitive declines in the older adult group but with a subtle difference from the younger adult group. The accuracy of the melodic CITs given in the target-like distraction task (CIT2) was significantly lower than that in the environmental noise (CIT1) condition in the older adult group, indicating that CIT2 may be a benchmark test for age-specific cognitive decline. The fNIRS findings also agreed with this interpretation, revealing significant increases in oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) concentration in the younger (p < 0.05 for Δpre - on task; p < 0.01 for Δon – post task) rather than the older adult group (n.s for Δpre - on task; n.s for Δon – post task). We further concluded that the oxyHb difference was present in the brain regions near the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Taken together, these findings suggest that CIT2 (i.e., the melodic contour task in the target-like distraction) is an optimized task that could indicate the degree and type of age-related cognitive decline. PMID:27378907

  11. Investigating possible earthquake-related structure beneath the southern Illinois Basin from seismic reflection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Sargent, M.L.; Potter, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between seismicity and faults observed on seismic reflection profiles from the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) in the central Mississippi Valley has been intensively studied for the past 15 years. However, comparable studies relating reflector sequences and earthquakes in the southern Illinois Basin, located northeast of the NMSZ, have not been undertaken. This study investigates the possible relationship between the source parameters of the November 9, 1968, magnitude (mbLg) 5.5 earthquake (a NNE-trending, previously interpreted west-dipping reverse fault at 21.2 ?? 5.4 km depth) in southern Illinois, and a zone of moderately dipping reflectors in crystalline (?) basement observed on a nearby high-quality seismic reflection profile. The 1968 event was the twentieth century's largest magnitude earthquake in the southern Illinois region. The zone of dipping basement reflectors is part of a broad prominent sequence, in which reflectors are subhorizontal or inclined with a strong west-dipping component, that appears beneath the Wabash Valley Fault System and extends to the west beneath the Illinois Basin where it steepens and plunges deeper into the crust over the 1968 hypocenter. More than one interpretation of the dipping reflector zone is admissible, including intrusion of igneous sills or thrust faults or both within a localized shear zone. The dipping reflector zone cannot be traced from the basement into the overlying Phanerozoic sedimentary section or associated directly with any particular previously mapped fault. If a tectonic interpretation is correct, the correlation between the 1968 reverse fault event and the reflector zone may mean that such quakes are nucleating along a blind compressional structure in the crystalline basement of southern Illinois, possibly analogous to the recent destructive southern California earthquakes.

  12. Age- and gender-dependent heterogeneous proportion of variation explained by SNPs in quantitative traits reflecting human health.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dain; Lee, Chaeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Age-related effects are often included as covariates in the analytical model for genome-wide association analysis of quantitative traits reflecting human health. Nevertheless, previous studies have hardly examined the effects of age on the proportion of variation explained by single nucleotide polymorphisms (PVSNP) in these traits. In this study, the PVSNP estimates of body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, pulse pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, triglyceride level (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and glucose level were obtained from Korean consortium metadata partitioned by gender or by age. Restricted maximum likelihood estimates of the PVSNP were obtained in a mixed model framework. Previous studies using pedigree data suggested possible differential heritability of certain traits with regard to gender, which we observed in our current study (BMI and TG; P < 0.05). However, the PVSNP analysis based on age revealed that, with respect to every trait tested, individuals aged 40 to 49 exhibited significantly lower PVSNP estimates than individuals aged 50 to 59 or 60 to 69 (P < 0.05). The consistent heterogeneous PVSNP with respect to age may be due to degenerated genetic functions in individuals between the ages of 50 and 69. Our results suggest the genetic mechanism of age- and gender-dependent PVSNP of quantitative traits related to human health should be further examined. PMID:25701395

  13. Possible modes of coral-reef development at Molokai, Hawaii, inferred from seismic-reflection profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Richmond, B.M.; Grossman, E.E.; Hart, P.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution, seismic-reflection data elucidate the late Quaternary development of the largest coral-reef complex in the main Hawaiian Islands. Six acoustic facies were identified from reflection characteristics and lithosome geometry. An extensive, buried platform with uniformly low relief was traced beneath fore-reef and marginal shelf environments. This highly reflective surface dips gently seaward to ???130 m depth and locally crops out on the seafloor. It probably represents a wave-cut platform or ancient reef flat. We propose alternative evolutionary models, in which sea-level changes have modulated the development of reef systems, to explain the observed stratigraphic relationships. The primary difference between the models is the origin of the underlying antecedent surface, which arguably could have formed during either regression/lowstand or subsequent transgression. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  14. What Is Policy? 21 Years Later: Reflections on the Possibilities of Policy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a reflection on "What is policy? Texts, Trajectories and Tool Boxes," which was first published in 1993, in "Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education." It looks back to what the 1993 paper was trying to do and at some of the developments of the ideas first sketched there in my later work, in…

  15. The Possibility of Cosmopolitan Learning: Reflecting on Future Directions for Diversity Teacher Education in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Carol; Sriprakash, Arathi

    2012-01-01

    This paper is situated in the re-visioning ethos that has been part of the genealogy of multicultural education. In the context of teacher education, the authors ask: where to now? In this paper, they reflect on their design and delivery of a new undergraduate unit offered by the School of Education, University of Western Sydney. The unit…

  16. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged Cu/Beta Zeolite Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, Charles HF; Kwak, Ja Hun; Burton, Sarah D.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Jen, H. W.; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine

    2012-04-30

    The hydrothermal stability of Cu/beta NH3 SCR catalysts are explored here. In particular, this paper focuses on the interesting ability of this catalyst to maintain and even enhance high-temperature performance for the "standard" SCR reaction after modest (900 °C, 2 hours) hydrothermal aging. Characterization of the fresh and aged catalysts was performed with an aim to identify possible catalytic phases responsible for the enhanced high temperature performance. XRD, TEM and 27Al NMR all showed that the hydrothermally aging conditions used here resulted in almost complete loss of the beta zeolite structure between 1 and 2 hours aging. While the 27Al NMR spectra of 2 and 10 hour hydrothermally-aged catalysts showed significant loss of a peak associated with tetrahedrally-coordinated Al species, no new spectral features were evident. Two model catalysts, suggested by these characterization data as possible mimics of the catalytic phase formed during hydrothermal aging of Cu/beta, were prepared and tested for their performance in the "standard" SCR and NH3 oxidation reactions. The similarity in their reactivity compared to the 2 hour hydrothermally-aged Cu/beta catalyst suggests possible routes for preparing multi-component catalysts that may have wider temperature windows for optimum performance than those provided by current Cu/zeolite catalysts.

  17. Sporting Bodies, Ageing, Narrative Mapping and Young Team Athletes: An Analysis of Possible Selves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phoenix, Cassandra; Sparkes, Andrew C.

    2007-01-01

    Drawing on life history data generated from interviews with young athletes at an English university, this paper explores the narrative maps provided to them by older team members and the ways in which these influence perceptions of self-ageing. Three possible selves associated with mid-life emerged from the analysis for detailed focus. These are…

  18. Investigation of the possibility of using waste cooking oil as a rejuvenating agent for aged bitumen.

    PubMed

    Zargar, Majid; Ahmadinia, Esmaeil; Asli, Hallizza; Karim, Mohamed Rehan

    2012-09-30

    The ageing of the bitumen during storage, mixing, transport and laying on the road, as well as in service life, are the most important problems presented by the use of bitumen in pavements. This paper investigates the possibility of using waste cooking oil (WCO), which is a waste material that pollutes landfills and rivers, as an alternative natural rejuvenating agent for aged bitumen to a condition that resembles the original bitumen. With this target, the physical and chemical properties of the original bitumen, aged bitumen and rejuvenated bitumen were measured and compared by the bitumen binder tests - softening point, penetration, Brookfield viscosity, dynamic shear rheometer and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In addition, the behaviour of the WCO rejuvenated bitumen is investigated and compared with virgin bitumen after using the rolling thin film oven ageing process. In general, the results showed that using 3-4% of WCO the aged bitumen group 40/50 was rejuvenated to a condition that closely resembled the physical, rheological properties of the original bitumen (80/100), however, there was a difference in the tendency to ageing between the WCO rejuvenated bitumen and the virgin bitumen during mixing, transport and laying on the road. PMID:22818590

  19. Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Walter

    2012-01-01

    This symposium was very special. It was topical: Some of the most outstanding problems in Nuclear Physics were discussed: Superheavy elements; extremely neutron rich elements, as well as nuclei with strangeness and their possible creation in the cosmos and on earth; the nuclear equation of state has to be identified within strongly compressed and hot nuclear matter as it appears in nucleus-nucleus encounters; giant nuclear systems which are short lived (˜ 10-19 - 10-20 seconds) and extremely important for identifying the vacuum decay in overcritical electric fields (this is a very fundamental process - the most fundamental one in Quantum Electrodynamics!); astrophysical centers of extreme high density around which magnificent sun-like objects are Kepler-orbiting are discovered in our Galaxy by R. Genzel and colleagues (these centers are no black holes those don't exist at all because repulsive gravitational forces may play an important role - the pseudocomplex general relativity eliminates the Schwarzschild singularity); network physics for distributing energy (nuclear, wind, sun, tides,...) all over Europe (and over the world) is basic for energy consumption now and even more so in future. We heard wonderful talks and I am grateful to all the friends and speakers (from Russia, America, Europe and India) for coming to Goa. It was a great symposium! Particular thanks go to Professor Bikash Sinha and especially to Professor Debades Bandyopadhyay from Calcutta who had the idea for and organized this Goa-symposium....

  20. Is it possible to reverse aged acetylcholinesterase inhibited by organophosphorus compounds? Insight from the theoretical study.

    PubMed

    An, Yun; Zhu, Yali; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Junjun

    2016-04-14

    The main treatment for organophosphorus (OP) compound poisoning in clinics is to restore the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) through oxime-induced reactivation of the phosphorylated OP-AChE adduct. It suffers from a competitive and irreversible aging reaction of the phosphorylated OP-AChE adduct, resulting in permanent inactivity of AChE. However, it was recently reported that N-methyl-2-methoxypyridinium species can act as methylating agents to methylate the methyl methane-phosphonate monoanion, in which the reaction mimics the reverse of the aging reaction of the phosphorylated OP-AChE adduct. If the aging reaction could be really reversed, the efficiency for the OP detoxification should be significantly improved, bringing up the possibility to develop an agent to reverse the aging process of the phosphorylated OP-AChE adduct. However, such a reaction with the N-methyl-2-methoxypyridinium species in the enzyme is still not reported so far. It is of great interest to know whether or not this reaction is observable in the enzyme, and more importantly, if it turns out to be not observable in the enzyme, why such a reaction proceeds quickly in aqueous solution but not in the enzyme. In the present study, we performed DFT calculations and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations to reveal the fundamental mechanism for the methylation of both the methyl methane-phosphonate monoanion and the aged sarin-AChE adduct by N-methyl-2-methoxypyridinium species, respectively. The obtained results support the SN2 reaction mechanism, not the stepwise mechanism, for the methylation of the methyl methane-phosphonate monoanion by 9 reported N-methyl-2-methoxypyridinium compounds. The calculated free energy barriers are in good agreement with the experimental data. The methylation of the aged sarin-AChE adduct by one N-methyl-2-methoxypyridinium compound (labeled as compound 2) also employs the SN2 reaction mechanism with an extremely high free energy

  1. Sirtuin Functions in Female Fertility: Possible Role in Oxidative Stress and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Tatone, Carla; Vitti, Maurizio; Santini, Silvano; D'Alessandro, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    In search for strategies aimed at preventing oxidative threat to female fertility, a possible role of sirtuins has emerged. Sirtuins (silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) proteins), NAD+ dependent enzymes with deacetylase and/or mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, are emerging as key antiaging molecules and regulators in many diseases. Recently, a crucial role for SIRT1 and SIRT3, the main components of sirtuin family, as sensors and guardians of the redox state in oocytes, granulosa cells, and early embryos has emerged. In this context, the aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge from research papers on the role of sirtuins in female fertility with particular emphasis on the impairment of SIRT1 signalling with oocyte aging. On this basis, the authors wish to build up a framework to promote research on the possible role of sirtuins as targets for future strategies for female fertility preservation. PMID:26075037

  2. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models. PMID:26885896

  3. Old age is a part of living: student reflections on intergenerational service-learning.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Hilary R; Coughlin, Deanna R; Ballard, Sharon M; Lamson, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of student journals examined the effect intergenerational service-learning had upon undergraduate students' attitudes and perceptions of older adults. Students (N = 102) engaged in 12 hours of service-learning with older adults that included writing structured reflection journals. Coding involved open, axial, and selective coding with common themes identified from the journals. Results revealed a positive attitude shift toward older adults over the course of the semester, greater comfort with the idea of aging, and a propensity to describe the experience as being personally and professionally influential in their own lives. Students also reported increased course understanding and a desire to continue volunteering. Implications for intergenerational service-learning are discussed. PMID:23362857

  4. Pointing Behavior in Infants Reflects the Communication Partner’s Attentional and Knowledge States: A Possible Case of Spontaneous Informing

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianwei; Hashiya, Kazuhide

    2014-01-01

    Inferring the epistemic states of others is considered to be an essential requirement for humans to communicate; however, the developmental trajectory of this ability is unclear. The aim of the current study was to determine developmental trends in this ability by using pointing behavior as a dependent measure. Infants aged 13 to 18 months (n = 32, 16 females) participated in the study. The experiment consisted of two phases. In the Shared Experience Phase, both the participant and the experimenter experienced (played with) an object, and the participant experienced a second object while the experimenter was absent. In the Pointing Phase, the participant was seated on his/her mother’s lap, facing the experimenter, and the same two objects from the Shared Experience Phase were presented side-by-side behind the experimenter. The participants’ spontaneous pointing was analyzed from video footage. While the analysis of the Shared Experience Phase suggested that there was no significant difference in the duration of the participants’ visual attention to the two objects, the participants pointed more frequently to the object that could be considered “new” for the experimenter (in Experiment 1). This selective pointing was not observed when the experimenter could be considered unfamiliar with both of the objects (in Experiment 2). These findings suggest that infants in this age group spontaneously point, presumably to inform about an object, reflecting the partner’s attentional and knowledge states. PMID:25211279

  5. Bone Turnover Does Not Reflect Skeletal Aging in Older Hispanic Men with Type 2 Diabetes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rianon, N.; McCormick, J.; Ambrose, C.; Smith, S. M.; Fisher-Hoch, S.

    2016-01-01

    were identified in women. Bone turnover in older Hispanic men with DM2 in our study does not reflect normal pattern of skeletal aging. It is unclear why similar results were not identified in women. We will continue to follow this cohort to investigate longitudinal trend of changes of bone turnover and its relationship with HbA1c in both men and women of this cohort.

  6. An Exploration of the Maturation of PGCE Student Teacher's Ability to Reflect, Using a Range of Reflective Strategies to Identify Possible Stages of Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantle, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    This research took place over a one-year PGCE training period. The participants were given the opportunity to reflect on their experience in a verbal (focus groups, action learning sets and interviews) and in written (journal and questionnaires) form. These reflective learning techniques were interpreted using Dewey's five stages of learning. The…

  7. Possibility of the detection and identification of substance at long distance using the noisy reflected THz pulse under real conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2015-05-01

    We show possibility of the detection and identification of substance at long distance (several metres, for example) using the THz pulse reflected from the object under the real conditions: at room temperature and humidity of about 70%. The main feature of this report consists in a demonstration of the detection and identification of substance using the computer processing of the noisy THz pulse. Amplitude of the useful signal is less than the amplitude of a noise. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect "fingerprint" frequencies of substance if these frequencies are known and the SDA method is used together with new assessments for probability estimation for presence of detected frequencies. Essential restrictions of the commonly used THz TDS method for the detection and identification under real conditions (at long distance about 3.5 m and at a high relative humidity more than 50%) are demonstrated using the physical experiment with chocolate bar and thick paper bag. We show also that the THz TDS method detects spectral features of dangerous substances even in the THz signals measured in laboratory conditions (at distance 30-40 cm from the receiver and at a low relative humidity less than 2%); the n-Si and p-Si semiconductors were used as neutral substances. However, the integral correlation and likeness criteria, based on SDA method, allow us to detect the absence of dangerous substances in the samples. Current results show feasibility of using the discussed method of the THz pulsed spectroscopy for the counter-terrorism problem.

  8. Possible role of ABO system in age-related diseases and longevity: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABO blood group antigens are expressed either on the surface of red blood cells either on a variety of other cells. Based on the available knowledge of the genes involved in their biosynthesis and their tissue distribution, their polymorphism has been suggested to provide intraspecies diversity allowing to cope with diverse and rapidly evolving pathogens. Accordingly, the different prevalence of ABO group genotypes among the populations has been demonstrated to be driven by malaria selection. In the similar manner, a particular ABO blood group may contribute to favour life-extension via biological mechanisms important for surviving or eluding serious disease. In this review, we will suggest the possible association of ABO group with age-related diseases and longevity taking into account the biological role of the ABO glycosyltransferases on some inflammatory mediators as adhesion molecules. PMID:25512760

  9. Structural variation of proterozoic dikes in central Superior Province: A possible reflection of post-Archean shield deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary work is reported on the use of two structural parameters, dike dip and thickness, as possible depth-of-exposure indicators in the Central Superior Province. The data demonstrate systematic variations in the dip and thickness of 2.6 and 1.14 Ga. dikes across the Central Superior Province and are tentatively interpreted to result from post intrusion deformation. Combination of these results with additional structural and paleomagnetic data from dikes of all gas may permit detailed mapping both spatially and temporally of crustal deformation in this part of the Canadian Shield. Although dike dip and thickness data apparently reflect crustal exposure level as given by host rock metamorphic grade (ranging from subgreenschist to granulite), these post-orogenic dikes themselves are at most only weakly metamorphosed. This requires that regional isotherms dropped dramatically after the Kenoran orogeny (2.65 Ga.) and prior to emplacement of the earlist post-orogenic swarm (Matachewan-Hearst) at 2.6 Ga.

  10. Loss, Survival, and Redemption: African American Male Youths' Reflections on Life without Fathers, Manhood, and Coming of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Andrea G.; Friend, Christian A.; Murphy, S. Yvette; Rollins, Alethea; Williams-Wheeler, Meeshay; Laughinghouse, Janzelean

    2006-01-01

    Using an interpretivist approach, this article explores young African American men's (n = 20) reflections on coming of age and the meanings of father loss. Based on focus groups, the authors found that it was through autobiographical narratives of loss, survival, and redemption that young men positioned themselves ideologically and constructed the…

  11. Bayesian Ages for Early-type Stars from Isochrones Including Rotation, and a Possible Old Age for the Hyades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Huang, Chelsea X.

    2015-07-01

    We combine recently computed models of stellar evolution using a new treatment of rotation with a Bayesian statistical framework to constrain the ages and other properties of early-type stars. We find good agreement for early-type stars and clusters with known young ages, including β Pictoris, the Pleiades, and the Ursa Majoris moving group. However, we derive a substantially older age for the Hyades open cluster (750 ± 100 Myr compared to 625 ± 50 Myr). This older age results from both the increase in main-sequence lifetime with stellar rotation and from the fact that rotating models near the main-sequence turnoff are more luminous, overlapping with slightly more massive (and shorter-lived) nonrotating ones. Our method uses a large grid of nonrotating models to interpolate between a much sparser rotating grid, and also includes a detailed calculation of synthetic magnitudes as a function of orientation. We provide a web interface at http://www.bayesianstellarparameters.info, where the results of our analysis may be downloaded for individual early-type (B-V≲ 0.25) Hipparcos stars. The web interface accepts user-supplied parameters for a Gaussian metallicity prior and returns posterior probability distributions on mass, age, and orientation.

  12. The Possible Mechanism of Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Shun-Yao; Ko, Hshin-An; Chu, Kuo-Hsiung; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Chi, Tzong-Cherng; Chen, Hong-I; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Chang, Shu-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been modified by β and γ-secretase that cause amyloid deposits (plaques) in neuronal cells. Glyceraldhyde-derived AGEs has been identified as a major source of neurotoxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In a previous study, we demonstrated that glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs increase APP and Aβ via ROS. Furthermore, the combination of AGEs and Aβ has been shown to enhance neurotoxicity. In mice, APP expression is increased by tail vein injection of AGEs. This evidence suggests a correlation between AGEs and the development of AD. However, the role played by AGEs in the pathogenesis of AD remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that AGEs up-regulate APP processing protein (BACE and PS1) and Sirt1 expression via ROS, but do not affect the expression of downstream antioxidant genes HO-1 and NQO-1. Moreover, we found that AGEs increase GRP78 expression and enhance the cell death-related pathway p53, bcl-2/bax ratio, caspase 3. These results indicate that AGEs impair the neuroprotective effects of Sirt1 and lead to neuronal cell death via ER stress. Our findings suggest that AGEs increase ROS production, which stimulates downstream pathways related to APP processing, Aβ production, Sirt1, and GRP78, resulting in the up-regulation of cell death related pathway. This in-turn enhances neuronal cell death, which leads to the development of AD. PMID:26587989

  13. Subretinal Hyper-Reflective Material in the Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Alex S.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Toth, Cynthia A.; Maguire, Maureen G.; Burns, Russell E.; Grunwald, Juan E.; Daniel, Ebenezer; Jaffe, Glenn J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of subretinal hyper-reflective material (SHRM) with visual acuity (VA), geographic atrophy (GA) and scar in the Comparison of Age related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT) Design Prospective cohort study within a randomized clinical trial. Participants The 1185 participants in CATT. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to ranibizumab or bevacizumab treatment monthly or as-needed. Masked readers graded scar and GA on fundus photography and fluorescein angiography images, SHRM on time domain (TD) and spectral domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) throughout 104 weeks. Measurements of SHRM height and width in the fovea, within the center 1mm2, or outside the center 1mm2 were obtained on SD-OCT images at 56 (n=76) and 104 (n=66) weeks. VA was measured by certified examiners. Main Outcome Measures SHRM presence, location and size, and associations with VA, scar, and GA. Results Among all CATT participants, the percentage with SHRM at enrollment was 77%, decreasing to 68% at 4 weeks after treatment and 54% at 104 weeks. At 104 weeks, scar was present more often in eyes with persistent SHRM than eyes with SHRM that resolved (64% vs. 31%; p<0.0001). Among eyes with detailed evaluation of SHRM at weeks 56 (n=76) and 104 (n=66), mean [SE] VA letter score was 73.5 [2.8], 73.1 [3.4], 65.3 [3.5], and 63.9 [3.7] when SHRM was absent, present outside the central 1mm2, present within the central 1mm2 but not the foveal center, or present at the foveal center (p=0.02). SHRM was present at the foveal center in 43 (30%), within the central 1mm2 in 21 (15%) and outside the central 1mm2 in 19 (13%). When SHRM was present, the median maximum height in microns under the fovea, within the central 1 mm2 including the fovea and anywhere within the scan was 86; 120; and 122, respectively. VA was decreased with greater SHRM height and width (p<0.05). Conclusions SHRM is common in eyes with NVAMD and often persists after anti

  14. Are Bombax buonopozense and Bombax malabaricum possible nutraceuticals for age management?

    PubMed

    Ngwuluka, Ndidi C

    2012-05-01

    Human longevity and healthy ageing though controversial require extended investigations. Some studies have shown that ageing can be managed by reducing the amounts of free radicals the cells are exposed to. Oxidative stress has been shown to be combated by antioxidants and plant sources are known to generate antioxidants that are efficacious and low in toxicity. This review aims to enlighten on antioxidants from Bombax buonopozense and Bombax malabaricum for prevention, reversal or delay of age-related diseases. Furthermore, it advocates for more studies to enable the shift from research to commercial applications of the antioxidants as nutraceuticals in age management. PMID:22230475

  15. Ageing horses by an examination of their incisor teeth: an (im)possible task?

    PubMed

    Muylle, S; Simoens, P; Lauwers, H

    1996-03-30

    It is generally considered that the age of a horse can be determined by examining its incisor teeth. However, the criteria used to determine age from dental configurations differ widely. The existence of this variety of rules and guidelines was the challenge for the present examination. Detailed descriptions of the incisor teeth of 212 horses of registered age were recorded and the results were compared with the age criteria of various authors. The time at which teeth were shed and the appearance of dental stars seemed to be more reliable features than the disappearance of the cups. The disappearance of the marks occurred four years later than usually stated. Other criteria, such as the presence of the seven-year notch and Galvayne's groove, were too variable and inconsistent to be reliable for the determination of age. PMID:8730689

  16. Possible Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Age-Related Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis in the F344XBN Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Sunil K.; Rice, Kevin M.; Katta, Anjaiah; Paturi, Satyanarayana; Wu, Miaozong; Kolli, Madhukar; Keshavarzian, Saba; Manzoor, Kamran; Wehner, Paulette S.

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in treatment, age-related cardiac dysfunction still remains a leading cause of cardiovascular death. Recent data have suggested that increases in cardiomyocyte apoptosis may be involved in the pathological remodeling of heart. Here, we examine the effects of aging on cardiomyocyte apoptosis in 6-, 30-, and 36-month-old Fischer344xBrown Norway F1 hybrid rats (F344XBN). Compared with 6-month hearts, aged hearts exhibited increased TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling–positive nuclei, caspase-3 activation, caspase-dependent cleavage of α-fodrin and diminished phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt (Thr 308). These age-dependent increases in cardiomyocyte apoptosis were associated with alterations in the composition of the cardiac dystrophin glycoprotein complex and elevated cytoplasmic IgG and albumin immunoreactivity. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed these data and demonstrated qualitative differences in localization of dystrophin–glycoprotein complex (DGC) molecules with aging. Taken together, these data suggest that aging-related increases in cardiac apoptotic activity model may be due, at least in part, to age-associated changes in DGC structure. PMID:20056683

  17. Retaining the wisdom: Academic nurse leaders' reflections on extending the working life of aging nurse faculty.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Aging nurse faculty members are vital human resources who serve as educators, researchers, and leaders within baccalaureate nursing (BSN) programs. On average, aging nurse faculty members are over 50 years of age and face key retirement decisions over the next decade. The purpose of this study was to begin to build substantive theory about academic nurse leaders' perceptions of extending the academic working life of aging nurse faculty members. Nine academic nurse leaders from BSN programs nationwide were interviewed in this grounded theory study. Data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Four categories emerged: valuing aging nurse faculty, enduring environmental challenges, recognizing stakeholder incongruence, and readjusting. Findings reveal that aging nurse faculty members are highly valued by academic nurse leaders, bringing wisdom, experience, and institutional, historical, and cultural awareness to their many roles. Yet, some aging nurse faculty fail to keep knowledge, skills, and teaching modes current, which is problematic given the multiple environmental challenges that academic nurse leaders face. Stakeholder incongruence arises as a mismatch between the needs of the BSN program and the skills and contributions of aging nurse faculty members. BSN programs, program leaders, and aging nurse faculty members can lessen incongruence by readjusting to address the pressures, tensions, and ongoing change. PMID:24503313

  18. DNA damage markers in dermal fibroblasts in vitro reflect chronological donor age

    PubMed Central

    Waaijer, Mariëtte E.C.; Croco, Eleonora; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Sedivy, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The aging process is accompanied by an accumulation of cellular damage, which compromises the viability and function of cells and tissues. We aim to further explore the association between in vitro DNA damage markers and the chronological age of the donor, as well as long-lived family membership and presence of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, numbers of 53BP1 foci, telomere-associated foci (TAF) and micronuclei were measured in cultured dermal fibroblasts obtained from three age groups of donors (mean age 22, 63 and 90 years). Fibroblasts were cultured without a stressor and with 0.6 μM rotenone for 3 days. We found that 53BP1 foci and TAF were more frequently present in fibroblasts of old donors compared to middle-aged and young donors. No association between micronuclei and donor age was found. Within the fibroblasts of the middle-aged donors we did not find associations between DNA damage markers and long-lived family membership or cardiovascular disease. Results were comparable when fibroblasts were stressedin vitro with rotenone. In conclusion, we found that DNA damage foci of cultured fibroblasts are significantly associated with the chronological age, but not biological age, of the donor. PMID:26830451

  19. INVESTIGATION OF POSSIBLE AGE EFFECTS ON MEIOTIC CHROMOSOMAL RECOMBINATION AND SEGREGATION IN ARMENIAN HAMSTER SPERMATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male Armenian hamsters (Cricetulus migratorius; 2N:22) were evaluated for age effects upon meiotic recombination and aneuploidy incidence. Primary spermatocytes from young and old animals revealed similar chiasma frequencies. The incidence of terminal-type chiasmata in sex bivale...

  20. Measles antibodies in cord blood in Portugal: Possible consequences for the recommended age of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Guilherme; Nunes, Carla; Mesquita, João Rodrigo; Nascimento, Maria São José; Frade, João

    2016-05-23

    The optimum age to give the first dose of measles vaccine must balance the risks of disease and vaccine failure. Both are influenced by the levels of transplacentally acquired maternal antibodies. This study was conducted in the Obstetric service of Portuguese hospital, in 2012-2013. Mothers were recruited after informed consent. Measles IgG was measured in 206 cord sera, using a commercial immunoassay. Geometric mean concentrations (and 95% CI) were 1849mIU/ml (1196-2857) and 790mIU/ml (618-1008) in cord sera of newborns from unvaccinated and vaccinated mothers respectively. Maternal age and vaccination status were both associated with the concentration in cord sera, but maternal age was the major predictor. The likely explanation is the same already mentioned in other studies: as a vaccination program progresses, vaccination coverage increases as measles incidence decreases. That results newborns from younger vaccinated mothers having less measles antibodies while the older mothers are more likely to have been infected with the wild virus. As the proportion of vaccinated mothers increase, developed countries tend to anticipate the recommended age of the first dose to 12 months of age. Models using hypothetical measles antibody decay rates in infancy were explored. Anticipating the first dose of MMR1 in Portugal to the age of 12 months might have not been the best decision but results were not conclusive, and arguments supporting or not the anticipation were discussed. PMID:27109563

  1. [Is it possible to "cancel" aging process of cell cultures under optimal conditions for cultivation?].

    PubMed

    Bozhkov, A I; Kovaleva, M K; Menzianova, N G

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of the cells epigenotypes Dunaliella viridis Teod. in the process of chronological and replicative aging were investigated. By 40th day of accumulative cultivation (which coincided with the stationary growth phase) DNA content in the cells of Dunaliella viridis increased 2 times, triacylglycerides 3 times, beta-carotene and carbonyl proteins 2 times, RNA content decreased in comparison with cells in exponential growth phase, i. e., the 40th day of growth of culture forms the age-related epigenotype. 4 received subcultures were being transplanted during 2 years in mid-logarithmic growth phase (subculture-10), early stationary phase of growth (subculture-20), in the mid-stationary growth phase (subculture-30), and late stationary growth phase (subculture-40). It is shown that epigenotype of subculture-10 remained unchanged over 2 years of cultivation, i. e., it does not manifest replicative aging. At the same time, the subculture-20, although long enough (at least 40 passages), maintained epigenotype characteristic of young cultures, and showed age-related changes. Pronounced age-dependent changes of epigenotype in the course of cultivation were identified for subculture-30, and subculture-40 was characterized by unstable epigenotype. Thus, cultivation conditions determine the intensity of replicative aging in Dunaliella viridis. PMID:21809617

  2. Dwell in Possibility: PLAR and e-Portfolios in the Age of Information and Communication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Judith O.

    2011-01-01

    Emily Dickinson wrote, "I dwell in Possibility--A fairer House than Prose--More Numerous of Windows--Superior--for Doors" (p. 657). Dickinson's simple yet profound reference to the expansive nature of poetry over prose may be taken as a metaphor for the possibilities of information and communication technologies (ICTs) over written modes of…

  3. Investigating Possible Effects of Ethnicity and Age on Gambling as an Escape.

    PubMed

    Cookman, Matthew L; Weatherly, Jeffrey N

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has shown that there are a number of risk factors for disordered and problem gambling, including an individual's ethnicity and age. Endorsing gambling as an escape has also been shown to contribute to and maintain disordered gambling. The present study examined potential interactions between ethnicity and age as they relate to disordered gambling, as well as if ethnicity and age would be predictors of endorsing gambling as an escape. Three hundred fifteen adults from the United States completed measures relating to gambling. Participants were grouped into ethnic categories of Caucasian and non-Caucasian, and age groups of 18-25, 26-35, 36-55, and 56 years old and above. Non-Caucasians reported more gambling problems than Caucasians. A significant interaction was found between ethnicity and age for 36-55 year olds. Overall, participants were more likely to gamble for positive than negative reinforcement. However, only gambling as an escape was a significant predictor of disordered gambling. Implications and limitations are discussed with the thought that these results are informative to practitioners treating disordered gambling. PMID:26032667

  4. Old Age Is a Part of Living: Student Reflections on Intergenerational Service-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalisch, Hilary R.; Coughlin, Deanna R.; Ballard, Sharon M.; Lamson, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of student journals examined the effect intergenerational service-learning had upon undergraduate students' attitudes and perceptions of older adults. Students (N = 102) engaged in 12 hours of service-learning with older adults that included writing structured reflection journals. Coding involved open, axial, and selective coding with…

  5. Possible influence of sulfur content on magnetic aging behaviors of non-oriented electrical steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wei-Min; Yang, Ping; Li, Chang-Rong

    2013-12-01

    Six non-oriented steel sheets of similar grade produced by different steel companies were used to analyze the magnetic aging behaviors after aging at 200°C for 48 h. It was observed that tiny S atoms, besides C and N, could also induce certain increase of core loss during aging. Thermodynamic calculation indicated that the nucleation driving force of FeS is much higher than those of Fe3C and Fe4N at low temperature, while S atoms, which tend to segregated around dislocations and boundaries, would diffuse rapidly along the crystalline defects while FeS particles would form. Therefore, higher content of tiny S atoms could increase core loss during service time of non-oriented steel sheets.

  6. Possible Mesozoic age of Ellenville Zn-Pb-Cu(Ag) deposit, Shawangunk Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.D.; Conrad, J.E.; McKee, E.H.; Mutschler, F.E.; Zartman, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Ore textures, epithermal open-space filling of Permian structures of the Alleghanian orogeny, and largely postorogenic mineralization of the Ellenville, New York, composite Zn-Pb-Cu(Ag) vein system, provide permissive evidence for post-Permian mineralization. Isochron ages determined by 40Ar/39Ar laser-fusion techniques for K-bearing liquid inclusions in main-stage quartz from the Ellenville deposit additionally suggest a Mesozoic time of mineralization, associated with extensional formation of the Newark basin. The best 40Ar/39Ar total-fusion age range is 165 ?? 30 to 193 ?? 35 Ma. The Mesozoic 40Ar/39Ar age agrees with that of many other dated northern Appalachian Zn-Pb-Cu(Ag) deposits with near-matching lead isotope ratios, and adds new evidence of Jurassic tectonism and mineralization as an overprint to Late Paleozoic tectonism at least as far north as Ellenville (lat. 41??43???N). ?? 1994 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Age-Dependent Kinetics and Metabolism of Dichloroacetate: Possible Relevance to Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shroads, Albert L.; Guo, Xu; Dixit, Vaishali; Liu, Hui-Ping; James, Margaret O.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2008-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) is an investigational drug for certain metabolic diseases. It is biotransformed principally by the ζ-1 family isoform of glutathione transferase (GSTz1), also known as maleylacetoacetate isomerase (MAAI), which catalyzes the penultimate step in tyrosine catabolism. DCA causes a reversible peripheral neuropathy in several species, including humans. However, recent clinical trials indicate that adults are considerably more susceptible to this adverse effect than children. We evaluated the kinetics and biotransformation of DCA and its effects on tyrosine metabolism in nine patients treated for 6 months with 25 mg/kg/day and in rats treated for 5 days with 50 mg/kg/day. We also measured the activity and expression of hepatic GSTz1/MAAI. Chronic administration of DCA causes a striking age-dependent decrease in its plasma clearance and an increase in its plasma half-life in patients and rats. Urinary excretion of unchanged DCA in rats increases with age, whereas oxalate, an end product of DCA metabolism, shows the opposite trend. Low concentrations of monochloroacetate (MCA), which is known to be neurotoxic, increase as a function of age in the urine of dosed rats. MCA was detectable in plasma only of older animals. Hepatic GSTz1/MAAI-specific activity was inhibited equally by DCA treatment among all age groups, whereas plasma and urinary levels of maleylacetone, a natural substrate for this enzyme, increased with age. We conclude that age is an important variable in the in vivo metabolism and elimination of DCA and that it may account, in part, for the neurotoxicity of this compound in humans and other species. PMID:18096758

  8. Linking possible selves and behavior: do domain-specific hopes and fears translate into daily activities in very old age?

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Christiane A; Gerstorf, Denis; Smith, Jacqui; Klumb, Petra L

    2007-03-01

    We used time-sampling information from a subsample of the Berlin Aging Study (N=83; M=81.1 years) to investigate the link between possible selves in three domains (health, everyday cognition, and social relations) and performance of daily activities. In the domains of health and social relations, hoped-for selves were associated with higher probabilities of performing daily activities in those domains. There were no associations in the cognitive domain or between feared selves and activities. Individuals who engaged in hope-related activities reported concurrent higher positive affect and subsequently had a higher probability of survival over a 10-year period. These findings speak to important associations between beliefs about possible selves and activities in advanced old age and the value of considering associations between microlevel and macrolevel indicators of successful aging. PMID:17379670

  9. Donor/Recipient Delta Age: A Possible Risk for Arterial Stenosis in Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pallotti, Giovanni; Donati, Gabriele; Capelli, Irene; Baraldi, Olga; Comai, Giorgia; Agati, Patrizia; Nichelatti, Michele; Cianciolo, Giuseppe; La Manna, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Different arterial wall properties can significantly increase the risk of blood turbulent fluxes leading to complications such as atherosclerosis. Since the mechanical properties of arterial vessels are influenced by age, we investigated, in a retrospective study, the effects on renal artery stenosis of an age difference >15 years between donor and recipient in a cohort of 164 patients undergoing renal transplantation between 1981 and 1991. The age difference between donor and recipient was ≤15 years in 87 patients (53.0%) (Group A) and >15 years in 77 patients (47.0%) (Group B, p = ns). None of the Group A patients developed an anastomotic arterial stenosis, whereas 8/77 Group B patients (10.4%) had an anastomotic arterial stenosis (p < 0.001). This study shows that an age difference >15 years is significantly linked to the risk of developing arterial stenosis after renal transplantation. Indeed, different wall properties can significantly increase the risk of generation of blood turbulent fluxes and involve, in the arterial vessels, the development of complications such as atherosclerosis. PMID:26933444

  10. Donor/Recipient Delta Age: A Possible Risk for Arterial Stenosis in Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pallotti, Giovanni; Donati, Gabriele; Capelli, Irene; Baraldi, Olga; Comai, Giorgia; Agati, Patrizia; Nichelatti, Michele; Cianciolo, Giuseppe; La Manna, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Different arterial wall properties can significantly increase the risk of blood turbulent fluxes leading to complications such as atherosclerosis. Since the mechanical properties of arterial vessels are influenced by age, we investigated, in a retrospective study, the effects on renal artery stenosis of an age difference >15 years between donor and recipient in a cohort of 164 patients undergoing renal transplantation between 1981 and 1991. The age difference between donor and recipient was ≤15 years in 87 patients (53.0%) (Group A) and >15 years in 77 patients (47.0%) (Group B, p = ns). None of the Group A patients developed an anastomotic arterial stenosis, whereas 8/77 Group B patients (10.4%) had an anastomotic arterial stenosis (p < 0.001). This study shows that an age difference >15 years is significantly linked to the risk of developing arterial stenosis after renal transplantation. Indeed, different wall properties can significantly increase the risk of generation of blood turbulent fluxes and involve, in the arterial vessels, the development of complications such as atherosclerosis. PMID:26933444

  11. A drug-induced accelerated senescence (DIAS) is a possibility to study aging in time lapse.

    PubMed

    Alili, Lirija; Diekmann, Johanna; Giesen, Melanie; Holtkötter, Olaf; Brenneisen, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Currently, the oxidative stress (or free radical) theory of aging is the most popular explanation of how aging occurs at the molecular level. Accordingly, a stress-induced senescence-like phenotype of human dermal fibroblasts can be induced in vitro by the exposure of human diploid fibroblasts to subcytotoxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. However, several biomarkers of replicative senescence e.g. cell cycle arrest and enlarged morphology are abrogated 14 days after treatment, indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) rather acts as a trigger for short-term senescence (1-3 days) than being responsible for the maintenance of the senescence-like phenotype. Further, DNA-damaging factors are discussed resulting in a permanent senescent cell type. To induce long-term premature senescence and to understand the molecular alterations occurring during the aging process, we analyzed mitomycin C (MMC) as an alkylating DNA-damaging agent and ROS producer. Human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), used as model for skin aging, were exposed to non-cytotoxic concentrations of MMC and analyzed for potential markers of cellular aging, for example enlarged morphology, activity of senescence-associated-ß-galactosidase, cell cycle arrest, increased ROS production and MMP1-activity, which are well-documented for HDF in replicative senescence. Our data show that mitomycin C treatment results in a drug-induced accelerated senescence (DIAS) with long-term expression of senescence markers, demonstrating that a combination of different susceptibility factors, here ROS and DNA alkylation, are necessary to induce a permanent senescent cell type. PMID:24833306

  12. High sensitivity to autoxidation in neonatal calf erythrocytes: possible mechanism of accelerated cell aging.

    PubMed

    Imre, S; Csornai, M; Balazs, M

    2001-01-01

    The suspension viscosity, formation of methaemoglobin and production of malondialdehyde (MDA) associated with the non-enzymatic oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids during auto-oxidation conditions in vitro have been compared in erythrocytes from young calves (2, 4 and 6 weeks of age) and mature cattle. The autoxidation conditions were designed to simulate the oxidative stress to which neonatal erythrocytes are exposed in vivo. Characterisation of lipid peroxidation was also undertaken by a combination of lipid fluorescent measurements and quantification of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities of the erythrocytes. The results demonstrated that high SOD activities in the erythrocytes of the neonatal calf was insufficient to afford protection against the increased autoxidation of haemoglobin and subsequent accumulation of lipid peroxidation products. High levels of methaemoglobin formation and lipid peroxidation were able to provide an explanation for an observed reduction in rheological adaptability (increased suspension viscosity) and an accelerated aging of the neonatal cells under in vivo conditions. PMID:11163624

  13. Cadmium affects the episodic luteinizing hormone secretion in male rats: possible age-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Márquez, N; Piquero, S; Esquifino, A I

    1999-01-11

    Cadmium affects luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion through unknown mechanisms. The present study was undertaken to assess whether chronic exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may affect the episodic secretion of LH and if these effects are age-dependent. Male rats were given cadmium at a dose of 50 ppm in the drinking water, from day 30 to 60 or from day 60 to 90 of life. Age-matched rats with access to cadmium-free water were used as controls. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected every 7 min for 3 h, from 10:30 to 13.30 in conscious, freely moving rats. In control animals, mean serum LH levels and pulse duration increased with age (P < or = 0.001), and pulse frequency and the relative amplitude of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.001). Cadmium administration, from day 30 to 60 of life, decreased the pulse frequency and mean half-life of the hormone (P < or = 0.05, P < or = 0.01, respectively). However, no changes in any other parameters studied were observed as compared to the control group. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90, mean serum LH levels and the duration of LH pulses decreased (P < or = 0.05), whereas the pulse frequency increased (P < or = 0.05). The absolute and relative amplitude of the LH peaks and the mean half-life of the hormone were not changed after cadmium administration from day 60 to 90. These results indicate that low doses of cadmium change the pulsatile secretion of LH in male rats and that the effect of cadmium on episodic LH release was age-dependent. PMID:10048746

  14. Analysis of hydrogen maser frequency drift due to possible drifts in load VSWR and phase angle of reflection coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, R. W.; Otosh, T. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical equations are derived for calculating the effects of local VSWR and reflection coefficient phase angle drifts on hydrogen maser frequency stability. Sample calculations made for a typical JPL maser show that under special load conditions, a VSWR drift of 0.000075/h or phase angle drive of 0.01 deg/h can produce a frequency drift of (10 to the -14th power f sub 0) Hz/h where f sub 0 is the maser frequency of approximately 1.42 x 10 to the 9th power Hz.

  15. The impact of sleep on age-related sarcopenia: Possible connections and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Piovezan, Ronaldo D; Abucham, Julio; Dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli; Mello, Marco Tulio; Tufik, Sergio; Poyares, Dalva

    2015-09-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric condition that comprises declined skeletal muscle mass, strength and function, leading to the risk of multiple adverse outcomes, including death. Its pathophysiology involves neuroendocrine and inflammatory factors, unfavorable nutritional habits and low physical activity. Sleep may play a role in muscle protein metabolism, although this hypothesis has not been studied extensively. Reductions in duration and quality of sleep and increases in prevalence of circadian rhythm and sleep disorders with age favor proteolysis, modify body composition and increase the risk of insulin resistance, all of which have been associated with sarcopenia. Data on the effects of age-related slow-wave sleep decline, circadian rhythm disruptions and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG), somatotropic axes, and glucose metabolism indicate that sleep disorder interventions may affect muscle loss. Recent research associating OSA with the risk of conditions closely related to the sarcopenia process, such as frailty and sleep quality impairment, indirectly suggest that sleep can influence skeletal muscle decline in the elderly. Several protein synthesis and degradation pathways are mediated by growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone, cortisol and insulin, which act on the cellular and molecular levels to increase or reestablish muscle fiber, strength and function. Age-related sleep problems potentially interfere intracellularly by inhibiting anabolic hormone cascades and enhancing catabolic pathways in the skeletal muscle. Specific physical exercises combined or not with nutritional recommendations are the current treatment options for sarcopenia. Clinical studies testing exogenous administration of anabolic hormones have not yielded adequate safety profiles. Therapeutic approaches targeting sleep disturbances to normalize circadian rhythms and sleep homeostasis may

  16. Transformations and Self-Discovery: Mature-Age Women's Reflections on Returning to University Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shea, S.; Stone, C.

    2011-01-01

    Research has highlighted the challenges that women face as mature-age students in higher education. The challenges are particularly acute when a woman is the first in her family to go to university. Many women begin their journey as students with considerable self-doubt and lack of confidence. They may also face an ongoing struggle to find a way…

  17. Age-related changes in involuntary and voluntary attention as reflected in components of the event-related potential (ERP).

    PubMed

    Kok, A

    2000-10-01

    The present paper provides an overview of age-related changes in both involuntary and voluntary attention in adult subjects as manifested in scalp-recorded ERPs. A decline in orienting with old age was inferred from a substantial reduction with age in the magnitude of deviance-related ERP components like MMN, target as well as nontarget P3s, novelty P3 and N400. A review of focused attention studies further suggested that old and young subjects do not differ substantially in the quality of attentional operations. In old subjects early selection processes, as reflected in their selection potentials, have a somewhat slower onset than in young subjects, especially in conditions in which selection is based upon complex discrimination of stimulus features. Furthermore, the global pattern emerging from visual and memory search studies is that search-related negativities in the ERPs are smaller and of longer duration in old than in young subjects over the central and anterior scalp sites. These effects could indicate that controlled search is less intense or takes more time per search operation in old than in young subjects. At more posterior scalp sites there was tendency towards an enhanced search-related negativity that could reflect a specific difficulty (or compensatory increase in mental effort) of old subjects in spatially locating targets in complex visual fields. PMID:11035221

  18. Coordination of DNA repair by NEIL1 and PARP-1: a possible link to aging

    PubMed Central

    Noren Hooten, Nicole; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Kompaniez, Kari; Jacob, Kimberly D.; Moore, Brittany R.; Nagle, Julia; Barnes, Janice; Lohani, Althaf; Evans, Michele K.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative DNA damage accumulates with age and is repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. This process is initiated by DNA glycosylases, which remove damaged bases in a substrate-specific manner. The DNA glycosylases human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and NEIL1, a mammalian homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease VIII, have overlapping yet distinct substrate specificity. Recently, we reported that OGG1 binds to the Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a DNA damage sensor protein that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ates nuclear proteins in response to DNA damage and other cellular signals. Here, we show that NEIL1 and PARP-1 bind both in vitro and in vivo. PARP-1 binds to the C-terminal-100 amino acids of NEIL1 and NEIL1 binds to the BRCT domain of PARP-1. NEIL1 stimulates the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity of PARP-1. Furthermore, NEIL-deficient fibroblasts have impaired poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of cellular proteins after DNA damage, which can be rescued by NEIL1 expression. Additionally, PARP-1 inhibits NEIL1 incision activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Consistent with the idea of impaired DNA repair during aging, we observed differential binding of PARP-1 to recombinant NEIL1 in older mice compared to younger mice. These data further support the idea that dynamic interplay between different base excision repair proteins is important for efficient BER. PMID:23104860

  19. Choosing among possible persons: The ethics of prenatal selection in the postgenomic age.

    PubMed

    Mauron, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The "spectre of eugenics" is often raised about various current reproductive practices that imply a form of choice between future possible persons. Some of these practices are linked to genetic technologies such as pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, others merely entail the choice of a procreator having specific traits, such as in artificial insemination with donor. The weight and limits of this reproof of eugenics are examined, with special attention to the conceptual problems resulting from confusing choices involving virtual persons with the selection of existing persons. PMID:26228932

  20. Do Performance-based Health Measures Reflect Differences in Frailty Among Immigrants Age 50+ in Europe?

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Thomas D.; Theou, Olga; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background Life course influences, including country of residence and country of birth, are associated with frailty index scores. We investigated these associations using performance-based health measures. Methods Among 33,745 participants age 50+ (mean age 64.8 ± 10.1; 55% women) in the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe, grip strength, delayed word recall, and semantic verbal fluency were assessed. Participants were grouped by country of residence (Northern/Western Europe or Southern/Eastern Europe), and by country of birth (native-born, immigrants born in low- and middle-income countries [LMICs], or immigrants born in high-income countries [HICs]). Results Participants in Southern/Eastern Europe had lower mean test scores than those in Northern/Western Europe, and their scores did not differ by country of birth group. In Northern/Western Europe, compared with native-born participants, LMIC-born immigrants demonstrated lower mean grip strength (32.8 ± 7.6 kg vs. 35.7 ± 7.7 kg), delayed recall (2.9 ± 1.9 vs. 3.6 ± 1.9), and verbal fluency scores (16.0 ± 6.9 vs. 20.3 ± 7.0). HIC-born immigrants had mean scores higher than LMIC-born immigrants, but lower than native-born participants (all p<.001). Conclusions Cognitive and motor performance, measured from late middle age, were associated with national income levels of both country of residence and country of birth. This was similar to previously observed differences in frailty index scores. PMID:25232369

  1. Neural Activation During Submaximal Contractions Seems More Reflective of Neuromuscular Ageing than Maximal Voluntary Activation

    PubMed Central

    Scaglioni, Gil; Narici, Marco V.; Martin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at testing the hypothesis that differences in neural activation strategy during submaximal but not maximal plantarflexions exist between young and older men. Eleven young men (YM, 26 ± 4 years) and thirteen old men (OM, 76 ± 3 years) volunteered for the investigation. Maximal voluntary torque (MVT) was 38.2%, lower (p < 0.001) in OM than in YM, while voluntary activation was equivalent (~97%). The relationship between the interpolated twitch-torque and the voluntary torque (IT-VT relationship) was composite (curvilinear + exponential) for both age-groups. However, the OM showed accentuated concavity, as attested by the occurrence of the deviation from linearity at a lower contraction intensity (OM: 54.9 vs. YM: 71.9% MVT). In conclusion, ageing does not affect the capacity to fully activate the plantar flexors during maximal performances, but it alters the activation pattern for submaximal levels of effort. The greater age-related concavity of the IT-VT relationship suggests that, during submaximal contractions, OM need to reach a level of activation higher than YM to develop an equivalent relative torque. PMID:26941638

  2. Analogical reflection as a source for the science of life: Kant and the possibility of the biological sciences.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Dalia

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to the previously widespread view that Kant's work was largely in dialogue with the physical sciences, recent scholarship has highlighted Kant's interest in and contributions to the life sciences. Scholars are now investigating the extent to which Kant appealed to and incorporated insights from the life sciences and considering the ways he may have contributed to a new conception of living beings. The scholarship remains, however, divided in its interest: historians of science are concerned with the content of Kant's claims, and the ways in which they may or may not have contributed to the emerging science of life, while historians of philosophy focus on the systematic justifications for Kant's claims, e.g., the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of Kant's statement that living beings are mechanically inexplicable. My aim in this paper is to bring together these two strands of scholarship into dialogue by showing how Kant's methodological concerns (specifically, his notion of reflective judgment) contributed to his conception of living beings and to the ontological concern with life as a distinctive object of study. I argue that although Kant's explicit statement was that biology could not be a science, his implicit and more fundamental claim was that the study of living beings necessitates a distinctive mode of thought, a mode that is essentially analogical. I consider the implications of this view, and argue that it is by developing a new methodology for grasping organized beings that Kant makes his most important contribution to the new science of life. PMID:27474186

  3. Possible Mechanisms of a Southward Shift in Tropical Precipitation During the Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, A.; Wu, E.; Battisti, D. S.; Frierson, D. M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    A number of tropical hydroclimate reconstructions provide evidence for substantial changes in tropical rainfall patterns over the last millennium. One of the hypothesized features of the climate during the Little Ice Age (LIA; ca. 1300-1800 CE) is a more southerly position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). We evaluate the evidence for, and mechanisms of, a southward shift of tropical precipitation during the LIA, utilizing the last millennium simulations in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5/Paleoclimate Intercomparison Project Phase 3 archive. Six out of the seven model simulations analyzed demonstrate a southward shift in tropical precipitation during the LIA in (as determined by a decrease in tropical precipitation asymmetry between the Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere). While a southward shift of tropical precipitation during the LIA appears to be a robust feature across model simulations, the change is small and is manifested in the different model simulations in largely disparate ways. However, some common features emerge. We compare the simulated precipitation changes to proxy records and discuss to what extent the precipitation changes appear to be driven by thermodynamic scaling principles (i.e. a wet-get-drier, dry-get-wetter scenario associated with global cooling) and to what extent they appear to be tied to circulation changes in the atmosphere (e.g. a southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone).

  4. U-Pb Detrital Zircon Ages from Sarawak: Changes in Provenance Reflecting the Tectonic Evolution of Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfeld, H. T.; Galin, T.; Hall, R.

    2014-12-01

    Sarawak is located on the northern edge of Sundaland in NW Borneo. Five sedimentary basins are distinguished with ages from Triassic to Cenozoic. New light mineral, heavy mineral and U-Pb detrital zircon ages show differences in provenance reflecting the tectonic evolution of the region. The oldest clastic sediments are Triassic of the Sadong-Kuching Basin and were sourced by a Carnian to Norian volcanic arc and erosion of Cathaysian rocks containing zircons of Paleoproterozoic age. Sandstones of the Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous Bau-Pedawan Basin have distinctive zircon populations indicating a major change of tectonic setting, including initiation of subduction below present-day West Sarawak in the Late Jurassic. A wide range of inherited zircon ages indicates various Cathaysian fragments as major source areas and the arrival of the SW Borneo Block following subduction beneath the Schwaner Mountains in the early Late Cretaceous. After collision of the SW Borneo Block and the microcontinental fragments with Sundaland in the early Late Cretaceous, deep marine sedimentation (Pedawan Formation) ceased, and there was uplift forming the regional Pedawan-Kayan unconformity. Two episodes of extension were responsible for basin development on land from the latest Cretaceous onwards, probably in a strike-slip setting. The first episode formed the Kayan Basin in the Latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) to Early Paleocene, and the second formed the Ketungau Basin and the Penrissen Sandstone in the Middle to Late Eocene. Zircons indicate nearby volcanic activity throughout the Early Cenozoic in NW Borneo. Inherited zircon ages indicate an alternation between Borneo and Tin Belt source rocks. A large deep marine basin, the Rajang Basin, formed north of the Lupar Line fault. Zircons from sediments of the Rajang Basin indicate they are of similar age and provenance as the contemporaneous terrestrial sediments to the south suggesting a narrow steep continental Sundaland margin at the

  5. Awareness of the earth and possibilities for new science education in the Internet age.

    PubMed

    Takemura, S

    1999-01-01

    The internet as "the nervous system of global size" and multimedia technology have changed our global experience radically and suggests possibilities of entirely new approaches to the conventional education of sciences and the environment. They are not merely the changes where printed text books are converted into dynamic things with vivid appeal to our senses and information about the world's museums and art galleries, digitalized and shared by all. If the seismic activities occurring every day in various parts of the world can be seen in real form directly through the internet by all the people of the world, how will children's views of the earth change and how will their scientific understanding improved? If there was a system whereby one could monitor, in real time, how one member or others of the world net surf the global home pages, and if one could follow the "moving" process on the internet, children would certainly appreciate the presence of the internet as a global network of information. The web site "Sensorium" (http://www.sensorium.org) was created by us in an effort to put these live experiences of the internet into design. Sensorium is not a site merely to digitalize and list the existing knowledge and data. It is an experiment for the Digital Museum as a new "forum" where we may experience and share a moment. It is also an attempt to create tools for science and environment education which are only available on the network. PMID:10770086

  6. Attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared analysis of fly ash geopolymer gel aging.

    PubMed

    Rees, Catherine A; Provis, John L; Lukey, Grant C; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2007-07-17

    Structural changes in fly ash geopolymers activated with different sodium hydroxide and silicate concentrations are investigated using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy over a period of 200 days. A strong correlation is found between the concentration of silicate monomer in the activating solution and the position of the main Si-O-T stretching band in the FTIR spectrum, which gives an indication of the relative changes in the gel Si/Al ratio. The FTIR spectra of geopolymer samples with activating solution concentrations of up to 1.2 M SiO2 indicate that an Al-rich gel forms before the final gel composition is reached. The time required for the system to reach a steady gel composition depends on the silicate activating solution concentration and speciation. Geopolymers activated with solutions containing predominantly high-order silicate species rapidly reach a steady gel composition without first forming an Al-rich gel. A minimum silicate monomer concentration of approximately 0.6 M is required to shift the geopolymer synthesis mechanism from hydroxide activation to silicate activation. Silicate speciation in the activating solutions also affects zeolite formation and geopolymer microstructures, with a more homogeneous microstructure and less zeolite formation observed at a higher SiO2 content. PMID:17590027

  7. Three-dimensional structure of axonal mitochondria reflects the age of drosophila☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Honglian; Sun, Xiaojiang

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of axonal mitochondria using Fiji and Neurolucida software, and to observe directly the morphology and distribution of mitochondria in axons of motor neurons in dorsal longitudinal flight muscles of drosophila aged 5 days and 20 days, using electron microscopy. Results indicated that there was no difference in the total area and volume of mitochondria between 5-day-old drosophila and 20-day-old drosophila in all sections, but the ratio of mitochondrial total areas to axon total areas, as well as mitochondrial density of 20-day-old drosophila, was lower than that of 5-day-old drosophila. The number of mitochondria, whose volume was less than 1 000 000 μm3, and between 1 000 000 μm3 and 10 000 000 μm3, was higher in 20-day-old drosophila than that in 5-day-old drosophila. The number of mitochondria with a volume between 1 000 000 μm3 and 100 000 000 μm3 was apparently higher than those with a volume less than 1 000 000 μm3 or larger than 100 000 000 μm3. In addition, the number of mitochondria with a volume more than 100 000 000 μm3 was small; however, the volume was nearly 70% of the total volume in both 5-day-old and 20-day-old drosophila. In contrast, the number of mitochondria with a volume between 1 000 000 μm3 and 10 000 000 μm3 was large, but the volume was less than 30% of the total volume. These experimental findings suggest that changes in mitochondrial morphology and number in motor neurons from the dorsal longitudinal muscle of drosophila are present during different ages. PMID:25206706

  8. Megalandslide in the Northern Caucasus foredeep (Uspenskoye, Russia): geomorphology, possible mechanism and age constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pánek, T.; Hradecký, J.; Šilhán, K..; Strom, A. L.; Smolková, V.; Zerkal, O.

    2012-04-01

    Although worldwide datasets reveal that majority of giant landslides have occurred within the steepest portion of the Earth's landsurface, recent observations have brought evidence that some of the largest landslides originated in the low-relief landscapes and moved upon very gently inclined slip surfaces. Extremely large landslide with volume ~2.8 km3 was detected on the right bank of the Kuban river in the Northern Caucasus foredeep (Russian Federation). Megalandslide with gently inclined (<5°) slip surface originated within the low-gradient landscape formed by weak, nearly horizontally inclined clay-rich Miocene strata. Field analysis of numerous outcrops within the landslide body together with interpretations of DEM and satellite images revealed two stages of gravitational emplacement. Major phase was connected with rather catastrophic rotational blockslide transforming in the distal part to the earthflow. Secondary phase was attributed to the steepening of the landslide toe due to the lateral erosion of the Kuban river. As a consequence, multiply rotational collapse of the distal part of megalandslide took place. OSL and radiocarbon dating of both deformed soil and loess-like deposits overlying landslide body suggest possible formation of the Uspenskoye megalandslide between ~18-35 ka BP. Inferring trigger of the major megalandslide movement remains rather speculative, but we prefer palaeoseismic hypothesis in connection with rupture of some Late Quaternary fault in the vicinity of landslide area. Area of megalandslide is recently subject of intensive denudation marked by activity of numerous shallow landslides, gully erosion and dynamic aggradation (>2 m during last ~300 years) of material within valley floors.

  9. A megalandslide in the Northern Caucasus foredeep (Uspenskoye, Russia): Geomorphology, possible mechanism and age constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pánek, Tomáš; Šilhán, Karel; Hradecký, Jan; Strom, Alexander; Smolková, Veronika; Zerkal, Oleg

    2012-12-01

    An extremely large landslide, ~ 2.8 km3 in volume and 32 km2 in area, has been detected on the right bank of the Kuban River in the Northern Caucasus foredeep (Russian Federation). The megalandslide has a very gently inclined slip surface (< 5°) and originated in a low-gradient landscape formed by weak, nearly horizontally inclined Miocene limestones overlying clay-rich strata. It is one of the largest documented slope failures in the world originating in low-gradient settings outside of high-relief mountain regions. Field analysis of 22 outcrops within the landslide body and interpretations of a 3″ SRTM digital elevation model and satellite images indicate at least two stages of emplacement. It started as a catastrophic rotational blockslide and turned into an earthflow in the distal part of the landslide. The secondary phase is attributed to a steepening of the landslide toe due to lateral erosion of the Kuban River. As a consequence, multiple rotational collapses of the distal part of the megalandslide occurred. OSL and AMS radiocarbon dating of deformed soil and loess overlying the landslide body suggest possible formation of the megalandslide between ~ 13 and 35 ka BP. Although the trigger of the megalandslide is difficult to establish, we hypothesise that during the slightly moister interval of the Last Glacial, it may have been triggered by an earthquake associated with the rupture of the Late Quaternary Kazminskiy Fault nearby. Fragmented and weakened material from the megalandslide has recently been subjected to intensive denudation by numerous shallow landslides, gully erosion and subsequent aggradation of material on valley floors.

  10. Aging and thermal stability of Mg/SiC and Mg/Y2O3 reflection multilayers in the 25-35 nm region

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Takeo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Banse, Takanori; Saito, Katsuhiko; Kondo, Yuji; Ichimaru, Satoshi; Takenaka, Hisataka

    2005-09-10

    Reflection measurements in the 25-35 nm region were made for Mg/SiC and Mg/Y2O3 multilayers kept in a low-humidity atmosphere for 4 or 5 years. Aged Mg/SiC multilayers keep their reflectances, and the reflectance value at 31.2 nm is 0.44 at 10 deg. of the normal angle of incidence. Aged Mg/Y2O3 multilayers change reflectance as top layer materials, and the best value at 30.1 nm is 0.40 at 10 deg. . Reflection measurements are also made for Mg-based multilayers that are annealed from room temperature to 400 deg. C at 50 deg. C intervals. Both multilayers keep their reflectance at annealing temperatures of 200 deg. C. These results suggest that both Mg-based multilayers can be applied to practical optics.

  11. Transfer of Nature of Science Understandings into Similar Contexts: Promises and Possibilities of an Explicit Reflective Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishfe, Rola

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) investigate the effectiveness of explicit nature of science (NOS) instruction in the context of controversial socioscientific issues and (b) explore whether the transfer of acquired NOS understandings, which were explicitly taught in the context of one socioscientific context, into other similar contexts (familiar and unfamiliar) was possible. Participants were 10th grade students in two intact sections at one high school. The treatment involved teaching a six-week unit about genetic engineering. For one group (non-NOS group), there was no explicit instruction about NOS. For the other group (NOS group), explicit instruction about three NOS aspects (subjective, empirical, and tentative) was dispersed across the genetic engineering unit. A questionnaire including two open-ended scenarios, in conjunction with semi-structured interviews, was used to assess the change in participants' understandings of NOS and their ability to transfer their acquired understandings into similar contexts. The first scenario involved a familiar context about genetically modified food and the second one focused on an unfamiliar context about water fluoridation. Results showed no improvement in NOS understandings of participants in the non-NOS group in relation to the familiar and unfamiliar contexts. On the other hand, there was a general improvement in the NOS understandings of participants in the NOS group in relation to both the familiar and unfamiliar contexts. Implications about the transfer of participants' acquired NOS understandings on the basis of the distance between the context of learning and that of application are highlighted and discussed in link with the classroom learning environment.

  12. Possible effects of anthropogenically-increased CO2 on the dynamics of climate - Implications for ice age cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Barry; Maasch, Kirk A.; Verbitsky, Mikhail YA.

    1993-01-01

    A dynamical model, developed to account for the observed major variations of global ice mass and atmospheric CO2 during the late Cenozoic, is used to provide a quantitative demonstration of the possibility that the anthropogenically-forced increase of atmospheric CO2, if maintained over a long period of time (perhaps by tectonic forcing), could displace the climatic system from an unstable regime of oscillating ice ages into a more stable regime representative of the pre-Pleistocene. This stable regime is characterized by orbitally-forced oscillations that are of much weaker amplitude than prevailed during the Pleistocene.

  13. Effects of leaf age within growth stages of pepper and sorghum plants on leaf thickness, water, chlorophyll, and light reflectance. [in spectral vegetation discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Cardenas, R.; Berumen, A.

    1974-01-01

    Pepper and sorghum plants (characterized by porous and compact leaf mesophylls, respectively) were used to study the influence of leaf age on light reflectance. Measurements were limited to the upper five nodal positions within each growth stage, since upper leaves make up most of the reflectance surfaces remotely sensed. The increase in leaf thickness and water content with increasing leaf age was taken into consideration, since each of these factors affects the reflectance as well as the selection of spectral wavelength intervals for optimum discrimination of vegetation.

  14. Increased BrdU incorporation reflecting DNA repair, neuronal de-differentiation or possible neurogenesis in the adult cochlear nucleus following bilateral cochlear lesions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiwen; Begum, Shaeza; Zhang, Chu; Fleming, Kirk; Masumura, Chisako; Zhang, Ming; Smith, Paul; Darlington, Cynthia

    2011-05-01

    Neurogenesis is known to occur in response to injury in the brain, for example, as a result of neurodegenerative diseases. However, there have been few investigations into how the brain responds to damage to peripheral sensory nerves, in other areas such as the brainstem. Here, we report that bilateral surgical lesions of the cochlea result in increased incorporation of the DNA replication marker, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), in cells of the brainstem cochlear nucleus (CN) of the adult rat, suggesting either cell proliferation or DNA repair. Some of the BrdU-labelled cells colabelled for the mature neuron marker, NeuN and the GABAergic enzyme GAD-65, suggesting the possibility that neurogenesis might have occurred and resulted in the generation of new neurons with a GABAergic phenotype. However, some of the mature neurons also re-expressed immature neuronal intermediate filament and microtuble-associated proteins, without apoptotic neuronal death, which suggests that the colabelling of BrdU with NeuN and GAD-65 may not be a true reflection of neurogenesis, but injury-stimulated neuronal dedifferentiation. These results suggest the possibility that DNA repair, neuronal de-differentiation or possible neurogenesis occurs in the cochlear nucleus, in response to damage to the peripheral auditory system. PMID:21104237

  15. Possible contribution of prostatic anterior fibromuscular stroma to age-related urinary disturbance in reference to pressure-flow study.

    PubMed

    Ukimura, Osamu; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Ushijima, So; Suzuki, Kei; Honjo, Hisashi; Okihara, Koji; Mizutani, Yoichi; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2004-05-01

    Recently, we reported that the anterior fibromuscular stroma (AFMS) of the prostate has significant different innervation compared with the other glandular regions of the prostate. In healthy volunteers (n = 12) using transrectal ultrasound (US), or TRUS, monitoring during voiding, we observed dynamic change (p < 0.0001) of the thickness of the AFMS during voiding. The aim of this study was to reveal the possible functional contribution of the AFMS to micturition, as well as the age-related voiding dysfunction. In the patients (n = 56) with voiding dysfunction who underwent both pressure-flow study (PFS) for determining obstruction and TRUS monitoring during voiding, we measured the ultrasonic dynamic change of the lower urinary tract during voiding. In old men with voiding dysfunction, ultrasonic measurements of dynamic change in the AFMS (p < 0.01) as well as the opening urethra (p < 0.05) could contribute to diagnosing of the anatomical localization of obstructive lesions. The poor movement of AFMS could account for the age-related urinary disturbance in the patients without benign prostatic enlargement and without bladder neck obstruction. PMID:15183221

  16. Red tide detection by means of peak shift of remote sensing reflectance and possibility of red tide detection with polarized radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Kohei; Terayama, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    A method for detection of red tide by means of remote sensing reflectance peak shift is proposed together with suspended solid influence eliminations. Although remote sensing reflectance peak is situated at around 550nm for sea water without suffered from red tide, the peak is shifted to the longer wavelength when sea water is suffered from red tide. Based on this fact, it is capable to detect red tide using high wavelength resolution of spectral-radiometers. The proposed system uses web camera with band-pass filter on the optics surface. Acquired imagery data can be transmitted through wireless LAN to Internet terminal and can be archived in server through Internet. Validity of the proposed method is confirmed with the system deployed in Ariake Sea which is situated in northern Kyushu, Japan. Also a method for red tide detection with satellite imagery data is attempted with suspended solid influence eliminations. Furthermore, a possibility of red tide detection with polarized radiance measurements is discussed through polarization camera derived sue surface imagery data, in particular, for non-spherical shape of red tide.

  17. Does the age-related "anterior shift" of the P3 reflect an inability to habituate the novelty response?

    PubMed Central

    Alperin, Brittany R.; Mott, Katherine K.; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Daffner, Kirk R.

    2014-01-01

    Old adults often generate larger anterior neural responses than young adults when carrying out task requirements. A common finding in the ERP literature is an "anterior shift" of the P3b to targets. Utilizing principal component analysis (PCA), we recently demonstrated that rather than the P3b moving anteriorly, old adults generate a large P3a that temporally overlaps with their P3b. A dominant hypothesis for the age-related increase in anterior P3 is the failure to habituate the brain’s novelty response to rare targets. We tested this hypothesis in young and old adults by comparing the amplitude of the PCA factor representing P3a to targets presented in the first versus last of eight blocks of a visual oddball task. If, unlike young adults, old adults are unable to habituate a novelty response, one would expect 1) the P3a amplitude to decrease between the first and last blocks for young, but not old subjects and 2) the difference in P3a amplitude between young and old subjects to be greater in the last than the first block. Our results indicate the amplitude of the P3a was larger in old adults than young adults. However, this effect was not modulated by block. These findings argue against the hypothesis that an age-related increase in the P3a to targets reflects an inability of old subjects to habituate a novelty response. An alternative hypothesis is that the augmented P3a indexes the increased utilization of frontal executive functions to provide compensatory scaffolding to carry out a task. PMID:24905171

  18. Study of the possibility of increasing the probing depth by the method of reflection confocal microscopy upon immersion clearing of near-surface human skin layers

    SciTech Connect

    Meglinskii, I V; Bashkatov, A N; Genina, Elina A; Tuchin, Valerii V; Churmakov, D Yu

    2002-10-31

    The possibility of increasing the human-skin probing depth by the method of reflection confocal microscopy (RCM) upon decreasing the amplitude of spatial fluctuations of the refractive index of the upper skin layers is considered. A change in the probing depth is estimated by analysing the spatial distribution of the probability density of the effective optical paths of detected photons calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The results of the numerical simulation are interpreted within the framework of the possible application of RCM to the study of the human skin exposed to an immersion liquid compatible to it. A diffusion of the immersion agent into the skin depth involves the equalising of the refractive indices of the structural elements of near-surface skin layers, which in turn causes a decrease in the scattering intensity and a certain increase in the transparency of the upper tissue layers. It is shown that a decrease in the light scattering in the near-surface skin layers leads to a significant increase in the probing depth obtained with the RCM technique.

  19. Principal component analysis for surface reflection components and structure in the facial image and synthesis of the facial image in various ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Misa; Toyota, Saori; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Ogawa-Ochiai, Keiko; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, principal component analysis is applied to pigmentation distributions, surface reflectance components and facial landmarks in the whole facial images to obtain feature values. Furthermore, the relationship between the obtained feature vectors and age is estimated by multiple regression analysis to modulate facial images in woman of ages 10 to 70. In our previous work, we analyzed only pigmentation distributions and the reproduced images looked younger than the reproduced age by the subjective evaluation. We considered that this happened because we did not modulate the facial structures and detailed surfaces such as wrinkles. By analyzing landmarks represented facial structures and surface reflectance components, we analyzed the variation of facial structures and fine asperity distributions as well as pigmentation distributions in the whole face. As a result, our method modulate the appearance of a face by changing age more appropriately.

  20. Behavioral deficits during early stages of aging in Caenorhabditis elegans result from locomotory deficits possibly linked to muscle frailty.

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Charles F.; Chow, David K.; Gami, Minaxi S.; Iser, Wendy B.; Hanselman, Keaton B.; Wolkow, Catherine A.; David, Lawrence; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Cooke, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    Many behavioral responses require the coordination of sensory inputs with motor outputs. Aging is associated with progressive declines in both motor function and muscle structure. However, the consequences of age-related motor deficits upon behavior have not been clearly defined. Here, we examined the effects of aging on behavior in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. As animals aged, mild locomotory deficits appeared that were sufficient to impair behavioral responses to sensory cues. In contrast, sensory ability appeared well-maintained during aging. Age-related behavioral declines were delayed in animals with mutations in the daf-2/insulin-like pathway governing longevity. A decline in muscle tissue integrity was correlated with the onset of age-related behavioral deficits, although significant muscle deterioration did not. Treatment with a muscarinic agonist significantly improved locomotory behavior in aged animals, indicating that improved neuromuscular signaling may be one strategy for reducing the severity of age-related behavioral impairments. PMID:15699524

  1. Behavioral deficits during early stages of aging in Caenorhabditis elegans result from locomotory deficits possibly linked to muscle frailty.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Charles F; Chow, David K; David, Lawrence; Cooke, Carol A; Gami, Minaxi S; Iser, Wendy B; Hanselman, Keaton B; Goldberg, Ilya G; Wolkow, Catherine A

    2004-12-01

    Many behavioral responses require the coordination of sensory inputs with motor outputs. Aging is associated with progressive declines in both motor function and muscle structure. However, the consequences of age-related motor deficits on behavior have not been clearly defined. Here, we examined the effects of aging on behavior in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. As animals aged, mild locomotory deficits appeared that were sufficient to impair behavioral responses to sensory cues. In contrast, sensory ability appeared well maintained during aging. Age-related behavioral declines were delayed in animals with mutations in the daf-2/insulin-like pathway governing longevity. A decline in muscle tissue integrity was correlated with the onset of age-related behavioral deficits, although significant muscle deterioration was not. Treatment with a muscarinic agonist significantly improved locomotory behavior in aged animals, indicating that improved neuromuscular signaling may be one strategy for reducing the severity of age-related behavioral impairments. PMID:15699524

  2. Microglial AGE-albumin is critical for neuronal death in Parkinson’s disease: a possible implication for theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Bayarsaikhan, Enkhjargal; Bayarsaikhan, Delger; Lee, Jaesuk; Son, Myeongjoo; Oh, Seyeon; Moon, Jeongsik; Park, Hye-Jeong; Roshini, Arivazhagan; Kim, Seung U; Song, Byoung-Joon; Jo, Seung-Mook; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), by inducing protein aggregation and cross-link, formation of Lewy body, and neuronal death. In this study, we observed that AGE-albumin, the most abundant AGE product in the human PD brain, is synthesized in activated microglial cells and accumulates in the extracellular space. AGE-albumin synthesis in human-activated microglial cells is distinctly inhibited by ascorbic acid and cytochalasin treatment. Accumulated AGE-albumin upregulates the receptor to AGE, leading to apoptosis of human primary dopamine (DA) neurons. In animal experiments, we observed reduced DA neuronal cell death by treatment with soluble receptor to AGE. Our study provides evidence that activated microglial cells are one of the main contributors in AGE-albumin accumulation, deleterious to DA neurons in human and animal PD brains. Finally, activated microglial AGE-albumin could be used as a diagnostic and therapeutic biomarker with high sensitivity for neurodegenerative disorders, including PD. PMID:27601894

  3. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance – Part II: Development of an accelerated aging method for roofing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley E.; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea V.; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amandine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-01-09

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products₋single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles₋and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. In conclusion, this accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  4. Identification of possible recent water/lava source fissures in the Cerberus Plains: stratigraphic and crater count age constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Rebecca J.

    2013-04-01

    The Cerberus plains are one of the youngest surfaces on Mars. They are thought to have been formed by lava and/or water flows, but there is considerable debate regarding the source of this material. Much of the material forming the western plains, including the Athabasca Valles outflow channels, appears to have flowed from the region of the Cerberus Fossae graben system [1,2,3] and limited areas forming the eastern plains may have been erupted by low shield volcanoes [4,5]. However, flow of material from west to east is obstructed by a ridge centred on 157°E, 7°N and, prior to this study, vents which might be the source of fluid of a low enough viscosity to form the majority of the flat eastern plains had not been identified. We studied new HiRISE (25cm/px, High Resolution Science Imaging Experiment) images of the ridge between the east and west plains and observed possible source vents for this material: the ridge is cut by a series of pits and fissures which lie at the heads of flows and channels extending towards the surrounding plains. In order to establish the stratigraphic relationships between the vents and plains, this study produced large scale geomorphological maps based on the HiRISE images. The mapping showed that both incised channels and leveed flows extend onto the plain to the south of the ridge and that these were the final phase of plains-forming activity in that region. Conversely, to the north, ridge-sourced deposits only form the plains surface close to the ridge - beyond that, they are overlain by large-scale regional flows that appear to have originated from the direction of Athabasca Valles. In the southeast, a large-scale flow which does not emanate from this ridge forms the plains surface, but there is evidence that the youngest outflow activity from the ridge was contemporaneous with emplacement of this unit. We also performed crater counts to age-date the surfaces and these indicate that plains-forming and ridge-sourced units are of a

  5. Hydroclimatic changes in China and surroundings during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age: spatial patterns and possible mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianhui; Chen, Fahu; Feng, Song; Huang, Wei; Liu, Jianbao; Zhou, Aifeng

    2015-01-01

    Investigating hydroclimatic changes during key periods such as the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, 1000-1300 AD) and the Little Ice Age (LIA, 1400-1900 AD) is of fundamental importance for quantifying the responses of precipitation to greenhouse gas-induced warming on regional and global scales. This study synthesizes the most up-to-date and comprehensive proxy moisture/precipitation records during the past 1000 years in China and surroundings. The proxy data collected include 34 records from arid central Asia (ACA) and 37 records from monsoonal Asia. Our results demonstrate a pattern of generally coherent regional moisture variations during the MCA and LIA. In mid-latitude Asia north of 30°N, monsoonal northern China (North China and Northeast China) was generally wetter, while ACA (Northwest China and Central Asia) was generally drier during the MCA than in the LIA (a West-East mode). The boundary between wetter northern China and drier ACA was roughly consistent with the modern summer monsoon boundary. In monsoonal China to the east of 105°E, the northern part was generally wetter, while the southern part was generally drier during the MCA than in the LIA (a North-South mode), with a boundary roughly along the Huai River at about 34°N. These spatial patterns of moisture/precipitation variations are also identified by instrumental data during the past 50 years. In order to understand the possible mechanisms related to the moisture variations during the MCA and LIA, we investigate the major SST and atmospheric modes (e.g. the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)) which affect the moisture/precipitation variations in the study region using both the instrumental data and the reconstructed time series. It is found that the ENSO may play an important role in determining hydroclimatic variability over China and surroundings on a multi-centennial time-scale; and that the foregoing

  6. Integrating Curriculum and Practice with Students and Their Field Supervisors: Reflections on Spirituality and The Aging (Rosa) Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkenmaier, Julie; Behrman, Gary; Berg-Weger, Marla

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge and sensitivity about diverse aging populations is a rapidly emerging area of interest in higher education. The next decades will see dramatic increases in the number of older adults in the United States (Administration on Aging (AOA), 2000). Recognizing and utilizing spiritual and religious traditions holds special significance when…

  7. A Reflection on Aging: A Portfolio of Change in Attitudes toward Geriatric Patients during a Clerkship Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Duca, Danny; Duque, Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    The process of students' evaluation in medical schools has changed from a tutor-led evaluation system based on students' performance to a student-based evaluation that involves self-reflection and their level of change in skills and attitudes. At the McGill University Division of Geriatric Medicine, we developed an innovative system of evaluation…

  8. Critical Pedagogy in the New Dark Ages: Challenges and Possibilities. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. Volume 422

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolakaki, Maria, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book unmasks the neoliberal ideology that led modern civilization to withdraw from its previous accomplishments into what may be called the new Dark Ages. The international group of contributors to this volume aggressively rejects the siege of society by capitalism and the resulting deterioration. These authors engage a critical pedagogy that…

  9. Aging.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Choon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2013-09-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  10. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  11. Systemic Inflammation Impairs Attention and Cognitive Flexibility but Not Associative Learning in Aged Rats: Possible Implications for Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Culley, Deborah J.; Snayd, Mary; Baxter, Mark G.; Xie, Zhongcong; Lee, In Ho; Rudolph, James; Inouye, Sharon K.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a common and morbid condition in elderly hospitalized patients. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood but inflammation has been implicated based on a clinical association with systemic infection and surgery and preclinical data showing that systemic inflammation adversely affects hippocampus-dependent memory. However, clinical manifestations and imaging studies point to abnormalities not in the hippocampus but in cortical circuits. We therefore tested the hypothesis that systemic inflammation impairs prefrontal cortex function by assessing attention and executive function in aged animals. Aged (24-month-old) Fischer-344 rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 μg/kg) or saline and were tested on the attentional set-shifting task (AST), an index of integrity of the prefrontal cortex, on days 1–3 post-injection. Plasma and frontal cortex concentrations of the cytokine TNFα and the chemokine CCL2 were measured by ELISA in separate groups of identically treated, age-matched rats. LPS selectively impaired reversal learning and attentional shifts without affecting discrimination learning in the AST, indicating a deficit in attention and cognitive flexibility but not learning globally. LPS increased plasma TNFα and CCL2 acutely but this resolved within 24–48 h. TNFα in the frontal cortex did not change whereas CCL2 increased nearly threefold 2 h after LPS but normalized by the time behavioral testing started 24 h later. Together, our data indicate that systemic inflammation selectively impairs attention and executive function in aged rodents and that the cognitive deficit is independent of concurrent changes in frontal cortical TNFα and CCL2. Because inattention is a prominent feature of clinical delirium, our data support a role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of this clinical syndrome and suggest this animal model could be useful for studying that relationship further. PMID:24959140

  12. T-kininogen: a biomarker of aging in Fisher 344 rats with possible implications for the immune response.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Gómez, Christian R; Pérez, Viviana; Li, Min; Torres, Claudio; Walter, Robin; Murasko, Donna M; Sierra, Felipe

    2006-07-01

    T-kininogen (T-KG) is a reliable biomarker of aging in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Here we confirm, in a longitudinal study, a similar behavior in Fisher 344 rats of both sexes. In males, the increase in serum levels of T-KG follows an exponential curve, whereas in females the increase is best fitted by a linear curve. In both genders, dietary restriction delays the increase in T-KG. We have previously shown that T-KG inhibits T lymphocyte proliferation. Here we show that serum T-KG levels correlate negatively with the ability of splenocytes (most likely B cells) to proliferate in response to lipopolysaccharide. A similar correlation was not observed with other markers of inflammation, including alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), haptoglobin, or interleukin-10. We conclude that the increase in serum T-KG represents a useful biomarker of aging in Fisher 344, and it correlates with decreased lymphocyte proliferation with age, although a cause-effect relationship has not been established. PMID:16870624

  13. Possible therapeutic benefits of adenosine-potentiating drugs in reducing age-related degenerative disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzzi, R J; Baker, D J

    2003-10-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous, biologically important molecule that is a precursor of other biologically active molecules. It also is a component of some co-factors and has distinct physiological actions in its own right. Levels are maintained by synthesis from dietary precursors and re-cycling. The daily turnover of adenosine is very high. Adenosine can act either as a hormone by binding to adenosine receptors, four adenosine receptor subtypes have been identified, and as an intracellular modulator, after transport into the cell by membrane transporter proteins. One of the principal intracellular actions of adenosine is inhibition of the enzyme phosphodiesterase. Extracellular adenosine also has specific neuromodulatory actions on dopamine and glutamate. Selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists of adenosine are available. The tasks of developing, evaluating and exploiting the therapeutic potential of these compounds is still in its infancy. Adenosine has actions in the central nervous system (CNS), heart and vascular system, skeletal muscle and the immune system and the presence of receptors suggests potential actions in the gonads and other organs. Adenosine agonists improve tissue perfusion through actions on vascular smooth muscle and erythrocyte fluidity and they can be used to improve the quality of life in aged dogs. This article reviews the therapeutic potential of adenosine-potentiating drugs in the treatment of age-related conditions in companion animals, some of which may be exacerbated by castration or spaying at an early age. PMID:14633184

  14. Possible Mechanisms Underlying Aging-Related Changes in Early Diastolic Filling and Long Axis Motion—Left Ventricular Length and Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Peverill, Roger E.; Chou, Bon; Donelan, Lesley; Mottram, Philip M.; Gelman, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The transmitral E wave and the peak velocity of early diastolic mitral annular motion (e`) both decrease with age, but the mechanisms underlying these age-related changes are incompletely understood. This study investigated the possible contributions of blood pressure (BP) and left ventricular end-diastolic length (LVEDL) to age-related reductions in E and e`. Methods The study group were 82 healthy adult subjects <55 years of age who were not obese or hypertensive. Transmitral flow and mitral annular motion were recorded using pulsed-wave Doppler. LVEDL was measured from the mitral annular plane to the apical endocardium. Results Age was positively correlated with diastolic BP and septal wall thickness (SWT), inversely correlated with LVEDL (β = -0.25) after adjustment for sex and body surface area, but was not related to left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD). Age was also inversely correlated with E (r = -0.36), septal e`(r = -0.53) and lateral e`(r = -0.53). On multivariable analysis, E was inversely correlated with diastolic BP and LVEDD, septal e`was inversely correlated with diastolic BP and positively correlated with SWT and LVEDL, after adjusting for body mass index, whilst lateral e`was inversely correlated with diastolic BP and positively correlated with LVEDL. Conclusion The above findings are consistent with higher BP being a contributor to age-related reductions in both E and e`and shortening of LVEDL with age being a contributor to the age-related reduction in e`. An implication of these findings is that slowing of myocyte relaxation is unlikely to be the sole, and may not be the main, mechanism underlying age-related decreases in E and e`. PMID:27351745

  15. Human Aging and Retirement: Questions Unresolved and Resolved. Some Reflections on Contemporary Gerontology and its Relevance to Retirement Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhee, H. A.

    The report is a general multidisciplinary survey of current areas of interest in the field of gerontology, especially those having to do with retirement and the provision of social security. Chapter 1 discusses social security as an issue in gerontology and the concern of social security with retirement and aging. Chapter 2 discusses the "Third…

  16. Age and provenance of the target materials for tektites and possible impactites as inferred from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr systematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, H. F.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical, trace element, and isotopic compositions of tektites are consistent with production by melting of sediments derived from the old terrestrial continental crust. Each tektite group is characterized by a uniform Nd model age, interpreted as the time of formation of the crustal segment which weathered to form the parent sediment for the tektites. Sr model ages are variable within each group, reflecting Rb-Sr fractionation, and, in the favorable limit of very high Rb/Sr ratios, approach the time of sedimentation of the parent material which melted to form the tektites. Unlike tektites, which are dense homogeneous objects, sanidine spherules are porous, fine grained inhomogeneous objects. The leaching experiment employed by the present study shows that the sanidine spherules could have been formed by an oceanic impact involving basaltic crust and overlying sediments or seawater.

  17. Possible secondary apatite fission track age standard from altered volcanic ash beds in the middle Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowallis, B.J.; Christiansen, E.H.; Everett, B.H.; Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Miller, D.S.; Deino, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary age standards are valuable in intra- and interlaboratory calibration. At present very few such standards are available for fission track dating that is older than Tertiary. Several altered volcanic ash beds occur in the Middle Jurassic Carmel Formation in southwestern Utah. The formation was deposited in a shallow marine/sabhka environment. Near Gunlock, Utah, eight ash beds have been identified. Sanidines from one of the ash beds (GUN-F) give a single-crystal laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar age of 166.3??0.8 Ma (2??). Apatite and zircon fission track ages range from 152-185 Ma with typically 15-20 Ma errors (2??). Track densities in zircons are high and most grains are not countable. Apatites are fairly common in most of the ash beds and have reasonable track densities ranging between 1.2-1.5 ?? 106 tracks/cm2. Track length distributions in apatites are unimodal, have standard deviations <1??m, and mean track lengths of about 14-14.5 ??m. High Cl apatites (F:Cl:OH ratio of 39:33:28) are particularly abundant and large in ash GUN-F, and are fairly easy to concentrate, but the concentrates contain some siderite, most of which can be removed by sieving. GUN-F shows evidence of some reworking and detriaal contamination based on older single grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses and some rounding of grains, but the apatite population appears to be largely uncontaminated. At present BJK has approximately 12 of apatite separate from GUN-F. ?? 1993.

  18. Age and dynamics of the Namib Sand Sea: A review of chronological evidence and possible landscape development models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, A. E. C.

    2013-06-01

    The Namib Sand Sea constitutes a major physiographic feature of the Namib Desert on the west of Namibia, covering a 50-160 km wide region of the coast between Lüderitz and Walvis Bay. It is widely considered to be one of the oldest desert regions, with a Tertiary-aged fossil desert underlying the modern sand sea. The sand sea has been well studied, benefiting from the presence of the Gobabeb Training and Research Centre during the past 50 years. Whilst much is understood about its sediments and geomorphology, it is only recently that new chronological information, using cosmogenic-nuclide burial dating and optically stimulated luminescence dating have offered new insights, and this calls for an updated review of the age and landscape development of the sand sea. This assessment of the geomorphological and Quaternary dynamics of the region is complemented by developments in the description and analysis of sediment composition. New age control from cosmogenic dating indicates that the sand sea is in excess of a million years old. Initial data from luminescence dating yields depositional ages for dune sediments from three broad areas of the sand sea that include MIS 5, later in the Pleistocene around the Last Glacial Maximum and the Holocene, although it is not expected that these will be the only, or discrete age groupings. Detailed dating and application of ground penetrating radar in the far northern reaches reveals extensive dune migration and deposition during the Holocene. It is important to stress that the upper limit of luminescence dating here is about ˜200 ka (depending on the environmental dose rate of the site) and that migration and reworking of dunes resets the luminescence signal (so what is recorded is(are) the last phase(s) of preserved sediment accumulation). Whilst there are three potential sources of material for the Namib Sand Sea (reworked Tsondab Sandstone (TSS), material from the Great Escarpment derived by rivers and water and wind

  19. Aging and magnetism: Presenting a possible new holistic paradigm for ameliorating the aging process and the effects thereof, through externally applied physiologic PicoTesla magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jerry; Sherlag, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    A new holistic paradigm is proposed for slowing our genomic-based biological clocks (e.g. regulation of telomere length), and decreasing heat energy exigencies for maintenance of physiologic homeostasis. Aging is considered the result of a progressive slow burn in small volumes of tissues with increase in the quantum entropic states; producing desiccation, microscopic scarring, and disruption of cooperative coherent states. Based upon piezoelectricity, i.e. photon-phonon transductions, physiologic PicoTesla range magnetic fields may decrease the production of excessive heat energy through target specific, bio molecular resonant interactions, renormalization of intrinsic electromagnetic tissue profiles, and autonomic modulation. Prospectively, we hypothesize that deleterious effects of physical trauma, immunogenic microbiological agents, stress, and anxiety may be ameliorated. A particle-wave equation is cited to ascertain magnetic field parameters for application to the whole organism thereby achieving desired homeostasis; secondary to restoration of structure and function on quantum levels. We hypothesize that it is at the atomic level that physical events shape the flow of signals and the transmission of energy in bio molecular systems. References are made to experimental data indicating the aspecific efficacy of non-ionizing physiologic magnetic field profiles for treatment of various pathologic states. PMID:26092501

  20. Reflecting Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galea, Simone

    2012-01-01

    This paper demystifies reflective practice on teaching by focusing on the idea of reflection itself and how it has been conceived by two philosophers, Plato and Irigaray. It argues that reflective practice has become a standardized method of defining the teacher in teacher education and teacher accreditation systems. It explores how practices of…

  1. Effects of breed, sex, and age on the variation and ability of fecal near-infrared reflectance spectra to predict the composition of goat diets.

    PubMed

    Walker, J W; Campbell, E S; Lupton, C J; Taylor, C A; Waldron, D F; Landau, S Y

    2007-02-01

    The effects of breed, sex, and age of goats on fecal near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy-predicted percentage juniper in the diet were investigated, as were spectral differences in feces from goats differing in estimated genetic merit for juniper consumption. Eleven goats from each breed, sex, and age combination, representing 2 breeds (Angora and meat-type), 3 sex classifications (female, intact male, and castrated male), and 2 age categories [adult and kid (less than 12 mo of age)] were fed complete, pelleted rations containing 0 or 14% juniper. After 7 d on the same diet, fecal samples were collected for 3 d, and the spectra from the 3 replicate samples were averaged. Fecal samples were assigned to calibration or validation data sets. In a second experiment, Angora and meat goats with high or low estimated genetic merit for juniper consumption were fed the same diet to determine the effect of consumer group on fecal spectra. Feces were scanned in the 1,100- to 2,500-nm range with a scanning reflectance monochromator. Fecal spectra were analyzed for the difference in spectral characteristics and for differences in predicted juniper in the diet using internal and independent calibration equations. Internal calibration had a high precision (R(2) = 0.94), but the precision of independent validations (r(2) = 0.56) was low. Spectral differences were affected by diet, sex, breed, and age (P < 0.04). However, diet was the largest source of variation in spectral differences. Predicted percentage of juniper in the diet also showed that diet was the largest source of variation, accounting for 95% of the variation in predictions from internal calibrations and 51% of the variation in independent validations. Predictions from independent calibrations readily detected differences (P < 0.001) in the percentage of juniper in the 2 diets, and the predicted differences were similar to the actual differences. Predicted juniper in the diet was also affected by sex. Feces from

  2. The Neogene Akcasehir formation; A possible new constrain on the age of the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroglu, F.; Kazanci, N.; Emre, O.; Dogan, A.; Sarac, G.

    2003-04-01

    There are several suggestions on the age of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) from the Middle Miocene to latest Pliocene. Late/ latest Pliocene periods were inferred by the some authors of this paper in their previous studies. We present new geological and geomorphological evidence for the age and total offset of the NAF from the Gerede-Ilgaz section. The Akcasehir Formation (AF) of Neogene is a coarse-grained, continental succession which formed at the western part of the (NAF), particularly in the Yenicaga-Gerede-Eskipazar areas where outcrops are seen as patches because of erosion and/or recent cover. The AF overlies unconformably the Eocene units and it is overlain by volcanic rocks of late Neogene in some places and/or travertines of Quaternary age. The present thickness of the succession varies between 50-150 m to outcrops, however the thicker sections are in the Eskipazar area. The exposures of the AF are found both on the north and south sides of the NAF. The main sedimentary facies of the succession, in ascending order, are bouldery conglomerates of alluvial fans at the base, medium to fine grained conglomerates and sandstones of fluvial systems, mudstones of a marsh environment and limestones of a lacustrine environment. The latter is seen only on southern side of the NAF and is some times succeded by fluvial deposits. The mudstone facies of the succession includes a typical micro-mammalian fauna assemblages of Early Pliocene. A palaeontological interpretation of AF is that it has been deposited c. 4 ma ago in a continental basin. Also, facies analysis and environmental reconstruction suggest the AF was deposited as a succession fining upward and then coarsening upward in a tectonically controlled basin with a N-S prolongation. Probably, the southern margin of that basin was tectonically more active during the deposition when there was onlapping of lacustrine limestones on the alluvial fan deposits; and also onto the higher reliefs of bedrock. The so mapped

  3. From 'the thing to do' to 'defying the ravages of age': older women reflect on the use of lipstick.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Laura Hurd; Bundon, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Using data from in-depth interviews with 36 women, aged 71 to 93, this manuscript examines older women's use of lipstick. The most ubiquitously used cosmetic by the women we interviewed, lipstick was a taken-for-granted practice in the women's performance of gender. In the women's youth, the performance of gender through lipstick usage was related to rebellion and peer acceptance. In contrast, the use of lipstick in later life was related to the maintenance of an attractive and respectable appearance. We discuss our findings in light of interpretative feminist theorizing concerning beauty work, doing gender, and the presentation of self. PMID:20183145

  4. Phosphodiesterase-4 modulation as a potential therapeutic for cognitive loss in pathological and non-pathological aging: possibilities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Rolf T; Zhang, Han-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a super family of 11 enzyme families responsible for the hydrolysis of the intracellular secondary messengers cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). PDE4, in particular, is highly expressed in brain regions involved with regulation of memory, anxiety, and depression, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens. Senescence has been shown to result in extreme dysregulation of the cAMP pathway in various brain regions. Thus, as a critical controller of intracellular cAMP levels, PDE4 may be a potential target for the treatment of senescence-related cognitive disorders, which could be pathological and/or non-pathological in origin. While there is great potential in the development of novel PDE4 inhibitors for treatment of senescent-cognition impairment, there are also currently many pitfalls that need to be overcome. PDE4 has four subfamilies (PDE4A, B, C, and D) that are differentially expressed throughout the brain and body, as well as at least 25 splice variants derived from alternative splicing and multiple promoter sites. PDE4 subtypes have been shown to have differential effects on behavior, and cAMP itself has also been shown to play a contrasting role in behavior in different brain regions. This review will focus on what is currently understood about PDE4 in aging, the potential for PDE4 modulation as a cognitive therapy, and current pitfalls and limitations that need to be overcome in the PDE4 field. Overall, furthering our understanding of this incredibly complex pathway may one day assist with the development of novel therapeutics for both pathological and non-pathological cognitive disorders associated with senescence. PMID:25159075

  5. How long do louse eggs take to hatch? A possible answer to an age-old riddle.

    PubMed

    Burgess, I F

    2014-06-01

    There are no rigorous data on how long eggs of the head louse, Pediculus capitis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), take to hatch. Pediculicide users often report reinfestations after apparently successful treatments in the absence of infective contacts. This study aimed to resolve the question of whether some louse eggs hatch after the completion of treatment, thereby giving rise to a new infestation. Data were extracted from the records of lice collected after treatments in 20 clinical intervention trials. All datasets were eliminated except those in which only newly hatched louse nymphs were found prior to the final assessment. This excluded the possibility that new eggs were laid after the first treatment and thus any young lice found must have originated from eggs laid before the start of treatment. This identified 23 of 1895 (1.2%) records with evidence of louse nymphs emerging at 13 days or more after the first treatment, 3–6 days longer than previous estimates. Current treatment regimens for pediculicides of two applications 7–10 days apart appear inadequate, which may explain continuing infestation in the community. Therefore, it is suggested that a revised approach using three treatments applied at intervals of 1 week should prevent the survival of any nymphs and their development into a new generation of adults. PMID:24987776

  6. Early sponges and toxic protists: possible sources of cryostane, an age diagnostic biomarker antedating Sturtian Snowball Earth.

    PubMed

    Brocks, J J; Jarrett, A J M; Sirantoine, E; Kenig, F; Moczydłowska, M; Porter, S; Hope, J

    2016-03-01

    The period 800-717 million years (Ma) ago, in the lead-up to the Sturtian Snowball glaciation, saw an increase in the diversity of eukaryotic microfossils. To afford an independent and complementary view of this evolutionary period, this study presents the distribution of eukaryotic biomarkers from three pre-Sturtian successions across the supercontinent Rodinia: the ca. 780 Ma Kanpa Formation of the Western Australian Officer Basin, the ca. 800-740 Ma Visingsö Group of Sweden, and the 740 Ma Chuar Group in Arizona, USA. The distribution of eukaryotic steranes is remarkably similar in the three successions but distinct from all other known younger and older sterane assemblages. Cholestane was the only conventional structure, while indigenous steranes alkylated in position C-24, such as ergostane, stigmastane, dinosterane and isopropylcholestane, and n-propylcholestane, were not observed. This sterane distribution appears to be age diagnostic for the pre-Sturtian Neoproterozoic. It attests to the distinct evolutionary state of pre-Snowball eukaryotes, pointing to a taxonomic disparity that was still lower than in the Ediacaran (635-541 Ma). All three basins also show the presence of a new C28 sterane that was tentatively identified as 26-methylcholestane, here named cryostane. The only known extant organisms that can methylate sterols in the 26-position are demosponges. This assignment is plausible as molecular clocks place the appearance of the earliest animals into the pre-Sturtian Neoproterozoic. The unusual 26-methylsterol may have protected sponges, but also other eukaryotes, against their own membranolytic toxins. Some protists release lytic toxins to deter predators and kill eukaryotic prey. As conventional membrane sterols can be the site of attack for these toxins, sterols with unusual side-chain modification protect the cell. This interpretation of cryostane supports fossil evidence of predation in the Chuar Group and promotes hypotheses about the

  7. [ACOUSTIC FEATURES OF VOCALIZATIONS, REFLECTING THE DISCOMFORT AND COMFORT STATE OF INFANTS AGED THREE AND SIX MONTHS].

    PubMed

    Pavlikova, M I; Makarov, A K; Lyakso, E E

    2015-08-01

    The paper presented the possibility of recognition by adult the comfort and discomfort state of 3 and 6 months old infant's on the base of their vocalizations. The acoustic features of the vocalizations that are important for the recognition of the infant state of the characteristics of voice was described. It is shown that discomfort vocalizations differ from comfort ones on the basis of the average and maximum values of pitch, pitch values in the central and final part of the vocalization. A mathematical model is proposed and described a classification function signal of discomfort and comfort. Was found that the vocalizations of infants attributable adults with a probability of 0.75 and above the categories of comfort and discomfort with high reliability are recognized by the mathematical model based on a classification function. PMID:26591591

  8. Modeling the relative roles of the foehn wind and urban expansion in the 2002 Beijing heat wave and possible mitigation by high reflective roofs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongyun; Shao, Haiyan; Song, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Rapid urbanization has intensified summer heat waves in recent decades in Beijing, China. In this study, effectiveness of applying high-reflectance roofs on mitigating the warming effects caused by urban expansion and foehn wind was simulated for a record-breaking heat wave occurred in Beijing during July 13-15, 2002. Simulation experiments were performed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF version 3.0) model coupled with an urban canopy model. The modeled diurnal air temperatures were compared well with station observations in the city and the wind convergence caused by urban heat island (UHI) effect could be simulated clearly. By increasing urban roof albedo, the simulated UHI effect was reduced due to decreased net radiation, and the simulated wind convergence in the urban area was weakened. Using WRF3.0 model, the warming effects caused by urban expansion and foehn wind were quantified separately, and were compared with the cooling effect due to the increased roof albedo. Results illustrated that the foehn warming effect under the northwesterly wind contributed greatly to this heat wave event in Beijing, while contribution from urban expansion accompanied by anthropogenic heating was secondary, and was mostly evident at night. Increasing roof albedo could reduce air temperature both in the day and at night, and could more than offset the urban expansion effect. The combined warming caused by the urban expansion and the foehn wind could be potentially offset with high-reflectance roofs by 58.8 % or cooled by 1.4 °C in the early afternoon on July 14, 2002, the hottest day during the heat wave.

  9. Late quaternary distribution of the Cycladophora davisiana radiolarian species: Reflection of possible ventilation of the North Pacific intermediate water during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matul, A. G.; Abelmann, A.; Gersonde, R.; Nürnberg, D.; Tiedemann, R.; Kruglikova, S. B.

    2015-02-01

    A comparison of micropaleontological data on the distribution of the Cycladophora davisiana radiolarian species in the surface sediment layer and the Late Quaternary sediments from the Subarctic Pacific and Far East marginal seas allowed conclusions concerning the possible conditions and occurrence of intermediate waters during the last glacial maximum. We used the modern data on the C. davisiana species, which is a micro-paleontological indicator of the cold oxygen-rich upper intermediate water mass, which is now forming only in the Sea of Okhotsk. The high amount of C. davisiana in sediments of the last glacial maximum may point to the possible formation and expansion of the ventilated intermediate water in the most part of the Subarctic paleo-Pacific: the Bering Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, within the NW Gyre, and in the Gulf of Alaska.

  10. Aortic pulse wave velocity and reflecting distance estimation from peripheral waveforms in humans: detection of age- and exercise training-related differences.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Gary L; Casey, Darren P; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Seals, Douglas R; Curry, Timothy B; Barnes, Jill N; Wilson, DeMaris R; Stauss, Harald M

    2013-07-01

    We hypothesized that demographic/anthropometric parameters can be used to estimate effective reflecting distance (EfRD), required to derive aortic pulse wave velocity (APWV), a prognostic marker of cardiovascular risk, from peripheral waveforms and that such estimates can discriminate differences in APWV and EfRD with aging and habitual endurance exercise in healthy adults. Ascending aortic pressure waveforms were derived from peripheral waveforms (brachial artery pressure, n = 25; and finger volume pulse, n = 15) via a transfer function and then used to determine the time delay between forward- and backward-traveling waves (Δtf-b). True EfRDs were computed as directly measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV) × 1/2Δtf-b and then used in regression analysis to establish an equation for EfRD based on demographic/anthropometric data (EfRD = 0.173·age + 0.661·BMI + 34.548 cm, where BMI is body mass index). We found good agreement between true and estimated APWV (Pearson's R² = 0.43; intraclass correlation = 0.64; both P < 0.05) and EfRD (R² = 0.24; intraclass correlation = 0.40; both P < 0.05). In young sedentary (22 ± 2 years, n = 6), older sedentary (62 ± 1 years, n = 24), and older endurance-trained (61 ± 2 years, n = 14) subjects, EfRD (from demographic/anthropometric parameters), APWV, and 1/2Δtf-b (from brachial artery pressure waveforms) were 52.0 ± 0.5, 61.8 ± 0.4, and 60.6 ± 0.5 cm; 6.4 ± 0.3, 9.6 ± 0.2, and 8.1 ± 0.2 m/s; and 82 ± 3, 65 ± 1 and 76 ± 2 ms (all P < 0.05), respectively. Our results demonstrate that APWV derived from peripheral waveforms using age and BMI to estimate EfRD correlates with CFPWV in healthy adults. This method can reliably detect the distal shift of the reflecting site with age and the increase in APWV with sedentary aging that is attenuated with habitual endurance exercise. PMID:23624628

  11. Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Emily E; Polen, Kara N D; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Ellington, Sascha R; Oduyebo, Titilope; Cohn, Amanda; Oster, Alexandra M; Russell, Kate; Kawwass, Jennifer F; Karwowski, Mateusz P; Powers, Ann M; Bertolli, Jeanne; Brooks, John T; Kissin, Dmitry; Villanueva, Julie; Muñoz-Jordan, Jorge; Kuehnert, Matthew; Olson, Christine K; Honein, Margaret A; Rivera, Maria; Jamieson, Denise J; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2016-01-01

    CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available. PMID:27031943

  12. Evaluating Computer Screen Time and Its Possible Link to Psychopathology in the Context of Age: A Cross-Sectional Study of Parents and Children

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Sharon; Silman, Zmira; Maoz, Hagai; Bloch, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have suggested that high levels of computer use are linked to psychopathology. However, there is ambiguity about what should be considered normal or over-use of computers. Furthermore, the nature of the link between computer usage and psychopathology is controversial. The current study utilized the context of age to address these questions. Our hypothesis was that the context of age will be paramount for differentiating normal from excessive use, and that this context will allow a better understanding of the link to psychopathology. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 185 parents and children aged 3–18 years were recruited in clinical and community settings. They were asked to fill out questionnaires regarding demographics, functional and academic variables, computer use as well as psychiatric screening questionnaires. Using a regression model, we identified 3 groups of normal-use, over-use and under-use and examined known factors as putative differentiators between the over-users and the other groups. Results After modeling computer screen time according to age, factors linked to over-use were: decreased socialization (OR 3.24, Confidence interval [CI] 1.23–8.55, p = 0.018), difficulty to disengage from the computer (OR 1.56, CI 1.07–2.28, p = 0.022) and age, though borderline-significant (OR 1.1 each year, CI 0.99–1.22, p = 0.058). While psychopathology was not linked to over-use, post-hoc analysis revealed that the link between increased computer screen time and psychopathology was age-dependent and solidified as age progressed (p = 0.007). Unlike computer usage, the use of small-screens and smartphones was not associated with psychopathology. Conclusions The results suggest that computer screen time follows an age-based course. We conclude that differentiating normal from over-use as well as defining over-use as a possible marker for psychiatric difficulties must be performed within the context of age. If verified by

  13. Does the myth of Phaethon reflect an impact? Revising the fall of Phaethon and considering a possible relation to the Chiemgau Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglock, B.; Rappenglock, M.

    In Greek Mythology there exists one story that has repeatedly been interpreted to describe the fall of a celestial body: the story of Phaethon, who undertakes a disastrous drive with the sun-chariot of his father Helios. First, the article presents the arguments given by ancient authors for interpreting this story as the reflection of a natural phenomenon. Then details given in the old descriptions of Phaethon's fall are compared with nowadays knowledge of impact phenomena. Furthermore the texts are examined for clues to the time and the location of the hypothesized impact. These considerations called Chiemgau Impact. The impact struck the south-east of Bavaria Germany at some time during the Celtic period and left an extended crater-strewnfield of about 100 craters. A conspicuous intersection between the tradition of the Phaethon story and the up to now known time-frame for the Chiemgau Impact gives new clues for dating the Chiemgau Impact to the time between 600 and 428 B.C.

  14. Possible relationship of cranial traumatic injuries with violence in the south-east Iberian Peninsula from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Brobeil, S A; du Souich, Ph; Al Oumaoui, I

    2009-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyze the presence and distribution of cranial trauma, as possible evidence of violence, in remains from the Neolithic to Bronze Age from the SE Iberian Peninsula. The sample contains skulls, crania, and cranial vaults belonging to 410 prehistoric individuals. We also studied 267 crania from medieval and modern times for comparative purposes. All lesions in the prehistoric crania are healed and none of them can be attributed to a specific weapon. In all studied populations, injuries were more frequent in adults than in subadults and also in males than in females, denoting a sexual division in the risk of suffering accidents or intentional violence. According to the archeological record, the development of societies in the SE Iberian Peninsula during these periods must have entailed an increase in conflict. However, a high frequency of cranial traumatic injuries was observed in the Neolithic series, theoretically a less conflictive time, and the lowest frequency was in crania from the 3rd millennium B.C. (Copper Age), which is characterized by the archeologists as a period of increasing violence. The relatively large size and the high rate of injuries in Neolithic crania and the practice of cannibalism are strongly suggestive of episodes of interpersonal or intergroup conflict. The number and distribution of injuries in Bronze Age is consistent with the increase in violence at that time described by most archeologists. PMID:19425096

  15. The expression of NLRX1 in C57BL/6 mice cochlear hair cells: Possible relation to aging- and neomycin-induced deafness.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qianqian; Sun, Gaoying; Cao, Zhixin; Yin, Haiyan; Qi, Qi; Wang, Jinghan; Liu, Wenwen; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo; Li, Jianfeng

    2016-03-11

    Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing family member X1 (NLRX1) is a cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor that is predominantly located in mitochondria, which is tightly related to mitochondrial damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, inflammation and apoptosis. The present study was designed to explore whether NLRX1 expresses in C57BL/6 mice cochlear hair cells and, if so, to investigate the possible correlations between NLRX1 and hearing. The location and dynamic expression of NLRX1 were investigated by immunofluorescence, real-time PCR and Western blotting. Hearing thresholds of C57BL/6 mice were measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR). Moreover, the downstream inflammatory and apoptotic pathways regulated by NLRX1 were examined in age-related and neomycin-induced hair cell damage. Data showed that NLRX1 expressed in cytoplasm of C57BL/6 cochlear hair cells, especially in the cilia, which were essential for sound sensation. The expression of NLRX1 in hair cells increased as the mice grew up, and, decreased as they aged. Additionally, the activated apoptotic JNK pathway was detected in 9-month old mice with worse-hearing and 3-month old mice treated with neomycin. Overall, results indicate that NLRX1 may relate to hair cell maturity, hearing formation and maintenance, and promote hair cell apoptosis through JNK pathway induced by aging and neomycin. PMID:26836140

  16. Investigation Of North Anatolian Fault In The Sea Of Marmara: Fault Geometry, The Cumulative Extension, Age Modeling In Çinarcik Basin Using Multi Channel Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atgın, Orhan; Çifçi, Günay; Soelien, Christopher; Seeber, Leonardo; Steckler, Michael; Shillington, Donna; Kurt, Hülya; Dondurur, Derman; Okay, Seda; Gürçay, Savaş; Sarıtaş, Hakan; Mert Küçük, H.; Barın, Burcu

    2013-04-01

    Marmara Sea is a limelight area for investigations due to its tectonic structure and remarkable seismic activity of North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). As NAFZ separates into 3 branches in the Marmara Sea, it has a complicated tectonic structure which gives rise to debates among researchers. Çınarcık Basin, which is close to Istanbul and very important for its tectonic activity is studied in this thesis. Two different multichannel seismic reflection data were used in this thesis. First data were acquired in 2008 in the frame of TAMAM (Turkish American Multichannel Project) and second data were in 2010 in the frame of TAMAM-2 (PirMarmara) onboard R/V K.Piri Reis. Also high resolution multibeam data were used which is provided by French Marine Institute IFREMER. In the scope of TAMAM project total 3000 km high resolution multi channel data were collected. 3000 km of multichannel seismic reflection profiles were collected in 2008 and 2010 using 72, 111, and 240 channels of streamer with a 6.25 m group interval. The generator-injector airgun was fired every 12.5 or 18.75 m and the resulting MCS data has 10-230 Hz frequency band. In this study, a detailed fault map of the basin is created and the fault on the southern slope of the basin which is interpreted by many researchers in many publications was investigated. And there is no evidence that such a fault exists on the southern part of the basin. With the multichannel seismic reflection data seismic stratigrafic interpretations of the basin deposits were done. The yearly cumulative north-south extension of the basin was calculated by making some calculations on the most active part of the faulting in the basin. In addition, the tilt angles of parallel tilted sediments were calculated and correlated with global sea level changes to calculate ages of the deposits in the basin. Keywords: NAFZ, multi channel seismic reflection, Çınarcık Basin

  17. Elemental analysis of human amniotic fluid and placenta by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence: child weight and maternal age dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Custódio, P. J.; Reus, U.; Prange, A.

    2001-11-01

    This work is an attempt to evaluate the possible influence of the mother's age in trace element concentrations in human amniotic fluid and placenta and whether these concentrations are correlated to the weight of the newborn infants. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to analyze 16 amniotic fluid samples, and the placenta samples were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The whole samples were collected during delivery from healthy mothers and healthy infants and full-term pregnancies. According to the age of the mother, three different groups were considered: 20-25, 25-30 and 30-40 years old. Only two mothers were aged more than 35 years. The weight of the infants ranged from 2.56 to 4.05 kg and three groups were also considered: 2.5-3, 3-3.5 and 3.5-4 kg. The organic matrix of the amniotic fluid samples was removed by treatment with HNO 3 followed by oxygen plasma ashing. Yttrium was used as the internal standard for TXRF analysis. Placenta samples were lyophilized and analyzed by EDXRF without any chemical treatment. Very low levels of Ni and Sr were found in the amniotic fluid samples, and were independent of the age of the mother and weight of the child. Cr, Mn, Se and Pb were at the level of the detection limit. Zn, considered one of the key elements in neonatal health, was not significantly different in the samples analyzed; however, it was weakly related to birth weigh. The concentrations obtained ranged from 0.11 to 0.92 mg/l and 30 to 65 μg/g in amniotic fluid and placenta, respectively. The only two elements which seemed to be significantly correlated with mother's age and newborn weight were Ca and Fe for both types of sample: Ca levels were increased in heavier children and older mothers; however, Fe increased with increasing maternal age, but decreased for heavier babies. The same conclusions were obtained for placenta and amniotic fluid samples. Cu is closely associated with Fe in its function in the organism

  18. Lake dwellers occupation gap in Lake Geneva (France-Switzerland) possibly explained by an earthquake-mass movement-tsunami event during Early Bronze Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Katrina; Marillier, François; Hilbe, Michael; Simpson, Guy; Dupuy, David; Yrro, Ble J. F.; Rachoud-Schneider, Anne-Marie; Corboud, Pierre; Bellwald, Benjamin; Wildi, Walter; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution seismic and sediment core data from the ‘Grand Lac’ basin of Lake Geneva reveal traces of repeated slope instabilities with one main slide-evolved mass-flow (minimum volume 0.13 km3) that originated from the northern lateral slope of the lake near the city of Lausanne. Radiocarbon dating of organic remains sampled from the top of the main deposit gives an age interval of 1865-1608 BC. This date coincides with the age interval for a mass movement event described in the ‘Petit Lac’ basin of Lake Geneva (1872-1622 BC). Because multiple mass movements took place at the same time in different parts of the lake, we consider the most likely trigger mechanism to be a strong earthquake (Mw 6) that occurred in the period between 1872 and 1608 BC. Based on numerical simulations, we show the major deposit near Lausanne would have generated a tsunami with local wave heights of up to 6 m. The combined effects of the earthquake and the following tsunami provide a possible explanation for a gap in lake dwellers occupation along the shores of Lake Geneva revealed by dendrochronological dating of two palafitte archaeological sites.

  19. Late Pleistocene sediments and fossils near the mouth of Mad River, Humboldt County, California: Facies analysis, sequence development, and possible age correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, E.W. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-04-01

    Study of late Pleistocene-age sediments near the mouth of the Mad River revealed a sequence of nearshore marine and shallow bay deposits. This sequence, bounded by unconformities, is informally named the Mouth of Mad unit. The Mouth of mad unit can be divided into four distinct depositional facies at the study site. The lowest facies are the Nearshore Sand and Estuarine Mud, which lie unconformably on a paleosol. The sand facies grades upward into a high-energy, interbedded Nearshore Sand and Gravel facies containing storm and rip-channel deposits. Above the sand and gravel is a Strand-Plain Sand facies. This sand is overlain by a laterally variable sequence of shell-rich Bay facies. The bay deposits can be further divided into five subfacies: (1) a Bioturbated Sand; (2) a Lower Tidal Flat Mud; (3) a Mixed Sand and Mud; (4) an oyster-rich Bay Mud; and (5) an Upper Tidal Flat Mud. The bay sequence is overlain unconformably by younger late Pleistocene-age marine terrace deposits. The depositional environments represented by these facies progress from a shoreline estuary to nearshore deposits, above storm wave base, and slowly back to shoreline and finally shallow bay conditions. The Mouth of Mad unit represents a transgressive-regressive sequence, involving the development of a protective spit. The uppermost mud within the Mouth of Mad unit has been dated, using thermoluminescence age estimation, at 176 [+-] 33 ka, placing it in the late Pleistocene. The Mouth of Mad unit appears to be younger than the fossiliferous deposits at Elk Head, Crannell Junction, Trinidad Head, Moonstone Beach, and the Falor Formation near Maple Creek, and possibly time equivalent with gravel deposits exposed at the western end of School Road in McKinleyville.

  20. Reflective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Thomas Farrell's "Reflective Teaching" outlines four principles that take teachers from just doing reflection to making it a way of being. Using the four principles, Reflective Practice Is Evidence Based, Reflective Practice Involves Dialogue, Reflective Practice Links Beliefs and Practices, and Reflective Practice Is a Way of Life,…

  1. Reflection Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses and provides an example of reflectivity approximation to determine whether reflection will occur. Provides a method to show thin-film interference on a projection screen. Also applies the reflectivity concepts to electromagnetic wave systems. (MVL)

  2. Evidence that glucose metabolism is decreased in the cerebrum of aged female senescence-accelerated mouse; possible involvement of a low hexokinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, T; Sato, E; Inoue, A; Ishibashi, S

    1996-08-16

    d-Glucose metabolism in cerebral cells prepared from aged senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM), was investigated in consideration of a sex difference. The production of 14CO2 from 6-[14C]D-glucose was reduced in female senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) 8, a prone substrain, in comparison with that in female senescence-accelerated-resistant mouse (SAMR) 2, a control substrain, whereas there was no difference in males. The 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake into cerebral cells from female SAMP8 was also lower than that of control mice. But, the 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake in SAMP8 was higher than that of SAMR2, suggesting that the low hexokinase activity was involved in the decreased glucose metabolism in cerebrum of SAMP8 females irrespective of glucose transporter. This possibility was supported by the finding that the contents of glucose 6-phosphate produced from glucose added to cerebral cells from SAMP8 was lower than that in ICR mice. PMID:8873128

  3. Sun exposure and visual field damage among children on the Adriatic Island Rab--possible initial risk factor in development of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Vojniković, Bozidar; Micović, Vladimir; Coklo, Miran; Vojniković, Davor

    2009-09-01

    The Adriatic Island Rab, situated in the northern part of the Croatian sea, is more strongly exposed to sunlight (especially from May to October) than the other parts of Croatia and most of the European countries. As consequences of higher solar radiation, significant percentage of Pseudoexfoliation of lens capsula occurs in 15% and fundus picture of AMD (Age-Related Macular Degeneration) in 18% of agriculturalists and fishermen (45-70 years old). We previously presented the first clinical study showing that in AMD the peripheral visual field is also damaged. In this clinical study we examined 68 children (8-15 years old), including following procedures: vision correction, slit lamp examination, visual field in technic of isopters and profile quantitative perimetry (meridian retinal thresholds examination) using Kowa automated perimeter. In 15% of examinees we found strictly foveal "degeneration", and changes of visual fields: higher meridian thresholds and typical changes with invagination of isopters. It is very interesting that these children with damaged visual field and fundus picture do not protect their eyes from the sunlight during summertime. We suggest the possibility of the influence of higher sun radiation as one of the risk factors in the earlier development of future AMD. PMID:19860099

  4. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  5. Location in Cognitive and Residential Space at Age 70 Reflects a Lifelong Trait over Parental and Environmental Circumstances: The Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Gow, Alan J.; Corley, Janie; Starr, John M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2010-01-01

    Though mental ability tends to be relatively stable throughout the lifespan, many still argue that late life cognitive function largely reflects education, social class, and environmental circumstances. Instead, it may be that early life cognitive function contributes to each of these in turn, as well as to late life cognitive function. This paper…

  6. [Growing up in the digital age].

    PubMed

    Huerre, Patrice; Vlachopoulou, Xanthie

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality is at the heart of our daily lives at every age. The proliferation of screens and their use at an ever earlier age requires reflection on how to give the best possible support to children and teenagers with regard to their modern virtual practices. Health professionals have their role to play in combining their knowledge of these age groups with in-depth understanding of the issues surroundingvirtual realities. PMID:25771593

  7. A possible role of collagen fibrils in the process of calcification observed in the capsule of the pineal gland in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Humbert, W; Cuisinier, F; Voegel, J C; Pévet, P

    1997-06-01

    The relationship between collagen fibrils and calcified concretions exclusively appearing in the pineal gland of adult/aging rats has been investigated. Deposits of lanthanum, which replace calcium ions are distributed along collagen fibrils with a repeating period of about 70 nm. Calcium has been detected histochemically between collagen bundles surrounding extracellular concretions by means of the pyroantimonate method and by X-ray microanalysis. It is associated with phosphorus. The data presented here suggest that collagen fibrils are involved in the genesis and growth of extracellular concretions located in the connective tissue surrounding the pineal gland of aging rats. PMID:9134857

  8. 3D constraints on a possible deep > 2.5 km massive sulphide mineralization from 2D crooked-line seismic reflection data in the Kristineberg mining area, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Bongajum, Emmanuel; Bellefleur, Gilles; Juhlin, Christopher; Tryggvason, Ari

    2009-12-01

    2D crooked-line seismic reflection surveys in crystalline environments are often considered challenging in their processing and interpretation. These challenges are more evident when complex diffraction signals that can originate from out-of-the-plane and a variety of geological features are present. A seismic profile in the Kristineberg mining area in northern Sweden shows an impressive diffraction package, covering an area larger than 25 km 2 in the subsurface at depths greater than 2.5 km. We present here a series of scenarios in which each can, to some extent, explain the nature of this extraordinarily large package of diffractions. Cross-dip analysis, diffraction imaging and modeling, as well as 3D processing of the crooked-line data provided constraints on the interpretation of the diffraction package. Overall, the results indicate that the diffraction package can be associated with at least four main short south-dipping diffractors in a depth range of 2.5-4.5 km. Candidate scenarios for the origin of the diffraction package are: (1) a series of massive sulphide deposits, (2) a series of mafic-ultramafic intrusions, (3) a major shear-zone and (4) multiple contact lithologies. We have also investigated the possible contribution of mode-converted scattered energy in the diffraction package using a modified converted-wave 3D prestack depth migration algorithm with the results indicating that a majority of the diffractions are P-wave diffractions. The 3D prestack migration of the data provided improved images of a series of steeply north-dipping mafic-ultramafic sill intrusions to a depth of about 4 km, where the diffractions appear to focus after the migration. The results and associated interpretations presented in this paper have improved our understanding of this conspicuous package of diffractions and may lead to re-evaluation of the 3D geological model of the Kristineberg mining area.

  9. 1.6 Ga U-Pb zircon age for the Chorhat Sandstone, lower Vindhyan, India: Possible implications for early evolution of animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Birger; Bose, Pradip K.; Sarkar, Subir; Banerjee, Santanu; Fletcher, Ian R.; McNaughton, Neal J.

    2002-02-01

    Bedding-plane markings in the Chorhat Sandstone (lower Vindhyan), central India, were recently interpreted as burrows produced by triploblastic animals. Because the rocks were thought to be older than 1000 Ma, these structures were regarded as the oldest fossil evidence for metazoan life. However, the biological origin of the markings has been questioned, as has their age. Current age estimates are based on K-Ar, Rb-Sr, and fission- track dates, though some contentious evidence suggests that the rocks may be only 540 Ma. Here we provide the first robust age data for the lower Vindhyan by using SHRIMP (sensitive, high-resolution ion microprobe) U-Pb zircon geochronology to date silicified tuffs bounding the Chorhat Sandstone. Our results show that the sediments were deposited between 1628 ± 8 Ma and 1599 ± 8 Ma. If the Chorhat markings are burrows left by worm-like animals, then our data suggest that complex metazoans had evolved before 1600 Ma, 1 b.y. before the “Cambrian explosion” when animals rapidly diversified and became ecologically dominant. However, given the doubts expressed about the origin of the bedding-plane structures, as well as the surprisingly “old” age of the host rocks, further studies are urgently required to provide supportive evidence.

  10. Difference in growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) testing following GHRH subacute treatment in normal aging and growth hormone-deficient adults: possible perspectives for therapeutic use of GHRH or its analogs in elderly subjects?

    PubMed

    Iovino, M; Triggiani, V; Giagulli, V A; Iovine, N; Licchelli, B; Resta, F; Sabbà, C; Tafaro, E; Solimando, A; Tommasicchio, A; Guastamacchia, E

    2011-06-01

    The somatotroph axis function shows a decline in the elderly (somatopause). In particular growth hormone (GH) response to GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) is reduced in aged man but less than that observed in GH-deficient adults (GHDAs). Plasma GH response to GHRH (1 µg/kg BW) was significantly lower in four GHDAs than in seven healthy aged men 30, 60, and 90 min after acute GHRH administration. To verify whether a priming regimen might be able to increase the reduced GH response to GHRH, both healthy aged men and GHDA patients underwent repetitive administration of GHRH (100 µg GHRH intravenously as a single morning dose, every 2 days for 12 days). After the GHRH-priming regimen, plasma GH values 30, 60, and 90 min after the acute GHRH test were significantly higher than values at the corresponding time points before priming regimen in healthy aged men but not in GHDA patients. These findings confirmed that somatotroph cells become less sensitive to GHRH with normal aging and demonstrate that repetitive administration of GHRH restores the attenuated response only in healthy aged men but not in GHDA patients. This could support the possible use of GHRH or its analogs instead of recombinant human GH in elderly patients with the advantage of preserving the endogenous pulses of GH with the secretion of the different isoforms of GH. However, concerns arise about the possible role of these molecules in tumorigenesis and tumor growth promotion. PMID:20843274

  11. [Pain, independence and subjective attitude to aging--an empirical contribution from the study "Possibilities and limits of independent living by the elderly"].

    PubMed

    Hofer, J; Kruse, A; Pöhlmann, K; Schmitt, E

    1995-01-01

    In a study on chances and limits of independent life in old age, we collected data about sensations of pain in 990 participants. Information about intensity and frequency of pain sensations was combined to differentiate empirically between five patterns of pain sensations. According to severity, these patterns can be ordered hierarchically. 873 persons could be grouped into the five patterns of pain sensations. There was no relationship between chronological age and patterns of pain sensations. The relationship between patterns of pain sensations and degree of independence in everyday life was only weak. Comparing the five patterns of pain sensations in seven psychological variables, we found only few statistically significant differences, mainly between people who had no pain and those who suffered from strong or very strong pain most of the time or permanently. In KLC-measures of external and internal control beliefs related to health and body, in PGC-dimensions attitude towards age, lonely dissatisfaction and agitation as well as in PGC-score for life satisfaction, we found only few and weak differences between patterns of pain sensations. Stepwise multiple regression analysis with the independent variables degree of independence in everyday life, pattern of pain sensations and chronological age could explain 1.4% to 6.7% of variance in those psychological variables. In contrast, patterns of pain sensations greatly differed in NAF-measures of subjective aging. A stepwise multiple regression with the independent variables degree of independence in everyday life and pattern of pain sensations could explain 24.6% of variance. Degree of independence in everyday life alone could explain 17.9% of variance. We hypothesize that effects in most psychological variables are weak, because what people mean by a "good" or personally satisfying life is only partly influenced by their health status. PMID:8528928

  12. Composite Aging Markers Can Be Used for Quantitative Profiling of Aging.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Lior

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of a single marker that reliably reflects biological aging, or even an exact definition of biological age, compound aging scores that combine multiple aging biomarkers into a single composite aging score can quantitatively reflect the age-related changes over time. If aging is viewed as the broad accumulation of alterations over time, a composite score that reflects numerous diverse aspects of these alterations can be used as a quantitative approximation of aging. Profiling the changes of the composite aging score over time shows variations in the pace of aging at different chronological ages, such that the changes over time show distinct stages separated by a short period of rapid aging. These observations are difficult to explain by molecular entropy or stochastic accumulation of irreparable environmental damage alone, as a process driven solely by entropy or stochasticity is not expected to have signs of distinct stages or leaps in aging. These results are in agreement with some previous observations in other organisms, indicating the possibility of the involvement of pathways in the process of aging. Given this evidence, the contention that aging can be driven also by biological pathways should be considered. PMID:26088420

  13. Presence of dopa and amino acid hydroperoxides in proteins modified with advanced glycation end products (AGEs): amino acid oxidation products as a possible source of oxidative stress induced by AGE proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, S; Fu, M X; Baynes, J W; Thorpe, S R; Dean, R T

    1998-02-15

    Glycation and subsequent Maillard or browning reactions of glycated proteins, leading to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), are involved in the chemical modification of proteins during normal aging and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Oxidative conditions accelerate the browning of proteins by glucose, and AGE proteins also induce oxidative stress responses in cells bearing AGE receptors. These observations have led to the hypothesis that glycation-induced pathology results from a cycle of oxidative stress, increased chemical modification of proteins via the Maillard reaction, and further AGE-dependent oxidative stress. Here we show that the preparation of AGE-collagen by incubation with glucose under oxidative conditions in vitro leads not only to glycation and formation of the glycoxidation product Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), but also to the formation of amino acid oxidation products on protein, including m-tyrosine, dityrosine, dopa, and valine and leucine hydroperoxides. The formation of both CML and amino acid oxidation products was prevented by anaerobic, anti-oxidative conditions. Amino acid oxidation products were also formed when glycated collagen, prepared under anti-oxidative conditions, was allowed to incubate under aerobic conditions that led to the formation of CML. These experiments demonstrate that amino acid oxidation products are formed in proteins during glycoxidation reactions and suggest that reactive oxygen species formed by redox cycling of dopa or by the metal-catalysed decomposition of amino acid hydroperoxides, rather than by redox activity or reactive oxygen production by AGEs on protein, might contribute to the induction of oxidative stress by AGE proteins. PMID:9461515

  14. A noninflammatory immune response in aged DNA Aβ42-immunized mice supports its safety for possible use as immunotherapy in AD patients.

    PubMed

    Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Rosenberg, Roger N

    2015-03-01

    Aging in the immune system results in tendency to proinflammatory responses. Intradermal DNA immunization showed Th2 polarized noninflammatory immune responses. We tested here 18-month-old mice which were immunized with Aβ42 peptide, DNA Aβ42 trimer, or 2 different prime boost protocols identical to previous experiments. High Aβ42 antibody levels were found in aged mice which had received peptide immunizations (900 μg/mL plasma), and in mice which had received peptide prime and DNA boost immunizations (500 μg/mL), compared with antibodies in DNA Aβ42 immunized mice with 50 μg/mL. Although we found T-cell proliferation and inflammatory cytokines in mice which had received peptide or prime boost immunization, these were not found in DNA-immunized mice. The results are concordant with proinflammatory responses because of immunosenescence and contraindicate the use of Aβ42 peptide immunizations or prime boost immunization protocols for the use in elderly Alzheimer's disease patients. DNA Aβ42 immunization only on the other hand does lead to effective levels of antibodies without inflammatory cytokine or T-cell responses in the aged animal model tested. PMID:25725942

  15. Possible age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) and corresponding change in echolocation parameters in a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin.

    PubMed

    Li, Songhai; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong; Hoffmann-Kuhnt, Matthias; Fernando, Nimal; Taylor, Elizabeth A; Lin, Wenzhi; Chen, Jialin; Ng, Timothy

    2013-11-15

    The hearing and echolocation clicks of a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in Zhuhai, China, were studied. This animal had been repeatedly observed in the wild before it was stranded and its age was estimated to be ~40 years. The animal's hearing was measured using a non-invasive auditory evoked potential (AEP) method. Echolocation clicks produced by the dolphin were recorded when the animal was freely swimming in a 7.5 m (width)×22 m (length)×4.8 m (structural depth) pool with a water depth of ~2.5 m. The hearing and echolocation clicks of the studied dolphin were compared with those of a conspecific younger individual, ~13 years of age. The results suggested that the cut-off frequency of the high-frequency hearing of the studied dolphin was ~30-40 kHz lower than that of the younger individual. The peak and centre frequencies of the clicks produced by the older dolphin were ~16 kHz lower than those of the clicks produced by the younger animal. Considering that the older dolphin was ~40 years old, its lower high-frequency hearing range with lower click peak and centre frequencies could probably be explained by age-related hearing loss (presbycusis). PMID:24172886

  16. Aging decreases collagen IV expression in vivo in the dermo-epidermal junction and in vitro in dermal fibroblasts: possible involvement of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Feru, Jezabel; Delobbe, Etienne; Ramont, Laurent; Brassart, Bertrand; Terryn, Christine; Dupont-Deshorgue, Aurelie; Garbar, Christian; Monboisse, Jean-Claude; Maquart, Francois-Xavier; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Collagen IV is a major component of the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ). To study expression of collagen IV upon aging in the DEJ and dermal fibroblasts isolated from the same patients. A model of senescent fibroblasts was developed in order to identify biological compounds that might restore the level of collagen IV. Skin fragments of women (30 to 70 years old) were collected. Localisation of collagen IV expression in the DEJ was studied by immunofluorescence. Fibroblast collagen IV expression was studied by real-time PCR, ELISA, and western blotting. Premature senescence was simulated by exposing fibroblasts to subcytotoxic H2O2 concentrations. Collagen IV decreased in the DEJ and fibroblasts relative to age. TGF-β1 treatment significantly increased collagen IV gene and protein expression in fibroblasts and restored expression in the model of senescence. Addition of TGF-β1-neutralizing antibody to fibroblast cultures decreased collagen IV expression. Taken together, the results suggest that the decrease in collagen IV in the DEJ, relative to age, could be due to a decrease in collagen IV expression by senescent dermal fibroblasts and may involve TGF-β1 signalling. PMID:27124123

  17. (U-Th)/He Age Elevation Profiles from the Adamello Batholith (Southern Alps, Italy): Possible Insights into the Miocene Landscape Development of the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverman, R.

    2009-12-01

    Alpine landscapes are developed through the complex interplay between tectonics and climate. However, the nature of this interplay is still poorly understood. Age elevation profiles, especially those for low temperature thermochronometers, provide high resolution near surface exhumation rates. These rates can be used to constrain the rate of surface relief development in response to climatic and/or tectonic events. In this study we present the first apatite (U-TH) /He ages for two vertical profiles from the Adamello batholith (Southern Alps, Italy). These initial ages span the Miocene and suggest at least two periods of accelerated cooling. The Adamello batholith is the largest of the Tertiary intrusions along the Insubric line in the European Alps and is bound by two major faults, the Tonale line and the Giudicarie line. Major river systems within the massif drain south to the Po Plain. This makes it an ideal location to determine the role and magnitude of known tectonic events (Giudicarie phase shortening in the Tortonian) and climatic events (Messinian Salinity crisis and Neogene glaciation) in the recent development of alpine relief. Further work will include 4He/3He analysis, zircon (U-Th)/He dating and apatite fission-track analysis.

  18. From Reflective Practice to Holistic Reflexivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleakley, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Examines Schon's idea of "reflective practice" in higher education through analysis of "reflectivity" -- its history, possible forms, interpretations, and underpinning values. Notes four underpinning epistemologies for reflective practice: technical rational, humanistic emancipatory, postmodern deconstructive, and radical phenomenological.…

  19. Reflected Glory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Colin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific model of how people see things is far removed from children's real-world experience. They know that light is needed in order to see an object, but may not know that light is reflected off the object and some of that light enters the eyes. In this article, the author explores children's understanding of reflection and how to develop…

  20. How Possibly Do Leisure and Social Activities Impact Mental Health of Middle-Aged Adults in Japan?: An Evidence from a National Longitudinal Survey

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Fumi; Noguchi, Haruko; Monma, Takafumi; Tamiya, Nanako

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to investigate longitudinal relations between leisure and social activities and mental health status, considering the presence or absence of other persons in the activity as an additional variable, among middle-aged adults in Japan. This study used nationally representative data in Japan with a five-year follow-up period. Methods This study focused on 16,642 middle-aged adults, age 50–59 at baseline, from a population-based, six-year panel survey conducted by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. To investigate the relations between two leisure activities (‘hobbies or cultural activities’ and ‘exercise or sports’) and four social activities (‘community events’, ‘support for children’, ‘support for elderly individuals’ and ‘other social activities’) at baseline and mental health status at follow-up, multiple logistic regression analysis was used. We also used multiple logistic regression analysis to investigate the association between ways of participating in these activities (‘by oneself’, ‘with others’, or ‘both’ (both ‘by oneself’ and ‘with others’)) at baseline and mental health status at follow-up. Results Involvement in both leisure activity categories, but not in social activities, was significantly and positively related to mental health status in both men and women. Furthermore, in men, both ‘hobbies or cultural activities’ and ‘exercise or sports’ were significantly related to mental health status only when conducted ‘with others’. In women, the effects of ‘hobbies or cultural activities’ on mental health status were no differences regardless of the ways of participating, while the result of ‘exercise or sports’ was same as that in men. Conclusions Leisure activities appear to benefit mental health status among this age group, whereas specific social activities do not. Moreover, participation in leisure activities would be effective especially if

  1. Does the School Performance Variable Used in the International Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) Study Reflect Students' School Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder-Puig, Rosemarie; Griebler, Robert; Samdal, Oddrun; King, Matthew A.; Freeman, John; Duer, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Given the pressure that educators and policy makers are under to achieve academic standards for students, understanding the relationship of academic success to various aspects of health is important. The international Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) questionnaire, being used in 41 countries with different school and…

  2. Are Africans Susceptible to Dementia? Preliminary Reflections on Linguistic Behaviour in Aged Care and the Discourse in Xhosa of a Dementing White Bilingual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makoni, Sinfree; Makoe, Pinky

    1999-01-01

    Reports on an aspect of a larger project broadly examining the role of language in health care practices. Discusses the effects of dementia on the speech of an aging white Xhosa speaker in the context of a health care institution. Dementia has not been conclusively demonstrated in black Africans. Shows the effects of dementia on the responses…

  3. Collagen cross-links as a determinant of bone quality: a possible explanation for bone fragility in aging, osteoporosis, and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Marumo, K

    2010-02-01

    Collagen cross-linking, a major post-translational modification of collagen, plays important roles in the biological and biomechanical features of bone. Collagen cross-links can be divided into lysyl hydroxylase and lysyloxidase-mediated enzymatic immature divalent cross-links,mature trivalent pyridinoline and pyrrole cross-links, and glycation- or oxidation-induced non-enzymatic cross-links(advanced glycation end products) such as glucosepane and pentosidine. These types of cross-links differ in the mechanism of formation and in function. Material properties of newly synthesized collagen matrix may differ in tissue maturity and senescence from older matrix in terms of crosslink formation. Additionally, newly synthesized matrix in osteoporotic patients or diabetic patients may not necessarily be as well-made as age-matched healthy subjects. Data have accumulated that collagen cross-link formation affects not only the mineralization process but also microdamage formation. Consequently, collagen cross-linking is thought to affect the mechanical properties of bone. Furthermore,recent basic and clinical investigations of collagen cross-links seem to face a new era. For instance, serum or urine pentosidine levels are now being used to estimate future fracture risk in osteoporosis and diabetes. In this review, we describe age-related changes in collagen cross-links in bone and abnormalities of cross-links in osteoporosis and diabetes that have been reported in the literature. PMID:19760059

  4. Age-Associated Weight Gain, Leptin, and SIRT1: A Possible Role for Hypothalamic SIRT1 in the Prevention of Weight Gain and Aging through Modulation of Leptin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the principal regulator of body weight and energy balance. It modulates both energy intake and energy expenditure by sensing the energy status of the body through neural inputs from the periphery as well as direct humoral inputs. Leptin, an adipokine, is one of the humoral factors responsible for alerting the hypothalamus that enough energy is stored in the periphery. Plasma leptin levels are positively linked to adiposity; leptin suppress energy intake and stimulates energy expenditure. However, prolonged increases in plasma leptin levels due to obesity cause leptin resistance, affecting both leptin access to hypothalamic neurons and leptin signal transduction within hypothalamic neurons. Decreased sensing of peripheral energy status through leptin may lead to a positive energy balance and gradual gains in weight and adiposity, further worsening leptin resistance. Leptin resistance, increased adiposity, and weight gain are all associated with aging in both humans and animals. Central insulin resistance is associated with similar observations. Therefore, improving the action of humoral factors in the hypothalamus may prevent gradual weight gain, especially during middle age. SIRT1 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase with numerous substrates, including histones, transcription factors, co-factors, and various enzymes. SIRT1 improves both leptin sensitivity and insulin sensitivity by decreasing the levels of several molecules that impair leptin and insulin signal transduction. SIRT1 and NAD+ levels decrease with age in the hypothalamus; increased hypothalamic SIRT1 levels prevent age-associated weight gain and improve leptin sensitivity in mice. Therefore, preventing the age-dependent loss of SIRT1 function in the hypothalamus could improve the action of humoral factors in the hypothalamus as well as central regulation of energy balance. PMID:26236282

  5. Shifts in the recent distribution of energy intake among U.S. children aged 2-18 years reflect potential abatement of earlier declining trends.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Michelle A; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Miles, Donna R; Slining, Meghan M; Popkin, Barry M

    2014-08-01

    Recent national surveys suggest that child obesity in the United States may have reached a plateau, but corresponding trends in energy intake have not been examined in depth. This article evaluates medium-term trends in children's reported energy intake by using 4 waves of national dietary surveillance from 2003-2004 to 2009-2010. The analysis uses up to 2 24-h dietary recalls, incorporating methods that address challenges in estimating usual intake, accounting for intraindividual variance and covariates such as the presence of atypical consumption days. Quantile regression was used to assess disparities in intake among sociodemographic subgroups at extremes of the distribution as well as at the median, and the potential influence of misreporting was evaluated. Results indicated that after an initial decline in intakes across all age groups through 2007-2008, there were significant increases of ∼90 kcal/d at the median among adolescents in 2009-2010, whereas intakes in younger children remained steady. Among adolescent boys, the recent increase was larger at the 90th percentile than at the median. Intake trends did not vary by race/ethnic group, among whom intakes were similar at the upper end of the distribution. Misreporting did not influence trends over time, but intakes were lower in younger children and higher in older children after excluding misreporters. Overall, findings suggest that declines in children's energy intake from 2003-2004 through 2007-2008 were consistent with the obesity plateau observed in most age and gender subgroups through 2009-2010. However, there is evidence of increased intakes among adolescents in 2009-2010, which may threaten the earlier abatement in overweight in this older age group. PMID:24919689

  6. Accretionary Complexes: Recorders of Plate Tectonism and Environmental Conditions Through Time on Earth and Possibly Those Early Noachian (Hadean-equivalent) in Age on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Miyamoto, H.; Viviano-Beck, C. E.; Anderson, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    On Earth, highlighted in Japan, North America, Europe, and Greenland, accretionary complexes comprehensively record information compiled while the oceanic crust is en route from the mid-oceanic ridge to the subduction zone, spanning hundreds of millions of years. At the zone, oceanic crustal materials are stacked along thrust faults and/or subducted to be eventually recycled into the mantle. The surviving accretionary-complex materials include Ocean Plate Stratigraphy (OPS). The ideal succession of the OPS (from oldest to youngest) is mid-ocean ridge basalt, pelagic sediment including radiolarian chert, hemipelagic sediment including siliceous shale, and trench turbidite deposits. Therefore, accretionary complexes often record diverse environmental conditions from deep- to shallow-marine environments, including those perturbed by magmatic, impact, and possibly extrasolar events. Stratigraphic, impact-crater, paleotectonic, and magnetic-anomaly information point to Early Noachian (Hadean-equivalent) Martian geologic terrains; they are extremely ancient environmental records compared to those destroyed on Earth due to differences in planetary mass and evolutional states. Such record a dynamic phase of the evolution of Mars, including interacting ocean, landmass, and atmosphere, as well as possible plate tectonism during an operating dynamo. A candidate accretionary complex and nearby outcrops of steeply dipping beds comprising olistostrome-like blocks, nearby and in the Claritas rise, respectively, may be key evidence of major crustal shortening related to plate tectonism, in addition to being extremely ancient environmental records. Claritas rise is a rugged promontory about 250 km across, which forms the northwest part of an extremely ancient and large mountain range, Thaumasia highlands, with a length nearing 2,400 km, or approximating that of the Himalayas. Future investigation of the ancient Martian basement, which includes geochemical analyses for possible OPS

  7. Early and late-onset effect of chronic stress on vascular function in mice: a possible model of the impact of depression on vascular disease in aging.

    PubMed

    Isingrini, Elsa; Belzung, Catherine; d'Audiffret, Alexandre; Camus, Vincent

    2011-04-01

    Depression is recognized as a predictor of increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. In addition, depressed patients exhibit an increase in the serum markers of endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation involved in the cascade of events leading to atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the early and late-onset expression of various vascular markers in a rodent model of depression. Male DBA (an inbred strain of mice)/2J mice were exposed to either 7 weeks of controlled living conditions or unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS), and subsequently given daily fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or NaCl (9%) during the last 5 weeks of the experiment. Depressive-like behavior was evaluated by using motivational and self-care behavior, including the assessment of the animal's coat state and grooming behavior. Enzyme-linked immunoassay was used to quantify matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression either immediately after the end of the UCMS procedure (short term condition) or 10 months later (long-term condition). Results indicate that 1) UCMS procedure induces a short-term depressive-like behavior in mice, defined as coat state deterioration, an effect that is prevented by fluoxetine treatment; 2) UCMS procedure has no effect on the short-term expression of the studied markers; however, UCMS increases expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 only in the long-term group; 3) fluoxetine treatment is unable to counteract this UCMS-induced change; 4) aging induces behavioral perturbation, defined as a decrease in grooming motivation, and an increase of all the vascular markers in both control and UCMS groups and 5) pretreatment with fluoxetine has no protective effects on aging-induced behavioral and vascular alterations. Thus, in this model of depression-like behavior, UCMS appears to induce late

  8. Clearance of autophagy-associated dying retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible source for inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Szatmári-Tóth, M; Kristóf, E; Veréb, Z; Akhtar, S; Facskó, A; Fésüs, L; Kauppinen, A; Kaarniranta, K; Petrovski, G

    2016-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can undergo different forms of cell death, including autophagy-associated cell death during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Failure of macrophages or dendritic cells (DCs) to engulf the different dying cells in the retina may result in the accumulation of debris and progression of AMD. ARPE-19 and primary human RPE cells undergo autophagy-associated cell death upon serum depletion and oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Autophagy was revealed by elevated light-chain-3 II (LC3-II) expression and electron microscopy, while autophagic flux was confirmed by blocking the autophago-lysosomal fusion using chloroquine (CQ) in these cells. The autophagy-associated dying RPE cells were engulfed by human macrophages, DCs and living RPE cells in an increasing and time-dependent manner. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) decreased the engulfment of the autophagy-associated dying cells by macrophages, whereas sorting out the GFP-LC3-positive/autophagic cell population or treatment by the glucocorticoid triamcinolone (TC) enhanced it. Increased amounts of IL-6 and IL-8 were released when autophagy-associated dying RPEs were engulfed by macrophages. Our data suggest that cells undergoing autophagy-associated cell death engage in clearance mechanisms guided by professional and non-professional phagocytes, which is accompanied by inflammation as part of an in vitro modeling of AMD pathogenesis. PMID:27607582

  9. Subjective Sleep Quality as a Possible Mediator in the Relationship between Personality Traits and Depressive Symptoms in Middle-Aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Huang, Vivian; Peck, Katlyn; Mallya, Sasha; Lupien, Sonia J; Fiocco, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the mediating role of sleep in the relationship between personality traits and depressive symptoms in a group of community-dwelling men and women (Mage = 57.92, SD = 4.00). Participants completed the short form NEO Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). High neuroticism and low conscientiousness was associated with poor sleep, as well as greater depressive symptom severity. Partial indirect mediation effects were found between personality traits (i.e., neuroticism and conscientiousness) and depressive symptoms through self-report sleep measures. An alternative model was also explored, entering depression as the mediator; however a smaller portion of the variance was explained by this model, compared with the hypothesized model. The current study provides preliminary information regarding the mechanisms that influence the relationship between personality traits, sleep, and depression among a group of community-dwelling middle-aged adults. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:27285159

  10. Subjective Sleep Quality as a Possible Mediator in the Relationship between Personality Traits and Depressive Symptoms in Middle-Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Katlyn; Mallya, Sasha; Lupien, Sonia J.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the mediating role of sleep in the relationship between personality traits and depressive symptoms in a group of community-dwelling men and women (Mage = 57.92, SD = 4.00). Participants completed the short form NEO Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). High neuroticism and low conscientiousness was associated with poor sleep, as well as greater depressive symptom severity. Partial indirect mediation effects were found between personality traits (i.e., neuroticism and conscientiousness) and depressive symptoms through self-report sleep measures. An alternative model was also explored, entering depression as the mediator; however a smaller portion of the variance was explained by this model, compared with the hypothesized model. The current study provides preliminary information regarding the mechanisms that influence the relationship between personality traits, sleep, and depression among a group of community-dwelling middle-aged adults. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:27285159

  11. Evaluation of dermal extracellular matrix and epidermal-dermal junction modifications using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging, in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy, echography, and histology: effect of age and peptide applications.

    PubMed

    Mondon, Philippe; Hillion, Mélanie; Peschard, Olivier; Andre, Nada; Marchand, Thibault; Doridot, Emmanuel; Feuilloley, Marc Gj; Pionneau, Cédric; Chardonnet, Solenne

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to establish a new methodology for evaluating elements of dermal extracellular matrix (ECM), of epidermal-dermal junction (EDJ), and effects of molecules which can modulate their synthesis. This methodology is based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI). In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (in vivo RCM) and echography were also used. Using immunohistochemistry methods on explants, age-related modification data were obtained for selected dermal ECM and EDJ proteins (collagen I, collagen IV, collagen VII, collagen XVII, nidogen I, decorin/decorunt) and used as reference for MALDI-MSI studies. A methodology was developed with MALDI-MSI to map epidermis and dermis proteins. Then MALDI-MSI was used to study age modifications. In vivo RCM and high-frequency ultrasounds were used to evaluate ECM and EDJ undulation modifications caused by aging. Anti-aging molecule evaluations were performed with a blend of palmitoyl oligopeptide and palmitoyl tetrapeptide-7. Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that the selected proteins were found to be less abundant in aged group explants vs. young group except for decorin. MALDI-MSI studies correlated the results obtained for decorin. In vivo RCM measurements indicated a decrease of EDJ undulation depth with age and ECM modifications in the upper part of dermis. Echography demonstrated that the peptide blend reduced subepidermal low-echogenic band thickness and improved its density. In vivo RCM studies indicated that the peptides improved the ECM structure vs. placebo. This preliminary MALDI-MSI study raised some technical difficulties that were overcome. Further studies will be conducted to identify more proteins and to demonstrate the interest of this method for cosmetic evaluations. PMID:25817264

  12. Three-micron extinction of the Titan haze in the 250-700 km altitude range: Possible evidence of a particle-aging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtin, Régis; Kim, Sang Joon; Bar-Nun, Akiva

    2015-01-01

    Context. The chemical nature of the Titan haze is poorly understood. The investigation carried out by the Cassini-Huygens suite of instruments is bringing new insights into this question. Aims: This work aims at deriving the vertical variation of the spectral structure of the 3.3-3.4 μm absorption feature of the Titan haze from Cassini VIMS solar occultation data recorded between 250 and 700 km altitude. Methods: We computed the transmittance of Titan's atmosphere using a spherical shell model and a radiative transfer code including the influence of CH4, CH3D, and C2H6, as well as the effects of absorption and scattering by the haze particles. We derived the haze extinction from a comparison of the synthetic spectra with the VIMS solar occultation spectra. Results: We find a marked change in the relative amplitudes of the 3.33 and 3.38 μm features, which are characteristic of aromatic (double C=C chains or rings) or aliphatic (single C-C chains) structural groups, respectively. The pseudo-ratio of aromatics to aliphatics (uncorrected for the absolute band strengths) varies from 3.3 ± 1.9 at 580-700 km to 0.9 ± 0.1 at 350-450 km, and is 0.5 ± 0.1 around 250 km. The structural change from the aromatic to the aliphatic type between 580 and 480 km appears to correspond to a spontaneous aging of the particles - a transition between unannealed and hardened particles - while the further decrease of the pseudo-ratio of aromatics to aliphatics below 480 km may be related to the coating of the core particles by condensates such as heavy alkanes. VIMS transmission spectra data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/573/A21

  13. Nondestructive evaluation of aircraft coatings with infrared diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, Hans G.; Wilson, Kody A.; Gross, Kevin C.; Hawks, Michael R.; Zens, Timothy W. C.

    2015-05-01

    Aircraft coatings degrade over time, but aging can be difficult to detect before failure and delamination. We present a method to evaluate aircraft coatings in situ using infrared diffuse reflectance spectra. This method can detect and classify coating degradation much earlier than visual inspection. The method has been tested on two different types of coatings that were artificially aged in an autoclave. Spectra were measured using a hand-held diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS). One set of 72 samples can be classified as either aged or unaged with 100% accuracy. A second sample set contained samples that had been artificially aged for 0, 24, 48 or 96 hours. Several classification methods are compared, with accuracy better than 98% possible.

  14. Mosaic aging

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lary C.; Herndon, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although all multicellular organisms undergo structural and functional deterioration with age, senescence is not a uniform process. Rather, each organism experiences a constellation of changes that reflect the heterogeneous effects of age on molecules, cells, organs and systems, an idiosyncratic pattern that we refer to as mosaic aging. Varying genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors (local and extrinsic) contribute to the aging phenotype in a given individual, and these agents influence the type and rate of functional decline, as well as the likelihood of developing age-associated afflictions such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Identifying key factors that drive aging, clarifying their activities in different systems, and in particular understanding how they interact will enhance our comprehension of the aging process, and could yield insights into the permissive role that senescence plays in the emergence of acute and chronic diseases of the elderly. PMID:20110150

  15. Reflective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents his study of parent participation at an international school in Spain offering the British curriculum. He used quantitative methods and administered questionnaires to gather data that reflected the views of a large proportion of the school's parent community. He administered semi-structured interviews to gain a…

  16. Reflections on the theory of "silver bullet" octreotide tracers: implications for ligand-receptor interactions in the age of peptides, heterodimers, receptor mosaics, truncated receptors, and multifractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The classical attitude of Nuclear Medicine practitioners on matters of peptide-receptor interactions has maintained an intrinsic monogamic character since many years. New advances in the field of biochemistry and even in clinical Nuclear Medicine have challenged this type of thinking, which prompted me to work on this review. The central issue of this paper will be the use of somatostatin analogs, i.e., octreotide, in clinical imaging procedures as well as in relation to neuroendocirne tumors. Newly described characteristics of G-protein coupled receptors such as the formation of receptor mosaics will be discussed. A small section will enumerate the regulatory processes found in the cell membrane. Possible new interpretations, other than tumor detection, based on imaging procedures with somatostatin analogs will be presented. The readers will be taken to situations such as inflammation, nociception, mechanosensing, chemosensing, fibrosis, taste, and vascularity where somatostatin is involved. Thyroid-associated orbitopathy will be used as a model for the development of multi-agent therapeutics. The final graphical summary depicts the multifactorial properties of ligand binding. PMID:22214590

  17. Selectively reflective transparent sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waché, Rémi; Florescu, Marian; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Clowes, Steven K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to selectively reflect certain wavelengths while maintaining the optical properties on other spectral ranges. This is of particular interest for transparent materials, which for specific applications may require high reflectivity at pre-determined frequencies. Although there exist currently techniques such as coatings to produce selective reflection, this work focuses on new approaches for mass production of polyethylene sheets which incorporate either additives or surface patterning for selective reflection between 8 to 13 μ m. Typical additives used to produce a greenhouse effect in plastics include particles such as clays, silica or hydroxide materials. However, the absorption of thermal radiation is less efficient than the decrease of emissivity as it can be compared with the inclusion of Lambertian materials. Photonic band gap engineering by the periodic structuring of metamaterials is known in nature for producing the vivid bright colors in certain organisms via strong wavelength-selective reflection. Research to artificially engineer such structures has mainly focused on wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. However few studies to date have been carried out to investigate the properties of metastructures in the mid infrared range even though the patterning of microstructure is easier to achieve. We present preliminary results on the diffuse reflectivity using FDTD simulations and analyze the technical feasibility of these approaches.

  18. Combined apatite fission-track and single grain apatite (U Th)/He ages from basement rocks of central Dronning Maud Land (East Antarctica) — Possible identification of thermally overprinted crustal segments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmel, B.; Jacobs, J.; Crowhurst, P.; Daszinnies, M. C.

    2007-12-01

    Apatite fission-track (FT) and single grain (U-Th)/He ages from four vertical profiles in central Dronning Maud Land (East Antarctica) range from 312 ± 20 Ma to 135 ± 11 Ma and 304 ± 28 Ma to 104 ± 8 Ma, respectively. The combined age data allows to discriminate between undisturbed cooled (due to exhumation) and thermally overprinted crustal blocks. Profiles at the Zwieselhöhe and the Conradgebirge revealed unusual apatite FT vs. elevation relationships and (U-Th)/He ages older than the corresponding central apatite FT ages, possibly providing evidence for a Jurassic thermal overprint. Most probably Jurassic magmatism and associated advective heating led to total annealing of the apatite fission-tracks but helium only partially diffused. The model developed in this paper suggests that the (U-Th)/He ages from the Zwieselhöhe and Conradgebirge profiles are in part relicts of the pre-Jurassic cooling history. Two thermally undisturbed vertical profiles are used to record the long-term cooling history of central Dronning Maud Land. Time-temperature paths derived from modelled apatite FT data of these profiles revealed two phases of accelerated cooling during the Late Carboniferous and the Early Jurassic. Both phases are followed by slow cooling which is also documented by the spread in apatite (U-Th)/He single grain ages. The cooling at the end of the Carboniferous is most probably related to far field effects associated to the prevailing convergent tectonics. During the initial separation between East Antarctica and Mozambique erosion along an evolving rift shoulder caused the Jurassic cooling. Denudation of the basement was simultaneous with volcanism with both pre-dating (c. 20-10 Ma) sea-floor spreading in the Riser Larsen Sea (c. 155 Ma). Post Jurassic cooling was restricted to the lowest temperature sensitivity of both methods. Combined inverse modelled apatite FT data and forward modelled (U-Th)/He data suggest an Eocene/Oligocene cooling step, possibly

  19. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

    PubMed

    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined. PMID

  20. Haitian reflections.

    PubMed

    Docrat, Fathima

    2010-08-01

    Natural disasters and acts of terrorism demonstrate a similar critical need for national preparedness. As one of a team of volunteers with a local South African NGO who recently went on a medical mission, I would like to share glimpses of our experience and reflect on the mistakes - and also to state the obvious: that we do not learn from our mistakes. A simple literature search has shown that the same mistakes happen repeatedly. 'Humanitarian disasters occur with frightening regularity, yet international responses remain fragmented, with organizations and responders being forced to "reinvent the wheel" with every new event'. This is the result of an obvious lack of preparedness. PMID:20822625

  1. Reflective Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The aluminized polymer film used in spacecraft as a radiation barrier to protect both astronauts and delicate instruments has led to a number of spinoff applications. Among them are aluminized shipping bags, food cart covers and medical bags. Radiant Technologies purchases component materials and assembles a barrier made of layers of aluminized foil. The packaging reflects outside heat away from the product inside the container. The company is developing new aluminized lines, express mailers, large shipping bags, gel packs and insulated panels for the building industry.

  2. GNSS Ocean Reflected Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, P.

    2012-12-01

    mode in separate receiver channels. The instrument setup consists of separate L1 and L2 antennas both oriented with the main gain lobe toward the horizon. The use of directive antennas pointed towards the horizon enables signal recordings down to the lowest layers of the atmosphere. The experimental instrumentation consists of a prototype high precision receiver, equivalent to the GPS receiver flying on the ESA MetOp satellites. By using an open-loop high-precision GNSS receiver, it is possible to provide the in-phase and quadrature components of the signal at high sample rates, which enables investigation of spectral signatures of ocean reflected signals. The measurements of the low elevation grazing signals reveal the incoherent scatter process in the reflection zone, the spectral skewness and width of the reflected signals, and the relation to surface winds, temperature and sea surface roughness. Thus, such observations are able to determine the spectral reflectivity of the ocean surface at GNSS wavelengths for a range of meteorological conditions.

  3. Deep seismic reflection profiling and continental growth curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemperer, Simon L.

    1988-01-01

    The results of deep seismic reflection profiling is discussed which shows that the lower crust is prominently layered, in many continental areas, regardless of the age of the surface rocks. The seismic Moho is commonly shallower than the petrological Moho, leading to the question of the nature and origin of this prominent reflector in the deep crust. The lower crust is much less well defined in Phanerozoic and Proterozoic accreted terranes, suggesting possible differences in types of lower crusts.

  4. Reflected Glory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  5. Reflected Glory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  6. Absorption of the eye lens and macular pigment derived from the reflectance of cone photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagers, Niels P. A.; van Norren, Dirk

    2004-12-01

    We measured the amplitude of the directional component of the bleached fundus reflectance, the so-called optical Stiles-Crawford effect, as a function of wavelength. The directional reflectance originates from within the outer segments of the photoreceptors. Thus only two anterior absorbers are of importance: macular pigment and the crystalline lens. Analysis of spectra obtained in pseudophakes established that the cone photoreceptors act as spectrally neutral reflectors. The reflectance spectra, expressed in density units, resembled the macular pigment density spectrum. Studying age effects in the lens of normal subjects resulted in a description of the optical density of the lens in terms of a ``young'' and an ``aged'' template. The young template represents the pigment O-β-glucoside of 3-hydroxykynurenine, which dominates the light absorption in young eyes and decreases with age. The aged template represents the pigments accumulating in the lens with age. The total optical density increased with age, but it was lower in the wavelength region 500-650 nm than was previously assumed on the basis of psychophysical studies. Analysis of the spectra also provided precise individual estimates of the optical density of macular pigment. Finally, we observed a decrease in the photoreceptor reflectivity with age, possibly reflecting a degradation of the photoreceptors.

  7. Involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPAR β/δ) in BDNF signaling during aging and in Alzheimer disease: possible role of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE).

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Elisabetta; D'Angelo, Barbara; Cristiano, Loredana; Di Giacomo, Erica; Fanelli, Francesca; Moreno, Sandra; Cecconi, Francesco; Fidoamore, Alessia; Antonosante, Andrea; Falcone, Roberta; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Cimini, Annamaria

    2014-01-01

    Aging and many neurological disorders, such as AD, are linked to oxidative stress, which is considered the common effector of the cascade of degenerative events. In this phenomenon, reactive oxygen species play a fundamental role in the oxidative decomposition of polyunsaturated fatty acids, resulting in the formation of a complex mixture of aldehydic end products, such as malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, and other alkenals. Interestingly, 4-HNE has been indicated as an intracellular agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ. In this study, we examined, at early and advanced AD stages (3, 9, and 18 months), the pattern of 4-HNE and its catabolic enzyme glutathione S-transferase P1 in relation to the expression of PPARβ/δ, BDNF signaling, as mRNA and protein, as well as on their pathological forms (i.e., precursors or truncated forms). The data obtained indicate a novel detrimental age-dependent role of PPAR β/δ in AD by increasing pro-BDNF and decreasing BDNF/TrkB survival pathways, thus pointing toward the possibility that a specific PPARβ/δ antagonist may be used to counteract the disease progression. PMID:24621497

  8. Reflecting on Čerenkov reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, D.; Gaug, M.; Oliva, P.

    2008-05-01

    MAGIC, as well as HESS and VERITAS, is a Čerenkov Telescope unveiling γ-ray sources above 60 GeV at vertical within noisy (hadronic) airshowering sky. These telescopes while facing the horizons may reveal rarest blazing UHECR as well as far fluorescence tails of downward PeV-EeV hadronic airshowers. Few of these inclined airshowers blazing on axis are spread by the geomagnetic field into twin spots. These twin flashes and their morphology may tag the UHECR origination site. There is a rich window of such reflecting Čerenkov lights visible by Telescopes on top of Mountains as MAGIC (and partially VERITAS): the reflections from the nearby ground (possibly enhanced by rain or snow, ice white cover), from the Sea and from the cloudy sky; in particular, these cloudy sheets may lay above or below the observer. MAGIC looking downward to the clouds or the snow, may well reveal blazing Moliere disks diffusing Čerenkov spots (few events per night). Because of geomagnetic forces and splitting of the inclined air-shower, one should reveal for the first time (at tens PeV or above) Čerenkov airshowers whose flashes are skimming the MAGIC nearby Sea and opened into twin spots. Their morphology may tag the UHECR origination, its consequent cross-section and composition. Magic telescopes looking upward into cloudy sky may observe very rare up-going UHE Tau, originated by UHE PeVs neutrinos skimming earth, air-showering into sky, reflecting into clouds. In particular Glashow resonant antineutrinos electron hitting into Earth electrons may lead to gauged boson W-, whose decay (inside the Earth) may produce a τ + bar nuτ [3], which later escape and decay in air is producing Čerenkov lights; these flashes may blaze into the clouds above MAGIC as upward dot spots. The Magic energy threshold for such UHE Neutrinos showers rises to PeV values. EeV UHE tau neutrinos by guaranteed GZK UHECR secondaries [6, 16], via the muon-tau flavor mixing, may skim the Earth, produce UHE tau

  9. A Reflective Look at Reflecting Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pender, Rebecca L.; Stinchfield, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This article reviewed existing literature and research on the reflecting team process. There is a dearth of empirical research that explores the reflecting team process and the outcome of counseling that uses reflecting teams. Implications of using reflecting teams for counselors, counselor educators, and clients will be discussed. A call for…

  10. Nondestructive Determination of the Age of 20th-Century Oil-Binder Ink Prints Using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR): A Case Study with Postage Stamps from the Łódź Ghetto.

    PubMed

    Bower, Nathan W; Blanchet, Conor J K; Epstein, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The ability to determine the production date for a painting or print would be of great benefit in the forensic detection of fakes and forgeries as well as in art history and conservation. Changes in the pigments used at different times have been invaluable in detecting incongruities that suggest fraud, but relatively little work has been published that uses the chemical changes in oil binders as they dry to determine when an ink print or an oil painting was made. Using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy and samples with known dates, we calibrate the drying of oil binders in inks and paints and cross-validate the paints with pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). We apply the ink calibration to a case study involving the age determination of possible philatelic counterfeits from a World War II Jewish Ghetto in Occupied Poland, obtaining a date of 1946 ± 6 (1 s, n = 9) for the genuine stamps, and 1963 ± 16 (1 s, n = 19) for the various reproductions. PMID:26767642

  11. Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck Plan 2009; Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck Plan 2009; Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck Plan 2010 - Gilpin's Falls Covered Bridge, Spanning North East Creek at Former (Bypassed) Section of North East Road (SR 272), North East, Cecil County, MD

  12. English Education and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Candida

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that English teachers are in an excellent position to help students learn about the aged and aging because they know literature that treats the joys and pains of later life and they understand how language shapes and reflects cultural attitudes. Proposes objectives and presents samples of activities to be used in an aging unit. (MM)

  13. Challenging Narcissus, or Reflecting on Reflecting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    The concept of reflective practice and teaching people to be reflective practitioners is examined. The document begins with a look at professional knowledge according to three prominent professionals in the educational administration field: Schon, Schein, and Achilles. "Reflective" strategies that could be incorporated into courses and seminars,…

  14. Deep reflection structure imaged by the 2008 3D seismic reflection Survey at the RIDGE- 2000 East Pacific Rise Integrated Studies Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedimović, M. R.; Carbotte, S. M.; Mutter, J. C.; Canales, P. J.; Carton, H.; Aghaei, O.; Marjanović, M.; Newman, K. R.; Hu, M.; Stowe, L.

    2008-12-01

    The first multi-source and multi-streamer 3D seismic reflection experiment carried out using academic resources was done aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth in Summer 2008 during cruise MGL0812. The targeted area was the RIDGE-2000 Integrated Studies Site at the East Pacific Rise. Our primary 3D survey grid extends from about 9° 57'N to 9° 42'N, with a smaller grid just to the south covering approximately from 9° 40'N to 9° 37.5'N. Additionally, about 1 and 0.5 km wide across-ridge-axis swaths of data were collected at 9° 36'N and 9°30'N respectively, as well as an along-ridge-axis swath about 1 km wide and extending from 10° 05'N to 9° 40'N. We here focus on a preliminary analysis of the reflection structure imaged within the lower crust and uppermost mantle. Moho reflection arrivals are imaged through much of the investigated area. The character of Moho reflection events varies from simple, single reflection wavelet to more complex arrivals indicating spatial changes in structure within the Moho transition zone. Particularly strong Moho reflections are observed in the southern half of the main 3D grid. In places, Moho reflection event appears to extend across the ridge axis potentially suggesting "zero-age" Moho development. Weak Moho arrivals are found at the north end of the main 3D box and within the smaller box to the south. Most notable place lacking Moho reflections is the Lamont seamount area where Moho is not observed on either side of the ridge axis, although the area lacking Moho reflections is wider on the western ridge flank. Further south, along the across-ridge-axis swaths, Moho reflections again become more pronounced. A suit of what mostly appear to be reflection events is recognized between the AMC and Moho. Many of them do not appear to be multiples, and their origin is not well understood. Possible origins for these events include: lower boundary of the AMC, S-converted waves, and lower crustal melt lenses. Along sections of the two 3D

  15. Reflections after the Diane affair.

    PubMed

    Kant, A; van Puijenbroek, E; van Hunsel, F

    2014-09-01

    The Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb received 621 reports of possible adverse drugs reactions on Diane-35® . Of all reports, 388 were received after media attention. Of the 309 reports of thromboembolic adverse drugs reactions, 18 cases were fatal. In 31 cases the thromboembolic adverse drugs reaction was initially not recognized as such. The analysis and the turmoil of the 'Diane affair' gave rise to the following reflections: Reflection 1. Continuous awareness and attention of risk of medicines is needed, also for known risks, for timely recognition of adverse drugs reactions. Reflection 2. Reporting side effects should be part of the professional attitude. Reports play a pivotal role in the detection of new adverse drugs reactions and the conditions under which known adverse drugs reactions occur. Reflection 3. Improvement of adequate use of drugs. Pharmacovigilance not only has the aim to improve knowledge on risk of medicines, but also the aim of getting this knowledge into Health Care practice. PMID:24909698

  16. Orientations to Reflective Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, Bud; Austin, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    Delineates five orientations to reflective practice: immediate, technical, deliberative, dialectic, and transpersonal, each reflecting different social science bases and beliefs and values about education. Views them as interactive, interdependent, noncompeting, aspects of reflective practice. (SK)

  17. 40Ar/39Ar ages of flood basalt provinces in Russia and China and their possible link to global faunal extinction events: A cautionary tale regarding alteration and loss of 40Ar∗

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, Ajoy K.

    2014-04-01

    The hypothesis that the Permo-Triassic boundary (PTB) mass extinctions were caused by flood basalt volcanism in Russia (Siberian Traps) and/or China (the Emeishan Traps) is investigated from the point of view of time of occurrence (40Ar/39Ar ages). Numerous published ages in the literature are rejected as good estimates of the time of crystallization. The filters applied in this respect are (a) statistical reliability of plateau/isochron sections of stepheating data and (b) the alteration state of the material that was dated. Alteration appears to be ubiquitous, unsurprising since most of the material dated was used without acid leaching - a procedure that is effective in yielding fresh(er) samples. Of ˜70 ages in the literature for the main pulse of Siberian Trap volcanism, less than ten prove to be reliable ages. Similar techniques applied to 40Ar/39Ar for the Emeishan Traps, leaves only a single reliable age for the magmatic episode. These ages are compared to both published and new 40Ar/39Ar ages for the PTB as based on analysis of minerals from critical ash beds in China. There is good overlap in the ages (PTB - 250.0 ± 0.1 Ma, Siberian Trap lavas - 250.1 ± 0.4 Ma), lending credence to a genetic link between the formation of the Siberian Traps and the faunal extinction event at the PTB. A similar link for the formation of the Viluy Traps (Russia) and the Late Devonian extinction event is investigated; only a single reliable 40Ar/39Ar age is available for the Viluy Traps, and falls close to the interpolated age for the Frasnian-Fammenian boundary. The use of the unspiked K-Ar technique to yield accurate ages for such (altered) samples is questioned.

  18. Benefits of Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Kathi

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses what she was able to learn from an exercise in self-reflection regarding her teaching. She also discusses the advantages of reflection for administrators: First, a reflective practice is data-driven, making it a more valid way to evaluate administrators' knowledge and skills. Second, a reflective practice…

  19. Telescope With Reflecting Baffle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.

    1985-01-01

    Telescope baffle made from combination of reflecting surfaces. In contrast with previous ellipsoidal reflecting baffles, new baffle reflects skew rays more effectively and easier to construct. For infrared telescopes, reflecting baffles better than absorbing baffles because heat load reduced, and not necessary to contend with insufficiency of infrared absorption exhibited by black coatings.

  20. Paths for Future Population Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigsby, Jill S.

    Population aging refers to an entire age structure becoming older. The age structure of a population is the result of three basic processes: fertility, mortality, and migration. Age structures reflect both past effects and current patterns of these processes. At the town, city, or regional level, migration becomes an important factor in raising…

  1. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  2. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported…

  3. Planar Reflection of Gaseous Detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damazo, Jason Scott

    Pipes containing flammable gaseous mixtures may be subjected to internal detonation. When the detonation normally impinges on a closed end, a reflected shock wave is created to bring the flow back to rest. This study built on the work of Karnesky (2010) and examined deformation of thin-walled stainless steel tubes subjected to internal reflected gaseous detonations. A ripple pattern was observed in the tube wall for certain fill pressures, and a criterion was developed that predicted when the ripple pattern would form. A two-dimensional finite element analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook material properties; the pressure loading created by reflected gaseous detonations was accounted for with a previously developed pressure model. The residual plastic strain between experiments and computations was in good agreement. During the examination of detonation-driven deformation, discrepancies were discovered in our understanding of reflected gaseous detonation behavior. Previous models did not accurately describe the nature of the reflected shock wave, which motivated further experiments in a detonation tube with optical access. Pressure sensors and schlieren images were used to examine reflected shock behavior, and it was determined that the discrepancies were related to the reaction zone thickness extant behind the detonation front. During these experiments reflected shock bifurcation did not appear to occur, but the unfocused visualization system made certainty impossible. This prompted construction of a focused schlieren system that investigated possible shock wave-boundary layer interaction, and heat-flux gauges analyzed the boundary layer behind the detonation front. Using these data with an analytical boundary layer solution, it was determined that the strong thermal boundary layer present behind the detonation front inhibits the development of reflected shock wave bifurcation.

  4. Understanding reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Jacqueline Sian; Dosser, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) requires that nurses and midwives use feedback as an opportunity for reflection and learning, to improve practice. The NMC revalidation process stipulates that practitioners provide examples of how they have achieved this. To reflect in a meaningful way, it is important to understand what is meant by reflection, the skills required, and how reflection can be undertaken successfully. Traditionally, reflection occurs after an event encountered in practice. The authors challenge this perception, suggesting that reflection should be undertaken before, during and after an event. This article provides practical guidance to help practitioners use reflective models to write reflective accounts. It also outlines how the reflective process can be used as a valuable learning tool in preparation for revalidation. PMID:27154119

  5. UV, stress and aging.

    PubMed

    Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Leduc, Cedric; Verbeke, Alix; Toussaint, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Skin is a model of choice in studies on aging. Indeed, skin aging can be modulated by internal and external factors, reflecting its complexity. Two types of skin aging have been identified: intrinsic, mainly genetically determined and extrinsic-also called "photo-aging"-resulting on the impact of environmental stress and more precisely of UV rays. Simplified in vitro models, based on cellular senescence, have been developed to study the relationship between UV and aging. These models vary on the cell type (fibroblasts or keratinocytes, normal or immortalized) and the type of UV used (UVA or UVB). PMID:23467762

  6. The Brain-Mind Cycle of Reflection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iran-Nejad, Asghar; Gregg, Madeleine

    2001-01-01

    Discusses a theory of thinking, learning, and schooling based on developments in biofunctional cognition and the notion that the brain-awareness-mind cycle directly represents the natural course of human reflection. The paper argues that what makes this brain-mind cycle of reflection possible is intuitive self-awareness. Data from an experimental…

  7. Designing for Reflective Practice in Legal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Judith; Field, Rachael

    2007-01-01

    Including reflective practice in tertiary learning design is one way of working towards making effective learning possible for students. This article considers how elements of reflective practice in teaching delivery and assessment have been successful in satisfying principles of effective teaching in the context of the study of law at first year…

  8. Reflective Thinking as a Goal of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Jonathan

    1981-01-01

    Dewey's notion of "reflective thinking" is discussed. A model of phases of reflective thinking is described: problem recognition, enumeration of possibilities, reasoning, revision, and evaluation. Each phase has at least one parameter governing its operation and one rule for setting the optimum parameter value. Sources of individual variability…

  9. Perfect anti-reflection from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Q-Han Park

    2013-01-01

    Reducing unwanted reflections through impedance matching, called anti-reflection, has long been an important challenge in optics and electrical engineering. Beyond trial and error optimization, however, a systematic way to realize anti-reflection is still absent. Here, we report the discovery of an analytic solution to this long standing problem. For electromagnetic waves, we find the graded permittivity and permeability that completely remove any given impedance mismatch. We demonstrate that perfect broadband anti-reflection is possible when a dispersive, graded refractive index medium is used for the impedance-matching layer. We also present a design rule for the ultra-thin anti-reflection coating which we confirm experimentally by showing the anti-reflection behavior of an exemplary λ/25-thick coating made of metamaterials. This work opens a new path to anti-reflection applications in optoelectronic device, transmission line and stealth technologies.

  10. Snow reflectance from thematic mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of snow reflectance in all 6 TM reflective bands (i.e., 1,2,3,4,5, and 7) using a delta Eddington model show that snow reflectance in bands 4,5, and 7 is sensitive to grain size. Efforts to interpret the surface optical grain size for the spectral extension of albedo are described. Results show the TM data include spectral channels suitable for snow/cloud discrimination and for snow albedo measurements that can be extended throughout the solar spectrum. Except for band 1, the dynamic range is large enough that saturation occurs only occasionally. The finer resolution gives much better detail on the snowcovered area and might make it possible to use textural information instead of the snowline as an index to the amount of snow melt runoff.

  11. Reflections in art

    PubMed Central

    CAVANAGH, PATRICK; CHAO, JESSICA; WANG, DINA

    2009-01-01

    When artists depict a mirror in a painting, it necessarily lacks the most obvious property of a mirror: as we move around the painting of the mirror, the reflections we see in it do not change. And yet representations of mirrors and other reflecting surfaces can be quite convincing in paintings. Here, we will examine the rules of reflection, the many ways that painters can break those rules without losing the impression of reflection and the rules that cannot be broken. The rules that govern the perception of reflection are a small subset of the physical rules of reflection. PMID:18534102

  12. U-Pb baddeleyite and zircon ages of 2040 Ma, 1650 Ma and 885 Ma on dolerites in the West African Craton (Anti-Atlas inliers): Possible links to break-up of Precambrian supercontinents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyaté, Djiky; Söderlund, Ulf; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Ernst, Richard; Hafid, Ahmid; Ikenne, Moha; Soulaimani, Abderrahmane; Bertrand, Hervé; El Janati, M'hamed; R'kha Chaham, Khalid

    2013-08-01

    Precambrian inliers of the Anti-Atlas belt in the southern part of Morocco contain numerous dolerite dyke and sill swarms which were previously poorly dated. Four dykes and two sills dated by the U-Pb TIMS method on baddeleyite and zircon provide the first steps toward a magmatic ‘barcode' for the West African Craton (WAC) and constraints on the timing of breakup of the WAC from Precambrian supercontinents. A 2040 ± 2 Ma (U-Pb zircon) age for a WNW dyke in the Zenaga inlier, matches the published age of a dyke in the Tagragra of Tata inlier, and also those of Eburnean granites observed in several inliers, which are collectively interpreted to represent ca. 2040 Ma bimodal magmatism due to a mantle plume. Based on the presence of matching 2040 Ma ages, the WAC may have been connected to the North Atlantic Craton at the initial stage of fragmentation of a late Archean continent. U-Pb baddeleyite ages of 1656 ± 9 Ma and ca. 1655 Ma from sills in the Zenaga inlier and 1654 ± 16 Ma from a NE-trending dyke in the Agadir Melloul inlier are similar to intraplate magmatic ages in eastern and northern Baltica, and support the SAMBA reconstruction (part of the Nuna supercontinent) of the WAC adjacent to Baltica. Approximate U-Pb ages of 885 Ma for two dykes in the Iguerda-Taïfast and Zenaga inliers date a NE trending swarm (named herein the Iguerda-Taïfast swarm) which is connected to the initial breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia, and a specific link with the São Francisco/Congo and North China craton is considered.

  13. Exploring the Possibilities of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanton, Jonathan F.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last few years, the Board and staff of the MacArthur Foundation have been exploring the implications of the digital age. They are engaged in a continuous and purposeful meditation on technological innovations and their possibilities for all the work they do. Their working hypothesis is that the digital revolution will rank with the…

  14. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  15. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  16. Reflective Learning in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockbank, Anne, Ed.; McGill, Ian, Ed.; Beech, Nic, Ed.

    This book contains 22 papers on reflective learning in practice. The following papers are included: "Our Purpose" (Ann Brockbank, Ian McGill, Nic Beech); "The Nature and Context of Learning" (Ann Brockbank, Ian McGill, Nic Beech); "Reflective Learning and Organizations" (Ann Brockbank, Ian McGill, Nic Beech); "Reflective Learning in Practice" (Ann…

  17. Liberating Moral Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  18. Teaching Critical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Despite long-standing commitment to the notion of critical reflection across the healthcare professions it is unusual for critical theory and practice to be taught as explicit subjects in healthcare higher education. There is evidence to show that reflective techniques such as critical portfolios and reflective diaries can help students to…

  19. Digital Storytelling: Expanding Media Possibilities for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Hilary, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Stories offer a powerful framework for engagement, reflection, and other important skills that young people need to learn. As digital media have expanded, so have the possibilities for creating stories. Here, several examples of those new possibilities are examined, examples that highlight student-produced online broadcasting initiatives,…

  20. Revalidation and reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Finch, Alison

    2016-04-01

    From April 2016 nurses must meet the requirements of the new Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) revalidation process to maintain their registration. It is their responsibility to ensure they meet all revalidation requirements, but organisations and nurse leaders can support them to do so. Reflection is an important part of revalidation, and nurses are required to submit written reflective accounts and engage in reflective discussion. This article discusses how revalidation encourages a more conscious and active form of reflection. It also describes how leaders can help nurses to reflect on practice to identify improvements and become more familiar with the NMC Code. PMID:27032284

  1. Change of antibody levels to ferritin in the sera of foals after birth: possible passive transfer of maternal anti-ferritin autoantibody via colostrum and age-related anti-ferritin autoantibody production.

    PubMed

    Numata, Masami; Kondo, Takashi; Nambo, Yasuo; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Orino, Koichi

    2013-12-01

    Antibody (immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM or IgA) levels relative to ferritin in six foal sera (three male and three female) after birth (day 0 and 2, 6, 10, 20, 28, 36, 40, 52 and 56 weeks of age) were semi-quantitatively measured with normalization with antibody activity to ferritin in one adult horse serum. After addition of horse spleen ferritin to the serum sample, the complex formed between antibodies to ferritin in the serum and ferritin was co-immunoprecipitated using antibody to horse spleen ferritin. Antibody classes of the co-immnoprecipitate were detected with antibodies specific for horse IgG, IgM or IgA heavy chain. Six adult horse serum samples were found to have ferritin-binding activities in all immunoglobulin classes examined. Although ferritin antibody activities (IgG, IgM and IgA) were scant in the foal sera before sucking colostrum (day 0), their activities increased at 2 weeks of age. IgG antibodies showed a biphasic response and IgM antibody activity increased up to 40 weeks of age. Antibody (IgG, IgM and IgA) activities to ferritin in three colostrum samples were significantly higher than in adult horse serum samples. These results demonstrate that antibody to ferritin in foal serum is derived from colostrum after birth and is produced thereafter. PMID:23607654

  2. Mapping sea ice using reflected GNSS signals in a bistatic radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Clara; Zuffada, Cinzia; Shah, Rashmi; Mannucci, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals can be used as a kind of bistatic radar, with receivers opportunistically recording ground-reflected signals transmitted by the GNSS satellites themselves. This technique, GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R), has primarily been explored using receivers flown on aircraft or balloons, or in modeling studies. Last year's launch of the TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) satellite represents an enormous opportunity to investigate the potential of using spaceborne GNSS receivers to sense changes in the land and ocean surface. Here, we examine the ability of reflected GNSS signals to estimate sea ice extent and sea ice age, as well as comment on the possibility of using GNSS-R to detect leads and polynyas within the ice. In particular, we quantify how the peak power of Delay Doppler Maps (DDMs) generated within the GNSS receiver responds as the satellite flies over the Polar Regions. To compute the effective peak power of each DDM, we first normalize the peak power of the DDM by the noise floor. We also correct for antenna gain, range, and incidence angle. Once these corrections are made, the effective peak power across DDMs may be used as a proxy for changes in surface permittivity and surface roughness. We compare our calculations of reflected power to existing sea ice remote sensing products such as data from the SSMI/S as well as Landsat imagery. Our analysis shows that GNSS reflections are extremely sensitive to the sea ice edge, with increases in reflected power of more than 10 dB relative to reflected power over the open ocean. As the sea ice ages, it thickens and roughens, and reflected power decreases, though it does not decrease below the power over the open ocean. Given the observed sensitivity of GNSS reflections to small features over land and the sensitivity to the sea ice edge, we hypothesize that reflection data could help map the temporal evolution of leads and polynyas.

  3. Cognitive Impairment and Age-Related Vision Disorders: Their Possible Relationship and the Evaluation of the Use of Aspirin and Statins in a 65 Years-and-Over Sardinian Population.

    PubMed

    Mandas, Antonella; Mereu, Rosa Maria; Catte, Olga; Saba, Antonio; Serchisu, Luca; Costaggiu, Diego; Peiretti, Enrico; Caminiti, Giulia; Vinci, Michela; Casu, Maura; Piludu, Stefania; Fossarello, Maurizio; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Dessí, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, vascular and mixed dementia) and visual loss (cataract, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy) are among the most common conditions that afflict people of at least 65 years of age. An increasing body of evidence is emerging, which demonstrates that memory and vision impairment are closely, significantly, and positively linked and that statins and aspirin may lessen the risk of developing age-related visual and neurological problems. However, clinical studies have produced contradictory results. Thus, the intent of the present study was to reliably establish whether a relationship exist between various types of dementia and age-related vision disorders, and to establish whether statins and aspirin may or may not have beneficial effects on these two types of disorders. We found that participants with dementia and/or vision problems were more likely to be depressed and displayed worse functional ability in basic and instrumental activities of daily living than controls. Mini mental state examination scores were significantly lower in patients with vision disorders compared to subjects without vision disorders. A closer association with macular degeneration was found in subjects with Alzheimer's disease than in subjects without dementia or with vascular dementia, mixed dementia, or other types of age-related vision disorders. When we considered the associations between different types of dementia and vision disorders and the use of statins and aspirin, we found a significant positive association between Alzheimer's disease and statins on their own or in combination with aspirin, indicating that these two drugs do not appear to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease or improve its clinical evolution and may, on the contrary, favor its development. No significant association in statin use alone, aspirin use alone, or the combination of these was found in subjects without vision disorders but

  4. Cognitive Impairment and Age-Related Vision Disorders: Their Possible Relationship and the Evaluation of the Use of Aspirin and Statins in a 65 Years-and-Over Sardinian Population

    PubMed Central

    Mandas, Antonella; Mereu, Rosa Maria; Catte, Olga; Saba, Antonio; Serchisu, Luca; Costaggiu, Diego; Peiretti, Enrico; Caminiti, Giulia; Vinci, Michela; Casu, Maura; Piludu, Stefania; Fossarello, Maurizio; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Dessí, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders (Alzheimer’s disease, vascular and mixed dementia) and visual loss (cataract, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy) are among the most common conditions that afflict people of at least 65 years of age. An increasing body of evidence is emerging, which demonstrates that memory and vision impairment are closely, significantly, and positively linked and that statins and aspirin may lessen the risk of developing age-related visual and neurological problems. However, clinical studies have produced contradictory results. Thus, the intent of the present study was to reliably establish whether a relationship exist between various types of dementia and age-related vision disorders, and to establish whether statins and aspirin may or may not have beneficial effects on these two types of disorders. We found that participants with dementia and/or vision problems were more likely to be depressed and displayed worse functional ability in basic and instrumental activities of daily living than controls. Mini mental state examination scores were significantly lower in patients with vision disorders compared to subjects without vision disorders. A closer association with macular degeneration was found in subjects with Alzheimer’s disease than in subjects without dementia or with vascular dementia, mixed dementia, or other types of age-related vision disorders. When we considered the associations between different types of dementia and vision disorders and the use of statins and aspirin, we found a significant positive association between Alzheimer’s disease and statins on their own or in combination with aspirin, indicating that these two drugs do not appear to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease or improve its clinical evolution and may, on the contrary, favor its development. No significant association in statin use alone, aspirin use alone, or the combination of these was found in subjects without vision

  5. Spectral reflectance of human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P H; Bjerring, P

    1990-02-01

    A newly developed skin reflectance spectrophotometer was evaluated for measurements of both melanin pigmentation and erythema. Physiological changes in blood flow and blood content in normal humans were induced by compression with an arm cuff during recording of skin reflectance spectra. Reflectance spectra of UV-induced erythema were also recorded and compared with laser-Doppler flow measurements. Spectral reflectance measurements were found to be highly sensitive in determining minimal erythema, which was not clinically detectable. The measurements of erythema using reflectance spectroscopy and UV irradiation were very highly correlated (r = 0.996). It was possible to calculate the in vivo absorbance of oxygenized haemoglobin. The melanin pigmentation following UV irradiation was quantified by reflectance spectroscopy and correlates highly with the dose of UV irradiation (r = 0.995). Furthermore, regional variations in skin melanin and haemoglobin were analysed for fair Caucasian skin. PMID:2196543

  6. Red and near-infrared spectral reflectance of snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, H. W.; Munis, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of snow in the range of 0.60 to 2.50 microns wavelengths was studied in a cold laboratory using natural snow and simulated preparations of snow. A white barium sulfate powder was used as the standard for comparison. The high reflectance (usually nearly 100%) of fresh natural snow in visible wavelengths declines rapidly at wavelengths longer than the visible, as the spectral absorption coefficients of ice increase. Aging snow becomes only somewhat less reflective than fresh snow in the visible region and usually retains a reflectance greater than 80%. In the near infrared, aging snow tends to become considerably less reflective than fresh snow.

  7. Thoughts on the Psycho-biology of Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvik, Ussy F.

    1975-01-01

    Reflections on psychological perspectives of aging are focused around issues of biological changes and mental functioning, genetic factors in aging, psychological changes with aging, individual differences in mental functioning and the intellectual decline of the aged. (EH)

  8. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  9. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J.; Wendt, Joel R.

    1994-01-01

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

  10. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

    1994-09-06

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

  11. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  12. Aging Brain, Aging Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selkoe, Dennis J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the aging process related to physical changes of the human neural structure involved in learning, memory, and reasoning. Presents evidence that indicates such alterations do not necessarily signal the decline in cognitive function. Vignettes provide images of brain structures involved in learning, memory, and reasoning; hippocampal…

  13. Distinguishing major lithologic types in rocks of precambrian age in central Wyoming using multilevel sensing, with a chapter on possible economic significance of iron formation discovered by use of aircraft images in the Granite Mountains of Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Information obtained by remote sensing from three altitude levels: ERTS-1 (565 miles), U-2 (60,000 feet), and C-130 aircraft (15,000 feet) illustrates the possible application of multilevel sensing in mineral exploration. Distinction can be made between rocks of greenstone belts and rocks of granite-granite gneiss areas by using ERTS-1 imagery in portions of the Precambrian of central Wyoming. Study of low altitude color and color infrared photographs of the mafic terrain revealed the presence of metasedimentary rocks with distinct layers that were interpreted as amphibolite by photogeologic techniques. Some of the amphibolite layers were found to be iron formation when examined in the field. To our knowledge this occurrence of iron formation has not been previously reported in the literature.

  14. Renewable liquid reflection grating

    DOEpatents

    Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Toor, Arthur

    2003-10-07

    A renewable liquid reflection grating. Electrodes are operatively connected to a conducting liquid in an arrangement that produces a reflection grating and driven by a current with a resonance frequency. In another embodiment, the electrodes create the grating by a resonant electrostatic force acting on a dielectric liquid.

  15. Critically Reflective Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    Critical Reflective Practice (CRP) has a proven reputation as a method for teacher-researchers in K-12 classrooms, but there have been few published examples of this method being used to document school leaders' work-based practice. This paper outlines adaptations made by the author from an original CRP method to a Critically Reflective Leadership…

  16. Transparencies and Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the use of perspective, or showing things as the human eye sees them, when creating reflections and transparencies in works of art. Provides examples of artwork using transparency, reflection, and refraction by M. C. Escher, Richard Estes, and Janet Fish to give students an opportunity to learn about these three art techniques. (CMK)

  17. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  18. Engaging in Retrospective Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevig, Laurey

    2006-01-01

    Reflection is a powerful means to involve readers actively in gaining new insights about texts and themselves as readers. This article relates the story of three fifth-grade girls engaged in metacognitive inquiry within a classroom book club group. The use of exploratory talk and reflection illustrate how the girls constructed meaning and deepened…

  19. Reflecting Random Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio, Alessandro; Orsingher, Enzo

    2015-09-01

    We consider random flights in reflecting on the surface of a sphere with center at the origin and with radius R, where reflection is performed by means of circular inversion. Random flights studied in this paper are motions where the orientation of the deviations are uniformly distributed on the unit-radius sphere . We obtain the explicit probability distributions of the position of the moving particle when the number of changes of direction is fixed and equal to . We show that these distributions involve functions which are solutions of the Euler-Poisson-Darboux equation. The unconditional probability distributions of the reflecting random flights are obtained by suitably randomizing n by means of a fractional-type Poisson process. Random flights reflecting on hyperplanes according to the optical reflection form are considered and the related distributional properties derived.

  20. Possible Problems: Inverted, Flat, or Pierced Nipples

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Breastfeeding > Possible Problems: ...

  1. Reflective Writing through the Use of Guiding Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moussa-Inaty, Jase

    2015-01-01

    Reflections can be seen as powerful tools for growth and intellectual development. It is no surprise that the writing of reflections is common practice at a Federal Institute in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The research presented sought to explore possible differences in reflective writing once guidelines were presented to a group of interns in…

  2. Promoting Teacher Reflection: What Is Said to Be Done

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos, Juanjo Mena; Sanchez, Emilio; Tillema, Harm H.

    2011-01-01

    The present article's aim is to evaluate studies that promote teacher reflection. Through programmes of professional development, teachers are being encouraged to improve their reflective practice. This paper explores the grounding of what is advocated as reflective teaching and looks at possible differences between what is evidenced in research…

  3. Aging and Vision.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Marcel V

    2016-01-01

    Aging involves defined genetic, biochemical and cellular pathways that regulate lifespan. These pathways are called longevity pathways and they have relevance for many age-related diseases. In the eye, longevity pathways are involved in the major blinding diseases, cataract, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy. Pharmaceutical targeting of longevity pathways can extend healthy lifespan in laboratory model systems. This offers the possibility of therapeutic interventions to also delay onset or slow the progression of age-related eye diseases. I suggest that retinal degeneration may be viewed as accelerated aging of photoreceptors and that interventions extending healthy lifespan may also slow the pace of photoreceptor loss. PMID:26427437

  4. Verification of reflectance models in turbid waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanis, F. J.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    Inherent optical parameters of very turbid waters were used to evaluate existing water reflectance models. Measured upwelling radiance spectra and Monte Carlo simulations of the radiative transfer equations were compared with results from models based upon two flow, quasi-single scattering, augmented isotropic scattering, and power series approximation. Each model was evaluated for three separate components of upwelling radiance: (1) direct sunlight; (2) diffuse skylight; and (3) internally reflected light. Limitations of existing water reflectance models as applied to turbid waters and possible applications to the extraction of water constituent information are discussed.

  5. A note on weak shock wave reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, D. P.; Susin, F. M.; Defina, A.

    2013-09-01

    This work discusses the possibility of reconstructing, both numerically and experimentally, the steady state flow field and shock reflection pattern close to the triple point of von Neumann, Guderley and Vasilev reflections. First, a criterion for the orientation of shock wave fronts, even in the case of subcritical/subsonic flow downstream the front, is introduced and formalized. Then, a technique for obtaining a close view of the above reflection patterns centered about the triple point is described and a numerical example, within the framework of shallow water flow, is presented and discussed.

  6. Weak shock reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, John K.; Brio, Moysey

    2000-05-01

    We present numerical solutions of a two-dimensional inviscid Burgers equation which provides an asymptotic description of the Mach reflection of weak shocks. In our numerical solutions, the incident, reflected, and Mach shocks meet at a triple point, and there is a supersonic patch behind the triple point, as proposed by Guderley for steady weak-shock reflection. A theoretical analysis indicates that there is an expansion fan at the triple point, in addition to the three shocks. The supersonic patch is extremely small, and this work is the first time it has been resolved.

  7. Persistent Possible Science Selves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Leila A.; Lin, Lin

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines literature on the development of self-knowledge for possible selves--how an individual thinks about oneself and one's potential future selves (Markus & Nurius, 1986). Future science selves research, a recent offshoot of possible selves theories, centers on the development and loss of future possible scientific selves and…

  8. Envy, Politics, and Age

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Christine R.; Henniger, Nicole E.

    2013-01-01

    In the last 5 years, the phrase “politics of envy” has appeared more than 621 times in English-language newspapers, generally in opinion essays contending that political liberalism reflects and exploits feelings of envy. Oddly, this assertion has not been tested empirically. We did so with a large adult sample (n = 357). Participants completed a Dispositional Envy Scale and questions about political ideology, socioeconomic status, and age. Envy and age were moderately correlated; younger people reported greater envy. Political ideology and envy were weakly correlated; however, this relationship was not significant when controlling for age. PMID:23471177

  9. Managing Diversity: Reflections of Tourette Syndrome Sufferers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jeni; Shrimpton, Bradley

    This paper discusses a study that investigated the management of Tourette Syndrome (TS), particularly how self-reflection and instruction affects the frequency of TS behaviors. The study included 3 girls and 24 boys (ages 7-17) with TS from Victoria and New South Wales, Australia. When students were asked to indicate their general self-image and…

  10. Reflections on Miniature Golf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Nancy Norem; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes a transformational geometry project in which groups of students explore symmetry, reflections, translations, rotations, and dilations to design and create one hole of miniature golf large enough to play on. Includes unit plan for transformational geometry. (MKR)

  11. Seasonal soybean crop reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaster, E. W. (Principal Investigator); Chance, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented from field measurements of 1980 including 5 acquisitions of handheld radiometer reflectance measurements, 7 complete sets of parameters for implementing the Suits mode, and other biophysical parameters to characterize the soybean canopy. LANDSAT calculations on the simulated Brazilian soybean reflectance are included along with data collected during the summer and fall on 1981 on soybean single leaf optical parameters for three irrigation treatments. Tests of the Suits vegetative canopy reflectance model for the full hemisphere of observer directions as well as the nadir direction show moderate agreement for the visible channels of the MSS and poor agreement in the near infrared channel. Temporal changes in the spectral characteristics of the single leaves were seen to occur as a function of maturity which demonstrates that the absorptance of a soybean single leaf is more a function of thetransmittancee characteristics than the seasonally consistent single leaf reflectance.

  12. Andreev reflection in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beenakker, Carlo

    2007-03-01

    Relativity and superconductivity have no common ground in ordinary matter, because the velocity of electrons is only a small fraction of the velocity of light. The unusual band structure of a single layer of carbon atoms (graphene) contains negatively and positively charged particles that move as relativistic electrons and positrons. The electron-like particles in the conduction band can be converted into positron-like particles in the valence band when they are reflected by a superconductor. (The missing charge of 2e enters the superconductor as a Cooper pair.) This interband reflection process can be distinguished from the usual intraband Andreev reflection, because the reflection angle has the opposite sign. A new phenomenology of graphene--superconductor junctions is predicted, including an anomalous scaling of the supercurrent with the length of the junction and the existence of charge-neutral modes propagating along the interface.

  13. The essence of aging

    PubMed Central

    Vijg, Jan; Kennedy, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    The idea that aging is a purposeful, programmed series of events is intuitively appealing based on its many conserved aspects and the demonstrated feasibility of modifying life span by manipulating single genes or pathways. Yet, the case for a non-adaptive basis of aging is strong and now all but generally accepted in the field. Here, we briefly review why the case for programmed aging is weak, with a focus on the lack of possible evolutionary beneficial effects. PMID:26389968

  14. Reflectance of aqueous solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querry, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    The optical properties and optical constants of water and aqueous solutions were studied to develop an accurate tabulation of graphical representations of the optical constants through a broad spectrum. Manuscripts of articles are presented concerning extinction coefficients, relative specular reflectance, and temperature effect on the water spectrum. Graphs of absolute reflectance, phase shifts, index of refraction, and extinction coefficients for water, heavy water and aqueous solutions are included.

  15. Defining Reflection: Another Look at John Dewey and Reflective Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Examines four criteria that characterize John Dewey's view of reflective thought: reflection as a meaning-making process; reflection as a systematic, rigorous, disciplined way of thinking with its roots in scientific inquiry; reflection needs to happen in community, in interaction with others; and reflection requires attitudes that value the…

  16. Analytical elimination of substrate backside reflections from reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Wilbrandt, Steffen; Stenzel, Olaf

    2016-09-01

    An analytical approach to eliminate substrate backside reflections from measured reflectance of an unknown optical coating has been deducted. Thereby, measured transmittance, reflectance, and backside reflectance of the coating and transmittance and reflectance of the uncoated substrate at the desired angle of incidence and polarization state are required as input data. In the underlying theory, layer and substrate materials may be absorbing. PMID:27607274

  17. The solar reflectance of a snow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1978-01-01

    The radiative transfer equation was solved using a modified Schuster-Schwartzschild approximation to obtain an expression for the solar reflectance of a snow field. The parameters in the reflectance formula are the single scattering albedo and the fraction of energy scattered in the backward direction. The single scattering albedo is calculated from the crystal size using a geometrical optics formula and the fraction of energy scattered in the backward direction is calculated from the Mie scattering theory. Numerical results for reflectance are obtained for visible and near infrared radiation for different snow conditions. Good agreement was found with the whole spectral range. The calculation also shows the observed effect of aging on the snow reflectance.

  18. Dwelling in Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmundson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Following an encounter with a student at the beginning of fall term, the writer reflects that today's student generation is a singular one: its members want to study, travel, make friends, make more friends, read everything (superfast), take in all the movies, listen to every hot band, keep up with everyone they've ever known. They live to…

  19. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) A healthy ... Aging email updates. Enter email address Submit Healthy Aging news Accessibility | Privacy policy | Disclaimers | FOIA | Link to ...

  20. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Change Contrast print sign up Share Healthy Aging This category offers tips on how to stay ... with Smell Problems with Taste Skin Care and Aging Sleep and Aging Taking Medicines Talking with Your ...

  1. Our Visions of Possibility for Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Tim; Reinier, Rise; Gallagher, Kevin; Morgan, Bruce; Lopez-Robertson, Julia; Santman, Donna; Wong-Kam, JoAnn; Hill, Sharon; Christensen, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Tim O'Keefe, Rise Reinier and Kevin Gallagher, Bruce Morgan, Julia Lopez-Robertson, Donna Santman, JoAnn Wong-Kam, Sharon Hill, and Linda Christensen provide short essays describing their personal visions of possibility about literacy and how they maintain that passion and vision. Across a range of contexts, they reflect on the ways in which their…

  2. Number skills are maintained in healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Didino, Daniele; Stoianov, Ivilin; Zorzi, Marco

    2014-03-01

    Numerical skills have been extensively studied in terms of their development and pathological decline, but whether they change in healthy ageing is not well known. Longer exposure to numbers and quantity-related problems may progressively refine numerical skills, similar to what happens to other cognitive abilities like verbal memory. Alternatively, number skills may be sensitive to ageing, reflecting either a decline of number processing itself or of more auxiliary cognitive abilities that are involved in number tasks. To distinguish between these possibilities we tested 30 older and 30 younger participants on an established numerosity discrimination task requiring to judge which of two sets of items is more numerous, and on arithmetical tasks. Older participants were remarkably accurate in performing arithmetical tasks although their numerosity discrimination (also known as 'number acuity') was impaired. Further analyses indicate that this impairment was limited to numerosity trials requiring inhibiting information incongruent to numerosity (e.g., fewer but larger items), and that this also correlated with poor inhibitory processes measured by standard tests. Therefore, rather than a numerical impairment, poor numerosity discrimination is likely to reflect elderly's impoverished inhibitory processes. This conclusion is supported by simulations with a recent neuro-computational model of numerosity perception, where only the specific degradation of inhibitory processes produced a pattern that closely resembled older participants' performance. Numeracy seems therefore resilient to ageing but it is influenced by the decline of inhibitory processes supporting number performance, consistent with the 'Inhibitory Deficit' Theory. PMID:24423632

  3. A Framework for Teacher Reflectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Claire

    1998-01-01

    Proposes a framework for teacher reflection based on a longitudinal study of the development of six experienced second-language teachers who attempted to implement reflection and reflective action into their teaching practice. The resulting framework included several phases in the development of reflective teaching: engaging with reflection,…

  4. Making Aging "Real" for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altpeter, Mary; Marshall, Victor W.

    2003-01-01

    Part of an undergraduate introductory aging course was an experiential web-based exercise on calculating life expectancy, which used transformative learning methods. Data from 12 undergraduates revealed the reflective exercise stimulated thinking and increased awareness of and sensitivity to aging. (Contains 11 references.) (SK)

  5. Reflecting on reflection: capitalizing on the learning in intergenerational service-learning.

    PubMed

    Karasik, Rona J

    2013-01-01

    Intergenerational service-learning has become an important practice in gerontology and geriatrics education. Although numerous benefits of service-learning have been documented, greater attention to critical reflection, a key component for harvesting the learning in service-learning, is needed to increase our understanding of what students really are learning from intergenerational service-learning and how we may best enhance the positive aspects of that learning. This article examines the elements necessary for effective service-learning reflection, as well as reports on the results of a survey of gerontology and geriatric educators (N = 142) regarding their experiences with intergenerational service-learning and their use of specific reflection practices. The findings suggest that the types and implementation of service-learning reflection activities used in aging courses vary considerably. The importance of service-learning reflection and its associated benefits and challenges are discussed. PMID:23362856

  6. Possible and Impossible Segments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rachel; Pullum, Geoffrey K.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the relationship between phonetic possibility and phonological permissibility of segment types. Specific focus is on whether there are any phonetically impossible segments phonologically permissible, and whether there are any phonetically possible segments phonologically impermissable. Examines the case of nasality spreading in Sudanese…

  7. Possible temperate lakes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vixie, Graham; Barnes, Jason W.; Jackson, Brian; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, Christophe; MacKenzie, Shannon; Wilson, Paul

    2015-09-01

    We analyze southern mid-latitude albedo-dark features on Titan observed by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). In exploring the nature of these features we consider their morphology, albedo, and specular reflectivity. We suggest that they represent candidates for potential temperate lakes. The presence of lakes at the mid-latitudes would indicate that surface liquid can accumulate and remain stable away from Titan's poles. Candidate lakes were identified by looking for possible shorelines with lacustrine morphology. Then, we applied an atmospheric correction that empirically solved for their surface albedo. Finally, we looked for a specular reflection of the sky in the identified candidates. Using this prescription, we find two candidates that remain as potential temperature lakes. If candidate features do represent temperate lakes on Titan, they have implications for formation mechanisms such as clouds and rainfall or, in low elevation areas, percolation and subsurface flow. Clouds were observed near candidate lake locations on the T66 flyby and this latitude band showed many clouds during southern summer. Our techniques can be applied to areas of Titan that lack RADAR coverage to search for mid- and low-latitude lakes in the future.

  8. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    Often students and educators view assessments as an obligation and finality for a unit. In the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, the balance of time, resources and emphasis on students' scores related to assessment have been slanted considerably toward the summative side. This tension between assessment for accountability and assessment to inform teaching strains instruction and educators' ability to use that information to design learning opportunities that help students develop deeper conceptual understanding. A substantive body of research indicates that formative and reflective assessment can significantly improve student learning. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum (BRAC) examines support provided for high school science students through assessment practices. This investigation incorporates the usage of reflective assessments as a guiding practice for differentiated instruction and student choice. Reflective assessment is a metacognitive strategy that promotes self-monitoring and evaluation. The goals of the curriculum are to promote self-efficacy and conceptual understanding in students learning biology through developing their metacognitive awareness. BRAC was implemented in a high school biology classroom. Data from assessments, metacognitive surveys, self-efficacy surveys, reflective journals, student work, a culminating task and field notes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The results suggest that students who develop their metacognitive skills developed a deeper conceptual understanding and improved feelings of self-efficacy when they were engaged in a reflective assessment unit embedded with student choice. BRAC is a tool for teachers to use assessments to assist students in becoming metacognitive and to guide student choice in learning opportunities.

  9. Design for reflection.

    PubMed

    Bagnara, Sebastiano; Pozzi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Since a few years, a number of academic papers have been proposing to shift from user-centered design to human-centered (or person) design. In this contribution, we discuss as the common tread underlying these works the idea that design should also address the reflective part of our human experience, and not only aim to maximize the experiential aspects. Our review is complemented with examples derived from the internet world and from ICT consumer products. The main research areas we see as promising for the approach of "design for reflection" are: design for pauses, design for detachment, design for serendipity. PMID:22316867

  10. Mystic Reflection Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazlov, Yuri; Berenstein, Arkady

    2014-04-01

    This paper aims to systematically study mystic reflection groups that emerged independently in the paper [Selecta Math. (N.S.) 14 (2009), 325-372] by the authors and in the paper [Algebr. Represent. Theory 13 (2010), 127-158] by Kirkman, Kuzmanovich and Zhang. A detailed analysis of this class of groups reveals that they are in a nontrivial correspondence with the complex reflection groups G(m,p,n). We also prove that the group algebras of corresponding groups are isomorphic and classify all such groups up to isomorphism.

  11. Considerations on Temperature, Longevity and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    A modest reduction in body temperature prolongs longevity and possibly retards aging in both poikilotherm and homeotherm animals. Some of the possible mechanisms mediating these effects are considered here with respect to major aging models and theories. PMID:18425417

  12. Using GPS Reflections for Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickler, David

    2000-01-01

    GPS signals that have reflected off of the ocean's surface have shown potential for use in oceanographic and atmospheric studies. The research described here investigates the possible deployment of a GPS reflection receiver onboard a remote sensing satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The coverage and resolution characteristics of this receiver are calculated and estimated. This mission analysis examines using reflected GPS signals for several remote sensing missions. These include measurement of the total electron content in the ionosphere, sea surface height, and ocean wind speed and direction. Also discussed is the potential test deployment of such a GPS receiver on the space shuttle. Constellations of satellites are proposed to provide adequate spatial and temporal resolution for the aforementioned remote sensing missions. These results provide a starting point for research into the feasibility of augmenting or replacing existing remote sensing satellites with spaceborne GPS reflection-detecting receivers.

  13. Reflections on Learning in Interdisciplinary Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Asa; Kalman, Hildur

    2010-01-01

    In the present article, we will reflect on some didactic challenges and possibilities that emerge when teaching in interdisciplinary settings, and we will use and discuss the journey as a metaphor for learning. We argue that teaching in interdisciplinary studies rests on movements between different understandings, and that it gives ample…

  14. "Blah" or Praxis? Reflection in Freirean Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasbrook, Melissa

    Paulo Freire's framework pursues social justice, or liberation. Students and teachers critically think about the conditions of their realities, for the purpose of constructing and attempting solutions, referred to as "action" by Freire. Reflection-action is possible through collaboration, or dialogue--interdependent and concurrent processes to…

  15. Reflections on a Changing Educational Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awender, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Reflects on some serious educational problems--a lack of time, a lack of promotional possibilities that leads to morale and motivational difficulties, a lack of clear relevant curriculum, and a lack of leadership--faced by teachers. (Author/RK)

  16. Possible Sources of Data for Early Childhood (Age 3) Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ysseldyke, James E.; And Others

    This booklet is designed to be used in developing a system of indicators of educational outcomes for 3-year-old children, including those with disabilities. The document summarizes a conceptual model of educational outcomes, lists specific outcomes for the early childhood level, and matches indicators with each of the outcomes. It then focuses on…

  17. Meanings and Reflective Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Lynda

    Meaning constructs are aspects of a person's cultural worldview. They are those aspects that philosophers often write about as a means by which to make sense of the world. Teachers carry their worldviews and meaning constructs into the classrooms with them. Similarly to teachers, reflective teaching proponents hold meaning constructs that are…

  18. Lights, Camera, Reflection!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mourlam, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    There are many ways to critique teaching, but few are more effective than video. Personal reflection through the use of video allows one to see what really happens in the classrooms--good and bad--and provides a visual path forward for improvement, whether it be in one's teaching, work with a particular student, or learning environment. This…

  19. Reflecting on Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Rudolf V.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a two-day optics laboratory activity that investigates the scientific phenomenon of reflection, which students are generally familiar with but usually have not studied in depth. This investigation can be used on its own or as part of a larger unit on optics. This lesson encourages students to think critically and…

  20. Clinical Linguistics: Conversational Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, David

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference…

  1. Renew, Reflect, and Refresh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2005-01-01

    Is that the sound of the last bus leaving the schoolyard? Or the staff's collective sigh of relief? School's out. Now it's time to nurture the lifelong learner deep inside with a summer reading list that will allow teachers to renew, reflect, and refresh. The National Science Education Standards reminds us, "Becoming an effective science teacher…

  2. Reflections on Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santini, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a teachers reflections on the matter of student expectations. Santini begins with a common understanding of the "Pygmalion effect" from research projects conducted in earlier years that intimated "people's expectations could influence other people in the world around them." In the world of deaf…

  3. Reflections on "La Esperanza"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Anita

    2007-01-01

    The author was recently asked to reflect on her "educational journey." As far as she can remember she has been hungry to learn. A friend once described her as having "hambres atrasadas," which he described as a kind of "hunger nipping at her heels." It goes back, of course, to her parents: Her father's and her early journeys scavenging the Wyoming…

  4. Reflecting through Peshkin's I's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Reflection is an appropriate way of accounting for professional practice and is a standard way in which one can "become better acquainted with one's own story". Defining "subjectivity" as "the quality of an investigator that affects the results of observational investigation", Peshkin highlights the requirement for any observer of, or participant…

  5. Interactive Reflective Logs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaton, Cynthia Minchew; Deaton, Benjamin E.; Leland, Katina

    2010-01-01

    The authors created an interactive reflective log (IRL) to provide teachers with an opportunity to use a journal approach to record, evaluate, and communicate student understanding of science concepts. Unlike a traditional journal, the IRL incorporates prompts to encourage students to discuss their understanding of science content and science…

  6. Reflections on 1972

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Ramon A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on the events that took place in the year 1972. The author was a junior at the University of New Mexico back then, refusing to eat or buy grapes and lettuce, picketing grocers who did not carry United Farm Workers of America produce. He and his buddies cast their votes against granting Richard Nixon a second…

  7. Reflection by Porro Prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2010-04-01

    Students all know that reflection from a plane mirror produces an image that is reversed right to left and so cannot be read by anyone but Leonardo da Vinci, who kept his notes in mirror writing. A useful counter-example is the Porro prism, which produces an image that is not reversed.

  8. Ionosphere-reflected propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    The predictability of those ionospheric parameters relevant to ionosphere-reflected communications is considered along with their optimum utilization. Several excellent original articles and review papers which have been published from time to time dealing with the long term and short term forecasting of ionospheric parameters, radio systems, and modelling needs for ionospheric communications, are covered.

  9. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  10. Measuring Practicum Student Teachers' Reflectivity: The Reflective Pedagogical Thinking Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seng, Toh Wah

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the original study was to investigate practicum student teachers' reflectivity. This paper describes the use of a revised version of the Reflective Pedagogical Thinking Scale (Sparks-Langer, et al., 1990) to measure reflectivity. The original scale was used by the developers to assess reflectivity through a structured interview. The…

  11. Parenting and Adolescent Adjustment: The Role of Parental Reflective Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benbassat, Naomi; Priel, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Reflective function (RF) is the capacity to reflect on one's own mental experiences and those of others. This study examined the relationship between parental RF and adolescent adjustment. One hundred and five adolescents, aged 14-18, and their mothers and fathers were interviewed and completed questionnaires during home visits. We measured…

  12. Engaging Young Students in Scientific Investigations: Prompting for Meaningful Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Travis; Perry, Michelle; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Grosshandler, Dean

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the verbal prompts a tutor used to promote reflection and young students' responses to these prompts. Seven children (ages 8-12) participated in 260 min of one-on-one tutoring to learn scientific concepts related to gear movement; the tutor spontaneously provided these students with 763 prompts for reflection. Prompts reliably…

  13. On aging and aged care in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Sevo, G; Davidovic, M; Erceg, P; Despotovic, N; Milosevic, D P; Tasic, M

    2015-06-01

    Serbia is a demographically old nation, with 17.4 % of its residents being aged 65 years and older in 2011. The previous two decades of turbulent history have significantly affected the demographic picture of this country, and their ramifications remain visible in Serbia's economic, political, cultural, and health spheres. Major demographic forces behind population aging in Serbia can be attributed to lower fertility rates, migrations, and declining mortality (reflecting improvements in overall health leading to a longer life expectancy). In Serbia, low fertility and migrations appear to play major roles, although the relative contribution of recent migrations cannot be measured with accuracy. Patterns of demographic aging vary considerably across different geographic, socioeconomic, and cultural settings. The common denominator throughout present day Serbia is extensive political and economic transition. One would expect that, given sufficient time, this process will result in improved population health, and yet, at this stage outcomes of major health care reform in Serbia are somewhat perplexing. For the second consecutive year, Serbia's health care system has been ranked at the very bottom of the scale among 34 European countries. It is then no surprise that the elderly represent particularly vulnerable population segment. This paper discusses some of the issues relevant to these demographic patterns of aging and aged care in contemporary Serbia, focusing on the period after 2000. PMID:25943380

  14. Doppler-shifted self-reflected wave from a semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuelzgen, Alex; Hughes, S.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    1997-06-01

    We report the first experimental observation of a self- reflected wave inside a very dense saturable absorber. An intense femtosecond pulse saturates the absorption and causes a density front moving into the semiconductor sample. Due to the motion of the boundary between saturated and unsaturated areas of the sample the light reflected at this boundary is red-shifted by the Doppler effect. The spectrally shifted reflection makes it possible to distinguish between surface reflection and self-reflection and is used to proof the concept of the dynamic nonlinear skin effect experimentally. Quite well agreement with model calculations is found.

  15. Normal-reflection image

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Common-angle wave-equation migration using the double-square-root is generally less accurate than the common-shot migration because the wavefield continuation equation for thc former involves additional approximations compared to that for the latter. We present a common-angle wave-equation migration that has the same accuracy as common-shot wave-equation migration. An image obtained from common-angle migration is a four- to five-dimensional output volume for 3D cases. We propose a normal-reflection imaging condition for common-angle migration to produce a 3D output volume for 3D migration. The image is closely related to the normal-reflection coefficients at interfaces. This imaging condition will allow amplitude-preserving migration to generate an image with clear physical meaning.

  16. Depth from water reflection.

    PubMed

    Linjie Yang; Jianzhuang Liu; Xiaoou Tang

    2015-04-01

    The scene in a water reflection image often exhibits bilateral symmetry. In this paper, we design a framework to reconstruct the depth from a single water reflection image. This problem can be regarded as a special case of two-view stereo vision. It is challenging to obtain correspondences from the real scene and the mirror scene due to their large appearance difference. We first propose an appearance adaptation method to transform the appearance of the mirror scene so that it is much closer to the real scene. We then present a stereo matching algorithm to obtain the disparity map of the real scene. Compared with other depth-from-symmetry work that deals with man-made objects, our algorithm can recover the depth maps of a variety of scenes, where both natural and man-made objects may exist. PMID:25643408

  17. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out of ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and ...

  18. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Shafer, David R.

    2000-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  19. My Reflective Practice as Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Marcia A.

    1999-01-01

    Using Schon's concepts and definition of reflective practice, this article elaborates a model used to analyze the author's own processes of "reflection-in-action" and "reflection-on-action" in teaching first-year architectural students. Emphasizes the importance of the concept of "role-frame" in informing the whole reflective process. (EV)

  20. Reflection Revisited: The Class Collage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Through the regular use of what Donald Schon has termed reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action, students can learn to improve their "reflection-in-presentation," in Kathleen Blake Yancey's term. Students are often asked to do this type of reflection-in-presentation as a capstone to first-year or basic writing courses. However, a number of…

  1. Quantitative assessment of skin aging.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, J L

    2001-11-01

    Noninvasive methods have allowed physicians to give an objective description of aged skin in terms of functional and esthetic properties. The relative influence of environment (mainly sun) on the true aging process can be assessed through the obtained data. It is also possible to measure the efficacy of topical preparations (cosmetics or drugs) designed for treating the various cutaneous aging marks. PMID:11535423

  2. Communication & Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, William E.

    This extensive bibliography contains more than 1,800 entries about communication and aging. The citations include journal articles, unpublished papers, speeches, dissertations, research studies, and books that relate aging and the aged to a variety of topics, including the following: physiological deterioration, socialization, political…

  3. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  4. Creative Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ager, Charlene Lee; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Explores some divergent attitudes toward aging, negative as well as positive. Presents a neurophysiological framework to support the belief that aging is an active and creative process. Explores physical, psychological, and sociological aspects, and identifies three factors in the creative aging process. (Author/JAC)

  5. Teaching Reflection Seismic Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forel, D.; Benz, T.; Pennington, W. D.

    2004-12-01

    Without pictures, it is difficult to give students a feeling for wave propagation, transmission, and reflection. Even with pictures, wave propagation is still static to many. However, when students use and modify scripts that generate wavefronts and rays through a geologic model that they have modified themselves, we find that students gain a real feeling for wave propagation. To facilitate teaching 2-D seismic reflection data processing (from acquisition through migration) to our undergraduate and graduate Reflection Seismology students, we use Seismic Un*x (SU) software. SU is maintained and distributed by Colorado School of Mines, and it is freely available (at www.cwp.mines.edu/cwpcodes). Our approach includes use of synthetic and real seismic data, processing scripts, and detailed explanation of the scripts. Our real data were provided by Gregory F. Moore of the University of Hawaii. This approach can be used by any school at virtually no expense for either software or data, and can provide students with a sound introduction to techniques used in processing of reflection seismic data. The same software can be used for other purposes, such as research, with no additional expense. Students who have completed a course using SU are well equipped to begin using it for research, as well. Scripts for each processing step are supplied and explained to the students. Our detailed description of the scripts means students do not have to know anything about SU to start. Experience with the Unix operating system is preferable but not necessary -- our notes include Computer Hints to help the beginner work with the Unix operating system. We include several examples of synthetic model building, acquiring shot gathers through synthetic models, sorting shot gathers to CMP gathers, gain, 1-D frequency filtering, f-k filtering, deconvolution, semblance displays and velocity analysis, flattening data (NMO), stacking the CMPs, and migration. We use two real (marine) data sets. One

  6. Software for a GPS-Reflection Remote-Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    A special-purpose software Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver designed for remote sensing with reflected GPS signals is described in Delay/Doppler-Mapping GPS-Reflection Remote-Sensing System (NPO-30385), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The input accepted by this program comprises raw (open-loop) digitized GPS signals sampled at a rate of about 20 MHz. The program processes the data samples to perform the following functions: detection of signals; tracking of phases and delays; mapping of delay, Doppler, and delay/Doppler waveforms; dual-frequency processing; coherent integrations as short as 125 s; decoding of navigation messages; and precise time tagging of observable quantities. The software can perform these functions on all detectable satellite signals without dead time. Open-loop data collected over water, land, or ice and processed by this software can be further processed to extract geophysical information. Possible examples include mean sea height, wind speed and direction, and significant wave height (for observations over the ocean); bistatic-radar terrain images and measures of soil moisture and biomass (for observations over land); and estimates of ice age, thickness, and surface density (for observations over ice).

  7. Reflections on 25 Years of Journal Editorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Michael R.

    2015-07-01

    These reflections range over some distinctive features of the journal Science & Education, they acknowledge in a limited way the many individuals who over the past 25 years have contributed to the success and reputation of the journal, they chart the beginnings of the journal, and they dwell on a few central concerns—clear writing and the contribution of HPS to teacher education. The reflections also revisit the much-debated and written-upon philosophical and pedagogical arguments occasioned by the rise and possible demise of constructivism in science education.

  8. The Possible Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, James C.; And Others

    The "Possible Dream Scholarship Program" was developed at San Juan College (SJC) in New Mexico to encourage students to complete high school and attend college. Every 8th grader in San Juan County, regardless of their academic performance, receives a scholarship certificate of $125 to attend San Juan College and an invitation to enroll in the…

  9. Gender and Possible Selves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lips, Hilary M.

    2007-01-01

    Women and men are still segregated into different occupations. There has been a marked underrepresentation of women in science and technology fields for many years, despite some increases in the number of women earning undergraduate and graduate degrees in science. The notion of possible selves can be applied broadly to the problem of why the…

  10. Possible markets for dirigibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The use of mini, small, medium, and heavy dirigibles for the transportation of passengers and cargo, for aerial handling of materials, for the support of scientific platforms, and for use in agriculture and forest management is evaluated. The operational efficiency of one or more dirigibles in view of possible integration into the general transport system is described.

  11. Malnutrition and ageing.

    PubMed

    Hickson, M

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to provide an overview of the problems that exist in relation to malnutrition and the elderly population. The changes that occur in body composition during ageing are described and how this may affect disease risk. The possible metabolic processes behind weight loss are discussed and the numerous factors that affect nutritional status in the older age group are described. Prevention of malnutrition in this group is important and so the roles of nutrition screening and assessment are examined. PMID:16397072

  12. Seismic reflection imaging, accounting for primary and multiple reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wapenaar, Kees; van der Neut, Joost; Thorbecke, Jan; Broggini, Filippo; Slob, Evert; Snieder, Roel

    2015-04-01

    Imaging of seismic reflection data is usually based on the assumption that the seismic response consists of primary reflections only. Multiple reflections, i.e. waves that have reflected more than once, are treated as primaries and are imaged at wrong positions. There are two classes of multiple reflections, which we will call surface-related multiples and internal multiples. Surface-related multiples are those multiples that contain at least one reflection at the earth's surface, whereas internal multiples consist of waves that have reflected only at subsurface interfaces. Surface-related multiples are the strongest, but also relatively easy to deal with because the reflecting boundary (the earth's surface) is known. Internal multiples constitute a much more difficult problem for seismic imaging, because the positions and properties of the reflecting interfaces are not known. We are developing reflection imaging methodology which deals with internal multiples. Starting with the Marchenko equation for 1D inverse scattering problems, we derived 3D Marchenko-type equations, which relate reflection data at the surface to Green's functions between virtual sources anywhere in the subsurface and receivers at the surface. Based on these equations, we derived an iterative scheme by which these Green's functions can be retrieved from the reflection data at the surface. This iterative scheme requires an estimate of the direct wave of the Green's functions in a background medium. Note that this is precisely the same information that is also required by standard reflection imaging schemes. However, unlike in standard imaging, our iterative Marchenko scheme retrieves the multiple reflections of the Green's functions from the reflection data at the surface. For this, no knowledge of the positions and properties of the reflecting interfaces is required. Once the full Green's functions are retrieved, reflection imaging can be carried out by which the primaries and multiples are

  13. Learning to integrate versus inhibiting information is modulated by age.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Pikkat, Helen; Upstill, Emily; Speekenbrink, Maarten; Walsh, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    Cognitive training aiming at improving learning is often successful, but what exactly underlies the observed improvements and how these differ across the age spectrum are currently unknown. Here we asked whether learning in young and older people may reflect enhanced ability to integrate information required to perform a cognitive task or whether it may instead reflect the ability to inhibit task-irrelevant information for successful task performance. We trained 30 young and 30 aging human participants on a numerosity discrimination task known to engage the parietal cortex and in which cue-integration and inhibitory abilities can be distinguished. We coupled training with parietal, motor, or sham transcranial random noise stimulation, known for modulating neural activity. Numerosity discrimination improved after training and was maintained long term, especially in the training + parietal stimulation group, regardless of age. Despite the quantitatively similar improvement in the two age groups, the content of learning differed remarkably: aging participants improved more in inhibitory abilities, whereas younger subjects improved in cue-integration abilities. Moreover, differences in the content of learning were reflected in different transfer effects to untrained but related abilities: in the younger group, improvements in cue integration paralleled improvements in continuous quantity (time and space), whereas in the elderly group, improvements in numerosity-based inhibitory abilities generalized to other measures of inhibition and corresponded to a decline in space discrimination, possibly because conflicting learning resources are used in numerosity and continuous quantity processing. These results indicate that training can enhance different, age-dependent cognitive processes and highlight the importance of identifying the exact processes underlying learning for effective training programs. PMID:25653376

  14. A Pause for Reflection: Incorporating Reflection into Surgical Training

    PubMed Central

    McGlinn, Evan P.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Reflection is an important learning technique for surgeons during their training and is a valuable tool for life-long learning and maintenance of certification to assure competency. Reflection helps individuals to evaluate their performance in the interest of improving their ability to deal with similar experiences in the future. Additionally, reflection can be helpful for established surgeons to continue to improve upon their performance and hone their craft. This article outlines the theoretical role of reflection in the learning process. We will discuss methods for incorporating reflection into training programs, and review the evidence for implementing reflection in surgical training. PMID:25003410

  15. Seasonal variation in the structure of red reflectance of leaves from yellow poplar, red oak, and red maple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakke, Thomas W.; Wergin, William P.; Erbe, Eric F.; Harnden, Joann M.

    1993-01-01

    The light scattered from leaves was measured as a function of view angle in the principal plane for yellow poplar, red oak, and red maple. The source was a parallel-polarized helium-neon laser. Yellow poplar leaves had the highest reflectance of the three species, which may have been due to its shorter palisade cells and more extensive spongy mesophyll. Prior to senescence, there was a significant decrease, but not total extinction, in the reflectance of the beam incident at 60 deg from nadir on the adaxial side of the leaves of all three species. Low-temperature SEM observations showed differences in the surface wax patterns among the three species but did not indicate a cause of the reflectance changes other than possibly the accumulation and aging of the wax.

  16. Propagator for finite range potentials: The case of reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2007-04-15

    Following a previous study on the transmission propagator for a finite range potential, the problem of reflection is considered. It is found that the Laplace transform of the reflection propagator can be expressed in terms of the usual Fredholm determinant {delta} and of a new similar determinant {gamma}, containing the peculiar characteristics of reflection. As an example, an array of delta potentials is considered. Moreover, a possible application to the calculation of quantum traversal time is shown.

  17. Binary phase digital reflection holograms - Fabrication and potential applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, N. C., Jr.; Angus, J. C.; Coffield, F. E.; Edwards, R. V.; Mann, J. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A novel technique for the fabrication of binary-phase computer-generated reflection holograms is described. By use of integrated circuit technology, the holographic pattern is etched into a silicon wafer and then aluminum coated to make a reflection hologram. Because these holograms reflect virtually all the incident radiation, they may find application in machining with high-power lasers. A number of possible modifications of the hologram fabrication procedure are discussed.

  18. Reflections on Wilderness Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggleston, Erin J.

    Te Whakapakari Youth Programme on Great Barrier Island, New Zealand, is a Maori initiative initially designed to help young Maori, particularly those involved in drug abuse. The program now accepts adjudicated youth, aged 13-18, from many cultures who experience drug, physical, or sexual abuse and exhibit antisocial or violent tendencies. The…

  19. A Small as Possible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, Scott

    2003-01-01

    This story begins with a bit of serendipity: I was on a trip to see a Shuttle launch and I happened to sit next to a guy who was in charge of batteries for Space Systems/Loral. He told me that they needed to create a new battery bypass switch, the device that takes a battery out of commission if it goes bad. After discussing the conversation back at my company, we decided that we could create the switch. We contacted the folks at Loral and they said, 'Okay, let s see what you can come up with. We need it as small as possible.' We asked, 'How small?' They said, 'We need it as small as you can possibly make it.'

  20. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  1. Force reflection with compliance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Two types of systems for force-reflecting control, which enables high force-reflection gain, are presented: position-error-based force reflection and low-pass-filtered force reflection. Both of the systems are combined with shared compliance control. In the position-error-based class, the position error between the commanded and the actual position of a compliantly controlled robot is used to provide force reflection. In the low-pass-filtered force reflection class, the low-pass-filtered output of the compliance control is used to provide force reflection. The increase in force reflection gain can be more than 10-fold as compared to a conventional high-bandwidth pure force reflection system, when high compliance values are used for the compliance control.

  2. Two-stream theory of reflectance of snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1979-01-01

    Spectral reflectance of snow under diffuse illumination is studied using the two-stream approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The scattering and absorption parameters of the radiative transfer equation - the single scattering albedo, the optical depth, and the integrated phase function are obtained from the grain size and density of snow. Analytical expressions for the intensity within the snowpack, the reflectance, and the asymptotic flux extinction coefficient, are given. Good agreement is shown between the theory and available experimental data on visible and near-infrared reflectance, and the asymptotic flux extinction coefficient. The theory may also be used to explain the observed effect of aging on the snow reflectance.

  3. The effect of ageing on health inequalities.

    PubMed

    Matthews, David

    The final article in this five-part series on the relationship between sociology and nursing practice discusses age-related health inequalities. Age has a direct influence on individuals' health and wellbeing. From a sociological viewpoint, individuals' health status in old age is a reflection of experiences throughout their lifetime, which means that health inequalities accumulate. PMID:26665634

  4. Promoting Critical Reflection in Teacher Education through Popular Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Patrick A.; Townsend, Jane S.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing the possible influences of media narratives upon self-concepts, teacher educators have used films and television programs about teachers to promote preservice teachers' reflections on their professional identities and instructional practices. Theoretical models of reflection, in conjunction with media analysis, have the potential to…

  5. Reflected Deck Plan, Reflected Roof Plan, Deck Plan Bridgeport ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Reflected Deck Plan, Reflected Roof Plan, Deck Plan - Bridgeport Covered Bridge, Spanning South Fork of Yuba River at bypassed section of Pleasant Valley Road (originally Virginia Turnpike) in South Yuba River State Park , Bridgeport, Nevada County, CA

  6. Progress Toward Roll Processing of Solar Reflective Material (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Smilgys, R.; Wallace, S.; Kennedy, C.

    2001-04-01

    This presentation discusses the goal of this project which was to demonstrate that it is possible to cost-effectively produce high performance solar reflective material using vacuum deposition techniques.

  7. Autoantibodies, mortality and ageing.

    PubMed

    Richaud-Patin, Y; Villa, A R

    1995-01-01

    Immunological failure may be the cause of predisposition to certain infections, neoplasms, and vascular diseases in adulthood. Mortality risks through life may reflect an undetermined number of causes. This study describes the prevalence of positivity of autoantibodies through life, along with general and specific mortality causes in three countries with different socioeconomic development (Guatemala, Mexico and the United States). Prevalence of autoantibodies by age was obtained from previous reports. In spite of having involved different ethnic groups, the observed trends in prevalence of autoantibodies, as well as mortality through life, showed a similar behavior. Thus, both the increase in autoantibody production and death risk as age rises, may share physiopathological phenomena related to the ageing process. PMID:7539882

  8. The albedo of particles in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relation between the apparent angular extent of a reflection nebula and the apparent magnitude of its illuminating star was reconsidered under a less restrictive set of assumptions. A computational technique was developed which permits the use of fits to the observed m-log a values to determine the albedo of particles composing reflection nebulae, providing only that a phase function and average optical thickness are assumed. Multiple scattering, anisotropic phase functions, and illumination by the general star field are considered, and the albedo of reflection nebular particles appears to be the same as that for interstellar particles in general. The possibility of continuous fluorescence contributions to the surface brightness is also considered.

  9. Reflection properties of gravito-acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Gordana

    2016-03-01

    We derive the dispersion equation for gravito-acoustic waves in an isothermal gravitationally stratified nonmagnetized atmosphere. In this model, with constant sound speed, it is possible to derive analytically the equations for gravito-acoustic waves. The large value of the viscous Reynolds number in the solar atmosphere imply that the dissipative terms in HD (hydrodynamics) equations are negligible. We consider the plane boundary z = 0 between two isothermal atmosphere regions and using the boundary conditions we derive the equation for the reflection coeffcient of gravito-acoustic waves. For the frequencies much greater than acoustic cutoff frequency, the reflection coefficient of the acoustic waves modified by gravity is the same as in the case of the pure acoustic waves. Reflection coefficient for the gravity waves is very high, R ≈ 1.

  10. Soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Nkenke, Emeka; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Adler, Werner; Douplik, Alexandre

    2009-07-01

    Laser surgery gives the possibility to work remotely which leads to high precision, little trauma and high level sterility. However these advantages are coming with the lack of haptic feedback during the laser ablation of tissue. Therefore additional means are required to control tissue-specific ablation during laser surgery supporting the surgeon regardless of experience and skills. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy provides a straightforward and simple approach for optical tissue differentiation. We measured diffuse reflectance from four various tissue types ex vivo. We applied Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to differentiate the four tissue types and computed the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Special emphasis was taken on the identification of nerve as the most crucial tissue for maxillofacial surgery. The results show a promise for differentiating soft tissues as guidance for tissue-specific laser surgery by means of the diffuse reflectance.

  11. Quantitative Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marvin E.; Aalderink, Bernard J.; Padoan, Roberto; de Bruin, Gerrit; Steemers, Ted A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a non-destructive optical analysis technique that can for instance be used to obtain information from cultural heritage objects unavailable with conventional colour or multi-spectral photography. This technique can be used to distinguish and recognize materials, to enhance the visibility of faint or obscured features, to detect signs of degradation and study the effect of environmental conditions on the object. We describe the basic concept, working principles, construction and performance of a laboratory instrument specifically developed for the analysis of historical documents. The instrument measures calibrated spectral reflectance images at 70 wavelengths ranging from 365 to 1100 nm (near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared). By using a wavelength tunable narrow-bandwidth light-source, the light energy used to illuminate the measured object is minimal, so that any light-induced degradation can be excluded. Basic analysis of the hyperspectral data includes a qualitative comparison of the spectral images and the extraction of quantitative data such as mean spectral reflectance curves and statistical information from user-defined regions-of-interest. More sophisticated mathematical feature extraction and classification techniques can be used to map areas on the document, where different types of ink had been applied or where one ink shows various degrees of degradation. The developed quantitative hyperspectral imager is currently in use by the Nationaal Archief (National Archives of The Netherlands) to study degradation effects of artificial samples and original documents, exposed in their permanent exhibition area or stored in their deposit rooms.

  12. Ionospherically reflected proton whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, D. I.; Shklyar, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present experimental observations and detailed investigation of the variety of proton whistlers that includes transequatorial and ionospherically reflected proton whistlers. The latter have previously been indicated from numerical modeling of spectrograms. The study is based on six-component ELF wave data from the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite which permits to obtain not only spectrograms displaying the power spectral density but also such wave properties as the polarization, wave normal angle, wave refractive index, and normalized parallel component of the Poynting vector. The explanation of various types of proton whistlers is based on the properties of ion cyclotron wave propagation in a multicomponent magnetoplasma, with special consideration of the effect of ion hybrid resonance reflection. Analysis of experimental data is supplemented by numerical modeling of spectrograms that reproduces the main features of experimental ones. As a self-contained result, we provide conclusive experimental evidences that the region illuminated by a lightning stroke in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide may spread over a distance of 4000 km in both hemispheres.

  13. Reflecting on Reflective Practice: (Re)Visiting Dewey and Schon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Since the author began work in reflective practice, at first informally in the late 1970s and then more formally in the mid-1980s, he has always looked at reflective practice as a compass of sorts to guide teachers when they may be seeking direction as to what they are doing in their classrooms. The metaphor of reflection as a compass enables…

  14. Reflection: Journals and Reflective Questions: A Strategy for Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Maggie

    2004-01-01

    Reflective journals have been used widely in teacher education programs to promote reflective thinking (Freidus, 1998; Carter & Francis, 2000; Yost, Senter & Forlenzo-Bailey, 2000). Smyth (1992) advocated that posing a series of questions to be answered in written journals could enhance reflective thinking. It was for this reason that…

  15. Reflection and Non-Reflection of Particle Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Timothy; Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Exact closed-form solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are obtained, describing the propagation of wavepackets in the neighbourhood of a potential. Examples given include zero reflection, total reflection and partial reflection of the wavepacket, for the sech[superscript 2]x/a, 1/x[superscript 2] and delta(x) potentials,…

  16. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  17. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  18. Possibilities of Engineering Ethics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuki, Junya

    This paper discusses the possibilities of teaching engineering ethics in universities. This is based on the teaching experience of a newly developed course that has been introduced to the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the University of Fukui, since April 2004. Entitled “ethics for engineers”, the course targeted senior-level students and makes use of a newly written textbook that emphasizes social aspects of science and technology. To encourage students to think and form their own opinions with regards to their role as engineers in a modern technological society, the book is complemented by other materials such as videos, newspaper articles and some other relevant books. Students are also encouraged to write reports that reflect their own opinion on subjects such as what kind of engineers they intend to be, or what do ethics mean to them? The paper will conclude by giving a course evaluation including students' response, highlighting valuable experiences and stating the importance of further developing this topic in engineering education.

  19. Education: A Possibility for Empowering Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kump, Sonja; Krasovec, Sabina Jelenc

    2007-01-01

    Educating older adults (in the so-called third age) is becoming an increasingly important activity for the elderly, above all because it empowers them, while at the same time reducing their social exclusion. The aim of this paper is to closely examine the actual state of affairs and the education possibilities for older adults in Slovenia. The…

  20. Robust reflective pupil slicing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meade, Jeffrey T.; Behr, Bradford B.; Cenko, Andrew T.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2014-07-01

    Tornado Spectral Systems (TSS) has developed the High Throughput Virtual Slit (HTVSTM), robust all-reflective pupil slicing technology capable of replacing the slit in research-, commercial- and MIL-SPEC-grade spectrometer systems. In the simplest configuration, the HTVS allows optical designers to remove the lossy slit from pointsource spectrometers and widen the input slit of long-slit spectrometers, greatly increasing throughput without loss of spectral resolution or cross-dispersion information. The HTVS works by transferring etendue between image plane axes but operating in the pupil domain rather than at a focal plane. While useful for other technologies, this is especially relevant for spectroscopic applications by performing the same spectral narrowing as a slit without throwing away light on the slit aperture. HTVS can be implemented in all-reflective designs and only requires a small number of reflections for significant spectral resolution enhancement-HTVS systems can be efficiently implemented in most wavelength regions. The etendueshifting operation also provides smooth scaling with input spot/image size without requiring reconfiguration for different targets (such as different seeing disk diameters or different fiber core sizes). Like most slicing technologies, HTVS provides throughput increases of several times without resolution loss over equivalent slitbased designs. HTVS technology enables robust slit replacement in point-source spectrometer systems. By virtue of pupilspace operation this technology has several advantages over comparable image-space slicer technology, including the ability to adapt gracefully and linearly to changing source size and better vertical packing of the flux distribution. Additionally, this technology can be implemented with large slicing factors in both fast and slow beams and can easily scale from large, room-sized spectrometers through to small, telescope-mounted devices. Finally, this same technology is directly

  1. Reflections on Aesthetic Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotiropoulou-Zormpala, Marina

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how it is possible to use the aesthetic process to enrich teaching practices in preschool and elementary school education. What is under scrutiny is the aesthetic dimension of a core curricular subject, the ultimate goal being to achieve an understanding of curricular content through aesthetic learning processes. For this…

  2. Teaching: A Reflective Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    German, Susan; O'Day, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they used formative assessments to ferret out possible misconceptions among middle-school students in a unit about weather-related concepts. Because they teach fifth- and eighth-grade science, this assessment also gives them a chance to see how student understanding develops over the years. This year they…

  3. Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

    2003-12-09

    A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

  4. Reflections on conformal spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungrok; Kravchuk, Petr; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2016-04-01

    We use modular invariance and crossing symmetry of conformal field theory to reveal approximate reflection symmetries in the spectral decompositions of the partition function in two dimensions in the limit of large central charge and of the four-point function in any dimension in the limit of large scaling dimensions Δ0 of external operators. We use these symmetries to motivate universal upper bounds on the spectrum and the operator product expansion coefficients, which we then derive by independent techniques. Some of the bounds for four-point functions are valid for finite Δ0 as well as for large Δ0. We discuss a similar symmetry in a large spacetime dimension limit. Finally, we comment on the analogue of the Cardy formula and sparse light spectrum condition for the four-point function.

  5. JFET reflection oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high frequency oscillator circuit is provided using a low cost junction type field effect transistor (T sub 1) with a tuned circuit connected to its gate. The frequency of operation is determined by the tuned circuit and the capacitance reflected from the source to the gate. The transistor is matched to the frequency of operation so that this frequency falls within the roll-off portion of the transistor's transconductance verses frequency curve, preferably somewhat above the 3 db point in frequency. Phase shift necessary to sustain oscillation occurs due to the operation of the transistor in the roll-off portion of the curve and the addition of a phase shifting network (R sub 1, C sub 1) at the source.

  6. Digital infrared fundus reflectance.

    PubMed

    Packer, S; Schneider, K; Lin, H Z; Feldman, M

    1980-06-01

    An infrared sensor was inserted at the film plane of a fundus camera. The signal was visualized on an oscilloscope. In this manner we measured infrared reflectance from the surface of the fundus. The purpose was to characterize choroidal malignant melanomas more reliably than is done with infrared color translation photography. Control lesions were choroidal nevi, metastatic tumors, and disciform macular degenerations. Correlations were made with radioactive phosphorus (32P) uptake, fluorescein angiography, and histopathologic findings. Several cases are presented, one in which this new method of infrared detection was the first diagnostic test to detect the spread of a choroidal melanoma. The simplicity of this technique and its increased accuracy justify the needed further refinements. PMID:7413142

  7. Reflecting on 80 years of excellence

    PubMed Central

    Savla, Ushma

    2004-01-01

    A small group of members of the American Society for Clinical Investigation began chatting in 1916 about the possibility of launching a new biomedical research journal. By October 1924, they managed to make the idea a reality with the publication of the first issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Our 80th birthday seems an appropriate time to reflect on the history of biomedical science as it has been played out on our pages. PMID:15489943

  8. Anomalous reflections from the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givishvili, G. V.; Leshchenko, L. N.

    2013-09-01

    The existence of anomalous ionospheric reflections was shown on the basis of vertical soundings at the Moskow station. They are observed at heights of 100-200 km. These anomalous reflections are not related to the main Ne( h) ionospheric profile. Morphological characteristics of such reflections are presented: the daily, seasonal, and cyclic dependences of their appearance.

  9. Reflections From a Fresnel Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2005-01-01

    Reflection of light by a convex Fresnel lens gives rise to two distinct images. A highly convex inverted real reflective image forms on the object side of the lens, while an upright virtual reflective image forms on the opposite side of the lens. I describe here a set of laser experiments performed upon a Fresnel lens. These experiments provide…

  10. Structures for Facilitating Student Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this article is to describe a continuum of levels of reflection. It briefly focuses on Deanna Kuhn's research into the development of scientific thinking and Robert Kegan's Object-Subject Theory of Development applied to the problems of inspiring students to be able to reflect. Assignments for improving students' ability to reflect are…

  11. [Stress and optimal ageing].

    PubMed

    Gogol, Manfred

    2015-08-01

    Stress is a stimulus or incident which has an exogenic or endogenic influence on an organism and leads to a biological and/or psychological adaptation from the organism by adaptation. Stressors can be differentiated by the temporal impact (e.g. acute, chronic or acute on chronic), strength and quality. The consequences of stress exposure and adaptation can be measured at the cellular level and as (sub) clinical manifestations, where this process can be biologically seen as a continuum. Over the course of life there is an accumulation of stress incidents resulting in a diminution of the capability for adaptation and repair mechanisms. By means of various interventions it is possible to improve the individual capability for adaptation but it is not currently definitively possible to disentangle alterations due to ageing and the development of diseases. As a consequence the term "healthy ageing" should be replaced by the concept of "optimal ageing". PMID:26208575

  12. The natural, the normal and the normative: contested terrains in ageing and old age.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian Rees; Higgs, Paul F

    2010-10-01

    Improvements in health and longevity in countries such as the UK and USA have radically destabilised notions of ageing and old age. From the 19th century onwards the idea of a natural lifecourse following normatively understood stages ending in infirmity and death has been challenged by social and bio-medical developments. Breakthroughs in bio-gerontology and in bio-medicine have created the possibility of an increasingly differentiated idea of normal ageing. The potential to overcome or significantly reduce the age-associated effects of bodies growing older has led many social gerontologists to argue for a return to a more 'normatively' based conception of ageing and old age. This paper examines and outlines the tensions between these different discourses and points out that our understanding of the norm is also fast changing as it intersects with the somatic diversity inherent in contemporary consumer society. Drawing on the theoretical work of Ulrich Beck and Zygmunt Bauman, this paper argues that the normalization of diversity leads to a reworking of the idea of normativity which in turn is reflected in profound transformations at the level of institutional arrangements and legal systems. Such changes not only lead to more discussion of what is legally and socially acceptable but also potentially lead to greater calls for regulation concerning outcomes. In this paper we argue that we need to distinguish between the newly reconfigured domains of the natural, the normal and the normative now being utilised in the understanding of ageing if we are to understand this important field of health. PMID:20728972

  13. Possibility of hyperbolic tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, Jose P.

    2010-08-15

    Traversable wormholes are primarily useful as 'gedanken experiments' and as a theoretician's probe of the foundations of general relativity. In this work, we analyze the possibility of having tunnels in a hyperbolic spacetime. We obtain exact solutions of static and pseudo-spherically symmetric spacetime tunnels by adding exotic matter to a vacuum solution referred to as a degenerate solution of class A. The physical properties and characteristics of these intriguing solutions are explored, and through the mathematics of embedding it is shown that particular constraints are placed on the shape function, that differ significantly from the Morris-Thorne wormhole. In particular, it is shown that the energy density is always negative, and the radial pressure is positive, at the throat, contrary to the Morris-Thorne counterpart. Specific solutions are also presented by considering several equations of state, and by imposing restricted choices for the shape function or the redshift function.

  14. The best possible child

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Julian Savulescu argues for two principles of reproductive ethics: reproductive autonomy and procreative beneficence, where the principle of procreative beneficence is conceptualised in terms of a duty to have the child, of the possible children that could be had, who will have the best opportunity of the best life. Were it to be accepted, this principle would have significant implications for the ethics of reproductive choice and, in particular, for the use of prenatal testing and other reproductive technologies for the avoidance of disability, and for enhancement. In this paper, it is argued that this principle should be rejected, and it is concluded that while potential parents do have important obligations in relation to the foreseeable lives of their future children, these obligations are not best captured in terms of a duty to have the child with the best opportunity of the best life. PMID:17470505

  15. Non-Gaussian water diffusion in aging white matter.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Jean-Philippe; Chen, J Jean; Rosas, H Diana; Salat, David H

    2014-06-01

    Age-associated white matter degeneration has been well documented and is likely an important mechanism contributing to cognitive decline in older adults. Recent work has explored a range of noninvasive neuroimaging procedures to differentially highlight alterations in the tissue microenvironment. Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) is an extension of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) that accounts for non-Gaussian water diffusion and can reflect alterations in the distribution and diffusion properties of tissue compartments. We used DKI to produce whole-brain voxel-based maps of mean, axial, and radial diffusional kurtoses, quantitative indices of the tissue microstructure's diffusional heterogeneity, in 111 participants ranging from the age of 33 to 91 years. As suggested from prior DTI studies, greater age was associated with alterations in white-matter tissue microstructure, which was reflected by a reduction in all 3 DKI metrics. Prominent effects were found in prefrontal and association white matter compared with relatively preserved primary motor and visual areas. Although DKI metrics co-varied with DTI metrics on a global level, DKI provided unique regional sensitivity to the effects of age not available with DTI. DKI metrics were additionally useful in combination with DTI metrics for the classification of regions according to their multivariate "diffusion footprint", or pattern of relative age effect sizes. It is possible that the specific multivariate patterns of age-associated changes measured are representative of different types of microstructural pathology. These results suggest that DKI provides important complementary indices of brain microstructure for the study of brain aging and neurologic disease. PMID:24378085

  16. Paleomagnetic database search possible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, William

    I have recently finished an on-line search program which allows remote users to search the “Abase” ASCII version of the World Paleomagnetic Database developed by Lock and McElhinny [1991]. The program is very simple to use and will search the Soviet, non-Soviet, rock unit, and reference databases and create output files that can be downloaded back to a researcher's local system using the ftp command.To use Search, telnet to 130.49.3.1 (earth.eps.pitt.edu) and login as the user “Search.rdquo There is no password, and the user is asked a series of questions, which define the geographic region and ages of interest. The program will also ask for an identifier with which to create the output file names. The program has three modes of operation: text-only, Tektronix graphics, or X11l/R5 graphics; the proper choice depends on the computer hardware that is used by the searcher.

  17. Bidirectional reflectance of zinc oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine original and useful information about the bidirection reflectance of zinc oxide. The bidirectional reflectance will be studied for the spectra between .25-2.5 microns and the hemisphere above the specimen. The following factors will be considered: (1) surface conditions; (2) specimen preparation; (3) specimen substrate, (4) polarization; (5) depolarization; (6) wavelength; and (7) angles of incident and reflection. The bidirectional reflectance will be checked by experimentally determined angular hemispherical measurements or hemispherical measurements will be used to obtain absolute bidirectional reflectance.

  18. Private Conflicts in Public Schools: The Sabotage of Educative Possibilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    Earlier in this century, the schools presented new visions of social possibility and cognitive worlds to conquer. Stripped of these dimensions, the schools will continue to reflect fragmentation and organize conflict rather than integrate new possibilities and enhance learning. (Author/IRT)

  19. Optical weed detection and evaluation using reflection measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrindts, Els; De Baerdemaeker, Josse

    1999-01-01

    For the site-specific application of herbicides, the automatic detection and evaluation of weeds is necessary. Since reflectance of crop, weeds and soil differs in visual and near IR wavelengths, there is a potential for using reflection measurements at different wavelengths to distinguish between them. Diffuse reflectance spectra of crop and weed leaves were used to evaluate the possibilities of weed detection with reflection measurements. Fourteen different weed species and four crops were included in the dataset. Classification of the spectra in crop, weeds and soil is possible, based on 3 to 7 narrow wavelength bands. The spectral analysis was repeated for reflectance measurements of canopies. Sugarbeet and Maize and 7 weed species were included in the measurements. The classification into crop and weeds was still possible, suing a limited number of wavelength band ratios. This suggest that reflection measurements at a limited number of wavelength bands could be used to detect and treat weeds in a field. This is a great environmental benefit, as agrochemicals will only be used where they are needed. The possibilities of using optical reflectance for weed detection and treatment in the field are discussed.

  20. Groundwater ages in fractured rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, P. G.; Love, A. J.; Robinson, N. I.; Simmons, C. T.

    2005-07-01

    In fractured porous media, matrix diffusion processes mean that groundwater ages obtained with environmental tracers usually do not reflect the hydraulic age of the water. The distribution of groundwater ages within these heterogeneous systems will be related to the groundwater velocity within the fractures, but also to the size of the fractures and the geometry of the fracture network, and to the hydraulic properties of the aquifer matrix. In this paper, we present analytical and numerical simulations of environmental tracer concentrations in fractured rock aquifers to examine the effect of changes in aquifer parameters on the tracer distributions. In particular, we show that where horizontal fractures are strongly vertically connected, then it may be reasonable to use one-dimensional models of flow and transport through vertical fractures to represent flow through aquifers containing both horizontal and vertical fractures. The presence of large numbers of horizontal fractures will not cause flow to depart significantly from the one-dimensional approximation. Where a smaller number of horizontal fractures are present, then abrupt decreases in the vertical water velocity can occur, as water is intercepted and diverted laterally. Measurements of 14C, 3H, 36Cl, and chlorofluorocarbons within nested piezometers from the Clare Valley, South Australia, display a number of the features apparent in the generic simulations. The use of a number of different tracers appears to allow some fracture and matrix parameters to be constrained more tightly than might previously have been thought possible.

  1. Age-dependent diet choice in an avian top predator.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Christian; Whittingham, Mark J; Newton, Ian

    2006-03-01

    Age-dependent breeding performance is arguably one of the best-documented phenomena in ornithology. The existence of age-related trends has major implications for life-history theory, but the proximate reasons for these patterns remain poorly understood. It has been proposed that poor breeding performance of young individuals might reflect lack of foraging skills. We investigated this possibility in a medium-sized, powerful raptor-the northern goshawk Accipiter gentilis. Male goshawks are responsible for providing their females and their offspring with food. We hypothesized that young males may generally show poor breeding performance or even delay breeding, because they lack the experience to hunt efficiently-especially, their principal avian prey, the feral pigeon Columba livia. Our study exploited a rare 'natural experiment', the expansion phase of an urban population, where intraspecific interference was negligible and many young males bred successfully. This enabled us to examine the improvement of foraging skills in a larger sample of young individuals, and in more controlled conditions than usually possible. Using data from individually identified male breeders, we show that, consistent with our hypothesis, the proportion of pigeons in the diet increased significantly with male age, for at least the first three years of life. Other studies have shown a parallel increase in productivity, and a positive effect of a pigeon-rich diet on brood size and nestling condition, stressing the potential fitness relevance of this prey species for goshawks. Our results suggest a causal link between patterns of age-dependence in foraging ecology and reproductive performance. Furthermore, our study is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that prey choice of breeders, which might reflect individual hunting skills, is age-dependent in a raptor. PMID:16537129

  2. [The reflective experience and education].

    PubMed

    Viniegra-Velázquez, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    The reflective experience is proposed in this article as the way to approach the elaboration of knowledge. The concept of vital experience is proposed to make reference to the links with a great affective significance that characterizes each person in his/her relation with the world. Some considerations are made about perception with its affective, cognitive and evaluative components and its implications in the knowledge process. The idea of knowledge as the use and consumption of information is discussed. This idea that prevails at school corresponds with the passive perspective of education. We propose the idea of knowledge as an elaboration of the person in knowledge situation which originates the participative perspective of education. The characteristics of both perspectives of education are contrasted with respect to the role of theory and practice, the role of the professor and the student, the main purposes and the type of society that they aspire. The more relevant aspects of participative education are shown: the practice of criticism and self-criticism; the development of solid points of view about problem situations of experience, the development of methodological and practical aptitudes, with emphasis on medical education. Considerations are made about in what way the participative perspective concerns pre-graduate and post-graduate medical education and its possible incorporation to the programs. PMID:18637572

  3. Piezosurgery: basics and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Schlee, Markus; Steigmann, Marius; Bratu, Emanuel; Garg, Arun K

    2006-12-01

    Useful in a variety of oral surgery procedures, piezosurgery has therapeutic features that include a micrometric cut (precise and secure action to limit tissue damage, especially to osteocytes), a selective cut (affecting mineralized tissues, but not surrounding soft tissues), and a clear surgical site (the result of the cavitation effect created by an irrigation/cooling solution and oscillating tip). Because the instrument's tip vibrates at different ultrasonic frequencies, since hard and soft tissues are cut at different frequencies, a "selective cut" enables the clinician to cut hard tissues while sparing fine anatomical structures (e.g., schneiderian membrane, nerve tissue). An oscillating tip drives the cooling-irrigation fluid, making it possible to obtain effective cooling as well as higher visibility (via cavitation effect) compared to conventional surgical instruments (rotating burs and oscillating saws), even in deep spaces. As a result, implantology surgical techniques such as bone harvesting (chips and blocks), crestal bone splitting, and sinus floor elevation can be performed with greater ease and safety. PMID:17172949

  4. Of possible cheminformatics futures.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Tudor I; Taboureau, Olivier; Bologa, Cristian G

    2012-01-01

    For over a decade, cheminformatics has contributed to a wide array of scientific tasks from analytical chemistry and biochemistry to pharmacology and drug discovery; and although its contributions to decision making are recognized, the challenge is how it would contribute to faster development of novel, better products. Here we address the future of cheminformatics with primary focus on innovation. Cheminformatics developers often need to choose between "mainstream" (i.e., accepted, expected) and novel, leading-edge tools, with an increasing trend for open science. Possible futures for cheminformatics include the worst case scenario (lack of funding, no creative usage), as well as the best case scenario (complete integration, from systems biology to virtual physiology). As "-omics" technologies advance, and computer hardware improves, compounds will no longer be profiled at the molecular level, but also in terms of genetic and clinical effects. Among potentially novel tools, we anticipate machine learning models based on free text processing, an increased performance in environmental cheminformatics, significant decision-making support, as well as the emergence of robot scientists conducting automated drug discovery research. Furthermore, cheminformatics is anticipated to expand the frontiers of knowledge and evolve in an open-ended, extensible manner, allowing us to explore multiple research scenarios in order to avoid epistemological "local information minimum trap". PMID:22207193

  5. Passive field reflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christian; Schinca, Daniel C.; Tocho, Jorge O.; Videla, Fabian

    2008-10-01

    The results of reflectance measurements performed with a three-band passive radiometer with independent channels for solar irradiance reference are presented. Comparative operation between the traditional method that uses downward-looking field and reference white panel measurements and the new approach involving duplicated downward- and upward-looking spectral channels (each latter one with its own diffuser) is analyzed. The results indicate that the latter method performs in very good agreement with the standard method and is more suitable for passive sensors under rapidly changing atmospheric conditions (such as clouds, dust, mist, smog and other scatterers), since a more reliable synchronous recording of reference and incident light is achieved. Besides, having separate channels for the reference and the signal allows a better balancing of gains in the amplifiers for each spectral channel. We show the results obtained in the determination of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) corresponding to the period 2004-2007 field experiments concerning weed detection in soybean stubbles and fertilizer level assessment in wheat. The method may be used to refine sensor-based nitrogen fertilizer rate recommendations and to determine suitable zones for herbicide applications.

  6. Venus Highland Anomalous Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Richard A.; Tyler, G. L.; Häusler, B.; Mattei, R.; Patzold, M.

    2009-09-01

    Maxwell Montes was one of several unusually bright areas identified from early Venus radar backscatter observations. Pioneer Venus' orbiting radar associated low emissivity with the bright areas and established a correlation between reflectivity and altitude. Magellan, using an oblique bistatic geometry, showed that the bright surface dielectric constant was not only large but also imaginary -- i.e., the material was conducting, at least near Cleopatra Patera (Pettengill et al., Science, 272, 1996). Venus Express (VEX) repeated Magellan's bistatic observations over Maxwell, using the more conventional circular polarization carried by most spacecraft. Although VEX signal-to-noise ratio was lower than Magellan's, echoes were sufficiently strong to verify the Magellan conclusions near Cleopatra (see J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00B41, doi:10.1029/2008JE003156). Only about 40% of the surface at Cleopatra scatters specularly, opening the Fresnel (specular) interpretation model to question. Elsewhere in Maxwell, the specular percentage may be even lower. Nonetheless, the echo polarization is reversed throughout Maxwell, a result that is consistent with large dielectric constants and difficult to explain without resorting qualitatively (if not quantitatively) to specular models. VEX was scheduled to explore other high altitude regions when its S-Band (13-cm wavelength) radio system failed in late 2006, so further probing of high altitude targets awaits arrival of a new spacecraft.

  7. Reflective Fourier ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Shaun; Zheng, Guoan; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-02-01

    The Fourier ptychography technique in reflection mode has great potential applications in tissue imaging and optical inspection, but the current configuration either has a limitation on cut-off frequency or is not practical. By placing the imaging aperture stop outside the illumination path, the illumination numerical aperture (NA) can be greater than the imaging NA of the objective lens. Thus, the cut-off frequency achieved in the proposed optical system is greater than twice the objective's NA divided by the wavelength (2NAobj/λ), which is the diffraction limit for the cut-off frequency in an incoherent epi-illumination configuration. We experimentally demonstrated that the synthesized NA is increased by a factor of 4.5 using the proposed optical concept. The key advantage of the proposed system is that it can achieve high-resolution imaging over a large field of view with a simple objective. It will have a great potential for applications in endoscopy, biomedical imaging, surface metrology, and industrial inspection.

  8. Reflective Fourier ptychography.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Shaun; Zheng, Guoan; Liang, Rongguang

    2016-02-01

    The Fourier ptychography technique in reflection mode has great potential applications in tissue imaging and optical inspection, but the current configuration either has a limitation on cut-off frequency or is not practical. By placing the imaging aperture stop outside the illumination path, the illumination numerical aperture (NA) can be greater than the imaging NA of the objective lens. Thus, the cut-off frequency achieved in the proposed optical system is greater than twice the objective's NA divided by the wavelength (2NAobj/λ ), which is the diffraction limit for the cut-off frequency in an incoherent epi-illumination configuration. We experimentally demonstrated that the synthesized NA is increased by a factor of 4.5 using the proposed optical concept. The key advantage of the proposed system is that it can achieve high-resolution imaging over a large field of view with a simple objective. It will have a great potential for applications in endoscopy, biomedical imaging, surface metrology, and industrial inspection. PMID:26891601

  9. Peer consultation reflection exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. B.; Hogg, W.; Delva, D.; Nanchoff-Glatt, M.; Moore, L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore participants' overall perception of the value of the Peer Consultation Reflection Exercise (PCRE); of barriers and facilitators to participation and learning during a PCRE; and of the transferability of the experience to participants' own settings. DESIGN: This study used the qualitative techniques of key informant interviews and a focus group. SETTING: Focus group and key informant interviews at the 1996 Annual Meeting of the College of Family Physicians of Canada's Section of Teachers. PARTICIPANTS: Family medicine teachers attending a PCRE. METHOD: Five key informant interviews and one focus group composed of five participants were conducted to explore participants' experience of participating and learning during a PCRE. MAIN FINDINGS: Participants viewed the PCRE as a valuable opportunity to interact and learn from colleagues a were especially impressed with the opportunity to listen. Confidentiality and the important role of the facilitator were identified as key components. The greatest perceived barrier was the formal structure of the PCRE. CONCLUSIONS: The PCRE is an innovative strategy for personal and professional development. It could be used in other settings. PMID:10386215

  10. Behavior analysis and the study of human aging

    PubMed Central

    Derenne, Adam; Baron, Alan

    2002-01-01

    As the population of older adults continues to rise, psychologists along with other behavioral and social scientists have shown increasing interest in this age group. Although behavior analysts have contributed to research on aging, the focus has been on applications that remedy age-related deficits, rather than a concern with aging as a developmental process. In particular, there has been little interest in the central theoretical questions that have guided gerontologists. How does behavior change with advancing years, and what are the sources of those changes? We consider the possibility that this neglect reflects the long-standing commitment of behavior analysts to variables that can be experimentally manipulated, a requirement that excludes the key variable—age itself. We review the options available to researchers and present strategies that minimize deviations from the traditional features of behavior-analytic designs. Our comments are predicated on the view that aging issues within contemporary society are far too important for behavior analysts to ignore. PMID:22478383

  11. Immunological Aging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunosenescence is associated with an increased incidence and severity of infections with common pathogens, neoplastic disease and autoimmunity. In general, aging is associated with a decline in function at the cellular level, rather than cell loss, although thymic atrophy and ...

  12. About possibilities of CMEs prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheyner, Olga

    Sufficiently long time there were examined in essence the effects of the solar proton flares influence on the earth. Recent solar researches lead to the concept of general approach to solar active events: CMEs are global phenomenon of solar activity and the analysis of it includes entire process of energy release as strictly the solar flare with its manifestations in all ranges of radiation (electromagnetic and corpuscular) as entire spectrum of the associated dynamic phenomena. Moreover the geoefficiency of CMEs is not examined sufficient. This access intends the development of approach to CMEs forecast. In this work the possibilities of the prediction of the evidence of CMEs formation and initial propagation are examined. They are based on effects observed in solar sporadic radio emission. To our mind, such prediction is possible because of complex events observed in solar microwave emission on the time interval from 2-3 days till the point of CMEs registration on the coronagraphs. That sort of effects consists of: a) an increase of the long-period (T > 20 min) fluctuations in 2-3 days prior to the formation of the Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) that exceeds in 2 times calm periods [1]; b) appearance and maintenance of the narrow-band (∆f 200-400 MHz) spectral special features in microwave emission intensity within 5-8-hours prior to the point of CMEs registration [2]; c) presence of radio precursors in 1-2 hours prior to CMEs registration, that possess broadband, directivity; their duration depends on the morphological type of recorded CMEs [3]; d) presence of periodic components with the periods in the range of 6-22 seconds in solar microwave emission directly preceded CMEs registration (less than the half-hour) [1]. Similar manifestations of solar activity in the microwave emission, preceding CMEs, can find explanations within the framework of the existing models and ideas about the reflection in the radio emission of the phenomena of the dynamics of the

  13. Organizational Climate for Successful Aging.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Hannes; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Research on successful aging at work has neglected contextual resources such as organizational climate, which refers to employees' shared perceptions of their work environment. We introduce the construct of organizational climate for successful aging (OCSA) and examine it as a buffer of the negative relationship between employee age and focus on opportunities (i.e., beliefs about future goals and possibilities at work). Moreover, we expected that focus on opportunities, in turn, positively predicts job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and motivation to continue working after official retirement age. Data came from 649 employees working in 120 companies (M age = 44 years, SD = 13). We controlled for organizational tenure, psychological climate for successful aging (i.e., individuals' perceptions), and psychological and organizational age discrimination climate. Results of multilevel analyses supported our hypotheses. Overall, our findings suggest that OCSA is an important contextual resource for successful aging at work. PMID:27458405

  14. Host Resistance and Immune Aging.

    PubMed

    Bandaranayake, Thilinie; Shaw, Albert C

    2016-08-01

    Human immune system aging results in impaired responses to pathogens or vaccines. In the innate immune system, which mediates the earliest pro-inflammatory responses to immunologic challenge, processes ranging from Toll-like Receptor function to Neutrophil Extracellular Trap formation are generally diminished in older adults. Dysregulated, enhanced basal inflammation with age reflecting activation by endogenous damage-associated ligands contributes to impaired innate immune responses. In the adaptive immune system, T and B cell subsets and function alter with age. The control of cytomegalovirus infection, particularly in the T lineage, plays a dominant role in the differentiation and diversity of the T cell compartment. PMID:27394014

  15. Shock-tube experiments on the stability of regular reflection in the dual-solution domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Adachi, T.

    2016-05-01

    Regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) are theoretically both possible in the dual-solution domain of oblique shock reflection. The physical difference between the two types of reflection is the pressure behind the reflected shock wave: that of MR is lower than that of RR for strong shock reflection. The magnitude relation of these pressures is inverted for weak shock reflection. In the present paper, we performed two kinds of experiment, depending on whether the oblique shock reflection is weak or strong. For strong shock reflection, we decreased the pressure behind the reflected wave of RR using a convex double-wedge. For weak shock reflection, we increased this pressure using a concave double-wedge. Thus, we investigated the stability of RR against pressure disturbances. The results indicate that RR in a shock tube is stable, in the dual-solution domain, for both weak and strong incident shocks.

  16. Calorimetric support of directional-hemispherical reflection measurements in the infrared spectral range.

    PubMed

    Richter, W; Sarge, S M; Kämmer, F

    1994-03-01

    Measurements of the directional-hemispherical reflectance ρ with the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt IR sphere reflectometer have been confirmed by calorimetric determination of the absorptance α in the same geometrical conditions (irradiation at 10°, hemispherical reflection). The good agreement of ρ with (1 - α) on both highly reflecting and low-reflecting surfaces indicates that in the mid-IR spectral range the integrating sphere reflectometer is capable of essentially correct reflectance measurements of diffusely reflecting surfaces, with an estimated uncertainty of 0.01 after correction for a small systematic deviation. This capability opens up the possibility of developing IR reflectance standards. PMID:20862150

  17. Planar Reflection of Detonations Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damazo, Jason; Shepherd, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    An experimental study examining normally reflected gaseous detonation waves is undertaken so that the physics of reflected detonations may be understood. Focused schlieren visualization is used to describe the boundary layer development behind the incident detonation wave and the nature of the reflected shock wave. Reflected shock wave bifurcation-which has received extensive study as it pertains to shock tube performance-is predicted by classical bifurcation theory, but is not observed in the present study for undiluted hydrogen-oxygen and ethylene-oxygen detonation waves. Pressure and thermocouple gauges are installed in the floor of the detonation tube so as to examine both the wall pressure and heat flux. From the pressure results, we observe an inconsistency between the measured reflected shock speed and the measured reflected shock strength with one dimensional flow predictions confirming earlier experiments performed in our laboratory. This research is sponsored by the DHS through the University of Rhode Island, Center of Excellence for Explosives Detection.

  18. Baffle system employing reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linlor, W. I.

    1983-12-01

    Reflective baffles are proposed to reject off-axis light entering a telescope. Toroidal surfaces and adjacent cones are positioned so that off-axis rays make multiple reflections between these two surfaces. Meridional rays are reflected approximately parallel to the entering direction. Skew rays are reflected obliquely, but leave the telescope aperture. The range of incident angles for which these reflections are obtained is approximately 45 deg. A system is described that is designed specifically for the Space Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Because of its reflective properties, the proposed baffle system rejects about 90 deg of the heat load from the SIRTF sunshade that would be absorbed in systems of conventional black baffles.

  19. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Howard, T.C.

    1986-12-23

    Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

  20. Variable area light reflecting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Thomas C.

    1986-01-01

    Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

  1. Age Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    The ages of rocks from the lunar highlands vary widely, even for a single rock sample. This makes it difficult to quantitatively test ideas for early lunar differentiation and formation of the crust. Lars Borg and Amy Gaffney (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), and Charles Shearer (University of New Mexico) have devised a set of guidelines to apply to geochronological data that leads to a relative ranking of the reliability of the age determined for a sample. Applying their guidelines to existing data for lunar highland rocks shows an upper limit on rock ages between 4340 and 4370 million years. This is essentially the same as the so-called model ages of the formation of KREEP (a chemical component enriched in potassium, rare earth elements, and phosphorous) and of the formation of the deep source regions that melted to produce mare basalts. The numerous ages close to 4370 million years suggests a complicated and protracted cooling of the primordial lunar magma ocean or a widespread vigorous period of magmatic activity in the Moon.

  2. Reflectional transformation for structural stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Vashi, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a structural reflection-related transformation for structural stiffness. The stiffness transformation addresses reflection of a structure about any of the three coordinate planes and renders the desired stiffness matrix using a stiffness matrix for the same structure before reflection. This transformation is elegant and simple, provides an efficient and technically rigorous approach to derive the required stiffness matrix without structural remodeling, and can be readily programmed to quickly perform the required matrix manipulations. 2 figs.

  3. Atlas of soil reflectance properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    A compendium of soil spectral reflectance curves together with soil test results and site information is presented in an abbreviated manner listing those soil properties most important in influencing soil reflectance. Results are presented for 251 soils from 39 states and Brazil. A narrative key describes relationships between soil parameters and reflectance curves. All soils are classified according to the U.S. soil taxonomy and soil series name for ease of identification.

  4. Spectral reflectance measurements in the genus Sphagnum

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelmann, J.E.; Moss, D.M. . Complex Systems/Institute for the Study of Earth Oceans and Space)

    1993-09-01

    High-spectral resolution reflectance data were acquired in the laboratory for four species of Sphagnum (peat moss): S. cuspidatum, S. papillosum, S. fallax, and S. capillifolium. All four species had different spectral reflectance properties. Species differences were noted especially in the visible portion of the spectrum from 0.45 [mu]m to 0.70 [mu]m; some major spectral differences were also noted in the near infrared. Samples analyzed had much lower reflectance than typical green vegetation in the midinfrared region of the spectrum from 1.30 [mu]m to 2.40 [mu]m. In addition, Sphagnum had very pronounced water-related absorption features at about 1.00m [mu] and 1.20 [mu]m, unlike typical green vegetation. Spectral data acquired as samples were dried indicated large spectral increases with increasing dryness, especially in the midinfrared. Simulated Landsat Thematic Mapper 5/4 band ratio data were linearly related to the log of wet weight/dry weight. Reflectance from vegetation in the midinfrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum is strongly modified by water content. Peatlands are major sources of global methane and it has been found that methane evolution within these peatlands is related to water status within these peatlands is related to water status within the wetland. It may be possible to indirectly estimate methane flux using remote sensing data.

  5. Modern Biological Theories of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kunlin

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in molecular biology and genetics, the mysteries that control human lifespan are yet to be unraveled. Many theories, which fall into two main categories: programmed and error theories, have been proposed to explain the process of aging, but neither of them appears to be fully satisfactory. These theories may interact with each other in a complex way. By understanding and testing the existing and new aging theories, it may be possible to promote successful aging. PMID:21132086

  6. Asymmetric light reflection at the reflecting layer incorporated in a linear, time-independent and non-magnetic two-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Gupta, Man; Medhekar, Sarang

    2016-06-01

    For the first time, we show the phenomenon of asymmetric light reflection at the reflecting layer incorporated in a linear, time-independent and non-magnetic two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC). The proposed reflector shows asymmetry in the reflection (and hence, in transmission), if incident and reflected ports are interchanged. The possibility shown here should be of interest from the point of view of basic optics and should have interesting consequences/applications in applied optics.

  7. Signals for specular Andreev reflection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingyun; Fu, Deyi; Wang, Baigeng; Zhang, R; Xing, D Y

    2008-07-25

    We report a theoretical investigation of the spin-dependent Andreev reflection at the interface of a graphene-based ferromagnet/superconductor junction. It is found that the ferromagnetic exchange interaction in the ferromagnet can suppress Andreev retroreflection but enhance the specular Andreev reflection. There is a transition between the specular Andreev reflection and Andreev retroreflection at which the shot noise vanishes and the Fano factor has a universal value. The present work provides a new method of detecting the specular Andreev reflection, which can be experimentally tested within the present-day technique. PMID:18764360

  8. Weak-shock reflection factors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges; square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders; and spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. We restrict ourselves to weak shocks. Shocks with a Mach number of M{sub O} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}{sub PI} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  9. Specular Reflection and Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies on the occurrence and effects of specular reflection in mid-infrared spectra of soils have shown that distortions due to specular reflection occur for both organic (humic acid) and non-organic fractions (carbonates, silica, ashed fraction of soil). The results demonstrated explain why the s...

  10. Postgraduate Education to Support Organisation Change: A Reflection on Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jim; Keegan, Anne; Stevens, Pam

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore how teaching and assessing reflective learning skills can support postgraduate practitioners studying organisational change and explores the challenges for tutors in assessing these journals. Design/methodology/approach: Assessment criteria were developed from the literature on reflective practice and…

  11. Studies of the Reflection, Refraction and Internal Reflection of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanchester, P. C.

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive apparatus and associated experiments are described for studying the basic laws of reflection and refraction of light at an air-glass interface, and multiple internal reflections within a glass block. In order to motivate students and encourage their active participation, a novel technique is described for determining the refractive…

  12. Reflective Practice Interventions: Raising Levels of Reflective Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Audrey; Schoen, Lea

    2009-01-01

    Reflective practice is a major focus of teacher preparation programs (Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 1992; Putnam & Borko, 2000; Zeichner, 1986; Zeichner & Liston, 1987), yet Zeichner (1986) asserts that developing reflective practice in preservice teachers has focused primarily on short-term, less systematic interventions and that interventions must be…

  13. Embodied Reflection and the Epistemology of Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne

    2007-01-01

    Donald Schon's theory of reflective practice has been extensively referred to and has had enormous impact in education and related fields. Nonetheless, there continues to be tremendous conceptual and practical confusion surrounding interpretations of reflective practice and philosophical assumptions underlying the theory. In this paper, I argue…

  14. Plutonium aging

    SciTech Connect

    Olivas, J.D.

    1999-03-01

    The author describes the plutonium aging program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The aging of plutonium components in the US nuclear weapons stockpile has become a concern due to several events: the end of the cold war, the cessation of full scale underground nuclear testing as a result of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the closure of the Rocky Flats Plant--the site where the plutonium components were manufactured. As a result, service lifetimes for nuclear weapons have been lengthened. Dr. Olivas will present a brief primer on the metallurgy of plutonium, and will then describe the technical approach to ascertaining the long-term changes that may be attributable to self-radiation damage. Facilities and experimental techniques which are in use to study aging will be described. Some preliminary results will also be presented.

  15. Quantifying the Shape of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wrycza, Tomasz F.; Missov, Trifon I.; Baudisch, Annette

    2015-01-01

    In Biodemography, aging is typically measured and compared based on aging rates. We argue that this approach may be misleading, because it confounds the time aspect with the mere change aspect of aging. To disentangle these aspects, here we utilize a time-standardized framework and, instead of aging rates, suggest the shape of aging as a novel and valuable alternative concept for comparative aging research. The concept of shape captures the direction and degree of change in the force of mortality over age, which—on a demographic level—reflects aging. We 1) provide a list of shape properties that are desirable from a theoretical perspective, 2) suggest several demographically meaningful and non-parametric candidate measures to quantify shape, and 3) evaluate performance of these measures based on the list of properties as well as based on an illustrative analysis of a simple dataset. The shape measures suggested here aim to provide a general means to classify aging patterns independent of any particular mortality model and independent of any species-specific time-scale. Thereby they support systematic comparative aging research across different species or between populations of the same species under different conditions and constitute an extension of the toolbox available to comparative research in Biodemography. PMID:25803427

  16. Understanding aging.

    PubMed

    Strehler, B L

    2000-01-01

    Enormous advances in our understanding of human aging have occurred during the last 50 yr. From the late 19th to the mid-20th centuries only four comprehensive and important sources of information were available: 1. August Weismann's book entitled Essays on Heredity and Kindred Biological Problems (the first of these essays dealt with The Duration of Life; 1). Weissmann states (p. 10) "In the first place in regulating the length of life, the advantage to the species, and not to the individual, is alone of any importance. This must be obvious to any one who has once thoroughly thought out the process of natural selection_". 2. A highly systematized second early source of information on aging was the collection of essays edited by Cowdry and published in 1938. This 900+ page volume contains 34 chapters and was appropriately called Problems of Aging. 3. At about the same time Raymond Pearl published his book on aging (2). Pearl believed that aging was the indirect result of cell specialization and that only the germ line was resistant to aging. Unfortunately Pearl died in the late 1930s and is largely remembered now for having been the founding editor of Quarterly Review of Biology while he was at the Johns Hopkins University, this author's alma mater. 4. Alexis Carrel wrote a monumental scientific and philosophical book, Man, the Unknown (3). Carrel believed that he had demonstrated that vertebrate cells could be kept in culture and live indefinitely, a conclusion challenged by others (more on this later). PMID:22351262

  17. The nurse teacher's role in the promotion of reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D E

    1995-10-01

    The art of reflection is seen as a key process in bringing together practice and knowledge in nursing. More specifically, reflection addresses the artistic elements of nursing care delivery. It thus appears a useful skill for pre-registration students to begin developing. However, research suggests that students under the age of 25 may lack both the cognitive readiness and the experience necessary for mature critical reflection. Teachers must therefore examine whether the reflective strategies and models that they present meet these students educational needs. It is postulated that simple models have a greater chance of success than those that are complex and demand a high time commitment. One such model for reflective journal writing is suggested. PMID:7494529

  18. Functions and possible provenance of primordial proteins.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Andrei P; Miyake, Norimune; Wickramasinghe, N Chandra; Narlikar, Jayant V; Al-Mufti, Shirwan

    2004-01-01

    Nanobacteria or living nanovesicles are of great interest to the scientific community because of their dual nature: on the one hand, they appear as primal biosystems originating life; on the other hand, they can cause severe diseases. Their survival as well as their pathogenic potential is apparently linked to a self-synthesized protein-based slime, rich in calcium and phosphate (when available). Here, we provide challenging evidence for the occurrence of nanobacteria in the stratosphere, reflecting a possibly primordial provenance of the slime. An analysis of the slime's biological functions may lead to novel strategies suitable to block adhesion modalities in modern bacterial populations. PMID:15595742

  19. Troubling Muddy Waters: Problematizing Reflective Practice in Global Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Thirusha; Kumagai, Arno K

    2016-03-01

    The idea of exporting the concept of reflective practice for a global medical education audience is growing. However, the uncritical export and adoption of Western concepts of reflection may be inappropriate in non-Western societies. The emphasis in Western medical education on the use of reflection for a specific end--that is, the improvement of individual clinical practice--tends to ignore the range of reflective practice, concentrating on reflection alone while overlooking critical reflection and reflexivity. This Perspective places the concept of reflective practice under a critical lens to explore a broader view for its application in medical education outside the West. The authors suggest that ideas about reflection in medicine and medical education may not be as easily transferable from Western to non-Western contexts as concepts from biomedical science are. The authors pose the question, When "exporting" Western medical education strategies and principles, how often do Western-trained educators authentically open up to the possibility that there are alternative ways of seeing and knowing that may be valuable in educating Western physicians? One answer lies in the assertion that educators should aspire to turn exportation of educational theory into a truly bidirectional, collaborative exchange in which culturally conscious views of reflective practice contribute to humanistic, equitable patient care. This discussion engages in troubling the already-muddy waters of reflective practice by exploring the global applicability of reflective practice as it is currently applied in medical education. The globalization of medical education demands critical reflection on reflection itself. PMID:26630601

  20. Internal reflection sensors with high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavirin, I.; Strelkov, O.; Vetskous, A.; Norton-Wayne, L.; Harwood, R.

    1996-07-01

    We discuss the use of total internal reflection for the production of sensors with high angular resolution. These sensors are intended for measurement of the angle between a sensor's axis and the direction to a source of radiation or reflecting object. Sensors of this type are used in controlling the position of machine parts in robotics and industry, orienting space vehicles and astronomic devices in relation to the Sun, and as autocollimators for checking angles of deviation. This kind of sensor was used in the Apollo space vehicle some 20 years ago. Using photodetectors with linear and area CCD arrays has opened up new application possibilities for appropriately designed sensors. A generalized methodology is presented applicable to a wide range of tasks. Some modifications that can improve the performance of the basic design are described.

  1. 'It's everywhere!' young Swedish people's thoughts and reflections about pornography.

    PubMed

    Häggström-Nordin, Elisabet; Sandberg, Jonas; Hanson, Ulf; Tydén, Tanja

    2006-12-01

    Pornography is one of the most sought-after topics on the Internet, and is easily available for anyone, including children and adolescents. At youth centres, nurse-midwives have noticed that young people have different kinds of questions about sexual practices compared with a few years ago. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of thoughts and reflections about pornography consumption, and its possible influence on sexual practices, among young women and men. The staff at a youth centre in a city in central Sweden asked the visitors if they had seen pornography and if they wanted to be interviewed about their experiences. Ten young women and eight men, aged 16-23 years, participated. In-depth interviews were performed and open-ended questions about pornography and sexuality were posed. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed according to grounded theory. The core category 'Living with the current sexual norm' depicted how pornography created sexual expectations and demands, for instance, to perform certain sexual acts. The informants expressed contradictory feelings towards pornography and felt that sexuality was separated from intimacy. A moral attitude was described and examples of stereotypic gender roles were given. To deal with the current sexual norm, informants had different individual handling strategies and attitudes to pornography, namely liberal, normalization, distance, feminist or conservative. Limitations of this study were the small sample size and that results from a qualitative research study cannot be generalized. The results contribute to an understanding of how pornographic material can influence young peoples' thoughts, reflections and sexual behaviour. This indicates the importance, for personnel at youth centres and schools, to discuss sexual behaviour and how sexuality is portrayed in pornographic material with young people. PMID:17116147

  2. Aging Secret

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The canny world of advertising has caught on to the free radical theory of aging, marketing a whole array of antioxidants for preventing anything from wrinkles to dry hair to reducing the risk of heart disease--promising to help slow the hands of time. Working with genetically engineered mice--to produce a natural antioxidant enzyme called…

  3. Gay Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2009-01-01

    The oldest of the baby boomers (boomers) were age 63 in 2009 and on the verge of retirement. This cohort has had a history of making societal changes throughout its life cycle, and it is unlikely that retirement, as we know it, will remain unscathed. This article highlights two events--the Stonewall Inn riots and two prominent professional…

  4. Gay aging.

    PubMed

    Haber, David

    2009-01-01

    The oldest of the baby boomers (boomers) were age 63 in 2009 and on the verge of retirement. This cohort has had a history of making societal changes throughout its life cycle, and it is unlikely that retirement, as we know it, will remain unscathed. This article highlights two events-the Stonewall Inn riots and two prominent professional associations removing homosexuality from their list of personality disorders-and how they occurred early enough in the gay boomers life cycle to change their attitudes, behaviors, and lifestyles. This article introduces the reader to a broad array of facts, research findings, and issues that inform the topic of gay aging. A summary of the discrimination and legal concerns affecting the gay community are also highlighted. Two influential community programs are identified: Services and Advocacy for Gay Elders (SAGE) and the American Society on Aging's LGBT Aging Issues Network (LAIN). Gerontological educators need to be sensitive to the needs, desires, and resources of the coming cohort of gay boomers, who are more likely to advocate for responsive services, organizations, and policies than the current cohort of gay older adults. PMID:19697188

  5. Active Aging Promotion: Results from the Vital Aging Program

    PubMed Central

    Caprara, Mariagiovanna; Molina, María Ángeles; Schettini, Rocío; Santacreu, Marta; Orosa, Teresa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Rojas, Macarena; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    Active aging is one of the terms in the semantic network of aging well, together with others such as successful, productive, competent aging. All allude to the new paradigm in gerontology, whereby aging is considered from a positive perspective. Most authors in the field agree active aging is a multidimensional concept, embracing health, physical and cognitive fitness, positive affect and control, social relationships and engagement. This paper describes Vital Aging, an individual active aging promotion program implemented through three modalities: Life, Multimedia, and e-Learning. The program was developed on the basis of extensive evidence about individual determinants of active aging. The different versions of Vital Aging are described, and four evaluation studies (both formative and summative) are reported. Formative evaluation reflected participants' satisfaction and expected changes; summative evaluations yielded some quite encouraging results using quasi-experimental designs: those who took part in the programs increased their physical exercise, significantly improved their diet, reported better memory, had better emotional balance, and enjoyed more cultural, intellectual, affective, and social activities than they did before the course, thus increasing their social relationships. These results are discussed in the context of the common literature within the field and, also, taking into account the limitations of the evaluations accomplished. PMID:23476644

  6. Can Reflective Practice Be Taught?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Gail; Thomas, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Almost ubiquitous in discourses about the development of teachers, reflective practice describes the process that occurs when persons are apprenticed to any meaningful activity. But reflective practice is a descriptive term for that process: it does not imply that the process is itself open to dissection and instruction. We contend that mistaken…

  7. Reflections on Becoming a Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Katherine K.; Pearson, P. David

    2013-01-01

    In this joint reflection two of the contributors to this issue of the "Journal of Education" consider the processes and practices that led to the publication of their respective pieces. Since one of the authors, Katherine Frankel, was a doctoral advisee of the other, David Pearson, they also reflect on the mentoring practices they shared…

  8. Flexible Bistable Cholesteric Reflective Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Deng-Ke

    2006-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) exhibit two stable states at zero field condition-the reflecting planar state and the nonreflecting focal conic state. ChLCs are an excellent candidate for inexpensive and rugged electronic books and papers. This paper will review the display cell structure,materials and drive schemes for flexible bistable cholesteric (Ch) reflective displays.

  9. Incorporating reflection into veterinary practice.

    PubMed

    2016-05-21

    New graduates are encouraged to reflect on their progress during their Professional Development Phase, but what does reflection really mean, and how can veterinary professionals use it to better their day-to-day practice? This was a topic discussed during an afternoon of sessions at the recent BSAVA congress in Birmingham. Georgina Mills reports. PMID:27199044

  10. Reflections on Justice in Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    First, Patricia F.

    2012-01-01

    This article is a reflection on the concept of justice as practiced in the public schools in the United States. Examples of justice denied or misconstrued are included. Cases, stories, and concepts invite educational leaders to reflect anew on delivering justice in education to all children. Underlying the article is the belief that understanding…

  11. Children's Literature-Some Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root, Shelton L., Jr.

    Ten reflections may be made regarding children's literature and its teaching. The reflections are as follows: (1) Teachers can make a profound difference in the lives of students and should attempt to do so. (2) Teachers of children's literature are a badly fragmented lot and need a common meeting ground where they can share their thinking. (3)…

  12. Making Connections to Teach Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Manuel G.; Bleicher, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Approaching reflection from the perspective of a teachable skill set implies that research may inform how to help students reflect. Employing a framework of making connections often used in reading comprehension, this study aimed to characterize how making connections between the service-learning experience (SLE) and prior experiences in similar…

  13. Why Reflection in Teacher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBoskey, Vicki Kubler

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on preservice teacher education by considering teacher reflectivity as an end rather than a means. The article provides a rationale for reflective teacher education in arguing the need to have teachers who are thoughtful, passionate, and principled educational decision makers. (GLR)

  14. Practicing Possibilities: Parents' Explanations of Unusual Events and Children's Possibility Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan-Reyes, Charlotte; Callanan, Maureen A.; Haigh, Kirsten A.

    2016-01-01

    Young children tend to judge improbable events to be impossible, yet there is variability across age and across individuals. Our study examined parent-child conversations about impossible and improbable events and links between parents' explanations about those events and children's possibility judgments in a reasoning task. Regression analyses…

  15. Perceptions of and Attitudes towards Ageing in Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mapoma, Christopher C.; Masaiti, Gift

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects part of the wider outlook on ageing in general in Zambia and was intended to investigate perceptions of and attitudes towards the aged and ageing in Zambia by members of the community who, by definition and chronologically are not classified as aged i.e. not yet 60 years and over. Focus Group Discussions (FGD) were used to…

  16. Organizational Climate for Successful Aging

    PubMed Central

    Zacher, Hannes; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Research on successful aging at work has neglected contextual resources such as organizational climate, which refers to employees’ shared perceptions of their work environment. We introduce the construct of organizational climate for successful aging (OCSA) and examine it as a buffer of the negative relationship between employee age and focus on opportunities (i.e., beliefs about future goals and possibilities at work). Moreover, we expected that focus on opportunities, in turn, positively predicts job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and motivation to continue working after official retirement age. Data came from 649 employees working in 120 companies (Mage = 44 years, SD = 13). We controlled for organizational tenure, psychological climate for successful aging (i.e., individuals’ perceptions), and psychological and organizational age discrimination climate. Results of multilevel analyses supported our hypotheses. Overall, our findings suggest that OCSA is an important contextual resource for successful aging at work. PMID:27458405

  17. [Concept analysis of reflective thinking].

    PubMed

    Van Vuuren, M; Botes, A

    1999-09-01

    The nursing practice is described as a scientific practice, but also as a practice where caring is important. The purpose of nursing education is to provide competent nursing practitioners. This implies that future practitioners must have both critical analytical thinking abilities, as well as empathy and moral values. Reflective thinking could probably accommodate these thinking skills. It seems that the facilitation of reflective thinking skills is essential in nursing education. The research question that is relevant in this context is: "What is reflective thinking?" The purpose of this article is to report on the concept analysis of reflective thinking and in particular on the connotative meaning (critical attributes) thereof. The method used to perform the concept analysis is based on the original method of Wilson (1987) as described by Walker & Avant (1995). As part of the concept analysis the connotations (critical attributes) are identified, reduced and organized into three categories, namely pre-requisites, processes and outcomes. A model case is described which confirms the essential critical attributes of reflective thinking. Finally a theoretical definition of reflective thinking is derived and reads as follows: Reflective thinking is a cyclic, hierarchical and interactive construction process. It is initiated, extended and continued because of personal cognitive-affective interaction (individual dimension) as well as interaction with the social environment (social dimension). to realize reflective thinking, a level of internalization on the cognitive and affective domain is required. The result of reflective thinking is a integrated framework of knowledge (meaningful learning) and a internalized value system providing a new perspective on and better understanding of a problem. Reflective thinking further leads to more effective decision making- and problem solving skills. PMID:11040626

  18. Tribal Aging Programs: A Basic Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Council on Aging, Albuquerque, NM.

    A national training session for administrators of tribal aging programs held by the National Indian Council on Aging in November 1979 was the basis for the training manual. The seven chapter titles reflect workshop topics with the text of each chapter incorporating material presented in the workshops and examples of model programs on reservations.…

  19. Utilizing Calibrated GPS Reflected Signals to Estimate Soil Reflectivity and Dielectric Constant: Results from SMEX02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Torres, Omar; Grant, Michael S.; Masters, Dallas

    2006-01-01

    Extensive reflected GPS data was collected using a GPS reflectometer installed on an HC130 aircraft during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX02) near Ames, Iowa. At the same time, widespread surface truth data was acquired in the form of point soil moisture profiles, areal sampling of near-surface soil moisture, total green biomass and precipitation history, among others. Previously, there have been no reported efforts to calibrate reflected GPS data sets acquired over land. This paper reports the results of two approaches to calibration of the data that yield consistent results. It is shown that estimating the strength of the reflected signals by either (1) assuming an approximately specular surface reflection or (2) inferring the surface slope probability density and associated normalization constants give essentially the same results for the conditions encountered in SMEX02. The corrected data is converted to surface reflectivity and then to dielectric constant as a test of the calibration approaches. Utilizing the extensive in-situ soil moisture related data this paper also presents the results of comparing the GPS-inferred relative dielectric constant with the Wang-Schmugge model frequently used to relate volume moisture content to dielectric constant. It is shown that the calibrated GPS reflectivity estimates follow the expected dependence of permittivity with volume moisture, but with the following qualification: The soil moisture value governing the reflectivity appears to come from only the top 1-2 centimeters of soil, a result consistent with results found for other microwave techniques operating at L-band. Nevertheless, the experimentally derived dielectric constant is generally lower than predicted. Possible explanations are presented to explain this result.

  20. Aging & Health.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    By 2050 an estimated 83.7 million Americans will be ages sixty-five and older, up from 40.3 million in 2010. The shock wave of aging Americans will have profound implications for older people, their families, health care providers, and the economy. Researchers, policy makers, health care leaders, and others are designing responses to the challenges these actuarial shifts will create. For example, delivering health care at home could help keep more older Americans out of costly emergency departments and nursing homes. But such steps require more health care providers, a broader distribution of providers than currently exists, and better use of the resources we have. PMID:27605632

  1. Anisotropy as cause for polarity reversals of D" reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christine; Wookey, James

    2013-04-01

    Seismic reflections from structures in the D" region - the lowest 200-400 km of the Earth's mantle - can provide information on the velocity contrast of this region. Using the waveforms and polarities of the D" reflections in P and S-waves we can distinguish between different possibilities that may cause the observed structures, such as phase transitions, aligned material or thermal anomalies. Here we use recordings of seismic events that reflect beneath the Caribbean and Eurasia. Both P and S reflected waves are used where possible. The source-receiver combinations provide reflections off D" in two fast velocity regions. Under Eurasia three crossing paths are used. The polarities of reflections in both regions differ and can therefore help to further discriminate the cause for the observed reflections. In one region, we find apparent positive S-velocity contrasts but negative P-wave velocity contrasts for the D" reflector. In the second fast velocity region we detect positive P- and S-wave velocity contrasts in two orthogonal paths crossing in the lowermost mantle indicating a different scenario for the structures in D". A third intersecting path shows negative polarities of the reflected P wave. One possible explanation to reconcile observations in both regions is a phase transition from perovskite to post-perovskite with 12 percent of alignment in the post-perovskite phase. Depending on the travel direction of the waves with respect to the flow direction in the lower mantle, apparent positive or negative velocity jumps (reflectivity) can be expected. Other isotropic and anisotropic models are tested but cannot fully explain the range of observations we find in the data.

  2. Near-100 percent Bragg Reflectivity of X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Y Shvydko; S Stoupin; V Blank; S Terentyev

    2011-12-31

    Ultrahigh-reflectance mirrors are essential optical elements of the most sophisticated optical instruments devised over the entire frequency spectrum. In the X-ray regime, super-polished mirrors with close to 100% reflectivity are routinely used at grazing angles of incidence. However, at large angles of incidence, and particularly at normal incidence, such high reflectivity has not yet been achieved. Here, we demonstrate by direct measurements that synthetic, nearly defect-free diamond crystals reflect more than 99% of hard X-ray photons backwards in Bragg diffraction, with a remarkably small variation in magnitude across the sample. This is a quantum leap in the largest reflectivity measured to date, which is at the limit of what is theoretically possible. This accomplishment is achieved under the most challenging conditions of normal incidence and with extremely hard X-ray photons.

  3. Reflective Practice and Its Implications for Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacy students require critical-thinking and problem-solving skills to integrate theory learned in the classroom with the complexities of practice, yet many pharmacy students fall short of acquiring these skills.1-2 Reflective practice activities encourage learning from the student’s own experiences and those of others, and offer a possible solution for the integration of knowledge-based curricula with the ambiguities of practice, as well as enhance communication and collaboration within a multidisciplinary team. Although reflective practices have been embraced elsewhere in health professions education, their strengths and shortcomings need to be considered when implementing such practices into pharmacy curricula. This review provides an overview of the evolution of theories related to reflective practice, critically examines the use of reflective tools (such as portfolios and blogs), and discusses the implications of implementing reflective practices in pharmacy education. PMID:24558286

  4. The near-infrared continuum emission of visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1984-01-01

    In the past, reflection nebulae have provided an astrophysical laboratory well suited for the study of the reflection properties of interstellar dust grains at visual and ultraviolet wavelengths. The present investigation is concerned with observations which were begun with the objective to extend to near-infrared wavelengths the study of grains in reflection. Observations of three classical visual reflection nebulae were conducted in the wavelength range from 1.25 to 2.2 microns, taking into account NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. All three nebulae were found to have similar near-infrared colors, despite widely different colors of their illuminating stars. The brightness level shown by two of the nebulae at 2.2 microns was too high to be easily accounted for on the basis of reflected light. Attention is given to a wide variety of possible emission mechanisms.

  5. Reflectance anisotropy for nadir observations of coniferous forest canopies

    SciTech Connect

    Syren, P. . Lab. of Remote Sensing)

    1994-07-01

    Nadir-viewed reflectances from forest canopies in four spectral bands, centered at 485 nm, 654 nm, 841 nm, and 1,676 nm were measured at different sun angles. Reflectances were measured made from a helicopter ca. 10 km NE of Stockholm, Sweden, over mature and young stands of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). The results show a significant increase in nadir reflectance with decreasing solar zenith angle. On the average, reflectance factors increased by 1--2% for each degree of decreasing solar zenith angle. Band ratios showed that there is a disproportional reflectance response in several of the spectral bands at varying zenith angles, differently expressed according to stand type and age. Within the solar zenith angle interval 30--70[degree], canopy reflectance was expressed as linear functions for each spectral band. These functions were used to calculate factors for reflectance standardization. Nomograms, containing reflectance correction factors for mature spruce stands, are presented. These can be directly applied in time-series analysis of multitemporal spectral data.

  6. Reflective masks for 1X deep ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Robert L.; Lee, Julienne Y.; Maluf, Nadim I.; Browning, Raymond; Jerabek, Paul; Pease, R. Fabian W.; Owen, Geraint

    1992-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the high resolution optical performance possible with simple 1X mostly-reflective optics: using 248 nm light from a mercury arc lamp, 0.25 micrometers features were delineated across a 2 mm radius semicircular field, and much large fields are possible with a scaled up version. The mask required for this system consists of a quartz substrate, a patterned thin film reflector, and a nonreflective backing which also serves to protect the reflector film. The mask is reflective at the quartz/reflector interface so the substrate is part of the projection optical path and so acts as the pellicle. We have investigated chromium, silicon, and aluminum for the reflector material; their reflection coefficients at 248 nm at the quartz-reflector interface are 30, 55, and 90 percent, respectively. Silicon has been chosen because it has a practical combination of reflectivity and ease of deposition and etching. Moreover films as thin as 30 nm provide the full (bulk-value) reflection and so precise etching is further facilitated. Among possible absorber materials, novolak photoresist is a practical choice having a quartz/film reflectivity of 1%. Features down to 0.25 micrometers are regularly patterned for these masks with a MEBES I using Shipley SAL-601 or PMMA electron beam resist.

  7. Plant canopy specular reflectance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Grant, L.

    1985-01-01

    A model is derived for the amount of light specularly reflected and polarized by a plant canopy. The model is based on the morphological and phenological characteristics of the canopy and upon the Fresnel equations of optics. The theory demonstrates that the specular reflectance of the plant canopy is a function of the angle of incidence and potentially contains information to help discriminate between species. The theory relates the specular reflectance to botanical condition of the canopy - to factors such as development stage, plant vigor, and leaf area index (LAI).

  8. Possible Risks of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... transfusions are done Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To ... Topic How blood transfusions are done Next Topic Alternatives to blood transfusions Possible risks of blood transfusions Although blood transfusions ...

  9. [Strategies for successful ageing].

    PubMed

    Orozco Ríos, Adriana Martha; López Velarde Peña, Tatiana; Martínez Gallardo Prieto, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the interest of anti-ageing medicine in the last few years, with a growth in the industry of products that promise to prolong life and restore all the suffering or "defects" produced by age. The understanding of ageing has changed over the years, giving rise to the possibility of intervening in different metabolic and cellular pathways, and thus, delaying the appearance of the degenerative chronic diseases that appear with age, and that are finally the causing factors of the vulnerability that leads to our death. It is hoped that we can help the clinician to orientate their patients, who, due to the overwhelming amount of information they receive by the Internet, arrive at the clinic full of questions, waiting to receive absolute answer from their physician in order to increase their longevity and quality of life. This article presents an analysis of the physical activity, diets, supplements and drugs that are being investigated as anti-ageing measures and of the many clinical studies that have produced encouraging, measurable and reproducible results. PMID:26656211

  10. Age Distribution of Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, U.; Daughney, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    Groundwater at the discharge point comprises a mixture of water from different flow lines with different travel time and therefore has no discrete age but an age distribution. The age distribution can be assessed by measuring how a pulse shaped tracer moves through the groundwater system. Detection of the time delay and the dispersion of the peak in the groundwater compared to the tracer input reveals the mean residence time and the mixing parameter. Tritium from nuclear weapons testing in the early 1960s resulted in a peak-shaped tritium input to the whole hydrologic system on earth. Tritium is the ideal tracer for groundwater because it is an isotope of hydrogen and therefore is part of the water molecule. Tritium time series data that encompass the passage of the bomb tritium pulse through the groundwater system in all common hydrogeologic situations in New Zealand demonstrate a semi-systematic pattern between age distribution parameters and hydrologic situation. The data in general indicate high fraction of mixing, but in some cases also indicate high piston flow. We will show that still, 45 years after the peak of the bomb tritium, it is possible to assess accurately the parameters of age distributions by measuring the tail of the bomb tritium.

  11. Age-Related Changes in Predictive Capacity Versus Internal Model Adaptability: Electrophysiological Evidence that Individual Differences Outweigh Effects of Age.

    PubMed

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Philipp, Markus; Alday, Phillip M; Kretzschmar, Franziska; Grewe, Tanja; Gumpert, Maike; Schumacher, Petra B; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical predictive coding has been identified as a possible unifying principle of brain function, and recent work in cognitive neuroscience has examined how it may be affected by age-related changes. Using language comprehension as a test case, the present study aimed to dissociate age-related changes in prediction generation versus internal model adaptation following a prediction error. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were measured in a group of older adults (60-81 years; n = 40) as they read sentences of the form "The opposite of black is white/yellow/nice." Replicating previous work in young adults, results showed a target-related P300 for the expected antonym ("white"; an effect assumed to reflect a prediction match), and a graded N400 effect for the two incongruous conditions (i.e. a larger N400 amplitude for the incongruous continuation not related to the expected antonym, "nice," versus the incongruous associated condition, "yellow"). These effects were followed by a late positivity, again with a larger amplitude in the incongruous non-associated versus incongruous associated condition. Analyses using linear mixed-effects models showed that the target-related P300 effect and the N400 effect for the incongruous non-associated condition were both modulated by age, thus suggesting that age-related changes affect both prediction generation and model adaptation. However, effects of age were outweighed by the interindividual variability of ERP responses, as reflected in the high proportion of variance captured by the inclusion of by-condition random slopes for participants and items. We thus argue that - at both a neurophysiological and a functional level - the notion of general differences between language processing in young and older adults may only be of limited use, and that future research should seek to better understand the causes of interindividual variability in the ERP responses of older adults and its relation to cognitive performance. PMID

  12. Body and Bulimia Revisited: Reflections on "A Secret Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillmann, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996, the author published "A Secret Life in a Culture of Thinness: Reflections on Body, Food, and Bulimia" (Tillmann-Healy, 1996), an account of her struggle with binging and purging from ages 15 to 25. She came to understand bulimia as a communicative act, expressing fear, anxiety, and grief. From 25 to 35, her recovery from bulimia involved…

  13. Capacity Differences Reflected in the Recall Performance of Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attig, Mary S.

    Recent theories in cognitive psychology have emphasized the role of capacity requirements in encoding tasks. To examine the notion that age-related differences in the recall performance reflect differences in cognitive capacity, 80 adults (40 undergraduates, and 40 senior citizens) recalled newspaper advertisements under free recall and cued…

  14. Reflections of a Lifelong Learner Teaching in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes and summarizes the author's experience of teaching in Italy for three months and the impact it had on him and his learning. The author, at the age of 61, lived in Italy for three months and here he reflects on what he learned and how it relates to adult learning theory concepts.

  15. A Reflective Conversation with Ugur Sak: Gifted Education in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Sak, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    In this reflective conversation, Ugur Sak discusses the current "state of the art" of gifted education in Turkey. He reviews the use of enrichment, discusses acceleration and reviews curricular procedures in Turkey. He responds to questions about the identification of gifted students and discusses the age old debate of talent versus…

  16. Motherhood, Choice and the British Media: A Time to Reflect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadfield, L.; Rudoe, N.; Sanderson-Mann, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we ask: How is motherhood being represented in the British media, especially in relation to choice, age and fertility? Do media discourses reflect a redefinition or transformation of "motherhood" in the twenty-first century, and what implications do they have for feminist research into maternal identity and motherhood? As three Ph.D.…

  17. Andreev reflection in graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainis, Diego; Taddei, Fabio; Dolcini, Fabrizio; Polini, Marco; Fazio, Rosario

    2009-03-01

    We study Andreev reflection in graphene nanoribbon/superconductor hybrid junctions. By using a tight-binding approach and the scattering formalism we show that finite-size effects lead to notable differences with respect to the bulk-graphene case. At subgap voltages, conservation of pseudoparity, a quantum number characterizing the ribbon states, yields either a suppression of Andreev reflection when the ribbon has an even number of sites in the transverse direction or perfect Andreev reflection when the ribbon has an odd number of sites. In the former case the suppression of Andreev reflection induces an insulating behavior even when the junction is biased; electron conduction can however be restored by applying a gate voltage. Finally, we check that these findings remain valid also in the case of nonideal nanoribbons in which the number of transverse sites varies along the transport direction.

  18. Reflection of cylindrical surface waves.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Reuven

    2009-10-12

    The reflection of the radially polarized surface wave on a metal wire at an abrupt end is derived. This theory allows for straightforward calculation of the reflection coefficient, including the phase and the amplitude, which will prove useful to the many applications in nanoplasmonics and terahertz spectroscopy. The theory shows excellent quantitative agreement with past comprehensive numerical simulations for small wires and for predicting the minima in reflection for larger wires. Using this theory, the wavelength dependent reflection is calculated for gold rods of diameter 10 nm, 26 nm and 85 nm, from which the Fabry-Perot resonance wavelengths are found. The Fabry-Perot resonances show good agreement with experimentally measured surface plasmon resonances in nanorods. This demonstrates the predictive ability of the theory for applications involving widely-used nanorods, optical antennas and plasmonic resonators. PMID:20372593

  19. Teacher Education and Teacher Reflectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough Jr., Robert V.

    1989-01-01

    The efforts of a small group of teacher educators to develop a program emphasizing reflectivity is described. Grounding program development in a conceptual framework is emphasized. Lessons learned about the program development process are shared. (IAH)

  20. Proverb interpretation changes in aging.

    PubMed

    Uekermann, Jennifer; Thoma, Patrizia; Daum, Irene

    2008-06-01

    Recent investigations have emphasized the involvement of fronto-subcortical networks to proverb comprehension. Although the prefrontal cortex is thought to be affected by normal aging, relatively little work has been carried out to investigate potential effects of aging on proverb comprehension. In the present investigation participants in three age groups were assessed on a proverb comprehension task and a range of executive function tasks. The older group showed impairment in selecting correct interpretations from alternatives. They also showed executive function deficits, as reflected by reduced working memory and deficient set shifting and inhibition abilities. The findings of the present investigation showed proverb comprehension deficits in normal aging which appeared to be related to reduced executive skills. PMID:18164527

  1. Reflections on wisdom and self.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Sophie

    2012-12-01

    The end of the year is often a time of reflection. For most of us, 2012 will have brought events that were planned, perhaps for years, as well as others that were full of serendipity or unexpected misfortune. We are invariably older than we were in January. We approach December with our own rituals: summer holidays, Hanukkah, Christmas or New Year's Eve. We may reflect on our joys and disappointments, or our actions and lessons learnt. PMID:23342382

  2. Estimators of bottom reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, L.; Holloway, J.

    1992-01-01

    Estimators of in situ bottom spectral reflectance are calculated from multi-station optical field data gathered with standard instrumentation from different sites. These spectra are then compared to reflectance spectra measured in the laboratory of the bottom sediments collected in the field for the stations at these different sites. The relative fit of the estimated spectral curves to those measured in the laboratory was measured. The most accurate absolute estimation was provided by the single scattering irradiance model.

  3. Experiments on Guderley Mach reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skews, Beric William; Li, Gavin; Paton, Randall

    2009-06-01

    Experiments have been conducted in a large shock tube to examine the four-wave shock reflection pattern, now known as Guderley reflection (GR). The fourth wave, an expansion, is clearly identified, as is the supersonic patch behind the reflected wave. A shocklet terminating the supersonic patch behind the reflected wave is identified, which forms a second triple point further down the Mach stem. Evidence is presented showing the presence of more than one expansion wave and more than one shocklet, thus indicating the existence of more than one supersonic patch. In order to distinguish between cases with a single patch without the shocklet as originally proposed by Guderley and found in some computations, and the indications of a multi-patch geometry found here, and also in other computations, this latter case is designated Guderley Mach reflection (GMR). Multi-exposure images of the shock propagation superimposed on a single image frame enable estimates to be made of the strength of the major waves, and it is shown that the reflected wave is very weak.

  4. Reflections on Focus Group Sessions Regarding Inclusive Education: Reconsidering Focus Group Research Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nel, Norma M.; Romm, Norma R. A.; Tlale, L. D. N.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we deliberate upon our way of facilitating focus group sessions with teachers concerning their views on inclusive education, by referring also to feedback that we received from the participants when they commented upon their experiences of the sessions. (The teacher participants were from three separate primary schools in South…

  5. A Time for Silence? Its Possibilities for Dialogue and for Reflective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Ana Cristina; Morgan, W. John

    2016-01-01

    From the beginning of history sounds have played a fundamentally important role in humanity's development as ways of expression and of communication. However in contemporary western society, and indeed globally, we are experiencing an excess of speech and a relentless encouragement to expression. Such excess indicates a misunderstanding about what…

  6. Reflections from an International Immersion Trip: New Possibilities to Institutionalize Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Encarna

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges confronted by higher education in the 21st century is to internationalize its programs and to make students more globally competent. This challenge is not new, but it has become increasingly complex. Gutek (1993) explains how the efforts to internationalize the university in the United States became particularly…

  7. Anomalous and negative reflection of Lamb waves in mode conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germano, M.; Alippi, A.; Bettucci, A.; Mancuso, G.

    2012-01-01

    Mode conversion is an important feature of wave propagation used in ultrasonic nondestructive testing with Lamb waves. When a wave packet with a given central frequency, and a correspondent central wavenumber, impinges on the free edge of a plate, the reflected wave generally is a weighed combination of all the possible modes compatible with the given frequency. Under particular conditions, only one wave packet is reflected with a distinct central wavenumber compared to the incident one. In such a case, according to Snell's law, the reflection angle is different from the incident one (anomalous reflection). In this article, experimental results are presented on anomalous reflection on a free edge of a thin plate of a Lamb wave packet; moreover, experimental results are reported on a Lamb wave packet that is reflected at an angle lying on the same side, with respect to the normal direction, of the impinging wave (negative reflection). Negative reflection of Lamb waves has been obtained through mode conversion taking place at the free edge of a thin plate of constant thickness: More precisely, a symmetric S1 Lamb mode has been converted into the same mode but with phase velocity antiparallel to group velocity, so obtaining the so-called backward-propagating Lamb wave packet.

  8. The Possible Selves of Young Fathers in Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Rosie

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on the social psychological concept of possible selves, this study explores the future self concept of young fathers in prison. In considering life after release from prison, qualitative data relating to hoped-for, feared and expected possible selves was generated by 34 young fathers aged between 18 and 21 years. The most common categories…

  9. Alpha-Synuclein Levels in Blood Plasma Decline with Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Niklas K. U.; Stransky, Elke; Meyer, Mirjam; Gaertner, Susanne; Shing, Mona; Schnaidt, Martina; Celej, Maria S.; Jovin, Thomas M.; Leyhe, Thomas; Laske, Christoph; Batra, Anil; Buchkremer, Gerhard; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Wernet, Dorothee; Richartz-Salzburger, Elke

    2015-01-01

    There is unequivocal evidence that alpha-synuclein plays a pivotal pathophysiological role in neurodegenerative diseases, and in particular in synucleinopathies. These disorders present with a variable extent of cognitive impairment and alpha-synuclein is being explored as a biomarker in CSF, blood serum and plasma. Considering key events of aging that include proteostasis, alpha-synuclein may not only be useful as a marker for differential diagnosis but also for aging per se. To explore this hypothesis, we developed a highly specific ELISA to measure alpha-synuclein. In healthy males plasma alpha-synuclein levels correlated strongly with age, revealing much lower concentrations in older (avg. 58.1 years) compared to younger (avg. 27.6 years) individuals. This difference between the age groups was enhanced after acidification of the plasmas (p<0.0001), possibly reflecting a decrease of alpha-synuclein-antibody complexes or chaperone activity in older individuals. Our results support the concept that alpha-synuclein homeostasis may be impaired early on, possibly due to disturbance of the proteostasis network, a key component of healthy aging. Thus, alpha-synuclein may be a novel biomarker of aging, a factor that should be considered when analyzing its presence in biological specimens. PMID:25844871

  10. Seismic Reflection Imaging of Subduction Bending-Related Faults at Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Carbotte, S. M.; Carton, H. D.; Gibson, J. C.; Canales, J. P.; Nedimovic, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The hydration state of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes at Cascadia, yet is poorly known. As oceanic plates subduct, faults develop at the outer rise due to flexural bending and have been shown to facilitate plate hydration near the trench. We present pre-stack time migrated (PSTM) images of two cross-plate transects offshore Oregon and Washington to characterize faulting within the Juan de Fuca Plate. Basement faulting evident from vertical offsets in the sediment section is observed as far as 200 km seaward of the deformation front, and may result from complex intraplate stresses within the JdF plate. Along the Oregon margin, bright fault plane reflections within the crust are observed beginning ~40 km seaward of the deformation front. They are sparsely spaced, form in conjugate pairs, and cut completely through the crust. We suggest they are related to plate bending. Within the same region, a set of mantle reflections, possibly originating from the continuations at depth of some of the crustal faults, extend as deep as ~6 km beneath the Moho. The waveforms of the fault plane reflections vary with depth, implying variation of the internal structure and/or pore fluid pressure within the fault zones. Along the Washington margin, densely spaced faults that may be bending-related are confined to the upper and middle crust and most of them are seaward dipping. Mantle reflections are not observed on this transect. In the lower crust, a set of dipping events is imaged, they are spaced at 1-2 km, dip ~ 30° towards the ridge and shoal into the Moho reflection. The crust in which these reflections are observed is 6-8 Ma old. Lower crustal reflections with similar characteristics are also observed in crust of same age on our Oregon transect, suggesting they are related to accretionary processes at the JdF Ridge during this time period. We conclude that different faulting patterns at Oregon and Washington margin result

  11. Seasonal Variations of Stratospheric Age Spectra in GEOSCCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Waugh, Darryn; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.; Strahan, Susan E.; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2011-01-01

    There are many pathways for an air parcel to travel from the troposphere to the stratosphere, each of which takes different time. The distribution of all the possible transient times, i.e. the stratospheric age spectrum, contains important information on transport characteristics. However, it is computationally very expensive to compute seasonally varying age spectra, and previous studies have focused mainly on the annual mean properties of the age spectra. To date our knowledge of the seasonality of the stratospheric age spectra is very limited. In this study we investigate the seasonal variations of the stratospheric age spectra in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We introduce a method to significantly reduce the computational cost for calculating seasonally dependent age spectra. Our simulations show that stratospheric age spectra in GEOSCCM have strong seasonal cycles and the seasonal cycles change with latitude and height. In the lower stratosphere extratropics, the average transit times and the most probable transit times in the winter/early spring spectra are more than twice as old as those in the summer/early fall spectra. But the seasonal cycle in the subtropical lower stratosphere is nearly out of phase with that in the extratropics. In the middle and upper stratosphere, significant seasonal variations occur in the sUbtropics. The spectral shapes also show dramatic seasonal change, especially at high latitudes. These seasonal variations reflect the seasonal evolution of the slow Brewer-Dobson circulation (with timescale of years) and the fast isentropic mixing (with timescale of days to months).

  12. DNA damage and ageing: new-age ideas for an age-old problem

    PubMed Central

    Garinis, George A.; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Vijg, Jan; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of genome maintenance may causally contribute to ageing, as exemplified by the premature appearance of multiple symptoms of ageing in a growing family of human syndromes and in mice with genetic defects in genome maintenance pathways. Recent evidence revealed a similarity between such prematurely ageing mutants and long-lived mice harbouring mutations in growth signalling pathways. At first sight this seems paradoxical as they represent both extremes of ageing yet show a similar ‘survival’ response that is capable of delaying age-related pathology and extending lifespan. Understanding the mechanistic basis of this response and its connection with genome maintenance would open exciting possibilities for counteracting cancer or age-related diseases, and for promoting longevity. PMID:18978832

  13. Imaging optical diffuse reflectance in beef muscles for tenderness prediction.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghesagara, J; Nath, T M; Wells, S J; Weaver, A D; Gerrard, D E; Yao, G

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel optical reflectance imaging method to predict beef tenderness. Two-dimensional (2D) optical reflectance in beef muscles induced by a point incident light was acquired. A set of five parameters were extracted from each reflectance image to describe quantitatively the reflectance profiles. Two parameters, q and B, were derived by numerically fitting the equi-intensity contours of the reflectance pattern. Two spatial gradients were calculated along the directions parallel and perpendicular to muscle fibers and total scattering intensity was obtained by excluding the specular reflectance. This method was applied to analyze 2D images of optical diffuse reflectance in 336 beef samples obtained from 14 steers in which large variations in tenderness were generated by altering animal genetics, suspension method and aging time as well as utilizing muscles varying in their inherent tenderness. Tenderness was evaluated using Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF). The effects of animal breed, muscle, types of suspension, and aging were investigated and results indicate that the scattering intensity measured at 1-d was correlated (R(2)=0.50 at lambda=720 nm) with 10-d WBSF in M. longissimus dorsi muscles; and the q parameters measured at 1-d was correlated (R(2)=0.46 at lambda=720 nm) with 10-d WBSF in M. psoas major muscles. These results show analyzing 2D reflectance images of meat surfaces provides valuable information regarding the physical characteristics of meat that are responsible for beef tenderness. PMID:20374804

  14. Age Relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    12 June 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a group of impact craters in Aonia Planum, Mars. Remarkably, two of the craters are approximately equal in size, however, they clearly differ in age. The left (west) crater has a well-defined rim and its ejecta blanket overlies part of the less pronounced crater to its immediate east. The one with the ejecta blanket is younger. Other circular depressions in this bouldery scene are also old, eroded impact craters.

    Location near: 59.5oS, 78.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  15. Aging blepharoplasty.

    PubMed

    Cho, Inchang

    2013-09-01

    In performing upper blepharoplasty in the elderly, looking younger and keeping the eyelids harmonious with the rest of the face have to be achieved at the same time. The most important goal in upper blepharoplasty for aging is correcting the drooping upper eyelid skin, and in this process, the surgeon may or may not create a double eyelid fold. The pros and cons have to be fully discussed with the patient, but the author personally prefers creating a double fold unless the patient refuses, because it is efficient in correcting and preventing further drooping of the skin. In most patients, the brow is elevated to compensate for the drooping eyelid, and when the drooping is corrected, brow ptosis may ensue. The surgeon has to prepare for these consequences before performing the procedure, and estimate the exact amount of skin to be excised. In the elderly, the skin and the orbicularis oculi muscle is thin, with a decreased amount of subcutaneous fat and retro-orbicularis oculi fat, and in most cases, excision of the skin alone is enough to correct the deformity. Removing large portions of soft tissue may also prolong the recovery period. Unlike younger patients, the lower skin flap should not be stretched too much in the elderly, as it may create an aggressive looking appearance. A few wrinkles in the lower flap should remain untouched to create a natural look. In this article, the author's own methods of performing an aging blepharoplasty are described specifically, with a step-by-step guide and surgical tips. PMID:24086798

  16. Developmental improvement and age-related decline in unfamiliar face matching.

    PubMed

    Megreya, Ahmed M; Bindemann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Age-related changes have been documented widely in studies of face recognition and eyewitness identification. However, it is not clear whether these changes arise from general developmental differences in memory or occur specifically during the perceptual processing of faces. We report two experiments to track such perceptual changes using a 1-in- 10 (experiment 1) and 1-in-1 (experiment 2) matching task for unfamiliar faces. Both experiments showed improvements in face matching during childhood and adult-like accuracy levels by adolescence. In addition, face-matching performance declined in adults of the age of 65 years. These findings indicate that developmental improvements and aging-related differences in face processing arise from changes in the perceptual encoding of faces. A clear face inversion effect was also present in all age groups. This indicates that those age-related changes in face matching reflect a quantitative effect, whereby typical face processes are engaged but do not operate at the best-possible level. These data suggest that part of the problem of eyewitness identification in children and elderly persons might reflect impairments in the perceptual processing of unfamiliar faces. PMID:26489213

  17. Redesigning Vocational Education: The Possibilities of Design-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeman, Yvonne; Wardekker, Willem

    2011-01-01

    This article describes and reflects our experiences as researchers in a design-based research project on a curriculum innovation focused on meaningful, co-operative learning in vocational education in the Netherlands. The project was successful in gaining insights in possible practices for workplace learning but did only partly realize the…

  18. Politics, Practices, and Possibilities of Open Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, Liam

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I reflect on the politics, practices and possibilities of the open educational resources (OER). OER raise important implications for current and potential students, for postsecondary education institutions, and for those currently teaching in higher education. The key questions raised by OER centre on the role of teaching in…

  19. Plutonium age dating reloaded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Monika; Richter, Stephan; Aregbe, Yetunde; Wellum, Roger; Mayer, Klaus; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Although the age determination of plutonium is and has been a pillar of nuclear forensic investigations for many years, additional research in the field of plutonium age dating is still needed and leads to new insights as the present work shows: Plutonium is commonly dated with the help of the 241Pu/241Am chronometer using gamma spectrometry; in fewer cases the 240Pu/236U chronometer has been used. The age dating results of the 239Pu/235U chronometer and the 238Pu/234U chronometer are scarcely applied in addition to the 240Pu/236U chronometer, although their results can be obtained simultaneously from the same mass spectrometric experiments as the age dating result of latter. The reliability of the result can be tested when the results of different chronometers are compared. The 242Pu/238U chronometer is normally not evaluated at all due to its sensitivity to contamination with natural uranium. This apparent 'weakness' that renders the age dating results of the 242Pu/238U chronometer almost useless for nuclear forensic investigations, however turns out to be an advantage looked at from another perspective: the 242Pu/238U chronometer can be utilized as an indicator for uranium contamination of plutonium samples and even help to identify the nature of this contamination. To illustrate this the age dating results of all four Pu/U clocks mentioned above are discussed for one plutonium sample (NBS 946) that shows no signs of uranium contamination and for three additional plutonium samples. In case the 242Pu/238U chronometer results in an older 'age' than the other Pu/U chronometers, contamination with either a small amount of enriched or with natural or depleted uranium is for example possible. If the age dating result of the 239Pu/235U chronometer is also influenced the nature of the contamination can be identified; enriched uranium is in this latter case a likely cause for the missmatch of the age dating results of the Pu/U chronometers.

  20. Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartell, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    From 1998-2000, Carol Bartell served as President of the California Council on the Education of Teachers. However, election to office in this organization is generally a six-year commitment, because an individual will serve for two years as President Elect, two years as President, and two more as Past President. In this article, she expresses that…

  1. Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li Preti, Franca

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the promise and problems of conflict resolution programs operating in the schools. Argues that, with open channels of communication, ongoing evaluation, and student control, such programs can bring long-term benefits to schools and communities. (SR)

  2. Timing of Early Cretaceous angiosperm diversification and possible links to major paleoenvironmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimhofer, U.; Hochuli, P. A.; Burla, S.; Dinis, J. M. L.; Weissert, H.

    2005-02-01

    Palynological records from the Western Portuguese and Algarve basins (Portugal) provide new insights on the timing and pattern of the early diversification of angiosperms (flowering plants) and its relationship to global environmental perturbations during the late Early Cretaceous. Angiosperm pollen displays a stepwise increase in both diversity and relative abundance during the late Barremian to middle Albian interval (ca. 124 104 Ma), reflecting the incipient radiation of flowering plants in lower midlatitude floras. Our results provide new evidence for the age interpretation of the previously described angiosperm mesofossil floras and associated in situ pollen assemblages from the Western Portuguese basin, until now interpreted as Barremian or possibly Aptian in age. Biostratigraphic and sedimentologic evidence indicates a post-Aptian age for these assemblages, hence demonstrating a major radiation phase of angiosperms during the early Albian. Correlation of the angiosperm pollen record with data on global paleoenvironmental changes suggests a link between the rapid adaptive radiation of flowering plants and major climatic and oceanographic perturbations during the late Early Cretaceous.

  3. Radiocarbon age differences between coexisting foraminiferal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace; Matsumoto, Katsumi; Clark, Elizabeth; Hajdas, Irka; Bonani, Georges

    1999-08-01

    Radiocarbon-age measurements on single species of foraminifera from a core on the Ceara Rise demonstrate the importance of the joint effect of bioturbation and variable rain abundance of foraminifera. The relatively high mixed layer ages for Pulleniatina obliquiloculata reflect, at least in part, an early Holocene peak in its abundance while the relatively young ages for Globorotalia menardii reflect the delay until mid Holocene of its reappearance in the Atlantic Ocean. These results clearly demonstrate that core-top sediment samples need not be representative foraminifera falling from today's surface ocean. Rather, at least on the Ceara Rise, such samples consist of a composite of changing species groupings. These results also reconfirm the pitfalls associated with attempts to reconstruct the radiocarbon age of deep ocean water on the basis of benthic-planktonic foraminiferal age differences.

  4. Virtual reflected-light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A P; Wong, C M; Joseph, D

    2011-12-01

    Research on better methods to digitally represent microscopic specimens has increased over recent decades. Opaque specimens, such as microfossils and metallurgic specimens, are often viewed using reflected light microscopy. Existing 3D surface estimation techniques for reflected light microscopy do not model reflectance, restricting the representation to only one illumination condition and making them an imperfect recreation of the experience of using an actual microscope. This paper introduces a virtual reflected-light microscopy (VRLM) system that estimates both shape and reflectance from a set of specimen images. When coupled with anaglyph creation, the system can depict both depth information and illumination cues under any desired lighting configuration. Digital representations are compact and easily viewed in an online setting. A prototype used to construct VRLM representations is comprised only of a microscope, a digital camera, a motorized stage and software. Such a system automatically acquires VRLM representations of large batches of specimens. VRLM representations are then disseminated in an interactive online environment, which allows users to change the virtual light source direction and type. Experiments demonstrate high quality VRLM representations of 500 microfossils. PMID:21919903

  5. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  6. Low reflectance radio frequency load

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M

    2014-04-01

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  7. Illuminating dissertation supervision through reflection.

    PubMed

    Snowball, J; Ross, K; Murphy, K

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes a small research study designed to explore the role of the dissertation supervisor and to examine the potential of using reflection as a tool for learning and for enhancing professional educational practice. The authors met to discuss and reflect upon the processes of supervision and the role of the supervisor throughout the period of supervising three dissertation students. Each author maintained individual reflective written accounts of supervisory meetings with students. These accounts and the transcribed tape-recordings of the group meetings provided two sets of data which were analysed using qualitative techniques. From the data analysis the authors were able to identify various phases in dissertation supervision--partnership; setting the learning contract; signposting; ownership of the dissertation; letting go; the rush at the end; maintaining the balance--and also contextual issues of humanness; time; and energy, which were needed to sustain the supervisory processes. The role of the dissertation supervisor was illuminated and the potential of using reflection as a tool for developing professional educational practice was realized. The importance of constructive support while engaged in processes of reflection cannot be underestimated. PMID:7930105

  8. Is extinction age dependent?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doran, N.A.; Arnold, A.J.; Parker, W.C.; Huffer, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    Age-dependent extinction is an observation with important biological implications. Van Valen's Red Queen hypothesis triggered three decades of research testing its primary implication: that age is independent of extinction. In contrast to this, later studies with species-level data have indicated the possible presence of age dependence. Since the formulation of the Red Queen hypothesis, more powerful tests of survivorship models have been developed. This is the first report of the application of the Cox Proportional Hazards model to paleontological data. Planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies allow the taxonomic and precise stratigraphic resolution necessary for the Cox model. As a whole, planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies clearly show age-dependent extinction. In particular, the effect is attributable to the presence of shorter-ranged species (range < 4 myr) following extinction events. These shorter-ranged species also possess tests with unique morphological architecture. The morphological differences are probably epiphenomena of underlying developmental and heterochronic processes of shorter-ranged species that survived various extinction events. Extinction survivors carry developmental and morphological characteristics into postextinction recovery times, and this sets them apart from species populations established independently of extinction events. Copyright ?? 2006, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  9. Oocyte ageing and epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zhao-Jia; Schatten, Heide; Zhang, Cui-Lian; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    It has become a current social trend for women to delay childbearing. However, the quality of oocytes from older females is compromised and the pregnancy rate of older women is lower. With the increased rate of delayed childbearing, it is becoming more and more crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying the compromised quality of oocytes from older women, including mitochondrial dysfunctions, aneuploidy and epigenetic changes. Establishing proper epigenetic modifications during oogenesis and early embryo development is an important aspect in reproduction. The reprogramming process may be influenced by external and internal factors that result in improper epigenetic changes in germ cells. Furthermore, germ cell epigenetic changes might be inherited by the next generations. In this review, we briefly summarise the effects of ageing on oocyte quality. We focus on discussing the relationship between ageing and epigenetic modifications, highlighting the epigenetic changes in oocytes from advanced-age females and in post-ovulatory aged oocytes as well as the possible underlying mechanisms. PMID:25391845

  10. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and aging.

    PubMed

    Barrou, Z; Charru, P; Lidy, C

    1997-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) is the most abundant circulating steroid hormone in humans and can readily be converted to its parent steroid DHEA by tissue sulfatases. Yet, a biologic function for these steroids has not been defined. The link between DHEA and aging has been raised by: (1) its well documented age-related decline, and (2) a preventive effect of DHEA on numerous age-related illnesses: ischemic heart-disease, cognitive impairment, immunodeficiency, malignancies, osteoporosis. These effects have been suggested by epidemiological studies in humans. Animal studies support a protective effect of DHEA on these age-related diseases. However, it remains unknown whether these results in animals can be transposed in humans, because adrenal secretion of DHEA seems to be particular to primates. In humans, only a few studies have been performed. The effects of oral supplementation with DHEA have, so far, focused on the possible metabolic effects of DHEA. A few studies have shown: the absence of any side-effects; no change in body-weight; conflicting results on body-composition and lipids and no effect on insulin-tolerance. The latest study showed a beneficial effect on well-being but these results need to be confirmed. PMID:15374110

  11. Value of Reflected Light Microscopy in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasteris, Jill Dill

    1983-01-01

    Briefly reviews some optical and other physical properties of minerals that can be determined in reflected/incident light. Topics include optical properties of minerals, reflectance, internal reflections, color, bireflectance and reflection pleochroism, anisotropism, zonation, and reflected light microscopy as a teaching tool in undergraduate…

  12. Facilitating Reflective Thought in Novice Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pultorak, Edward G.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the facilitation of reflection among novice teachers using three types of journal writing and reflective interviews to encourage novice teachers to reflect upon their teaching. The procedures solicited different types of reflection in the student teachers, suggesting that facilitation of teacher reflectivity is vital in teacher…

  13. Aspirations for Older Age in the 21st Century: What is Successful Aging?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling, Ann

    2007-01-01

    The literature on successful aging reveals a wide range of definitions, generally reflecting the academic discipline of the investigator. Biomedical models primarily emphasise physical and mental functioning as successful aging; socio-psychological models emphasise social functioning, life satisfaction and psychological resources as successful…

  14. Sustained Attention at Age 5 Predicts Attention-Related Problems at Age 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Anne; Razza, Rachel A.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study tested whether two aspects of sustained attention (focused attention and lack of impulsivity) measured at child age 5 predicted attention problems reported by mothers and teachers at age 9. Because lack of impulsivity reflects the executive control network, and ADHD is commonly characterized as a deficit in executive function, it was…

  15. Spectral reflectance of rice seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Alois J.; Herden, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of young rice plants was measured in the visible and near-IR region of the spectrum using a commercially available fiber optic contact probe and miniature spectrometer. This work aims to identify an empirical spectral index which changes when rice is exposed to increased levels of chloride anions in the irrigation water and soil. The ratio of near IR reflectance to that of green, R750/555 is known to be a quantitative measure of chlorophyll content in the leaf but int his study does not show a consistent shift for sample which are exposed to chloride levels equal to or less than 0.1 percent by mass of soil. However, leaf contact spectral reflectance measurements did reveal a significant and consistent increase in R750/555 along the length of the leaves, and this variation should represent an important factor in modeling remote and proximal sensing data.

  16. Wave reflections from duct terminations.

    PubMed

    Selamet, A; Ji, Z L; Kach, R A

    2001-04-01

    The reflection coefficients and inertial end corrections of several duct terminations, including finite length duct extensions perpendicular to an infinite wall, as well as at a number of angles, curved interface surfaces, and annular cavities, are determined and analyzed in the absence of flow by employing the boundary element method. Predictions for the classical unflanged and flanged circular ducts show good agreement with analytical and computational results available in the literature. The predictions for curved interface surfaces (bellmouth or horn) are also consistent with the available experimental data. In view of its high reflection coefficient, the duct termination with an annular cavity may be suggested for the suppression of noise radiation in a specific frequency band or for an effective wave reflection from the termination. PMID:11325101

  17. Reflective coherent spatial light modulator

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Richards, Roger K.; Hutchinson, Donald P.; Simpson, Marcus L.

    2003-04-22

    A reflective coherent spatial light modulator (RCSLM) includes a subwavelength resonant grating structure (SWS), the SWS including at least one subwavelength resonant grating layer (SWL) have a plurality of areas defining a plurality of pixels. Each pixel represents an area capable of individual control of its reflective response. A structure for modulating the resonant reflective response of at least one pixel is provided. The structure for modulating can include at least one electro-optic layer in optical contact with the SWS. The RCSLM is scalable in both pixel size and wavelength. A method for forming a RCSLM includes the steps of selecting a waveguide material and forming a SWS in the waveguide material, the SWS formed from at least one SWL, the SWL having a plurality of areas defining a plurality of pixels.

  18. Cartilage analysis by reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, T.; Muenzer, M.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    A cartilage bioreactor with analytical functions for cartilage quality monitoring is being developed. For determining cartilage composition, reflection spectroscopy in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral region is evaluated. Main goal is the determination of the most abundant cartilage compounds water, collagen I and collagen II. Therefore VIS and NIR reflection spectra of different cartilage samples of cow, pig and lamb are recorded. Due to missing analytical instrumentation for identifying the cartilage composition of these samples, typical literature concentration values are used for the development of chemometric models. In spite of these limitations the chemometric models provide good cross correlation results for the prediction of collagen I and II and water concentration based on the visible and the NIR reflection spectra.

  19. Lambert's multiple reflection model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Rothe, Hendrik

    2011-10-01

    In last years paper on the idea of Lambertian reflection we gave a partial translation of an almost lost chapter by Lambert on multiple reflection as a gimmick. The problem of multiple reflections is of special interest in scatterometric devices. The present paper is dedicated to a deeper discussion of the model proposed by J.H. Lambert or, better to say, a derivation using the matrix method of paraxial optics. Further some examples and special cases - especially the consequences for scatterometer design - are discussed. For easy handling it would be desirable to derive some simplified formulas describing the effective higher order refraction qualities of thick lenses, which might support the choice of lenses for certain applications.

  20. The low-AGE content of low-fat vegan diets could benefit diabetics - though concurrent taurine supplementation may be needed to minimize endogenous AGE production.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2005-01-01

    Increased endogenous generation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) contributes importantly to the vascular complications of diabetes, in part owing to activation of the pro-inflammatory RAGE receptor. However, AGE-altered oligopeptides with RAGE-activating potential can also be absorbed from the diet, and indeed make a significant contribution to the plasma and tissue pool of AGEs; this contribution is especially prominent when compromised renal function impairs renal clearance of AGEs. Perhaps surprisingly, foods rich in both protein and fat, and cooked at high heat, tend to be the richest dietary sources of AGEs, whereas low-fat carbohydrate-rich foods tend to be relatively low in AGEs. Conceivably, this reflects the fact that the so-called "AGEs" in the diet are generated primarily, not by glycation reactions, but by interactions between oxidized lipids and protein; such reactions are known to give rise to certain prominent AGEs, such as epsilonN-carboxymethyl-lysine and methylglyoxal. Although roasted nuts and fried or broiled tofu are relatively high in AGEs, low-fat plant-derived foods, including boiled or baked beans, typically are low in AGEs. Thus, a low-AGE content may contribute to the many benefits conferred to diabetics by a genuinely low-fat vegan diet. Nonetheless, the plasma AGE content of healthy vegetarians has been reported to be higher than that of omnivores - suggesting that something about vegetarian diets may promote endogenous AGE production. Some researchers have proposed that the relatively high-fructose content of vegetarian diets may explain this phenomenon, but there so far is no clinical evidence that normal intakes of fructose have an important impact on AGE production. An alternative or additional possibility is that the relatively poor taurine status of vegetarians up-regulates the physiological role of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants in the generation of AGEs - in which case, taurine supplementation might be expected to

  1. Reflecting on Reflection as a Critical Component in Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomquist, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Despite the popularity of service learning, it is sometimes criticized for its lack of academic rigor. This piece provides a counterpoint to that argument by describing a LIS service-learning course from the student's perspective. I focus particularly on the role of reflection, a key component in service-learning courses that helps to…

  2. Microseismic reflection imaging of the Central Andean crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzbach, C.; Kummerow, J.; Wigger, P.; Reshetnikov, A.; Salazar, P.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The coda of passive seismic recordings is often rich in arrivals that are coherent across several stations. If reflections can be extracted, then they may be used for seismic reflection subsurface imaging. With the objective to image the upper crust of the North Chilean Precordillera (Central Andes; approximate location 21°S 69°W), we developed a workflow to process passive seismic data into subsurface reflection images. We analysed the waveform recordings of several hundred microseismic events using signal processing and imaging techniques adapted from active (controlled source) seismic imaging as used in the oil industry. Key processing steps involved precise arrival time picking and hypocentre determination, removing signal amplitude variations due to varying source radiation patterns, identification and separation of reflections from coherent noise, and transformation of the processed waveforms into images of the subsurface reflectivity. When designing our microseismic reflection imaging workflow, we took advantage of the fact that the passive seismic recording geometry with the hypocentres located at depth and the receivers positioned at the surface resembles a reverse vertical-seismic profiling experiment. The resultant P- and S-wave reflection images reveal several reflective features, such as an approximate 15° westward dipping reflector over the 5-25 km depth range that largely coincides with a distinct seismicity boundary. We interpret the imaged interface as the brittle-ductile transition zone boundary, possibly enhanced by a tectonic shear zone. For the area of the North Chilean Precordillera, the deduced microseismic reflection sections with horizontal extensions of about 50 km represent the first high-resolution images of the shallow crust, which could not be obtained from previous active-source seismic-reflection data.

  3. The Possibilities of Today's School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebedev, O.

    2010-01-01

    The possibilities of the school are not unlimited. For this reason, in order to answer the question of what the existing resources ought to be used for there is always the problem of the choice of goals of the school's educational activity. Different schools have different possibilities when it comes to achieving the desired results of educational…

  4. System of reflective telescope baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavroudis, Orestes N.; Foo, Leslie D.

    1994-03-01

    The use of absorbing baffles for blocking scattered light in space-borne telescopes raises a major problem. The absorbed stray light becomes heat, which in the space environment cannot be dissipated by air convection. This is particularly important for those telescopes operating in the IR, because the warm baffles will reradiate at those wavelengths. The conventional solution to this problem is the use of cryogenic cooling. We present here an alternative system of reflective baffles that reflect back out of the entrance aperture a preponderance of the stray light. Some criteria are also presented that will aid in the location and the distribution of the individual vanes.

  5. Mars: Seasonally variable radar reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, L. E.; Downs, G. S.; Saunders, R. S.; Schubert, G.

    1985-01-01

    The 1971/1973 Mars data set acquired by the Goldstone Solar System Radar was analyzed. It was established that the seasonal variations in radar reflectivity thought to occur in only one locality on the planet (the Solis Lacus radar anomaly) occur, in fact, over the entire subequatorial belt observed by the Goldstone radar. Since liquid water appears to be the most likely cause of the reflectivity excursions, a permanent, year-round presence of subsurface water (frozen or thawed) in the Martian tropics can be inferred.

  6. Diffusely Reflecting Paints Containing TFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shai, M. C.; Schutt, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Highly reflective, diffused coatings developed by incorporating polytetrafluoroethylene (TFE) pigment with alcohol-soluble binders. Alcohol and binder mixed together in blender before adding TFE. TFE preferably outgassed in mechanical-pump vacuum for typical interval of 4 hours before adding to liquid. Like wetting agent, vacuum treatment helps to prevent clumping of TFE and eases dispersion throughout mixture. Mixture blended for 3 to 5 minutes before used. Coatings useful on reflectance-standard surfaces for calibrating radiometric instruments in both laboratory and field. Paints washable and usable as optical reference surfaces.

  7. Reflective practice: decoding ethical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Durgahee, T

    1997-05-01

    This article analyses reflective practice by exploring ethical knowledge-in-use and the influence of context on professional nursing practice. Is ethical knowledge used in an appropriate context? The author identifies and discusses the theoretical underpinnings of reflective practice and offers an alternative paradigm to the generation and use of ethical knowledge in practice. The message to teachers and practitioners is decoded to facilitate teaching and learning. This article is an extension of the work done by the author and described by him in Nursing Ethics. PMID:9233231

  8. Occurrence and Magnitude of High Reflectance Materials on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuno, R. G.; Boyd, A. K.; Robinson, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    We utilize a Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) 643 nm photometrically normalized (30°, 0°, 30°; i, e, g) reflectance map to investigate the occurrence and origin of high reflectance materials on the Moon. Compositional differences (mainly iron and titanium content) and maturity state (e.g. Copernican crater rays and swirls) are the predominant factors affecting reflectance variations observed on the Moon. Therefore, comparing reflectance values of different regions yields insight into the composition and relative exposure age of lunar materials. But an accurate comparison requires precise reflectance values normalized across every region being investigated. The WAC [1] obtains monthly near-global ground coverage, each month's observations acquired with different lighting conditions. Boyd et al. [2] utilized a geologically homogeneous subset [0°N to 90°N, 146°E to 148°E] of the WAC observations to determine an equation that describes how viewing and lighting angles affect reflectance values. A normalized global reflectance map was generated by applying the local empirical solution globally, with photometric angles derived from the WAC Global Lunar Digital Terrain Model (DTM)(GLD100) [3]. The GLD100 enables accurate correction of reflectance differences caused by local topographic undulations at the scale of 300 meters. We compare reflectance values across the Moon within 80°S to 80°N latitude. The features with the highest reflectance are steep crater walls within Copernican aged craters, such as the walls of Giordano Bruno, which have normalized reflectance values up to 0.35. Near-impact ejecta of some craters have high reflectance values, such as Virtanen (0.22). There are also broad relatively flat features with high reflectance, such as the 900-km Thales-Compton region (0.24) and the 600-km extent of Anaxagoras (Copernican age) ejecta (0.20). Since the interior of Anaxagoras contains occurrences of pure anorthosite [4], the high

  9. [Biological Age as a Method for Systematic Assessment of Ontogenetic Changes in the State of an Organism].

    PubMed

    Dontsov, V I; Krut'ko, V N

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a common feature of living and nonliving systems as a disturbance of the structure of the system accumulating with age. The only cause of aging of a living system, which is capable of renewal, is the insufficiency of renewal. The latter manifests itself as two global mechanisms of aging: the genetically determined nonrenewal of a number of structures that can only die with age (stochastic aging) and the regulatory reduction in the rate of self-renewal of living structures. The regulatory reduction in cellular self-renewal (cell growth and division) is most important. At the same chronological age, the degree of aging of the organism in general, as well as individual organs, cells, and systems of the organism, may be different, reflecting the concept of biological age (BA)--an indicator of the level of development, changes, or deterioration of a structure or function of an element of the organism, a functional system, or the organism as a whole. It is expressed in units oftime by relating the values of biomarkers defining the processes of aging with the standard average statistical dependences of changes in these biomarkers with the chronological age. The concept of BA is directly related to the concept of viability of the organism, which is determined by the sum (integral) of viabilities of its parts (in practice, the residual functional resource). For quantitative characterization of aging in general, the index of integrated biological age is used. To give a detailed characterization, the partial biological ages are used, which reflect the aging of different systems of the organism, as well as a number of indices reflecting its functional and psychological possibilities. The contribution of pathological processes to BA is also taken into account. In addition, the amount of retained adaptive reserves in the physical and nervous and mental aspects, the risk factors, and the factors of longevity should be determined. For this purpose, it is necessary to take

  10. Age-related changes in the thymus gland: CT-pathologic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A.V.; Korobkin, M.; Olanow, W.; Heaston, D.K.; Ram, P.C.; Dunnick, N.R.; Silverman, P.M.

    1983-08-01

    Recent reports suggest that computed tomography (CT) is useful for thymoma detection in patients with myasthenia gravis. However, that usefulness may be conditioned by the state of the normal thymus. To examine this concept, the CT findings in 64 consecutive patients with histologic confirmation of thymic status after thymectomy or thymic biopsy during mediastinal exploration were reviewed. The normal thymus has a bilobed, arrowhead-shaped cross section at all ages, with gradual focal or diffuse fatty infiltration of the parenchyma usually occurring between 20 and 40 years of age. A thymoma is usually a spherical or oval mass, often producing a focal, distinct bulge in the adjacent pleural reflection. The differentiation of thymoma from normal thymus should be possible in most patients if age-related changes in the normal gland are appreciated.

  11. Reflection at Large Distance from the Central Engine in Seyferts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzac, J.; Petrucci, O.

    We consider the possibility that most of the reflection component, observed in the hard X-ray spectra of Seyfert galaxies, could be formed on an extended medium, at large distance from the central source of primary radiation (e.g. on a torus). Then, the reflector cannot respond to the rapid fluctuations of the primary source. The observed reflected flux is controlled by the time-averaged primary spectrum rather than the instantaneous (observed) one. We show that this effect strongly influence the spectral fits parameters derived under the assumption of a reflection component consistent with the primary radiation. We find that a pivoting primary power-law spectrum with a nearly constant Comptonised luminosity may account for the reported correlation between the reflection amplitude R and the spectral index Γ.

  12. Specular Andreev reflection in thin films of topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Leyla; Asgari, Reza

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically reveal the possibility of specular Andreev reflection in a thin film topological insulator normal-superconductor (N/S) junction in the presence of a gate electric field. The probability of specular Andreev reflection increases with the electric field, and electron-hole conversion with unit efficiency happens in a wide experimentally accessible range of the electric field. We show that perfect specular Andreev reflection can occur for all angles of incidence with a particular excitation energy value. In addition, we find that the thermal conductance of the structure displays exponential dependence on the temperature. Our results reveal the potential of the proposed topological insulator thin-film-based N/S structure for the realization of intraband specular Andreev reflection.

  13. Reflective Teachers: Tensions between Abstractions and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Terry M.; Niles, Jerome A.

    1987-01-01

    The teacher as reflective practitioner of rhetoric of teacher education reform is balanced against the realities of promoting teacher reflection. Crucial conditions to promote reflection are identified. (Author/MT)

  14. Bidirectional reflectance modeling of non-homogeneous plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a 3-dimensional radiative transfer model for predicting the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) for heterogeneous vegetation canopies. Leaf bidirectional reflectance and transmittance distribution functions were measured for corn and soybean leaves. The measurements clearly show that leaves are complex scatterers and considerable specular reflectance is possible. Because of the character of leaf reflectance, true leaf reflectance is larger than the nadir reflectances that are normally used to represent leaves. A 3-dimensional reflectance model, named BIGAR (Bidirectional General Array Model), was developed and compared with measurements from corn and soybean. The model is based on the concept that heterogeneous canopies can be described by a combination of many subcanopies, which contain all the foliage, and these subcanopy envelopes can be characterized by ellipsoids of various sizes and shapes. The model/measurement comparison results indicate that this relatively simple model captures the essential character of row crop BRDF's. Finally, two soil BDRF models were developed: one represents soil particles as rectangular blocks and the other represents soil particles as spheres. The sphere model was found to be superior.

  15. A magnetron injection gun with extraction of reflected electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkov, M. V.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Goldenberg, A. L.; Petelin, M. I.

    2012-07-01

    Using irreversibility of electron drift in crossed axisymmetric electric and magnetic fields, it is possible to ensure the extraction of electrons reflected from a magnetic mirror, provided that one electrode possesses a helical symmetry. Electron guns of this type may be recommended for use in moderate-power subterahertz gyrotrons.

  16. Reflection and Distraction: Defensive Pessimism, Strategic Optimism, and Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Stacie M.; Norem, Julie K.

    1996-01-01

    Studies the interaction between performance strategies and imagery conditions. Defensive pessimists (who set low expectations, feel anxious, and rehearse possible outcomes) and strategic optimists (who set high expectations, feel calm, and avoid reflecting) were randomly assigned to three conditions: a coping imagery condition, a mastery imagery…

  17. Gyrotron Frequency Stabilization by a Weak Reflected Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Denisov, G. G.; Kulygin, M. L.; Mel'nikova, M. M.; Novozhilova, Yu. V.; Ryskin, N. M.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of reducing the radiation frequency fluctuations by a factor of 3-5 using a nonresonant or highly resonant weakly reflecting load for the gyrotrons employed in controlled-fusion facilities is shown. The ranges of system parameters where the frequency stabilization is most effective were identified both analytically and numerically.

  18. Aging and dry eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Juan; Sullivan, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Dry eye disease is a prevalent eye disorder that in particular affects the elderly population. One of the major causes of dry eye, meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD), shows increased prevalence with aging. MGD is caused by hyperkeratinization of the ductal epithelium of meibomian gland and reduced quantity and/or quality of meibum, the holocrine product that stabilizes and prevents the evaporation of the tear film. Of note, retinoids which are used in current anti-aging cosmetics may promote the development of MGD and dry eye disease. In this review, we will discuss the possible mechanisms of age-related MGD. PMID:22569356

  19. Reflection modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, David Robert; Robbins, Chris; Martin, Colin J.; Phanco, Graeme; Hare, Neil John O'

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is a widely used treatment which has exceptional success with a variety of skin conditions. Over-exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can however be detrimental and cause side effects such as erythema, photokeratisis, and even skin cancer. Quantifying patient dose is therefore imperative to ensure biologically effective treatment while minimizing negative repercussions. A dose model for treatment would be valuable in achieving these ends. Methods: Prior work by the authors concentrated on modeling the output of the lamps used in treatment and it was found a line source model described the output from the sources to a high degree. In practice, these lamps are surrounded by reflective anodized aluminum in patient treatment cabins and this work extends the model to quantify specular reflections from these planes on patient dose. Results: The extension of the model to allow for reflected images in addition to tube output shows a remarkably good fit to the actual data measured. Conclusions: The reflection model yields impressive accuracy and is a good basis for full UVR cabin modeling.

  20. Reflections on CME Congress 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary reflects the author's impressions of Continuing Medical Education (CME) Congress 2012, a provocative international conference on professional development and quality improvement in the health professions that took place in Toronto, Ontario, last spring. The sessions he attended and conversations he had with other attendees were…